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Sample records for acute mechanical damage

  1. Synthesis of a novel photopolymerized nanocomposite hydrogel for the treatment of acute mechanical damage to cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kathryn; Copeland-Johnson, Trishelle; Goodman, Matthew; Lipert, Robert; McKinley, Todd; Martin, James; Mallapragada, Surya; Lin, Zhiqun

    2011-03-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis is caused by a cascade of pathobiologic and pathomechanical events starting with intraarticular fractures in the cartilage. Currently, treatment of fractures is completely focused on restoration of the macroanatomy of the joint. The premise is that restoring the macroanatomy will prevent ongoing stresses and in turn prevent cartilage degeneration. However, current treatment ignores acute mechanical damage sustained by cartilage at the time of injury. This study describes the initial development of a novel nanocomposite photopolymerizing copolymer that has potential to restore local structural integrity to acutely injured cartilage, and subsequently act as a carrier for chondrocyte-enhancing bioactive agents.

  2. Metabolic fingerprinting to understand therapeutic effects and mechanisms of silybin on acute liver damage in rat

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qun; Wang, Cong; Li, Binbing; Zhang, Ai-hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic fingerprinting is a rapid and noninvasive analysis, representing a powerful approach for the characterization of phenotypes and the distinction of specific metabolic states due to environmental alterations. It has become a valuable analytical approach for the characterization of phenotypes and is the rapidly evolving field of the comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in bio-samples. Silybin has displayed bright prospects in the prevention and therapy of liver injury, and we had conducted a preliminary exploration on the molecular mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of silybin. Because the knowledge on the metabolic responses of an acute liver damage rat to the silybin is still scarce, metabolic fingerprinting can provide relevant information on the intrinsic metabolic adjustments. Materials and Methods: Here, the physiological and metabolic changes in the acute liver damage rat were investigated by performing a metabolic analysis. The phenotypic response was assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) combined with pattern recognition approaches such as principal components analysis and partial least squares projection to supervised latent structures and discriminant analysis. Multivariate analysis of the data showed trends in scores plots that were related to the concentration of the silybin. Results: Results indicate 10 ions (7 upregulated and 3 downregulated) as differentiating metabolites. Key observations include perturbations of metabolic pathways linked to glutathione metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, etc., Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the LC/MS combined with the pattern recognition methods that can engender new insights into silybin affecting on metabolism pathways of an acute liver damage rat. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that the combination of metabolic fingerprinting with appropriate chemometric analysis is a

  3. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  4. The Effect of Acute Microgravity on Mechanically-Induced Membrane Damage and Membrane-Membrane Fusion Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark, S. F.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Feedback, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". This response is characterized by both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  5. Mechanism of DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin

    2015-08-26

    DNA damage may compromise genome integrity and lead to cell death. Cells have evolved a variety of processes to respond to DNA damage including damage repair and tolerance mechanisms, as well as damage checkpoints. The DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway promotes the bypass of single-stranded DNA lesions encountered by DNA polymerases during DNA replication. This prevents the stalling of DNA replication. Two mechanistically distinct DDT branches have been characterized. One is translesion synthesis (TLS) in which a replicative DNA polymerase is temporarily replaced by a specialized TLS polymerase that has the ability to replicate across DNA lesions. TLS is mechanistically simple and straightforward, but it is intrinsically error-prone. The other is the error-free template switching (TS) mechanism in which the stalled nascent strand switches from the damaged template to the undamaged newly synthesized sister strand for extension past the lesion. Error-free TS is a complex but preferable process for bypassing DNA lesions. However, our current understanding of this pathway is sketchy. An increasing number of factors are being found to participate or regulate this important mechanism, which is the focus of this editorial. PMID:26322163

  6. Acute liver damage and anorexia nervosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bridet, Lionel; Martin, Juan Jose Beitia; Nuno, Jose Luis Cabriada

    2014-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder predominantly affecting young women and characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight and becoming fat. Liver injury with mild elevation of hepatic enzymes is a frequent complication, and steatosis of the liver is thought to be the major underlying pathology. However, acute hepatic failure with transaminase levels over 1000 u/L is a very rare complication, and the precise mechanism of the liver injury is still unclear. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman with a history of anorexia nervosa who developed acute liver damage with deep coma in relation to profound hypoglycemia. The treatment was hydration, correction of electrolyte and fluid imbalance, and gradual nutritional support to prevent refeeding syndrome. Our patient's consciousness was significantly improved with the recovery of liver function and normalization of transaminase levels. Although the mechanism of pathogenesis is largely unknown, we discuss the two principal hypotheses: starvation-induced autophagy and acute hypoperfusion.

  7. [Organ damage and cardiorenal syndrome in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Casado Cerrada, Jesús; Pérez Calvo, Juan Ignacio

    2014-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex syndrome that affects almost all organs and systems of the body. Signs and symptoms of organ dysfunction, in particular kidney dysfunction, may be accentuated or become evident for the first time during acute decompensation of heart failure. Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney, regardless of which of the two organs may have suffered the initial damage and regardless also of their previous functional status. Research into the mechanisms regulating the complex relationship between the two organs is prompting the search for new biomarkers to help physicians detect renal damage in subclinical stages. Hence, a preventive approach to renal dysfunction may be adopted in the clinical setting in the near future. This article provides a general overview of cardiorenal syndrome and an update of the physiopathological mechanisms involved. Special emphasis is placed on the role of visceral congestion as an emergent mechanism in this syndrome.

  8. Recent Advances in Composite Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifsnider, Ken; Case, Scott; Iyengar, Nirmal

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art and recent developments in the field of composite material damage mechanics are reviewed, with emphasis on damage accumulation. The kinetics of damage accumulation are considered with emphasis on the general accumulation of discrete local damage events such as single or multiple fiber fractures or microcrack formation. The issues addressed include: how to define strength in the presence of widely distributed damage, and how to combine mechanical representations in order to predict the damage tolerance and life of engineering components. It is shown that a damage mechanics approach can be related to the thermodynamics of the damage accumulation processes in composite laminates subjected to mechanical loading and environmental conditions over long periods of time.

  9. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    PubMed

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  10. Phototoxicity to the retina: mechanisms of damage.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Randolph D

    2002-01-01

    Light damage to the retina occurs through three general mechanisms involving thermal, mechanical, or photochemical effects. The particular mechanism activated depends on the wavelength and exposure duration of the injuring light. The transitions between the various light damage mechanism may overlap to some extent. Energy confinement is a key concept in understanding or predicting the type of damage mechanism produced by a given light exposure. As light energy (either from a laser or an incoherent source) is deposited in the retina, its penetration through, and its absorption in, various tissue compartments is determined by its wavelength. Strongly absorbing tissue components will tend to "concentrate" the light energy. The effect of absorbed light energy largely depends on the rate of energy deposition, which is correlated with the exposure duration. If the rate of energy deposition is too low to produce an appreciable temperature increase in the tissue, then any resulting tissue damage necessarily occurs because of chemical (oxidative) reactions induced by absorption of energetic photons (photochemical damage). If the rate of energy deposition is faster than the rate of thermal diffusion (thermal confinement), then the temperature of the exposed tissue rises. If a critical temperature is reached (typically about 10 degrees C above basal), then thermal damage occurs. If the light energy is deposited faster than mechanical relaxation can occur (stress confinement), then a thermoelastic pressure wave is produced, and tissue is disrupted by shear forces or by cavitation-nonlinear effects. Very recent evidence suggests that ultrashort laser pulses can produce tissue damage through nonlinear and photochemical mechanisms; the latter because of two-photon excitation of cellular chromophores. In addition to tissue damage caused directly by light absorption, light toxicity can be produced by the presence of photosensitizing agents. Drugs excited to reactive states by

  11. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  12. Methamphetamine causes acute hyperthermia-dependent liver damage.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Gunning, William T; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2013-10-01

    Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has been correlated with damage to the liver but this damage has not been extensively characterized. Moreover, the mechanism by which the drug contributes to liver damage is unknown. This study characterizes the hepatocellular toxicity of methamphetamine and examines if hyperthermia contributes to this liver damage. Livers from methamphetamine-treated rats were examined using electron microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Methamphetamine increased glycogen stores, mitochondrial aggregation, microvesicular lipid, and hydropic change. These changes were diffuse throughout the hepatic lobule, as evidenced by a lack of hematoxylin and eosin staining. To confirm if these changes were indicative of damage, serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase were measured. The functional significance of methamphetamine-induced liver damage was also examined by measuring plasma ammonia. To examine the contribution of hyperthermia to this damage, methamphetamine-treated rats were cooled during and after drug treatment by cooling their external environment. Serum aspartate and alanine aminotransferase, as well as plasma ammonia were increased concurrently with these morphologic changes and were prevented when methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was blocked. These findings support that methamphetamine produces changes in hepatocellular morphology and damage persisting for at least 24 h after drug exposure. At this same time point, methamphetamine treatment significantly increases plasma ammonia concentrations, consistent with impaired ammonia metabolism and functional liver damage. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia contributes significantly to the persistent liver damage and increases in peripheral ammonia produced by the drug. PMID:25505562

  13. DNA damage by bromate: mechanism and consequences.

    PubMed

    Ballmaier, Daniel; Epe, Bernd

    2006-04-17

    Exposure of mammalian cells to bromate (BrO3-) generates oxidative DNA modifications, in particular 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-guanine (8-oxoG). The damaging mechanism is quite unique, since glutathione, which is protective against most oxidants and alkylating agents, mediates a metabolic activation, while bromate itself does not react directly with DNA. Neither enzymes nor transition metals are required as catalysts in the activation. The ultimate DNA damaging species has not yet been established, but experiments under cell-free conditions suggest that neither molecular bromine nor reactive oxygen species such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide or singlet oxygen are involved. Rather bromine radicals (Br*) or oxides (BrO*, BrO2*) might be responsible. Compared to hypochlorite (ClO-), bromate is much less cytotoxic, probably because the former halite efficiently reacts with proteins and other vitally important cellular constituents. In consequence, oxidative DNA damage and the induction of mutations and micronuclei is easily detectable at non-cytotoxic concentrations of bromate, while DNA damage by hypochlorite is observed only at cytotoxic concentrations and follows a non-linear (hockey-stick-like) dose response. PMID:16490296

  14. Damage mechanisms in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza

    Shock wave lithotripsy is a 'non-invasive' therapy for treating kidney stones. Focused shock waves fragment stones to a size that can be passed naturally. There is, however, considerable tissue injury, and the mechanisms of stone fragmentation and tissue injury are not well understood. This work investigates potential tissue damage mechanisms, with an aim towards enhancing stone fragmentation and minimizing tissue damage. Lysis of red blood cells (RBC's) due to in vitro exposure to shock waves was investigated. Fluid flow-fields induced by a non-uniform shock wave, as well as radial expansion/implosion of a bubble was hypothesized to cause cell lysis. Both the above flow-fields constitute an unsteady extensional flow, exerting inertial as well as viscous forces on the RBC membrane. The resultant membrane tension and the membrane areal strain due to the above flow-fields were estimated. Both were found to exert a significantly higher inertial force (50--100 mN/m) than the critical membrane tension (10 mN/m). Bubble-induced flow-field was estimated to last for a longer duration (˜1 microsec) compared to the shock-induced flow (˜1 ns) and hence, was predicted to be lytically more effective, in typical in vitro experimental conditions. However, in vivo conditions severely constrain bubble growth, and cell lysis due to shock-induced shear could be dominant. Hemolysis due to shock-induced shear, in absence of cavitation, was experimentally investigated. The lithotripter-generated shock wave was refocused by a parabolic reflector. This refocused wave-field had a tighter focus (smaller beam-width and a higher amplitude) than the lithotripter wave-field. Cavitation was eliminated by applying overpressure to the fluid. Acoustic emissions due to bubble activity were monitored by a novel passive cavitation detector (HP-PCD). Aluminum foils were also used to differentiate cavitational from non-cavitational mode of damage. RBC's were exposed to the reflected wave-field from

  15. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  16. Damage Mechanics Approach for Bearing Lifetime Prognostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jing; Seth, Brij B.; Liang, Steven Y.; Zhang, Cheng

    2002-09-01

    The ability to achieve accurate bearing prognostics is critical to the optimal maintenance of rotating machinery in the interest of cost and productivity. However, techniques to real time predict the lifetime of a bearing under practical operating conditions have not been well developed. In this paper, a stiffness-based prognostic model for bearing systems based on vibration response analysis and damage mechanics is discussed. As the bearing system is considered as a single-degree-of-freedom vibratory system, its natural frequency and its acceleration amplitude at the natural frequency can be related to the system stiffness. On the other hand, the relationship between failure lifetime, running time and stiffness variation can be established from the damage mechanics. Combining the above two, the natural frequency and the acceleration amplitude of a bearing system can be related to its running time and failure lifetime. Thus, the failure lifetime of a bearing system can be predicted on-line based on vibration measurement. Experiments have been performed on a tapered roller bearing life testing stand under various operation conditions to calibrate and to validate the proposed model. The comparison between model-calculated data and experimental results indicates that this model can be used to effectively predict the failure lifetime and the remaining life of a bearing system.

  17. On certain fundamental issues in continuum damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiadjis, George Z.; Kattan, Peter I.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we discuss three fundamental issues in continuum damage mechanics. First, we investigate the nature of the damage process. For this purpose, we dissect the expression of the effective stress into an infinite geometric series and introduce several stages of damage that we call primary damage, secondary damage, tertiary damage, etc. The second issue to be discussed is the problem of small damage. In this regard, we introduce a new definition of the damage variable that is suitable for small-damage cases. Finally, we discuss the new concept of undamageable materials. These are currently hypothetical materials that maintain a zero value of the damage variable throughout the deformation process. It is hoped that these proposed new types of materials will open the way to new areas of research in both damage mechanics and materials science.

  18. Mechanism of frost damage to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhua

    We studied several topics that are important to explain the mechanisms of frost damage to concrete, including the volume change of concrete during freezing, the role of air voids in protecting concrete from frost damage, the pore structure of concrete, and the nucleation and propagation of ice in concrete. By combining calorimetric measurements with dilatometry, we were able to calculate the contributions of thermal expansion, pore pressure, and crystallization pressure of ice to the strain observed in a mortar during freezing/thawing cycles. Air-entrained mortars contract upon freezing due to the cryo-suction effect, while non-air-entrained mortars expand primarily due to hydraulic pressure. Based on the theory originally proposed by Powers and Helmuth, we show that the poromechanical calculations account quantitatively for the contraction of samples with air entrainment, which is shown to quantitatively account for a reduction of salt scaling damage based on the glue-spall theory. The method of thermoporometry (TPM) that we used to study the pore structure of concrete is also discussed. In a study of ice propagation inside concrete, we re-examined experiments by Helmuth [Proc. 4th Int. Cong. Chem. Cement, NBS Monog. 43, Vol. II (National Bureau of Standards, Washington, D.C., 1962) pp. 855--869] from which he concluded that ice grows in the pores of cement paste under heat-flow control, and that the internal temperature rises to the melting point given by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. Using experimental and computational methods, we find that his conclusions are correct, but the growth rates he reports are misleading. Our experiment reveals the true growth rate, which is about three times smaller than found by Helmuth. The dendritic morphology explains how fast constant growth rates can occur when the interior temperature of the sample is very near the melting point: the temperature at the tip of the dendrite is a few degrees below the melting point, but the liquid

  19. Acute sun damage and photoprotective responses in whales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Levasseur, Laura M; Gendron, Diane; Knell, Rob J; O'Toole, Edel A; Singh, Manuraj; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2011-05-22

    Rising levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) secondary to ozone depletion are an issue of concern for public health. Skin cancers and intraepidermal dysplasia are increasingly observed in individuals that undergo chronic or excessive sun exposure. Such alterations of skin integrity and function are well established for humans and laboratory animals, but remain unexplored for mammalian wildlife. However, effects are unlikely to be negligible, particularly for species such as whales, whose anatomical or life-history traits force them to experience continuous sun exposure. We conducted photographic and histological surveys of three seasonally sympatric whale species to investigate sunburn and photoprotection. We find that lesions commonly associated with acute severe sun damage in humans are widespread and that individuals with fewer melanocytes have more lesions and less apoptotic cells. This suggests that the pathways used to limit and resolve UVR-induced damage in humans are shared by whales and that darker pigmentation is advantageous to them. Furthermore, lesions increased significantly in time, as would be expected under increasing UV irradiance. Apoptosis and melanocyte proliferation mirror this trend, suggesting that whales are capable of quick photoprotective responses. We conclude that the thinning ozone layer may pose a risk to the health of whales and other vulnerable wildlife.

  20. Damage and fracture mechanics of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Saleh Ramadan

    The design of structural systems in the aerospace industry has been characterized by a continuing search for strong, yet lightweight, materials to achieve maximum payload capability for minimum weight. In recent years, this search has led to a wide use of fiber reinforced composites, such as carbon, glass and kevelar based composites. Comparison of these new materials with the traditional ones (metals) according to the basic properties, such as density, elastic modulus and also long-time and short-time strength, shows their superiority over traditional materials, when weight is a major design factor, like in the aerospace industry. Most composite materials of interest to aerospace applications have been adequately characterized under static loading conditions. Related work to study their fracture behaviour has been limited. Since most failure mechanisms involve crack growth and/or delamination, design of such components requires knowledge and understanding of their fracture properties. This thesis includes an experimental and analytical investigation of fracture characteristics of composite materials. The post-peak response of notched specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic loading is established to evaluate the fracture energy associated with progressive matrix damage and subsequent crack growth. A total of 75 uniaxial tension specimens were tested. The experimental work consisted of first testing several un-notched specimens with different thickness (number of layers) to determine the initial and secondary elastic modulus as well as the tensile strength. The investigation studied the effect of the various fracture parameters, including thickness, fiber orientation, and crack width ratio (a/w) on the behaviour of crack propagation, peak load, and post-peak response. The specimens used in this research were prepared using the vacuum bagging technique, with a chosen number of fiber glass cloth layers and fiber orientation. The experimental results provided

  1. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ming; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Pei-Chin; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Su, Yu-Jih; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Kung, Chia-Te; Chiu, Tsui-Min; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Lin, Wei-Che

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM) damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI. PMID:24804213

  2. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  3. Phenomenological approach to mechanical damage growth analysis.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola; Bosia, Federico; Gliozzi, Antonio S; Delsanto, Pier Paolo; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-10-01

    The problem of characterizing damage evolution in a generic material is addressed with the aim of tracing it back to existing growth models in other fields of research. Based on energetic considerations, a system evolution equation is derived for a generic damage indicator describing a material system subjected to an increasing external stress. The latter is found to fit into the framework of a recently developed phenomenological universality (PUN) approach and, more specifically, the so-called U2 class. Analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations based on a fiber-bundle model and statistically assigned local strengths at the microscale. The fits with numerical data prove, with an excellent degree of reliability, that the typical evolution of the damage indicator belongs to the aforementioned PUN class. Applications of this result are briefly discussed and suggested. PMID:18999489

  4. Mechanisms of Cell Death in Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bantel, Heike; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can be the consequence of various etiologies, that might vary between different geographic regions. Most frequent are intoxications with acetaminophen, viral hepatitis, or liver damage of unknown origin. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the regenerative capacity of the liver. The mode of liver cell death that is predominantly induced in ALF, i.e., apoptosis or necrosis, is still controversial and presumably determined by the etiology, duration, and magnitude of liver injury. Severe liver damage involves oxidative stress and depletion of ATP resulting in necrosis. In contrast, maintenance of ATP stores is required for the execution of apoptosis. Recent data suggest that necrosis resulting from severe liver damage is associated with poor outcome of ALF patients. Discrimination between apoptosis and necrosis might be therefore useful for the identification of ALF patients requiring liver transplantation. Identification of the molecular cell death mechanisms remains an important issue not only for early prediction of ALF outcome, but also for therapeutic interventions. In view of the pleiotropic functions of critical mediators of cell death and tissue regeneration, a particular challenge will be to reduce hepatocellular death without inhibiting the regenerative capacity of the liver. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of hepatocyte injury and the pathways leading to apoptosis and necrosis, which might represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in ALF. PMID:22485095

  5. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  6. Effects of acute and chronic administration of fenproporex on DNA damage parameters in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cinara L; Rezin, Gislaine T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Cardoso, Mariane R; Valvassori, Samira S; Munhoz, Bruna J P; Borges, Gabriela D; Bristot, Bruno N; Leffa, Daniela D; Andrade, Vanessa M; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a chronic and multifactorial disease, whose prevalence is increasing in many countries. Pharmaceutical strategies for the treatment of obesity include drugs that regulate food intake, thermogenesis, fat absorption, and fat metabolism. Fenproporex is the second most commonly consumed amphetamine-based anorectic worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine, which is associated with neurotoxicity. In this context, the present study evaluated DNA damage parameters in the peripheral blood of young and adult rats submitted to an acute administration and chronic administration of fenproporex. In the acute administration, both young and adult rats received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle. In the chronic administration, both young and adult rats received one daily injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5, or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or Tween for 14 days. 2 h after the last injection, the rats were killed by decapitation and their peripheral blood removed for evaluation of DNA damage parameters by alkaline comet assay. Our study showed that acute administration of fenproporex in young and adult rats presented higher levels of damage index and frequency in the DNA. However, chronic administration of fenproporex in young and adult rats did not alter the levels of DNA damage in both parameters of comet assay. The present findings showed that acute administration of fenproporex promoted damage in DNA, in both young and adult rats. Our results are consistent with other reports which showed that other amphetamine-derived drugs also caused DNA damage. We suggest that the activation of an efficient DNA repair mechanism may occur after chronic exposition to fenproporex. Our results are consistent with other reports that showed some amphetamine-derived drugs also caused DNA damage. PMID:23636618

  7. Direct acute tubular damage contributes to Shigatoxin-mediated kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Porubsky, Stefan; Federico, Giuseppina; Müthing, Johannes; Jennemann, Richard; Gretz, Norbert; Büttner, Stefan; Obermüller, Nicholas; Jung, Oliver; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Gröne, Elisabeth; Geiger, Helmut; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Betz, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis and therapy of Shigatoxin 2 (Stx2)-mediated kidney failure remain controversial. Our aim was to test whether, during an infection with Stx2-producing E. coli (STEC), Stx2 exerts direct effects on renal tubular epithelium and thereby possibly contributes to acute renal failure. Mice represent a suitable model because they, like humans, express the Stx2-receptor Gb3 in the tubular epithelium but, in contrast to humans, not in glomerular endothelia, and are thus free of glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). In wild-type mice, Stx2 caused acute tubular dysfunction with consequent electrolyte disturbance, which was most likely the cause of death. Tubule-specific depletion of Gb3 protected the mice from acute renal failure. In vitro, Stx2 induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in human tubular epithelial cells, thus implicating a direct effect of Stx2 on the tubular epithelium. To correlate these results to human disease, kidney biopsies and outcome were analysed in patients with Stx2-associated kidney failure (n = 11, aged 22-44 years). The majority of kidney biopsies showed different stages of an ongoing TMA; however, no glomerular complement activation could be demonstrated. All biopsies, including those without TMA, showed severe acute tubular damage. Due to these findings, patients were treated with supportive therapy without complement-inhibiting antibodies (eculizumab) or immunoadsorption. Despite the severity of the initial disease [creatinine 6.34 (1.31-17.60) mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase 1944 (753-2792) U/l, platelets 33 (19-124)/nl and haemoglobin 6.2 (5.2-7.8) g/dl; median (range)], all patients were discharged after 33 (range 19-43) days with no neurological symptoms and no dialysis requirement [creatinine 1.39 (range 0.84-2.86) mg/dl]. The creatinine decreased further to 0.90 (range 0.66-1.27) mg/dl after 24 months. Based on these data, one may surmise that acute tubular damage represents a separate

  8. Neuroprotection by gonadal steroid hormones in acute brain damage requires cooperation with astroglia and microglia.

    PubMed

    Johann, Sonja; Beyer, Cordian

    2013-09-01

    The neuroactive steroids 17β-estradiol and progesterone control a broad spectrum of neural functions. Besides their roles in the regulation of classical neuroendocrine loops, they strongly influence motor and cognitive systems, behavior, and modulate brain performance at almost every level. Such a statement is underpinned by the widespread and lifelong expression pattern of all types of classical and non-classical estrogen and progesterone receptors in the CNS. The life-sustaining power of neurosteroids for tattered or seriously damaged neurons aroused interest in the scientific community in the past years to study their ability for therapeutic use under neuropathological challenges. Documented by excellent studies either performed in vitro or in adequate animal models mimicking acute toxic or chronic neurodegenerative brain disorders, both hormones revealed a high potency to protect neurons from damage and saved neural systems from collapse. Unfortunately, neurons, astroglia, microglia, and oligodendrocytes are comparably target cells for both steroid hormones. This hampers the precise assignment and understanding of neuroprotective cellular mechanisms activated by both steroids. In this article, we strive for a better comprehension of the mutual reaction between these steroid hormones and the two major glial cell types involved in the maintenance of brain homeostasis, astroglia and microglia, during acute traumatic brain injuries such as stroke and hypoxia. In particular, we attempt to summarize steroid-activated cellular signaling pathways and molecular responses in these cells and their contribution to dampening neuroinflammation and neural destruction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'. PMID:23196064

  9. Mechanism of lung damage in explosive decompression.

    PubMed

    Topliff, E D

    1976-05-01

    It is known that pressure equalization via the trachea may diminish or prevent lung damage in explosive decompression. In this report, evidence is presented which demonstrates that closure of the trachea does not affect lethality in mice exposed to maximally rapid decompression. This observation suggests that in maximally rapid decompression the lungs and thorax may be treated as a closed system to which Boyle's Law might be applicable. PMID:1275842

  10. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  11. Mechanisms of Mechanically Induced Spontaneous Arrhythmias in Acute Regional Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Xiao; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Trayanova, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Although ventricular premature beats (VPBs) during acute regional ischemia have been linked to mechanical stretch of ischemic tissue, whether and how ischemia-induced mechanical dysfunction can induce VPBs and facilitate their degradation into reentrant arrhythmias has not been yet addressed. Objective This study used a novel multiscale electromechanical model of the rabbit ventricles to investigate the origin of and the substrate for spontaneous arrhythmias arising from ischemia-induced electrophysiological and mechanical changes. Methods and Results Two stages of ischemia were simulated. Dynamic mechanoelectrical feedback was modeled as spatially and temporally nonuniform membrane currents through mechanosensitive channels, the conductances of which depended on local strain rate. Our results reveal that both strains and strain rates were significantly larger in the central ischemic zone than in the border zone. However, in both ischemia stages, a VPB originated from the ischemic border in the left ventricular apical endocardium because of mechanically induced suprathreshold depolarizations. It then traveled fully intramurally until emerging from the ischemic border on the anterior epicardium. Reentry was formed only in the advanced ischemia stage as the result of a widened temporal excitable gap. Mechanically induced delayed afterdepolarization-like events contributed to the formation of reentry by further decreasing the already reduced-by-hyperkalemia local excitability, causing extended conduction block lines and slowed conduction in the ischemic region. Conclusions Mechanically induced membrane depolarizations in the ischemic region are the mechanism by which mechanical activity contributes to both the origin of and substrate for spontaneous arrhythmias under the conditions of acute regional ischemia. PMID:19893011

  12. Mechanisms for acute corneal hydrops and perforation.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2014-07-01

    Acute corneal hydrops (ACH) and perforation in corneal thinning diseases are the consequences of exposure to distending intraocular pressure (IOP) forces that are in excess of corneal resistance to them. Apart from thinning, resistance to these forces may be reduced by disease-related tissue changes, such as corneal scarring, which could lower resistance to IOP. Eye rubbing trauma has sometimes been found to be associated with ACH and perforation. This association is not surprising given that the combination of rubbing-related mechanical tissue trauma and the associated increased distending stress of higher IOP seem likely to increase the risk of complications. Many cases of ACH and perforation are described as spontaneous, but this classification may be the consequence of not considering the multiple potential mechanisms for IOP elevation such as coughing, sneezing, nose blowing, and sneeze suppression in addition to those related to eye rubbing/wiping/massaging/touching as well as changes in body orientation, strenuous exercise, and wearing swimming goggles for example. Classification of ACH or perforation as spontaneous may lead patients to assume that nothing can be done to avoid these complications. Patients with corneal thinning diseases who are counseled regarding the potential precipitating mechanisms for IOP elevation will have the opportunity of reducing exposure to them and the risk of the associated complications. In addition, when ACH or perforation occur, faster resolution of edema and wound healing may depend on reducing potentially exacerbating exposures to mechanisms for IOP elevation. PMID:25390550

  13. Ultrastructure damage of oviduct telocytes in rat model of acute salpingitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Chi, Chi; Liu, Zhen; Yang, Gang; Shen, Zong-Ji; Yang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acute salpingitis (AS) is an inflammatory disease which causes severe damage to a subset of classically described cells lining in oviduct wall and contributes to interstitial fibrosis and fertility problems. Telocytes (TCs), a newly discovered peculiar type of stromal cells, have been identified in many organs, including oviduct, with proposed multiple potential bio-functions. However, with recent increasing reports regarding TCs alterations in disease-affected tissues, there is still lack of evidence about TCs involvement in AS-affected oviduct tissues and potential pathophysiological roles. We presently identified normal TCs by their characteristic ultrastructural features and immunophenotype. However, in AS-affected oviduct tissues, TCs displayed multiple ultrastructural damage both in cellular body and prolongations, with obvious loss of TCs and development of tissue fibrosis. Furthermore, TCs lose their interstitial 3-D network connected by homocellular or heterocellular junctions between TCs and adjacent cells. And especially, TCs connected to the activated immunocytes (mononuclear cells, eosinophils) and affected local immune state (repression or activation). Meanwhile, massive neutrophils infiltration and overproduced Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), COX-2, suggested mechanism of inflammatory-induced TCs damage. Consequently, TCs damage might contribute to AS-induced structural and reproductive functional abnormalities of oviduct, probably via: (i) substances, energy and functional insufficiency, presumably, e.g. TC-specific genetic material profiles, ion channels, cytoskeletal elements, Tps dynamics, etc., (ii) impaired TCs-mediated multicellular signalling, such as homeostasis/angiogenesis, tissue repair/regeneration, neurotransmission, (iii) derangement of 3-D network and impaired mechanical support for TCs-mediated multicellular signals within the stromal compartment, consequently induced interstitial fibrosis, (iv) involvement in local

  14. Oxidative damage to RNA: mechanisms, consequences, and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qiongman

    2010-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals can damage cellular components resulting in progressive physiological dysfunction, which has been implicated in many human diseases. Oxidative damage to RNA received little attention until the past decade. Recent studies indicate that RNA, such as messenger RNA and ribosomal RNA, is very vulnerable to oxidative damage. RNA oxidation is not a consequence of dying cells but an early event involved in pathogenesis. Oxidative modification to RNA results in disturbance of the translational process and impairment of protein synthesis, which can cause cell deterioration or even cell death. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of oxidative damage to RNA and the possible biological consequences of damaged RNA. Furthermore, we review recent evidence suggesting that oxidative damage to RNA may contribute to progression of many human diseases. PMID:20148281

  15. Laser damage mechanisms in conductive widegap semiconductor films.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Menor, Marlon G; Adams, John J; Raman, Rajesh N; Lee, Jonathan R I; Olson, Tammy Y; Shen, Nan; Suh, Joonki; Demos, Stavros G; Bude, Jeff; Elhadj, Selim

    2016-08-01

    Laser damage mechanisms of two conductive wide-bandgap semiconductor films - indium tin oxide (ITO) and silicon doped GaN (Si:GaN) were studied via microscopy, spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and elemental analysis. Nanosecond laser pulse exposures with a laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) smaller than the conductive films bandgaps were applied and radically different film damage morphologies were produced. The laser damaged ITO film exhibited deterministic features of thermal degradation. In contrast, laser damage in the Si:GaN film resulted in highly localized eruptions originating at interfaces. For ITO, thermally driven damage was related to free carrier absorption and, for GaN, carbon complexes were proposed as potential damage precursors or markers. PMID:27505731

  16. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  17. Ontogenetic contingency of tolerance mechanisms in response to apical damage

    PubMed Central

    Gruntman, Michal; Novoplansky, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to tolerate tissue loss through vigorous branching which is often triggered by release from apical dominance and activation of lateral meristems. However, damage-induced branching might not be a mere physiological outcome of released apical dominance, but an adaptive response to environmental signals, such as damage timing and intensity. Here, branching responses to both factors were examined in the annual plant Medicago truncatula. Methods Branching patterns and allocation to reproductive traits were examined in response to variable clipping intensities and timings in M. truncatula plants from two populations that vary in the onset of reproduction. Phenotypic selection analysis was used to evaluate the strength and direction of selection on branching under the damage treatments. Key Results Plants of both populations exhibited an ontogenetic shift in tolerance mechanisms: while early damage induced greater meristem activation, late damage elicited investment in late-determined traits, including mean pod and seed biomass, and supported greater germination rates. Severe damage mostly elicited simultaneous development of multiple-order lateral branches, but this response was limited to early damage. Selection analyses revealed positive directional selection on branching in plants under early- compared with late- or no-damage treatments. Conclusions The results demonstrate that damage-induced meristem activation is an adaptive response that could be modified according to the plant's developmental stage, severity of tissue loss and their interaction, stressing the importance of considering these effects when studying plastic responses to apical damage. PMID:21873259

  18. Near-Infrared Optical Imaging Noninvasively Detects Acutely Damaged Muscle.

    PubMed

    Chrzanowski, Stephen M; Batra, Abhinandan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Vohra, Ravneet S; Forbes, Sean C; Jiang, Huabei; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle damage is currently assessed through methods such as muscle biopsy, serum biomarkers, functional testing, and imaging procedures, each with its own inherent limitations, and a pressing need for a safe, repeatable, inexpensive, and noninvasive modality to assess the state of muscle health remains. Our aim was to develop and assess near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging as a novel noninvasive method of detecting and quantifying muscle damage. An immobilization-reambulation model was used for inducing muscle damage and recovery in the lower hindlimbs in mice. Confirmation of muscle damage was obtained using in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and ex vivo tissue analysis. The soleus of the immobilized-reambulated hindlimb was found to have a greater amount of muscle damage compared to that in the contralateral nonimmobilized limb, confirmed by in vivo indocyanine green-enhanced NIR optical imaging (3.86-fold increase in radiant efficiency), magnetic resonance imaging (1.41-fold increase in T2), and an ex vivo spectrophotometric assay of indocyanine green uptake (1.87-fold increase in normalized absorbance). Contrast-enhanced NIR optical imaging provides a sensitive, rapid, and noninvasive screening method that can be used for imaging and quantifying muscle damage and recovery in vivo. PMID:27565039

  19. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  20. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-05-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  1. [Mitochondrial dysfunction and compensatory mechanisms in liver cells during acute carbon tetrachloride-induced rat intoxication].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2015-01-01

    Electron-transport chain and redox-balance of mitochondria are important targets that are damaged during intoxication. The aim of the present work was to estimate the role of impairments in cellular bioenergetic function in the development of liver damage during acute carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats and to elucidate possible compensatory mechanisms. Acute CCl4-induced rat intoxication (0.8 g/kg or 4 g/kg) resulted in considerable impairments of respiratory and synthetic mitochondrial functions; their manifestations depended on the dose of the toxic agent and the duration of the intoxication increased and accompanied by complete uncoupling of oxidation and phosphorylation processes in liver mitochondria. The intoxication induced considerable liver damage and accumulation of NO in blood plasma and liver tissue. The changes of some parameters of liver mitochondrial functional activity demonstrate an oscillative pattern, reflecting compensatory mechanisms during intoxication that involved increased reduced glutathione level and enhanced succinate dehydrogenase activity. PMID:26716745

  2. [Mitochondrial dysfunction and compensatory mechanisms in liver cells during acute carbon tetrachloride-induced rat intoxication].

    PubMed

    Zavodnik, I B

    2015-01-01

    Electron-transport chain and redox-balance of mitochondria are important targets that are damaged during intoxication. The aim of the present work was to estimate the role of impairments in cellular bioenergetic function in the development of liver damage during acute carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats and to elucidate possible compensatory mechanisms. Acute CCl4-induced rat intoxication (0.8 g/kg or 4 g/kg) resulted in considerable impairments of respiratory and synthetic mitochondrial functions; their manifestations depended on the dose of the toxic agent and the duration of the intoxication increased and accompanied by complete uncoupling of oxidation and phosphorylation processes in liver mitochondria. The intoxication induced considerable liver damage and accumulation of NO in blood plasma and liver tissue. The changes of some parameters of liver mitochondrial functional activity demonstrate an oscillative pattern, reflecting compensatory mechanisms during intoxication that involved increased reduced glutathione level and enhanced succinate dehydrogenase activity.

  3. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; Subba Rao, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  4. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  5. Characterizing mechanical effects of aging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T.D.; Chen, S.P.; Schoonover, J.R.; Trent, B.C.; Howe, P.M.; Hjelm, R.P.; Browning, R.V.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal was to develop and apply several different experimental and theoretical/computational tools to better understand physical and chemical aging phenomena in plastic-bonded high explosives, and to develop a methodology for predicting the likely effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the composite based on input from these fundamental studies. Initial comparisons were done for spectra of fresh and aged Esane, as well as PBX-9501, and the authors found differences in the carbonyl region of the spectrum, which possibly reflect differences in hydrogen bonding due to aging phenomena. The micromechanical model of composites was extended to study various volume fractions of HMX with binders. The results showed that, as the binder fraction increases, there is a decrease in the maximum stress that can be supported but an increase in the percent strain at final fracture. A more realistic microstructural model was obtained through the use of a phase field model. Using this model, the authors have studied the microstructural evolution as a function of the grain boundary energy vs. misorientation relationship. The initial results indicate that there are some changes in the grain growth rate when the grain-boundary energy dependence on the angle is not constant. They also find that solute tends to segregate at the grain boundary and slows the grain growth kinetics.

  6. Acute skin sun damage in children and its consequences in adults.

    PubMed

    Pustisek, Nives; Sikanić-Dugić, Nives; Hirsl-Hećej, Vlasta; Domljan, Mislav Luka

    2010-04-01

    Children spend more time outdoors than adults and there is compelling evidence that childhood is a particularly vulnerable time for the photocarcinogenic effects of the sun. The negative effects of solar radiation are accumulated during the entire lifetime; however 80% of total lifetime sun exposure is taking place before the age of 18 years. Child skin is more sensitive than adult skin because natural defense mechanisms are not fully developed. A short exposure to midday sun will result in sunburns. Epidemiologic studies show a higher incidence of malignant melanoma in persons with a history of sunburns during childhood and adolescence. Sun exposure among infants and pre-school children is largely dependent on the discretion of adult care providers. Sun protective habits of mothers may predict the level of sun exposure in children. It is very important to transfer the knowledge and positive habits of proper sun protection to children. The purpose of sun-safety behavior is not to avoid outdoor activities, but rather to protect the skin from detrimental sun effects. Proper sun protection of children includes protection from excessive sun exposure, sunburns and other forms of skin damage caused by sun, which may lead to the future development of skin cancers. This paper reviews acute skin reactivity to sun in childhood and adolescence that causes damage in skin structure and function and produces undesirable chronic changes in adults.

  7. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  8. Acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity after radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients: Consequential late damage

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D. . E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Koper, Peter; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity after radiotherapy can be partly explained by late effects of acute toxicity (consequential late damage). We studied whether there is a direct relationship between acute and late GI toxicity. Patients and Methods: A total of 553 evaluable patients from the Dutch dose escalation trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. We defined three outcomes for acute reactions: 1) maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity, 2) maximum acute mucous discharge (AMD), and 3) maximum acute proctitis. Within a multivariable model, late endpoints (overall toxicity and five toxicity indicators) were studied as a function of acute toxicity, pretreatment symptoms, and relevant dose parameters. Results: At multivariable analysis, AMD and acute proctitis were strong predictors for overall toxicity, 'intermittent bleeding,' and 'incontinence pads' (p {<=} 0.01). For 'stools {>=}6/day' all three were strong predictors. No significant associations were found for 'severe bleeding' and 'use of steroids.' The predictive power of the dose parameters remained at the same level or became weaker for most late endpoints. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity is an independent significant predictor of late GI toxicity. This suggests a significant consequential component in the development of late GI toxicity.

  9. Mechanical Data for Use in Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; James, Mark A.; Newman, John A.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results of a research program to determine the damage tolerance properties of metallic propeller materials. Three alloys were selected for investigation: 2025-T6 Aluminum, D6AC Steel and 4340 Steel. Mechanical response, fatigue (S-N) and fatigue crack growth rate data are presented for all of the alloys. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this study are as follows. The damage tolerant design of a propeller system will require a complete understanding of the fatigue crack growth threshold. There exists no experimental procedure to reliably develop the fatigue crack growth threshold data that is needed for damage tolerant design methods. Significant research will be required to fully understand the fatigue crack growth threshold. The development of alternative precracking methods, evaluating the effect of specimen configuration and attempting to identify micromechanical issues are simply the first steps to understanding the mechanics of the threshold.

  10. Damage mechanisms in uniaxial compression of single enamel rods.

    PubMed

    An, Bingbing; Wang, Raorao; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-02-01

    Enamel possesses a complex hierarchical structure, which bestows this tissue with unique mechanical properties. In this study, the mechanical behavior of single enamel rods was investigated under uniaxial compression. Numerical simulations were also performed using micromechanics models for individual enamel rods to identify the damage mechanisms contributing to the constitutive behavior. Experimental results showed that the single rods exhibited an elastic modulus ranging from 10~31 GPa, and that they undergo post-yield strain-hardening. The primary damage mode consisted of delamination within the assembly of mineral crystals. Results from numerical simulations suggest that strain localization within individual rods is responsible for the observed delamination, which is believed to arise from the non-uniform arrangement of mineral crystals. This mechanism was independent of mineral morphology and properties. The non-uniform crystal arrangement results in friction between crystals with different inclination angles and is believed to be responsible for the post-yield strain hardening behavior. PMID:25460920

  11. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-01

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  12. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  13. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  14. Acute acidic exposure induces p53-mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mai, Wei-jun; Yan, Jun-lun; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Ying; Xin, Yu; Wang, Wei-na

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain and inputs of acidic effluent can result in increased acidity in aquatic ecosystems, where it is known to have a significant impact and possibly, to cause the decline of some populations of aquatic organisms. In previous studies, intracellular acid-induced oxidative stress has been shown to cause DNA damage, and cooperatively activate the expression of the p53 gene. The acute effects of acidic environments on shrimp and fish have been widely studied. However, the molecular mechanism of acid-induced injury remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the cellular responses of tilapia to acidic exposure-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene expression. Furthermore, we determined how acute acid stress activates the ATM-p53 signal pathway. We measured the upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the intracellular Ca(2)(+) concentration ([Ca(2)(+)](i)), the tail DNA values, the malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the blood cells and the percentage of dead and damaged blood cells. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and DNA damage occurred in tilapia in conditions where the pH was 5.3. Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst staining, which was mainly associated with changes in cell viability. The parameters that we measured were related to acid-induced DNA damage, and all parameters changed in the blood cells through time. The effects of acute acid exposure (pH 5.3) on the expression of ATM, p53, p21, Bax, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were investigated in tilapia blood cells. The results showed that acute acid stress induced upregulation of ATM, p53 and p21, associated with increasing of DNA damage and apoptosis in blood cells. Additionally, the expression of Bax was slightly increased. Moreover, consensus p53-binding sequences were identified in tilapia MnSOD and GPx gene promoter regions and increased levels of ROS in the blood cells coincided with increased mRNA expression of p53, Mn

  15. Oxidative stress, DNA damage, and the telomeric complex as therapeutic targets in acute neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Park, Sookyoung; Krause, James S.; Banik, Naren L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as an important contributor to neurodegeneration associated with acute CNS injuries and diseases such as spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ischemic stroke. In this review, we briefly detail the damaging effects of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, etc.) with a particular emphasis on DNA damage. Evidence for DNA damage in acute CNS injuries is presented along with its downstream effects on neuronal viability. In particular, unchecked oxidative DNA damage initiates a series of signaling events (e.g. activation of p53 and PARP-1, cell cycle re-activation) which have been shown to promote neuronal loss following CNS injury. These findings suggest that preventing DNA damage might be an effective way to promote neuronal survival and enhance neurological recovery in these conditions. Finally, we identify the telomere and telomere-associated proteins (e.g. telomerase) as novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurodegeneration due to their ability to modulate the neuronal response to both oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:23422879

  16. Fatigue and Mechanical Damage Propagation in Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banan, Roshanak

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are generally exposed to high magnitude road-induced vibrations and impact loads, frequent humidity-temperature loading cycles, and freeze/thaw stresses when employed in automotive applications. The resultant mechanical stresses can play a significant role in the evolution of mechanical defects in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The focus of this research is to investigate fatigue challenges due to humidity-temperature (hygrothermal) cycles and vibrations and their effects on damage evolution in PEM fuel cells. To achieve this goal, this thesis is divided into three parts that provide insight into damage propagation in the MEA under i) hygrothermal cycles, ii) external applied vibrations, and iii) a combination of both to simulate realistic automotive conditions. A finite element damage model based on cohesive zone theory was developed to simulate the propagation of micro-scale defects (cracks and delaminations) in the MEA under fuel cell operating conditions. It was found that the micro-defects can propagate to critical states under start-up and shut-down cycles, prior to reaching the desired lifespan of the fuel cell. The simultaneous presence of hygrothermal cycles and vibrations severely intensified damage propagation and resulted in considerably large defects within 75% of the fuel cell life expectancy. However, the order of generated damage was found to be larger under hygrothermal cycles than vibrations. Under hygrothermal cycles, membrane crack propagation was more severe compared to delamination propagation. Conversely, the degrading influence of vibrations was more significant on delaminations. The presence of an anode/cathode channel offset under the combined loadings lead to a 2.5-fold increase in the delamination length compared to the aligned-channel case. The developed model can be used to investigate the damage behaviour of current materials employed in fuel cells as well as to evaluate the

  17. Hyperglycemia in acute coronary syndromes: from mechanisms to prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Fabio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Poltronieri, Cristina; Lazzari, Ludovico; Sordi, Martina; Garofoli, Marta; Bartolini, Claudia; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent condition in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Hyperglycemia during ACS is caused by an inflammatory and adrenergic response to ischemic stress, when catecholamines are released and glycogenolysis induced. Although the involved pathophysiological mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated, it is believed that hyperglycemia is associated with an increase in free fat acids (which induce cardiac arrhythmias), insulin resistance, chemical inactivation of nitric oxide and the production of oxygen reactive species (with consequent microvascular and endothelial dysfunction), a prothrombotic state, and vascular inflammation. It is also related to myocardial metabolic disorders, leading to thrombosis, extension of the damaged area, reduced collateral circulation, and ischemic preconditioning. In the last few years, several observational studies demonstrated that hyperglycemia in ACS is a powerful predictor of survival, increasing the risk of immediate and long-term complications in patients both with and without previously known diabetes mellitus. Glucose management strategies in ACS may improve outcomes in patients with hyperglycemia, perhaps by reducing inflammatory and clotting mediators, by improving endothelial function and fibrinolysis and by reducing infarct size. Recent clinical trials of insulin in ACS have resulted in varying levels of benefit, but the clinical benefit of an aggressive treatment with insulin is yet unproved.

  18. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    observations. Our results indicate that the proposed CDAC model is capable of simulating both initial small magnitude damage as well as complete failure of AC tissue. The results of this study may help to elucidate the mechanisms of AC tissue damage, which initiate and propagate OA. PMID:26043366

  19. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    observations. Our results indicate that the proposed CDAC model is capable of simulating both initial small magnitude damage as well as complete failure of AC tissue. The results of this study may help to elucidate the mechanisms of AC tissue damage, which initiate and propagate OA.

  20. A damage mechanics approach to high temperature fatigue crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Z.; Takezono, S.; Tao, K.

    1995-12-31

    A nonlocal damage constitutive model is developed for elasto-visco-plastic materials and is used to analyze fatigue crack growth at high temperature. In this model, no kinematic hardening rule is needed to account for the subsequent yielding and strain hardening behavior of the materials. A calculation method for nonlocal damage is introduced. The fatigue crack growth tests and the cyclic strain controlled fatigue tests are carried out at 723 K (450 C) on pure titanium. By means of FEM, the stress distribution near the crack tip, and the relationships between the crack growth rate dl/dN and some mechanical parameters, such as the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD), and the range of viscoplastic strain {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup vp} at the crack tip, are investigated. The mesh size dependence of these mechanical parameters in finite element analysis is discussed. The numerical results are given and compared with the experimental ones.

  1. Friction coefficients for mechanically damaged bovine articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Brunski, Daniel B; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Johnson, Matthew B; Striolo, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    We used a pin-on-disc tribometer to measure the friction coefficient of both pristine and mechanically damaged cartilage samples in the presence of different lubricant solutions. The experimental set up maximizes the lubrication mechanism due to interstitial fluid pressurization. In phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the measured friction coefficient increases with the level of damage. The main result is that when poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or hyaluronic acid (HA) are dissolved in PBS, or when synovial fluid (SF) is used as lubricant, the friction coefficients measured for damaged cartilage samples are only slightly larger than those obtained for pristine cartilage samples, indicating that the surface damage is in part alleviated by the presence of the various lubricants. Among the lubricants considered, 100 mg/mL of 100,000 Da MW PEO in PBS appears to be as effective as SF. We attempted to discriminate the lubrication mechanism enhanced by the various compounds. The lubricants viscosity was measured at shear rates comparable to those employed in the friction experiments, and a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring was used to study the adsorption of PEO, HA, and SF components on collagen type II adlayers pre-formed on hydroxyapatite. Under the shear rates considered the viscosity of SF is slightly larger than that of PBS, but lower than that of lubricant formulations containing HA or PEO. Neither PEO nor HA showed strong adsorption on collagen adlayers, while evidence of adsorption was found for SF. Combined, these results suggest that synovial fluid is likely to enhance boundary lubrication. It is possible that all three formulations enhance lubrication via the interstitial fluid pressurization mechanism, maximized by the experimental set up adopted in our friction tests.

  2. Systematic analysis of axonal damage and inflammatory response in different white matter tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, W; Corkill, D J; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2005-12-20

    The mechanisms of white matter (WM) damage during secondary degeneration are a fundamental issue in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Our main goal was to describe the pattern of an acute inflammatory response and secondary damage to axons in different WM tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord. Adult rats were deeply anesthetized and injected with 20 nmol of NMDA into the spinal cord ventral horn on T7. Animals were perfused after survival times of 1 day, 3 days and 7 days. Ten micrometer sections were submitted to immunocytochemical analysis for activated macrophages/microglia, neutrophils and damaged axons. There were inflammatory response and progressive tissue destruction of ventral WM (VWM) with formation of microcysts in both VWM and lateral WM (LWM). In the VWM, the number of beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) end-bulbs increased from 1 day with a peak at 3 days, decreasing by 7 days following the injection. APP end-bulbs were present in the dorsal WM (DWM) at 3 days survival time but were not in the LWM. Electron microscopic analysis revealed different degrees of myelin disruption and axonal pathology in the vacuolated WM up to 14 mm along the rostrocaudal axis. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant loss of medium and large axons (P < 0.05), but not of small axons (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that bystander axonal damage and myelin vacuolation are important secondary component of the pathology of WM tracts following rat SCI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these pathological events.

  3. Mechanical impedance measurement and damage detection using noncontact laser ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Lim, Hyeong Uk; Hong, Jung-Wuk; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-06-01

    This Letter proposes a mechanical impedance (MI) measurement technique using noncontact laser ultrasound. The ultrasound is generated by shooting a pulse laser beam onto a target structure, and its response is measured using a laser vibrometer. Once ultrasound propagation converges to structural vibration, MI is formed over the entire structure. Because noncontact lasers are utilized, this technique is applicable in harsh environments, free of electromagnetic interference, and able to perform wide-range scanning. The formation of MI and its feasibility for damage detection are verified through thermo-mechanical finite element analysis and lab-scale experiments.

  4. Mechanism study of goldenseal-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Wan, Liqing; Couch, Letha; Lin, Haixia; Li, Yan; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei

    2013-07-31

    Goldenseal has been used for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments including gastrointestinal disturbances, urinary tract disorders, and inflammation. The five major alkaloid constituents in goldenseal are berberine, palmatine, hydrastine, hydrastinine, and canadine. When goldenseal was evaluated by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the standard 2-year bioassay, goldenseal induced an increase in liver tumors in rats and mice; however, the mechanism of goldenseal-associated liver carcinogenicity remains unknown. In this study, the toxicity of the five goldenseal alkaloid constituents was characterized, and their toxic potencies were compared. As measured by the Comet assay and the expression of γ-H2A.X, berberine, followed by palmatine, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine and palmatine suppressed the activities of both topoisomerase (Topo) I and II. In berberine-treated cells, DNA damage was shown to be directly associated with the inhibitory effect of Topo II, but not Topo I by silencing gene of Topo I or Topo II. In addition, DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available goldenseal extracts and the extent of DNA damage was positively correlated to the berberine content. Our findings suggest that the Topo II inhibitory effect may contribute to berberine- and goldenseal-induced genotoxicity and tumorigenicity.

  5. Endogenous recovery after brain damage: molecular mechanisms that balance neuronal life/death fate.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Penagos-Puig, Andrés; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal survival depends on multiple factors that comprise a well-fueled energy metabolism, trophic input, clearance of toxic substances, appropriate redox environment, integrity of blood-brain barrier, suppression of programmed cell death pathways and cell cycle arrest. Disturbances of brain homeostasis lead to acute or chronic alterations that might ultimately cause neuronal death with consequent impairment of neurological function. Although we understand most of these processes well when they occur independently from one another, we still lack a clear grasp of the concerted cellular and molecular mechanisms activated upon neuronal damage that intervene in protecting damaged neurons from death. In this review, we summarize a handful of endogenously activated mechanisms that balance molecular cues so as to determine whether neurons recover from injury or die. We center our discussion on mechanisms that have been identified to participate in stroke, although we consider different scenarios of chronic neurodegeneration as well. We discuss two central processes that are involved in endogenous repair and that, when not regulated, could lead to tissue damage, namely, trophic support and neuroinflammation. We emphasize the need to construct integrated models of neuronal degeneration and survival that, in the end, converge in neuronal fate after injury. Under neurodegenerative conditions, endogenously activated mechanisms balance out molecular cues that determine whether neurons contend toxicity or die. Many processes involved in endogenous repair may as well lead to tissue damage depending on the strength of stimuli. Signaling mediated by trophic factors and neuroinflammation are examples of these processes as they regulate different mechanisms that mediate neuronal demise including necrosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. In this review, we discuss recent findings on balanced regulation and their involvement in neuronal death.

  6. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in multiple organs of mice acutely exposed to amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Yasin, Javed; Kazzam, Elsadig E; Ali, Badreldin H

    2016-01-01

    The use of amorphous silica (SiO2) in biopharmaceutical and industrial fields can lead to human exposure by injection, skin penetration, ingestion, or inhalation. However, the in vivo acute toxicity of amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles (SiNPs) on multiple organs and the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well understood. Presently, we investigated the acute (24 hours) effects of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm SiNPs (0.25 mg/kg) on systemic toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in the lung, heart, liver, kidney, and brain of mice. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased by SiNPs in the lung, liver, kidney, and brain, but was not changed in the heart. Similarly, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were significantly affected by SiNPs in all organs studied. While the concentration of tumor necrosis factor α was insignificantly increased in the liver and brain, its increase was statistically significant in the lung, heart, and kidney. SiNPs induced a significant elevation in pulmonary and renal interleukin 6 and interleukin-1 beta in the lung, liver, and brain. Moreover, SiNPs caused a significant increase in DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, in all the organs studied. SiNPs caused leukocytosis and increased the plasma activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alanine aminotranferase, and aspartate aminotransferase. These results indicate that acute systemic exposure to SiNPs causes oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in several major organs, and highlight the need for thorough evaluation of SiNPs before they can be safely used in human beings. PMID:27022259

  7. Evaluation of plasma von Willebrand factor as a biomarker for acute arterial damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, S J; Thudium, D T; Gossett, K A; Watson, E S; Schwartz, L W

    2000-01-01

    Plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) was evaluated as a potential biomarker of acute arterial damage in rats after a vasotoxic dose of the dopaminergic vasodilator, fenoldopam (FP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given FP or isotonic saline by subcutaneous injection, and plasma vWF was measured at 2, 6, and 24 hours after challenge. Mean plasma vWF values increased in FP-treated rats compared to controls at 2 hours (167 vs 122%; p < 0.05) and 6 hours postdose (172 vs 130%; p < 0.01) but were comparable to control values after 24 hours. Mesenteric arterial lesions were observed microscopically in all FP-treated rats 24 hours postdose but were not present in rats at 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8 hours after FP challenge. Further, plasma vWF concentrations increased in saline-treated rats after only the minimal perturbation of repeated venipuncture. These results indicate an early, minimal, and transient release of vWF that precedes the onset of morphologically evident vascular damage. The minimal increases in plasma vWF concentrations were of limited predictive value, may be more reflective of an acute-phase reactant response, and were not considered a reliable biomarker of acute FP-induced arterial damage in the rat.

  8. Visual indication of mechanical damage using core-shell microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Odom, Susan A; Jackson, Aaron C; Prokup, Alex M; Chayanupatkul, Sarut; Sottos, Nancy R; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2011-12-01

    We report a new core-shell microcapsule system for the visual detection of mechanical damage. The core material, 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene, is a conjugated cyclic olefin and a precursor to intensely colored polyacetylene. A combination of poly(urea-formaldehyde) and polyurethane is required to effectively encapsulate the volatile core material. Increasing the outer shell wall thickness and including a core-side prepolymer improves the thermal stability and free-flowing nature of these capsules, which tend to leach and rupture with thinner shell walls. Capsules ruptured in the presence of the Grubbs-Love ruthenium catalyst show immediate color change from nearly colorless to red-orange and dark purple over time, and color change in thin films resulted from scratch damage. PMID:22114767

  9. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    la Garza, Francisco Javier Guzmán-de; Ibarra-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Villegas-Quintero, Pablo; Villarreal-Ovalle, Claudia Ivette; Torres-González, Liliana; Oliva-Sosa, Norma Edith; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Fernández-Garza, Nancy Esthela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Carrillo-Arriaga, José Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student's t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion. PMID:23917671

  10. [Pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gabriel-Ortiz, Genaro; Pacheco-Mois, Fermín P; Bitzer-Quintero, K

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common cause of progressive neurological disability in young adults. This disease involves damage to the myelin sheath that normally insulates the electrical activity of nerve fibers. This leads to a wide range of symptoms as specific nerves become injured and lose their function. Epidemiological and experimental studies show that genetic alterations, antioxidant enzyme abnormalities and autoimmunity are risk factors for developing the disease. Recent evidence suggests that inflammation and oxidative stress within the central nervous system are major causes of ongoing tissue damage. Resident central nervous system cells and invading inflammatory cells release several reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which cause the histopathological features of multiple sclerosis: demyelization and axonal damage. The interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes results in an intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress status are important therapeutic strategies to slow or halt the disease processes. Therefore, several drugs are currently in trial in clinical practice to target this mechanism; particularly the use of supplements such as antioxidants and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in order to improve the survival and quality of patients' lives. PMID:26299060

  11. Protective mechanism of quercetin on acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Yang, M; Liu, J W; Yin, G T

    2016-03-11

    To investigate the protective mechanism of quercetin on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rats, an AMI rat model was established by ligating the left coronary anterior descending branch. The rats were randomly divided into the model group and low- and high-dose quercetin groups. The control group comprised sham-operated rats. The rats in the low- and high-dose quercetin groups were administered 100 and 400 mg/kg quercetin, respectively, by gavage. The rats in the control and model groups were administered isometric normal saline once daily for one week. The mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the myocardial tissue of rats were detected in each group by real time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the myocardial tissue and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were detected using a colorimetric method. The level of apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Compared with those in the control group, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and MDA content in the model, low-, and high-dose groups significantly increased. SOD and CAT activities decreased significantly. The cell apoptosis index increased significantly  (P < 0.05). Compared with those in the model group, the mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β and MDA content in myocardial tissue of rats in the low-dose and high-dose groups decreased significantly. SOD and CAT activities increased significantly. The cell apoptosis index significantly reduced (P < 0.05). In conclusion, quercetin has significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects on AMI rats and can effectively protect against myocardium damage.

  12. Pathophysiological mechanisms of acute pancreatitis define inflammatory markers of clinical prognosis.

    PubMed

    Minkov, Georgi A; Halacheva, Krasimira S; Yovtchev, Yovcho P; Gulubova, Maya V

    2015-07-01

    Development of acute pancreatitis illustrates the need to understand the basic mechanisms of disease progression to drive the exploration of therapeutic options. Cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis as underlying systemic inflammatory response, tissue damage, and organ dysfunction. However, little is known about circulating concentrations of these inflammatory markers and their real impact on clinical practice. Experimental studies have suggested that the prognosis for acute pancreatitis depends on the degree of pancreatic necrosis and the intensity of multisystem organ failure generated by the systemic inflammatory response. This suggests an intricate balance between localized tissue damage with proinflammatory cytokine production and a systemic anti-inflammatory response that restricts the inappropriate movement of proinflammatory agents into the circulation. Implication of such mediators suggests that interruption or blunting of an inappropriate immune response has the potential to improve outcome. A detailed understanding of pathophysiological processes and immunological aspects in patients with acute pancreatitis is the basis for the development of therapeutic strategies that will provide significant reductions in morbidity and mortality.

  13. Hygrothermal damage mechanisms in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman, F. W.; Mauri, R. E.; Warren, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    T300/5209 and T300/5208 graphite epoxy laminates were studied experimentally and analytically in order to: (1) determine the coupling between applied stress, internal residual stress, and moisture sorption kinetics; (2) examine the microscopic damage mechanisms due to hygrothermal cycling; (3) evaluate the effect of absorbed moisture and hygrothermal cycling on inplane shear response; (4) determine the permanent loss of interfacial bond strength after moisture absorption and drying; and (5) evaluate the three dimensional stress state in laminates under a combination of hygroscopic, thermal, and mechanical loads. Specimens were conditioned to equilibrium moisture content under steady exposure to 55% or 95% RH at 70 C or 93 C. Some specimens were tested subsequent to moisture conditioning and 100 cycles between -54 C and either 70 C or 93 C.

  14. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  15. Mechanisms of alcohol liver damage: aldehydes, scavenger receptors, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Willis, Monte S; Freeman, Thomas L; Kuszynski, Charles A; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2004-09-01

    While most of the investigations into the causative events in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) have been focused on multiple factors, increasing interest has centered around the possible role of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis and perpetuation of ALD. This is because many of the clinical features of ALD suggest that immune effector mechanisms may be contributing to liver tissue damage, as evidenced by the detection of circulating autoantibodies, and the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphoid cells in the livers of patients with ALD. One mechanism that has been associated with the development of autoimmune responses is the modification (haptenation or adduction) of liver proteins with aldehydes or other products of oxidative stress. This is because it has been shown that these adducted proteins can induce specific immune responses, to the adduct, the adduct plus protein (conformational antigens), as well as the unmodified parts of the protein. More importantly, it is possible to demonstrate that adducted self-proteins can induce reactivity to the normal self-protein and thereby induce autoimmune responses. Therefore, it is the purpose of this manuscript to outline the mechanism(s) by which these modified self proteins can induce autoimmune reactivity, and thus play a role in the development and/or progression of ALD.

  16. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  17. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture. PMID:27057990

  18. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity and indices of plasmatic oxidative damage after acute physical exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Berzosa, C; Gómez-Trullén, E M; Piedrafita, E; Cebrián, I; Martínez-Ballarín, E; Miana-Mena, F J; Fuentes-Broto, L; García, J J

    2011-06-01

    Optimal levels of membrane fluidity are essential for numerous cell functions including cell growth, solute transport and signal transduction. Since exercise enhances free radical production, our aim was to evaluate in healthy male subjects the effects of an acute bout of maximal and submaximal exercise on the erythrocyte membrane fluidity and its possible relation to the oxidative damage overproduction due to exercise. Subjects (n = 34) performed three cycloergometric tests: a continuous progressive exercise, a strenuous exercise until exhaustion and an acute bout of exercise at an intensity corresponding to 70% of maximal work capacity for 30 min. Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after these exercises. Erythrocyte membrane fluidity was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HDA) concentrations and carbonyl content of plasmatic proteins were used as an index of lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. Exercise produced a dramatic drop in the erythrocyte membrane fluidity as compared to resting time, but this was not accompanied by significant changes in the plasmatic MDA and 4-HDA concentrations. The highest erythrocyte membrane rigidity was detected immediately after strenuous exercise until exhaustion was performed. Protein carbonyl levels were higher after exhaustive exercises than at rest. Continuous progressive and strenuous exercises until exhaustion, but not submaximal workload, resulted in a significant enhanced accumulation of carbonylated proteins in the plasma. These findings are consistent with the idea that exercise exaggerates oxidative damage, which may contribute, at least partially, to explain the rigidity in the membrane of the erythrocytes due to acute exercise.

  19. Acute toxicity and superficial damage to goldfish from the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yu; Zeng, Shi-Hu; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Liu, Li; Ma, Shuai; Wang, Jian-Ji

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, goldfish toxicity and superficial damage from 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium bromide ([C8 mim]Br) exposure were evaluated by an acute toxicity test. These results show that the 24-h 50% lethal concentration for [C8 mim]Br in goldfish is 244 mg L(-1) , and this indicates that [C8 mim]Br is a chemical with moderate or low toxicity to organisms. Scanning electronic microscope and histological observations revealed that acute exposure to [C8 mim]Br induced obvious superficial damage to the skin, gill filaments, and intestinal villi of the goldfish, and this suggests that the skin, gills, and intestines may be the first direct targets of the ionic liquid in this fish. Histological examination also indicated that [C8 mim]Br-exposure caused damage to the goldfish's hepatopancreas and kidney, consisting mainly of hepatic cords in a loose connection, hepatic cytoplasmic vacuolation, renal parenchyma vacuolization, and intumescence of the renal tubule. In addition, we found that [C8 mim]Br caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the hepatopancreases from these goldfish, and thus we suggest that the MDA level may be a biomarker of [C8 mim]Br-toxicity in goldfish.

  20. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, A. De Monte, M. Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-05-15

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology.

  1. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  2. A mechanism for acute aluminium toxicity in fish.

    PubMed

    Exley, C; Chappell, J S; Birchall, J D

    1991-08-01

    Aluminium is acutely toxic to fish in acid waters. The gill is the principal target organ and death is due to a combination of ionoregulatory, osmoregulatory and respiratory dysfunction. The toxic mechanism has hitherto received little direct consideration and is unknown. In this paper the mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity is approached from a chemical perspective. Symptomatic evidence of toxicity is taken from the literature and combined with our own research to elucidate a biochemically sound model to describe a possible mechanism of acute aluminium toxicity in fish. The proposed model delineates the chemical conditions immediately adjacent to the gill surface and emphasizes their importance in aluminium's toxic mode of action. The mechanism is shown to be bipartite. Aluminium binding to functional groups both apically located at the gill surface and intracellularly located within lamellar epithelial cells disrupts the barrier properties of the gill epithelium. The concomitant iono- and osmoregulatory dysfunction results in accelerated cell necrosis, sloughing and death of the fish. The mechanism of epithelial cell death is proposed as a general mechanism of aluminium-induced accelerated cell death.

  3. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-02-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure that is characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier, with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities to treat ARDS have been investigated over the past several decades, supportive therapies remain the mainstay of treatment. In this article, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of ARDS and present emerging aspects of ARDS pathophysiology that encompass modulators of the innate immune response, damage signals, and aberrant proteolysis that may serve as a foundation for future therapeutic targets.

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  5. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage.

  6. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage. PMID:26940495

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred E. Crouch; Alan Dean; Carl Torres; Jeff Aron

    2004-03-01

    In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.

  8. Mechanisms and prevention of secondary brain damage during intensive care.

    PubMed

    Dearden, N M

    1998-01-01

    The injured brain may be damaged by primary impact, secondary injury from secondary damage due to initiation of destructive inflammatory and biochemical cascades by the primary injury or secondary ischemic injury following secondary insults that initiate or augment these immunological and biochemical cascades. Cerebral ischemia will arise whenever delivery of oxygen and substrates to the brain fall below metabolic needs. Many factors lead to the development of secondary insults to the injured brain during initial resuscitation, transport, surgery, and subsequent intensive care. Continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygenation (jugular oximetry, brain tissue PO2) and cerebral blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler ultrasonography) in patients with brain trauma reveals multiple episodes of transient hypoperfusion with an adverse relationship between incidence and outcome. Secondary brain insults arise through systemic or intracranial mechanisms that reduce cerebral blood flow from compromised CPP, vascular distortion or cerebrovascular narrowing or lower oxygen delivery from hypoxemia associated with airway obstruction, pulmonary pathology, or anemia. Secondary brain ischemia remains a common pathway to secondary brain damage in most critically ill neurosurgical patients. In the future prevention of secondary brain injury may well hinge on giving a cocktail of novel agents that modify destructive biochemical and inflammatory pathways, each having a potential therapeutic window possibly in a subgroup of patients. To date, phase 3 clinical trials of several agents including PEGSOD and tyrilizad mesylate have failed to show relevant efficacy after brain trauma or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The therapeutic role of calcium channel blockers in traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage is currently under investigation following the results of subgroup metaanalysis. Several phase 3, NMDA receptor antagonist studies are underway in brain trauma with results expected soon. Although we

  9. Damage Pre-Cursors Based Assessment of Accrued Thermo-Mechanical Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Field Deployed Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Pradeep; Harsha, Mahendra; Goebel, Kai; Jones, Jim

    Field deployed electronics may accrue damage due to environmental exposure and usage after finite period of service but may not often have any o-indicators of failure such as cracks or delamination. A method to interrogate the damage state of field deployed electronics in the pre-failure space may allow insight into the damage initiation, progression, and remaining useful life of the deployed system. Aging has been previously shown to effect the reliability and constitutive behavior of second-level leadfree interconnects. Prognostication of accrued damage and assessment of residual life can provide valuable insight into impending failure. In this paper, field deployed parts have been extracted and prognosticated for accrued damage and remaining useful life in an anticipated future deployment environment. A subset of the field deployed parts have been tested to failure in the anticipated field deployed environment to validate the assessment of remaining useful life. In addition, some parts have been subjected to additional known thermo-mechanical stresses and the incremental damage accrued validated with respect to the amount of additional damage imposed on the assemblies. The presented methodology uses leading indicators of failure based on micro-structural evolution of damage to identify accrued damage in electronic systems subjected to sequential stresses of thermal aging and thermal cycling. Damage equivalency methodologies have been developed to map damage accrued in thermal aging to the reduction in thermo-mechanical cyclic life based on damage proxies. The expected error with interrogation of system state and assessment of residual life has been quantified. Prognostic metrics including α-λmetric, sample standard deviation, mean square error, mean absolute percentage error, average bias, relative accuracy, and cumulative relative accuracy have been used to compare the performance of the damage proxies.

  10. Pathological display of affect in patients with depression and right frontal brain damage. An alternative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ross, E D; Stewart, R S

    1987-03-01

    Two patients are reported with the acute onset of pathological crying following right inferior frontal brain damage. Both had severe endogenous depression and neither had pseudobulbar palsy. These and other cases argue that two organic brain diseases--one structural and the other "physiopharmacological"--may interact to produce pathological display of affect that cannot be accounted for by traditional neurological explanations. A pharmacological mechanism for the rapid amelioration of pathological affect by tricyclic medications and its possible relationship to the newly discovered descending motor systems of the brain that use norepinephrine and serotonin as neurotransmitters is offered. These cases also suggest that pathological affect is a valuable clinical indicator of an underlying major depression in some brain-injured patients. PMID:3819712

  11. Rat liver mitochondrial damage under acute or chronic carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication: Protection by melatonin and cranberry flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheshchevik, V.T.; Lapshina, E.A.; Dremza, I.K.; Zabrodskaya, S.V.; Reiter, R.J.; Prokopchik, N.I.; Zavodnik, I.B.

    2012-06-15

    In current societies, the risk of toxic liver damage has markedly increased. The aim of the present work was to carry out further research into the mechanism(s) of liver mitochondrial damage induced by acute (0.8 g/kg body weight, single injection) or chronic (1.6 g/ kg body weight, 30 days, biweekly injections) carbon tetrachloride – induced intoxication and to evaluate the hepatoprotective potential of the antioxidant, melatonin, as well as succinate and cranberry flavonoids in rats. Acute intoxication resulted in considerable impairment of mitochondrial respiratory parameters in the liver. The activity of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) decreased (by 25%, p < 0.05). Short-term melatonin treatment (10 mg/kg, three times) of rats did not reduce the degree of toxic mitochondrial dysfunction but decreased the enhanced NO production. After 30-day chronic intoxication, no significant change in the respiratory activity of liver mitochondria was observed, despite marked changes in the redox-balance of mitochondria. The activities of the mitochondrial enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as that of cytoplasmic catalase in liver cells were inhibited significantly. Mitochondria isolated from the livers of the rats chronically treated with CCl{sub 4} displayed obvious irreversible impairments. Long-term melatonin administration (10 mg/kg, 30 days, daily) to chronically intoxicated rats diminished the toxic effects of CCl{sub 4}, reducing elevated plasma activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and bilirubin concentration, prevented accumulation of membrane lipid peroxidation products in rat liver and resulted in apparent preservation of the mitochondrial ultrastructure. The treatment of the animals by the complex of melatonin (10 mg/kg) plus succinate (50 mg/kg) plus cranberry flavonoids (7 mg/kg) was even more effective in prevention of toxic liver injury and liver mitochondria damage

  12. Mechanical damage to Escherichia coli cells in a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Satoshi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Iwatani, Shintaro; Kondo, Kazuya; Osumi, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Nobuharu; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical damage to the Escherichia coli cell caused by polyvinyl chloride particles as a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation. Our results indicated that the glucose-consumption rate and the intracellular ATP concentration temporarily increased by the mechanical damage, and decreased after considerable damage had occurred on cell membrane. PMID:22153714

  13. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest. PMID:26860409

  14. Mechanisms of formation damage in matrix-permeability geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bergosh, J.L.; Wiggins, R.B.; Enniss, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Tests were conducted to determine mechanisms of formation damage that can occur in matrix permeability geothermal wells. Two types of cores were used in the testing, actual cores from the East Mesa Well 78-30RD and cores from a fairly uniform generic sandstone formation. Three different types of tests were run. The East Mesa cores were used in the testing of the sensitivity of core to filtrate chemistry. The tests began with the cores exposed to simulated East Mesa brine and then different filtrates were introduced and the effects of the fluid contrast on core permeability were measured. The East Mesa cores were also used in the second series of tests which tested formation sandstone cores were used in the third test series which investigated the effects of different sizes of entrained particles in the fluid. Tests were run with both single-particle sizes and distributions of particle mixes. In addition to the testing, core preparation techniques for simulating fracture permeability were evaluated. Three different fracture formation mechanisms were identified and compared. Measurement techniques for measuring fracture size and permeability were also developed.

  15. DNA Damage Focus Analysis in Blood Samples of Minipigs Reveals Acute Partial Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lamkowski, Andreas; Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Ahmed, Emad A.; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR) induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI) with 49 Gy (±6%) Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1–8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available early after

  16. Current status of mechanical thrombectomy for acute stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Yilmaz, Hasan; Pellaton, Alain; Slater, Lee-Anne; Krings, Timo; Lovblad, Karl-Olof

    2015-02-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a morbid and disabling medical condition with a significant social and economic impact throughout the world. Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) has been the first line treatment for patients presenting up to 4.5 hours after symptom onset for many years. Endovascular stroke treatment has been used successfully as rescue therapy after failed IVT; in patients with contraindications to rtPA or presenting outside the 4.5-hour window. The effectiveness of IVT is high for distal thrombi but significantly lower for proximal occlusions. Endovascular treatment has been revolutionized by the evolution from intra-arterial thrombolysis and first generation mechanical devices to the current generation of stent retrievers and aspiration systems with large bore catheters. These devices have been associated with excellent revascularization, improved clinical outcomes, shorter procedure times and reduced device and procedure related complications. We report the current literature, clinical standards and perspectives on mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Interactive effects of mechanical ventilation, inhaled nitric oxide and oxidative stress in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Ferreira, Ana Lucia Anjos; Campos, Fabio Joly; Kurokawa, Cilmery Suemi; Carpi, Mario Ferreira; Moraes, Marcos Aurélio; Bonatto, Rossano Cesar; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Fioretto, Jose Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To compare conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), with/without inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), for oxygenation, inflammation, antioxidant/oxidative stress status, and DNA damage in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). Lung injury was induced by tracheal infusion of warm saline. Rabbits were ventilated at [Formula: see text] 1.0 and randomly assigned to one of five groups. Overall antioxidant defense/oxidative stress was assessed by total antioxidant performance assay, and DNA damage by comet assay. Ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters were recorded every 30min for 4h. ALI groups showed worse oxygenation than controls after lung injury. After 4h of mechanical ventilation, HFOV groups presented significant improvements in oxygenation. HFOV with and without iNO, and CMV with iNO showed significantly increased antioxidant defense and reduced DNA damage than CMV without iNO. Inhaled nitric oxide did not beneficially affect HFOV in relation to antioxidant defense/oxidative stress and pulmonary DNA damage. Overall, lung injury was reduced using HFOV or CMV with iNO. PMID:24148688

  18. Mechanisms of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gralinski, Lisa E.; Bankhead, Armand; Jeng, Sophia; Menachery, Vineet D.; Proll, Sean; Belisle, Sarah E.; Matzke, Melissa; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Luna, Maria L.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ferris, Martin T.; Bolles, Meagan; Chang, Jean; Aicher, Lauri; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Law, G. Lynn; Katze, Michael G.; McWeeney, Shannon; Baric, Ralph S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systems biology offers considerable promise in uncovering novel pathways by which viruses and other microbial pathogens interact with host signaling and expression networks to mediate disease severity. In this study, we have developed an unbiased modeling approach to identify new pathways and network connections mediating acute lung injury, using severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as a model pathogen. We utilized a time course of matched virologic, pathological, and transcriptomic data within a novel methodological framework that can detect pathway enrichment among key highly connected network genes. This unbiased approach produced a high-priority list of 4 genes in one pathway out of over 3,500 genes that were differentially expressed following SARS-CoV infection. With these data, we predicted that the urokinase and other wound repair pathways would regulate lethal versus sublethal disease following SARS-CoV infection in mice. We validated the importance of the urokinase pathway for SARS-CoV disease severity using genetically defined knockout mice, proteomic correlates of pathway activation, and pathological disease severity. The results of these studies demonstrate that a fine balance exists between host coagulation and fibrinolysin pathways regulating pathological disease outcomes, including diffuse alveolar damage and acute lung injury, following infection with highly pathogenic respiratory viruses, such as SARS-CoV. PMID:23919993

  19. Single-cell resolution mapping of neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia using thallium autometallography.

    PubMed

    Stöber, Franziska; Baldauf, Kathrin; Ziabreva, Iryna; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Neubert, Jenni; Reymann, Klaus G; Scheich, Henning; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Schröder, Ulrich H; Wunder, Andreas; Goldschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal damage shortly after onset or after brief episodes of cerebral ischemia has remained difficult to assess with clinical and preclinical imaging techniques as well as with microscopical methods. We here show, in rodent models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), that neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia can be mapped with single-cell resolution using thallium autometallography (TlAMG), a histochemical technique for the detection of the K(+)-probe thallium (Tl(+)) in the brain. We intravenously injected rats and mice with thallium diethyldithiocarbamate (TlDDC), a lipophilic chelate complex that releases Tl(+) after crossing the blood-brain barrier. We found, within the territories of the affected arteries, areas of markedly reduced neuronal Tl(+) uptake in all animals at all time points studied ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours after MCAO. In large lesions at early time points, areas with neuronal and astrocytic Tl(+) uptake below thresholds of detection were surrounded by putative penumbral zones with preserved but diminished Tl(+) uptake. At 24 hours, the areas of reduced Tl(+)uptake matched with areas delineated by established markers of neuronal damage. The results suggest the use of (201)TlDDC for preclinical and clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of hyperacute alterations in brain K(+) metabolism and prediction of tissue viability in cerebral ischemia.

  20. Acute ZnO nanoparticles exposure induces developmental toxicity, oxidative stress and DNA damage in embryo-larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Wang, Shutao; Wu, Yuan; You, Hong; Lv, Lina

    2013-07-15

    Nano-scale zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) is widely used in various industrial and commercial applications. However, the available toxicological information was inadequate to assess the potential ecological risk of nano-ZnO to aquatic organisms and the publics. In this study, the developmental toxicity, oxidative stress and DNA damage of nano-ZnO embryos were investigated in the embryo-larval zebrafish, the toxicity of Zn(2+) releasing from nano-ZnO were also investigated to ascertain the relationship between the nano-ZnO and corresponding Zn(2+). Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100mg/L nano-ZnO and 0.59, 2.15, 3.63, 4.07, 5.31, and 6.04 mg/L Zn(2+) for 144 h post-fertilisation (hpf), respectively. Up to 144 hpf, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, the genes related to oxidative damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage in zebrafish embryos were measured. The nano-ZnO was found to exert a dose-dependent toxicity to zebrafish embryos and larvae, reducing the hatching rate and inducing malformation and the acute toxicity to zebrafish embryos was greater than that of the Zn(2+) solution. The generation of ROS was significantly increased at 50 and 100mg/L nano-ZnO. DNA damage of zebrafish embryo was evaluated by single-cell gel electrophoresis and was enhanced with increasing nano-ZnO concentration. Moreover, the transcriptional expression of mitochondrial inner membrane genes related to ROS production, such as Bcl-2, in response to oxidative damage, such as Nqo1, and related to antioxidant response element such as Gstp2 were significantly down-regulated in the nano-ZnO treatment groups. However, the nano-ZnO up-regulated the transcriptional expression of Ucp2-related to ROS production. In conclusion, nano-ZnO induces developmental toxicity, oxidative stress and DNA damage on zebrafish embryos and the dissolved Zn(2+) only partially

  1. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  2. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  3. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  4. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  5. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE) particles, such as oxygen (16O), carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n) irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB) cells, and bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the hematopoietic

  6. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  7. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS. PMID:26855896

  8. Alterations in the expression of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE/ref-1) and DNA damage in the caudal region of acute and chronic spinal cord injured rats treated by embryonic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    DAGCI, T; ARMAGAN, G; KONYALIOGLU, S; YALCIN, A

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative mechanisms of injury-induced damage of neurons within the spinal cord are not very well understood. We used a model of T8-T9 spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat to induce neuronal degeneration. In this spinal cord injury model, unilateral avulsion of the spinal cord causes oxidative stress of neurons. We tested the hypothesis that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (or redox effector factor-1, APE/Ref-1) regulates this neuronal oxidation mechanism in the spinal cord region caudal to the lesion, and that DNA damage is an early upstream signal. The embryonic neural stem cell therapy significantly decreased DNA-damage levels in both study groups - acutely (followed up to 7 days after SCI), and chronically (followed up to 28 days after SCI) injured animals. Meanwhile, mRNA levels of APE/Ref-1 significantly increased after embryonic neural stem cell therapy in acutely and chronically injured animals when compared to acute and chronic sham groups. Our data has demonstrated that an increase of APE/Ref-1 mRNA levels in the caudal region of spinal cord strongly correlated with DNA damage after traumatic spinal cord injury. We suggest that DNA damage can be observed both in lesional and caudal regions of the acutely and chronically injured groups, but DNA damage is reduced with embryonic neural stem cell therapy.

  9. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F.; Fang, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  10. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process. PMID:26855751

  11. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  12. Acute O 3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment.

    PubMed

    Darbah, Joseph N T; Jones, Wendy S; Burton, Andrew J; Nagy, John; Kubiske, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    We studied the effect of high ozone (O(3)) concentration (110-490 nmol mol(-1)) on regenerating aspen (Populus tremuloides) and maple (Acer saccharum) trees at an open-air O(3) pollution experiment near Rhinelander WI USA. This study is the first of its kind to examine the effects of acute O(3) exposure on aspen and maple sprouts after the parent trees, which were grown under elevated O(3) and/or CO(2) for 12 years, were harvested. Acute O(3) damage was not uniform within the crowns of aspen suckers; it was most severe in the mature, fully expanded photosynthesizing leaves. Young expanding leaves showed no visible signs of acute O(3) damage contrary to expectations. Stomatal conductance played a primary role in the severity of acute O(3) damage as it directly controlled O(3) uptake. Maple sprouts, which had lower stomatal conductance, smaller stomatal aperture, higher stomatal density and larger leaf surface area, were tolerant of acute O(3) exposure. Moreover, elevated CO(2) did not ameliorate the adverse effects of acute O(3) dose on aspen and maple sprouts, in contrast to its ability to counteract the effects of long-term chronic exposure to lower O(3) levels.

  13. Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Darbah, J.N.; Nagy, J.; Jones, W. S.; Burton, A. J.; Kubiske, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    We studied the effect of high ozone (O{sub 3}) concentration (110-490 nmol mol{sup -1}) on regenerating aspen (Populus tremuloides) and maple (Acer saccharum) trees at an open-air O{sub 3} pollution experiment near Rhinelander WI USA. This study is the first of its kind to examine the effects of acute O{sub 3} exposure on aspen and maple sprouts after the parent trees, which were grown under elevated O{sub 3} and/or CO{sub 2} for 12 years, were harvested. Acute O{sub 3} damage was not uniform within the crowns of aspen suckers; it was most severe in the mature, fully expanded photosynthesizing leaves. Young expanding leaves showed no visible signs of acute O{sub 3} damage contrary to expectations. Stomatal conductance played a primary role in the severity of acute O{sub 3} damage as it directly controlled O{sub 3} uptake. Maple sprouts, which had lower stomatal conductance, smaller stomatal aperture, higher stomatal density and larger leaf surface area, were tolerant of acute O{sub 3} exposure. Moreover, elevated CO{sub 2} did not ameliorate the adverse effects of acute O{sub 3} dose on aspen and maple sprouts, in contrast to its ability to counteract the effects of long-term chronic exposure to lower O{sub 3} levels.

  14. Gastroprotective Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract in Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, Byoung Hwan; Seo, Pyoung Ju; Kang, Jung Mook; Jo, So Young; Park, Ji Hyun; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Won; Lee, Dong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The major compounds of Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) include momordica saponins. We report that the gastroprotective effect of SK-MS10 in an ethanol-induced gastric damage rat model is mediated by suppressing proinflammatory cytokines and downregulating cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), and the activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study, we evaluated the gastroprotective effects of SK-MS10 in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage rat model. Methods The pretreatment effect of SK-MS10 was evaluated in the NSAID-induced gastric damage rat model using aspirin, indomethacin, and diclofenac in 7-week-old rats. Gastric damage was evaluated based on the gross ulcer index by gastroenterologists, and the damage area (%) was measured using the MetaMorph 7.0 video image analysis system. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting was used to analyze the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, cPLA2, and 5-LOX. Results All NSAIDs induced gastric damage based on the gross ulcer index and damage area (p<0.05). Gastric damage was significantly attenuated by SK-MS10 pretreatment compared with NSAID treatment alone (p<0.05). The SK-MS10 pretreatment group exhibited lower MPO levels than the diclofenac group. The expression of cPLA2 and 5-LOX was decreased by SK-MS10 pretreatment in each of the three NSAID treatment groups. Conclusions SK-MS10 exhibited a gastroprotective effect against NSAID-induced acute gastric damage in rats. However, its protective mechanism may be different across the three types of NSAID-induced gastric damage models in rats. PMID:24516701

  15. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  16. Qualitative sensing of mechanical damage by a fluorogenic "click" reaction.

    PubMed

    Döhler, Diana; Rana, Sravendra; Rupp, Harald; Bergmann, Henrik; Behzadi, Shahed; Crespy, Daniel; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2016-09-25

    A simple and unique damage-sensing tool mediated by a Cu(i)-catalyzed [3+2] cycloaddition reaction is reported, where a fluorogenic "click"-reaction highlights physical damage by a strong fluorescence increase accompanied by in situ monitoring of localized self-healing. PMID:27538696

  17. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  18. Arterial damages in acute elbow dislocations: which diagnostic tests are required?

    PubMed

    Lutter, Christoph; Pfefferkorn, Ronny; Schoeffl, Volker

    2016-07-19

    Blunt vessel injuries of peripheral arteries caused by a direct trauma are rare. Studies have described the frequency of arterial ruptures following closed elbow dislocations in 0.3-1.7% of all cases. However, arterial damage does not always necessarily appear as a complete rupture of the vessel with a loss of peripheral circulation and ischaemic symptoms; a relatively strong periarticular system of collaterals can maintain circulation. Furthermore, the traumatic dislocation can also cause intimal tears, arterial dissections and aneurysms or thrombosis. In all cases of vessel injury, including total disruption, a peripheral pulse might still be palpable. 3 weeks after an acute elbow dislocation, we have diagnosed a patient with a long-segment stenosis of the brachial artery and a thrombosis of the radial artery. Therefore, the close anatomic proximity to the neurovascular structures should always be considered in cases of elbow dislocations, even if peripheral pulses are traceable.

  19. Neural mechanisms underlying nicotine addiction: acute positive reinforcement and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Watkins, S S; Koob, G F; Markou, A

    2000-02-01

    The neurobiology of nicotine addiction is reviewed within the context of neurobiological and behavioral theories postulated for other drugs of abuse. The roles of various neurotransmitter systems, including acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and opioid peptides in acute nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal from chronic administration are examined followed by a discussion of potential neuroadaptations within these neurochemical systems that may lead to the development of nicotine dependence. The link between nicotine administration, depression and schizophrenia are also discussed. Finally, a theoretical model of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying acute nicotine withdrawal and protracted abstinence involves alterations within dopaminergic, serotonergic, and stress systems that are hypothesized to contribute to the negative affective state associated with nicotine abstinence.

  20. Genotoxic Evaluation of Mikania laevigata Extract on DNA Damage Caused by Acute Coal Dust Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Heuser, V.D.; Tavares, P.; Leffa, D.D.; da Silva, G.A.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.R.T.; Pinho, R.A.; Streck, E.L.; Andrade,V.M.

    2009-06-15

    We report data on the possible antigenotoxic activity of Mikania laevigata extract (MLE) after acute intratracheal instillation of coal dust using the comet assay in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and liver cells and the micronucleus test in peripheral blood of Wistar rats. The animals were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution (groups 1 and 2) or MLE (100 mg/kg) (groups 3 and 4). On day 15, the animals were anesthetized with ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (20 mg/kg), and gross mineral coal dust (3 mg/0.3 mL saline) (groups 2 and 4) or saline solution (0.3 mL) (groups 1 and 3) was administered directly in the lung by intratracheal administration. Fifteen days after coal dust or saline instillation, the animals were sacrificed, and the femur, liver, and peripheral blood were removed. The results showed a general increase in the DNA damage values at 8 hours for all treatment groups, probably related to surgical procedures that had stressed the animals. Also, liver cells from rats treated with coal dust, pretreated or not with MLE, showed statistically higher comet assay values compared to the control group at 14 days after exposure. These results could be expected because the liver metabolizes a variety of organic compounds to more polar by-products. On the other hand, the micronucleus assay results did not show significant differences among groups. Therefore, our data do not support the antimutagenic activity of M. laevigata as a modulator of DNA damage after acute coal dust instillation.

  1. Chemo-mechanics of salt damage in stone.

    PubMed

    Flatt, Robert J; Caruso, Francesco; Sanchez, Asel Maria Aguilar; Scherer, George W

    2014-01-01

    Many porous materials are damaged by pressure exerted by salt crystals growing in their pores. This is a serious issue in conservation science, geomorphology, geotechnical engineering and concrete materials science. In all cases, a central question is whether crystallization pressure will cause damage. Here we present an experiment in which the crystallization pressure and the pore saturation are varied in a controlled way. We demonstrate that a strain energy failure criterion can be used to predict when damage will occur. The experiment considered is the most widely used means to study the susceptibility to salt crystallization, so quantification of this test has far-reaching implications. PMID:25208600

  2. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, M. S.; Ostachowicz, W.; Bai, R. B.; Radzieński, M.

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  3. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  4. Ca2+ toxicity and mitochondrial damage in acute pancreatitis: translational overview

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Hegyi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a leading cause of hospitalization among non-malignant gastrointestinal disorders. The mortality of severe AP can reach 30–50%, which is most probably owing to the lack of specific treatment. Therefore, AP is a major healthcare problem, which urges researchers to identify novel drug targets. Studies from the last decades highlighted that the toxic cellular Ca2+ overload and mitochondrial damage are key pathogenic steps in the disease development affecting both acinar and ductal cell functions. Moreover, recent observations showed that modifying the cellular Ca2+ signalling might be beneficial in AP. The inhibition of Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum or the activity of plasma membrane Ca2+ influx channels decreased the severity of AP in experimental models. Similarly, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening also seems to improve the outcome of AP in in vivo animal models. At the moment MPTP blockers are under detailed clinical investigation to test whether interventions in MPTP openings and/or Ca2+ homeostasis of the cells can be specific targets in prevention or treatment of cell damage in AP. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377719

  5. Maltol, a Food Flavoring Agent, Attenuates Acute Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Xu, Qi; Hu, Jiang-ning; Han, Xin-yue; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of maltol, a food-flavoring agent, on alcohol-induced acute oxidative damage in mice. Maltol used in this study was isolated from red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A Meyer) and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, pretreatment with maltol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg; 15 days) drastically prevented the elevated activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) in serum and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in liver tissue (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of hepatic antioxidant, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were elevated by maltol pretreatment, compared to the alcohol group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that maltol pretreatment significantly inhibited alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. Interestingly, pretreatment of maltol effectively relieved alcohol-induced oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner. Maltol appeared to possess promising anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities. It was suggested that the hepatoprotective effect exhibited by maltol on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25608939

  6. Novel Lipid Mediators and Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Because inflammation is appreciated as a unifying basis of many widely occurring diseases, the mechanisms involved in its natural resolution are of considerable interest. Using contained, self-limited inflammatory exudates and a systems approach, novel lipid-derived mediators and pathways were uncovered in the resolution of inflammatory exudates. These new families of local mediators control both the duration and magnitude of acute inflammation as well as the return of the site to homeostasis in the process of catabasis. This new genus of specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) includes essential fatty acid–derived lipoxins, resolvins, protectins, and, most recently, maresins. These families were named based on their unique structures and potent stereoselective actions. The temporally initiated biosynthesis of SPM and their direct impact on leukocyte trafficking and macrophage-directed clearance mechanisms provide clear evidence that resolution is an active, programmed response at the tissue level. Moreover, SPM that possess anti-inflammatory (ie, limiting PMN infiltration) and proresolving (enhance macrophage uptake and clearance of apoptotic PMN and microbial particles) actions as well as stimulating mucosal antimicrobial responses demonstrate that anti-inflammation and proresolution are different responses of the host and novel defining properties of these molecules. The mapping of new resolution circuits has opened the possibility for understanding mechanisms that lead from acute to chronic inflammation, or to the resolution thereof, as well as to potential, resolution-based immunopharmacological therapies. PMID:20813960

  7. Gastroprotective Effects of PMK-S005 against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seo, Ji Hyung; Lee, Seonmin; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the gastroprotective effects of PMK-S005, which is a synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC; a sulfur-containing amino acid), against acute ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, including a nonethanol group, groups treated with absolute ethanol 1 hour after pretreatment with various doses of PMK-S005 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) or rebamipide (50 mg/kg), and an absolute ethanol-only group. Ethanol-induced gross ulcer and mucus levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, PGE2, LTB4, cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), GCLC, and GCLM, were assessed. Results PMK-S005 significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced gastric damage; it reduced mucosal inflammatory cytokine production and increased mucus levels. The expression levels of cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 were decreased by PMK-S005. PMK-S005 did not affect PGE2 synthesis, but LTB4 production was significantly suppressed. In addition, long-term administration of PMK-S005 significantly increased the expression of HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that PMK-S005 prevents gastric mucosal damage and that these gastroprotective activities are due to anti-inflammatory effects and enhancement of the gastric defense system, including antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26347516

  8. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  9. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for treatment of acute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Michael; Käunicke, Matthias; Hailer, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Acute and subacute ischemia of the legs in acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion is a dramatic situation that endangers the survival of the limbs, depending on the severity of the ischemia. Different therapy options like percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedures, which include rotational thrombectomy, have become available in recent years, in addition to local lysis and surgical thrombectomy. Surgical thrombectomy using the Fogarty catheter technique, in particular, shows an increased incidence of perioperative complications but only small technical success rates in randomized trials. On the other hand, local lysis is associated with increased costs due to resource-consuming measures, such as intensive monitoring and repeat angiographies, in addition to bleeding complications. In the past, further development of the Straub Rotarex® system as an endovascular therapy option has demonstrated good success leading to amputation-free survival in multiple studies. At the same time, a low rate of complications with use has been documented. Most examinations have been conducted in the thigh. To date, there are little investigational data on its use in acutely and subacutely occluded femoropopliteal bypasses. In this paper, the current study-based significance of the Rotarex system for this indication is analyzed based on the existing literature and the authors’ own experiences with 22 patients. PMID:22661895

  10. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  11. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  12. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  13. Fatigue damage-fracture mechanics interaction in cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Fyhrie, D P

    2002-03-01

    Fatigue loading causes accumulation of damage that may lead to the initiation of a macrocrack and result in a catastrophic failure of bone. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of fatigue damage on crack growth parameters in bovine cortical bone. Nineteen rectangular beam specimens (4 x 4 x 48 mm) were machined from bovine tibiae. The long axis of the beams was aligned with the long axis of bones. Using a four-point bending fatigue setup, ten specimens were fatigue-damaged to different levels as indicated by stiffness loss. A through-thickness notch was machined at the center of each damaged and undamaged beam. The notched specimens were then monotonically loaded beyond failure using a three-point bending protocol. Critical stress intensity factor, K(I), and work to critical load, W(Q), were significantly lower in the damaged group than in the undamaged group (p < 0.03). When the undamaged specimens were assigned a percent stiffness loss of zero and pooled with the damaged group, significant negative correlations of percent stiffness loss with K(I) (R = 0.58, p < 0.01), W(Q) (R = 0.54, p < 0.02), maximum load, P(max) (R = 0.59, p < 0.008), deflection at maximum load, Delta(max) (R = 0.48, p < 0.04), structural stiffness, S(max) (R = 0.53, p < 0.02), W(max) (R = 0.55, p < 0.02), and load at 1.4 mm deflection (a value beyond failure but without complete fracture), P(1.4) (R = 0.47, p < 0.05), were found. Post hoc analysis revealed that the average load-deflection curve from the damaged group was transformable into that from the undamaged group through a special shift on the load-deflection plane. Fatigue damage reduces bone stiffness and resistance to crack initiation, maximum load-carrying capacity, and deflection before and after failure in cortical bone. The data suggest there is a single rule that governs the overall effect of fatigue damage on the fracture behavior of cortical bone. PMID:11882466

  14. Damage mechanisms avoided or managed for NIF large optics

    DOE PAGES

    Manes, K. R.; Spaeth, M. L.; Adams, J. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bude, J. D.; Carr, C. W.; Conder, A. D.; DiNicola, J. M. G.; Dixit, S. N.; Feigenbaum, E.; et al

    2016-02-09

    After every other failure mode has been considered, in the end, the high-performance limit of all lasers is set by optical damage. The demands of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pushed lasers designed as ICF drivers into this limit from their very earliest days. The first ICF lasers were small, and their pulses were short. Their goal was to provide as much power to the target as possible. Typically, they faced damage due to high intensity on their optics. As requests for higher laser energy, longer pulse lengths, and better symmetry appeared, new kinds of damage also emerged, some of themmore » anticipated and others unexpected. This paper will discuss the various types of damage to large optics that had to be considered, avoided to the extent possible, or otherwise managed as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser was designed, fabricated, and brought into operation. Furthermore, it has been possible for NIF to meet its requirements because of the experience gained in previous ICF systems and because NIF designers have continued to be able to avoid or manage new damage situations as they have appeared.« less

  15. Mechanisms underlying spinal cord damage in decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Hallenbeck, J M; Bove, A A; Elliott, D H

    1975-04-01

    Decompression sickness, which damaged the spinal cord, was produced in anesthetized dogs using a compression chamber. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and several intravascular and intracardiac pressures were monitored during the course of the simulated dives. Manometric responses to forcible lung inflation and abdominal compression were measured both predive and postdive after signs of spinal cord damage were evident. Cinevenography of the epidural vertebral venous system was performed both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of both predive and postdive. Histopathologic studies of the brains and cords of paretic animals were carried out. The results indicate that the epidural vertebral venous system becomes obstructed during spinal cord damaging decompression sickness and strongly suggests that spinal cord infarction in decompression sickness is caused by obstruction of cord venous drainage at the level of the epidural vertebral venous system. PMID:1168317

  16. Fatigue damage mechanisms in boron-aluminium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue and shakedown in metal matrix composites is investigated theoretically and experimentally for unidirectional and laminated 6061 Al-B materials. It is shown that no fatigue damage takes place if the applied stress range is such that the material remains elastic, or shakes down, i.e., resumes elastic cyclic straining after a small number of plastic strain cycles. Fatigue damage occurs only in specimens subjected to stress ranges which cause sustained cyclic plastic straining in the aluminum matrix. If the applied stress range is smaller than that required for fatigue failure, after about 10 to the 6th cycles a saturation damage state is reached which remains essentially unchanged with increasing number of cycles.

  17. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  18. The involvement of immune reactions in cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction: role of cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, M; Vasiljevic, Z; Vuckovic-Dekic, L; Spasic, S

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating humoral and cell-mediated immune response in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as possible mechanisms involved in the infarction enlargement. Twenty three patients with first AMI and 15 healthy volunteers were examined. Of the AMI patients, 14 had extensive infarction (group A), while 9 patients had small infarction (group B). Immunologic analyses were performed at admission, and repeated after 3, 7, 14 and 21 days of the acute event. Following parameters were tested: number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells; serum IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels; polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, metabolic activity); leukocyte migration in vitro in the presence of water-soluble homologous heart extract. It was demonstrated that the number of B cells, serum IgG, C3, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels were elevated from 7th-14th days after AMI. Concerning these parameters, however, no significant differences were obtained between group A and group B of AMI patients. Chemotaxis and metabolic activity of peripheral blood PMN, but not phagocytosis, were enhanced during AMI, again changes of PMN did not correlate with the extension of infarction. In contrast, leukocyte migration inhibition in vitro revealed that only patients with extensive AMI have developed positive reaction during the first 14 days after the onset of the disease, while leukocyte inhibition reaction appeared in patients with nonextensive AMI not earlier than the 21st day after the infarction. These findings demonstrate generation of immune reactivity during AMI and indicate that humoral immune response seems more likely to be an epiphenomenon related to tissue necrosis, while cell-mediated immune reactions could influence the extensiveness of cardiac damage.

  19. [New mechanisms and recent insights in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI)].

    PubMed

    Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Quercia, Alessandro Domenico; Dellepiane, Sergio; Figliolini, Federico; Medica, Davide; De Lena, Michela

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients often associated with multiple organ failure, increased mortality and progression toward chronic kidney disease. The identification of new cellular and molecular targets involved in AKI may lead to an improvement of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In recent years, the pathogenetic mechanisms of AKI have been fully elucidated: tubular epithelial cells and endothelial cells present in the microvasculature have been identified as the main targets of ischemia and of nephrotoxic drugs. Indeed, endothelial cell injury is associated with an extension phase of AKI, whereas tubular cells are subjected to an alteration of cell polarity, mislocalization of tight junction proteins and membrane transporters, and finally to the development of necrosis or apotosis. Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is also a key component of sepsis-associated AKI in which the mechanisms of tissue damage are associated not only with hypoperfusion but also with a direct detrimental effect of bacterial products and inflammatory mediators on resident kidney cells. Endothelial and tubular epithelial cells also represent the main targets in the immunological mechanisms of AKI in kidney transplantation during cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection. Recent studies evidenced new molecules as early biomarkers of AKI. Among these molecules, NGAL and KIM-1 play a possible role in the progression toward chronic kidney disease. Lastly, the new frontier of AKI therapy is represented by the use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells able to induce a regenerative program in the damaged kidney.

  20. Mechanisms of cell damage in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1986-01-01

    Cells growing on microcarriers may be damaged by collisions of the microcarrier against another microcarrier or the reactor agitator. Bead-bead collisions are caused by small-scale turbulence, which can also cause high local shear stress on the cells. The cells are also exposed to 10-20 Hz cyclic shear stress by bead rotation.

  1. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α or IL-1β, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially γδ T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  2. A novel fluorinated stilbene exerts hepatoprotective properties in CCl(4)-induced acute liver damage.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Horacio; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Bautista, Wendy; Shibayama, Mineko; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Muriel, Pablo; Pérez-Álvarez, Víctor

    2011-10-01

    There has been a recently increase in the development of novel stilbene-based compounds with in vitro anti-inflamatory properties. For this study, we synthesized and evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of 2 fluorinated stilbenes on carbon tetrachloride (CCl₄)-induced acute liver damage. To achieve this, CCl₄ (4 g·kg(-1), per os) was administered to male Wistar rats, followed by either 2-fluoro-4'-methoxystilbene (FME) or 2,3-difluoro-4'-methoxystilbene (DFME) (10 mg·kg(-1), per os). We found that although both of the latter compounds prevented cholestatic damage (γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activity), only DFME showed partial but consistent results in the prevention of necrosis, as assessed by both alanine aminotransferase activity and histological analysis. Since inflammatory responses are mediated by cytokines, mainly tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), we used the Western blot technique to determine the action of FME and DFME on the expression level of this cytokine. The observed increase in the level of TNF-α caused by CCl₄ administration was only prevented by treatment with DFME, in agreement with our biochemical findings. This result was confirmed by measuring interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, since the expression of this protein depends on the level of TNF-α. In this case, DFME completely blocked the CCl₄-induced increase of IL-6. Our results suggest that DFME possesses greater anti-inflammatory properties in vivo than FME. DFME constitutes a possible therapeutic agent for liver disease and could serve as a template for structure optimization.

  3. Acute and chronic watercress supplementation attenuates exercise-induced peripheral mononuclear cell DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Mark C; Hughes, Ciara M; Burke, George; Brown, John C; Davison, Gareth W

    2013-01-28

    Pharmacological antioxidant vitamins have previously been investigated for a prophylactic effect against exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, large doses are often required and may lead to a state of pro-oxidation and oxidative damage. Watercress contains an array of nutritional compounds such as β-carotene and α-tocopherol which may increase protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress. The present randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that acute (consumption 2 h before exercise) and chronic (8 weeks consumption) watercress supplementation can attenuate exercise-induced oxidative stress. A total of ten apparently healthy male subjects (age 23 (SD 4) years, stature 179 (SD 10) cm and body mass 74 (SD 15) kg) were recruited to complete the 8-week chronic watercress intervention period (and then 8 weeks of control, with no ingestion) of the experiment before crossing over in order to compete the single-dose acute phase (with control, no ingestion). Blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-supplementation), at rest (pre-exercise) and following exercise. Each subject completed an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion following chronic and acute watercress supplementation or control. The main findings show an exercise-induced increase in DNA damage and lipid peroxidation over both acute and chronic control supplementation phases (P< 0.05 v. supplementation), while acute and chronic watercress attenuated DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and decreased H₂O₂ accumulation following exhaustive exercise (P< 0.05 v. control). A marked increase in the main lipid-soluble antioxidants (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and xanthophyll) was observed following watercress supplementation (P< 0.05 v. control) in both experimental phases. These findings suggest that short- and long-term watercress ingestion has potential antioxidant effects against exercise-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

  4. γ-Oryzanol protects against acute cadmium-induced oxidative damage in mice testes.

    PubMed

    Spiazzi, Cristiano C; Manfredini, Vanusa; Barcellos da Silva, Fabiana E; Flores, Erico M M; Izaguirry, Aryele P; Vargas, Laura M; Soares, Melina B; Santos, Francielli W

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal that is present at low levels mainly in food and water and also in cigar smoke. The present study evaluated the testicular damage caused by acute cadmium exposure and verified the protective role of γ-oryzanol (ORY). Mice were administrated with a single dose of 2.5mg/kg of CdCl2, and then treated with ORY (50mM in canola oil, 5mL/kg). Testes were removed after 24h and tested for lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein carbonylation, DNA breakage, ascorbic acid, cadmium and non-proteic thiols contents, and for the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and δ-aminolevulic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA-D). Cadmium presented a significant alteration in all parameters, except GPx and CAT activities. Therapy reduced in a slight degree cadmium concentration in testes (around 23%). ORY restored SOD and GST activities as well as TBARS production to the control levels. Furthermore, ORY partially recovered δ-ALA-D activity inhibited by cadmium. This study provides the first evidence on the therapeutic properties of ORY in protecting against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:23395783

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cells attenuate early damage in a ventilated pig model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Yuben; Sturm, Marian; Shaw, Kathryn; Shimbori, Chiko; Tan, Dino B A; Kolb, Martin; Graham, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have shown promise in treating inflammatory lung conditions. We hypothesised that human MSC (hMSC) can improve ALI/ARDS through their anti-inflammatory actions. We subjected pigs (n=6) to intravenous oleic acid (OA) injury, ventilation and hMSC infusion, while the controls (n=5) had intravenous OA, ventilation and an infusion vehicle control. hMSC were infused 1h after the administration of OA. The animals were monitored for additional 4h. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), a transcription factor that mediates several inflammatory pathways was reduced in hMSC treated pigs compared to controls (p=0.04). There was no significant difference in lung injury, assessed by histological scoring in hMSC treated pigs versus controls (p=0.063). There was no difference in neutrophil counts between hMSC-treated pigs and controls. Within 4h, there was no difference in the levels of IL-10 and IL-8 pre- and post-treatment with hMSC. In addition, there was no difference in hemodynamics, lung mechanics or arterial blood gases between hMSC treated animals and controls. Subsequent studies are required to determine if the observed decrease in inflammatory transcription factors will translate into improvement in inflammation and in physiological parameters over the long term.

  6. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  7. Hierarchical nanoreinforced composites: Computational analysis of damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.; Pontefisso, Alessandro; Dai, Gaoming

    2016-07-01

    The potential of hierarchical composites with secondary nanoreinforcement is discussed and analysed on the basis of the computational modelling. The concept of nanostructuring of interfaces as an important reserve of the improvement of the composite properties is discussed. The influence of distribution, shape, orientation of nanoparticles (carbon nanotube, graphene) in unidirectional polymer matrix composites on the strength and damage resistance of the composites is studied in computational studies. The possible directions of the improvement of nanoreinforced composites by controlling shapes, localization and other parameters of nanoreinforcements are reviewed.

  8. Effects of hydromechanical loading history and antecedent soil mechanical damage on shallow landslide triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Linfeng; Lehmann, Peter; Or, Dani

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the sudden triggering of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is preceded by accumulation of local internal failures in the soil mantle before their abrupt coalescence into a landslide failure plane. The mechanical status of a hillslope at any given time reflects competition between local damage accumulated during antecedent rainfall events and rates of mechanical healing (e.g., rebonding of microcracks and root regrowth). This dynamic interplay between damage accumulation and healing rates determines the initial mechanical state for landslide modeling. We evaluated the roles of these dynamic processes on landslide characteristics and patterns using a hydromechanical landslide-triggering model for a sequence of rainfall scenarios. The progressive nature of soil failure was represented by the fiber bundle model formalism that considers threshold strength of mechanical bonds linking adjacent soil columns and bedrock. The antecedent damage induced by prior rainfall events was expressed by the fraction of broken fibers that gradually regain strength or mechanically heal at rates specific to soil and roots. Results indicate that antecedent damage accelerates landslide initiation relative to pristine (undamaged) hillslopes. The volumes of first triggered landslides increase with increasing antecedent damage; however, for heavily damaged hillslopes, landslide volumes tend to decrease. Elapsed time between rainfall events allows mechanical healing that reduces the effects of antecedent damage. This study proposed a quantitative framework for systematically incorporating hydromechanical loading history and information on precursor events (e.g., such as recorded by acoustic emissions) into shallow landslide hazard assessment.

  9. Initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the intervertebral disc under cyclic loading using continuum damage mechanics methodology: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.; Andersson, Gunnar B.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to study the breakdown of disc tissue over several years of exposure to bending and lifting by experimental methods. There is also no finite element model that elucidates the failure mechanism due to repetitive loading of the lumbar motion segment. The aim of this study was to refine an already validated poro-elastic finite element model of lumbar motion segment to investigate the initiation and progression of mechanical damage in the disc under simple and complex cyclic loading conditions. Continuum damage mechanics methodology was incorporated into the finite element model to track the damage accumulation in the annulus in response to the repetitive loading. The analyses showed that the damage initiated at the posterior inner annulus adjacent to the endplates and propagated outwards towards its periphery under all loading conditions simulated. The damage accumulated preferentially in the posterior region of the annulus. The analyses also showed that the disc failure is unlikely to happen with repetitive bending in the absence of compressive load. Compressive cyclic loading with low peak load magnitude also did not create the failure of the disc. The finite element model results were consistent with the experimental and clinical observations in terms of the region of failure, magnitude of applied loads and the number of load cycles survived. PMID:22682891

  10. Progress in research on laser damage mechanisms and contamination problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, H.; Kato, K.; Sato, E.; Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Miyanaga, N.; Azechi, H.

    2014-09-01

    In high power laser systems, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in optical coating is very important parameters for obtaining high performances. Recently, LIDT was found to have strong temperature dependences in the bulk, surface of substrates, and in coatings. These temperature dependences of LIDT were carefully measured, and the damage formation model was constructed regarding to this temperature dependence. To explain this temperature dependence of LIDT, the temperature dependences of the initial electron generation and electron multiplication in the avalanche process were taken into account. On the other hand, LIDT in optical coating is very sensitive to organic contaminations accumulated in coating layers during storage and using condition. This paper also introduces the oil-contamination problem in LFEX laser system for First Ignition scheme in the laser fusion. We have analyzed contaminants and evaluated the effects of the contamination. We also developed new cleaning methods to remove contamination from the coating, and we have succeeded to prevent the degradation in LIDT for the duration of evacuation with Silica-gel in the chamber. The quantitative analysis of contamination on LIDT was made. We have investigated the characteristics of LIDT in dielectric coatings under the controlled contamination with several materials.

  11. Korean red ginseng ameliorates acute 3-nitropropionic acid-induced cochlear damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunjie; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Young Chul; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Youn Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial toxin, has been reported to induce an acute cochlear damage. Korean red ginseng (KRG) is known to have protective effects from some types of hearing loss. This study aimed to observe the protective effect of KRG in an ototoxic animal model using 3-NP intratympanic injection. BALB/c mice were classified into 5 groups (n=15) and dose-dependent toxic effects after intratympanic injection with 3-NP (300-5000 mM) on the left ear were investigated to determine the appropriate toxicity level of 3-NP. For observation of the protective effects of KRG, 23 mice were grouped into 3-NP (500 mM, n=12) and KRG+3-NP groups (300 mg/kg KRG for 7 days before 500 mM 3-NP administration, n=11). Auditory brain response (ABR) and cochlear morphological evaluations were performed before and after drug administration. The ABR thresholds in the 800-5000 mM groups exceeded the maximum recording limit at 16 and 32 kHz 1 day after 3-NP administration. The ABR threshold in the 500 mM 3-NP+KRG group was significantly lower than that in the 500 mM 3-NP group from post 1 week to 1 month. The mean type II fibrocyte counts significantly differed between the control and 3-NP groups and between the 3-NP and 3-NP+KRG groups. Spiral ganglion cell degeneration in the 3-NP group was more severe than that in the 3-NP+KRG group. This animal model exhibited a dose-dependent hearing loss with histological changes. KRG administration ameliorated the deterioration of hearing by 3-NP. PMID:23164932

  12. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to vascular damage in sustained ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    de Bragança, Ana C; Volpini, Rildo A; Mehrotra, Purvi; Andrade, Lúcia; Basile, David P

    2016-07-01

    Reductions in renal microvasculature density and increased lymphocyte activity may play critical roles in the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) following acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis progression following IRI-AKI We evaluated the effect of vitamin D deficiency in sustained IRI-AKI, hypothesizing that such deficiency contributes to the early reduction in renal capillary density or alters the lymphocyte response to IRI Wistar rats were fed vitamin D-free or standard diets for 35 days. On day 28, rats were randomized into four groups: control, vitamin D deficient (VDD), bilateral IRI, and VDD+IRI Indices of renal injury and recovery were evaluated for up to 7 days following the surgical procedures. VDD rats showed reduced capillary density (by cablin staining), even in the absence of renal I/R. In comparison with VDD and IRI rats, VDD+IRI rats manifested a significant exacerbation of capillary rarefaction as well as higher urinary volume, kidney weight/body weight ratio, tissue injury scores, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and alpha-smooth muscle actin. VDD+IRI rats also had higher numbers of infiltrating activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells staining for interferon gamma and interleukin-17, with a significant elevation in the Th17/T-regulatory cell ratio. These data suggest that vitamin D deficiency impairs renal repair responses to I/R injury, exacerbates changes in renal capillary density, as well as promoting fibrosis and inflammation, which may contribute to the transition from AKI to CKD.

  13. True porosity measurement of hair: a new way to study hair damage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hessefort, Yin; Holland, Brian T; Cloud, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    This study employs a novel method, gas sorption (1), to quantify the porosity characteristics of hair by determining total pore volume, adsorption pore-size distribution, and the surface area of damaged hair. Damage mechanisms were studied by comparing the different pore volume and surface area resulting from two different types of damage: chemical and UV. Hair color measurement and tensile strength, both reflecting the changes in hair cortex, were also employed in this study. The results suggest that hair damage caused by oxidative bleach and UV oxidation follows different pathways. Chemical damage (oxidative bleach) nearly triples the hair surface area in the first minute of bleaching due to the increase in the number of pores, followed by a sudden drop after 10 min of bleaching from smaller pores breaking down into larger ones. In contrast, UV damage shows an immediate loss in surface area in the first 200 hr of exposure and a gradual increase as exposure time continues.

  14. True porosity measurement of hair: a new way to study hair damage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hessefort, Yin; Holland, Brian T; Cloud, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    This study employs a novel method, gas sorption (1), to quantify the porosity characteristics of hair by determining total pore volume, adsorption pore-size distribution, and the surface area of damaged hair. Damage mechanisms were studied by comparing the different pore volume and surface area resulting from two different types of damage: chemical and UV. Hair color measurement and tensile strength, both reflecting the changes in hair cortex, were also employed in this study. The results suggest that hair damage caused by oxidative bleach and UV oxidation follows different pathways. Chemical damage (oxidative bleach) nearly triples the hair surface area in the first minute of bleaching due to the increase in the number of pores, followed by a sudden drop after 10 min of bleaching from smaller pores breaking down into larger ones. In contrast, UV damage shows an immediate loss in surface area in the first 200 hr of exposure and a gradual increase as exposure time continues. PMID:18818850

  15. Severe envenomation by Cerastes cerastes viper: an unusual mechanism of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, Houssam; Nejmi, Hicham; Abouelhassan, Taoufik; Hasni, Khadija; Samkaoui, Mohamed-Abdenasser

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral complications after snake bites--particularly ischemic complications--are rare. Very few cases of cerebral infarction resulting from a viper bite have been reported, and we call attention to this uncommon etiology. We discuss 3 authenticated reports of acute ischemic cerebrovascular accidents after 3 typical severe envenomations by Cerastes cerastes vipers. The 3 patients developed extensive local swelling and life-threatening systemic envenomation characterized by disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, increased fibrinolysis, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. This clinical picture involved atypical neurologic manifestations. These patients had either low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) or hemiparesis within hours to 4 days after being bitten, and they were found to have computed tomographic evidence of single or multiple ischemic (nonhemorrhagic) strokes of small- to large-vessel territories of the brain. One patient had good clinical recovery without neurologic deficits. Thrombotic complications occurred an average of 36 hours after being bitten, and their importance depends on the degree of envenomation. The possible mechanisms for cerebral infarction in these cases include generalized prothrombotic action of the venom (consumptive coagulopathy), toxin-induced vasculitis, and endothelial damage.

  16. Temporal Effects of Mechanical Loading on Deformation-Induced Damage in Skeletal Muscle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stekelenburg, A.; Strijkers, G. J.; Rijpkema, J. J. M.; Baaijens, F. P. T.; Bader, D. L.; Nicolay, K.; Oomens, C. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical loading of soft tissues covering bony prominences can cause skeletal muscle damage, ultimately resulting in a severe pressure ulcer termed deep tissue injury. Recently, by means of an experimental-numerical approach, it was shown that local tissue deformations cause tissue damage once a deformation threshold is exceeded. In the present study, the effects of load exposure time and intermittent load relief on the development of deformation-induced muscle damage were investigated. The data showed that a 2 h loading period caused more damage than 10 min loading. Intermittent load reliefs of 2 min during a 2 h loading period had minimal effect on the evolution of skeletal muscle damage. In addition, a local deformation threshold for damage was found, which was similar for each of the loading regimes applied in this study. For short loading periods, these results imply that local tissue deformations determine whether muscle damage will develop and the exposure time influences the amount of tissue damage. Temporary load reliefs were inefficient in reducing deformation-induced damage, but may still influence the development of ischemia-induced damage during longer loading periods. PMID:20232152

  17. Characteristics and mechanism of laser-induced surface damage initiated by metal contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shuang; Sun, Mingying; Shi, Shuaixu; Li, Zhaoyan; Zhang, Ya-nan; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    In high power laser facility, contaminants on optics surfaces reduce damage resistance of optical elements and then decrease their lifetime. By damage test experiments, laser damage induced by typical metal particles such as stainless steel 304 is studied. Optics samples with metal particles of different sizes on surfaces are prepared artificially based on the file and sieve. Damage test is implemented in air using a 1-on-1 mode. Results show that damage morphology and mechanism caused by particulate contamination on the incident and exit surfaces are quite different. Contaminants on the incident surface absorb laser energy and generate high temperature plasma during laser irradiation which can ablate optical surface. Metal particles melt and then the molten nano-particles redeposit around the initial particles. Central region of the damaged area bears the same outline as the initial particle because of the shielding effect. However, particles on the exit surface absorb a mass of energy, generate plasma and splash lots of smaller particles, only a few of them redeposit at the particle coverage area on the exit surface. Most of the laser energy is deposited at the interface of the metal particle and the sample surface, and thus damage size on the exit surface is larger than that on the incident surface. The areas covered by the metal particle are strongly damaged. And the damage sites are more serious than that on the incident surface. Besides damage phenomenon also depends on coating and substrate materials.

  18. Experimental Study on the Thermal Damage Characteristics of Limestone and Underlying Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Sun, Qiang; Hao, Shuqing; Wang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This work discusses an experimental investigation on the thermal damage characteristics of limestone and underlying mechanism. Cylindrical rock samples were heated to a specific temperature level of 25, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, and 900 °C. Then the thermal damage evolution equation was established based on the experimental results and the characteristics of thermal damage were analyzed. Last, possible mechanisms for the observed thermo-physical and mechanical response are discussed. The results show that with the increase of temperature in the tested range of temperature, the P-wave velocity, peak compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease, but the peak strain increases; the damage factors increase faster in 200-600 °C; the development of high-temperature-induced cracks conforms to the dislocation theory; the decomposition of magnesium carbonate and dolomite is the main reaction in the tested temperature range.

  19. Vascular damage, fibrosis, and chronic inflammation in mechanical back pain problems.

    PubMed

    Jayson, M I

    1989-05-01

    Our current hypothesis is that mechanical damage in the spine such as a disc prolapse can lead directly to pain. However, pain arising for this reason is usually of short duration. In many subjects, however, the mechanical problems lead to vascular damage and, in particular, venous obstruction and dilatation with endothelial damage, fibrin deposition, and intravascular thromboses. In turn, this is associated with perineural and intraneural fibrosis. There is a defect in the fibrinolytic system in the peripheral blood that may be the result of vascular damage but in turn may contribute to the persistence of this problem. Therefore, it seems likely that in many patients with chronic mechanical back pain there are important vascular, fibrotic, and inflammatory components to the problem. Treatment in the future should be directed specifically at these aspects of the disorder and hopefully can lead to better control of symptoms.

  20. Pre- and post-annealing of mechanical damage in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwottke, G. H.

    1982-01-01

    Basic properties of mechanical damage in silicon consisting of cracks and abrasion were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The crystallographic structure of mechanical damage was determined before and after high temperature annealing. The main findings include that stresses in silicon around crack tips are not plastically relieved at room temperature and that abrasion at room temperature introduces shear loops into the silicon. It was also found that cracks of micron size can be annealed out, specifically, if cleavage occurs on 111 planes. The healing products of such cracks are 60 deg and 90 deg dislocations. Submicron cracks transform into stacking faults during annealing. Likewise high concentrations of shear loops due abrasion were found to anneal into stacking faults. A one to one correlation between surface areas containing small cracks and stacking faults was made. Measurements of damage removal on silicon surfaces through chemical-mechanical etching techniques are presented. It is shown that silicon dioxide repolishes damaged silicon surfaces most effectively.

  1. Alphavirus Encephalomyelitis: Mechanisms and Approaches to Prevention of Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Diane E

    2016-07-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses are important causes of death and long-term neurologic disability due to encephalomyelitis. Studies of mice infected with the alphavirus Sindbis virus have shown that outcome is dependent on the age and genetic background of the mouse and virulence of the infecting virus. Age-dependent susceptibility reflects the acquisition by neurons of resistance to virus replication and virus-induced cell death with maturation. In mature mice, the populations of neurons most susceptible to infection are in the hippocampus and anterior horn of the spinal cord. Hippocampal infection leads to long-term memory deficits in mice that survive, while motor neuron infection can lead to paralysis and death. Neuronal death is immune-mediated, rather than a direct consequence of virus infection, and associated with entry and differentiation of pathogenic T helper 17 cells in the nervous system. To modulate glutamate excitotoxicity, mice were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonists or a glutamine antagonist. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 protected hippocampal neurons but not motor neurons, and mice still became paralyzed and died. α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonists GYKI-52466 and talampanel protected both hippocampal and motor neurons and prevented paralysis and death. Glutamine antagonist 6-diazo-5-l-norleucine protected hippocampal neurons and improved memory generation in mice surviving infection with an avirulent virus. Surprisingly, in all cases protection was associated with inhibition of the antiviral immune response, reduced entry of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system, and delayed virus clearance, emphasizing the importance of treatment approaches that include prevention of immunopathologic damage. PMID:27114366

  2. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, Rossella; Comi, Claudia; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  3. Mechanism of relapse in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Michelle J; Choi, Seoyeon; Beesley, Alex H; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Marshall, Glenn M; Kees, Ursula R; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D

    2008-05-15

    Relapse following initial chemotherapy remains a barrier to survival in approximately 20% of children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recently, to investigate the mechanism of relapse, we analysed clonal populations in 27 pairs of matched diagnosis and relapse ALL samples using PCR-based detection of multiple antigen receptor gene rearrangements. These clonal markers revealed the emergence of apparently new populations at relapse in 13 patients. In those cases where the new 'relapse clone' could be detected in the diagnosis population, there was a close correlation between length of first remission and quantity of the relapse clone in the diagnosis sample. A shorter length of time to first relapse correlated with a higher quantity of the relapsing clone at diagnosis. This observation, together with demonstrated differential chemosensitivity between sub-clones at diagnosis, indicates that relapse in ALL patients may commonly involve selection of a minor intrinsically resistant sub-clone that is undetectable by routine PCR-based methods. From a clinical perspective, relapse prediction may be improved with strategies to detect minor potentially resistant sub-clones early during treatment, hence allowing intensification of therapy. Together with the availability of relevant in vivo experimental models and powerful technology for detailed analysis of patient specimens, this new information will help shape future experimentation towards targeted therapy for high-risk ALL.

  4. Experimental investigation on mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ranjith, P. G.; Huang, Yan-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Jing, Hong-Wen; Gui, Yi-Lin; Yu, Qing-Lei

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone subjected to cyclic loading is very significant to evaluate the stability and safety of deep excavation damage zones. However to date, there are very few triaxial experimental studies of sandstone under cyclic loading. Moreover, few X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) observations have been adopted to reveal the damage mechanism of sandstone under triaxial cyclic loading. Therefore, in this research, a series of triaxial cyclic loading tests and X-ray micro-CT observations were conducted to analyse the mechanical damage characteristics of sandstone with respect to different confining pressures. The results indicated that at lower confining pressures, the triaxial strength of sandstone specimens under cyclic loading is higher than that under monotonic loading; whereas at confining pressures above 20 MPa, the triaxial strength of sandstone under cyclic loading is approximately equal to that under monotonic loading. With the increase of cycle number, the crack damage threshold of sandstone first increases, and then significantly decreases and finally remains constant. Based on the damage evolution of irreversible deformation, it appears that the axial damage value of sandstone is all higher than the radial damage value before the peak strength; whereas the radial damage value is higher than the axial damage value after the peak strength. The evolution of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of sandstone can be characterized as having four stages: (i) Stage I: material strengthening; (ii) Stage II: material degradation; (iii) Stage III: material failure and (iv) Stage IV: structure slippage. X-ray micro-CT observations demonstrated that the CT scanning surface images of sandstone specimens are consistent with actual surface crack photographs. The analysis of the cross-sections of sandstone supports that the system of crack planes under triaxial cyclic loading is much more complicated than that under triaxial

  5. Suppression of nano-absorbing precursors and damage mechanism in optical coatings for 3ω mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Zhang, Weili; Sun, Jian; Chai, Yingjie; Tu, Feifei; Zhao, Jiaoling; Yu, Zhen; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Meiping; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-03-15

    Damage precursors in the 3ω (351 nm) mirror for a high-power laser system are investigated as well as the relevant damage mechanisms. The precursors are classified into two ensembles according to the different laser resistance and damage features. The former is nano-absorbing precursors, which are sensitive to the standing wave electric field and vulnerable to the laser irradiation. The latter is submicrometer nodular defects, which have higher laser resistance and are sensitive to the adhesion strength between the fluoride coatings and oxide coatings. The damage due to nano-absorbing precursors is efficiently suppressed with the double stack design that screens the electric field in the oxides. Currently, the nodular seed is major originating from the Al2O3/SiO2 stack. Even for the same defect type and mirror, the final damage features are dependent on the local mechanical properties at the irradiation location. The investigations of the damage mechanisms provide a direction to further improve the laser-induced damage threshold of the 3ω mirror.

  6. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  7. Redox instability, mechanical deformation, and heterogeneous damage accumulation in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Nelson, G. J.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Haataja, M.

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical integrity and damage tolerance represent two key challenges in the design of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In particular, reduction and oxidation (redox) cycles, and the associated large transformation strains have a notable impact on the mechanical stability and failure mode of SOFC anodes. In this study, the deformation behavior under redox cycling is investigated computationally with an approach that provides a detailed, microstructurally based view of heterogeneous damage accumulation behavior within an experimentally obtained nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia SOFC anode microstructure. Simulation results underscore the critical role that the microstructure plays in the mechanical deformation behavior of and failure within such materials.

  8. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  9. Mechanical damage assessment by means of thermo-electrical lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordatos, E. Z.; Exarchos, D. A.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    The present work deals with the nondestructive assessment of the metallic materials' mechanical damage. An innovative Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) methodology based on two thermographic approaches was developed in order the state of fatigue damage to be assessed. The first approach allows the detection of heat waves generated by the thermomechanical coupling during the fatigue loading (online method). Specifically, both the thermo-elastic and intrinsic dissipated energy was correlated with the mechanical degradation and the remaining fatigue life. The second approach involves the monitoring of the materials' thermal behavior using a Peltier device for accurate thermal excitation (offline method). The correlation of the thermal behavior and the state of damage was achieved by the determination of the material's thermal response. The combination of these two approaches enables the rapid and accurate assessment of the cumulative damage.

  10. Mechanisms of sensorineural cell damage, death and survival in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ann C. Y.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed. PMID:25954196

  11. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  12. In Vitro Comparative Assessment of Mechanical Blood Damage Induced by Different Hemodialysis Treatments.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Ranko; Lodi, Carlo Alberto; Sconziano, Sara Antonia; Beck, Werner; Bosch, Juan P

    2015-12-01

    Gradual deterioration of red blood cells (RBCs) due to mechanical stress (chronic hemolysis) is unavoidable during treatments that involve extracorporeal blood circulation, such as hemodialysis (HD). This effect is generally undetectable and does not generate any acute symptoms, but it leads to an increase in plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). There are no absolute safety levels for fHb increase, indicating the need for an empirical evaluation using comparative testing. The increase in fHb levels was investigated in vitro by applying double-needle double-pump HD (HD-DNDP), a new modality in which arterial and venous pumps both run continuously. fHb was measured during typical and worst-case simulated dialysis treatments (double-needle single-pump HD [HD-DNSP], hemodiafiltration [HDF-DN], single-needle double-pump HD [HD-SNDP], and HD-DNDP) performed in vitro using bovine blood for 4 h. Hemolysis-related indices (fHb%; index of hemolysis, IH; and normalized IH) were calculated and used for comparison. The increase in fHb during either HDF-DN or HD-SNDP with Artis and AK200 dialysis machines was similar, while the fHb at the maximum real blood flow rate (Qbreal ) at the completion of the HD-DNDP treatment on Artis was higher than that for HD-DNSP using a Phoenix dialysis machine (fHb% = 1.24 ± 0.13 and 0.92 ± 0.12 for the Artis machine with HD-DNDP at Qbreal  = 450 mL/min and Phoenix with HD-DNSP at Qbreal  = 500 mL/min, respectively). However, the fHb levels increased linearly, and no steep changes were observed. The increases observed during HD-DNDP were the same order of magnitude as those for widely used bloodlines and treatment modes for delivering dialysis treatments. The observed results matched literature findings, and thus the measured fHb trends are not predicted to have clinical side effects. HD-DNDP treatment with Artis does not merit any additional concern regarding mechanical stress to RBCs compared with that observed for

  13. In Vitro Comparative Assessment of Mechanical Blood Damage Induced by Different Hemodialysis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Carlo Alberto; Sconziano, Sara Antonia; Beck, Werner; Bosch, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gradual deterioration of red blood cells (RBCs) due to mechanical stress (chronic hemolysis) is unavoidable during treatments that involve extracorporeal blood circulation, such as hemodialysis (HD). This effect is generally undetectable and does not generate any acute symptoms, but it leads to an increase in plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). There are no absolute safety levels for fHb increase, indicating the need for an empirical evaluation using comparative testing. The increase in fHb levels was investigated in vitro by applying double‐needle double‐pump HD (HD‐DNDP), a new modality in which arterial and venous pumps both run continuously. fHb was measured during typical and worst‐case simulated dialysis treatments (double‐needle single‐pump HD [HD‐DNSP], hemodiafiltration [HDF‐DN], single‐needle double‐pump HD [HD‐SNDP], and HD‐DNDP) performed in vitro using bovine blood for 4 h. Hemolysis‐related indices (fHb%; index of hemolysis, IH; and normalized IH) were calculated and used for comparison. The increase in fHb during either HDF‐DN or HD‐SNDP with Artis and AK200 dialysis machines was similar, while the fHb at the maximum real blood flow rate (Qbreal) at the completion of the HD‐DNDP treatment on Artis was higher than that for HD‐DNSP using a Phoenix dialysis machine (fHb % = 1.24 ± 0.13 and 0.92 ± 0.12 for the Artis machine with HD‐DNDP at Qbreal = 450 mL/min and Phoenix with HD‐DNSP at Qbreal = 500 mL/min, respectively). However, the fHb levels increased linearly, and no steep changes were observed. The increases observed during HD‐DNDP were the same order of magnitude as those for widely used bloodlines and treatment modes for delivering dialysis treatments. The observed results matched literature findings, and thus the measured fHb trends are not predicted to have clinical side effects. HD‐DNDP treatment with Artis does not merit any additional concern regarding mechanical stress

  14. NRF2 promotes neuronal survival in neurodegeneration and acute nerve damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wenjun; MacColl Garfinkel, Alexandra E.; Li, Yiqing; Benowitz, Larry I.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the loss of neurons in many disease conditions as well as during normal aging; however, small-molecule agents that reduce oxidation have not been successful in preventing neurodegeneration. Moreover, even if an efficacious systemic reduction of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species (ROS/NOS) could be achieved, detrimental side effects are likely, as these molecules regulate normal physiological processes. A more effective and targeted approach might be to augment the endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism only in the cells that suffer from oxidation. Here, we created several adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to deliver genes that combat oxidation. These vectors encode the transcription factors NRF2 and/or PGC1a, which regulate hundreds of genes that combat oxidation and other forms of stress, or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase, which directly detoxify ROS. We tested the effectiveness of this approach in 3 models of photoreceptor degeneration and in a nerve crush model. AAV-mediated delivery of NRF2 was more effective than SOD2 and catalase, while expression of PGC1a accelerated photoreceptor death. Since the NRF2-mediated neuroprotective effects extended to photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells, which are 2 very different types of neurons, these results suggest that this targeted approach may be broadly applicable to many diseases in which cells suffer from oxidative damage. PMID:25798616

  15. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel.

  16. Anisotropic constitutive model incorporating multiple damage mechanisms for multiscale simulation of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songyun; Scheider, Ingo; Bargmann, Swantje

    2016-09-01

    An anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in the framework of finite deformation to capture several damage mechanisms occurring in the microstructure of dental enamel, a hierarchical bio-composite. It provides the basis for a homogenization approach for an efficient multiscale (in this case: multiple hierarchy levels) investigation of the deformation and damage behavior. The influence of tension-compression asymmetry and fiber-matrix interaction on the nonlinear deformation behavior of dental enamel is studied by 3D micromechanical simulations under different loading conditions and fiber lengths. The complex deformation behavior and the characteristics and interaction of three damage mechanisms in the damage process of enamel are well captured. The proposed constitutive model incorporating anisotropic damage is applied to the first hierarchical level of dental enamel and validated by experimental results. The effect of the fiber orientation on the damage behavior and compressive strength is studied by comparing micro-pillar experiments of dental enamel at the first hierarchical level in multiple directions of fiber orientation. A very good agreement between computational and experimental results is found for the damage evolution process of dental enamel. PMID:27294283

  17. Mechanisms of damage to corals exposed to sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Lott, Christian; Polerecky, Lubos; Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Fabricius, Katharina E

    2012-06-12

    We investigated the mechanisms leading to rapid death of corals when exposed to runoff and resuspended sediments, postulating that the killing was microbially mediated. Microsensor measurements were conducted in mesocosm experiments and in naturally accumulated sediment on corals. In organic-rich, but not in organic-poor sediment, pH and oxygen started to decrease as soon as the sediment accumulated on the coral. Organic-rich sediments caused tissue degradation within 1 d, whereas organic-poor sediments had no effect after 6 d. In the harmful organic-rich sediment, hydrogen sulfide concentrations were low initially but increased progressively because of the degradation of coral mucus and dead tissue. Dark incubations of corals showed that separate exposures to darkness, anoxia, and low pH did not cause mortality within 4 d. However, the combination of anoxia and low pH led to colony death within 24 h. When hydrogen sulfide was added after 12 h of anoxia and low pH, colonies died after an additional 3 h. We suggest that sedimentation kills corals through microbial processes triggered by the organic matter in the sediments, namely respiration and presumably fermentation and desulfurylation of products from tissue degradation. First, increased microbial respiration results in reduced O(2) and pH, initiating tissue degradation. Subsequently, the hydrogen sulfide formed by bacterial decomposition of coral tissue and mucus diffuses to the neighboring tissues, accelerating the spread of colony mortality. Our data suggest that the organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a key process in the degradation of coral reefs exposed to terrestrial runoff.

  18. The impact of acute temperature stress on hemocytes of invasive and native mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus californianus): DNA damage, membrane integrity, apoptosis and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cui-Luan; Somero, George N

    2012-12-15

    We investigated the effects of acute heat stress and cold stress on cell viability, lysosome membrane stability, double- and single-stranded DNA breakage, and signaling mechanisms involved in cellular homeostasis and apoptosis in hemocytes of native and invasive mussels, Mytilus californianus and Mytilus galloprovincialis, respectively. Both heat stress (28, 32°C) and cold stress (2, 6°C) led to significant double- and single-stranded breaks in DNA. The type and extent of DNA damage were temperature and time dependent, as was caspase-3 activation, an indicator of apoptosis, which may occur in response to DNA damage. Hemocyte viability and lysosomal membrane stability decreased significantly under heat stress. Western blot analyses of hemocyte extracts with antibodies for proteins associated with cell signaling and stress responses [including members of the phospho-specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family c-JUN NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38-MAPK, and apoptosis executor caspase-3] revealed that heat and cold stress induced a time-dependent activation of JNK, p38-MAPK and caspase-3 and that these signaling and stress responses differed between species. The thermal limits for activation of cell signaling processes linked to the repair of stress-induced damage may help determine cellular thermal tolerance limits. Our results show similarities in responses to cold and heat stress and suggest causal linkages between levels of DNA damage at both extremes of temperature and downstream regulatory responses, including induction of apoptosis. Compared with M. californianus, M. galloprovincialis might have a wider temperature tolerance due to a lower amount of single- and double-stranded DNA damage, faster signaling activation and transduction, and stronger repair ability against temperature stress.

  19. Left ventricular muscle and fluid mechanics in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nucifora, Gaetano; Delgado, Victoria; Bertini, Matteo; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Van de Veire, Nico R; Ng, Arnold C T; Siebelink, Hans-Marc J; Schalij, Martin J; Holman, Eduard R; Sengupta, Partho P; Bax, Jeroen J

    2010-11-15

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling is characterized by the formation of intraventricular rotational bodies of fluid (termed "vortex rings") that optimize the efficiency of LV ejection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphology and dynamics of LV diastolic vortex ring formation early after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in relation to LV diastolic function and infarct size. A total of 94 patients with a first ST-segment elevation AMI (59 ± 11 years; 78% men) were included. All patients underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After 48 hours, the following examinations were performed: 2-dimensional echocardiography with speckle-tracking analysis to assess the LV systolic and diastolic function, the vortex formation time (VFT, a dimensionless index for characterizing vortex formation), and the LV untwisting rate; contrast echocardiography to assess LV vortex morphology; and myocardial contrast echocardiography to identify the infarct size. Patients with a large infarct size (≥ 3 LV segments) had a significantly lower VFT (p <0.001) and vortex sphericity index (p <0.001). On univariate analysis, several variables were significantly related to the VFT, including anterior AMI, LV end-systolic volume, LV ejection fraction, grade of diastolic dysfunction, LV untwisting rate, and infarct size. On multivariate analysis, the LV untwisting rate (β = -0.43, p <0.001) and infarct size (β = -0.33, p = 0.005) were independently associated with VFT. In conclusion, early in AMI, both the LV infarct size and the mechanical sequence of diastolic restoration play key roles in modulating the morphology and dynamics of early diastolic vortex ring formation.

  20. Purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) anthocyanins: preventive effect on acute and subacute alcoholic liver damage and dealcoholic effect.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongnan; Mu, Taihua; Liu, Xingli; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jingwang

    2014-03-19

    This study aimed to investigate the dealcoholic effect and preventive effect of anthocyanins from purple sweet potato (PSPAs) on acute and subacute alcoholic liver damage (ALD). Seven-week-old male inbred mice were grouped into five groups: control group (without PSPAs and ethanol treatments), model group (with ethanol treatment only), low-dose group (50 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), middle-dose group (125 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), and high-dose group (375 mg PSPAs/kg body weight), and the mice in all groups were administered intragastrically. Biochemical parameters of serum and liver were determined, and the histopathological changes of liver tissue were also analyzed. Results showed that all tested parameters were ameliorated after consumption of PSPAs. Therefore, PSPAs have preventive effect on acute and subacute ALD. It is suggested that PSPAs could be used as a supplementary reagent during prophylactic and curative managements of ALD.

  1. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation for the treatment of radioactivity‑induced acute skin damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Wu, Weizhen; Yang, Shunliang; Huang, Lianghu; Chen, Jin; Gong, Chungui; Fu, Zhichao; Zhang, Linlin; Tan, Jianming

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to observe the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the repair of acute skin damage caused by radiation. Rat bone marrow MSCs (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured in vitro. A rat model of radiation‑induced acute skin damage was established by irradiation of the hind legs of Sprague-Dawley rats using a linear accelerator (45 Gy). After irradiation, rats were randomly divided into two groups: BMSC group and control group. Rats in the BMSC group were treated with a tail vein injection of 2x106 BMSCs (1 ml) immediately after irradiation and a local multipoint injection of 2x106 BMSCs at the injured area two weeks later. Then the wound healing of each rat was observed. The expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1, stromal cell‑derived factor-1 (SDF‑1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the wounded tissues was determined by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that skin damage was milder in the BMSC group than in the control group. Moreover, the speed of healing in the BMSC group was better than that in the control group. In addition, the wound score, it was significantly lower in the BMSC group than in the control group (P<0.05). The expression of PGE2 and TGF‑β1 in the BMSC group was also significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), whereas the SDF‑1 expression was significantly higher in the BMSC group than that in the control group (P<0.05). BMSCs can effectively reduce inflammation and fibrosis in the wounded skin and promote the repair of acute radioactive skin injury. Thus, may be developed as a novel treatment for wound healing. PMID:26323987

  2. Triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise improves session volume load and reduces muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen P; Mabon, Tom; Pryde, Mitchell; Feebrey, Sarah; Cannon, Jack

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise would enhance muscular performance, produce a more favorable anabolic profile, and reduce biochemical markers of muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. Fifteen male strength-trained athletes completed two acute lower-body resistance exercise sessions to fatigue 7 days apart. After a 4-hour fast, participants consumed either a multinutrient supplement (Musashi 1-2-3 Step System, Notting Hill, Australia) (SUPP) or placebo (PLA) beverage preexercise (PRE), during (DUR), and immediately postexercise (IP). Session volume loads were calculated as kilograms × repetitions. Lower-body peak power was measured using unloaded repeated countermovement jumps, and blood samples were collected to assess biochemistry, serum hormones, and muscle damage markers at PRE, DUR, IP, 30 minutes postexercise (P30), and 24 hours postexercise (P24h). The SUPP demonstrated increased glucose concentrations at DUR and IP compared with at PRE (P < .01), whereas PLA demonstrated higher glucose at P30 compared with at PRE (P < .001). Session volume load was higher for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). Cortisol increased at DUR, IP, and P30 compared with at PRE in both treatments (P < .05); however, SUPP also displayed lower cortisol at P24h compared with at PRE and PLA (P < .01). The total testosterone response to exercise was higher for PLA compared with SUPP (P < .01); however, total creatine kinase and C-reactive protein responses to exercise were lower for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). These data indicate that although triphasic multinutrient supplementation did not produce a more favorable anabolic profile, it improved acute resistance exercise performance while attenuating muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

  3. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  4. Mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischemic stroke in pregnancy using the penumbra system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Sanjith; Shyamkumar, N K; Alexander, Sunithi; Babu, P Suresh; Prabhakar, A T; Moses, Vinu; Murthy, T V; Alexander, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Even though intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) is the standard of care in acute ischemic stroke, its use in pregnancy is not clearly defined. Mechanical thrombectomy devices can be an option; however, literature on the use of such mechanical devices in stroke in pregnancy is lacking. Here we describe two cases that developed acute embolic stroke during pregnancy who were successfully treated by mechanical clot retrieval using the Penumbra system 28 (Penumbra Inc., Alameda, California, USA). To the best of our knowledge, these are the only case reports on the use of the Penumbra device in pregnant patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27293343

  5. Fault damage zones in mechanically layered rocks: The effects of planar anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Ellis, Susan; Mandal, Nibir

    2015-08-01

    This study shows how inherited strength anisotropy influences damage localization at both the tip and wall regions of a fault or fracture. We performed analogue and numerical compression experiments on transversely isotropic models with single and multiple cuts of finite length, simulating the propagation of preexisting faults and cracks in layered rock. The stress-strain curves from the analogue experiments show a change in bulk yield behavior with fault inclination and anisotropy orientation with respect to the stress direction. Earlier isotropic models demonstrated a brittle (wing fracturing) to ductile (shear-zone formation) transition as the fault angle (α) to the principal compression direction increased. The experiments with anisotropic models show patterns of damage localization change dramatically with the orientation of transversely isotropic planes (θ, measured with respect to principal extension direction). Under layer-normal (θ = 0°) and layer-parallel compression (θ = 90°), preexisting faults undergo significant reactivation when 0 < α < 90°, and fault slip eventually leads to mechanical instabilities within the anisotropic layering, causing damage zones in the tip regions. For layer-normal (θ = 0°) compression, the damage processes involve intense extensional shear localization, whereas for layer-parallel compression, contractional shear localization and tensile opening result in characteristic internal shear-band structures. In contrast, for 0 < θ < 90°, the faults undergo little or no reactivation, irrespective of α. In this case, bulk compression leads to an interlayer slip-mediated global deformation. Obliquely anisotropic models thus produce weak or no fault damage zones. We also show that the fault-parallel principal damage localized at the tips can be coupled with transversely oriented, antithetic secondary damage in the wall regions. However, secondary damage develops predominantly when θ = 90°. Field examples of fault damage

  6. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  7. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration.

  8. Multiscale Approach to the Physics of Ion-Beam Therapy:. Thermo-Mechanical Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, A. V.; Yakubovich, A. V.; Surdutovich, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the multiscale approach towards the understanding of processes responsible for the radiation damage caused by energetic ions. This knowledge is important because it can be utilized in the ion-beam cancer therapy, which is one of the most advanced modern techniques to cure certain types of cancer. The central element of the multiscale approach is the theoretical evaluation and quantification of DNA damage within cell environment. We consider different pathways of DNA damage and focus on the the illustration of the thermo-mechanical effects caused by the propagation of ions through the biological environment and in particular on the possibility of the creation of the shock waves in the vicinity of the ion tracks. We demonstrate that at the initial stages after ion's passage the shock wave is so strong that it can contribute to the DNA damage due to large pressure gradients developed at the distances of a few nanometers from the ionic tracks. This novel mechanism of the DNA damage provides an important contribution to the cumulative bio-damage caused by low-energy secondary electrons, holes and free radicals.

  9. Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yongfeng; Li Hui

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

  10. Prediction of Size Effects in Notched Laminates Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camanho, D. P.; Maimi, P.; Davila, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a continuum damage model to predict strength and size effects in notched carbon-epoxy laminates. The effects of size and the development of a fracture process zone before final failure are identified in an experimental program. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting predictions of size effects are compared with alternative approaches: the point stress and the inherent flaw models, the Linear-Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach, and the strength of materials approach. The results indicate that the continuum damage model is the most accurate technique to predict size effects in composites. Furthermore, the continuum damage model does not require any calibration and it is applicable to general geometries and boundary conditions.

  11. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage: The role of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A H; Zariyantey, A H; Budin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines-including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α-exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  12. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  13. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  14. Inhibition of pancreatic oxidative damage by stilbene derivative dihydro-resveratrol: implication for treatment of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Siu Wai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Wang, Juan; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a natural stilbenoid possessing multifarious pharmacological benefits; however, when orally consumed, it is rapidly metabolised by colonic microflora and converted to dihydro-resveratrol. Thus, this microbial metabolite is of great therapeutic relevance. In the present study, upon the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol (10–50 mg/kg), the severity of acute pancreatitis in the cerulein-treated rats was significantly ameliorated as evidenced by decreased α-amylase activities in the plasma and lessened oedema formation in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, the generation of intracellular reactive oxidative products, including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, was accordingly reduced, so as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. While inhibiting the activities of NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase, the depletion of glutathione was considerably restored. Importantly, the attenuation of pancreatic oxidative damage by dihydro-resveratrol was associated with a down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappaB and phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase-serine/threonine kinase signalling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the solubility of dihydro-resveratrol was at least 5 times higher than trans-resveratrol whilst exhibiting a much lower cytotoxicity. Collectively, the current findings accentuate new mechanistic insight of dihydro-resveratrol in pancreatic oxidative damage, and advocate its therapeutic potential for the management of acute pancreatitis, particularly for patients unresponsive to trans-resveratrol due to the lack of proper microbial strains. PMID:26971398

  15. Acute exposure of uranyl nitrate causes lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage in brain and bone of Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Badri Narain; Mishra, Kaushala Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium (U) toxicity, recent studies have shown that U can cross the blood-brain barrier to accumulate in the brain. Uranyl nitrate (U-238)induced oxidative damage was investigated in brain and bone of Wistar rats after intraperitoneal injection of uranyl nitrate at acute doses either nephrotoxic (576 microg of U/kg body weight) or subnephrotoxic (144 microg U/kg body weight). The health effects of U administration at 576 microg of U/kg body weight were seen in terms of decrease in food intake and no gain in body weight compared to respective controls. These alterations were correlated with increased lipid peroxidation as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in rat brain and bone. However, at lower dosage of U (144 microg U/kg body weight), no significant lipid peroxidation was observed in brain and bone. Histological examination of U-treated (576 microg of U/kg body weight) rat brain tissues showed marked and diffuse cystic degeneration and a similar pattern in histological alterations was observed in kidneys in treated animals; whereas no significant histological change was observed in rat brains and kidney treated with a lower dose of U (144 microg U/kg body weight). It is concluded that administration of U at an acute nephrotoxic dose caused oxidative stress in brain and bone manifested as lipid peroxidation and histopathological damage.

  16. Development of an autonomous continuous monitoring system for mechanical damage detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, H.; Allen, D. W.; Farrar, C. R.; Worden, K.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of damage identification is to ascertain the existence of damage within a mechanical system. This study applies the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to examine if damage is present or not. In the original formulation of the SPRT, the distribution of data is assumed Gaussian and thresholds for monitoring are set focusing on the center mass properties of the distribution. Decision-making for damage identification is, however, often sensitive to the tails of the distribution and the tails may not necessarily be governed by Gaussian characteristics. By modeling the tails using the technique of Extreme Value Statistics (EVS), the thresholds for the SPRT may be set more accurately avoiding the unnecessary normality assumption. The proposed combination of the SPRT and the EVS is demonstrated using experimental data collected from a three-story frame structure with bolted connections. The primary goal of structural health monitoring is simply to identify from measured data if a structure has deviated from a normal operational condition. Particularly, vibration-based damage detection techniques assume that changes of the structure's integrity affect characteristics of the measured vibration signals enabling one to detect damage. Many current approaches to this problem involve methods that leave much to the interpretation of analysts. These methods may enable a trained eye to discern and locate damage but are not easily automated or objective. In an attempt to automate the damage identification procedure, the SPRT is employed for the decision-making procedure. The original SPRT assumes that the extracted features have a Gaussian distribution. This normality assumption, however, may place misleading constraints on the tails of the distribution. As the problem of damage detection specifically focuses attention on the tails, the assumption of normality is likely to lead the analysis astray. To overcome this difficulty, the performance of the SPRT

  17. Prediction of anisotropic behavior of nano/micro composite based on damage mechanics with cell modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dock-Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Moon-Ki; Choi, Jae-Boong; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Liu, Wing Kam

    2011-01-01

    New advanced composite materials have recently been of great interest. Especially, many researchers have studied on nano/micro composites based on matrix filled with nano-particles, nano-tubes, nano-wires and so forth, which have outstanding characteristics on thermal, electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical properties. Therefore, the need of numerical approach for design and development of the advanced materials has been recognized. In this paper, finite element analysis based on multi-resolution continuum theory is carried out to predict the anisotropic behavior of nano/micro composites based on damage mechanics with a cell modeling. The cell modeling systematically evaluates constitutive relationships from microstructure of the composite material. Effects of plastic anisotropy on deformation behavior and damage evolution of nano/micro composite are investigated by using Hill's 48 yield function and also compared with those obtained from Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman isotropic damage model based on von Mises yield function.

  18. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  19. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. PMID:23423911

  20. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  1. Coordination of DNA damage tolerance mechanisms with cell cycle progression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, A. John; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA damage tolerance (DDT) mechanisms allow cells to synthesize a new DNA strand when the template is damaged. Many mutations resulting from DNA damage in eukaryotes are generated during DDT when cells use the mutagenic translesion polymerases, Rev1 and Polζ, rather than mechanisms with higher fidelity. The coordination among DDT mechanisms is not well understood. We used live-cell imaging to study the function of DDT mechanisms throughout the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We report that checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay provides a cellular mechanism to ensure the completion of high fidelity DDT, largely by homology-directed repair (HDR). DDT by mutagenic polymerases is suppressed during the checkpoint delay by a mechanism dependent on Rad51 recombinase. When cells pass the G2/M checkpoint and can no longer delay mitosis, they completely lose the capacity for HDR and simultaneously exhibit a requirement for Rev1 and Polζ. Thus, DDT is coordinated with the checkpoint response so that the activity of mutagenic polymerases is confined to a vulnerable period of the cell cycle when checkpoint delay and HDR are not possible. PMID:26652183

  2. Coordination of DNA damage tolerance mechanisms with cell cycle progression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Callegari, A John; Kelly, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance (DDT) mechanisms allow cells to synthesize a new DNA strand when the template is damaged. Many mutations resulting from DNA damage in eukaryotes are generated during DDT when cells use the mutagenic translesion polymerases, Rev1 and Polζ, rather than mechanisms with higher fidelity. The coordination among DDT mechanisms is not well understood. We used live-cell imaging to study the function of DDT mechanisms throughout the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We report that checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay provides a cellular mechanism to ensure the completion of high fidelity DDT, largely by homology-directed repair (HDR). DDT by mutagenic polymerases is suppressed during the checkpoint delay by a mechanism dependent on Rad51 recombinase. When cells pass the G2/M checkpoint and can no longer delay mitosis, they completely lose the capacity for HDR and simultaneously exhibit a requirement for Rev1 and Polζ. Thus, DDT is coordinated with the checkpoint response so that the activity of mutagenic polymerases is confined to a vulnerable period of the cell cycle when checkpoint delay and HDR are not possible. PMID:26652183

  3. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  4. Phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by carbon nanotube agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Hoshikawa, Kazue; Hirose, Akihiko; Sato, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used in many fields, including energy, healthcare, environmental technology, materials, and electronics, the adverse effects of CNTs in the brain are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of CNTs on cultured microglia, as microglia are the first responders to foreign materials. We compared the effects of sonicated suspensions of 5 kinds of CNTs and their flow-through filtered with a 0.22 µm membrane filter on microglial viability. We found that sonicated suspensions caused microglial cell damage, but their flow-through did not. The number of microglial aggregates was well correlated with the extent of the damage. We also determined that the CNT agglomerates consisted of two groups: one was phagocytosed by microglia and caused microglial cell damage, and the other caused cell damage without phagocytosis. These results suggest that phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by CNT agglomerates and it is important to conduct studies about the relationships between physical properties of nanomaterial-agglomerates and cell damage. PMID:27432236

  5. Imperfect asymmetry: The mechanism governing asymmetric partitioning of damaged cellular components during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Sundararaghavan; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Aging is universally associated with organism-wide dysfunction and a decline in cellular fitness. From early development onwards, the efficiency of self-repair, energy production, and homeostasis all decrease. Due to the multiplicity of systems that undergo agingrelated decline, the mechanistic basis of organismal aging has been difficult to pinpoint. At the cellular level, however, recent work has provided important insight. Cellular aging is associated with the accumulation of several types of damage, in particular damage to the proteome and organelles. Groundbreaking studies have shown that replicative aging is the result of a rejuvenation mechanism that prevents the inheritance of damaged components during division, thereby confining the effects of aging to specific cells, while removing damage from others. Asymmetric inheritance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, as well as reduced mitochondria, has been shown in yeast. Until recently, however, it was not clear whether a similar mechanism operates in mammalian cells, which were thought to mostly divide symmetrically. Our group has recently shown that vimentin establishes mitotic polarity in immortalized mammalian cells, and mediates asymmetric partitioning of multiple factors through direct interaction. These findings prompt a provocative hypothesis: that intermediate filaments serve as asymmetric partitioning modules or “sponges” that, when expressed prior to mitosis, can “clean” emerging cells of the damage they have accumulated. PMID:25941938

  6. Dissecting the molecular mechanism of ionizing radiation-induced tissue damage in the feather follicle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liao, Chunyan; Chu, Qiqi; Zhou, Guixuan; Lin, Xiang; Li, Xiaobo; Lu, Haijie; Xu, Benhua; Yue, Zhicao

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a common therapeutic agent in cancer therapy. It damages normal tissue and causes side effects including dermatitis and mucositis. Here we use the feather follicle as a model to investigate the mechanism of IR-induced tissue damage, because any perturbation of feather growth will be clearly recorded in its regular yet complex morphology. We find that IR induces defects in feather formation in a dose-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed at 5 Gy. A transient, reversible perturbation of feather growth was induced at 10 Gy, leading to defects in the feather structure. This perturbation became irreversible at 20 Gy. Molecular and cellular analysis revealed P53 activation, DNA damage and repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the pathobiology. IR also induces patterning defects in feather formation, with disrupted branching morphogenesis. This perturbation is mediated by cytokine production and Stat1 activation, as manipulation of cytokine levels or ectopic Stat1 over-expression also led to irregular feather branching. Furthermore, AG-490, a chemical inhibitor of Stat1 signaling, can partially rescue IR-induced tissue damage. Our results suggest that the feather follicle could serve as a useful model to address the in vivo impact of the many mechanisms of IR-induced tissue damage.

  7. Conservation of clay-bearing stones: Understanding the swelling and damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangler, Timothy

    Certain sandstones used in historic monuments and decorative building facades may contain clays that swell upon wetting, producing differential strains during wetting and drying cycles and leading to the development of stresses that are on the order of the strength of the stone. This leads to damage observed in the field as buckling and surface delamination, damage expected to occur during a wetting cycle as a thin wet layer of stone goes into compression relative to the bulk of the dry stone. Clays swell due to hydration of counterbalancing cations that exist between the negatively charged aluminosilicate layers that make up a clay particle. This swelling has been observed to occur over two distinct ranges: short-range, discrete intracrystalline swelling, and long-range, continuous, osmotic swelling. Additionally, it has been shown that swelling can be reduced, but not eliminated, by exchanging the counterbalancing cations in the interlayer with alpha,o diaminoalkanes. In order to mitigate damage due to swelling, it is important to understand the mechanism by which clays swell, the mechanism by which alpha,o diaminoalkanes inhibit swelling, and the mechanism by which damage occurs on a macroscopic level. In this work, it is shown that for the sandstones studied, clays swell almost entirely via intracrystalline swelling and that alpha,o diaminoalkanes inhibit swelling via ion exchange and subsequently reduced rehydration. A buckling damage mechanism is verified experimentally and a flaw propagation mechanism in which flaws can grow to a critical buckling size is explored. An understanding of the development of stresses during wetting is explored via a novel warping experiment and swelling pressure experiments.

  8. Mechanism of DNA damage by cadmium and interplay of antioxidant enzymes and agents.

    PubMed

    Badisa, Veera L D; Latinwo, Lekan M; Odewumi, Caroline O; Ikediobi, Christopher O; Badisa, Ramesh B; Ayuk-Takem, Lambert T; Nwoga, Jude; West, John

    2007-04-01

    Cadmium is an environmental toxicant, which causes cancer in different organs. It was found that it damages DNA in the various tissues and cultured cell lines. To investigate the mechanism of DNA damage, we have studied the effect of cadmium-induced DNA damage in plasmid pBR322 DNA, and the possible ameliorative effects of antioxidative agents under in vitro conditions. It was observed that cadmium alone did not cause DNA damage. However, it caused DNA damage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, in a dose dependent manner, because of production of hydroxyl radicals. Findings from this study show the conversion of covalently closed circular double-stranded pBR 322 DNA to the open circular and linear forms of DNA when treated with 10 muM cadmium and various concentrations of H(2)O(2). The conversion was due to nicking in DNA strands. The observed rate of DNA strand breakage was dependent on H(2)O(2) concentration, temperature, and time. Metallothionein I failed to prevent cadmium-induced DNA nicking in the presence of H(2)O(2). Of the two antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) studied, only catalase conferred significant (50-60%) protection. EDTA and DMSO exhibited protection similar to catalase, while mannitol showed only about 20% protection against DNA damage. Ethyl alcohol failed to ameliorate cadmium-induced DNA strands break. From this study, it is plausible to infer that cadmium in the presence of hydrogen peroxide causes DNA damage probably by the formation of hydroxyl ions. These results may indicate that cadmium in vivo could play a major role in the DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. PMID:17366568

  9. Compensated overexpression of procollagens alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) following perilla mint ketone-induced acute pulmonary damage in horses.

    PubMed

    Schmidbauer, S-M; Venner, M; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Drommer, W; Gruber, A D

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease with chronic fibrosis is a frequent cause of reduced performance in horses. The aim of this study was to establish a model of acute alveolar damage and interstitial lung disease in horses that could be used to monitor the histopathological lesions and changes in expression levels of genes relevant to pulmonary fibrosis. Six adult horses were given a single intravenous injection (6 mg per kg body weight) of perilla mint ketone (PMK). Transthoracic lung biopsy samples (1 x 0.2 x 0.2 cm) were collected before and after (days 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25 and 29) the administration of PMK. Light and electron microscopy revealed severe acute alveolar damage (days 1 to 4), proliferation of type II pneumocytes (days 4 to 11) and finally complete healing at about day 18. However, unexpectedly severe clinical signs necessitated euthanasia in two horses on days 9 and 11. The expression levels of the collagen genes COL1AI and COL3AI as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta were examined in the biopsy samples by reverse transcription-real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. COL1AI and COL3AI gene expressions were upregulated (3- and 17-fold, respectively) between days 1 and 29 in all six horses, whereas TGF-beta was upregulated in two horses (2- and 4-fold, respectively), between days 4 and 18. Although the gene expression analyses indicated a strong activation of the pro-fibrotic pathway, no interstitial fibrosis was seen in any horse. A complete necropsy performed on day 60 revealed complete recovery of the lungs of the four surviving horses, with no evidence of fibrosis. Unidentified compensatory mechanisms may have prevented pulmonary fibrosis, despite strong upregulation of pro-fibrotic genes.

  10. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  11. Gastroprotective effect of 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate against acute gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2016-05-01

    Gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol is a serious medical problem. Recent evidences suggest that reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators play a key role in the destruction of gastric mucosa. The present study was aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effect of MESNA (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were orally pretreated with vehicle or MESNA and then treated with acidified ethanol to induce gastric mucosal damage. One hour after ethanol ingestion mice were euthanized and stomach samples were collected for biochemical analysis. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa showed that pretreatment with MESNA attenuated gastric lesions induced by ethanol. Administration of MESNA significantly increased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the gastric tissues. In addition, MESNA markedly reduced ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels. These findings suggest that the thiol-containing compound MESNA is able to decrease alcohol-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in the gastric tissue. It seems that MESNA may have a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. PMID:26967742

  12. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  13. Dexrazoxane Diminishes Doxorubicin-Induced Acute Ovarian Damage and Preserves Ovarian Function and Fecundity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ringelstetter, Ashley; Khatib, Hasan; Abbott, David H.; Salih, Sana M.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer treatment utilizing multiple chemotherapies have dramatically increased cancer survivorship. Female cancer survivors treated with doxorubicin (DXR) chemotherapy often suffer from an acute impairment of ovarian function, which can persist as long-term, permanent ovarian insufficiency. Dexrazoxane (Dexra) pretreatment reduces DXR-induced insult in the heart, and protects in vitro cultured murine and non-human primate ovaries, demonstrating a drug-based shield to prevent DXR insult. The present study tested the ability of Dexra pretreatment to mitigate acute DXR chemotherapy ovarian toxicity in mice through the first 24 hours post-treatment, and improve subsequent long-term fertility throughout the reproductive lifespan. Adolescent CD-1 mice were treated with Dexra 1 hour prior to DXR treatment in a 1:1 mg or 10:1 mg Dexra:DXR ratio. During the acute injury period (2–24 hours post-injection), Dexra pretreatment at a 1:1 mg ratio decreased the extent of double strand DNA breaks, diminished γH2FAX activation, and reduced subsequent follicular cellular demise caused by DXR. In fertility and fecundity studies, dams pretreated with either Dexra:DXR dose ratio exhibited litter sizes larger than DXR-treated dams, and mice treated with a 1:1 mg Dexra:DXR ratio delivered pups with birth weights greater than DXR-treated females. While DXR significantly increased the “infertility index” (quantifying the percentage of dams failing to achieve pregnancy) through 6 gestations following treatment, Dexra pretreatment significantly reduced the infertility index following DXR treatment, improving fecundity. Low dose Dexra not only protected the ovaries, but also bestowed a considerable survival advantage following exposure to DXR chemotherapy. Mouse survivorship increased from 25% post-DXR treatment to over 80% with Dexra pretreatment. These data demonstrate that Dexra provides acute ovarian protection from DXR toxicity, improving reproductive health in a mouse

  14. Oral Supplementation of Glucosamine Fails to Alleviate Acute Kidney Injury in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Damage.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Marc; Späth, Martin Richard; Denzel, Martin S; Göbel, Heike; Kubacki, Torsten; Hoyer, Karla Johanna Ruth; Hinze, Yvonne; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Antebi, Adam; Burst, Volker; Müller, Roman-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in the ageing population. Proteotoxic stress response pathways have been suggested to contribute to the development of acute renal injury. Recent evidence suggests that increased synthesis of N-glycan precursors in the hexosamine pathway as well as feeding of animals with aminosugars produced in the hexosamine pathway may increase stress resistance through reducing proteotoxic stress and alleviate pathology in model organisms. As feeding of the hexosamine pathway metabolite glucosamine to aged mice increased their life expectancy we tested whether supplementation of this aminosugar may also protect mice from acute kidney injury after renal ischemia and reperfusion. Animals were fed for 4 weeks ad libitum with standard chow or standard chow supplemented with 0.5% N-acetylglucosamine. Preconditioning with caloric restriction for four weeks prior to surgery served as a positive control for protective dietary effects. Whereas caloric restriction demonstrated the known protective effect both on renal function as well as survival in the treated animals, glucosamine supplementation failed to promote any protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury. These data show that although hexosamine pathway metabolites have a proven role in enhancing protein quality control and survival in model organisms oral glucosamine supplementation at moderate doses that would be amenable to humans does not promote protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury of the kidney. PMID:27557097

  15. Oral Supplementation of Glucosamine Fails to Alleviate Acute Kidney Injury in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Marc; Späth, Martin Richard; Denzel, Martin S.; Göbel, Heike; Kubacki, Torsten; Hoyer, Karla Johanna Ruth; Hinze, Yvonne; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Antebi, Adam; Burst, Volker; Müller, Roman-Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in the ageing population. Proteotoxic stress response pathways have been suggested to contribute to the development of acute renal injury. Recent evidence suggests that increased synthesis of N-glycan precursors in the hexosamine pathway as well as feeding of animals with aminosugars produced in the hexosamine pathway may increase stress resistance through reducing proteotoxic stress and alleviate pathology in model organisms. As feeding of the hexosamine pathway metabolite glucosamine to aged mice increased their life expectancy we tested whether supplementation of this aminosugar may also protect mice from acute kidney injury after renal ischemia and reperfusion. Animals were fed for 4 weeks ad libitum with standard chow or standard chow supplemented with 0.5% N-acetylglucosamine. Preconditioning with caloric restriction for four weeks prior to surgery served as a positive control for protective dietary effects. Whereas caloric restriction demonstrated the known protective effect both on renal function as well as survival in the treated animals, glucosamine supplementation failed to promote any protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury. These data show that although hexosamine pathway metabolites have a proven role in enhancing protein quality control and survival in model organisms oral glucosamine supplementation at moderate doses that would be amenable to humans does not promote protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury of the kidney. PMID:27557097

  16. Common micro-RNA signature in skeletal muscle damage and regeneration induced by Duchenne muscular dystrophy and acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Greco, Simona; De Simone, Marco; Colussi, Claudia; Zaccagnini, Germana; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Pescatori, Mario; Cardani, Rosanna; Perbellini, Riccardo; Isaia, Eleonora; Sale, Patrizio; Meola, Giovanni; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo; Martelli, Fabio

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this work was to identify micro-RNAs (miRNAs) involved in the pathological pathways activated in skeletal muscle damage and regeneration by both dystrophin absence and acute ischemia. Eleven miRNAs were deregulated both in MDX mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients (DMD signature). Therapeutic interventions ameliorating the mdx-phenotype rescued DMD-signature alterations. The significance of DMD-signature changes was characterized using a damage/regeneration mouse model of hind-limb ischemia and newborn mice. According to their expression, DMD-signature miRNAs were divided into 3 classes. 1) Regeneration miRNAs, miR-31, miR-34c, miR-206, miR-335, miR-449, and miR-494, which were induced in MDX mice and in DMD patients, but also in newborn mice and in newly formed myofibers during postischemic regeneration. Notably, miR-206, miR-34c, and miR-335 were up-regulated following myoblast differentiation in vitro. 2) Degenerative-miRNAs, miR-1, miR-29c, and miR-135a, that were down-modulated in MDX mice, in DMD patients, in the degenerative phase of the ischemia response, and in newborn mice. Their down-modulation was linked to myofiber loss and fibrosis. 3) Inflammatory miRNAs, miR-222 and miR-223, which were expressed in damaged muscle areas, and their expression correlated with the presence of infiltrating inflammatory cells. These findings show an important role of miRNAs in physiopathological pathways regulating muscle response to damage and regeneration.

  17. Effect of technique and timing of tracheostomy in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury undergoing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ganuza, Javier Romero; Forcada, Angel Garcia; Gambarrutta, Claudia; De La Lastra Buigues, Elena Diez; Gonzalez, Victoria Eugenia Merlo; Fuentes, Fátima Paz; Luciani, Alejandro A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of timing and techniques of tracheostomy on morbidity, mortality, and the burden of resources in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) undergoing mechanical ventilation. Design Review of a prospectively collected database. Setting Intensive and intermediate care units of a monographic hospital for the treatment of SCI. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) during their first inpatient rehabilitation for cervical and thoracic traumatic SCI. A total of 323 patients were included: 297 required mechanical ventilation and 215 underwent tracheostomy. Outcome measures Demographic data, data relevant to the patients’ neurological injuries (level and grade of spinal cord damage), tracheostomy technique and timing, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay at ICU, incidence of pneumonia, incidence of perioperative and early postoperative complications, and mortality. Results Early tracheostomy (<7 days after orotracheal intubation) tracheostomy was performed in 101 patients (47%) and late (≥7 days) in 114 (53%). Surgical tracheostomy was employed in 119 cases (55%) and percutaneous tracheostomy in 96 (45%). There were 61 complications in 53 patients related to all tracheostomy procedures. Two were qualified as serious (tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal abscess). Other complications were mild. Bleeding was moderate in one case (late, percutaneous tracheostomy). Postoperative infection rate was low. Mortality of all causes was also low. Conclusion Early tracheostomy may have favorable effects in patients with acute traumatic SC. Both techniques, percutaneous and surgical tracheostomy, can be performed safely in the ICU. PMID:21528630

  18. Biomarkers for oxidative stress in acute lung injury induced in rabbits submitted to different strategies of mechanical ventilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative damage has been said to play an important role in pulmonary injury, which is associated with the development and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to identify biomarkers to determine the oxidative stress in an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) using ...

  19. Effects of acute resistance exercise on muscle damage and perceptual measures between men who are lean and obese.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Brett A; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Volek, Jeff S; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Kupchak, Brian R; Flanagan, Shawn D; Denegar, Craig R; Kraemer, William J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess indices of muscle damage and psychological stress between young, untrained, lean, and obese men. Using a between-subject design, 19 young men (9 lean men [age, 20.1 ± 2.1 years; body mass, 71.7 ± 5.8 kg; height, 177.8 ± 8.7 cm; body fat (BF), 14.7 ± 3.5%], 5 World Health Organization [WHO] class 1 obese men [age, 21.6 ± 2.5 years; body mass, 97.8 ± 8.6 kg; height, 176.3 ± 3.7 cm; BF, 34.7 ± 3.0%], and 5 WHO class 2 or 3 men [age, 20.0 ± 1.4 years; body mass, 120.8 ± 10.5 kg; height, 177.7 ± 5.2 cm; BF, 40.5 ± 5.8%]) volunteered and completed an acute resistance exercise (RE) protocol (6 exercises performed for 3 sets of 10 repetitions at an intensity of 85-95% of a 10 repetition maximum). Plasma myoglobin and serum creatine kinase were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and in recovery (at +110 minutes and +24 hours). Perceptual measures including rating of perceived exertion, pain and soreness, fatigue, and general soreness were assessed at different time points (during exercise for rating of perceived exertion, and for the fatigue and soreness measures before, immediately after, and at 24 hours of recovery from exercise). The primary findings of this investigation were that lean and obese, sedentary, young men do not significantly differ from each other in terms of indirect, humoral measures of muscle damage, or perceptual scales in response to a moderate-intensity acute RE bout, despite using significantly more exercise volume relative to fat mass (FM). We conclude that excess FM during daily activities of life provides a protective effect for muscle damage. When strength training individuals who are obese, practitioners should be aware of how excess FM affects muscle damage and total volume. But these considerations do not preclude individuals who are obese from using well-designed RE workouts which use free-weight, multijoint movements that stimulate all of the major muscle groups.

  20. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  1. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described.

  2. Mechanisms of the acute effects of inhaled ozone in humans.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Philip A

    2016-12-01

    Ambient air ozone (O3) is generated photochemically from oxides of nitrogen and volatile hydrocarbons. Inhaled O3 causes remarkably reversible acute lung function changes and inflammation. Approximately 80% of inhaled O3 is deposited on the airways. O3 reacts rapidly with CC double bonds in hydrophobic airway and alveolar surfactant-associated phospholipids and cholesterol. Resultant primary ozonides further react to generate bioactive hydrophilic products that also initiate lipid peroxidation leading to eicosanoids and isoprostanes of varying electrophilicity. Airway surface liquid ascorbate and urate also scavenge O3. Thus, inhaled O3 may not interact directly with epithelial cells. Acute O3-induced lung function changes are dominated by involuntary inhibition of inspiration (rather than bronchoconstriction), mediated by stimulation of intraepithelial nociceptive vagal C-fibers via activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 cation channels by electrophile (e.g., 4-oxo-nonenal) adduction of TRPA1 thiolates enhanced by PGE2-stimulated sensitization. Acute O3-induced neutrophilic airways inflammation develops more slowly than the lung function changes. Surface macrophages and epithelial cells are involved in the activation of epithelial NFkB and generation of proinflammatory mediators such as IL-6, IL-8, TNFa, IL-1b, ICAM-1, E-selectin and PGE2. O3-induced partial depolymerization of hyaluronic acid and the release of peroxiredoxin-1 activate macrophage TLR4 while oxidative epithelial cell release of EGFR ligands such as TGFa or EGFR transactivation by activated Src may also be involved. The ability of lipid ozonation to generate potent electrophiles also provides pathways for Nrf2 activation and inhibition of canonical NFkB activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. PMID:27451958

  3. Acute oxidant damage promoted on cancer cells by amitriptyline in comparison with some common chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio; Bautista-Ferrufino, María Rosa; Carmona-López, María Inés; Illanes, Matilde; Ríos, María José; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Alcudia, Ana; Navas, Plácido; de Miguel, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative therapy is a relatively new anticancer strategy based on the induction of high levels of oxidative stress, achieved by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or by depleting the protective antioxidant machinery of tumor cells. We focused our investigations on the antitumoral potential of amitriptyline in three human tumor cell lines: H460 (lung cancer), HeLa (cervical cancer), and HepG2 (hepatoma); comparing the cytotoxic effect of amitriptyline with three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs: camptothecin, doxorubicin, and methotrexate. We evaluated apoptosis, ROS production, mitochondrial mass and activity, and antioxidant defenses of tumor cells. Our results show that amitriptyline produces the highest cellular damage, inducing high levels of ROS followed by irreversible serious mitochondrial damage. Interestingly, an unexpected decrease in antioxidant machinery was observed only for amitriptyline. In conclusion, based on the capacity of generating ROS and inhibiting antioxidants in tumor cells, amitriptyline emerges as a promising new drug to be tested for anticancer therapy.

  4. Damage Mechanisms of Filled Siloxanes for Predictive Multiscale Modeling of Aging Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, B; Maxwell, R; de Teresa, S; Dinh, L; Gee, R

    2002-04-02

    Predictions of component performance versus lifetime are often risky for complex materials in which there may be many underlying aging or degradation mechanisms. In order to develop more accurate predictive models for silica-filled siloxane components, we are studying damage mechanisms over a broad range of size domains, linked together through several modeling efforts. Atomistic and molecular dynamic modeling has elucidated the chemistry of the silica filler to polymer interaction, as this interaction plays a key role in this material's aging behavior. This modeling work has been supported by experimental data on the removal of water from the silica surface, the effect of the surrounding polymer on this desiccation, and on the subsequent change in the mechanical properties of the system. Solid State NMR efforts have characterized the evolution of the polymer and filler dynamics as the material is damaged through irradiation or desiccation. These damage signatures have been confirmed by direct measurements of changes in polymer crosslink density and filler interaction as measured by solvent swelling, and by mechanical property tests. Data from the changes at these molecular levels are simultaneously feeding the development of age-aware constitutive models for polymer behavior. In addition, the microstructure of the foam, including under load, has been determined by Computed Tomography, and this data is being introduced into Finite Element Analysis codes to allow component level models. All of these techniques are directed towards the incorporation of molecular and microstructural aging signatures into predictive models for overall component performance.

  5. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  6. Application of the damage mechanics to the description of multiple cracks development in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    Oil and gas shales are one of the most perspective sources of hydrocarbons. Damage processes are in the focus of any technology of oil shales development because of their extremely low permeability. As a rule the aim of stimulation treatments is to make a system of multiple cracks. Real rock masses are almost heterogeneous. Strength of layered rocks like shales has anisotropic properties. Damage mechanics gives one of the natural ways of description of multiple cracks development. The phenomenological model of multiple cracks evolution in porous media based on general principles of thermodynamics [Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y., 2009] was generalized to the case of layered rocks. This model takes into account elastic domain existence, dependency of elastic domain on orientation of axis of anisotropy, reduction of elasticity modulus in active process, permeability and porosity change. The model involves latent energy of damage and elastic energy release due to damage evolution. In the report some coupled problems of damage and filtration are discussed. This work was supported by Russian President Grant for Young Scientists MK-7249.2013.5. Kondaurov V.I., Izvekov O.Y. A Model of Saturated Porous Media with an Elastic Brittle Skeleton // Proc. of the 4-th Biot Conference on Poromechanics, POROMECHANICS IV. - EStech Publications, Inc., PA,USA, 2009.

  7. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year`s work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA`s hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year`s work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation.

  8. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view.

  9. Mechanical blood trauma in assisted circulation: sublethal RBC damage preceding hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Olia, Salim E; Maul, Timothy M; Antaki, James F; Kameneva, Marina V

    2016-06-15

    After many decades of improvements in mechanical circulatory assist devices (CADs), blood damage remains a serious problem during support contributing to variety of adverse events, and consequently affecting patient survival and quality of life. The mechanisms of cumulative cell damage in continuous-flow blood pumps are still not fully understood despite numerous in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies of blood trauma. Previous investigations have almost exclusively focused on lethal blood damage, namely hemolysis, which is typically negligible during normal operation of current generation CADs. The measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (plfHb) concentration to characterize hemolysis is straightforward, however sublethal trauma is more difficult to detect and quantify since no simple direct test exists. Similarly, while multiple studies have focused on thrombosis within blood pumps and accessories, sublethal blood trauma and its sequelae have yet to be adequately documented or characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding of sublethal trauma to red blood cells (RBCs) produced by exposure of blood to flow parameters and conditions similar to those within CADs. It also suggests potential strategies to reduce and/or prevent RBC sublethal damage in a clinically-relevant context, and encourages new research into this relatively uncharted territory.

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the {open_quotes}Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNA{close_quotes}.

  11. Acute formation of lumbar discal cyst: what is the mechanism?

    PubMed

    Aydin, S; Kucukyuruk, B; Yildirim, H; Abuzayed, B; Bozkus, H; Vural, M

    2010-12-01

    Lumbar discal cysts are extremely rare pathologies, with only few reports describing these lesions in the literature. Moreover, their definite pathogenesis is still unknown, with proposed theories based on radialogic and histologic findings. In this report, the authors present an acute formation of a discal cyst, which is reported for the first time. Also, we center our case on the discussion of the possible pathogenesis. Also, this is the first case of discal cyst reported in Turkey. A 67-year-old woman, whose complaints, and clinical and radiological findings demonstrated lumbar disc herniation with acute Modic 1 degererative changes of the adjacent end plates of L3-4 level. After medical and physical therapies, follow-up lumbar MRI has been taken to demonstrate a discal cyst formation on the adjacent intervertebral disc, showed cranially migrated cyst superior posterior on herniated disc, in 2 weeks period. The patient was treated by microsurgical resection of the cyst, and her complaints resolved completely. PMID:21423085

  12. Damage evolution and mechanical response of cross-ply ceramic composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Weitsman, Y.; Yu, N.; Zhu, H.

    1995-12-31

    A mechanistic model for the damage evolution and mechanical response of cross-ply ceramic composite laminates under monotonically increasing uniaxial tension is presented. The model accounts for a variety of damage mechanisms evolving in cross-ply ceramic composite laminates, such as fiber-bridged matrix cracks in 0{degrees}-plies, transversely oriented matrix cracks in 90{degrees}-plies, and slips at 0{degrees}/90{degrees} ply interfaces as well as at the fiber/matrix interfaces. Energy criteria are developed to determine the creation and progression of matrix cracks and slip zones. The model predicts that the crack density in 0{degrees}-plies becomes higher than that within the 90{degrees}-plies as the applied load is incrementally increased, which agrees with the experimental observation. It is also shown that the model provides a reasonable prediction for the nonlinear stress-strain behavior of crossply SiC/CAS ceramic composites.

  13. Molecular mechanism of photosensitization. XI. Membrane damage and DNA cleavage photoinduced by enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Sortino, S; Condorelli, G; De Guidi, G; Giuffrida, S

    1998-11-01

    The photosensitizing activity of enoxacin, 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)- 1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxilic acid (ENX), toward membranes and DNA has been studied, taking into account human erythrocyte photohemolysis, unilamellar liposome alterations and plasmid pBR322 DNA photocleavage. Hydroxyl radicals and an aromatic carbene generated from ENX photodefluorination seem to be the active intermediates involved in the photosensitization process. The steady-state photolysis products do not participate in the process. The mechanism of photosensitization responsible for the membrane damage depends on the oxygen concentration and follows a different path with respect to that operative for DNA cleavage. Between oxygenated radicals, the hydroxyl seems the species mainly responsible for membrane damage, whereas DNA cleavage is mainly produced by the carbene intermediate. A molecular mechanism of the photosensitization induced by ENX is proposed.

  14. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years’ experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance. PMID:27111088

  15. Myocardial changes in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Ultrastructural evidence of immune damage and the role of microangiopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Andrade, S. G.; Correa, R.; Sadigursky, M.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1994-01-01

    Histological and ultrastructural studies of the hearts of dogs sacrificed 18 to 26 days after intraperitoneal inoculation with 4 x 10(5) blood forms of the 12 SF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi/kg of body weight disclosed myocarditis characterized by parasitic invasion of some myocytes, damage and necrosis of nonparasitized myocytes, and interstitial infiltration by mononuclear cells. Nonparasitized myocytes showed alterations ranging from mild edema to severe myocytolysis. These changes often were accompanied by contacts of myocytes with lymphocytes (both granular and agranular) and macrophages. These contacts were characterized by focal loss of the myocyte basement membrane and close approximation of the plasma membranes of the two cells. Contacts between lymphocytes and capillary endothelial cells were also frequent. Platelet aggregates and fibrin microthrombi were observed in some capillaries. Our findings suggest that immune effector cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the myocyte damage and the microangiopathy in acute Chagas' disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8203476

  16. Cgnz1 allele confers kidney resistance to damage preventing progression of immune complex-mediated acute lupus glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yan; Jiang, Chao; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Bagavant, Harini; Dai, Chao; Wang, Hongyang; Kannapell, Carol C; Cathro, Helen P; Gaskin, Felicia; Fu, Shu Man

    2013-10-21

    Cgnz1 and Agnz1 on the distal region of mouse chromosome 1 are associated with chronic glomerulonephritis (cGN) and acute GN (aGN). NZM2328.Lc1R27 (R27) was generated by introgressing a C57L/J region where Cgnz1 is located to NZM2328. R27 female mice developed aGN mediated by immune complex (IC) deposition and complement activation without progression to cGN with severe proteinuria. End stage renal disease (ESRD) was not seen in R27 mice as old as 15 mo. Thus, aGN and cGN are under separate genetic control, and IC-mediated proliferative GN need not progress to cGN and ESRD. NZM2328 and R27 female mice have comparable immune and inflammatory parameters. In contrast to NZM2328, R27 mice were resistant to sheep anti-mouse GBM serum-induced nephritis, supporting the hypothesis that aGN is mediated by autoimmunity and resistance to the development of cGN is mediated by end organ resistance to damage. Thus, autoimmunity should be considered distinct from end organ damage. The Cgnz1 region has been mapped to a 1.34 MB region with 45 genes. Nine candidate genes were identified. Clinical relevance of these observations is supported by case studies. Clinical implications and the significance to human lupus and other diseases are presented.

  17. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  18. Tertiary mechanisms of brain damage: a new hope for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral palsy is caused by injury or developmental disturbances to the immature brain and leads to substantial motor, cognitive, and learning deficits. In addition to developmental disruption associated with the initial insult to the immature brain, injury processes can persist for many months or years. We suggest that these tertiary mechanisms of damage might include persistent inflammation and epigenetic changes. We propose that these processes are implicit in prevention of endogenous repair and regeneration and predispose patients to development of future cognitive dysfunction and sensitisation to further injury. We suggest that treatment of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be possible by various means, including preventing the repressive effects of microglia and astrocyte over-activation, recapitulating developmentally permissive epigenetic conditions, and using cell therapies to stimulate repair and regeneration Recognition of tertiary mechanisms of damage might be the first step in a complex translational task to tailor safe and effective therapies that can be used to treat the already developmentally disrupted brain long after an insult.

  19. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: an update on mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Thangaraj, Kavitha R; Goel, Ashish; Eapen, C E; Balasubramanian, K A; Ramachandran, Anup

    2011-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), characterized by hepatic microvesicular steatosis, is a sudden catastrophic illness occurring almost exclusively in the third trimester of pregnancy. Defective fatty acid oxidation in the fetus has been shown to be associated with this disease. Since the placenta has the same genetic makeup as the fetus and as AFLP patients generally recover following delivery, we hypothesized that the placenta might be involved in pathogenesis of this disease. In an animal model of hepatic microvesicular steatosis (using sodium valproate), we found that microvesicular steatosis results in mitochondrial structural alterations and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles of the liver. In placentas from patients with AFLP, we observed placental mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles. In addition, defective placental fatty acid oxidation results in accumulation of toxic mediators such as arachidonic acid. Escape of these mediators into the maternal circulation might affect the maternal liver resulting in microvesicular steatosis.

  20. The evaluation of damage mechanism of unreinforced masonry buildings after Van (2011) and Elazig (2010) Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, D.; Aydin, E.; Öztürk, B.

    2015-07-01

    On March 8th, 2010 Karakocan-Elazig earthquake of magnitude 6.0 occurred at a region where masonry and adobe construction is very common. Karakocan-Elazig is located in a high seismicity region on Eastern Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). Due to the earthquake, 42 people were killed and 14’113 buildings were damaged. Another city, Van located at South east of Turkey is hit by earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on October 23rd, 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanli village) and M = 5.6 on November 9th, 2011 with an epicenter near the town of Edremit, south of Van and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 10’000 buildings were seriously damaged. There are many traditional types of structures existing in the region hit by earthquakes (both Van and Elazig). These buildings were built as adobe, unreinforced masonry or mixed type. These types of buildings are very common in rural areas (especially south and east) of Turkey because of easy workmanship and cheap construction cost. Many of those traditional type structures experienced serious damages. The use of masonry is very common in some of the world's most hazard-prone regions, such as in Latin America, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia, the Middle East, and southern Europe. Based on damage and failure mechanism of those buildings, the parameters affecting the seismic performance of those traditional buildings are analyzed in this paper. The foundation type, soil conditions, production method of the masonry blocks, construction method, the geometry of the masonry walls, workmanship quality, existence of wooden beams, type of roof, mortar between adobe blocks are studied in order to understand the reason of damage for these types of buildings.

  1. Protective Role of Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 against Acute Oxidative Stress-Induced Pancreatic β -Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Wang, Huihui; Yang, Bei; Zhao, Rui; Lu, Chunwei; Liu, Zhiyuan; Hou, Yongyong; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qiang; Qu, Weidong; Pi, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that occurs in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a master regulator in the cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. The present study found that MIN6 β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) and islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout mice expressed substantially reduced levels of antioxidant enzymes in response to a variety of stressors. In scramble MIN6 cells or wild-type islets, acute exposure to oxidative stressors, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, resulted in cell damage as determined by decrease in cell viability, reduced ATP content, morphology changes of islets, and/or alterations of apoptotic biomarkers in a concentration- and/or time-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 sensitized MIN6 cells or islets to the damage. In addition, pretreatment of MIN6 β-cells with NRF2 activators, including CDDO-Im, dimethyl fumarate (DMF), and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), protected the cells from high levels of H2O2-induced cell damage. Given that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and persistent activation of NRF2 blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling and GSIS, the present study highlights the distinct roles that NRF2 may play in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that occurs in different stages of diabetes. PMID:25949772

  2. Acute toxicity of heavy metals to Tetrahymena in an in vitro experiment and envelope damage study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Li, Xi; Lu, Yang; Wu, Chunyun; Fang, Tingting; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Chaocan; Liang, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The toxicity of Cr³⁺, Cu²⁺ and Cd²⁺ to Tetrahymena growth metabolism was studied by microcalorimetry at 28°C, and the growth constant (k), peak time (T) and generation times (T(G)) were calculated. The metal ion concentrations that resulted in 50% inhibition (IC₅₀) of population growth were obtained through the dynamic parameters. The results indicated that the order of toxicity was Cd²⁺> Cr³⁺> Cu²⁺. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry results suggested that the metal ions affected the permeability of the cell membrane. Observations of the Cd-exposed organisms by scanning electron microscopy revealed damage to the cell membrane in the form of an altered surface appearance. The cells suffered serious damage after sufficient acting time. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that amide groups and PO₂⁻ of the phospholipid phospho-diester, both located in the hydrophobic end of the outer layer of the cell membrane, were most readily affected.

  3. Endothelial cells are damaged by autophagic induction before hepatocytes in Con A-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chen; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-08-01

    We have reported both T-cell-dependent and -independent hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficiency mice, respectively, after intravenous injection of Con A in mice. The mode of hepatocyte cell death is different: autophagy for T-cell-independent hepatitis in contrast to apoptosis for T-cell-dependent one. In this study, we further demonstrate that liver blood vessels are the first target in both modes. The infused Con A bond to the hepatic vascular endothelial cells and cause its damage with autophagy. Before the elevation of the serum alanine aminotransferase at 6 h post-injection, the plasma leakage and hemorrhage occur at 1-3 h without inflammation. Con A induces autophagy of endothelial cells and hemorrhage that is enhanced by IFN-gamma. Using the endothelial cell line HMEC-1, a dose- and time-dependent cell death with autophagic LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3) conversion was induced by Con A and was enhanced by IFN-gamma. In conclusion, Con A induced autophagy on hepatic endothelial cells; the damage of liver blood vessel occurs before the induction of T-cell-dependent hepatitis via apoptosis or T-cell-independent hepatitis via autophagy.

  4. [Pneumomediastinum: an aspect of pulmonary barotrauma during mechanical ventilation of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Y; En-Nafaa, I; Chkoura, K; Boughalem, M; Kamili, N Drissi

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite compliance with the recommendations of protective mechanical ventilation, it can results in serious complications including the pulmonary barotrauma. This is often manifested by a pneumothorax. This observation describes an unusual aspect of barotrauma which is pneumomediastinum. The authors also point out the role of chest imaging in the management of mechanical ventilation during ARDS.

  5. Theoretical research on damage mechanism of ultrafast laser ablation crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Tingfeng

    2013-09-01

    High peak power picosecond laser ablation of silicon draws great attention in solar cell manufacture,laser optoelectric countermeasure applications, eta. This paper reports the damage process of ultrafast lasers interaction with silicon,which is based on Two-Temperature Model(TTM) and 1-on-1 damage threshold test method. Pulsed laser caused damage manifests in several ways, such as heat damage, mechanical effect and even eletrical effect. In this paper, a modified Two Temperature Model is applied in ultrashort laser interaction with silicon.The traditional Two-Temperature Model methods is proposed by Anismov in 1970s to calculate the interaction between ultrafast laser with metals, which is composed of free electrons and lattice. Beyond the carrier and lattice temperture model, an additional excited term and Auger recombination term of carriers is taken into account in this modified Two-Temperature Model model to reflect the characteristics in semicondutors. Under the same pulse-duration condition, the damage threshold is found to be 161 mJ/cm2 and a characteritic double-peak shape shows up. As the pulse energy density rises from 50mJ/cm2 to 161 mJ/cm2, the difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down proportionally.Also,a detailed interaction process between photon-electron and electron-phonon is discussed. Electron and lattice temperature evolutes distinctly different, while the former is much higher than the latter until heat tranfer finished at 200 picoseconds. Two-peak feature of electron temperature is also identified. As the pulse duration increases from 20 picosecond to 60 picosecond, the he difference between carrier and lattice temperature steps down significantly. The calculated damage threshold does not change fundamentally, remaining approximately 0.16J/cm2. Also, the damage mechanism is found to be thermal heating with the pulse width between 20 and 60 picoseconds at threshold fluences which is identical to experiment test result

  6. Insight into mechanism of lanthanum (III) induced damage to plant photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yueli; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    A great deal of literature is available regarding the environmental and ecological effects of rare earth element pollution on plants. These studies have shown that excess lanthanum (La) (III) in the environment can inhibit plant growth and even cause plant death. Moreover, inhibition of plant photosynthesis is known to be one of the physiological bases of these damages. However, the mechanism responsible for these effects is still unclear. In this study, the mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was clarified from the viewpoint of the chloroplast ultrastructure, the contents of chloroplast mineral elements and chlorophyll, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits and chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, in which rice was selected as a study object. Following treatment with low level of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure of rice was not changed, and the contents of chloroplast mineral elements (Mg, P, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) increased, but the chlorophyll content did not change significantly. Moreover, the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices increased. Following treatment with high levels of La(III), the chloroplast ultrastructure was damaged, chloroplast mineral elements (except Cu and Zn) and chlorophyll contents decreased, and the transcription of chloroplast ATPase subunits, chloroplast Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, the net photosynthetic rate and growth indices decreased. Based on these results, a possible mechanism of La(III)-induced damage to plant photosynthesis was proposed to provide a reference for scientific evaluation of the potential ecological risk of rare earth elements in the environment.

  7. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  8. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. PMID:27316765

  9. Fabrication of Anti-human Cardiac Troponin I Immunogold Nanorods for Sensing Acute Myocardial Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. R.; Gu, C. R.; Fan, X.; Bian, Z. P.; Wu, H. F.; Yang, D.; Gu, N.; Zhang, J. N.

    2009-12-01

    A facile, rapid, solution-phase method of detecting human cardiac troponin I for sensing myocardial damage has been described using gold nanorods-based biosensors. The sensing is demonstrated by the distinct change of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the gold nanorods to specific antibody-antigen binding events. For a higher sensitivity, the aspect ratio of gold nanorods is increased up to ca 5.5 by simply adding small amount of HCl in seed-mediated growth solution. Experimental results show that the detecting limit of the present method is 10 ng/mL. Contrast tests reveal that these gold nanorods-based plasmonic biosensors hold much higher sensitivity than that of conventionally spherical gold nanoparticles.

  10. Damage Development in High Purity Copper Under Varying Dynamic Conditions and Microstructural States Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Esposito, L.; Iannitti, G.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of CDM, the evolution of the plastic strain, at which damage processes initiates, as a function of stress triaxiality, making the assumption of constant damage dissipated work is derived. Based on this, the CDM model proposed by Bonora (Eng. Frac. Mech., 58, 1-2, 1997) has been used to predict the occurrence of ductile failure at different stress triaxiality conditions, under both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. This solution allows the possibility to correctly predict the conditions for which ductile damage can initiate under uniaxial strain (such as that for the flyer plate impact test) and mixed conditions such as those in the Taylor impact test. The solution offers the possibility to correlate continuum damage model parameters to micro structural features such as grain size and purity grade.

  11. MC-3 receptor and the inflammatory mechanisms activated in acute myocardial infarct.

    PubMed

    Getting, Stephen J; Di Filippo, Clara; Christian, Helen C; Lam, Connie W; Rossi, Francesco; D'Amico, Michele; Perretti, Mauro

    2004-10-01

    Investigation of the mechanisms activated by endogenous inhibitory pathways can lead to identification of novel targets for cardiovascular inflammatory pathologies. Here we exploited the potential protective role that melanocortin receptor type 3 (MC3-R) activation might play in a myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury model. In resting conditions, mouse and rat heart extracts expressed MC3-R mRNA and protein, without changes following ischemia-reperfusion. At the cellular level heart macrophages, but not fibroblasts or cardiomyocytes, expressed this receptor, as demonstrated by immunogold labeling. In vivo, administration of the melanocortin agonist MTII (10 microg per mouse equivalent to 9.3 nmol) 30 min prior to ischemia (25 min) attenuated mouse heart 2 h reperfusion injury by approximately 40%, an effect prevented by the mixed MC3/4-R antagonist SHU9119 but not by the selective MC4-R antagonist HS204. Similar results were obtained when the compound was given at the beginning of the reperfusion period. Importantly, delayed myocardial damage as measured 24 h post-reperfusion was equally protected by administration of 10 microg MTII. The focus on MC3-R was also substantiated by analysis of the recessive yellow (e/e) mouse, bearing a mutated (inactive) MC1-R, in which MTII was fully protective. Myocardial protection was associated with reduced markers of systemic and local inflammation, including cytokine contents (interleukin-1 and KC) and myeloperoxidase activity. In conclusion, this study has highlighted a previously unrecognized protective role for MC3-R activation on acute and delayed heart reperfusion injury. These data may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention against heart and possibly other organ ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  12. MECHANISMS OF SYNERGISTIC ANTILEUKEMIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN VALPROIC ACID AND CYTARABINE IN PEDIATRIC ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chengzhi; Edwards, Holly; Xu, Xuelian; Zhou, Hui; Buck, Steven A.; Stout, Mark L.; Yu, Qun; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Ge, Yubin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine the possibility of synergistic anti-leukemic activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms associated with cytarabine combined with valproic acid (VPA) [a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) and an FDA-licensed drug for treating both children and adults with epilepsy] in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Experimental Design The type and extent of anti-leukemic interactions between cytarabine and VPA in clinically relevant pediatric AML cell lines and diagnostic blasts from children with AML were determined by MTT assays and standard isobologram analyses. The effects of cytarabine and VPA on apoptosis and cell cycle distributions were determined by flow cytometry analysis and caspase enzymatic assays. The effects of the two agents on DNA damage and Bcl-2 family proteins were determined by Western blotting. Results We demonstrated synergistic antileukemic activities between cytarabine and VPA in 4 pediatric AML cell lines and 9 diagnostic AML blast samples. t(8;21) AML blasts were significantly more sensitive to VPA and showed far greater sensitivities to combined cytarabine and VPA than non-t(8;21) AML cases. Cytarabine and VPA cooperatively induced DNA double strand breaks, reflected in induction of γH2AX and apoptosis, accompanied by activation of caspases 9 and 3. Further, VPA induced Bim expression and shRNA knockdown of Bim resulted in significantly decreased apoptosis induced by cytarabine, and by cytarabine plus VPA. Conclusions Our results establish global synergistic antileukemic activity of combined VPA and cytarabine in pediatric AML and provide compelling evidence to support the use of VPA in the treatment of children with this deadly disease. PMID:20889917

  13. Protracted Oxidative Alterations in the Mechanism of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V.; Sharma, Pushpa

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of high-dose total body ionizing irradiation [(thereafter, irradiation (IR)] are attributed to primary oxidative breakage of biomolecule targets, mitotic, apoptotic and necrotic cell death in the dose-limiting tissues, clastogenic and epigenetic effects, and cascades of functional and reactive responses leading to radiation sickness defined as the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). The range of remaining and protracted injuries at any given radiation dose as well as the dynamics of post-IR alterations is tissue-specific. Therefore, functional integrity of the homeostatic tissue barriers may decline gradually within weeks in the post-IR period culminating with sepsis and failure of organs and systems. Multiple organ failure (MOF) leading to moribundity is a common sequela of the hemotapoietic form of ARS (hARS). Onset of MOF in hARS can be presented as “two-hit phenomenon” where the “first hit” is the underlying consequences of the IR-induced radiolysis in cells and biofluids, non-septic inflammation, metabolic up-regulation of pro-oxidative metabolic reactions, suppression of the radiosensitive hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues and the damage to gut mucosa and vascular endothelium. While the “second hit” derives from bacterial translocation and spread of the bacterial pathogens and inflammagens through the vascular system leading to septic inflammatory, metabolic responses and a cascade of redox pro-oxidative and adaptive reactions. This sequence of events can create a ground for development of prolonged metabolic, inflammatory, oxidative, nitrative, and carbonyl, electrophilic stress in crucial tissues and thus exacerbate the hARS outcomes. With this perspective, the redox mechanisms, which can mediate the IR-induced protracted oxidative post-translational modification of proteins, oxidation of lipids and carbohydrates and their countermeasures in hARS are subjects of the current review. Potential role of ubiquitous, radioresistant

  14. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  15. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  16. Studies on immunoregulatory mechanisms in acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Lemm, G; Salzer, K; Warnatz, H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with acute hepatitis B and HBV-induced chronic hepatitis as well as normal control persons participated in the study. Hepatitis patients of both groups have decreased OKT4+/OKT8+T cell ratios due to an percental increase of OKT8+T cells in peripheral blood compared to the data of controls. Lymphocyte cultures of chronic hepatitis patients show reduced DNA synthesis after stimulation by allogeneic non-T cells, PHA, Con A and PWM. PWM-induced immunoglobulin secretion by B cells, determined by means of a reverse haemolytic plaque assay (RHPA) and a solid phase ELISA, showed comparable results in hepatitis B patients and controls. The AMLR, which is thought to reflect an autologous immunoregulatory phenomenon, is slightly impaired in cultures of hepatitis B patients in comparison to controls. Con A-induced suppressor cell activity on T cell reactions is decreased in hepatitis, whereas suppressor cell activity on B cell activation is within the same range as in cultures of controls. It is concluded from these data, that suppressor cell activity on T cell function is impaired in hepatitis B, whereas B cell functions and suppressor cell activity on B cell function are in the normal range. The results with the functional assays and the finding of increased proportions of OKT8+T cells in hepatitis B are considered to reflect properties of different T cell subpopulations, responsible for different immunoregulatory functions. PMID:6222854

  17. Enamel Insulated Copper Wire in Electric Motors: Sliding Behavior and Possible Damage Mechanisms During Die Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiri, Albion

    This study investigates the sliding friction and the forming behaviour of enamel insulated copper wire during the die-forming process. It also aims to determine potential damage mechanisms to the wire during bending process for electric motor coils. In this investigation a wire-bending machine was designed and built in order to simulate the wire forming process in a laboratory scale. Bending angle of the wire and the bending radii were used to control the strain on the wire surface. The effect of speed on COF was investigated for different speeds of of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20mm/s. A positive correlation was observed between the COF and the testing speed. Additionally, the effect of strain on COF was studied for 2% and 23% to determine its influence on the COF. A general trend was observed of decreased COF with increased strain in wires. Finally, the ability of the enamel coating to resist external damage and wire strain was investigated by tensile testing of pre-scratched magnet wire. The results showed that wire enamel can withstand significant surface damage prior to breach and failure. The insulating polymer coating failed under the scratch tests at 20N load using a Rockwell indenter and at 5N load using a 90° conical steel indenter. Additional tests, such as tensile testing, scratch testing and reciprocating friction testing, were used to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of the enamel insulated copper wire.

  18. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  19. Duration of emission of volatile organic compounds from mechanically damaged plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln; Beck, John J

    2015-09-01

    Classical biological control of invasive alien weeds depends on the use of arthropod herbivores that are sufficiently host specific to avoid risk of injuring nontarget plants. Host plant specificity is usually evaluated by using a combination of behavioral and developmental experiments under choice, no-choice and field conditions. Secondary plant compounds are likely to have an important influence on host plant specificity. However, relatively little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by target and nontarget plants, and how environmental conditions may affect their emission. Previous studies have shown that mechanical damage of leaves increases the composition and content of VOCs emitted. In this study we measured the VOC emissions of five species of plants in the subtribe Centaureinae (Asteraceae)--Carthamus tinctorius, Centaurea cineraria, Centaurea melitensis, Centaurea rothrockii, and Centaurea solstitialis--that have previously been used in host specificity experiments for a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis). Leaves of each plant were punctured with a needle and the VOCs were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) periodically over 48 h and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 49 compounds were detected. Damage caused an immediate increase of 200-600% in the composition of VOCs emitted from each plant species, and the amounts generally remained high for at least 48 h. The results indicate that a very unspecific mechanical damage can cause a prolonged change in the VOC profile of plants. PMID:26398629

  20. Tension Strength, Failure Prediction and Damage Mechanisms in 2D Triaxial Braided Composites with Notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Anglin, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unnotched and notched (open hole) tensile strength and failure mechanisms of two-dimensional (2D) triaxial braided composites were examined. The effect of notch size and notch position were investigated. Damage initiation and propagation in notched and unnotched coupons were also examined. Theory developed to predict the normal stress distribution near an open hole and failure for tape laminated composites was evaluated for its applicability to 2D triaxial braided textile composite materials. Four different fiber architectures were considered; braid angle, yarn and braider size, percentage of longitudinal yarns and braider angle varied. Tape laminates equivalent to textile composites were also constructed for comparison. Unnotched tape equivalents were stronger than braided textiles but exhibited greater notch sensitivity. Notched textiles and tape equivalents have roughly the same strength at large notch sizes. Two common damage mechanisms were found: braider yarn cracking and near notch longitudinal yarn splitting. Cracking was found to initiate in braider yarns in unnotched and notched coupons, and propagate in the direction of the braider yarns until failure. Damage initiation stress decreased with increasing braid angle. No significant differences in prediction of near notch strain between textile and tape equivalents could be detected for small braid angle, but the correlations were weak for textiles with large braid angle. Notch strength could not be predicted using existing anisotropic theory for braided textiles due to their insensitivity to notch.

  1. Duration of emission of volatile organic compounds from mechanically damaged plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lincoln; Beck, John J

    2015-09-01

    Classical biological control of invasive alien weeds depends on the use of arthropod herbivores that are sufficiently host specific to avoid risk of injuring nontarget plants. Host plant specificity is usually evaluated by using a combination of behavioral and developmental experiments under choice, no-choice and field conditions. Secondary plant compounds are likely to have an important influence on host plant specificity. However, relatively little is known about the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by target and nontarget plants, and how environmental conditions may affect their emission. Previous studies have shown that mechanical damage of leaves increases the composition and content of VOCs emitted. In this study we measured the VOC emissions of five species of plants in the subtribe Centaureinae (Asteraceae)--Carthamus tinctorius, Centaurea cineraria, Centaurea melitensis, Centaurea rothrockii, and Centaurea solstitialis--that have previously been used in host specificity experiments for a prospective biological control agent of yellow starthistle (C. solstitialis). Leaves of each plant were punctured with a needle and the VOCs were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) periodically over 48 h and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 49 compounds were detected. Damage caused an immediate increase of 200-600% in the composition of VOCs emitted from each plant species, and the amounts generally remained high for at least 48 h. The results indicate that a very unspecific mechanical damage can cause a prolonged change in the VOC profile of plants.

  2. Severe acute oxidant exposure: morphological damage and aerobic metabolism in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.R.; Teuscher, F.; LaSota, I.; Niewoehner, D.E.

    1986-09-01

    Groups of male rats were exposed to acute doses of oxygen, ozone, or paraquat which produced equivalent mortality (25-30%) over a 28 day post-exposure period. Quantitative evaluation of morphological changes indicated the primary response to be edema and inflammation with only slight fibrosis being apparent by the end of the observation period. Aerobic pulmonary metabolism was inhibited in lungs from animals exposed to oxygen and ozone as evidenced by decreased oxygen consumption; however, this was transient and O/sub 2/ consumption returned to normal within 24 hours after removal from the exposure chamber. Conversely, treatment with paraquat caused an immediate, transient stimulation of O/sub 2/ consumption. Glucose metabolism was unaltered by the gas exposures and, as previously reported, was initially stimulated by paraquat treatment. In vitro, only paraquat altered both O/sub 2/ consumption and glucose metabolism when added to lung slice preparations; ozone had no effect. Oxygen did not alter O/sub 2/ consumption but caused a slight biphasic response in glucose metabolism. Aerobic metabolism is relatively unchanged by these doses of oxygen and ozone which result in the death of 25-30% of all treated animals. Even though paraquat produces similar morphologic changes, it may represent a more severe metabolic insult than ''equivalent'' doses of oxygen or ozone. Also, if interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is a desired result of experimental exposure, rats may not be a suitable model for oxidant induced lung injury.

  3. Kidney damage biomarkers detect acute kidney injury but only functional markers predict mortality after paraquat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Fahim; Buckley, Nicholas A; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Pickering, John W; Peake, Philip; Palangasinghe, Chathura; Wijerathna, Thilini; Ratnayake, Indira; Shihana, Fathima; Endre, Zoltan H

    2015-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following paraquat ingestion. The diagnostic performance of injury biomarkers was investigated in serial blood and urine samples from patients from 5 Sri Lankan hospitals. Functional AKI was diagnosed using serum creatinine (sCr) or serum cystatin C (sCysC). The 95th centile in healthy subjects defined the urinary biomarker cutoffs for diagnosing structural AKI. 50 poisoned patients provided 2 or more specimens, 76% developed functional AKI [AKIN stage 1 (n=12), 2 (n=7) or 3 (n=19)]; 19/26 patients with AKIN stage 2/3 also had functional AKI by sCysC criteria (≥50% increase). Urinary cystatin C (uCysC), clusterin (uClu) and NGAL (uNGAL) increased within 24h of ingestion compared with NoAKI patients and healthy controls. Each biomarker demonstrated moderate diagnostic utility [AUC-ROC: uCysC 0.79, uNGAL 0.79, uClu 0.68] for diagnosis of functional AKI at 16h. Death occurred only in subjects with functional AKI. Structural biomarker-based definitions detected more AKI than did sCr or sCysC, but did not independently predict death. Renal injury biomarkers did not add clinical value to patients who died rapidly due to multi-organ failure. Use of injury biomarkers within 16-24h may guide early intervention for reno-protection in less severe paraquat poisoning. PMID:26071311

  4. Hepatoprotective Effect of Opuntia robusta and Opuntia streptacantha Fruits against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    González-Ponce, Herson Antonio; Martínez-Saldaña, María Consolación; Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) is a serious health problem in developed countries. N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), the current therapy for APAP-induced ALF, is not always effective, and liver transplantation is often needed. Opuntia spp. fruits are an important source of nutrients and contain high levels of bioactive compounds, including antioxidants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of Opuntia robusta and Opuntia streptacantha extracts against APAP-induced ALF. In addition, we analyzed the antioxidant activities of these extracts. Fruit extracts (800 mg/kg/day, orally) were given prophylactically to male Wistar rats before intoxication with APAP (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Rat hepatocyte cultures were exposed to 20 mmol/L APAP, and necrosis was assessed by LDH leakage. Opuntia robusta had significantly higher levels of antioxidants than Opuntia streptacantha. Both extracts significantly attenuated APAP-induced injury markers AST, ALT and ALP and improved liver histology. The Opuntia extracts reversed APAP-induced depletion of liver GSH and glycogen stores. In cultured hepatocytes, Opuntia extracts significantly reduced leakage of LDH and cell necrosis, both prophylactically and therapeutically. Both extracts appeared to be superior to NAC when used therapeutically. We conclude that Opuntia extracts are hepatoprotective and can be used as a nutraceutical to prevent ALF. PMID:27782042

  5. Acute LVOT Obstruction with a Carbomedics Mechanical Valve Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Alsidawi, Said; Joyce, David L; Malouf, Joseph F; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old female with severe symptomatic rheumatic mitral stenosis was referred for mitral valve replacement. A 27-mm Carbomedics mechanical mitral valve was placed using everting sutures. As the patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass, she became hemodynamically unstable. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram revealed a significant drop in left ventricular function along with severe LVOT obstruction. The Carbomedics prosthesis was replaced by a 27-mm St. Jude mechanical valve using noneverting sutures which relieved the LVOT obstruction. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12749 (J Card Surg 2016;31:376-379). PMID:27087635

  6. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  7. MECHANISMS FOR COUNTERING OXIDATIVE STRESS AND DAMAGE IN RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; O’Mealey, Gary B.; Szweda, Luke I.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence supports that chronic oxidative stress is a primary contributing factor to numerous retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Eyes obtained postmortem from AMD patients have extensive free radical damage to the proteins, lipids, DNA, and mitochondria of their retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In addition, several mouse models of chronic oxidative stress develop many of the pathological hallmarks of AMD. However, the extent to which oxidative stress is an etiologic component versus its involvement in disease progression remains a major unanswered question. Further, whether the primary target of oxidative stress and damage is photoreceptors or RPE cells, or both, is still unclear. In this review, we discuss the major functions of RPE cells with an emphasis on the oxidative challenges these cells encounter and the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms employed to neutralize the deleterious effects that such stresses can elicit if left unchecked. PMID:22878106

  8. Molecular Mechanism of Aggravation of Hypertensive Organ Damages by Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Hisashi; Kudo, Hiroshi; Takayama, Narimasa; Yasuoka, Suguru; Aoki, Yuji; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that not only the elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) but also the increase in BP variability (or fluctuation) are associated with hypertensive organ damages and the morbidity and mortality of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events. However, the molecular mechanism whereby the increase in BP variability aggravates hypertensive organ damages remains unknown. Thus, we created a rat chronic model of a combination of hypertension and large BP variability by performing bilateral sino-aortic denervation in spontaneously hypertensive rat. A series of our studies using this model revealed that large BP variability induces chronic myocardial inflammation by activating local angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptor systems and thereby aggravates cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis, leading to systolic dysfunction, in hypertensive hearts. In addition, large BP variability induces the aggravation of arteriolosclerotic changes and ischemic cortical fibrosis in hypertensive kidney via local angiotensin II system. PMID:25544288

  9. A Novel Mechanism of Spine Damages in Stroke via DAPK1 and Tau

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Wang, Shan; Jin, Huijuan; Bi, Linlin; Wei, Na; Yan, Honglin; Yang, Xin; Yao, Chengye; Xu, Mengmeng; Shu, Shu; Guo, Yu; Yan, Huanhuan; Wu, Jianhua; Li, Hao; Pang, Pei; Tian, Tian; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Ling-Qiang; Shang, You; Lu, Youming

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic spine loss is one of the major preceding consequences of stroke damages, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we report that a direct interaction of DAPK1 with Tau causes spine loss and subsequently neuronal death in a mouse model with stroke. We found that DAPK1 phosphorylates Tau protein at Ser262 (pS262) in cortical neurons of stroke mice. Either genetic deletion of DAPK1 kinase domain (KD) in mice (DAPK1-KD−/−) or blocking DAPK1-Tau interaction by systematic application of a membrane permeable peptide protects spine damages and improves neurological functions against stroke insults. Thus, disruption of DAPK1-Tau interaction is a promising strategy in clinical management of stroke. PMID:25995053

  10. Metallothionein blocks oxidative DNA damage induced by acute inorganic arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Wei Waalkes, Michael P.

    2015-02-01

    We studied how protein metallothionein (MT) impacts arsenic-induced oxidative DNA damage (ODD) using cells that poorly express MT (MT-I/II double knockout embryonic cells; called MT-null cells) and wild-type (WT) MT competent cells. Arsenic (as NaAsO{sub 2}) was less cytolethal over 24 h in WT cells (LC{sub 50} = 11.0 ± 1.3 μM; mean ± SEM) than in MT-null cells (LC{sub 50} = 5.6 ± 1.2 μM). ODD was measured by the immuno-spin trapping method. Arsenic (1 or 5 μM; 24 h) induced much less ODD in WT cells (121% and 141% of control, respectively) than in MT-null cells (202% and 260%). In WT cells arsenic caused concentration-dependent increases in MT expression (transcript and protein), and in the metal-responsive transcription factor-1 (MTF-1), which is required to induce the MT gene. In contrast, basal MT levels were not detectable in MT-null cells and unaltered by arsenic exposure. Transfection of MT-I gene into the MT-null cells markedly reduced arsenic-induced ODD levels. The transport genes, Abcc1 and Abcc2 were increased by arsenic in WT cells but either showed no or very limited increases in MT-null cells. Arsenic caused increases in oxidant stress defense genes HO-1 and GSTα2 in both WT and MT-null cells, but to much higher levels in WT cells. WT cells appear more adept at activating metal transport systems and oxidant response genes, although the role of MT in these responses is unclear. Overall, MT protects against arsenic-induced ODD in MT competent cells by potential sequestration of scavenging oxidant radicals and/or arsenic. - Highlights: • Metallothionein blocks arsenic toxicity. • Metallothionein reduces arsenic-induced DNA damage. • Metallothionein may bind arsenic or radicals produced by arsenic.

  11. A Micromechanical Damage Mechanics Model for the Seismic Coupling of Underground Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers-Martinez, M. A.; Sammis, C. G.; Mihaly, J. M.; Bhat, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismological discrimination between underground explosions and earthquakes is complicated by the observation that explosions generate significant S wave radiation. Whether these S waves are generated mainly in the non-linear source region, or by slip on nearby faults, or by mode conversion at boundaries along the propagation path remains controversial. In this study we explore the hypothesis that S wave radiation is generated during the ubiquitous generation of fractures observed in the non-linear source region. We model the nucleation, growth, and interaction of these fractures using a fully dynamic micromechanical damage mechanics recently formulated by Bhat et al. (J. Appl. Mech., 2012). Parameters in the model include the size, density, and orientation of initial fractures in the source rock, the coefficient of friction on their faces, and the dynamic critical stress intensity factor for nucleation and propagation. The damage mechanics is built into the ABAQUS dynamic finite element code as a user-defined rheology and is used to calculate the spatial extent and geometry of the fracture damage as well as resultant seismic radiation generated by an explosion with a specified pressure time-function. A fundamental result of these calculations is that any process that breaks the spherical symmetry of the explosion produces S waves. Sources of asymmetry include an anisotropic distribution of initial fracture (e.g. a rift in the granitic texture), an anisotropic regional pre-stress, or even heterogeneity that breaks the symmetry of the radial fractures. We compare our calculations with field experiments (by Weston Geophysical and New England Research) in a granite quarry and with laboratory experiments that use high-speed photography and laser velocimeters to record the evolution of the damage pattern and resultant seismic radiation.

  12. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials. PMID:26289729

  13. Plasticity and ductility in graphene oxide through a mechanochemically induced damage tolerance mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoding; Mao, Lily; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Paci, Jeffrey T.; Huang, Jiaxing; Nguyen, Sonbinh T.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-08-01

    The ability to bias chemical reaction pathways is a fundamental goal for chemists and material scientists to produce innovative materials. Recently, two-dimensional materials have emerged as potential platforms for exploring novel mechanically activated chemical reactions. Here we report a mechanochemical phenomenon in graphene oxide membranes, covalent epoxide-to-ether functional group transformations that deviate from epoxide ring-opening reactions, discovered through nanomechanical experiments and density functional-based tight binding calculations. These mechanochemical transformations in a two-dimensional system are directionally dependent, and confer pronounced plasticity and damage tolerance to graphene oxide monolayers. Additional experiments on chemically modified graphene oxide membranes, with ring-opened epoxide groups, verify this unique deformation mechanism. These studies establish graphene oxide as a two-dimensional building block with highly tuneable mechanical properties for the design of high-performance nanocomposites, and stimulate the discovery of new bond-selective chemical transformations in two-dimensional materials.

  14. Chromatin Modifications during Repair of Environmental Exposure-Induced DNA Damage: A Potential Mechanism for Stable Epigenetic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to environmental toxicants and toxins cause epigenetic changes that likely play a role in the development of diseases associated with exposure. The mechanism behind these exposure-induced epigenetic changes is currently unknown. One commonality between most environmental exposures is that they cause DNA damage either directly or through causing an increase in reactive oxygen species, which can damage DNA. Like transcription, DNA damage repair must occur in the context of chromatin requiring both histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling. These chromatin changes aid in DNA damage accessibility and signaling. Several proteins and complexes involved in epigenetic silencing during both development and cancer have been found to be localized to sites of DNA damage. The chromatin-based response to DNA damage is considered a transient event, with chromatin being restored to normal as DNA damage repair is completed. However, in individuals chronically exposed to environmental toxicants or with chronic inflammatory disease, repeated DNA damage-induced chromatin rearrangement may ultimately lead to permanent epigenetic alterations. Understanding the mechanism behind exposure-induced epigenetic changes will allow us to develop strategies to prevent or reverse these changes. This review focuses on epigenetic changes and DNA damage induced by environmental exposures, the chromatin changes that occur around sites of DNA damage, and how these transient chromatin changes may lead to heritable epigenetic alterations at sites of chronic exposure. PMID:24259318

  15. Global sensitivity analysis of a mathematical model of acute inflammation identifies nonlinear dependence of cumulative tissue damage on host interleukin-6 responses.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Shibin; Bartels, John; Banerjee, Ipsita; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2014-10-01

    The precise inflammatory role of the cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 and its utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target have been the source of much debate, presumably due to the complex pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of this cytokine. We previously developed a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to explain the dynamics of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS)-induced acute inflammation and associated whole-animal damage/dysfunction (a proxy for the health of the organism), along with the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-10, and nitric oxide (NO). The model was partially calibrated using data from endotoxemic C57Bl/6 mice. Herein, we investigated the sensitivity of the area under the damage curve (AUCD) to the 51 rate parameters of the ODE model for different levels of simulated LPS challenges using a global sensitivity approach called Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR). We explored sufficient parametric Monte Carlo samples to generate the variance-based Sobol' global sensitivity indices, and found that inflammatory damage was highly sensitive to the parameters affecting the activity of IL-6 during the different stages of acute inflammation. The AUCIL6 showed a bimodal distribution, with the lower peak representing healthy response and the higher peak representing sustained inflammation. Damage was minimal at low AUCIL6, giving rise to a healthy response. In contrast, intermediate levels of AUCIL6 resulted in high damage, and this was due to the insufficiency of damage recovery driven by anti-inflammatory responses from IL-10 and the activation of positive feedback sustained by IL-6. At high AUCIL6, damage recovery was interestingly restored in some population of simulated animals due to the NO-mediated anti-inflammatory responses. These observations suggest that the host's health status during acute inflammation depends in a nonlinear fashion on the magnitude of the inflammatory stimulus

  16. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures. PMID:18375722

  17. Association between neuroserpin and molecular markers of brain damage in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuroserpin has shown neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia and has been associated with functional outcome after ischemic stroke. Our aim was to study whether neuroserpin serum levels could be associated to biomarkers of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption. Methods We prospectively included 129 patients with ischemic stroke (58.1% male; mean age, 72.4 ± 9.6 years) not treated with tPA within 12 hours (h) of symptoms onset (mean time, 4.7 ± 2.1 h). Poor functional outcome at 3 months was considered as a modified Rankin scale score >2. Serum levels of neuroserpin, Interleukin 6 (IL-6), Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), active Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and cellular fibronectin (cFn) (determined by ELISA) and glutamate (determined by HPLC) were measured on admission, 24 and 72 h. The main variable was considered the decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h. ROC analysis was used to select the best predictive value for neuroserpin to predict poor functional outcome due to a lack of linearity. Results The decrease of neuroserpin levels within the first 24 h was negatively correlated with serum levels at 24 hours of glutamate (r = -0.642), IL-6 (r = -0.678), ICAM-1 (r = -0.345), MMP-9 (r = -0.554) and cFn (r = -0.703) (all P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, serum levels of glutamate (OR, 1.04; CI95%, 1.01-1.06, p = 0.001); IL-6 (OR, 1.4; CI95%, 1.1-1.7, p = 0.001); and cFn (OR, 1.3; CI95%, 1.1-1.6, p = 0.002) were independently associated with a decrease of neuroserpin levels <70 ng/mL at 24 h after adjusting for confounding factors. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroprotective properties of neuroserpin may be related to the inhibition of excitotoxicity, inflammation, as well as blood brain barrier disruption that occur after acute ischemic stroke. PMID:21569344

  18. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85-90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  19. Switch telomerase to ALT mechanism by inducing telomeric DNA damages and dysfunction of ATRX and DAXX

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Laichen; Li, Feng; Jiang, Yuanling; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Wenbin; Zhao, Yong; Songyang, Zhou; Huang, Junjiu

    2016-01-01

    Activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is necessary for tumours to escape from dysfunctional telomere-mediated senescence. Anti-telomerase drugs might be effective in suppressing tumour growth in approximately 85–90% of telomerase-positive cancer cells. However, there are still chances for these cells to bypass drug treatment after switching to the ALT mechanism to maintain their telomere integrity. But the mechanism underlying this switch is unknown. In this study, we used telomerase-positive cancer cells (HTC75) to discover the mechanism of the telomerase-ALT switch by inducing telomere-specific DNA damage, alpha-thalassemia X-linked syndrome protein (ATRX) knockdown and deletion of death associated protein (DAXX). Surprisingly, two important ALT hallmarks in the ALT-like HTC75 cells were observed after treatments: ALT-associated promyelocytic leukaemia bodies (APBs) and extrachromosomal circular DNA of telomeric repeats. Moreover, knocking out hTERT by utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 technique led to telomere elongation in a telomerase-independent manner in ALT-like HTC75 cells. In summary, this is the first report to show that inducing telomeric DNA damage, disrupting the ATRX/DAXX complex and inhibiting telomerase activity in telomerase-positive cancer cells lead to the ALT switch. PMID:27578458

  20. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  1. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  2. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  3. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    PubMed Central

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  4. Acute dissection of a Contegra conduit: a rare mechanism of failure.

    PubMed

    Kavarana, Minoo N; Dorfman, Adam L; Agarwal, Prachi P; Bove, Edward L

    2010-09-01

    The Contegra (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) bovine jugular vein conduit has been used with increasing frequency in congenital heart disease for the reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract. In this report, we describe a mechanism for conduit failure secondary to an acute dissection of the inner neointimal peel from the conduit wall. PMID:20732536

  5. “Missing clot” during mechanical thrombectomy in acute stroke using Solitaire stent retrieval system

    PubMed Central

    Huded, Vikram; Nambiar, Vivek; De Souza, Romnesh; Bohra, Vikram; Ramankutty, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Stent retrieval system is an established treatment modality in acute ischemic stroke with large vessel occlusion. Here, we describe a complication which occurred during mechanical thrombectomy in three cases where the clot dislodged during retrieval. There was a possibility of the clot getting reinjected into the artery with possible dire consequences. PMID:27293350

  6. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight.

  7. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, LBH589, induces expression of DNA damage response genes and apoptosis in Ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Scuto, Anna; Kirschbaum, Mark; Kowolik, Claudia; Kretzner, Leo; Juhasz, Agnes; Atadja, Peter; Pullarkat, Vinod; Bhatia, Ravi; Forman, Stephen; Yen, Yun; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-15

    We investigated the mechanism of action of LBH589, a novel broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitor belonging to the hydroxamate class, in Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two model human Ph(-) ALL cell lines (T-cell MOLT-4 and pre-B-cell Reh) were treated with LBH589 and evaluated for biologic and gene expression responses. Low nanomolar concentrations (IC(50): 5-20 nM) of LBH589 induced cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and histone (H3K9 and H4K8) hyperacetylation. LBH589 treatment increased mRNA levels of proapoptosis, growth arrest, and DNA damage repair genes including FANCG, FOXO3A, GADD45A, GADD45B, and GADD45G. The most dramatically expressed gene (up to 45-fold induction) observed after treatment with LBH589 is GADD45G. LBH589 treatment was associated with increased histone acetylation at the GADD45G promoter and phosphorylation of histone H2A.X. Furthermore, treatment with LBH589 was active against cultured primary Ph(-) ALL cells, including those from a relapsed patient, inducing loss of cell viability (up to 70%) and induction of GADD45G mRNA expression (up to 35-fold). Thus, LBH589 possesses potent growth inhibitory activity against including Ph(-) ALL cells associated with up-regulation of genes critical for DNA damage response and growth arrest. These findings provide a rationale for exploring the clinical activity of LBH589 in the treatment of patients with Ph(-) ALL.

  8. Finite Element Modeling of Magnetic Flux Leakage Signals from Mechanical Damage Containing Corrosion Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbar, Vijay; Clapham, Lynann

    2009-03-01

    Steel pipeline defects such as mechanical damage (dents) and corrosion pits have been studied using the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technique and finite element modeling (FEM). The nature of MFL signals from these defects is generally known. However, since a dented region is more susceptible to corrosion, a dent-pit defect combination may be formed, which adds complexity to signal interpretation. The present work employs FEM to investigate the change in dent signal in the presence of a pit of varying dimensions. It helps to infer if a pit located inside a dent is detectable.

  9. [DIFFERENTIATED APPROACH TO CLOSING OF WOUND SURFACES TRUNK AND EXTREMITIES AFTER ITS MECHANICAL DAMAGE].

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, O V

    2015-07-01

    The results of examination and treatment of 231 patients on defects covering tissues of the trunk and limbs were presented. The severity of the injury determined by classification A. V. Kaplan, O. M. Markova. In 10 patients wound treatment method used, developed in the clinic, using the combined preparation of hyaluronic acid with sodium succinate (Latsert), ensuring efficiency of treatment. Differentiated approach to the selection of closing wound surfaces method caused by mechanical damage, allowed to achieve satisfactory results in 97.84% of cases. PMID:26591223

  10. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  11. Development of acute lympboblastic leukemia in a patient with increased hematogones after toxic bone marrow damage.

    PubMed

    Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge we describe the first case showing the association of increased B cell precursors/hematogones in a regenerating post-toxic bone marrow with subsequent development of a B-ALL. Since all immunohistochemical/moleculargenetic anaylses have failed to identify the initial malignant leukemic clone, we suggest a close-meshed follow-up of such cases to identify potential mechanisms for the malignant transformation of B-cell precursors/hematogones and to prevent further fatal courses. PMID:20224729

  12. Ion-induced electron production in tissue-like media and DNA damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Obolensky, O. I.; Scifoni, E.; Pshenichnov, I.; Mishustin, I.; Solov'yov, A. V.; Greiner, W.

    2009-01-01

    This work is the first stage in the development of an inclusive approach to calculation of the DNA damage caused by irradiation of biological tissue by ion/proton beams. The project starts with an analysis of ionization caused by the projectiles and the characteristics of secondary electrons produced in tissue-like media. We consider interactions with the medium on a microscopic level and this allows us to obtain the energy spectrum and abundance of secondary electrons as functions of the projectile’s kinetic energy. The physical information obtained in this analysis is related to biological processes responsible for the DNA damage induced by the projectile. In particular, we consider double strand breaks of DNA caused by secondary electrons and free radicals, and local heating in the ion’s track. The heating may enhance the biological effectiveness of electron/free radical nteractions with the DNA and may even be considered as an independent mechanism of DNA damage. Numerical estimates are performed for the case of carbon-ion beams. The obtained dose-depth curves are compared with results of the MCHIT model based on the GEANT4 toolkit.

  13. Assessing the mechanism of DNA damage induced by lead through direct and indirect interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Mengyu; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2014-07-01

    Lead still possesses great threats to human health owing to its widespread distribution in the environment caused by human activities, although various actions have been taken to cut down the use and distribution of lead. In this work, mechanisms of DNA damage caused by lead through indirect and direct interactions were investigated. Results from comet assay showed lead at 1-10 μM induced DNA strand breaks in mice liver cells according to olive tail moment analysis. Signals of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) were not significantly detected until exposed at 100 μM Pb(2+). Further more, direct interactions between Pb(2+) and DNA were explored to determine the binding mode between them using spectra analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry studies and molecular docking investigations, which indicated that Pb(2+) could bind to DNA with four binding sites to form Pb(2)(+)-DNA complex by minor groove binding effects and electrostatic forces, resulting in damage to the structure of DNA double helix. Combined studies of lead genotoxicity in indirect (comet assay and DPC assay) and direct (binding mode investigations) interactions can be applied to study the potential damages to DNA induced by heavy metal pollutants.

  14. ANALYSES OF VARIOUS DAMAGE MECHANISMS IN TRANSPARENT ARMOR SUBJECT TO PROJECTILE IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Canhai; Sun, Xin; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2009-01-23

    Design and manufacturing of transparent armor have been historically carried out using experimental approaches. In this study, we use advanced computational modeling tools to study the various stress components during the impact event and to identify the different crack/damage driving mechanisms for the different cracking patterns. Experimentally observed damage patterns for a thick glass laminate under fragmentation simulation projectile (FSP) impact are used to compare with the modeling results. AHPCRC developed modeling software EPIC’06 [1] is used in predicting the penetration resistance of transparent armor systems. It is found that a 1-parameter single state model can be used to predict the impact penetration depth with relatively good accuracy. In addition, hoop stress and circumferential stresses are found to produce ripple cracks, needle cracks and radial cracks. It is also found that a region of high hoop stress and circumferential stress is produced by the impact at the back side of the target plate, causing the floret damage region possibly leading to higher penetration depth for thinner laminates or higher velocity impact.

  15. Damage morphology and mechanism in ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Hartmann, Claudia; Schulz, Wolfgang; Zhu, Jianqiang; Lin, Zunqi

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally investigated the morphology and mechanism of laser-induced damage in the ablation cutting of thin glass sheets with picosecond pulsed lasers and we compared the experimental results to our models. After several passes of laser ablation, we observed two different kinds of damage morphologies on the cross-section of the cut channel. They are distinguished to be the damage region caused by high-density free-electrons and the heat-affected zone due to the heat accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, micro-cracks can be observed on the top surface of the workpiece near the cut edge. The nano-cracks could be generated by high energy free-electrons but opened and developed to be visible micro-cracks by thermal stress generated in the heat-affected zone. The crack length was proportional to the volume of heat-affected zone. Heat-affected-zone and visible-cracks free conditions of glass cutting were achieved by controlling the repetition rate and spatial overlap of laser pulses.

  16. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-10-01

    This study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage due to natural U and Th impurities and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson's ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. in Am Mineral 76:1510-1532, 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 × 1018 α-decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by Özkan (J Appl Phys 47:4772-4779, 1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~54 %) and hardness (~48 %) and an increase in the Poisson's ratio (~54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Ríos et al. in J Phys Condens Matter 12:2401-2412, 2000a; Farnan and Salje in J Appl Phys 89:2084-2090, 2001; Zhang and Salje in J Phys Condens Matter 13:3057-3071, 2001). The excellent agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a large influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, this study indicates the importance of acquiring better knowledge about the mechanical long-term stability of radiation-damaged materials.

  17. Flaxseed Mitigates Acute Oxidative Lung Damage in a Mouse Model of Repeated Radiation and Hyperoxia Exposure Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours and be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health. We have developed a mouse model of total body radiation and hyperoxia exposure and identified acute damage of lung tissues. In the current study we evaluated the usefulness of dietary flaxseed (FS) as a countermeasure agent for such double-hit exposures. Methods We evaluated lung tissue changes 2 weeks post-initiation of exposure challenges. Mouse cohorts (n=5/group) were pre-fed diets containing either 0% FS or 10% FS for 3 weeks and exposed to: a) normoxia (Untreated); b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) 3 times per week for 2 consecutive weeks, where 8-hour hyperoxia treatments were spanned by normoxic intervals. Results At 2 weeks post challenge, while control-diet fed mice developed significant lung injury and inflammation across all challenges, FS protected lung tissues by decreasing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils (p<0.003) and protein levels, oxidative tissue damage, as determined by levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.008) and nitrosative stress as determined by nitrite levels. Lung hydroxyproline levels, a measure of lung fibrosis, were significantly elevated in mice fed 0% FS (p<0.01) and exposed to hyperoxia/radiation or the combination treatment, but not in FS-fed mice. FS also decreased levels of a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrogenic cytokine (TGF-β1) gene expression levels in lung. Conclusion Flaxseed mitigated adverse effects in lung of repeat exposures to radiation/hyperoxia. This data will provide useful information in the design of countermeasures to early

  18. TNF-mediated damage to glomerular endothelium is an important determinant of acute kidney injury in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Chang, Anthony; Hack, Bradley K; Eadon, Michael T; Alper, Seth L; Cunningham, Patrick N

    2014-01-01

    Severe sepsis is often accompanied by acute kidney injury (AKI) and albuminuria. Here we studied whether the AKI and albuminuria associated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in mice reflects impairment of the glomerular endothelium with its associated endothelial surface layer. LPS treatment decreased the abundance of endothelial surface layer heparan sulfate proteoglycans and sialic acid, and led to albuminuria likely reflecting altered glomerular filtration permselectivity. LPS treatment decreased the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), while also causing significant ultrastructural alterations in the glomerular endothelium. The density of glomerular endothelial cell fenestrae was 5-fold lower, whereas the average fenestrae diameter was 3-fold higher in LPS-treated than in control mice. The effects of LPS on the glomerular endothelial surface layer, endothelial cell fenestrae, GFR, and albuminuria were diminished in TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) knockout mice, suggesting that these LPS effects are mediated by TNF-α activation of TNFR1. Indeed, intravenous administration of TNF decreased GFR and led to loss of glomerular endothelial cell fenestrae, increased fenestrae diameter, and damage to the glomerular endothelial surface layer. LPS treatment decreased kidney expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, our findings confirm the important role of glomerular endothelial injury, possibly by a decreased VEGF level, in the development and progression of AKI and albuminuria in the LPS model of sepsis in the mouse.

  19. Soft tissue impact characterisation kit (STICK) for ex situ investigation of heart rhythm responses to acute mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Patricia J; Epstein, Avi; Macleod, Iain A; Schaaf, Sarah T M; Sheldon, Judith; Boulin, Christian; Kohl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Both mechanical induction and mechanical termination of arrhythmias have been reported in man. Examples include pre-cordial impacts by sports implements (baseballs, pucks) that can trigger arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation, or via the so-called pre-cordial thump, used as an emergency resuscitation measure to convert arrhythmias to normal sinus node rhythm. These interventions have been partially reproduced in experimental studies on whole animals. Relating observations at the system's level to underlying mechanisms has been difficult, however, largely because of: (i) a deficit in efficient and affordable pharmacological agents to selectively target (sub-)cellular responses in whole animal studies, and (ii) the lack of suitable experimental models to study the above responses at intermediate levels of functional and structural integration, such as the isolated heart or cardiac tissue. This paper presents a soft tissue impact characterisation kit (STICK), suitable for quantitative investigations into the effects of acute mechanical stimulation on cardiac electro-mechanical function in rodent isolated heart or tissue preparations. The STICK offers independent control over a range of relevant biophysical parameters, such as impact location and energy, pre-impact projectile speed and contact area, as well as over the timing of a mechanical stimulus relative to the cardiac cycle (monitored via electrocardiogram, ECG, here recorded directly from the cardiac surface). Projectile deceleration upon interaction with the tissue is monitored, contact-free, with a resolution of 175 microm, providing information on tissue deformation dynamics, force, pressure and work of the mechanical intervention. In order to study functional effects of cardiac mechanical stimulation in the absence of tissue damage, impacts must be limited (for juvenile Guinea pig heart) to 2-2.5 mJ in the slack left ventricle (diastolic impact) and 5-10 mJ in contracture (systolic impact), as

  20. Characterization of damage mechanisms associated with reference point indentation in human bone.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Bryan G; Kennedy, Oran D

    2015-06-01

    Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) is the clinical gold standard in cases of compromised skeletal integrity, such as with osteoporosis. While BMD is a useful measurement to index skeletal health, it is also limited since it cannot directly assess any mechanical properties. The ability to directly assess mechanical properties of bone tissue would be clinically important. Reference point indentation (RPI) is a technology that has been designed to try and achieve this goal. While RPI has been shown to detect altered bone tissue properties, the underlying physical mechanism of these measurements has not been characterized. Thus, we designed a study whereby the contribution of (1) test cycle number and (2) test load level to RPI test-induced sub-surface damage was characterized and quantified. Standardized specimens were prepared from cadaveric human tibiae (n=6), such that 12 replicates of each testing condition could be carried out. A custom rig was fabricated to accurately position and map indentation sites. One set of tests was carried out with 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (Max Load: 8 N, Freq: 2 Hz), and a second set of tests was carried out with Load levels of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 N (Cycle number: 20, Freq: 2 Hz). The RPI parameter Loading Slope (LS) was cycle dependent at 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). First Cycle Indentation Distance (ID 1st), Total Indentation Distance (TID), Mean Energy Dissipation (ED), First Cycle Unloading Slope (US 1st), Mean Unloading Slope (US) and LS were significantly different at 6, 8 and 10 N compared to 2 N (p<0.05). From the histomorphometric measurements, damage zone span was significantly different after 5, 10, 15 and 20 cycles compared with 1 cycle while indent profile width and indent profile depth were significantly different at 10, 15 and 20 cycles (p<0.05). With the load varying protocol, each of these parameters differed significantly at each increased load level (4, 6, 8, 10 N) compared with the basal level of 2 N (p<0

  1. Tissue-Specific Regulation of p38α-Mediated Inflammation in Con A-Induced Acute Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young Jun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Otsu, Kinya

    2015-05-15

    Because p38α plays a critical role in inflammation, it has been an attractive target for the development of anti-inflammation therapeutics. However, p38α inhibitors showed side effects, including severe liver toxicity, that often prevailed over the benefits in clinical studies, and the mechanism of toxicity is not clear. In this study, we demonstrate that p38α regulates the inflammatory responses in acute liver inflammation in a tissue-specific manner, and liver toxicity by p38α inhibitors may be a result of the inhibition of protective activity of p38α in the liver. Genetic ablation of p38α in T and NKT cells protected mice from liver injury in Con A-induced liver inflammation, whereas liver-specific deletion of p38α aggravated liver pathology. We found that p38α deficiency in the liver increased the expression of chemokines to recruit more inflammatory cells, indicating that p38α in the liver plays a protective anti-inflammatory role during acute liver inflammation. Therefore, our results suggest that p38α regulates the inflammatory responses in a tissue-specific manner, and that the tissue-specific p38α targeting strategies can be used for the development of an effective anti-inflammation treatment with an improved side-effect profile.

  2. Percutaneous mechanical assist for severe cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Ryan; Raval, Amish N

    2015-05-01

    Acute right ventricular failure can lead to severe cardiogenic shock and death. Recovery may be achieved with early supportive measures. In many patients, intravenous fluid and inotropic resuscitation is inadequate to improve cardiac output. In these cases, percutaneous mechanical assist may provide a non-surgical bridge to recovery. Herein, we describe a case series of patients with severe, refractory cardiogenic shock due to acute right ventricular failure who received a continuous flow percutaneous ventricular device primarily utilizing the right internal jugular vein for out flow cannula placement.

  3. Acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock: pharmacologic and mechanical hemodynamic support pathways.

    PubMed

    Graf, Tobias; Desch, Steffen; Eitel, Ingo; Thiele, Holger

    2015-09-01

    Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the predominant cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction, although mortality has been reduced in recent years. Early percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting are causal therapies implemented in CS, supported by catecholamines, fluids, intra-aortic balloon pumping, and also active percutaneous assist devices. There is only limited evidence from randomized studies of any of these treatments in CS, except for early revascularization and the relative ineffectiveness of intra-aortic balloon pumping. This review will present treatment pathways of CS complicating acute myocardial infarction, with a major focus on revascularization, intensive care unit treatment, and mechanical support devices.

  4. The serpentine path to a novel mechanism-based inhibitor of acute inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Comroe lecture on which this review is based described my research path during the past 45 years, beginning with studies of oxidant stress (hyperoxia) and eventuating in the discovery of a synthetic inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activity (called MJ33) that prevents acute lung injury in mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide. In between were studies of lung ischemia, lung surfactant metabolism, the protein peroxiredoxin 6 and its phospholipase A2 activity, and mechanisms for NADPH oxidase activation. These seemingly unrelated research activities provided the nexus for identification of a novel target and a potentially novel therapeutic agent for prevention or treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:24744383

  5. Coupled hydro-mechanical properties of Cobourg limestone with special reference to excavation damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Ye, Sheng; Su, Grant; Nguyen, Son; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Argillaceous rock formations being considered as potential host or cap rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes are usually characterized by the presence of bedding planes, resulting in anisotropy of their strength and deformation properties. A laboratory experimental program was performed at the Rock Fracture Dynamics Facility at the University of Toronto to determine the coupled hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone with special reference to its potential for damage. The program consists of triaxial tests with measurement of permeability using the pulse decay method and measurement of the seismic wave velocity at different stress levels. The tests were carried out on specimens parallel and perpendicular to the foliation planes within a geophysical imaging cell under different stress levels up to and beyond their peak strength. The specimens are characterized by random and irregular clay pockets and discontinuous argillaceous weak layers. Permeability of the specimens was measured with the pulse decay method under different pre - and post- failure deviatoric stresses. The specimens tested parallel to foliation planes show higher triaxial compressive strengths and higher axial strains at failure in comparison to the specimens tested perpendicular to the foliation planes. The permeability (k) values measured under different stress levels for all specimens show a consistent trend. The k value decreases with the stress increase at the beginning due to the closure of pre-existing fissures and beddings. The k value then increases continuously with the increase in the stress level with highest k values obtained at the post-failure stage. The evolution of the compressional and shear-wave velocities and shear wave splitting as a function of the axial stress is compatible with preferably oriented weak planes and with the evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of the Cobourg limestone. From the test results, it can be interpreted that at

  6. Damage-Resistant Composites Using Electrospun Nanofibers: A Multiscale Analysis of the Toughening Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Daelemans, Lode; van der Heijden, Sam; De Baere, Ives; Rahier, Hubert; Van Paepegem, Wim; De Clerck, Karen

    2016-05-11

    Today, fiber-reinforced polymer composites are a standard material in applications where a high stiffness and strength are required at minimal weight, such as aerospace structures, ultralight vehicles, or even flywheels for highly efficient power storage systems. Although fiber-reinforced polymer composites show many advantages compared to other materials, delamination between reinforcing plies remains a major problem limiting further breakthrough. Traditional solutions that have been proposed to toughen the interlaminar region between reinforcing plies have already reached their limit or have important disadvantages such as a high cost or the need for adapted production processes. Recently, electrospun nanofibers have been suggested as a more viable interlaminar toughening method. Although the expected benefits are numerous, the research on composite laminates enhanced with electrospun nanofibrous veils is still very limited. The work that has been done so far is almost exclusively focused on interlaminar fracture toughness tests with different kinds of nanofibers, where typically a trial and error approach has been used. A thorough understanding of the micromechanical fracture mechanisms and the parameters to obtain toughened composites has not been reported as of yet, but it is crucial to advance the research and design highly damage-resistant composites. This article provides such insight by analyzing the nanofiber toughening effect on three different levels for several nanofiber types. Only by combining the results from different levels, a thorough understanding can be obtained. These levels correspond to the hierarchical nature of a composite: the laminate, the interlaminar region, and the matrix resin. It is found that each level corresponds to certain mechanisms that result in a toughening effect. The bridging of microcracks by electrospun nanofibers is the main toughening mechanism resulting in damage resistance. Nevertheless, the way in which the

  7. Mesobuthus tamulus venom induces acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats involving additional mechanisms as compared to oleic acid model.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Tiwari, Anil K; Patne, Shashikant C U; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2015-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is produced after Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) envenomation and compared it with oleic acid (OA)-induced ARDS. The trachea, jugular vein and femoral artery were cannulated in anesthetized adult rats. Lethal dose of MBT venom (5 mg/kg) or OA (75 μL) was administered intravenously and the time-dependent changes in respiratory frequency (RF), heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded. Minute ventilation (MV) and the PaO2/FiO2 (P/F) ratio were also determined. At the end lungs were excised, one lung was used for histopathological examination and the other was used for determination of pulmonary water content physically. MBT venom or OA produced hypoxemia, pulmonary pathology (alveolar damage, infiltration of inflammatory cells, capillary damage and exudation) and pulmonary edema implicating for ARDS. However, the hypoxemia in MBT venom group was associated with decreased MV, apnea/bradypnea, and bradycardia whereas, in OA group it was seen with increased MV, tachypnea, and tachycardia. Lack of effect of hypoxemic drive on RF/MV or HR in MBT venom group unlike OA group, suggests the involvement of medullary centers. The present results demonstrate that MBT venom produces ARDS. However MBT venom-induced ARDS involves pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary mechanisms.

  8. The protective mechanisms of paracetamol against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Poon, Y K; Cho, C H; Ogle, C W

    1989-08-01

    The protective mechanisms of paracetamol against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage have been examined. The antiulcer action of subcutaneously (s.c.)-injected paracetamol, 250 mg kg-1, was attenuated by either subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or s.c. injection of N-ethylmaleimide, 10 mg kg-1. This attenuation was not seen in rats given paracetamol by the oral route (p.o.). Indomethacin pretreatment, 5 mg kg-1, did not influence the lesion-preventing action of paracetamol given s.c. or p.o. The findings suggest that the antiulcer effect of s.c.-administered paracetamol results from an action involving the vagal nerve and tissue sulfhydryls, but not prostaglandins. On the other hand, the protective mechanism of paracetamol p.o. is independent of the vagal system or tissue sulfhydryls and prostaglandins. It seems that paracetamol given p.o. exerts its antiulcer effect by acting directly on the mucosal cell to strengthen mucosal integrity.

  9. Calcitriol-induced DNA damage: toward a molecular mechanism of selective cell death.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Rizvi, Asim; Naseem, Imrana

    2013-09-01

    Calcitriol, the biologically active form of vitamin D, is known to function as an important anticancer agent. The exact mechanism by which calcitriol exerts its effects remains unknown. Recent evidence suggests a link between calcitriol-induced, free-radical-mediated DNA damage and cell death, in the presence of elevated levels of copper, such as those observed in malignant cells. As calcitriol is a lipid-soluble molecule, its interaction with DNA and copper would require a "chaperone"-like molecule, which binds the relatively hydrophobic calcitriol and polar DNA. A candidate protein is the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which binds both molecules. Using the recently elucidated full-length structure of the VDR molecule, we present and discuss three possible mechanisms to explain the interaction between calcitriol and DNA, as mediated by VDR.

  10. γ-Ray irradiation stability and damage mechanism of glycidyl amine epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Feiyu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yujian; Fang, Jun; Luan, Weilin

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation stability of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resins was evaluated according to the changes of physico-chemical and mechanical properties under 60Co γ-ray irradiation with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The result shows that with the increase of radiation dose, bending strength, thermal stability, free radical concentration and storage modulus of epoxy resin decrease first, then increase slightly, and decline sharply at the end with a dose of 960 kGy, due to competition effects between radiation-induced degradation and cross-linking reaction. The damage mechanism was derived by analyzing structure and composition change of AFG-90 resins after irradiation via IR and XPS. Irradiation will result in weak bond breaking such as Csbnd C and Csbnd N bond, and new bond forming like Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O.

  11. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M D

    1980-09-01

    In this project several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and a series of experiments detailed utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. Under current investigation are irradiated systems of DNA constituents which may shed light on indirect effects. In addition, studies of radiation effects on lipids have been undertaken which will shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane. Studies completed during the past year are: (1) ..pi.. cations produced in DNA bases by attack of oxidizing radicals; (2) INDO studies of radicals produced in peptides and carboxylic acid model compounds; (3) electron reactions with carboxylic acids, ketones and aldehydes; and (4) ..gamma..-irradiation of esters and triglycerides. Progress has been made this year in a study of radicals generated in model compounds for the sugar-phosphate backbone.

  12. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  13. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  14. Mechanisms of isoproterenol-induced cardiac mitochondrial damage: protective actions of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debasri; Ghosh, Arnab K; Dutta, Mousumi; Mitra, Elina; Mallick, Sanjaya; Saha, Bhaskar; Reiter, Russel J; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction due to oxidative damage is the key feature of several diseases. We have earlier reported mitochondrial damage resulting from the generation of oxidative stress as a major pathophysiological effect of isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial ischemia in rats. That melatonin is an antioxidant that ameliorates oxidative stress in experimental animals as well as in humans is well established. We previously demonstrated that melatonin provides cardioprotection against ISO-induced myocardial injury as a result of its antioxidant properties. The mechanism of ISO-induced cardiac mitochondrial damage and protection by melatonin, however, remains to be elucidated in vitro. In this study, we provide evidence that ISO causes dysfunction of isolated goat heart mitochondria. Incubation of cardiac mitochondria with increasing concentrations of ISO decreased mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, which plays a pivotal role in mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as altered the activities of other key enzymes of the Kreb's cycle and the respiratory chain. Co-incubation of ISO-challenged mitochondria with melatonin prevented the alterations in enzyme activity. That these changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism were due to the perpetration of oxidative stress by ISO was evident from the increased levels of lipid peroxidation and decreased reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio. ISO-induced oxidative stress also altered mitochondrial redox potential and brought about changes in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes manganese superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, eventually leading to alterations in total ATPase activity and membrane potential. Melatonin ameliorated these changes likely through its antioxidant abilities suggesting a possible mechanism of cardioprotection by this indole against ISO-induced myocardial injury. PMID:25652673

  15. Membrane vesiculation of Naegleria fowleri amoebae as a mechanism for resisting complement damage.

    PubMed

    Toney, D M; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1994-03-15

    Pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae activate the alternative C pathway; however, only pathogenic amoebae are resistant to C-mediated damage. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism by which highly pathogenic N. fowleri amoebae resist C-mediated damage. Nomarski optics microscopy and electron microscopy of Naegleria amoebae revealed membrane blebbing on the surface of C-resistant N. fowleri, but not on C-sensitive N. gruberi, in response to incubation in normal human serum diluted 1:4 to 1:16. Immunofluorescent staining of pathogenic amoebae, by using antiserum to human C proteins comprising the membrane attack complex, C5b through C9, and FITC-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG, confirmed that the membrane attack complex was concentrated on the membrane blebs. Binding studies with the use of radioiodinated C9 demonstrated a decrease in the 125I-labeled C9 cpm associated with N. fowleri amoebae and an increase in the 125I-labeled C9 cpm associated with the released membrane vesicles after increasing incubation periods in normal human serum. Treatment of pathogenic, C-resistant N. fowleri with cytochalasin D or cytochalasin B to inhibit actin-dependent exocytic processes increased the susceptibility of the amoebae to C damage. In contrast, incubation of nonpathogenic, C-sensitive amoebae with cytochalasins did not alter their susceptibility to C lysis. These data indicate that pathogenic N. fowleri use membrane vesiculation to remove membrane-deposited C proteins, specifically the membrane attack complex (C5b-C9). The ability to remove surface-associated membrane attack complexes serves as one mechanism by which pathogenic N. fowleri resist C lysis.

  16. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: A route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles; Azdoud, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe "volume" damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a "surface" degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  17. Plasma damage mechanisms in low k organosilicate glass and their inhibition by Ar ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Kazi, Haseeb; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2014-03-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with or without O{sub 2}, and O radicals point to distinct mechanisms of carbon abstraction in nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) films. VUV alone in the absence of O{sub 2} results in Si-CH{sub 3} bond scission and recombination preferentially at silicon monomethyl sites, obeying diffusion kinetics. In contrast, the presence of O{sub 2} interferes with recombination, resulting in diffusion-dominated carbon loss kinetics, enhanced Si oxidation, and greatly accelerating the rate of carbon loss in both the near surface and bulk regions of the OSG, at both monomethyl and dimethyl sites. Carbon abstraction due to exposure to (O({sup 3}P)) does not follow diffusion kinetics, and such interactions yield a SiO{sub 2}-like surface layer inhibiting further O diffusion. Results indicate that diffusion-dominated carbon abstraction kinetics previously observed for OSG exposure to O{sub 2} plasma damage is primarily attributable to the diffusion of O{sub 2} down OSG nanopores, reacting at photoactivated sites, rather than the diffusion of O radicals. OSG pretreatment by 900 eV Ar{sup +} bombardment effectively inhibits both VUV + O{sub 2} and O damage mechanisms by formation of ∼1 nm thick SiO{sub 2}-like surface region that inhibits both O and O{sub 2} diffusion.

  18. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  19. The Split Second Effect: The Mechanism of How Equinus Can Damage the Human Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Amis, James

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in the process of discovering that many, if not the majority, of the non-traumatic acquired adult foot and ankle problems are caused by a singular etiology: non-neuromuscular equinus or the isolated gastrocnemius contracture. There is no question that this biomechanical association exists and in time much more will be uncovered. There are three basic questions that must be answered: why would our calves tighten as we normally age, how does a tight calf, or equinus, actually cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle, and how do the forces produced by equinus cause so many seemingly unrelated pathologies in the foot and ankle? The purpose of this paper is to address the second question: how does a tight calf mechanically cause problems remotely in the foot and ankle? There has been little evidence in the literature addressing the biomechanical mechanisms by which equinus creates damaging forces upon the foot and ankle, and as a result, a precise, convincing mechanism is still lacking. Thus, the mere concept that equinus has anything to do with foot pathology is generally unknown or disregarded. The split second effect, described here, defines exactly how the silent equinus contracture creates incremental and significant damage and injury to the human foot and ankle resulting in a wide variety of pathological conditions. The split second effect is a dissenting theory based on 30 years of clinical and academic orthopedic foot and ankle experience, keen clinical observation along the way, and review of the developing literature, culminating in examination of many hours of slow motion video of normal and abnormal human gait. To my knowledge, no one has ever described the mechanism in detail this precise. PMID:27512692

  20. Collagen insulated from tensile damage by domains that unfold reversibly: in situ X-ray investigation of mechanical yield and damage repair in the mussel byssus

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Matthew J.; Gupta, Himadri S.; Fratzl, Peter; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The byssal threads of the California mussel, Mytilus californianus, are highly hysteretic, elastomeric fibers that collectively perform a holdfast function in wave-swept rocky seashore habitats. Following cyclic loading past the mechanical yield point, threads exhibit a damage-dependent reduction in mechanical performance. However, the distal portion of the byssal thread is capable of recovering initial material properties through a time-dependent healing process in the absence of active cellular metabolism. Byssal threads are composed almost exclusively of multi-domain hybrid collagens known as preCols, which largely determine the mechanical properties of the thread. Here, the structure-property relationships that govern thread mechanical performance are further probed. The molecular rearrangements that occur during yield and damage repair were investigated using time-resolved in situ wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) coupled with cyclic tensile loading of threads and through thermally enhanced damage-repair studies. Results indicate that the collagen domains in byssal preCols are mechanically protected by the unfolding of sacrificial non-collagenous domains that refold on a slower time-scale. Time-dependent healing is primarily attributed to stochastic recoupling of broken histidine-metal coordination complexes. PMID:19275941

  1. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Alfonso Megido, Joaquín; González Franco, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    When acute heart failure progresses and there is acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, routine therapeutic measures should be accompanied by other measures that help to correct oxygenation of the patient. The final and most drastic step is mechanical ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation has been developed in the last few years as a method that attempts to improve oxygenation without the need for intubation, thus, in theory, reducing morbidity and mortality in these patients. The present article describes the controversies surrounding the results of this technique and discusses its indications. The article also discusses how to start non-invasive ventilation in patients with acute pulmonary edema from a practical point of view. PMID:24930085

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Damage Processes in Aluminum Alloys: Grain-Scale Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, J. D.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bozek, J. E.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper has two goals related to the development of a physically-grounded methodology for modeling the initial stages of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy. The aluminum alloy, AA 7075-T651, is susceptible to fatigue cracking that nucleates from cracked second phase iron-bearing particles. Thus, the first goal of the paper is to validate an existing framework for the prediction of the conditions under which the particles crack. The observed statistics of particle cracking (defined as incubation for this alloy) must be accurately predicted to simulate the stochastic nature of microstructurally small fatigue crack (MSFC) formation. Also, only by simulating incubation of damage in a statistically accurate manner can subsequent stages of crack growth be accurately predicted. To maintain fidelity and computational efficiency, a filtering procedure was developed to eliminate particles that were unlikely to crack. The particle filter considers the distributions of particle sizes and shapes, grain texture, and the configuration of the surrounding grains. This filter helps substantially reduce the number of particles that need to be included in the microstructural models and forms the basis of the future work on the subsequent stages of MSFC, crack nucleation and microstructurally small crack propagation. A physics-based approach to simulating fracture should ultimately begin at nanometer length scale, in which atomistic simulation is used to predict the fundamental damage mechanisms of MSFC. These mechanisms include dislocation formation and interaction, interstitial void formation, and atomic diffusion. However, atomistic simulations quickly become computationally intractable as the system size increases, especially when directly linking to the already large microstructural models. Therefore, the second goal of this paper is to propose a method that will incorporate atomistic simulation and small-scale experimental characterization into the existing multiscale

  3. Ballistic impact damage and penetration mechanics of fiber-reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patts, Henry Michael

    2000-10-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed to characterize and model the processes of damage evolution and resulting penetration failure of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy resin composite laminates ("structural grade") under ballistic impact. In contrast to the local yielding demonstrated by ductile isotropic materials, the penetration failure of fiber-reinforced composites produced extensive fragmentation of material with multiple modes of damage propagation such as "delamination," "interfiber matrix splitting," "transverse fiber cuts," and "through-the-thickness plugging." Due to the formation of damage zones in three-dimensional scale, the increase in target thickness raised the amount of kinetic energy absorption for full penetration in a "non-linear" fashion in fiber composites unlike the linear correlation for isotropic material such as polycarbonate and aluminum. Interfiber matrix splitting and delamination were found to be the first sign of structural deterioration occurring far below V50 and precede transverse cutting of fibers and plugging. The development of interfiber splitting into delamination of composites is explained by relying on the contact mechanics of a spherical indentor. Matrix splits on adjacent plies formed one pair of geometrical "wedges" at the ply interface, resulting in a delamination zone connected through an "isthmus." Contained in this free ply region, stress concentration readily led to transverse cutting (approximately at 85 percent of the V50) of plies when longitudinal stress of the reinforcing fibers reaches a critical level for fracture. The observed distribution of the damage leading to transverse fiber cuts was modeled by idealizing a circular target panel of staircase laminate into three zones with different values of bending stiffness due to the progression of damage. In "three-zone" model, the energy absorbed by the panel were represented in three forms of potential energy; surface free energy due to delamination

  4. a Study of Biophysical Mechanisms of Damage by Ionizing Radiation to Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Zhang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An extensive survey made of published survival data of damage by ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro has led to the new conclusion that the damage is determined by the specific ionization or the mean free path between ionizing events along the charged particle tracks. The optimum damage is observed when the mean free path is equivalent to the DNA double strand spacing of 1.8 nm. Therefore, the biological mechanism of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro is intra track dominant. A 100 keV electron accelerator has been constructed and commissioned to produce a broad beam irradiation field of greater than 1 cm diameter. The fluence rate may be adjusted from 10^8cm^ {-2}sec^{-1} downwards to enable further development as a chronic irradiation facility. Another new feature of the accelerator is that it incorporates a differential vacuum system which permits irradiation of the monolayer cell cultures to be carried out in normal pressure. Experiments of irradiation to Chinese hamster cells, by ^{241}Am alpha particles at low fluence rate, have supplied satisfactory data for testing a new DNA-rupture model which is under development. For V79 cells irradiated at a low fluence rate of 10^5cm^{ -2}min^{-1}, when survival data were fitted into the model, new biophysical parameters were extracted and a proposal was made that the repair phenomenon of cellular survival at very low doses is determined by three time factors: the irradiation time, the damage fixation time and the repair time. The values obtained were 3-4 hours for the mean repair time, and more than 10 hours for the damage to be considered permanent. Details of the monolayer cell culture technique developed and used in the present experiments are described. Consideration has been given to the significance of the results obtained from the study in radiation protection and in radiotherapy. In future studies it is recommended that more

  5. Anisotropic mechanical properties of zircon and the effect of radiation damage

    DOE PAGES

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Bismayer, Ulrich; Boatner, Lynn A.; Isaacson, Scott G.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2016-06-02

    Our study provides new insights into the relationship between radiation-dose-dependent structural damage, due to natural U and Th impurities, and the anisotropic mechanical properties (Poisson s ratio, elastic modulus and hardness) of zircon. Natural zircon samples from Sri Lanka (see Muarakami et al. 1991) and synthetic samples, covering a dose range of zero up to 6.8 x 1018 -decays/g, have been studied by nanoindentation. Measurements along the [100] crystallographic direction and calculations, based on elastic stiffness constants determined by zkan (1976), revealed a general radiation-induced decrease in stiffness (~ 54 %) and hardness (~ 48 %) and an increase ofmore » the Poisson s ratio (~ 54 %) with increasing dose. Additional indentations on selected samples along the [001] allowed one to follow the amorphization process to the point that the mechanical properties are isotropic. This work shows that the radiation-dose-dependent changes of the mechanical properties of zircon can be directly correlated with the amorphous fraction as determined by previous investigations with local and global probes (Rios et al. 2000a; Farnan and Salje 2001; Zhang and Salje 2001). This agreement, revealed by the different methods, indicates a huge influence of structural and even local phenomena on the macroscopic mechanical properties.« less

  6. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-09-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models show a strong dependence on the level of hydrostatic tension. Even though the reason for this pressure dependence is different in the two models, as the shear-extended Gurson model does not describe voids flattening out and the associated failure mechanism by micro-cracks interacting with neighbouring micro-cracks, it is shown that the trends of the predictions are in good agreement.

  7. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  8. Acute stress regulates nociception and inflammatory response induced by bee venom in rats: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; Li, Feng-Peng; Li, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Bao-Jun; Qu, Fang; Wen, Wei-Wei; Wang, Yang; Lin, Qing

    2013-09-01

    Restraint stress modulates pain and inflammation. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of acute restraint stress on inflammatory pain induced by subcutaneous injection of bee venom (BV). First, we investigated the effect of 1 h restraint on the spontaneous paw-flinching reflex (SPFR), decrease in paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) and increase in paw volume (PV) of the injected paw induced by BV. SPFR was measured immediately after BV injection, and PWMT and PV were measured 2 h before BV and 2-8 h after BV. The results showed that acute restraint inhibited significantly the SPFR but failed to affect mechanical hyperalgesia. In contrast, stress enhanced significantly inflammatory swelling of the injected paw. In a second series of experiments, the effects of pretreatment with capsaicin locally applied to the sciatic nerve, systemic 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), and systemic naloxone were examined on the antinociception and proinflammation produced by acute restraint stress. Local capsaicin pretreatment inhibited BV-induced nociception and inflammatory edema, and had additive effects with stress on nociception but reduced stress enhancement of edema. Systemic 6-OHDA treatment attenuated the proinflammatory effect of stress, but did not affect the antinociceptive effect. Systemic naloxone pretreatment eliminated the antinociceptive effect of stress, but did not affect proinflammation. Taken together, our data indicate that acute restraint stress contributes to antinociception via activating an endogenous opioid system, while sympathetic postganglionic fibers may contribute to enhanced inflammation in the BV pain model.

  9. Mechanism of plasma-induced damage to low-k SiOCH films during plasma ashing of organic resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Keigo; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takashima, Seigo; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Oshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hori, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Plasma-induced damage to porous SiOCH (p-SiOCH) films during organic resist film ashing using dual-frequency capacitively coupled O2 plasmas was investigated using the pallet for plasma evaluation method developed by our group. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Individual and synergetic damage associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions in the O2 plasma were clarified. It was found that the damage was caused not only by radicals but also by synergetic reactions of radicals with VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. It is noteworthy that the damage induced by plasma exposure without ion bombardment was larger than the damage with ion bombardment. These results differed from those obtained using an H2/N2 plasma for resist ashing. Finally, the mechanism of damage to p-SiOCH caused by O2 and H2/N2 plasma ashing of organic resist films is discussed. These results are very important in understanding the mechanism of plasma-induced damage to p-SiOCH films.

  10. Mechanism of plasma-induced damage to low-k SiOCH films during plasma ashing of organic resists

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Keigo; Miyawaki, Yudai; Takashima, Seigo; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Oshima, Keiji; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya; Hori, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Plasma-induced damage to porous SiOCH (p-SiOCH) films during organic resist film ashing using dual-frequency capacitively coupled O{sub 2} plasmas was investigated using the pallet for plasma evaluation method developed by our group. The damage was characterized by ellipsometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Individual and synergetic damage associated with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and UV radiation, radicals, and ions in the O{sub 2} plasma were clarified. It was found that the damage was caused not only by radicals but also by synergetic reactions of radicals with VUV and UV radiation emitted by the plasmas. It is noteworthy that the damage induced by plasma exposure without ion bombardment was larger than the damage with ion bombardment. These results differed from those obtained using an H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma for resist ashing. Finally, the mechanism of damage to p-SiOCH caused by O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} plasma ashing of organic resist films is discussed. These results are very important in understanding the mechanism of plasma-induced damage to p-SiOCH films.

  11. A damage mechanics approach for quantifying stress changes due to brittle failure of porous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquey, Antoine B.; Cacace, Mauro; Blöcher, Guido; Milsch, Harald; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Natural fault zones or man-made injection or production of fluid impact the regional stress distribution in Earth's crust and can be responsible for localized stress discontinuities. Understanding the processes controlling fracturing of the porous rocks and mechanical behaviour of fault zones is therefore of interest for several applications including geothermal energy production. In this contribution, we will present a thermodynamically consistent visco-poroelastic damage model which can deal with the multi-scale and multi-physics nature of the physical processes controlling the deformation of porous rocks during and after brittle failure. Deformation of a porous medium is crucially influenced by the changes in the effective stress. Considering a strain-formulated yield cap and the compaction-dilation transition, three different regimes can be identified: quasi-elastic deformation, cataclastic compaction with microcracking (damage accumulation) and macroscopic brittle failure with dilation. The governing equations for deformation, damage accumulation/healing and fluid flow have been implemented in a fully-coupled finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly and in a tightly coupled manner on unstructured meshes which is of interest for such non-linear context. To illustrate the model, simulation of a compaction experiment of a sandstone leading to shear failure will be presented which allows to quantify the stress drop accompanying the failure. Finally, we will demonstrate that this approach can also be used at the field scale to simulate hydraulic fracturing and assess the resulting changes in the stress field.

  12. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  13. Microscopic mechanism of DNA damage searching by hOGG1.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Meng M; Schonhoft, Joseph D; McKibbin, Paige L; David, Sheila S; Stivers, James T

    2014-08-01

    The DNA backbone is often considered a track that allows long-range sliding of DNA repair enzymes in their search for rare damage sites in DNA. A proposed exemplar of DNA sliding is human 8-oxoguanine ((o)G) DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), which repairs mutagenic (o)G lesions in DNA. Here we use our high-resolution molecular clock method to show that macroscopic 1D DNA sliding of hOGG1 occurs by microscopic 2D and 3D steps that masquerade as sliding in resolution-limited single-molecule images. Strand sliding was limited to distances shorter than seven phosphate linkages because attaching a covalent chemical road block to a single DNA phosphate located between two closely spaced damage sites had little effect on transfers. The microscopic parameters describing the DNA search of hOGG1 were derived from numerical simulations constrained by the experimental data. These findings support a general mechanism where DNA glycosylases use highly dynamic multidimensional diffusion paths to scan DNA.

  14. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  15. A numerical investigation of blood damage in the hinge area of bileaflet mechanical heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Min; Wu, Jingshu; Simon, Helene; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Aidun, Cyrus; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2010-11-01

    Studies have shown that high shear stress and large recirculation regions have a strong impact on thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHV). This study quantitatively compares the hinge flow field and blood damage of the 23mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) regent with different hinge gap widths and the 23mm CarboMedics (CM) valves. The lattice-Boltzmann method with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) [Wu and Aidun, Int. J Num. Methods Fluids, 62, 7, 2009] was implemented to simulate the flow and capture the dynamics and the surface shear stress of the platelets with realistic geometry. The velocity boundary conditions for the small-scale hinge flow are obtained from previous 3D large-scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations [Simon et al, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 38, 3, 2009]. The flow patterns of three hinges that were studied were similar during diastole. However, velocity magnitudes and shear stresses at the hinge gap were different, which may explain the higher blood damage index (BDI) value for the CM valve and lower BDI value for the SJM valve with a larger gap width. The multiscale computational method used to quantitatively measure the BDI during a full cardiac cycle will be discussed.

  16. Free radical-mediated oxidative DNA damage in the mechanism of thalidomide teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Parman, T; Wiley, M J; Wells, P G

    1999-05-01

    The sedative drug thalidomide ([+]-alpha-phthalimidoglutarimide), once abandoned for causing birth defects in humans, has found new therapeutic license in leprosy and other diseases, with renewed teratological consequences. Although the mechanism of teratogenesis and determinants of risk remain unclear, related teratogenic xenobiotics are bioactivated by embryonic prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) to a free-radical intermediates that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause oxidative damage to DNA and other cellular macromolecules. Similarly, thalidomide is bioactivated by horseradish peroxidase, and oxidizes DNA and glutathione, indicating free radical-mediated oxidative stress. Furthermore, thalidomide teratogenicity in rabbits is reduced by the PHS inhibitor acetylsalicylic acid, indicating PHS-catalyzed bioactivation. Here, we show in rabbits that thalidomide initiates embryonic DNA oxidation and teratogenicity, both of which are abolished by pre-treatment with the free radical spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). In contrast, in mice, a species resistant to thalidomide teratogenicity, thalidomide does not enhance DNA oxidation, even at a dose 300% higher than that used in rabbits, providing insight into an embryonic determinant of species-dependent susceptibility. In addition to their therapeutic implications, these results constitute direct evidence that the teratogenicity of thalidomide may involve free radical-mediated oxidative damage to embryonic cellular macromolecules.

  17. Vibration damage mechanism analysis on rotor of diesel generating set with rigid coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing; Shi, Weizhen; Hua, Chunrong; Liu, Jingming; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The crankshaft output end is generally connected with generator rotor through the coupling in diesel generating set. When using rigid coupling, the attachments and connecting parts of generator rotor (especially at larger gyration radius) are vulnerable to fatigue damage even if the vibration level of the generating set does not exceed the acceptable “usual value”. In order to investigate the reasons, the torsional vibration of the rotor in the diesel generating set was calculated and measured in this paper, which shows that using high rigidity coupling would result in large torsional vibration on the generator rotor, and that the linear vibration (the tangential vibration) value induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius of generator motor is almost the same as the vibration level of the generating set. Then, the vibration level of generating set was obtained, and the maximum vibration velocities of the generator are below the permissible value regulated by ISO 8528-9. But the velocities of synthetic vibration of the generating set vibration and the linear vibration induced by torsional vibration at larger gyration radius are much higher than permissible value 2(28mm/s) regulated by ISO 8528-9, which may be the reason of the mechanical damage of the attachments and connecting parts at larger gyration radius of generator motor caused by exceeded vibration.

  18. AFM investigation on surface damage caused by mechanical probing with small ruby spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Felix; Küng, Alain

    2007-02-01

    One challenge for today's coordinate metrology is fast and accurate 3D measurements on small objects. Mechanical probing is considered to be simple and accurate but limitations may arise from elastic and plastic deformations at the contact point. Understanding these limits quantitatively will help to avoid surface damage and measurement errors. Static and dynamic forces for single point probings and for scanning measurements were investigated in the present work using a metrology AFM and a micro-CMM. The obtained results were compared with theoretical predictions made by Hertz's theory. We found that the standard forces used by the METAS micro-CMM can be kept below the macroscopic damage threshold. On the other hand, plastic deformation of microscopic contact points which forms at the interface due to the surface roughness of the probe and sample is always present. Additionally, probe contamination by build-up of ductile metal on the probe surface was observed and probe wear on a hard sample was measured.

  19. S1P lyase regulates DNA damage responses through a novel sphingolipid feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Oskouian, B; Fyrst, H; Zhang, M; Paris, F; Saba, J D

    2011-01-01

    The injurious consequences of ionizing radiation (IR) to normal human cells and the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells represent limitations to cancer radiotherapy. IR induces DNA damage response pathways that orchestrate cell cycle arrest, DNA repair or apoptosis such that irradiated cells are either repaired or eliminated. Concomitantly and independent of DNA damage, IR activates acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which generates ceramide, thereby promoting radiation-induced apoptosis. However, ceramide can also be metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which acts paradoxically as a radioprotectant. Thus, sphingolipid metabolism represents a radiosensitivity pivot point, a notion supported by genetic evidence in IR-resistant cancer cells. S1P lyase (SPL) catalyzes the irreversible degradation of S1P in the final step of sphingolipid metabolism. We show that SPL modulates the kinetics of DNA repair, speed of recovery from G2 cell cycle arrest and the extent of apoptosis after IR. SPL acts through a novel feedback mechanism that amplifies stress-induced ceramide accumulation, and downregulation/inhibition of either SPL or ASMase prevents premature cell cycle progression and mitotic death. Further, oral administration of an SPL inhibitor to mice prolonged their survival after exposure to a lethal dose of total body IR. Our findings reveal SPL to be a regulator of ASMase, the G2 checkpoint and DNA repair and a novel target for radioprotection.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF CONDITIONS OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE RESERVOIRS AND DESIGN AND DEMONSTRATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNIQUES FOR DAMAGE MECHANISMS FOUND THEREIN

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Frantz Jr; K.G. Brown; W.K. Sawyer; P.A. Zyglowicz; P.M. Halleck; J.P. Spivey

    2004-12-01

    The underground gas storage (UGS) industry uses over 400 reservoirs and 17,000 wells to store and withdrawal gas. As such, it is a significant contributor to gas supply in the United States. It has been demonstrated that many UGS wells show a loss of deliverability each year due to numerous damage mechanisms. Previous studies estimate that up to one hundred million dollars are spent each year to recover or replace a deliverability loss of approximately 3.2 Bscf/D per year in the storage industry. Clearly, there is a great potential for developing technology to prevent, mitigate, or eliminate the damage causing deliverability losses in UGS wells. Prior studies have also identified the presence of several potential damage mechanisms in storage wells, developed damage diagnostic procedures, and discussed, in general terms, the possible reactions that need to occur to create the damage. However, few studies address how to prevent or mitigate specific damage types, and/or how to eliminate the damage from occurring in the future. This study seeks to increase our understanding of two specific damage mechanisms, inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite), and non-darcy damage, and thus serves to expand prior efforts as well as complement ongoing gas storage projects. Specifically, this study has resulted in: (1) An effective lab protocol designed to assess the extent of damage due to inorganic precipitates; (2) An increased understanding of how inorganic precipitates (specifically siderite) develop; (3) Identification of potential sources of chemical components necessary for siderite formation; (4) A remediation technique that has successfully restored deliverability to storage wells damaged by the inorganic precipitate siderite (one well had nearly a tenfold increase in deliverability); (5) Identification of the types of treatments that have historically been successful at reducing the amount of non-darcy pressure drop in a well, and (6) Development of a tool that can

  1. Laser-Induced Thermal-Mechanical Damage Characteristics of Cleartran Multispectral Zinc Sulfide with Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yajing; Jiang, Yanxue; Yang, Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal-mechanical damage characteristics of window materials are the focus problems in laser weapon and anti-radiation reinforcement technology. Thermal-mechanical effects and damage characteristics are investigated for cleartran multispectral zinc sulfide (ZnS) thin film window materials irradiated by continuous laser using three-dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical model. Some temperature-dependent parameters are introduced into the model. The temporal-spatial distributions of temperature and thermal stress are exhibited. The damage mechanism is analyzed. The influences of temperature effect of material parameters and laser intensity on the development of thermal stress and the damage characteristics are examined. The results show, the von Mises equivalent stress along the thickness direction is fluctuant, which originates from the transformation of principal stresses from compressive stress to tensile stress with the increase of depth from irradiated surface. The damage originates from the thermal stress but not the melting. The thermal stress is increased and the damage is accelerated by introducing the temperature effect of parameters or the increasing laser intensity.

  2. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  3. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  4. The axon-glia unit in white matter stroke: mechanisms of damage and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Shira, Rosenzweig; Thomas, Carmichael S.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one quarter of all strokes in humans occur in white matter, and the progressive nature of white matter lesions often results in severe physical and mental disability. Unlike cortical grey matter stroke, the pathology of white matter stroke revolves around disrupted connectivity and injured axons and glial cells, rather than neuronal cell bodies. Consequently, the mechanisms behind ischemic damage to white matter elements, the regenerative responses of glial cells and their signaling pathways, all differ significantly from those in grey matter. Development of effective therapies for white matter stroke would require an enhanced understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions within the white matter, leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets. This review will address the unique properties of the axon-glia unit during white matter stroke, describe the challenging process of promoting effective white matter repair, and discuss recently-identified signaling pathways which may hold potential targets for repair in this disease. PMID:25704204

  5. The Response to Oxidative DNA Damage in Neurons: Mechanisms and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Narciso, Laura; Parlanti, Eleonora; Racaniello, Mauro; Simonelli, Valeria; Cardinale, Alessio; Merlo, Daniela; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the mechanisms that control genome stability are of key importance in the development and function of the nervous system. The major threat for neurons is oxidative DNA damage, which is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Functional mutations of enzymes that are involved in the processing of single-strand breaks (SSB) that are generated during BER have been causally associated with syndromes that present important neurological alterations and cognitive decline. In this review, the plasticity of BER during neurogenesis and the importance of an efficient BER for correct brain function will be specifically addressed paying particular attention to the brain region and neuron-selectivity in SSB repair-associated neurological syndromes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26942017

  6. In situ damage monitoring in vibration mechanics: diagnostics and predictive maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basseville, M.; Benveniste, A.; Gach-Devauchelle, B.; Goursat, M.; Bonnecase, D.; Dorey, P.; Prevosto, M.; Olagnon, M.

    1993-09-01

    A system identification approach is presented for damage monitoring in vibration mechanics. Identification, detection, and diagnostics are performed using accelerometer measurements from the system at work so that the excitation is not controlled, usually not observed and may involve turbulent phenomena. Targeted applications include power engineering (rotating machines, core and pipes of nuclear power plants), civil engineering (large buildings subject to hurricanes or earthquakes, bridges, dams, offshore structures), aeronautics (wings and other structures subject to strength), automobile, rail transportation etc. The method is illustrated by a laboratory example, and the results of 3 years industrial usage. This paper is a progress report on a 10 year project involving three people almost permanently. We describe here the whole approach but omit the technical details which are available in previous papers.

  7. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  8. Mitigation of Shear-Induced Blood Damage by Mechanical Bileaflet Heart Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharin, Boris; Arjunon, Sivakkumar; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit; Glezer, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The strong transitory shear stress generated during the time-periodic closing of bileaflet mechanical heart valves that is associated with the formation of counter-rotating vortices near the leaflet edges may be damaging to blood elements and may result in platelet activation and therefore thrombosis and thromboembolism complications. These flow transients are investigated using fluorescent PIV in a new, low-volume test setup that reproduces the pulsatile physiological conditions associated with a 25 mm St. Jude Medical valve. The flow transients are partially suppressed and the platelet activation is minimized using miniature vortex generator arrays that are embedded on the surface of the leaflets. Measurements of the ensuing flow taken phase-locked to the leaflet motion demonstrate substantial modification of the transient vertical structures and concomitant reduction of Reynolds shear stresses. Human blood experiments validated the effectiveness of miniature vortex generators in reducing thrombus formation by over 42 percent.

  9. Radiation Damage Mechanisms for Luminescence in Eu-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; Castelaz, J M; Felter, T E; Wetzel, C; Talley, C E; Morse, J D; Stevens, C G

    2005-11-01

    Thin films of Eu-doped GaN are irradiated with 500 keV He{sup +} ions to understand radiation damage mechanisms and to quantify luminescence efficiency. Ion beam induced luminescence was monitored spectroscopically as function of fluence. Behavior observed is consistent with simultaneous creation of non-radiative defects and destruction of luminescent centers associated with the 4f-4f core-level transition in Eu{sup 3+}. This model contrasts with a previous description which takes into account only non-radiative defect generation in GaN:Eu. Based on light from a BaF{sub 2} scintillator standard, the luminescent energy generation efficiency of GaN:Eu films doped to {approx}3 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} Eu is estimated to be {approx}0.1%.

  10. Time dependent reliability model incorporating continuum damage mechanics for high-temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Presently there are many opportunities for the application of ceramic materials at elevated temperatures. In the near future ceramic materials are expected to supplant high temperature metal alloys in a number of applications. It thus becomes essential to develop a capability to predict the time-dependent response of these materials. The creep rupture phenomenon is discussed, and a time-dependent reliability model is outlined that integrates continuum damage mechanics principles and Weibull analysis. Several features of the model are presented in a qualitative fashion, including predictions of both reliability and hazard rate. In addition, a comparison of the continuum and the microstructural kinetic equations highlights a strong resemblance in the two approaches.

  11. Damage mechanism at different transpassive potentials of solution-annealed 316 and 316l stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, K.; Pakshir, M.; Abbasi, Z.; Najafisayar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), anodic polarization and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the damage mechanism in the transpassive potential region of AISI 316 and AISI 316L solution-annealed stainless steels (SS) with different degrees of sensitization. Depending on the DC potential applied during EIS tests, the AC responses in the transpassive region included three different regions: the first one associated with anodic dissolution of the passive layer, the second one contributed to the dissolution at the area near grain boundaries, and the last one attributed to pitting corrosion. In addition, the fitting results to experimental data showed that as the DC bias during the EIS test increases the charge transfer resistance ( R ct) decreases. Moreover, the R ct values decreased as the sensitization temperature increases but the AISI 316L SS samples exhibited a higher resistance to intergranular corrosion than 316 SS samples.

  12. Optical detection of mechanically damaged areas on manufactured metal parts by spatial frequency filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Kihou, Takemune

    2014-05-01

    An inspection of mechanically damaged areas on manufactured metal parts is necessary to produce high-quality products. A scanning probe on a sample is necessary for a conventional surface inspection system, which is time-consuming. We propose a novel high-speed detection method for defects on metal surfaces with rolling indentations. To obtain a large field of view in a measurement, we used a laser sheet that was expanded with a laser line generator and also used an expanded collimated beam, rather than a small laser spot as used in conventional techniques. Furthermore, we used an obliquely incident laser beam to suppress the effect of the rolling indentations surrounding defects, and also applied spatial frequency filtering to extract only defects. The spatial frequency filtering under oblique incidence is theoretically explained and defect extraction was investigated in experiments.

  13. Acute cardiac arrhythmias following surgery for congenital heart disease: mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and management.

    PubMed

    Payne, Linda; Zeigler, Vicki L; Gillette, Paul C

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on the management of those cardiac arrhythmias most commonly seen in the immediate postoperative period. They include ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, atrial flutter, junctional ectopic tachycardia, bradycardia, and atrioventricular block. The mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias are reviewed followed by a brief overview of the predominant acute arrhythmias, tools used for the diagnostic evaluation of these arrhythmias, management strategies, and, finally, nursing considerations.

  14. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  15. Towards mechanism-based simulation of impact damage using Exascale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shterenlikht, Anton; Margetts, Lee; McDonald, Samuel; Bourne, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 60 years, the finite element method has been very successful in modelling deformation in engineering structures. However the method requires the definition of constitutive models that represent the response of the material to applied loads. There are two issues. Firstly, the models are often difficult to define. Secondly, there is often no physical connection between the models and the mechanisms that accommodate deformation. In this paper, we present a potentially disruptive two-level strategy which couples the finite element method in the macroscale with cellular automata in the mesoscale. The cellular automata are used to simulate mechanisms, such as crack propagation. The stress-strain relationship emerges as a continuum mechanics scale interpretation of changes at the micro- and meso-scales. Iterative two-way updating between the cellular automata and finite elements drives the simulation forward as the material undergoes progressive damage at high strain rates. The strategy is particularly attractive on large-scale computing platforms as both methods scale well on tens of thousands of CPUs. Supported by the ARCHER Service (e347) and the Hartree Centre (HCP010).

  16. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; et al

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore » arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  17. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung -Hyun

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  18. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  19. Effects of edge grinding and sealing on mechanical properties of machine damaged laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yeoh, Jason; Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz

    2016-04-01

    Fiber reinforced composites have been utilized for a number of different applications, including aircraft, wind turbine, automobile, construction, manufacturing, and many other industries. During the fabrication, machining (waterjet, diamond and band saws) and assembly of these laminate composites, various edge and hole delamination, fiber pullout and other micro and nanocracks can be formed on the composite panels. The present study mainly focuses on the edge grinding and sealing of the machine damaged fiber reinforced composites, such as fiberglass, plain weave carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber. The MTS tensile test results confirmed that the composite coupons from the grinding process usually produced better and consistent mechanical properties compared to the waterjet cut samples only. In addition to these studies, different types of high strength adhesives, such as EPON 828 and Loctite were applied on the edges of the prepared composite coupons and cured under vacuum. The mechanical tests conducted on these coupons indicated that the overall mechanical properties of the composite coupons were further improved. These processes can lower the labor costs on the edge treatment of the composites and useful for different industrial applications of fiber reinforced composites.

  20. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites. PMID:25562780

  1. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively

  2. Investigations of the damage mechanisms during ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dental tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domke, Matthias; Wick, Sebastian; Laible, Maike; Rapp, Stephan; Kuznetsova, Julia; Homann, Christian; Huber, Heinz P.; Sroka, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Several investigations of dental tissue ablation with ultrashort pulsed lasers suggest that these lasers enable precise and selective material removal and reduce the formation of micro cracks and thermal effects, when compared to ns-pulses. In this study, two damage mechanisms are presented occurring during ablation of dentin using a laser emitting pulses of a duration of 380 fs at a wavelength of 1040 nm. First, it was found that nano cracks appear around the craters after single fs-pulse ablation. These cracks are directed to the crater and cross the dentinal tubules. Transient investigation of the single fs-pulse ablation process by pump-probe microscopy suggest that the driving mechanism could be a pressure wave that is released after stress confinement. Second, squared ablation holes were created by moving the laser focus at scan speeds between 0.5 mm/s and 2.0 m/s and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. It was found that deep cracks appear at the edges of the squared holes, if the scan speed is about 0.5 m/s. The fluence has only a minor impact on the crack formation. The crack propagation was investigated in the depth using x-ray micro tomography and optical coherence tomography. It was found that these cracks appear in the depth down to the dental pulp. These findings suggest that fast scanning of the laser beam is the key for damage free processing using ultrashort pulse lasers. Then, ablation rates of about 2.5 - 3.5 mm3/min/W can be achieved in dentine with pulse durations of 380 fs.

  3. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study.

  4. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    PubMed

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  5. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  6. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  7. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  8. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving.

    PubMed

    Shiels, H A; Galli, G L J; Block, B A

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation-contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range.

  9. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, H. A.; Galli, G. L. J.; Block, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca2+ transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation–contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  10. Molecular mechanisms of silk gland damage caused by phoxim exposure and protection of phoxim-induced damage by cerium chloride in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sun, Qingqing; Yu, Xiaohong; Xie, Yi; Hong, Jie; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sang, Xuezi; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2015-09-01

    It is known that exposure to organophosphorus pesticides (OP) including phoxim can produce oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and greatly attenuate cocooning rate in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Cerium treatment has been demonstrated to relieve phoxim-induced toxicity in B. mori; however, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of silk gland injury due to OP exposure and protection of gland damage due to cerium pretreatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate silk gland damage and its molecular mechanisms in phoxim-induced silkworm toxicity and the protective mechanisms of cerium following exposure to phoxim. The results showed that phoxim exposure resulted in severe gland damage, reductions in protein synthesis and the cocooning rate of silkworms. Cerium (Ce) attenuated gland damage caused by phoxim, promoted protein synthesis, increased the antioxidant capacity of the gland and increased the cocooning rate of B. mori. Furthermore, digital gene expression data suggested that phoxim exposure led to significant up-regulation of 714 genes and down-regulation of 120 genes. Of these genes, 122 were related to protein metabolism, specifically, the down-regulated Ser2, Ser3, Fib-L, P25, and CYP450. Ce pretreatment resulted in up-regulation of 162 genes, and down-regulation of 141 genes, importantly, Ser2, Ser3, Fib-L, P25, and CYP333B8 were up-regulated. Treatment with CeCl3 + phoxim resulted in higher levels of Fib-L, P25, Ser2, Ser3, CAT, TPx, and CYP333B8 expression in the silk gland of silkworms. These findings indicated that Ce increased cocooning rate via the promotion of silk protein synthesis-related gene expression in the gland under phoxim-induced toxicity. These findings may expand the application of rare earths in sericulture.

  11. Effects of DHA-rich fish oil supplementation on the lipid profile, markers of muscle damage, and neutrophil function in wheelchair basketball athletes before and after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Marques, Camila Garcia; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Jacintho, Thiago Manzoni; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich fish oil (FO) supplementation on the lipid profile, levels of plasma inflammatory mediators, markers of muscle damage, and neutrophil function in wheelchair basketball players before and after acute exercise. We evaluated 8 male basketball wheelchair athletes before and after acute exercise both prior to (S0) and following (S1) FO supplementation. The subjects were supplemented with 3 g of FO daily for 30 days. The following components were measured: the plasma lipid profile (total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides), plasma inflammatory mediators (C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α), markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)), and neutrophil function (cytokine production, phagocytic capacity, loss of membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, neutral lipid accumulation, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)). Acute exercise increased the plasma levels of total cholesterol, LDH, IL1ra, and IL-6, led to the loss of membrane integrity, ROS production, and a high mitochondrial membrane potential in neutrophils, and reduced the phagocytic capacity and IL-6 production by the neutrophils (S0). However, supplementation prevented the increases in the plasma levels of LDH and IL-6, the loss of membrane integrity, and the alterations in ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential in the neutrophils that were induced by exercise (S1). In conclusion, DHA-rich FO supplementation reduces the markers of muscle damage, inflammatory disturbances, and neutrophil death induced by acute exercise in wheelchair athletes.

  12. Characteristics and progression of children with acute viral bronchiolitis subjected to mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Ferlini, Roberta; Pinheiro, Flávia Ohlweiler; Andreolio, Cinara; Carvalho, Paulo Roberto Antonacci; Piva, Jefferson Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of children with acute viral bronchiolitis subjected to mechanical ventilation for three consecutive years and to correlate their progression with mechanical ventilation parameters and fluid balance. Methods Longitudinal study of a series of infants (< one year old) subjected to mechanical ventilation for acute viral bronchitis from January 2012 to September 2014 in the pediatric intensive care unit. The children's clinical records were reviewed, and their anthropometric data, mechanical ventilation parameters, fluid balance, clinical progression, and major complications were recorded. Results Sixty-six infants (3.0 ± 2.0 months old and with an average weight of 4.7 ± 1.4kg) were included, of whom 62% were boys; a virus was identified in 86%. The average duration of mechanical ventilation was 6.5 ± 2.9 days, and the average length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit was 9.1 ± 3.5 days; the mortality rate was 1.5% (1/66). The peak inspiratory pressure remained at 30cmH2O during the first four days of mechanical ventilation and then decreased before extubation (25 cmH2O; p < 0.05). Pneumothorax occurred in 10% of the sample and extubation failure in 9%, which was due to upper airway obstruction in half of the cases. The cumulative fluid balance on mechanical ventilation day four was 402 ± 254mL, which corresponds to an increase of 9.0 ± 5.9% in body weight. Thirty-seven patients (56%) exhibited a weight gain of 10% or more, which was not significantly associated with the ventilation parameters on mechanical ventilation day four, extubation failure, duration of mechanical ventilation or length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit. Conclusion The rate of mechanical ventilation for acute viral bronchiolitis remains constant, being associated with low mortality, few adverse effects, and positive cumulative fluid balance during the first days. Better fluid control might reduce the duration of mechanical

  13. Lead accumulation, oxidative damage and histopathological alteration in testes and accessory glands of freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense, induced by acute lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hou, Yu-hua; Ma, Dan-dan; Jing, Wei-xin; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Wang, Lan

    2015-07-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most toxic environmental pollutants and known to exert multiple toxic effects including gonadotoxic and spermiotoxic effects. In order to understand toxic mechanisms of lead (Pb) on the testes and the accessory glands of crabs, we investigated Pb accumulation in testes and accessory glands and the survival rate of sperms of freshwater crab, Sinopotamon henanense. The tissue damaging effects of Pb was also investigated by histopathological examination and analyses of antioxidant enzymes as well as lipid peroxidation. Crabs were exposed to different Pb concentrations (0, 3.675, 7.35, 14.7, 29.4 and 58.8 mg/L) for 3, 5 and 7 days. The results showed that Pb levels in testes and accessory glands increased significantly following Pb exposure for 5 and 7 days in almost all treated groups, and survival rate of sperm decreased with increasing Pb concentrations at 5 and 7 days. Morphological changes identified histologically were discovered in testes, including a disordered arrangement of germ cells, a decreased number of sperm in the lumina of the seminiferous tubules, extensive necrosis in the germinal layer of the seminiferous tubules, etc. At the same time, histological abnormalities were discovered in accessory glands, the wall cells were separated from the basement membrane, and wall cells were missing partly. The activities of SOD, GPx and CAT in testes showed no statistically significant changes compared to the control for 3 days, and initially increased and subsequently decreased with increasing Pb concentrations at 5 and 7 days. The antioxidant enzyme activities in accessory glands initially increased and subsequently decreased with increasing Pb concentrations and Pb exposure. This was accompanied with an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) content in a concentration-dependent manner. These results showed that acute Pb exposure led to a reduction of survival rate of sperm and harmful effects at the cellular level of crab testes and accessory

  14. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  15. Characterization of mechanical damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials. Technical report, 23 May 1987-24 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, J.

    1988-09-01

    High-strain-rate compressive failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials were characterized. These are contrasted with composite damage development at low-strain rates, and with the dynamic failure of monolithic ceramics. It is shown that it is possible to derive major strain-rate strengthening benefits if a major fraction of the fiber reinforcement is aligned with the load axis. This effect considerably exceeds the inertial microfracture strengthening observed in monolithic ceramics, and non-aligned composites. Its basis is shown to be the trans-specimen propagation time period for heterogeneously-nucleated, high-strain kink bands. A brief study on zirconia focused on the remarkable inverse strength-strain rate result previously observed for both fully and partially-stabilized zirconia single crystals, whereby the strength decreased with increasing strain rate. Based on the hypothesis that the suppression of microplastic flow, hence, local stress relaxation, might be responsible for this behavior, fully stabilized (i.e., non-transformable) specimens were strain-gaged and subjected to compressive microstrain. The rather stunning observation was that the crystals are highly microplastic, exhibiting plastic yield on loading and anelasticity and reverse plasticity upon unloading. These results clearly support the hypothesis that with increasing strain rate, microcracking is favored at the expense of microplasticity.

  16. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists. PMID:26312104

  17. The Protection of Salidroside of the Heart against Acute Exhaustive Injury and Molecular Mechanism in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunru; Xu, Peng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Haiyan; Zhou, Yuwen; Cao, Xuebin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the protection of salidroside of the heart against acute exhaustive injury and its mechanism of antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction. Method. Adult male SD rats were divided into four groups randomly. Cardiomyocytes ultrastructure was observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The contents of CK, CK-MB, LDH, MDA, and SOD were determined by ELISA method, and the phosphorylation degrees of ERK and p38 MAPK were assayed by Western blotting. Cardiac function of isolated rat heart ischemia/reperfusion was detected by Langendorff technique. Results. Salidroside reduced the myocardium ultrastructure injury caused by exhaustive swimming, decreased the contents of CK, CK-MB, and LDH, improved the LVDP, ±LV dp/dtmax under the basic condition, reduced the content of MDA and the phosphorylation degree of p38 MAPK, and increased the content of SOD and the phosphorylation degree of ERK in acute exhaustive rats. Conclusion. Salidroside has the protection of the heart against acute exhaustive injury. The cardioprotection is mainly mediated by antioxidative stress and MAPKs signal transduction through reducing the content of MDA, increasing the content of SOD, and increasing p-ERK and decreasing p-p38 protein expressions in rat myocardium, which might be the mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of salidroside. PMID:24454984

  18. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality.

  19. Pathophysiological Basis of Acute Respiratory Failure on Non-Invasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Dapueto, C; Budini, H; Cerpa, F; Caceres, D; Hidalgo, V; Gutiérrez, T; Keymer, J; Pérez, R; Molina, J; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) was created for patients who needed noninvasive ventilator support, this procedure decreases the complications associated with the use of endotracheal intubation (ETT). The application of NIMV has acquired major relevance in the last few years in the management of acute respiratory failure (ARF), in patients with hypoxemic and hypercapnic failure. The main advantage of NIMV as compared to invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is that it can be used earlier outside intensive care units (ICUs). The evidence strongly supports its use in patients with COPD exacerbation, support in weaning process in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), and Immunosuppressed patients. On the other hand, there is poor evidence that supports the use of NIMV in other pathologies such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and during procedures as bronchoscopy, where its use is still controversial because the results of these studies are inconclusive against the decrease in the rate of intubation or mortality. PMID:26312101

  20. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, V; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D; Gutiérrez, T; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatment in acute respiratory failure, and the standard of care in severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and in immunosuppressed patients with high levels of evidence that support the work of physiotherapist. Exist other considerations where most of the time, physicians and other professionals in the critical units do not take into account when checking the patient ventilator synchrony, such as the appropriate patient selection, ventilator selection, mask selection, mode selection, and the selection of a trained team in NIMV. The physiotherapist needs to evaluate bedside; if patients are properly connected to the ventilator and in a synchronously manner. In Chile, since 2004, the physioterapist are included in the guidelines as a professional resource in the ICU organization, with the same skills and obligations as those described in the literature for respiratory therapists.

  1. Sub-surface mechanical damage distributions during grinding of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Wong, L L; Miller, P E; Feit, M D; Menapace, J A; Steele, R A; Davis, P A; Walmer, D

    2005-11-28

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracking (i.e. sub-surface damage or SSD) formed during standard grinding processes has been investigated on fused silica glass. The SSD distributions of the ground surfaces were determined by: (1) creating a shallow (18-108 {micro}m) wedge/taper on the surface by magneto-rheological finishing; (2) exposing the SSD by HF acid etching; and (3) performing image analysis of the observed cracks from optical micrographs taken along the surface taper. The observed surface cracks are characterized as near-surface lateral and deeper trailing indent type fractures (i.e., chatter marks). The SSD depth distributions are typically described by a single exponential distribution followed by an asymptotic cutoff in depth (c{sub max}). The length of the trailing indent is strongly correlated with a given process. Using established fracture indentation relationships, it is shown that only a small fraction of the abrasive particles are being mechanically loaded and causing fracture, and it is likely the larger particles in the abrasive particle size distribution that bear the higher loads. The SSD depth was observed to increase with load and with a small amount of larger contaminant particles. Using a simple brittle fracture model for grinding, the SSD depth distribution has been related to the SSD length distribution to gain insight into ''effective'' size distribution of particles participating in the fracture. Both the average crack length and the surface roughness were found to scale linearly with the maximum SSD depth (c{sub max}). These relationships can serve as useful rules-of-thumb for nondestructively estimating SSD depth and to identify the process that caused the SSD. In certain applications such as high intensity lasers, SSD on the glass optics can serve as a reservoir for minute amounts of impurities that absorb the high intensity laser light and lead to subsequent laser-induced surface damage. Hence a more scientific

  2. Left Ventricular Mechanical Property Changes During Acute AV Synchronous Right Ventricular Pacing in Children.

    PubMed

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Bratincsak, Andras; Bachner-Hinenzon, Noa; Khamis, Hanan; Rzasa, Callie; Adam, Dan; Printz, Beth F; Perry, James C

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged RV pacing is recognized as a cause of LV dysfunction due to dyssynchronous activation. There are no specific longitudinal parameters known to help predict RV pacing-induced LV dysfunction. The aim of the study was to assess the acute effects of AV synchronous RV pacing on LV mechanics using echocardiographic speckle tracking. Nineteen children, aged 6-23 years, underwent echocardiographic evaluation prior to and following elective electrophysiology and ablation studies. The subjects were evaluated in sinus rhythm and later with AV synchronous RV pacing at a cycle length of 550 ms with a short AV delay of 80 ms. The echocardiographic clips were analyzed using speckle tracking methods to calculate LV circumferential and longitudinal strain, rotation and twist in all conditions. Acute RV apical pacing decreased LV longitudinal strain from 16.1 ± 3.7% in sinus rhythm to 14.4 ± 3.3% (p = 0.03) and LV base rotation from -8.4° ± 3.6° to -6.4° ± 4.0° (p = 0.04). The circumferential strain, apical rotation and LV twist were not affected. Separate analysis of subjects with no prior preexcitation showed that acute RV pacing caused significant twist reduction, from 15.9° ± 7.6° to 12.1° ± 7.0° (p = 0.02), and decreased longitudinal strain and base rotation. Patients with preexcitation had abnormalities that persisted acutely after ablation. Acute RV apical pacing causes reductions in LV base rotation, longitudinal strain and twist. The recognition of abnormal LV activation patterns may provide longitudinal clues to LV dysfunction in chronically paced patients and potential novel indices of effective CRT interventions to reverse these abnormalities.

  3. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  4. [Psychopathology and various mechanisms contributing to the formation of the Kandinsky syndrome in acute alcoholic hallucinosis].

    PubMed

    Guliamova, N M

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients with acute alcoholic hallucinosis associated with the Kandinsky syndrome were examined clinicopsychopathologically. Manifestation of the Kandinsky syndrome was limited by associative automatism in patients with stage II alcoholism with transient hallucinosis lasting 2-4 days. In patients with stage III alcoholism with more prolonged (6-9 days) psychoses, the non-extensive Kandinsky syndrome manifested itself in integrity. Psychopathological phenomena of the syndrome in the picture of acute alcoholic hallucinosis were notable for their descriptiveness, concreteness, extreme simplicity, and instability. Senestopathic and kinesthetic automatisms were localized at the sites of real painful disorders. Therefore, apart from cerebral disorders, the peripheral sensory mechanisms are considered to be of importance in the genesis of the Kandinsky syndrome.

  5. Mechanism of Action of Lung Damage Caused by a Nanofilm Spray Product

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Dallot, Constantin; Larsen, Susan W.; Rose, Fabrice; Poulsen, Steen S.; Nørgaard, Asger W.; Hansen, Jitka S.; Sørli, Jorid B.; Nielsen, Gunnar D.; Foged, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of waterproofing spray products has on several occasions caused lung damage, which in some cases was fatal. The present study aims to elucidate the mechanism of action of a nanofilm spray product, which has been shown to possess unusual toxic effects, including an extremely steep concentration-effect curve. The nanofilm product is intended for application on non-absorbing flooring materials and contains perfluorosiloxane as the active film-forming component. The toxicological effects and their underlying mechanisms of this product were studied using a mouse inhalation model, by in vitro techniques and by identification of the binding interaction. Inhalation of the aerosolized product gave rise to increased airway resistance in the mice, as evident from the decreased expiratory flow rate. The toxic effect of the waterproofing spray product included interaction with the pulmonary surfactants. More specifically, the active film-forming components in the spray product, perfluorinated siloxanes, inhibited the function of the lung surfactant due to non-covalent interaction with surfactant protein B, a component which is crucial for the stability and persistence of the lung surfactant film during respiration. The active film-forming component used in the present spray product is also found in several other products on the market. Hence, it may be expected that these products may have a toxicity similar to the waterproofing product studied here. Elucidation of the toxicological mechanism and identification of toxicological targets are important to perform rational and cost-effective toxicological studies. Thus, because the pulmonary surfactant system appears to be an important toxicological target for waterproofing spray products, study of surfactant inhibition could be included in toxicological assessment of this group of consumer products. PMID:24863969

  6. Mechanisms of islet damage mediated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming.

    PubMed

    Omori, Keiko; Kobayashi, Eiji; Rawson, Jeffrey; Takahashi, Masafumi; Mullen, Yoko

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged pancreas cold ischemia is known to negatively correlate with islet isolation outcomes, hindering successful islet transplantation to treat Type-1 Diabetes. Due to poor islet isolation outcome, pancreata with over 16 h cold ischemia are currently not considered for islet transplantation. Mechanisms involved in pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming mediated islet damage during islet isolation and culture are not well understood. Using an en bloc cold preserved rat pancreas preparation, we attempted to clarify possible mechanisms of islet death associated with prolonged pancreas cold ischemia and subsequent rewarming. Cold ischemia lasting 16 h decreased post-isolation islet yield and increased islet death during the initial 6 h of culture. Electron micrographs revealed swelling and severe disruption of cellular and mitochondrial membranes, as well as an enlarged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in β-cells isolated from cold preserved pancreata. Prolonged cold ischemia of the pancreas transiently activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in isolated islets and increased lipid peroxidation products 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 after culture, indicating the activation of oxidative stress signaling pathways. The islet isolation process, irrespective of pancreas cold ischemia, activated unfolded protein response (UPR), while the ER protective chaperon BiP was further upregulated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming. During the first 6 h of culture following islet isolation, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and caspase-3 activation were also upregulated. Our study indicates the involvement of both apoptosis and necrosis in islet death, and suggests oxidative stress and disruption of membranes are critical mechanisms mediated by pancreas cold ischemia/rewarming. PMID:27587006

  7. Effect of Calendula officinalis Flower Extract on Acute Phase Proteins, Antioxidant Defense Mechanism and Granuloma Formation During Thermal Burns.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Preethi K; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-09-01

    Effect of Calendula officinalis flower extract was investigated against experimentally induced thermal burns in rats. Burn injury was made on the shaven back of the rats under anesthesia and the animals were treated orally with different doses of the flower extract (20 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg/kg body weight). The animals treated with the extract showed significant improvement in healing when compared with the control untreated animals. The indicators of the wound healing such as collagen-hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents were significantly increased in the treated group indicating accelerated wound healing in the treated animals. The acute phase proteins-haptoglobin and orosomucoid which were increased due to burn injury were found to be decreased significantly in 200 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The antioxidant defense mechanism, which was decreased in the liver during burn injury, was found to be enhanced in treated animals. The lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered in the treated group when compared to control animals. Tissue damage marker enzymes- alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases were significantly lowered in the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. The histopathological analyses of skin tissue also give the evidence of the increased healing potential of the extract after burn injury.

  8. Mechanism of Mitochondrial Connexin43′s Protection of the Neurovascular Unit under Acute Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuai; Shen, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Ming-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Hong-Yan; Deng, Fang; Feng, Jia-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We observed mitochondrial connexin43 (mtCx43) expression under cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, analyzed its regulation, and explored its protective mechanisms. Wistar rats were divided into groups based on injections received before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Cerebral infarction volume was detected by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolim chloride staining, and cell apoptosis was observed by transferase dUTP nick end labeling. We used transmission electron microscopy to observe mitochondrial morphology and determined superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content. MtCx43, p-mtCx43, protein kinase C (PKC), and p-PKC expression were detected by Western blot. Compared with those in the IR group, cerebral infarction volumes in the carbenoxolone (CBX) and diazoxide (DZX) groups were obviously smaller, and the apoptosis indices were down-regulated. Mitochondrial morphology was damaged after I/R, especially in the IR and 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD) groups. Similarly, decreased SOD activity and increased MDA were observed after MCAO; CBX, DZX, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) reduced mitochondrial functional injury. Expression of mtCx43 and p-mtCx43 and the p-Cx43/Cx43 ratio were significantly lower in the IR group than in the sham group. These abnormalities were ameliorated by CBX, DZX, and PMA. MtCx43 may protect the neurovascular unit from acute cerebral IR injury via PKC activation induced by mitoKATP channel agonists. PMID:27164087

  9. Effect of Calendula officinalis Flower Extract on Acute Phase Proteins, Antioxidant Defense Mechanism and Granuloma Formation During Thermal Burns

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi K.; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2008-01-01

    Effect of Calendula officinalis flower extract was investigated against experimentally induced thermal burns in rats. Burn injury was made on the shaven back of the rats under anesthesia and the animals were treated orally with different doses of the flower extract (20 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg/kg body weight). The animals treated with the extract showed significant improvement in healing when compared with the control untreated animals. The indicators of the wound healing such as collagen-hydroxyproline and hexosamine contents were significantly increased in the treated group indicating accelerated wound healing in the treated animals. The acute phase proteins—haptoglobin and orosomucoid which were increased due to burn injury were found to be decreased significantly in 200 mg/kg body weight extract treated animals. The antioxidant defense mechanism, which was decreased in the liver during burn injury, was found to be enhanced in treated animals. The lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered in the treated group when compared to control animals. Tissue damage marker enzymes- alkaline phosphatase, alanine and aspartate transaminases were significantly lowered in the treated groups in a dose dependant manner. The histopathological analyses of skin tissue also give the evidence of the increased healing potential of the extract after burn injury. PMID:18818737

  10. Mechanism of Radiation Damage Reduction in Equiatomic Multicomponent Single Phase Alloys.

    PubMed

    Granberg, F; Nordlund, K; Ullah, Mohammad W; Jin, K; Lu, C; Bei, H; Wang, L M; Djurabekova, F; Weber, W J; Zhang, Y

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of metal alloys, of single-phase multicomponent composition at roughly equal atomic concentrations ("equiatomic"), have been shown to exhibit promising mechanical, magnetic, and corrosion resistance properties, in particular, at high temperatures. These features make them potential candidates for components of next-generation nuclear reactors and other high-radiation environments that will involve high temperatures combined with corrosive environments and extreme radiation exposure. In spite of a wide range of recent studies of many important properties of these alloys, their radiation tolerance at high doses remains unexplored. In this work, a combination of experimental and modeling efforts reveals a substantial reduction of damage accumulation under prolonged irradiation in single-phase NiFe and NiCoCr alloys compared to elemental Ni. This effect is explained by reduced dislocation mobility, which leads to slower growth of large dislocation structures. Moreover, there is no observable phase separation, ordering, or amorphization, pointing to a high phase stability of this class of alloys. PMID:27081990

  11. Susceptibility to DNA Damage as a Molecular Mechanism for Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Francis-West, Philippa; Kuta, Anna; Almada, Bruno Vinícius Pimenta; Ferreira, Simone Gomes; de Andrade-Lima, Leonardo Carmo; Bueno, Daniela Franco; Raposo-Amaral, Cássio Eduardo; Menck, Carlos Frederico; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P) is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10−2–5.02×10−9). This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease. PMID:23776525

  12. The mechanism of cell-damaging reactive oxygen generation by colloidal fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Zoran; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kleut, Duska; Nikolic, Nadezda; Vranjes-Djuric, Sanja; Misirkic, Maja; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Janjetovic, Kristina; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Harhaji, Ljubica; Babic-Stojic, Branka; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-12-01

    Because of the ability to induce cell death in certain conditions, the fullerenes (C(60)) are potential anticancer and toxic agents. The colloidal suspension of crystalline C(60) (nano-C(60), nC(60)) is extremely toxic, but the mechanisms of its cytotoxicity are not completely understood. By combining experimental analysis and mathematical modelling, we investigate the requirements for the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cytotoxicity of different nC(60) suspensions, prepared by solvent exchange method in tetrahydrofuran (THF/nC(60)) and ethanol (EtOH/nC(60)), or by extended mixing in water (aqu/nC(60)). With regard to their capacity to generate ROS and cause mitochondrial depolarization followed by necrotic cell death, the nC(60) suspensions are ranked in the following order: THF/nC(60)>EtOH/nC(60)>aqu/nC(60). Mathematical modelling of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) generation indicates that the (1)O(2)-quenching power (THF/nC(60)damage. These data could have important implications for toxicology and biomedical application of colloidal fullerenes.

  13. A study of the mechanism of hydralazine enhancement of thermal damage in the KHT tumour.

    PubMed

    Honess, D J; Hu, D E; Bleehen, N M

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of the potentiation of thermal damage by hydralazine (HDZ) has been investigated. Using the KHT sarcoma in the leg of C3H mice, it was shown that 5 mg/kg of HDZ given i.v. 15-20 min before irradiation or heat exposure: (i) increased the radiobiological hypoxic fraction from 1 to 32%; (ii) produced a greater than additive growth delay when combined with heating for 30 min at either 43 or 43.5 degrees C, or 60 min at 43 degrees C; (iii) produced only additive cell killing when combined with 30 min heating at 43, 43.5, or 44 degrees C, assayed by clonogenic cell survival immediately or 24 h after treatment; and (iv) produced a prolonged (greater than 72 h) reduction in relative tissue perfusion (RTP) in the tumour when combined with heating for 30 min at 43.5 degrees C. The effects of HDZ or heat alone lasted for less than 24 and 48 h, respectively. The RTP in skin was unaffected by either agent or combination of agents at the times assayed. The results show that this 30-fold increase in hypoxia does not increase the intrinsic thermosensitivity of KHT tumour cells, and that the prolonged reduction in RTP caused by the combined treatment is probably responsible, at least in part, for the greater than additive component of the measured growth delay in this system. The data suggest that non-perfused tumour vessels are more heat sensitive than perfused vessels.

  14. The axon-glia unit in white matter stroke: mechanisms of damage and recovery.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Shira; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2015-10-14

    Approximately one quarter of all strokes in humans occur in white matter, and the progressive nature of white matter lesions often results in severe physical and mental disability. Unlike cortical grey matter stroke, the pathology of white matter stroke revolves around disrupted connectivity and injured axons and glial cells, rather than neuronal cell bodies. Consequently, the mechanisms behind ischemic damage to white matter elements, the regenerative responses of glial cells and their signaling pathways, all differ significantly from those in grey matter. Development of effective therapies for white matter stroke would require an enhanced understanding of the complex cellular and molecular interactions within the white matter, leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets. This review will address the unique properties of the axon-glia unit during white matter stroke, describe the challenging process of promoting effective white matter repair, and discuss recently-identified signaling pathways which may hold potential targets for repair in this disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Cell Interactions In Stroke.

  15. Mechanism of Radiation Damage Reduction in Equiatomic Multicomponent Single Phase Alloys.

    PubMed

    Granberg, F; Nordlund, K; Ullah, Mohammad W; Jin, K; Lu, C; Bei, H; Wang, L M; Djurabekova, F; Weber, W J; Zhang, Y

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of metal alloys, of single-phase multicomponent composition at roughly equal atomic concentrations ("equiatomic"), have been shown to exhibit promising mechanical, magnetic, and corrosion resistance properties, in particular, at high temperatures. These features make them potential candidates for components of next-generation nuclear reactors and other high-radiation environments that will involve high temperatures combined with corrosive environments and extreme radiation exposure. In spite of a wide range of recent studies of many important properties of these alloys, their radiation tolerance at high doses remains unexplored. In this work, a combination of experimental and modeling efforts reveals a substantial reduction of damage accumulation under prolonged irradiation in single-phase NiFe and NiCoCr alloys compared to elemental Ni. This effect is explained by reduced dislocation mobility, which leads to slower growth of large dislocation structures. Moreover, there is no observable phase separation, ordering, or amorphization, pointing to a high phase stability of this class of alloys.

  16. Mechanism of Radiation Damage Reduction in Equiatomic Multicomponent Single Phase Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Nordlund, K.; Ullah, Mohammad W.; Jin, K.; Lu, C.; Bei, H.; Wang, L. M.; Djurabekova, F.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Recently a new class of metal alloys, of single-phase multicomponent composition at roughly equal atomic concentrations ("equiatomic"), have been shown to exhibit promising mechanical, magnetic, and corrosion resistance properties, in particular, at high temperatures. These features make them potential candidates for components of next-generation nuclear reactors and other high-radiation environments that will involve high temperatures combined with corrosive environments and extreme radiation exposure. In spite of a wide range of recent studies of many important properties of these alloys, their radiation tolerance at high doses remains unexplored. In this work, a combination of experimental and modeling efforts reveals a substantial reduction of damage accumulation under prolonged irradiation in single-phase NiFe and NiCoCr alloys compared to elemental Ni. This effect is explained by reduced dislocation mobility, which leads to slower growth of large dislocation structures. Moreover, there is no observable phase separation, ordering, or amorphization, pointing to a high phase stability of this class of alloys.

  17. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  18. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iltis, X.; Ben Saada, M.; Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N.

    2016-06-01

    Four batches of UO2 pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO2 pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO2 viscoplastic deformation mechanisms.

  19. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  20. Sensing of damage and substrate stress in concrete using electro-mechanical impedance measurements of bonded PZT patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Arun; Subramaniam, Kolluru V. L.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of stress and induced damage in concrete on the electro-mechanical (EM) impedance response of bonded PZT patches is evaluated for applied compressive loading. Full field displacements obtained from digital image correlation are used to evaluate the level of stress-induced damage in concrete. Stress in the substrate produces an imposed strain on the PZT. A change in the imposed strain produces a rightward frequency shift and an increase in the amplitude of the resonant peak in the EM conductance spectrum of the PZT. An increase in the substrate compliance produces a decrease in the resonant frequency and an increase in the amplitude of the resonant peak. Changes in the resonant peak in the conductance spectrum induced by increasing substrate stress are of a significant magnitude when compared with the changes induced by damage. In the early stages of damage associated with distributed microcracking, the counteracting influences of increasing level of damage and increasing stress on the resonant peak result in no shift in frequency for measurements under applied load. There is however an increase in the amplitude of the resonance peak. When the applied stress is removed, there is a net decrease in frequency resulting from damage in the form of distributed microcracks. Measures of changes in the resonant peak based on root mean square deviation (RMSD), do not show any observable change when measurements are performed under applied loading. There is a consistent increase in RMSD values and frequency shift with increasing damage when the applied stress is removed. The centroidal measure of the normalized frequency spectrum reflects changes in substrate stress. At higher applied stress levels, there is a nonlinear increase in damage, leading to localization and cracking. The influence of damage is dominant in this region and significant changes are obtained in the RMSD values in both loaded and unloaded conditions.

  1. A Polyamine-Deficient Diet Prevents Oxaliplatin-Induced Acute Cold and Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Pereira, Bruno; Daulhac, Laurence; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis; Moulinoux, Jacques-Philippe; Balayssac, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but it can also cause painful peripheral neuropathies. The pathophysiology of these neuropathies has not been yet fully elucidated, but may involve spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, particularly the NR2B subunit. As polyamines are positive modulators of NMDA-NR2B receptors and mainly originate from dietary intake, the modulation of polyamines intake could represent an interesting way to prevent/modulate neuropathic pain symptoms by opposing glutamate neurotransmission. Methods The effect of a polyamine deficient diet was investigated in an animal model of oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity using behavioral tests (mechanical and cold hypersensitivity). The involvement of spinal glutamate neurotransmission was monitored by using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomic approach and by assessing the expression and phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Results A 7-day polyamine deficient diet totally prevented oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia. Oxaliplatin-induced pain hypersensitivity was not associated with an increase in NR2B subunit expression or phosphorylation, but with an increase of glutamate level in the spinal dorsal horn which was completely prevented by a polyamine deficient diet. As a validation that the oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity could be due to an increased activity of the spinal glutamate system, an intrathecal administration of the specific NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, totally reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. Conclusion A polyamine deficient diet could represent a promising and valuable nutritional therapy to prevent oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity. PMID:24204988

  2. Development of 66kV XLPE submarine cable using optical fiber as a mechanical-damage-detection-sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Toshio; Miyahara, Tsutomu; Takehana, Hajime; Tateno, Fuminori

    1995-10-01

    Submarine cables are exposed to great risk of serious mechanical damage by ship anchors or equipment used for fishing. Detection of such damage in a submarine cable is a very useful technology for improving the reliability of a submarine cable transmission line. A mechanical-damage-detection-sensor using optical fiber was developed. A prototype 66kV XLPE submarine cable incorporating the sensor was manufactured for trial, and the ability of a sensor was confirmed by compression test. Actual 66kV XLPE submarine cable incorporating the sensor was manufactured for trial, and the ability of a sensor was confirmed by compression test. Actual 66kV XLPE submarine cable with the sensor was manufactured and installed as an operating transmission line in Japan.

  3. Investigation of Ductile Damage in DP980 Steel Sheets Using Mechanical Tests and X-ray Micro-Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A.; Leguen, C.; Thuillier, S.; Maire, E.

    2011-05-01

    This study is part of a broader research project on the prediction of formability limits in bending on radius of the order of the sheet thickness, based on ductile damage. As a first step, ductile damage in DP980 steel sheet was investigated by means of micro-tomography and mechanical testing, including tensile and simple shear tests. The local strain in tension was measured with a digital image correlation device up to rupture, on macroscopic samples of standard dimensions. Moreover, interrupted tensile tests on smaller specimen were also performed, in order to analyze the void distribution by X-ray micro-tomography. The final aim is to perform numerical simulation of the tests, with Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, to take into account the influence of ductile damage on the mechanical behavior. A fair description of the void volume fraction was obtained as well as the stress level, in the case of small-size specimen.

  4. Mechanisms of Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Experimental Lonomia obliqua Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Markus; Santi, Lucélia; Beys-da-Silva, Walter O.; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus Silva; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Yates, John R.; Ribeiro, Maria Aparecida; Guimarães, Jorge Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Background Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be responsible for its deadly actions. This study evaluates the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. Methods To characterize L. obliqua venom effects we subcutaneously injected rats and examined renal functional, morphological and biochemical parameters at several time points. We also performed discovery based proteomic analysis to measure protein expression to identify molecular pathways of renal disease. Results L. obliqua envenomation causes acute tubular necrosis, which is associated with renal inflammation; formation of hematic casts, resulting from intravascular hemolysis; increase in vascular permeability and fibrosis. The dilation of Bowman’s space and glomerular tuft is related to fluid leakage and intra-glomerular fibrin deposition, respectively, since tissue factor procoagulant activity increases in the kidney. Systemic hypotension also contributes to these alterations and to the sudden loss of basic renal functions, including filtration and excretion capacities, urinary concentration and maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In addition, envenomed kidneys increases expression of proteins involved in cell stress, inflammation, tissue injury, heme-induced oxidative stress, coagulation and complement system activation. Finally, the localization of the venom in renal tissue agrees with morphological and functional alterations, suggesting also a direct nephrotoxic activity. Conclusions Mechanisms of L. obliqua-induced AKI are complex involving mainly glomerular and tubular functional impairment and vascular alterations. These results are important to understand the mechanisms of renal injury and may suggest more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the pathology of Lonomia’s envenomation. PMID:24798088

  5. Acute mechanical circulatory support for fulminant myocarditis complicated by cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Mody, Kanika P; Takayama, Hiroo; Landes, Elissa; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Colombo, Paolo C; Naka, Yoshifumi; Jorde, Ulrich P; Uriel, Nir

    2014-03-01

    In fulminant myocarditis complicated by cardiogenic shock, early mechanical circulatory support (MCS) may prevent cardiomyopathy and death. We sought to examine the outcomes of patients with fulminant myocarditis supported with MCS. A retrospective review of patients with acute cardiogenic shock treated with MCS from 2007 to 2013 was conducted, and patients with a diagnosis of fulminant myocarditis were included in this series. At our center, 260 patients received MCS for acute cardiogenic shock, and 11 were implanted for fulminant myocarditis. Eight received the Centrimag biventricular assist device (BIVAD), and three received veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (VA ECMO), though 1 VA ECMO-supported patient was transitioned to BIVAD due to refractory shock. The mean acute support time was 14.7 ± 4.4 days. Two patients required long-term left ventricular assist devices and were further supported for 55 and 112 days. Eight patients recovered with a mean ejection fraction of 54 ± 7 %, and one was successfully transplanted. Eight patients survived to discharge (73 %) with mean follow-up: 292.6 ± 306.8 days. All three deaths were due to neurologic complications. MCS should be considered in patients with fulminant myocarditis complicated by shock. With aggressive medical therapy, early utilization of MCS carries promising outcomes.

  6. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  7. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  8. Molecular mechanisms of phoxim-induced silk gland damage and TiO2 nanoparticle-attenuated damage in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Yu, Xiaohong; Gui, Suxin; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Hong, Jie; Sun, Qingqing; Sang, Xuezi; Sheng, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Rengping; Wang, Ling; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    Phoxim is a useful organophosphate (OP) pesticide used in agriculture in China, however, exposure to this pesticide can result in a significant reduction in cocooning in Bombyx mori (B. mori). Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been shown to decrease phoxim-induced toxicity in B. mori; however, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of silk gland damage due to OP exposure and repair of gland damage by TiO2 NP pretreatment. In the present study, exposure to phoxim resulted in a significant reduction in cocooning rate in addition to silk gland damage, whereas TiO2 NP attenuated phoxim-induced gland damage, increased the antioxidant capacity of the gland, and increased cocooning rate in B. mori. Furthermore, digital gene expression data suggested that phoxim exposure led to significant alterations in the expression of 833 genes. In particular, phoxim exposure caused significant down-regulation of Fib-L, Ser2, Ser3, and P25 genes involved in silk protein synthesis, and up-regulation of SFGH, UCH3, and Salhh genes involved in silk protein hydrolysis. A combination of both phoxim and TiO2 NP treatment resulted in marked changes in the expression of 754 genes, while treatment with TiO2 NPs led to significant alterations in the expression of 308 genes. Importantly, pretreatment with TiO2 NPs increased Fib-L, Ser2, Ser3, and P25 expression, and decreased SFGH, UCH3, and Salhh expression in silk protein in the silk gland under phoxim stress. Therefore, Fib-L, Ser2, Ser3, P25, SFGH, UCH3, and Salhh may be potential biomarkers of silk gland toxicity in B. mori caused by phoxim exposure.

  9. DIRECT-ACTING, DNA-DAMAGING AS (III)-METHYLATED SPECIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARCINOGENIC MECHANISM OF ACTION OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct-acting, DNA-damaging As (III)-methylated species: implications for a carcinogenic . mechanism of action of arsenicals

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs, arsenite and arsenate) has been thought to act as a carcinogen without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor the As(...

  10. Independent mechanisms for macrophage binding and macrophage phagocytosis of damaged erythrocytes. Evidence of receptor cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Sambrano, G R; Terpstra, V; Steinberg, D

    1997-12-01

    The binding and phagocytosis of oxidatively damaged red blood cells (OxRBCs) by mouse peritoneal macrophages can be inhibited by oxidatively modified LDL (OxLDL), implying some commonality at their receptor-binding domains. Studies from many different laboratories support the view that OxRBC binding is due to the disruption of plasma membrane phospholipid asymmetry and the subsequent exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet. Presumably, oxidation of LDL creates a surface structure on it in some way homologous to the PS-rich domain on OxRBCs. Apoptotic cells in some instances are also recognized because of PS exposure on the outer leaflet of the membrane, and apoptotic cells are a common feature of atherosclerotic lesions. In the present studies, the mechanisms of binding and internalization of cells recognized by virtue of their membrane PS were studied using OxRBCs or vanadate-treated erythrocytes (VaRBCs) as models. Disruption of phospholipid asymmetry with vanadate produced cells that were bound by macrophages in the same divalent cation-dependent manner as OxRBCs. However, whereas OxRBCs were rapidly phagocytosed, VaRBCs were not. Stimulation of mouse macrophages with phorbol myristate acetate resulted in a concentration-dependent induction of phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs, an effect that could be prevented by the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. Because phagocytosis of OxRBCs occurred unassisted, we speculated that there must be additional membrane changes induced by oxidation (over and above the disruption of phospholipid asymmetry) that contribute to phagocytosis of OxRBCs, possibly resulting in the ligation of a distinct receptor that does not necessarily contribute to adherence. This proposal is supported by the finding that ligation of macrophage Fc gamma receptors by the anti-Fc gamma RII/RIII antibody 2.4G2 triggers the phagocytosis of bound VaRBCs. Phagocytosis is also triggered by subthreshold opsonization of VaRBC, i

  11. Ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As : damage structures and amorphization mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B. W.; Turkot, B. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Coleman, J. J.; Roh, S. D.; Forbes, D. V.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    1998-07-01

    We review previous research on ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As-GaAs heterostructures, and include observations from our current work in order to assess the various mechanisms that have been proposed to account for damage accumulation and amorphization in this system. In considering all of the experimental observations, the most consistent description is one where amorphization occurs by a combination of point-defect buildup and direct impact amorphization mechanisms.

  12. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In Ontario, current treatment for eligible patients who have an acute ischemic stroke is intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). However, there are some limitations and contraindications to IVT, and outcomes may not be favourable for patients with stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. An alternative is mechanical thrombectomy with newer devices, and a number of recent studies have suggested that this treatment is more effective for improving functional independence and clinical outcomes. The objective of this health technology assessment was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices (with or without IVT) compared to IVT alone (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature, limited to randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using stent retrievers and thromboaspiration devices for patients with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We developed a Markov decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) versus IVT alone (if eligible), calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios using a 5-year time horizon, and conducted sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of the estimates. Results There was a substantial, statistically significant difference in rate of functional independence (GRADE: high quality) between those who received mechanical thrombectomy (with or without IVT) and IVT alone (odds ratio [OR] 2.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.88–3.04). We did not observe a difference in mortality (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.60–1.07) or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (GRADE: moderate quality) (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.66–1.87). In the base-case cost-utility analysis, which had a 5 year time horizon, the costs and effectiveness for

  13. Comparison of ex-situ volatile emissions from intact and mechanically damaged walnuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The codling moth (Cydia pomonella) and navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) are insect pests that inflict serious economic damage to California walnuts. Feeding by these larvae causes physical damage, resulting in lower kernel quality, and can lead to fungal contamination by the aflatoxigenic fun...

  14. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    To support FAA certification airworthiness standards, composite substrates are subjected to lightning direct-effect electrical waveforms to determine performance characteristics of the lightning strike protection (LSP) conductive layers used to protect composite substrates. Test results collected from independent LSP studies are often incomparable due to variability in test procedures & applied practices at different organizations, which impairs performance correlations between different LSP data sets. Under a NASA supported contract, The Boeing Company developed technical procedures and documentation as guidance in order to facilitate a test method for conducting universal common practice lightning strike protection test procedures. The procedures obtain conformity in future lightning strike protection evaluations to allow meaningful performance correlations across data sets. This universal common practice guidance provides the manufacturing specifications to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) test panels, including finish, grounding configuration, and acceptable methods for pretest nondestructive inspection (NDI) and posttest destructive inspection. The test operations guidance elaborates on the provisions contained in SAE ARP5416 to address inconsistencies in the generation of damage protection performance data, so as to provide for maximum achievable correlation across capable lab facilities. In addition, the guidance details a direct effects test bed design to aid in quantification of the multi-physical phenomena surrounding a lightning direct attachment supporting validation data requirements for the development of predictive computational modeling. The lightning test bed is designed to accommodate a repeatable installation procedure to secure the test panel and eliminate test installation uncertainty. It also facilitates a means to capture the electrical waveform parameters in 2 dimensions, along with the mechanical displacement and thermal

  15. Effect of CO2 deastringency treatment on flesh disorders induced by mechanical damage in persimmon. Biochemical and microstructural studies.

    PubMed

    Novillo, Pedro; Salvador, Alejandra; Llorca, Empar; Hernando, Isabel; Besada, Cristina

    2014-02-15

    Manifestation of flesh browning while commercialising 'Rojo Brillante' persimmon is one of the main causes of postharvest loss. It is known that mechanical damage is a decisive factor for browning development and that astringent fruit is less sensitive to this disorder than fruit submitted to a CO2 deastringency treatment under standard conditions (24h, 95% CO2, 20 °C). However, there is no information available about the mechanism behind this alteration. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treatment with high CO2 concentrations applied for 0-40 h on the incidence of mechanical impact-induced flesh disorders using biochemical, chromatographic and microstructural techniques. Our results show that the longer the CO2 exposure, the higher the incidence and the greater the severity browning. A deastringency treatment with CO2 results in O2(-) accumulation in fruit, which is greater the longer treatment is. However, mechanical damage triggers the browning manifestation, resulting in the accumulation of both O2(-) and H2O2. In this oxidative stress state, which must be greater as higher the level of O2(-) previously accumulated in the deastringency treatment, insoluble tannins initially uncolour, undergo an oxidation process and turn red-brown, observed as flesh browning. Moreover, we identified a new disorder, "pinkish-bruising", which is manifested in astringent fruit. The mechanism of this alteration, also associated with mechanical damage, seems similar to that of browning, but the oxidation process would affect soluble tannins.

  16. Mechanical Revascularization for Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Single-Center, Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeromel, Miran Milosevic, Z. V. Kocijancic, I. J. Lovric, D.; Svigelj, V. Zvan, B.

    2013-04-15

    BackgroundEndovascular mechanical revascularization (thrombectomy) is an increasingly used method for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke. The purpose of the study was to analyze the recanalization rate, clinical outcome, and complication rate in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. A total of 57 patients with large vessel stroke (within 3 h for anterior and 12 h for posterior circulation) were treated with mechanical revascularization at a single center during 24 months. The primary goal of endovascular treatment using different mechanical devices was recanalization of the occluded vessel. Recanalization rate (reported as thrombolysis in cerebral infarction [TICI] score), clinical outcome (reported as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score and modified Rankin scale [mRS] score), as well as periprocedural complications were analyzed. The mean age of the patients was 63.1 {+-} 12.9 years, with baseline median NIHSS score of 14 (interquartile range, 9.5-19). Successful recanalization (TICI 2b or 3) was achieved in 41 (72 %) patients. Twenty patients (35 %) presented with favorable outcome (mRS {<=}2) 30 days after stroke. Overall, significant neurological improvement ({>=}4 NIHSS point reduction) occurred in 36 (63 %) patients. A clinically significant procedure-related adverse events (vessel disruption, peri/postprocedural intracranial bleeding) defined with decline in NIHSS of {>=}4 or death occurred in three (5 %) patients. The study showed a high recanalization rate with improved clinical outcome and a low rate of periprocedural complications in our stroke patients treated with mechanical revascularization. Therefore, we could conclude that endovascular revascularization (primary or in combination with a bridging thrombolysis) was an effective and safe procedure for intracranial large vessel recanalization in acute stroke.

  17. Modeling of damage generation mechanisms in silicon at energies below the displacement threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Ivan; Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes

    2006-11-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the generation of damage in Si within the low-energy deposition regime. We have demonstrated that energy transfers below the displacement threshold can produce a significant amount of damage, usually neglected in traditional radiation damage calculations. The formation of amorphous pockets agrees with the thermal spike concept of local melting. However, we have found that the order-disorder transition is not instantaneous, but it requires some time to reach the appropriate kinetic-potential energy redistribution for melting. The competition between the rate of this energy redistribution and the energy diffusion to the surrounding atoms determines the amount of damage generated by a given deposited energy. Our findings explain the diverse damage morphology produced by ions of different masses.

  18. Blood damage through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve: a quantitative computational study using a multiscale suspension flow solver.

    PubMed

    Min Yun, B; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-10-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are among the most popular prostheses to replace defective native valves. However, complex flow phenomena caused by the prosthesis are thought to induce serious thromboembolic complications. This study aims at employing a novel multiscale numerical method that models realistic sized suspended platelets for assessing blood damage potential in flow through BMHVs. A previously validated lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate pulsatile flow through a 23 mm St. Jude Medical (SJM) Regent™ valve in the aortic position at very high spatiotemporal resolution with the presence of thousands of suspended platelets. Platelet damage is modeled for both the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. No platelets exceed activation thresholds for any of the simulations. Platelet damage is determined to be particularly high for suspended elements trapped in recirculation zones, which suggests a shift of focus in blood damage studies away from instantaneous flow fields and toward high flow mixing regions. In the diastolic phase, leakage flow through the b-datum gap is shown to cause highest damage to platelets. This multiscale numerical method may be used as a generic solver for evaluating blood damage in other cardiovascular flows and devices. PMID:25070372

  19. Assessing the Impact of Mechanical Damage on Full-Thickness Porcine and Human Skin Using an In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dabboue, Hinda; Builles, Nicolas; Frouin, Éric; Scott, Dan; Ramos, Jeanne; Marti-Mestres, Gilberte

    2015-01-01

    For most xenobiotics, the rates of percutaneous absorption are limited by diffusion through the horny layer of skin. However, percutaneous absorption of chemicals may seriously increase when the skin is damaged. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro representative model of mechanically damaged skins. The epidermal barrier was examined following exposure to a razor, a rotating brush, and a microneedle system in comparison to tape-stripping which acted as a reference. Excised full-thickness skins were mounted on a diffusion chamber in order to evaluate the effect of injuries and to mimic physiological conditions. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was greatly increased when the barrier function was compromised. Measurements were made for all the damaged biopsies and observed histologically by microscopy. On human and porcine skins, the tape-stripping application (0 to 40 times) showed a proportional increase in TEWL which highlights the destruction of the stratum corneum. Similar results were obtained for all cosmetic instruments. This is reflected in our study by the nonsignificant difference of the mean TEWL scores between 30 strips and mechanical damage. For a specific appreciation, damaged skins were then selected to qualitatively evaluate the absorption of a chlorogenic acid solution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26247021

  20. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E.; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms used in the acute phase of stimulated steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomson, M

    1998-01-01

    Steroidogenic tissue can respond almost immediately to a stimulatory hormonal stimuli. Recent findings are shedding light on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that are used to synthesize and export steroid hormones in the acute phase of stimulation. In addition to utilising the cAMP intracellular messenger system to convey a stimulatory message, steroidogenic cells may employ the protein kinase C, arachidonic acid, tyrosine phosphate and nitrous oxide systems. It has been proposed that cholesterol laden vesicles travel along a network of intermediate filaments to reach the mitochondria. Cholesterol may then translocate from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the inner via sites of contact between the two membranes. These contact sites may be composed of protein bridges which include the constituents, porin, the benzodiazepine receptor and GTP binding proteins. Cholesterol is transported through the contact sites to the inner membrane and on reaching cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc), cholesterol is converted to pregnenolone. Pregnenolone is in turn converted to a range of steroid hormones via enzyme casades. GTP binding proteins may regulate the contact site between the inner and outer membranes and thereby modulate cholesterol flux to P450scc. In the adrenal and gonads the rate that cholesterol traverses the contact point to reach the inner membrane is accelerated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. Newly synthesized steroid hormones are transported to the cell periphery for export via a mechanism that may utilise an ion exchange protein.

  2. Alterations in attentional mechanisms in response to acute inflammatory pain and morphine administration.

    PubMed

    Boyette-Davis, J A; Thompson, C D; Fuchs, P N

    2008-01-24

    Research indicates that pain negatively impacts attention; however, the extent of this impact and the mechanisms of the effect of pain on normal attentional processing remain unclear. This study 1) examined the impact of acute inflammatory pain on attentional processing, 2) examined the impact of morphine on attentional processing, and 3) determined if an analgesic dose of morphine would return attentional processing to normal levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on the 5 choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT), a test commonly used to assess the attentional mechanisms of rodents. Animals were injected with saline or 1, 3, or 6 mg/kg of morphine. Twenty minutes later, animals received a formalin (or saline) injection into one hind paw to induce an inflammatory condition and were then immediately tested in the 5CSRTT. The results show that the formalin injection significantly impaired performance, as measured by an increase in the number of trials in which the animal failed to attend to the task. Likewise, a high dose of morphine (6 mg/kg) produced similar decrements in task performance. Of primary importance is that 3 mg/kg of morphine produced analgesia with only mild sedation, and performance in the 5CSRTT was improved with this dose. This is the first study to use an animal model of acute pain to demonstrate the negative impact of pain on attention, and provides a novel approach to examine the neural correlates that underlie the disruptive impact of pain on attention.

  3. Usefulness of the Pain Tracking Technique in Acute Mechanical Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Bravo Acosta, Tania; Martín Cordero, Jorge E; Hernández Tápanes, Solangel; Pedroso Morales, Isis; Fernández Cuesta, José Ignacio; Leyva Serrano, Maritza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the usefulness of the pain tracking technique in acute mechanical low back pain. Method. We performed an experimental prospective (longitudinal) explanatory study between January 2011 and September 2012. The sample was randomly divided into two groups. Patients were assessed at the start and end of the treatment using the visual analogue scale and the Waddell test. Treatment consisted in applying the pain tracking technique to the study group and interferential current therapy to the control group. At the end of treatment, cryotherapy was applied for 10 minutes. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the Mann Whitney test were used. They were performed with a predetermined significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results. Pain was triggered by prolonged static posture and intense physical labor and intensified through trunk movements and when sitting and standing. The greatest relief was reported in lateral decubitus position and in William's position. The majority of the patients had contracture. Pain and disability were modified with the rehabilitation treatment in both groups. Conclusions. Both the pain tracking and interferential current techniques combined with cryotherapy are useful treatments for acute mechanical low back pain. The onset of analgesia is faster when using the pain tracking technique. PMID:26240758

  4. Mechanism of injury and treatment of trauma-associated acute compartment syndrome of the foot.

    PubMed

    Brink, F; Bachmann, S; Lechler, P; Frink, M

    2014-10-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the foot represents a rare complication following trauma of the lower extremity. Early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to prevent poor outcome. The study was conducted to describe etiology and treatment of foot ACS. In the current study, patients diagnosed with and treated for ACS between 1st December 2000 and 30th September 2007 were included. Mechanism of injury, additional injuries and treatment was analyzed. We included 31 patients (21 males) with a mean age of 33.8 ± 16.9 years. Most injuries were caused by a motor vehicle accident, while nearly 20 % occurred after a low-energy mechanism. Multiple injuries with a mean ISS of 19.5 ± 11.0 were present in 14 patients. Superficial infections occurred in 6 feet, while a deep infection only developed in one patient. Acute compartment syndrome of the foot has a low incidence. A thorough clinical examination in patients on risk is required to provide timely diagnosis and adequate surgical decompression.

  5. Organophosphate-induced brain damage: mechanisms, neuropsychiatric and neurological consequences, and potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-induced brain damage is defined as progressive damage to the brain, resulting from the cholinergic neuronal excitotoxicity and dysfunction induced by OP-induced irreversible AChE inhibition. This delayed secondary neuronal damage that occurs mainly in the cholinergic regions of the brain that contain dense accumulations of cholinergic neurons and the majority of cholinergic projection, might be largely responsible for persistent profound neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments (memory, cognitive, mental, emotional, motor and sensory deficits) in the victims of OP poisoning. Neuroprotective strategies for attenuating OP-induced brain damage should target different development stages of OP-induced brain damage, and may include but not limited to: (1) Antidote therapies with atropine and related efficient anticholinergic drugs; (2) Anti-excitotoxic therapies targeting attenuation of cerebral edema and inflammatory reaction, blockage of calcium influx, inhibition of apoptosis program, and the control of seizures; (3) Neuroprotective strategies using cytokines, antioxidants and NMDAR antagonists (a single drug or a combination of drugs) to slow down the process of secondary neuronal damage; and (4) Therapies targeting individual symptoms or clusters of chronic neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms. These neuroprotective strategies may help limit or prevent secondary neuronal damage at the early stage of OP poisoning and attenuate the subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments, thus reducing the long-term disability caused by exposure to OPs. PMID:22498093

  6. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Nunan, R

    2015-08-01

    A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to heal and leave behind a noticeable scar. At the extreme end, chronic wounds - defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months - have become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world and will only increase as our populations advance in age, and with the increasing incidence of diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Here we describe the clinical problems and how, through better dialogue between basic researchers and clinicians, we may extend our current knowledge to enable the development of novel potential therapeutic treatments.

  7. Study progress on mechanism of severe acute pancreatitis complicated with hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jie

    2007-04-01

    Study on the action mechanism of inflammatory mediators generated by the severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in multiple organ injury is a hotspot in the surgical field. In clinical practice, the main complicated organ dysfunctions are shock, respiratory failure, renal failure, encephalopathy, with the rate of hepatic diseases being closely next to them. The hepatic injury caused by SAP cannot only aggravate the state of pancreatitis, but also develop into hepatic failure and cause patient death. Its complicated pathogenic mechanism is an obstacle in clinical treatment. Among many pathogenic factors, the changes of vasoactive substances, participation of inflammatory mediators as well as OFR (oxygen free radical), endotoxin, etc. may play important roles in its progression.

  8. Mutational analysis of the damage-recognition and catalytic mechanism of human SMUG1 DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Mayumi; Tanaka, Tamon; Terato, Hiroaki; Ohmae, Eiji; Izumi, Shunsuke; Katayanagi, Katsuo; Ide, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Single-strand selective monofunctional uracil-DNA glycosylase (SMUG1), previously thought to be a backup enzyme for uracil-DNA glycosylase, has recently been shown to excise 5-hydroxyuracil (hoU), 5-hydroxymethyluracil (hmU) and 5-formyluracil (fU) bearing an oxidized group at ring C5 as well as an uracil. In the present study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to construct a series of mutants of human SMUG1 (hSMUG1), and tested their activity for uracil, hoU, hmU, fU and other bases to elucidate the catalytic and damage-recognition mechanism of hSMUG1. The functional analysis of the mutants, together with the homology modeling of the hSMUG1 structure based on that determined recently for Xenopus laevis SMUG1, revealed the crucial residues for the rupture of the N-glycosidic bond (Asn85 and His239), discrimination of pyrimidine rings through pi-pi stacking to the base (Phe98) and specific hydrogen bonds to the Watson-Crick face of the base (Asn163) and exquisite recognition of the C5 substituent through water-bridged (uracil) or direct (hoU, hmU and fU) hydrogen bonds (Gly87-Met91). Integration of the present results and the structural data elucidates how hSMUG1 accepts uracil, hoU, hmU and fU as substrates, but not other oxidized pyrimidines such as 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-formylcytosine and thymine glycol, and intact pyrimidines such as thymine and cytosine.

  9. Modelling and simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cement-based materials: Interactions between damage and leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Stora, E.; Bary, B.; Deville, E.; Montarnal, P.

    2010-08-15

    The assessment of the durability of cement-based materials, which could be employed in underground structures for nuclear waste disposal, requires accounting for deterioration factors, such as chemical attacks and damage, and for the interactions between these phenomena. The objective of the present paper consists in investigating the long-term behaviour of cementitious materials by simulating their response to chemical and mechanical solicitations. In a companion paper (Stora et al., submitted to Cem. Concr. Res. 2008), the implementation of a multi-scale homogenization model into an integration platform has allowed for evaluating the evolution of the mineral composition, diffusive and elastic properties inside a concrete material subjected to leaching. To complete this previous work, an orthotropic micromechanical damage model is presently developed and incorporated in this numerical platform to estimate the mechanical and diffusive properties of damaged cement-based materials. Simulations of the chemo-mechanical behaviour of leached cementitious materials are performed with the tool thus obtained and compared with available experiments. The numerical results are insightful about the interactions between damage and chemical deteriorations.

  10. Endovascular Mechanical Recanalisation of Acute Carotid-T Occlusions: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fesl, Gunther; Wiesmann, Martin; Patzig, Maximilian; Holtmannspoetter, Markus; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Dichgans, Martin; Brueckmann, Hartmut

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Acute carotid-T occlusion generally responds poorly to thrombolysis. Endovascular mechanical thrombectomy (EMT) seems to be a promising alternative. However, there are few data on EMT in carotid-T occlusions. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data of 14 consecutive patients with acute carotid-T occlusions treated with mechanical recanalisation devices. A clot separation/aspiration system was used in 11 patients; different other mechanical retriever devices were used in seven patients; and stents were used in four patients. Modified Rankin Scale scores at 90 days were recorded to assess functional outcome. Results: Six women and eight men were included in the study. Mean patient age was 59.2 years; median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score on admission was 19; and mean time to treatment was 4.2 h. Successful recanalisation (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] score II and III) was achieved in 11 patients (78.6%). Seven patients (50.0%) were treated with more than one device, leading to successful recanalisation in six of these patients (85.7%). Subarachnoid haemorrhage and large space-occupying bleedings occurred in one (7.1%) and three (21.4%) patients, respectively. At follow-up, three patients (21.4%) were functionally independent, and six (42.9%) had died. Conclusion: When applying different mechanical devices, we found a high recanalisation rate. However, discrepancy between recanalisation and clinical outcome remained. More data are needed to assess the effect of the different methods on the prognoses of stroke patients.

  11. Light damage in the rat retina: effect of a radioprotective agent (WR-77913) on acute rod outer segment disk disruptions.

    PubMed

    Remé, C E; Braschler, U F; Roberts, J; Dillon, J

    1991-07-01

    Primary events in the course of light induced retinal lesions are still not fully elucidated. Under chronic conditions, lipid peroxidation in the retina and death of photoreceptor cells are observed. The radioprotective agent WR-77913 scavenges singlet oxygen, hydrated electrons and free radicals. WR-77913 was used to protect against acute light induced photoreceptor outer segment membrane disruptions in the rat retina. There was a partial but not complete protection at higher illuminance levels (800 lx for 30 min), whereas threshold lesions (400 lx for 30 min) were almost completely prevented. These observations indicate an involvement of photodynamic reactions in causing acute photoreceptor lesions. PMID:1658823

  12. Effect of mechanical tissue properties on thermal damage in skin after IR-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, M.; Mischler, Ch.; Romano, V.; Forrer, M.; Müller, O. M.; Weber, H. P.

    1991-04-01

    The damage created instantaneously in dorsal skin and in the subjacent skeletal muscle layer after CO2 and Er3+ laser incisions is histologically and ultrastructurally investigated. Light microscopical examinations show an up to three times larger damage zone in the subcutaneous layer of skeletal muscle than in the connective tissue above. The extent of thermally altered muscle tissue is classified by different zones and characterized by comparison to long time heating injuries. The unexpectedly large damage is a result of the change of elastic properties occurring abruptly at the transition between different materials. This leads to a discontinuity of the cutting dynamics that reduces the ejection of tissue material. We show that the degree of thermal damage originates from the amount of hot material that is not ejected out of the crater acting as a secondary heat source.

  13. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  14. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila França; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  15. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  16. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila França; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  17. Damage and fracture mechanisms in cross-woven C/SiC composite subjected to tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Laird, C.

    1994-12-31

    In order to investigate the structure sensitivity of composite behavior, tensile tests were conducted on CVI processed cross-woven C/SiC composites. Tensile damage mechanisms were observed using SEM on loaded and then unloaded samples. The damage modes identified include bundle matrix cracking, fiber/matrix debonding, fiber breaking delamination and bundle splitting. Because of the inhomogeneous SiC distribution in the fiber bundles, matrix cracking was observed to develop three dimensionally, including the following processes: lateral growth in matrix dominated regions such as bundle coatings, and crack arrest due to the decrease in matrix volume fraction, followed by formation of new matrix cracks inside the bundle, producing a damage zone characterized by a high density of small inter-fiber cracks. Final failure of the composite resulted from fiber breaks at different locations across the fiber bundles, producing in a rugged fracture surface.

  18. Mechanical damage to pollen aids nutrient acquisition in Heliconius butterflies (Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Krenn, Harald W; Eberhard, Monika J B; Eberhard, Stefan H; Hikl, Anna-Laetitia; Huber, Werner; Gilbert, Lawrence E

    2009-12-01

    Neotropical Heliconius and Laparus butterflies actively collect pollen onto the proboscis and extract nutrients from it. This study investigates the impact of the processing behaviour on the condition of the pollen grains. Pollen samples (n = 72) were collected from proboscides of various Heliconius species and Laparus doris in surrounding habitats of the Tropical Research Station La Gamba (Costa Rica). Examination using a light microscope revealed that pollen loads contained 74.88 ± 53.67% of damaged Psychotria pollen, 72.04 ± 23.4% of damaged Psiguria/Gurania pollen, and 21.35 ± 14.5% of damaged Lantana pollen (numbers represent median ± first quartile). Damaged pollen grains showed deformed contours, inhomogeneous and/or leaking contents, or they were empty. Experiments with Heliconius and Laparus doris from a natural population in Costa Rica demonstrated that 200 min of pollen processing behaviour significantly increased the percentage of damaged pollen of Psychotria compared to pollen from anthers (P = 0.015, Z = -2.44, Mann-Whitney U-test). Examination of pollen loads from green house reared Heliconius butterflies resulted in significantly greater amounts of damaged Psiguria pollen after 200 min of processing behaviour compared to pollen from flowers (P < 0.001, Z = -4.583, Mann-Whitney U-test). These results indicate that pollen processing functions as extra oral digestion whereby pollen grains are ruptured to make the content available for ingestion.

  19. Scaling Between Fault Length, Damaged Zone Thickness and Width of Secondary Fault Fans Derived from Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Mao, Xiaolin

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between earthquakes, fault network geometry and fault zone structure is a key question motivating the integration of dynamic rupture and long-term crustal deformation modeling. Here, we address the scaling between fault structural properties from the perspective of dynamic and quasi-static processes involved in fault system evolution. Faults are surrounded by materials damaged through quasi-static and dynamic processes, forming damaged zones whose thickness and damage intensity may vary as a function of fault maturity and length. In the vicinity (typically less than a few hundred meters) of their principal slip surface, faults develop an "inner damage zone", usually characterized by micro-fracture observations. At a larger scale, faults develop an "outer damage zone" of secondary macroscopic fault branches at their tips, which organize into fans of splay faults. Inner damage zones can significantly affect earthquake ruptures, enhance near-field ground motions and facilitate fluid transport in the crust. Fault zone trapped waves can generate pulse-like rupture and oscillatory rupture speed, facilitate supershear rupture transition and allow for steady rupture propagation at speeds that are unstable or inadmissible in homogeneous media. The effects of a fault damage zone crucially depend on its thickness. Field observations of inner damage zone thickness as a function of cumulated slip show linear scaling at small slip but saturation at large slip, with maximum damage zone thickness of a few hundred meters. We previously developed fracture mechanics theoretical arguments and dynamic rupture simulations with off-fault inelastic deformation that predict saturation of the thickness of co-seismic damage zone controlled by the depth extent of the seismogenic zone. In essence, the stress intensity factor at the front of a rupture, which controls the distance reached by the large off-fault stresses that cause damage, scales with the shortest characteristic

  20. Thermomechanical Fatigue Damage/Failure Mechanisms in SCS-6/Timetal 21S [0/90](Sub S) Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1994-01-01

    The thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) deformation, damage, and life behaviors of SCS6/Timetal 21S (0/90)s were investigated under zero-tension conditions. In-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) loadings were investigated with a temperature cycle from 150 to 650 deg C. An advanced TMF test technique was used to quantify mechanically damage progression. The technique incorporated explicit measurements of the macroscopic (1) isothermal static moduli at the temperature extremes of the TMF cycle and (2) coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as functions of the TMF cycles. The importance of thermal property degradation and its relevance to accurate post-test data analysis and interpretation is briefly addressed. Extensive fractography and metallography were conducted on specimens from failed and interrupted tests to characterize the extent of damage at the microstructure level. Fatigue life results indicated trends analogous to those established for similar unidirectional(0) reinforced titanium matrix composite systems. High stress IP and mid to low stress OP loading conditions were life-limiting in comparison to maximum temperature isothermal conditions. Dominant damage mechanisms changed with cycle type. Damage resulting from IP TMF conditions produced measurable decreases in static moduli but only minimal changes in the CTE. Metallography on interrupted and failed specimens revealed extensive (0) fiber cracking with sparse matrix damage. No surface initiated matrix cracks were present. Comparable OP TMF conditions initiated environment enhanced surface cracking and matrix cracking initiated at (90) fiber/matrix (F/M) interfaces. Notable static moduli and CTE degradations were measured. Fractography and metallography revealed that the transverse cracks originating from the surface and (90) F/M interfaces tended to converge and coalesce at the (0) fibers.

  1. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Kechker, Peter; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4. Thus DDR inhibition

  2. The Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Provides a Novel Mechanism for Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Brestovitsky, Anna; Nebenzahl-Sharon, Keren; Kechker, Peter; Sharf, Rakefet; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2016-02-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a conglomerate of pathways designed to detect DNA damage and signal its presence to cell cycle checkpoints and to the repair machinery, allowing the cell to pause and mend the damage, or if the damage is too severe, to trigger apoptosis or senescence. Various DDR branches are regulated by kinases of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinase family, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). Replication intermediates and linear double-stranded genomes of DNA viruses are perceived by the cell as DNA damage and activate the DDR. If allowed to operate, the DDR will stimulate ligation of viral genomes and will inhibit virus replication. To prevent this outcome, many DNA viruses evolved ways to limit the DDR. As part of its attack on the DDR, adenovirus utilizes various viral proteins to cause degradation of DDR proteins and to sequester the MRN damage sensor outside virus replication centers. Here we show that adenovirus evolved yet another novel mechanism to inhibit the DDR. The E4orf4 protein, together with its cellular partner PP2A, reduces phosphorylation of ATM and ATR substrates in virus-infected cells and in cells treated with DNA damaging drugs, and causes accumulation of damaged DNA in the drug-treated cells. ATM and ATR are not mutually required for inhibition of their signaling pathways by E4orf4. ATM and ATR deficiency as well as E4orf4 expression enhance infection efficiency. Furthermore, E4orf4, previously reported to induce cancer-specific cell death when expressed alone, sensitizes cells to killing by sub-lethal concentrations of DNA damaging drugs, likely because it inhibits DNA damage repair. These findings provide one explanation for the cancer-specificity of E4orf4-induced cell death as many cancers have DDR deficiencies leading to increased reliance on the remaining intact DDR pathways and to enhanced susceptibility to DDR inhibitors such as E4orf4. Thus DDR inhibition

  3. Bond breaks of nucleotides by dissociative electron transfer of nonequilibrium prehydrated electrons: a new molecular mechanism for reductive DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Rong; Nguyen, Jenny; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2009-08-19

    DNA damage is a central mechanism in the pathogenesis and treatment of human diseases, notably cancer. Little is known about reductive DNA damage in causing genetic mutations during oncogenesis and killing cancer cells during radiotherapy. The prehydrated electron (e(-)(pre)) has the highest yield among all the radicals generated in cells during ionizing radiation and has subpicosecond lifetimes (10(-13) s) and energies below 0 eV, but its role in DNA damage is unknown. In this work, our real-time measurements by femtosecond time-resolved laser spectroscopy have revealed that while adenine and cytosine can effectively trap an e(-)(pre) to form stable anions, thymidine and especially guanine are highly susceptible to dissociative electron transfer of e(-)(pre), leading to bond dissociation in DNA. Our finding demonstrates a dissociative electron transfer pathway for reductive DNA damage that might be related to various diseases such as cancer and stroke. Moreover, this finding challenges the conventional notion that damage to the genome is mainly induced by the oxidizing OH* radical and might eventually lead to improved radiotherapy of cancer and radioprotection of humans.

  4. Solid-extracellular fluid interaction and damage in the mechanical response of rat brain tissue under confined compression.

    PubMed

    Haslach, Henry W; Leahy, Lauren N; Riley, Peter; Gullapalli, Rao; Xu, Su; Hsieh, Adam H

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical processes that underlie mild traumatic brain injury from physical insults are not well understood. One aspect in particular that has not been examined is the tissue fluid, which is known to be critical in the mechanical function of other organs. To investigate the contributions of solid-fluid interactions to brain tissue mechanics, we performed confined compression tests, that force the extracellular fluid (ECF) to flow in the direction of the deformation, on 6.35mm diameter, 3mm long cylindrical samples excised from various regions of rat brains. Two types of tests in deformation control, (1) quasi-static, slow and moderate constant strain rate tests at 0.64×10(-5)/s, 0.001/s and 1/s to large strains and (2) several applications of slow linear deformation to 5% strain each followed by stress relaxation are employed to explore the solid-fluid interaction. At slow and moderate compressive strain rates, we observed stress peaks in the applied strain range at about 11%, whose magnitudes exhibited statistically significant dependence on strain rate. These data suggest that the ECF carries load until the tissue is sufficiently damaged to permit pathological fluid flow. Under the slow ramp rate in the ramp-relaxation cycles protocol, commonly used to estimate permeability, the stress relaxes to zero after the first cycle, rather than to a non-zero equilibrium stress corresponding to the applied strain, which further implicates mechanical damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of changes in tissue microstructure during confined compression, before and after compression, provides further evidence of tissue damage. The solid-fluid interactions, reflected in the morphology of the stress-stretch curves and supported by the MRI data, suggest that increases in hydrostatic pressure in the ECF may contribute to mechanical damage of brain tissue.

  5. Histological aspects of retinal damage following exposure to pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation in rabbits: indication for mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, T.; Peri, D.; Turetz, J.; Fishbine, E.; Sahar, R.; Egoz, I.; Sapiens, N.; Brandeis, R.

    2007-02-01

    The severity and characteristics of retinal injury following laser radiation derived from laser and tissue related factors. We have previously shown that retinal damage following Nd:YAG Q-switched laser radiation in rabbits was related to physical parameters, i.e. energy levels and number of pulses. Yet, an extremely large variability in the severity of the damage was found under similar exposure paradigms, even within the same retina. This emphasizes the role of the biological variables in the pathological mechanism of laser-induced retinal damage. The aim of the present study was to further study histological parameters of the injury in relation to retinal site and to elucidate their role in the initiation and characteristics of the damage, following various energy levels (10-50 μJ) and number of pulses (1-4). Pigmented rabbits were exposed to Nd:YAG laser radiation (532nm, pulse duration: 20ns). Exposures were conducted in retina tissue, adjacent to the optic nerve, with a total of 20 exposures per retina. Animals were sacrificed 15 min or 24 hours post exposure, eyes enucleated and processed for paraffin embedding. 4μm thick serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, were examined under light microscopy. Two major types of retinal damage were observed: focal edema confined to the pigmented epithelium and the photoreceptor cells, and hemorrhages, associated with destruction of retinal tissue. While focal edema associated with slight elevation of the photoreceptor layer seems to depend on the pigmented epithelium, hemorrhages were related also to the choroid vasculature at the site of radiation. It is suggested that a thermo-mechanical mechanism is involved in laser induced retinal hemorrhages at energies above 10-30μJ (2-1 pulses, respectively).

  6. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  7. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future.

  8. Incidence of acute volleyball injuries: a prospective cohort study of injury mechanisms and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bahr, R; Bahr, I A

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the incidence and mechanisms of acute volleyball injuries, with particular reference to possible risk factors for ankle injuries. Coaches and players in the top two divisions of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation were asked to keep records of exposure time and all acute volleyball injuries causing a player to miss at least one playing day during one season. We found 89 injuries among 272 players during 51588 player hours, 45837 h of training and 5751 h of match play. The total injury incidence was 1.7 +/- 0.2 per 1000 h of play, 1.5 +/- 0.2 during training and 3.5 +/- 0.8 during match play. The ankle (54%) was the most commonly injured region, followed by the lower back (11%), knee (8%), shoulder (8%) and fingers (7%). Of the ankle injuries, 79% were recurrences, and the relative risk of injury was 3.8 (P < 0.0001) for previously injured ankles (38 of 232) vs. non-injured ankles (10 of the 234). Moreover, a reinjury was observed in 21 of the 50 ankles that had suffered an ankle sprain within the last 6 months (42.0 +/- 7.0%; risk ratio: 9.8 vs. uninjured ankles; P < 0.000001). The data indicate that external supports should be worn for 6-12 months after an ankle sprain and that specific injury prevention programs may be developed for ankle sprains in volleyball. PMID:9200321

  9. Mechanism initiated by nanoabsorber for UV nanosecond-pulse-driven damage of dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chaoyang; Shao, Jianda; He, Hongbo; Yi, Kui; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2008-03-01

    A model of plasma formation for UV nanosecond pulse-laser interaction with SiO(2) thin film based on nanoabsorber is proposed. The formalism considered the temperature dependence of band gap. The numerical results show that during the process of nanosecond pulsed-laser interaction with SiO(2) films, foreign inclusion absorbing a fraction of incident radiation heats the surrounding host material through heat conduction causing the decrease of the band gap and making the initial transparent matrix into an absorptive medium around the inclusion. During the remainder pulse, the abosorbing volume of the host material is effectively growed and lead to the formation of the damage craters. We investigated the experimental damage craters and compared with theoretical prediction. The pulselength dependence of damage threshold was also investigated. PMID:18542429

  10. Monodisperse Sn nanocrystals as a platform for the study of mechanical damage during electrochemical reactions with Li.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linping; Kim, Chunjoong; Shukla, Alpesh K; Dong, Angang; Mattox, Tracy M; Milliron, Delia J; Cabana, Jordi

    2013-04-10

    Monodisperse Sn spherical nanocrystals of 10.0 ± 0.2 nm were prepared in dispersible colloidal form. They were used as a model platform to study the impact of size on the accommodation of colossal volume changes during electrochemical lithiation using ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significant mechanical damage was observed after full lithiation, indicating that even crystals at these very small dimensions are not sufficient to prevent particle pulverization that compromises electrode durability.

  11. Subsurface mechanical damage during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaineau, P.; André, D.; Laheurte, R.; Darnis, P.; Darbois, N.; Cahuc, O.; Neauport, J.

    2015-10-01

    The subsurface damage (SSD) introduced during bound abrasive grinding of fused silica glass was measured using a wet etch technique. Various process parameters and grinding configurations were studied. The relation between the SSD depth, the process parameters and forces applied by the grinding wheel on the sample was investigated and compared to a simulation using a discrete element method to model the grinding interface. The results reveal a relation between the SSD depth and the grinding forces normalized by the abrasive concentration. Regarding the creation of the SSD, numerical simulations indicate that only a small fraction of the largest particles in the diamond wheel are responsible for the depth of the damaged layer.

  12. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  13. Developments in mechanical thrombectomy devices for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mordasini, Pasquale; Gralla, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Several recent prospective randomized controlled trials of endovascular stroke therapy using latest generation thrombectomy devices, so called stent-retrievers, have shown significantly improved clinical outcome compared to the standard treatment with intra-venous thrombolysis using r-tPA alone. Despite some differences in inclusion criteria between these studies, all required non-invasive vessel imaging to proof occlusion of a major brain supplying vessel. Furthermore, in most studies additional imaging techniques were used to exclude patients with already established large cerebral infarction or unfavorable collateral or penumbral status. Patients with small infarct volume, severe neurological deficits and in whom thrombectomy can be initiated within the first 6 hours after symptom onset seem to benefit the most. Therefore, mechanical thrombectomy using stent-retrievers in addition to intra-venous thrombolysis is recommended for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke with proven major vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation.

  14. CYLD Regulates Noscapine Activity in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia via a Microtubule-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunfan; Ran, Jie; Sun, Lei; Sun, Xiaodong; Luo, Youguang; Yan, Bing; Tala; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Zhang, Lei; Bao, Gang; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Noscapine is an orally administrable drug used worldwide for cough suppression and has recently been demonstrated to disrupt microtubule dynamics and possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating noscapine activity remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that cylindromatosis (CYLD), a microtubule-associated tumor suppressor protein, modulates the activity of noscapine both in cell lines and in primary cells of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that CYLD increases the ability of noscapine to induce mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Examination of cellular microtubules as well as in vitro assembled microtubules shows that CYLD enhances the effect of noscapine on microtubule polymerization. Microtubule cosedimentation and fluorescence titration assays further reveal that CYLD interacts with microtubule outer surface and promotes noscapine binding to microtubules. These findings thus demonstrate CYLD as a critical regulator of noscapine activity and have important implications for ALL treatment. PMID:25897332

  15. Prostaglandin E2 and reactive oxygen metabolite damage in the cecum in a pony model of acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    McConnico, Rebecca S.; Argenzio, Robert A.; Roberts, Malcolm C.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to determine early tissue biochemical events associated with increased colonic secretion during the acute stage of castor-oil-induced colitis by measuring cecal mucosal and submucosal malondialdehyde (MDA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), levels in ponies. Intestinal tissue (inflamed or healthy) samples were obtained from 4 age- and sex-matched Shetland ponies. Biochemical methods were used to determine MDA and PGE2 levels in intestinal tissue samples from inflamed and healthy equine intestine. Inflamed tissue MDA and PGE2 levels increased with time after castor oil challenge and correlated with granulocyte infiltration, as determined by myeloperoxidase levels in a companion study. Elevated intestinal tissue MDA levels suggest that lipid peroxidation could be attributed to reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) released from stimulated, recruited, and resident granulocytes. Tissue levels of MDA and PGE2 suggest a role for granulocyte-derived mediators of intestinal inflammation in the massive secretory response in cases of acute equine colitis. Tissue MDA and PGE2 levels may be useful laboratory tools to quantify and characterize intestinal secretory inflammatory responses in acute inflammatory conditions in the equine colon. PMID:11858649

  16. [Defense mechanism to prevent ectopic activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes under physiological conditions and its breakdown in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Kaku, Midori; Otsuko, Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Independent of the etiology, acute pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and the potential for mortality. In most patients, acute pancreatitis follows an uncomplicated or mild course. Recent studies in hereditary pancreatitis have clearly revealed that trypsin is the key enzyme at the onset of pancreatitis. However, there are several defense mechanisms to prevent ectopic activation of trypsin under physiological conditions. If the defense mechanisms failed or activation of trypsin occurred over defense ability, trypsin would activate other digestive enzymes and self-digestion of the pancreas would occur.

  17. Surgical indicators for the operative treatment of acute mechanical intestinal obstruction due to adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Boluk, Salih; Bayraktar, Baris; Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Yildirim Boluk, Sumeyra; Tombalak, Ercument; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to investigate the predictive factors indicating strangulation, and the requirement for surgery in patients with acute mechanical intestinal obstruction due to adhesions. Methods This study retrospectively evaluated the records of patients with adhesive acute mechanical intestinal obstruction. The surgical treatment (group S), conservative treatment (group C), intraoperative bowel ischemia (group I), and intraoperative adhesion only (group A) groups were statistically evaluated according to the diagnostic and surgical parameters. Results The study group of 252 patients consisted of 113 women (44.8%), and 139 men (55.2%). The mean age was 62.79 ± 18.08 years (range, 20-98 years). Group S consisted of 50 patients (19.8%), and 202 (80.2%) were in group C. Group I consisted of 19 patients (38%), where as 31 (62%) were in group A. In group S, the prehospital symptomatic period was longer, incidence of fever was increased, and elevated CRP levels were significant (P < 0.05). Plain abdominal radiography, and abdominal computerized tomography were significantly sensitive for strangulation (P < 0.05). The elderly were more prone to strangulation (P < 0.05). Fever, rebound tendernes, and urea & creatinine levels were significantly higher in the presence of strangulation (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, and P < 0.05, consecutively). Conclusion Fever, rebound tenderness, urea & creatinine levels, plain abdominal radiography, and abdominal computerized tomography images were important indicators of bowel ischemia. Longer prehospital symptomatic period was related with a tendency for surgical treatment, and the elderly were more prone to strangulation. CRP detection was considered to be useful for the decision of surgery, but not significantly predictive for strangulation. PMID:26029678

  18. Accounting for the Delay in the Transition from Acute to Chronic Pain: Axonal and Nuclear Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Bogen, Oliver; Reichling, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute insults produce hyperalgesic priming, a neuroplastic change in nociceptors that markedly prolongs inflammatory mediator-induced hyperalgesia. After an acute initiating insult, there is a 72 h delay to the onset of priming, for which the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that the delay is due to the time required for a signal to travel from the peripheral terminal to the cell body followed by a return signal to the peripheral terminal. We report that when an inducer of hyperalgesic priming (monocyte chemotactic protein 1) is administered at the spinal cord of Sprague Dawley rats, priming is detected at the peripheral terminal with a delay significantly shorter than when applied peripherally. Spinally induced priming is detected not only when prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is presented to the peripheral nociceptor terminals, but also when it is presented intrathecally to the central terminals in the spinal cord. Furthermore, when an inducer of priming is administered in the paw, priming can be detected in spinal cord (as prolonged hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal PGE2), but only when the mechanical stimulus is presented to the paw on the side where the priming inducer was administered. Both spinally and peripherally induced priming is prevented by intrathecal oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to the nuclear transcription factor CREB mRNA. Finally, the inhibitor of protein translation reversed hyperalgesic priming only when injected at the site where PGE2 was administered, suggesting that the signal transmitted from the cell body to the peripheral terminal is not a newly translated protein, but possibly a newly expressed mRNA. PMID:25589745

  19. Mechanical support of the pressure overloaded right ventricle: an acute feasibility study comparing low and high flow support.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Tom; Verhoeven, Jelle; Goda, Motohiko; Burkhoff, Daniel; Delcroix, Marion; Rega, Filip; Meyns, Bart

    2015-08-15

    The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of low flow right ventricular support and to describe the hemodynamic effects of low versus high flow support in an animal model of acute right ventricular pressure overload. A Synergy Pocket Micro-pump (HeartWare International, Framingham, MA) was implanted in seven sheep. Blood was withdrawn from the right atrium to the pulmonary artery. Hemodynamics and pressure-volume loops were recorded in baseline conditions, after banding the pulmonary artery, and after ligating the right coronary artery in these banded sheep. End-organ perfusion (reflected by total cardiac output and arterial blood pressure) improved in all conditions. Intrinsic right ventricular contractility was not significantly impacted by support. Diastolic unloading of the pressure overloaded right ventricle (reflected by decreases in central venous pressure, end-diastolic pressure and volume, and ventricular capacitance) was successful, but with a concomitant and flow-dependent increase of the systolic afterload. This unloading diminished with right ventricular ischemia. Right ventricular mechanical support improves arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. It provides diastolic unloading of the right ventricle, but with a concomitant and right ventricular assist device flow-dependent increase of systolic afterload. These effects are most distinct in the pressure overloaded right ventricle without profound ischemic damage. We advocate the low flow strategy, which is potentially beneficial for the afterload sensitive right ventricle and has the advantage of avoiding excessive increases in pulmonary artery pressure when pulmonary hypertension exists. This might protect against the development of pulmonary edema and hemorrhage.

  20. Mechanism for the acute effects of organophosphate pesticides on the adult 5-HT system

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Sarah J.; Savy, Claire Y.; Campbell, Matthew; Dodds, Rebecca; Gomes, Larissa Kruger; Laws, Grace; Watson, Anna; Blain, Peter G.; Morris, Christopher M.; Gartside, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is involved in mood disorder aetiology and it has been reported that (organophosphate) OP exposure affects 5-HT turnover. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying OP effects on the adult 5-HT system. First, acute in vivo administration of the OP diazinon (0, 1.3, 13 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) to male Hooded Lister rats inhibited the activity of the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase in blood and in the hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), striatum and prefrontal cortex. Diazinon-induced cholinesterase inhibition was greatest in the DRN, the brain's major source of 5-HT neurones. Second, acute in vivo diazinon exposure (0 or 39 mg/kg i.p.) increased the basal firing rate of DRN neurones measured ex vivo in brain slices. The excitatory responses of DRN neurones to α1-adrenoceptor or AMPA/kainate receptor activation were not affected by in vivo diazinon exposure but the inhibitory response to 5-HT was attenuated, indicating 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. Finally, direct application of the diazinon metabolite diazinon oxon to naive rat brain slices increased the firing rate of DRN 5-HT neurones, as did chlorpyrifos-oxon, indicating the effect was not unique to diazinon. The oxon-induced augmentation of firing was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine and the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX. Together these data indicate that 1) acute OP exposure inhibits DRN cholinesterase, leading to acetylcholine accumulation, 2) the acetylcholine activates nicotinic receptors on 5-HT neurones and also on glutamatergic neurones, thus releasing glutamate and activating 5-HT neuronal AMPA/kainate receptors 3) the increase in 5-HT neuronal activity, and resulting 5-HT release, may lead to 5-HT1A autoreceptor down-regulation. This mechanism may be involved in the reported increase in risk of developing anxiety and depression following occupational OP exposure. PMID

  1. Measure of mechanical impacts in commercial blueberry packing lines and potential damage to blueberry fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern blueberry packing lines create impact damage to blueberries which will result in fruit bruising. In this study, impacts created by commercial blueberry packing lines were measured quantitatively using a miniature instrumented sphere. Impacts were recorded at transfer points. Average peakG ...

  2. Application of ARMAV models to the identification and damage detection of mechanical and civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeux, J. B.; Golinval, J. C.

    2001-06-01

    In this paper, the application of auto-regressive moving average vector models to system identification and damage detection is investigated. These parametric models have already been applied for the analysis of multiple input-output systems under ambient excitation. Their main advantage consists in the capability of extracting modal parameters from the recorded time signals, without the requirement of excitation measurement. The excitation is supposed to be a stationary Gaussian white noise. The method also allows the estimation of modal parameter uncertainties. On the basis of these uncertainties, a statistically based damage detection scheme is performed and it becomes possible to assess whether changes of modal parameters are caused by, e.g. some damage or simply by estimation inaccuracies. The paper reports first an example of identification and damage detection applied to a simulated system under random excitation. The `Steel-Quake' benchmark proposed in the framework of COST Action F3 `Structural Dynamics' is also analysed. This structure was defined by the Joint Research Centre in Ispra (Italy) to test steel building performance during earthquakes. The proposed method gives an excellent identification of frequencies and mode shapes, while damping ratios are estimated with less accuracy.

  3. Task order #24 update: exploration of damage mechanisms in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, Ann M

    2011-01-14

    A typical method of failure for ductile materials is spallation damage, which is caused by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids due to the presence of high tensile stress in the material. Spallation damage models, such as TEPLA, are currently implemented in hydrodynamic computer codes used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Parameters for such constitutive models are derived from data sets obtained primarily from gas gun and shock-driven experiments, which are designed to allow one-dimensional analysis of the evolution of the failure characteristics. However, in a non-planar geometry, advanced failure models predict failure to be a multi-dimensional process. Additionally, a limited amount of data exists for the process of void nucleation, growth and coalescence. Another lightly researched area is the state of the material in the event that the spallation layer is recollected and voids are closed. The experiments described here are being conducted as part of a Campaign-l effort to provide data addressing these issues. The Russian Damage Experimental Series is designed to provide fundamental non-planar (cylindrical) spallation damage data, including early time processes (void nucleation, growth and coalescence) and late time processes (recollection of the spallation layer). Previous experiments produced data addressing some of the early time processes. This presentation will be provided to LANL and VNIIEF colleagues as a means of assessing the status of Task Order No.24 at the current time.

  4. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    quantities of biochemical compounds which appear in blood vessels with the activation of acute phase response pathways. The mechanisms underlying the subsidence in α1-AGP content as well as its consequences for the organism are not clear now. Nevertheless, an ascertainment of concentration changes of α1-AGP and other APPs, their time courses at the early stages of APR, stimulated by extreme impacts, requires additional experiments.

  5. Females have greater left ventricular twist mechanics than males during acute reductions to preload.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alexandra M; Shave, Rob E; Stembridge, Mike; Eves, Neil D

    2016-07-01

    Compared to males, females have smaller left ventricular (LV) dimensions and volumes, higher ejection fractions (EF), and higher LV longitudinal and circumferential strain. LV twist mechanics determine ventricular function and are preload-dependent. Therefore, the sex differences in LV structure and myocardial function may result in different mechanics when preload is altered. This study investigated sex differences in LV mechanics during acute challenges to preload. With the use of conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography, LV structure and function were assessed in 20 males (24 ± 6.2 yr) and 20 females (23 ± 3.1 yr) at baseline and during progressive levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Fourteen participants (8 males, 6 females) were also assessed following a rapid infusion of saline. LV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume (SV), and EF were reduced in both groups during LBNP (P < 0.001). While males had greater absolute volumes (P < 0.001), there were no sex differences in allometrically scaled volumes at any stage. Sex differences were not detected at baseline in basal rotation, apical rotation, or twist. Apical rotation and twist increased in both groups (P < 0.001) with LBNP. At -60 mmHg, females had greater apical rotation (P = 0.009), twist (P = 0.008), and torsion (P = 0.002) and faster untwisting velocity (P = 0.02) than males. There were no differences in mechanics following saline infusion. Females have larger LV twist and a faster untwisting velocity than males during large reductions to preload, supporting that females have a greater reliance on LV twist mechanics to maintain SV during severe reductions to preload.

  6. A novel perspective on neuron study: damaging and promoting effects in different neurons induced by mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhou; Wang, Wei; Li, Zong; Hao, Shilei; Wang, Bochu

    2016-10-01

    A growing volume of experimental evidence demonstrates that mechanical stress plays a significant role in growth, proliferation, apoptosis, gene expression, electrophysiological properties and many other aspects of neurons. In this review, first, the mechanical microenvironment and properties of neurons under in vivo conditions are introduced and analyzed. Second, research works in recent decades on the effects of different mechanical forces, especially compression and tension, on various neurons, including dorsal root ganglion neurons, retinal ganglion cells, cerebral cortex neurons, hippocampus neurons, neural stem cells, and other neurons, are summarized. Previous research results demonstrate that mechanical stress can not only injure neurons by damaging their morphology, impacting their electrophysiological characteristics and gene expression, but also promote neuron self-repair. Finally, some future perspectives in neuron research are discussed.

  7. Damage effect and mechanism of the GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor induced by the electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Wen, Xi; Chang-Chun, Chai; Gang, Zhao; Yin-Tang, Yang; Xin-Hai, Yu; Yang, Liu

    2016-04-01

    The damage effect and mechanism of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) are investigated in this paper. By using the device simulation software, the distributions and variations of the electric field, the current density and the temperature are analyzed. The simulation results show that there are three physical effects, i.e., the forward-biased effect of the gate Schottky junction, the avalanche breakdown, and the thermal breakdown of the barrier layer, which influence the device current in the