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Sample records for acute medical patients

  1. Characteristics and Acute Care Use Patterns of Patients in a Senior Living Community Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Ryan; Gillespie, Suzanne M.; Nelson, Dallas; Newman, Calvin; Shah, Manish N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Primary care medical practices dedicated to the needs of older adults who dwell in independent and assisted living residences in senior living communities (SLCs) have been developed. To date, the demographic and acute medical care use patterns of patients in these practices have not been described. Design A descriptive study using a six-month retrospective record review of adults enrolled in a medical primary care practice that provides on-site primary medical care in SLCs. Setting Greater Rochester, New York. Participants 681 patients residing in 19 SLCs. Measurements Demographic and clinical data were collected. Use of acute medical care by patients in the SLC program including phone consultation, provider emergent/urgent in-home visit, emergency department (ED) visit, and hospital admissions were recorded. ED visit and hospital admissions at the two primary referral hospitals for the practice were reviewed for chief complaint and discharge plan. Results 635/681 (93%) of records were available. The median age was 85 years (interquartile range (IQR) 77, 89). Patients were predominantly female (447, 70%) and white (465, 73%). Selected chronic medical diseases included: dementia/cognitive impairment (367, 58%); cardiac disease (271, 43%); depression (246, 39%); diabetes (173, 27%); pulmonary disease (146, 23%); renal disease (118, 19%); cancer (115, 18%); stroke/TIA (93,15%). The median MMSE score was 25 (IQR 19, 28; n=446). Patients took a median of 10 medications (IQR 7, 12). Important medication classes included: cardiovascular (512 (81%); hypoglycemics (117, 18%); benzodiazepines (71, 11%); dementia (194, 31%); and anticoagulants (51, 8%). Patients received acute care 1,876 times (median frequency 3, IQR 2, 6) for 1,504 unique medical issues. Falls were the most common complaint (399, 20%). Of these 1,876 episodes, patients accessed acute care via telephone (1071, 57%), provider visit at the SLC (417, 22%), and ED visit (388, 21%). Of the cases

  2. Medication Literacy in a Cohort of Chinese Patients Discharged with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuqing; Zheng, Feng; Guo, Yuna; Luo, Aijing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating medication literacy of discharged patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in China, and the important determinants of medication literacy among them. For this purpose, we conducted a prospective cohort study. Patient's demographic and clinical data were retrieved from hospital charts and medication literacy was measured by instructed interview using the Chinese version of Medication Literacy Questionnaire on Discharged Patient between 7 and 30 days after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The results show that medication literacy for the surveyed patients was insufficient: >20% did not have adequate knowledge on the types of drugs and the frequency that they need to take the drugs, >30% did not know the name of and the dosage of the drugs they are taking, and >70% did not have adequate knowledge on the effects and side effects of the drugs they are taking. Our research indicated that medication literacy scores decreased with age but increased with education. The number of medicines the discharged patient took with them and days between discharge and interview were not associated with medication literacy levels. PMID:27428990

  3. Medication Literacy in a Cohort of Chinese Patients Discharged with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhuqing; Zheng, Feng; Guo, Yuna; Luo, Aijing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at investigating medication literacy of discharged patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in China, and the important determinants of medication literacy among them. For this purpose, we conducted a prospective cohort study. Patient’s demographic and clinical data were retrieved from hospital charts and medication literacy was measured by instructed interview using the Chinese version of Medication Literacy Questionnaire on Discharged Patient between 7 and 30 days after the patient was discharged from the hospital. The results show that medication literacy for the surveyed patients was insufficient: >20% did not have adequate knowledge on the types of drugs and the frequency that they need to take the drugs, >30% did not know the name of and the dosage of the drugs they are taking, and >70% did not have adequate knowledge on the effects and side effects of the drugs they are taking. Our research indicated that medication literacy scores decreased with age but increased with education. The number of medicines the discharged patient took with them and days between discharge and interview were not associated with medication literacy levels. PMID:27428990

  4. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  5. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  6. Medical costs of treatment and survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, A L; Beutels, P; Smits, E L; Van Tendeloo, V F; Nijs, G; Anguille, S; Verlinden, A; Gadisseur, A P; Schroyens, W A; Dom, S; Cornille, I; Goossens, H; Berneman, Z N

    2016-07-01

    The advent of new cell-based immunotherapies for leukemia offers treatment possibilities for certain leukemia subgroups. The wider acceptability of these new technologies in clinical practice will depend on its impact on survival and costs. Due to the small patient groups who have received it, these aspects have remained understudied. This non-randomized single-center study evaluated medical costs and survival for acute myeloid leukemia between 2005 and 2010 in 50 patients: patients treated with induction and consolidation chemotherapy (ICT) alone; patients treated with ICT plus allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), which is the current preferred post-remission therapy in patients with intermediate- and poor-risk AML with few co-morbidities, and patients treated with ICT plus immunotherapy using autologous dendritic cells (DC) engineered to express the Wilms' tumor protein (WT1). Total costs including post- consolidation costs on medical care at the hematology ward and outpatient clinic, pharmaceutical prescriptions, intensive care ward, laboratory tests and medical imaging were analyzed. Survival was markedly better in HCT and DC. HCT and DC were more costly than ICT. The median total costs for HCT and DC were similar. These results need to be confirmed to enable more thorough cost-effectiveness analyses, based on observations from multicenter, randomized clinical trials and preferably using quality-adjusted life-years as an outcome measure. PMID:27111858

  7. A medical cost estimation with fuzzy neural network of acute hepatitis patients in emergency room.

    PubMed

    Kuo, R J; Cheng, W C; Lien, W C; Yang, T J

    2015-10-01

    Taiwan is an area where chronic hepatitis is endemic. Liver cancer is so common that it has been ranked first among cancer mortality rates since the early 1980s in Taiwan. Besides, liver cirrhosis and chronic liver diseases are the sixth or seventh in the causes of death. Therefore, as shown by the active research on hepatitis, it is not only a health threat, but also a huge medical cost for the government. The estimated total number of hepatitis B carriers in the general population aged more than 20 years old is 3,067,307. Thus, a case record review was conducted from all patients with diagnosis of acute hepatitis admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of a well-known teaching-oriented hospital in Taipei. The cost of medical resource utilization is defined as the total medical fee. In this study, a fuzzy neural network is employed to develop the cost forecasting model. A total of 110 patients met the inclusion criteria. The computational results indicate that the FNN model can provide more accurate forecasts than the support vector regression (SVR) or artificial neural network (ANN). In addition, unlike SVR and ANN, FNN can also provide fuzzy IF-THEN rules for interpretation. PMID:26153643

  8. 'The time it takes…' How doctors spend their time admitting a patient during the acute medical take.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Jodie; Khan, Waleed; Subbe, Christian P; Franklin, Marc; Abulela, Iman; Khan, Anwar; Mohammed, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Patient safety depends on adequate staffing but the number of doctors required for safe staffing for medical emergencies is not known. We measured the duration of the admission process for patients seen by medical teams in emergency departments (EDs) and acute medical units. History taking and examination by a core medical trainee took 22 minutes for a patient referred from the ED and 21 minutes for a patient referred from primary care. A complete admission clerking with prescription and ordering of investigations ranged from a mean of 15 minutes for a consultant in acute medicine to a mean of 55 minutes for a foundation year 1 trainee. The duration of post-take ward rounds also showed significant variability.Our data can be used to model staffing patterns if combined with information about admission numbers and local set up. PMID:27481373

  9. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Results: Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of any PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p < 0.001) and discontinued PIMs (p < 0.001) significantly more often than other medical wards. No relations between number of PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Conclusion: Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids.KEY POINTSAcute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications.Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced.The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more

  10. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care. PMID:25847647

  11. Acute medical management of the non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) in older patients.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) represent many clinical challenges. For example diagnosis can be difficult, and comorbidities are common. Furthermore, NSTE-ACS is particularly common in older patients (>60% of acute myocardial infarctions occurring in patients aged 65 years or older) and the mortality associated with NSTE-ACS is particularly high. Despite these many concerns, evidence from clinical trials based on this group of patients is limited. Future prospective clinical trials should therefore more accurately reflect the NSTE-ACS patient population by including more elderly patients and including efficacy endpoints that are relevant for these patients. Furthermore, the lack of clear clinical evidence in this population means that the current treatment guidelines do not fully address the needs of elderly patients. Several recent clinical trials have highlighted some of the main considerations we should make when treating elderly patients with NSTE-ACS. Different therapy options in the pharmacological management of NSTE-ACS in this age group are also discussed. PMID:19819566

  12. Multiple medication use in older patients in post-acute transitional care: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Runganga, Maureen; Peel, Nancye M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults with a range of comorbidities are often prescribed multiple medications, which may impact on their function and cognition and increase the potential for drug interactions and adverse events. Aims This study investigated the extent of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications in patients receiving post-discharge transitional home care and explored the associations of polypharmacy with patient characteristics, functional outcomes, and frailty. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of 351 patients discharged home from hospital with support from six Transition Care Program (TCP) sites in two states of Australia. A comprehensive geriatric assessment was conducted at TCP admission and discharge using the interRAI Home Care assessment tool, with frailty measured using an index of 57 accumulated deficits. Medications from hospital discharge summaries were coded using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Results Polypharmacy (5–9 drugs) was observed in 46.7% and hyperpolypharmacy (≥10 drugs) in 39.2% of patients. Increasing numbers of medications were associated with greater number of comorbid conditions, a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dizziness, and dyspnea and increased frailty. At discharge from the program, the non-polypharmacy group (<5 drugs) had improved outcomes in Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and fewer falls, which was mediated because of lower levels of frailty. The commonest drugs were analgesics (56.8%) and antiulcer drugs (52.7%). The commonest potentially inappropriate medications were tertiary tricyclic antidepressants. Conclusion Polypharmacy is common in older patients discharged from hospital. It is associated with frailty, falls, and poor functional outcomes. Efforts should be made to encourage regular medication reviews and

  13. An update on prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Kleber, Franz-Xaver

    2006-01-01

    Both the recently updated consensus guidelines published by the American College of Chest Physicians, and the International Union of Angiology recommend thromboprophylaxis with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (UFH) in medical patients at risk of VTE. However, no guidance is given regarding the appropriate dosing regimens that should be used for thromboprophylaxis in this patient group. LMWH (enoxaparin and dalteparin) and UFH have been shown to be effective for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk hospitalized medical patients. Although LMWH once daily (o.d.) has been shown to be as effective as UFH three times daily (t.i.d.) for thromboprophylaxis in at-risk medical patients, there are no data to show that UFH twice daily (b.i.d) is as effective as either LMWH o.d. or UFH t.i.d. On the basis of currently available evidence, the LMWHs enoxaparin and dalteparin are more attractive alternatives to UFH for the prevention of VTE in hospitalized medical patients because of their convenient once-daily administration and better safety profile, demonstrated in terms of reduced bleeding, HIT, and other adverse events. PMID:16817957

  14. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  15. Relationship between Blood Pressure and Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Administered Lytic Medication in the TIMS-China Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingquan; Liao, Xiaoling; Wang, Chunjuan; Pan, Yuesong; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased blood pressure (BP) management following acute ischemic stroke (AIS) remains controversial. This study aimed to identify the association between BP and clinical outcomes in AIS patients administered lytic medication in the TIMS-China (thrombolysis implementation and monitor of acute ischemic stroke in China) database. Methods The sample comprised 1128 patients hospitalized within 4.5 hours (h) of AIS for intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (i.v. rt-PA) thrombolysis. Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) at baseline, 2 h and 24 h after treatment, and changes from baseline were analyzed. The study outcomes comprised a favorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0–1 at 90 days) and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), analyzed using logistic regression, with low BP as the reference group. Results Lower BP (baseline, 2 h, and 24 h) was beneficial in AIS patients and significantly related to a favorable outcome (P<0.05). A substantial BP decrease at 24 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with a favorable outcome compared with a moderate BP decrease (P = 0.0298). A SBP >160 mmHg 2 h after rt-PA thrombolysis was significantly associated with SICH compared with a SBP <140 mmHg (P = 0.0238). An increase or no change (>25 mmHg) in SBP was significantly associated with SICH (P = 0.002) compared with a small SBP decrease (1–9 mmHg). Conclusions This study provides novel evidence that lower BP within the first 24 h is associated with a more favorable outcome and less frequent SICH in AIS patients administered lytic medication. Routine BP-lowering treatment should be considered in AIS patients following lytic medication. PMID:26828609

  16. Prediction of mortality in patients in acute medical wards using basic laboratory and anthropometric data.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J.; Mak, Y. T.; Lau, J.; Swaminathan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The value of anthropometric and biochemical indices in predicting short-term mortality among patients in general medical wards was assessed in 294 patients admitted consecutively to a district hospital over a one month period. Using a stepwise logistic regression model and supported by the linear discriminant analysis method, mortality within 3 months could be predicted with sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 84% using the following variables: sex, functional ability, urea, total protein, alkaline phosphatase and albumin-adjusted calcium. Addition of anthropometric values and biochemical nutritional indices did little to improve the accuracy of the prediction, contrary to previous findings among surgical patients and elderly residents of long-term care institutions. PMID:1494524

  17. [Acute anterior myocardial infarction presented with cardiogenic shock in a patient on herbal medication].

    PubMed

    Güneş, Hakan; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Karapınar, Hekim; Gül, İbrahim

    2012-04-01

    Uncontrolled usage of herbal medications may cause problems that can lead to serious complications, including death. Panax is thought to have hypocholesterolemic, anticarcinogenic, antiinflammatory, and antimicrobial effects via its saponin ingredient and positive inotropic effects via its panax ginseng effect. However, clinical studies have shown that it can increase the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels secondary to its hypocholesterolemic effect, have a hypertensive effect in chronic users via ginseng abuse syndrome, and also have hypotensive effects. Here, we present a case with typical angina pectoris in which coronary angiography was suggested but refused. The male patient initiated panax therapy and presented to our emergency department with diffuse anterior myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock, and was discharged after appropriate therapy. PMID:22864324

  18. Comparative assessment of blood and urine analyses in patients with acute poisonings by medical, narcotic substances and alcohol in clinical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Yury Nikolaevich; Lisovik, Zhanna Andreevna; Belova, Maria Vladimirovna; Luzhnikov, Evgeny Alekseevich; Livanov, Alexandr Sergeevich

    2005-01-01

    Acute poisonings by medical, narcotic substances and alcohol are actual in Russia in the recent years. Comparison of analytic facilities of modern analytical techniques: chromatographic (HPLC, GC, GC-MS) and immuno-chemical (FPIA) in clinical toxicology for urgent diagnostics, assessment of the severity of acute poisoning and the efficacy of the treatment in patients with acute poisonings by psychotropic drugs, narcotics and alcohol have been done. The object of the study were serum, blood, urine of 611 patients with acute poisonings by amitriptyline, clozapine, carbamazepine, opiates and also alcohol. Threshold concentrations (threshold, critical and lethal) of the toxicants and their active metabolites which corresponded to different degrees of poisoning severity have been determined. The most comfortable and informative screening method for express diagnostics and assessment of severity of acute poisonings by psychotropic drugs and narcotics showed the HPLC with using automatic analyzers. FPIA using the automatic analyzer could be applied for screening studies, if group identification is enough. GC-FID method is advisable in case of poisoning by medical substances and narcotics in view of repeated investigation for assessment of the efficacy of the therapy. GC-MS could be advisable for confirming the results of other methods. GC-TCD possess high sensitivity and specificity and is optimal for express differential diagnostics and quantitative assessment of acute poisoning by ethanol and other alcohols. PMID:16225131

  19. Frequent Prescription of Antibiotics and High Burden of Antibiotic Resistance among Deceased Patients in General Medical Wards of Acute Care Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yee Gyung; Moon, Chisook; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Baek-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are often administered to terminally ill patients until death, and antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). We investigated antibiotic use and the isolation of MDROs among patients who died in general medical wards. Methods All adult patients who died in the general internal medicine wards at four acute care hospitals between January and June 2013 were enrolled. For comparison with these deceased patients, the same number of surviving, discharged patients was selected from the same divisions of internal medicine subspecialties during the same period. Results During the study period, 303 deceased patients were enrolled; among them, 265 (87.5%) had do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in their medical records. Antibiotic use was more common in patients who died than in those who survived (87.5% vs. 65.7%, P<0.001). Among deceased patients with DNR orders, antibiotic use was continued in 59.6% of patients after obtaining their DNR orders. Deceased patients received more antibiotic therapy courses (two [interquartile range (IQR) 1–3] vs. one [IQR 0–2], P<0.001). Antibiotics were used for longer durations in deceased patients than in surviving patients (13 [IQR 5–23] vs. seven days [IQR 0–18], P<0.001). MDROs were also more common in deceased patients than in surviving patients (25.7% vs. 10.6%, P<0.001). Conclusions Patients who died in the general medical wards of acute care hospitals were exposed to more antibiotics than patients who survived. In particular, antibiotic prescription was common even after obtaining DNR orders in patients who died. The isolation of MDROs during the hospital stay was more common in these patients who died. Strategies for judicious antibiotic use and appropriate infection control should be applied to these patient populations. PMID:26761461

  20. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  1. When is an invasive palliative intervention in an acute internal medical patient worth it? A structured palliative approach.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Strasser, Florian

    2015-12-01

    A 67-year-old patient with coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery after a recent myocardial infarction despite a high perioperative risk of death. While waiting, acute renal failure developed, and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). After the patient and his wife were informed that CABG surgery was no longer possible, he declined further intensive care treatment and subsequently died peacefully.We show that a structured palliative approach which has been proposed for cancer patients may also be feasible in palliative situations concerning nononcologic patients. PMID:26620468

  2. Acute Kidney Injury is More Common in Acute Haemorrhagic Stroke in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ray, N C; Chowdhury, M A; Sarkar, S R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after acute stroke and is an independent predictor of both early and long-term mortality after acute stroke. Acute kidney injury is associated with increased mortality in haemorrhagic stroke patients. This cross sectional observational study was conducted in Nephrology, Neuromedicine and Medicine department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital, Mymensingh from July 2012 to June 2014. A total of 240 patients with newly detected acute stroke confirmed by CT scan of brain were included in this study. According to this study, 15.42% of acute stroke patients developed AKI. Among the patients with haemorrhagic stroke 21.87% developed AKI while only 13.07% patients with ischaemic stroke developed AKI. So, early diagnosis and management of AKI in patients with acute stroke especially in haemorrhagic stroke is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:26931240

  3. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6%) who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB), or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients. PMID:22966970

  4. Clinical characteristics and management of patients with early acute severe pancreatitis: Experience from a medical center in China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hou-Quan; Zhang, Jing-Xia; Zou, Shou-Chun

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study clinical characteristics and management of patients with early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). METHODS: Data of 297 patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) admitted to our hospital within 72 h after onset of symptoms from January 1991 to June 2003 were reviewed for the occurrence and development of early severe acute pancreatitis (ESAP). ESAP was defined as presence of organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms. Sixty-nine patients had ESAP, 228 patients without organ dysfunction within 72 h after onset of symptoms had SAP. The clinical characteristics, incidence of organ dysfunction during hospitalization and prognosis between ESAP and SAP were compared. RESULTS: Impairment degree of pancreas (Balthazar CT class) in ESAP was more serious than that in SAP (5.31 ± 0.68 vs 3.68 ± 0.29, P < 0.01). ESAP had a higher mortality than SAP (43.4% vs 2.6%, P < 0.01), and a higher incidence of hypoxemia (85.5% vs 25%, P < 0.01), pancreas infection (15.9% vs 7.5%, P < 0.05), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) (78.3% vs 23.2%, P < 0.01) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)(78.3% vs 10.1%, P < 0.01). In multiple logistic regression analysis, the main predisposing factors to ESAP were higher APACHE II score, Balthazar CT class, MODS and hypoxemia. CONCLUSION: ESAP is characterised by MODS, severe pathological changes of pancreas, early hypoxemia and abdominal compartment syndrome. Given the poor prognosis of ESAP, these patients should be treated in specialized intensive care units with special measures such as close supervision, fluid resuscitation, improvement of hypoxemia, reduction of pancreatic secretion, elimination of inflammatory mediators, prevention and treatment of pancreatic infections. PMID:15040047

  5. Multifaceted Intervention to Prevent Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Hospitalized for Acute Medical Illness: A Multicenter Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Pierre-Marie; Rachas, Antoine; Meyer, Guy; Le Gal, Grégoire; Durieux, Pierre; El Kouri, Dominique; Honnart, Didier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Legall, Catherine; Hausfater, Pierre; Chrétien, Jean-Marie; Mottier, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Misuse of thromboprophylaxis may increase preventable complications for hospitalized medical patients. Objectives To assess the net clinical benefit of a multifaceted intervention in emergency wards (educational lectures, posters, pocket cards, computerized clinical decision support systems and, where feasible, electronic reminders) for the prevention of venous thromboembolism. Patients/Methods Prospective cluster-randomized trial in 27 hospitals. After a pre-intervention period, centers were randomized as either intervention (n = 13) or control (n = 14). All patients over 40 years old, admitted to the emergency room, and hospitalized in a medical ward were included, totaling 1,402 (712 intervention and 690 control) and 15,351 (8,359 intervention and 6,992 control) in the pre-intervention and intervention periods, respectively. Results Symptomatic venous thromboembolism or major bleeding (primary outcome) occurred at 3 months in 3.1% and 3.2% of patients in the intervention and control groups, respectively (adjusted odds ratio: 1.02 [95% confidence interval: 0.78–1.34]). The rates of thromboembolism (1.9% vs. 1.9%), major bleedings (1.2% vs. 1.3%), and mortality (11.3% vs. 11.1%) did not differ between the groups. Between the pre-intervention and intervention periods, the proportion of patients who received prophylactic anticoagulant treatment more steeply increased in the intervention group (from 35.0% to 48.2%: +13.2%) than the control (40.7% to 44.1%: +3.4%), while the rate of adequate thromboprophylaxis remained stable in both groups (52.4% to 50.9%: -1.5%; 49.1% to 48.8%: -0.3%). Conclusions Our intervention neither improved adequate prophylaxis nor reduced the rates of clinical events. New strategies are required to improve thromboembolism prevention for hospitalized medical patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01212393 PMID:27227406

  6. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  7. Seroprevalence of acute dengue in a Malaysian tertiary medical centre

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chuan Hun; Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Khang, NanFeng; Low, Wan Ngor; Hussin, Nurabrar; Marzuki, Melissa Iqlima; Jaafar, Alyaa Nadhira; Roslan, Nurul Ain’ Nabilla; Chandrasekaran, Terukumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the seroprevalence of acute dengue in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) Medical Centre and its correlation with selected haematological and biochemical parameters. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to June 2015. A patient was serologically diagnosed with acute dengue if the dengue virus IgG, IgM or NS-1 antigen was reactive. Results: Out of 1,774 patients suspected to have acute dengue, 1,153 were serologically diagnosed with the infection, resulting in a seroprevalence of 64.9%. Dengue-positive patients had a lower mean platelet count (89 × 109/L) compared to the dengue-negative patients (171 × 109/L) (p<0.0001). The mean total white cell count was also lower in the dengue-positive cases (4.7 × 109/L vs. 7.2 × 109/L; p<0.0001). The mean haematocrit was higher in patients with acute dengue (42.5% vs. 40.0%; p<0.0001). Likewise, the serum alanine transaminase level was also higher in patients with acute dengue (108 U/L vs. 54 U/L; p<0.0001). Conclusions: Dengue is very prevalent in UKM Medical Centre as most patients suspected to have acute dengue had serological evidence of the infection. The platelet count was the single most likely parameter to be abnormal (i.e. low) in patients with acute dengue. PMID:27182269

  8. Acute post-disaster medical needs of patients with diabetes: emergency department use in New York City by diabetic adults after Hurricane Sandy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David C; Gupta, Vibha K; Carr, Brendan G; Malik, Sidrah; Ferguson, Brandy; Wall, Stephen P; Smith, Silas W; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the acute impact of disasters on diabetic patients, we performed a geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by New York City diabetic adults in the week after Hurricane Sandy. Research design and methods Using an all-payer claims database, we retrospectively analyzed the demographics, insurance status, and medical comorbidities of post-disaster ED patients with diabetes who lived in the most geographically vulnerable areas. We compared the patterns of ED use among diabetic adults in the first week after Hurricane Sandy's landfall to utilization before the disaster in 2012. Results In the highest level evacuation zone in New York City, postdisaster increases in ED visits for a primary or secondary diagnosis of diabetes were attributable to a significantly higher proportion of Medicare patients. Emergency visits for a primary diagnosis of diabetes had an increased frequency of certain comorbidities, including hypertension, recent procedure, and chronic skin ulcers. Patients with a history of diabetes visited EDs in increased numbers after Hurricane Sandy for a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, prescription refills, drug dependence, dialysis, among other conditions. Conclusions We found that diabetic adults aged 65 years and older are especially at risk for requiring postdisaster emergency care compared to other vulnerable populations. Our findings also suggest that there is a need to support diabetic adults particularly in the week after a disaster by ensuring access to medications, aftercare for patients who had a recent procedure, and optimize their cardiovascular health to reduce the risk of heart attacks. PMID:27547418

  9. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  10. ECG scores for a triage of patients with acute myocardial infarction transported by the emergency medical system.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Grzybowski, M; Ross, M A; Blaustein, N; Bock, B

    2000-01-01

    Prehospital triage of cardiac patients for bypass from community hospitals to cardiac centers may improve survival. This article determines if electrocardiogram (ECG)-based scoring triage methods (Aldrich MI scoring, QRS distortion, and the TIMI classification) and location of infarct (via 12 lead ECG) are associated with mortality before and after adjusting for age, sex, and race. It is a retrospective study of 291 AMI adult patients transported by ambulance to community hospitals or cardiac centers. Patients with an ED chief complaint of chest pain or dyspnea, presence of MI as defined by ECG findings of 0.1 mV of ST segment elevation in two leads or positive CPK-MB were eligible for the study. The primary outcome variable was 2-year mortality as determined with a metropolitan Detroit tri-county death index. Logistic regression was used to calculate the unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (with 95% CIs) of the predictor variables with mortality. Of the initial population selected for the study (n = 291), 229 patients were eligible for the analysis. The mean age was 66 years (SD of 14.4) with 63.8% being male and 54% being white. The overall mortality point estimate was 21.3% (95% CI of 15.2 to 27.3%). Aldrich scores and QRS distortion (yes/no) were not associated with mortality. Patients classified as a "high risk" for AMI per TIMI status were almost 3 times more likely to die than those at "low risk" and reached borderline statistical significance (P = .06) after adjusting for the covariates. Having an anterior infarct, as opposed to an inferior infarct, was significantly associated with death before and after adjusting for the covariates (Unadjusted OR = 2.6, Adjusted OR = 2.8). Properly training emergency medical system professionals in this area may prove useful for identifying higher risk AMI patients in the prehospital setting. PMID:11265729

  11. Trends in the Use of Guideline-Recommended Medications and In-Hospital Mortality of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xie, Yanming; Shu, Zheng; Yang, Wei; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current practice guidelines recommend the routine use of several cardiac medications early in the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Our objective was to analyze temporal trends in medication use and in-hospital mortality of AMI patients in a Chinese population. Methods This is a retrospective observational study using electronic medical records from the hospital information system (HIS) of 14 Chinese hospitals. We identified 5599 patients with AMI between 2005 and 2011. Factors associated with medication use and in-hospital mortality were explored by using hierarchical logistic regression. Results The use of several guideline-recommended medications all increased during the study period: statins (57.7%–90.1%), clopidogrel (61.8%–92.3%), β-Blockers (45.4%–65.1%), ACEI/ARB (46.7%–58.7%), aspirin (81.9%–92.9%), and the combinations thereof increased from 24.9% to 42.8% (P<0.001 for all). Multivariate analyses showed statistically significant increases in all these medications. The in-hospital mortality decreased from 15.9% to 5.7% from 2005 to 2011 (P<0.001). After multivariate adjustment, admission year was still a significant factor (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.79–0.96, P = 0.007), the use of aspirin (OR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.46–0.87), clopidogrel (OR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.31–0.61), ACEI/ARB (OR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.56–0.94) and statins (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.40–0.73) were associated with a decrease in in-hospital mortality. Patients with older age, cancer and renal insufficiency had higher in-hospital mortality, while they were generally less likely to receive all these medications. Conclusion Use of guideline-recommended medications early in the course of AMI increased between 2005 and 2011 in a Chinese population. During this same time, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality. PMID:25706944

  12. Geriatric rehabilitation on an acute-care medical unit.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M F

    1984-09-01

    This study examined a geriatric rehabilitation pilot project on an acute-care medical unit. Over a 6-week period, using a 35-item geriatric rating scale and a mental assessment tool, changes in behaviours of 23 patients admitted to the geriatric rehabilitation module were compared to changes in behaviours of 10 elderly patients on a regular medical unit. The patients' demographic characteristics, their nursing and medical diagnoses, and discharge patterns were reviewed. Significant changes in behaviours of patients on the rehabilitation model included: increased ability to care for themselves, to maintain balance, and to communicate with others; decreased restlessness at night; decreased confusion; decreased incidence of incontinence; and improved social skills. The paper describes the geriatric rehabilitation programme and discusses implications for nursing of elderly patients in acute-care hospitals. PMID:6567647

  13. Substance Use, Depression and Mental Health Functioning in Patients Seeking Acute Medical Care in an Inner-City ED

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Maureen A.; Barry, Kristin L.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the behavioral health of a consecutive sample of 5,641 adult emergency department (ED) patients aged 19 through 60 presenting for medical care in a large, inner-city hospital emergency department. Twenty-three percent met criteria for major depression; average mental health functioning, as measured by the mental health component of the SF-12, was half of a standard deviation lower than in the general population; 15% met criteria for alcohol or drug abuse/dependence in the past year. Comorbidity was high. These behavioral health disorders may complicate treatment and diagnosis of the chief presenting complaint. These findings, coupled with the high rates of these disorders, suggest the importance of screening and either beginning appropriate treatment or offering appropriate referral for such disorders in ED settings. PMID:21086057

  14. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  15. Patient and System-Related Delays of Emergency Medical Services Use in Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Results from the Third Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-3Ps)

    PubMed Central

    AlHabib, Khalid F.; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Almahmeed, Wael; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Amin, Haitham; Al Jarallah, Mohammed; Alfaleh, Hussam F.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Hersi, Ahmad; Kashour, Tarek; Al Aseri, Zohair; Ullah, Anhar; Altaradi, Hani B.; Nur Asfina, Kazi; Welsh, Robert C.; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about Emergency Medical Services (EMS) use and pre-hospital triage of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Arabian Gulf countries. Methods Clinical arrival and acute care within 24 h of STEMI symptom onset were compared between patients transferred by EMS (Red Crescent and Inter-Hospital) and those transferred by non-EMS means. Data were retrieved from a prospective registry of 36 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries, from January 2014 to January 2015. Results We enrolled 2,928 patients; mean age, 52.7 (SD ±11.8) years; 90% men; and 61.7% non-Arabian Gulf citizens. Only 753 patients (25.7%) used EMS; which was mostly via Inter-Hospital EMS (22%) rather than direct transfer from the scene to the hospital by the Red Crescent (3.7%). Compared to the non-EMS group, the EMS group was more likely to arrive initially at a primary or secondary health care facility; thus, they had longer median symptom-onset-to-emergency department arrival times (218 vs. 158 min; p˂.001); they were more likely to receive primary percutaneous coronary interventions (62% vs. 40.5%, p = 0.02); they had shorter door-to-needle times (38 vs. 42 min; p = .04); and shorter door-to-balloon times (47 vs. 83 min; p˂.001). High EMS use was independently predicted mostly by primary/secondary school educational levels and low or moderate socioeconomic status. Low EMS use was predicted by a history of angina and history of percutaneous coronary intervention. The groups had similar in-hospital deaths and outcomes. Conclusion Most acute STEMI patients in the Arabian Gulf region did not use EMS services. Improving Red Crescent infrastructure, establishing integrated STEMI networks, and launching educational public campaigns are top health care system priorities. PMID:26807577

  16. Prediction of persistence of combined evidence-based cardiovascular medications in patients with acute coronary syndrome after hospital discharge using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bourdès, Valérie; Ferrières, Jean; Amar, Jacques; Amelineau, Elisabeth; Bonnevay, Stéphane; Berlion, Maryse; Danchin, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    In the PREVENIR-5 study, artificial neural networks (NN) were applied to a large sample of patients with recent first acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to identify determinants of persistence of evidence-based cardiovascular medications (EBCM: antithrombotic + beta-blocker + statin + angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor-ACEI and/or angiotensin-II receptor blocker-ARB). From October 2006 to April 2007, 1,811 general practitioners recruited 4,850 patients with a mean time of ACS occurrence of 24 months. Patient profile for EBCM persistence was determined using automatic rule generation from NN. The prediction accuracy of NN was compared with that of logistic regression (LR) using Area Under Receiver-Operating Characteristics-AUROC. At hospital discharge, EBCM was prescribed to 2,132 patients (44%). EBCM persistence rate, 24 months after ACS, was 86.7%. EBCM persistence profile combined overweight, hypercholesterolemia, no coronary artery bypass grafting and low educational level (Positive Predictive Value = 0.958). AUROC curves showed better predictive accuracy for NN compared to LR models. PMID:21598000

  17. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  18. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. Aim To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Method Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Conclusions Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them. PMID:25626943

  19. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  20. Factor Analysis Influencing Postoperative Hospital Stay and Medical Costs for Patients with Definite, Suspected, or Unmatched Diagnosis of Acute Cholecystitis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaki, Aoi; Takahashi, Koji; Fujii, Takehiro; Kumamoto, Koji; Fujii, Koji; Matsumoto, Eiichi; Miyahara, Shigeki; Kusuta, Tsukasa; Azumi, Yoshinori; Isaji, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To identify significant independent preoperative factors influencing postoperative hospital stay (PHS) and medical costs (MC) in 171 patients who underwent cholecystectomy for benign gallbladder diseases and had definite, suspected, or unmatched acute cholecystitis (AC) diagnosis according to the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13). Methods. The 171 patients were classified according to the combination of diagnostic criteria including local signs of inflammation (A), systemic signs of inflammation (B), and imaging findings (C): A+ B+ C (definite diagnosis, n = 84), A+ B (suspected diagnosis, n = 25), (A or B) + C (n = 10), A (n = 41), and B (n = 11). Results. The A+ B + C and (A or B) + C groups had equivalent PHS and MC, suggesting that imaging findings were essential for AC diagnosis. PHS and MC were significantly increased in the order of severity grades based on TG13. Performance status (PS), white blood cell count, and severity grade were identified as preoperative factors influencing PHS by multivariate analysis, and significant independent preoperative factors influencing MC were age, PS, preoperative biliary drainage, hospital stay before surgery, albumin, and severity grade. Conclusion. PS and severity grade significantly influenced prolonged PHS and increased MC. PMID:27239193

  1. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  2. The medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Parnell, A G

    1986-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is found in up to 5 per cent of the population. There is an excess of blood sugar due to a deficiency or diminished effectiveness of insulin. It is a complex disease which, if not controlled, has many major complications including an increased incidence of heart attacks, strokes and vascular changes in many other organs. The management of young onset diabetic patients is directed towards: controlling the carbohydrate intake, testing the blood sugar by the patient and regular insulin injections. Great care must be taken in treating diabetics in the dental surgery. Except for children, any diabetic can be treated for simple dental procedures by ensuring freedom from pain, by eliminating stress and by ensuring that the patient does not miss a meal. Children, unstable diabetic patients and those with infections or requiring multiple extractions should be treated in hospital under the care of an endocrinologist. In hypertension it is only after a number of years that complications begin to appear. The main ones are those of stroke, retinal haemorrhages, renal failure and heart disease. Dentists should be encouraged to take the blood pressure of all adults who present for treatment. Patients with increased blood pressure yet controlled by drugs may be treated as normal patients. Those that are not well controlled should be referred to their physician. Dental appointments must be free of pain and stress should be avoided. A screening method is presented which assists in the evaluation of medically compromised patients. PMID:2941377

  3. Development and validation of the Thai version of the 4 ‘A’s Test for delirium screening in hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Kuladee, Sanchai; Prachason, Thanavadee

    2016-01-01

    Background The English version of the 4 ‘A’s Test (4AT) is a rapid screening tool for delirium with a high sensitivity and specificity among hospitalized elderly patients. Objective To develop the Thai version of the 4AT (4AT-T) and assess its validity. Subjects and setting A total of 97 elderly patients aged 60 years or above who were admitted to the general medical wards were included. Methods Both authors independently translated the English version of the 4AT into Thai and thereafter developed a single reconciled forward translation by consensus. Back translation was performed by a bilingual native English speaker and it was then reviewed to ensure its agreement with the original one. After 24 hours of admission, subjects were enrolled and clinical data collected. Definite diagnosis of delirium was made by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria and the 6-item Thai Delirium Rating Scale; the 4AT was then administered to participants by nurses within 30 minutes. A 4AT score ≥4 was considered positive for delirium screening. The optimal cut-off point of the 4AT-T was identified by Youden’s index. Results In all, 24 out of 97 participants met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, Text-Revision criteria for delirium. At a cut-off score of 4 or greater, the 4AT-T exhibited satisfactory diagnostic performance with a sensitivity of 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62.6%–95.3%) and specificity of 86.3% (95% CI: 76.3%–93.2%). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92. The specified score provided maximal Youden’s index, suggesting an optimal criterion value for delirium screening. Conclusion The 4AT-T is a valid delirium-screening instrument for hospitalized elderly patients with acute medical illnesses. PMID:26966365

  4. Thromboprophylaxis in immobilized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Vaitkus, Paul T

    2004-03-30

    Venous thromboembolism accounts for a large number of preventable deaths. The majority of these events occur in medical patients, but medical thromboprophylaxis remains underutilised in this population. The purpose of this review is to examine the results of recent clinical trials of low molecular weight heparins in the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in medical patients. The available data make a compelling case in favor of widespread use of low molecular weight heparin in medical patients. PMID:15096323

  5. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  6. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC “usability”. To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found “easy to use” (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post

  7. Improving acute care through use of medical device data.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, R J

    1998-02-01

    The Medical Information Bus (MIB) is a data communications standard for bedside patient connected medical devices. It is formally titled IEEE 1073 Standard for Medical Device Communications. MIB defines a complete seven layer communications stack for devices in acute care settings. All of the design trade-offs in writing the standard were taken to optimize performance in acute care settings. The key clinician based constraints on network performance are: (1) the network must be able to withstand multiple daily reconfigurations due to patient movement and condition changes; (2) the network must be 'plug-and-play' to allow clinicians to set up the network by simply plugging in a connector, taking no other actions; (3) the network must allow for unambiguous associations of devices with specific patients. A network of this type will be used by clinicians, thus giving complete, accurate, real time data from patient connected devices. This capability leads to many possible improvements in patient care and hospital cost reduction. The possible uses for comprehensive automatic data capture are only limited by imagination and creativity of clinicians adapting to the new hospital business paradigm. PMID:9600414

  8. Thromboprophylaxis with dalteparin in medical patients: which patients benefit?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Turpie, Alexander G G; Leizorovicz, Alain; Olsson, Carl-Gustav; Vaitkus, Paul T; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2007-05-01

    It is unclear whether thromboprophylaxis produces a consistent risk reduction in different subgroups of medical patients at risk from venous thromboembolism. We performed a retrospective, post hoc analysis of 3706 patients enrolled in the PREVENT study. Patients were at least 40 years old with an acute medical condition requiring hospitalization for at least 4 days and had no more than 3 days of immobilization prior to enrolment. Patients received either subcutaneous dalteparin (5000 IU) or placebo once daily. The primary end point was the composite of symptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism, asymptomatic proximal DVT, or sudden death. Primary diagnosis subgroups were acute congestive heart failure, acute respiratory failure, infectious disease, rheumatological disorders, or inflammatory bowel disease. All patients, except those with congestive heart or respiratory failure, had at least one additional risk factor for venous thromboembolism. A risk reduction was shown in patients receiving dalteparin versus placebo. The relative risk (RR) was 0.73 in patients with congestive heart failure, 0.72 for respiratory failure, 0.46 for infectious disease, and 0.97 for rheumatological disorders. The RR was 0.52 in patients aged > or = 75 years, 0.64 in obese patients, 0.34 for patients with varicose veins, and 0.71 in patients with chronic heart failure. No subgroup had a significantly different response from any other. Importantly, multivariate analysis showed that all patient groups benefited from thromboprophylaxis with dalteparin. Our findings, therefore, support the broad application of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients. PMID:17615800

  9. Medication for older patients.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of literature documents multiple morbidities and multiple medication use among older people with intellectual disabilities. In Ireland in 2012, 8.6% of all medication-related adverse events were reported from the disability sector. PMID:27581916

  10. [Medication in infectious acute diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Cézard, J-P; Bellaiche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea in children remain still a frequent cause of morbidity. 50 % of them are due to rotavirus. Oral rehydration therapy and early realimentation have drastically reduced their mortality and morbidity. Beside oral or eventually IV rehydration therapy no medication has proven its efficacy based on the main HMO criteria (reduction of over 30 % of the stool output) except racecadotril and loperamide which is contre-indicated for the last one in children less than 2 years old. Other medications such as silicates or some probiotics have shown efficacy on diarrhea duration or stool consistency but not on stool output. They have so no formal indication in infectious diarrhea and should be considered as "comfort" treatment. Antibiotics, beside their indication in shigella, cholera and amibiasis could be used in invasive diarrhea in some debilating conditions or infants less than 3 months. PMID:17961811

  11. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  12. Patient Disclosure of Medical Misdeeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Clara; Stivers, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Modern patients walk a tightrope between respecting medical authority and acting as knowledgeable advocates regarding health issues, with the agency and responsibilities that come with this. This article uses conversation analysis to explore this balance in relation to patient disclosures of medical misdeeds in video-recorded primary care medical…

  13. Integrating Patients into Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    The discussions about medical education in the public focus upon quantity. The quality of the teaching process isn’t questioned. But the professionalization of medical education should start with a close look at bedside teaching because it is the core of training medical doctors. Patient-centered teaching: German medical leicensure act (Approbationsordnung) defines the quality of medical education by standard setting for group sizes and fixing the hours of bedside teaching. Although there are some fuzzy definitions it is possible to extract some special forms of bedside teaching. The capacity act (Kapazitätsverordnung) interprets these definitions for calculating the number of students who could be enrolled each year. Types of bedside teaching: The different forms of contact with patients which are necessary for a good medical education can be transformed into distinct types of courses. Our classification of courses with specific forms of patient contact is suitable to describe each German program of medical studies. This quantitative profile offers new opportunities for comparing medical education at the different faculties. Discussion: In many German medical schools the hours of bedside teaching are allocated in a verv pragmatical way according to the medical leicensure act. A more professional curriculum planning leads to a sophisticated use of these diverse forms of patient-centered teaching. Because this professional planning is better derived from the legal basis it offers new arguments against an economically oriented hospital management. PMID:22403598

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  15. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    PubMed

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  16. Utilizations and Perceptions of Emergency Medical Services by Patients with ST-Segments Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction in Abu Dhabi: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Callachan, Edward Lance; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on the use of emergency medical services (EMS) by patients with cardiac conditions in the Gulf region are scarce, and prior studies have suggested underutilization. Patient perception and knowledge of EMS care is critical to proper utilization of such services. Objectives: To estimate utilization, knowledge, and perceptions of EMS among patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Methods: We conducted a multicenter prospective study of consecutive patients admitted with STEMI in four government-operated hospitals in Abu Dhabi. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients to assess the rationale for choosing their prehospital mode of transport and their knowledge of EMS services. Results: Of 587 patients with STEMI (age 51 ± 11 years, male 95%), only 15% presented through EMS, and the remainder came via private transport. Over half of the participants (55%) stated that they did not know the telephone number for EMS. The most common reasons stated for not using EMS were that private transport was quicker (40%) or easier (11%). A small percentage of participants (7%) did not use EMS because they did not think their symptoms were cardiac-related or warranted an EMS call. Stated reasons for not using EMS did not significantly differ by age, gender, or primary language of the patients. Conclusions: EMS care for STEMI is grossly underutilized in Abu Dhabi. Patient knowledge and perceptions may contribute to underutilization, and public education efforts are needed to raise their perception and knowledge of EMS. PMID:27512532

  17. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  18. Acute Porphyria in a Patient with Arnold Chiari Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianbin; O’Keefe, Kevin; Webb, Lisa B.; DeGirolamo, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 33 Final Diagnosis: Acute porphyria Symptoms: Abdominal pain • alternating bowel habits Medication: Metronidazole • bactrim • oxybutynin Clinical Procedure: EMG • porhyria workup Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation are both uncommon genetic disorders without known association. The insidious onset, non-specific clinical manifestations, and precipitating factors often cause diagnosis of acute porphyria to be missed, particularly in patients with comorbidities. Case Report: A women with Arnold Chiari malformation type II who was treated with oxybutynin and antibiotics, including Bactrim for neurogenic bladder and recurrent urinary tract infection, presented with non-specific abdominal pain, constipation, and diarrhea. After receiving Flagyl for C. difficile colitis, the patient developed psychosis, ascending paralysis, and metabolic derangements. She underwent extensive neurological workup due to her congenital neurological abnormalities, most of which were unremarkable. As a differential diagnosis of Guillain Barré syndrome, acute porphyria was then considered and ultimately proved to be the diagnosis. After hematin administration and intense rehabilitation, the patient slowly recovered from the full-blown acute porphyria attack. Conclusions: This case report, for the first time, documents acute porphyria attack as a result of a sequential combination of 3 common medications. This is the first case report of the concomitant presence of both acute porphyria and Arnold Chiari malformation, 2 genetic disorders with unclear association. PMID:25697467

  19. Patient Compliance and Medication Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckalew, L. W.; Sallis, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses problem of patient noncompliance with regimens of prescribed medication, with attention to incidence and illogical nature of this behavior. Psychological theory of cognitive dissonance is suggested as appropriate to understanding some aspects of noncompliance because medicinal preparations represent stimuli that are not necessarily…

  20. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  1. Acute diverticulitis. Comparison of treatment in immunocompromised and nonimmunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J D; Shield, C F; Chang, F C; Farha, G J

    1984-12-01

    The clinical course and required treatment of diverticulitis were reviewed in 76 nonimmunocompromised patients and 10 immunocompromised patients. The immunocompromised patients presented with either minimal or no symptoms and findings. Therefore, to make the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in this group, a high index of suspicion must be maintained. The required treatment varied considerably between the two groups. In 45 nonimmunocompromised patients (76 percent), medical therapy was successful. Medical treatment failed in the other 14 patients (24 percent). However, the compromised group had no patients in whom medical therapy was successful (100 percent failure rate). Thirty-one of the nonimmunocompromised patients (41 percent) required an operation, whereas 100 percent of the immunocompromised patients with acute diverticulitis required an operation. By relating postoperative complications, we were unable to determine the initial operative procedure of choice in the nonimmunocompromised group; however, in the immunocompromised group, colostomy and resection had fewer surgical complications than colostomy and drainage. The immunocompromised patient with acute diverticulitis requires operation. We believe the operation of choice is colostomy and resection of the involved segment. PMID:6507744

  2. Medical problems in hip fracture patients.

    PubMed

    Chong, Carol Pei Wei; Savige, Judith A; Lim, Wen Kwang

    2010-11-01

    Increasing number of older patients are admitted to hospital with hip fractures. This review evaluates the common medical problems that arise as a consequence of having a hip fracture. Older patients with fractures commonly have co-morbidities that require evaluation prior to and after surgery. Joint acute orthopaedic-geriatric units have been established to provide comprehensive orthopaedic and medical care with some studies showing a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality. Recommendations surrounding the care of the older orthopaedic patient include early surgical fixation, the use of prophylactic antibiotics and thromboembolic prophylaxis, good perioperative pain control to improve ambulation, delirium detection and management to decrease the risk complications, such as institutionalisation, the avoidance of malnutrition, urinary tract management, osteoporosis management and the promotion of early mobilisation to improve functional recovery. Physicians are well placed to manage these patients with orthopaedic surgeons during the perioperative period. Sufficient evidence exists for most recommendations for fracture patients, but further research is needed in most areas. PMID:20049603

  3. [Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute medical care: myths versus reality].

    PubMed

    von Düring, Stephan; Bruchez, Stéphanie; Suppan, Laurent; Niquille, Marc

    2015-08-12

    Oxygen adiministration for both medical and traumatic emergencies is regarded as an essential component of resuscitation. However, many recent studies suggest that the use of oxygen should be more restrictive. Detrimental effects of normobaric oxygen therapy in patients suffering from hypercapnic respiratory diseases have been demonstrated, especially because of the suppression of the hypoxic drive. Apart from this particular situation, correction of hypoxemia is still a widely accepted treatment target, although there is growing evidence that hyperoxemia could be harmful in acute coronary syndromes and cardio-respiratory arrests. In other pathologies, such as stroke or hemorragic shock, the situation is still unclear, and further studies are needed to clarify the situation. Generally speaking, oxygen therapy should from now on be goal-directed, and early monitoring of both pulse oximetry and arterial blood gases is advised. PMID:26449100

  4. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  5. Acute Cholecystitis in Patients with Scrub Typhus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun; Ji, Misuk; Hwang, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Ja-Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyung; Chung, Kyung Min; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of scrub typhus. Although a few such cases have been reported in patients with scrub typhus, the clinical course is not well described. Of 12 patients, acute cholecystitis developed in 66.7% (8/12) of patients older than 60 yr. The scrub typhus group with acute cholecystitis had marginal significant longer hospital stay and higher cost than the group without cholecystitis according to propensity score matching. Scrub typhus should be kept in mind as a rare etiology of acute cholecystitis in endemic areas because the typical signs of scrub typhus such as skin rash and eschar can present after the abdominal pain. PMID:26539017

  6. Patient-Centered Medical Homes in 2016.

    PubMed

    Tayloe, David T

    2016-01-01

    There is much information in the medical literature concerning the medical home concept. Each medical practice must utilize that literature to devise a system of care-a patient-centered medical home-that best meets the needs of patients, families, and practice staff. This article is Goldsboro Pediatrics' attempt to describe its system of care, its patient-centered medical home. PMID:27422953

  7. Prognostic Significance of NPM1 Mutations in the Absence of FLT3–Internal Tandem Duplication in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A SWOG and UK National Cancer Research Institute/Medical Research Council Report

    PubMed Central

    Ostronoff, Fabiana; Othus, Megan; Lazenby, Michelle; Estey, Elihu; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Evans, Anna; Godwin, John; Gilkes, Amanda; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Burnett, Alan; List, Alan F.; Fang, Min; Oehler, Vivian G.; Petersdorf, Stephen H.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Stirewalt, Derek L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring NPM1 mutations without FLT3–internal tandem duplications (ITDs; NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype) are classified as better risk; however, it remains uncertain whether this favorable classification can be applied to older patients with AML with this genotype. Therefore, we examined the impact of age on the prognostic significance of NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative status in older patients with AML. Patients and Methods Patients with AML age ≥ 55 years treated with intensive chemotherapy as part of Southwest Oncology Gorup (SWOG) and UK National Cancer Research Institute/Medical Research Council (NCRI/MRC) trials were evaluated. A comprehensive analysis first examined 156 patients treated in SWOG trials. Validation analyses then examined 1,258 patients treated in MRC/NCRI trials. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to determine the impact of age on the prognostic significance of NPM1 mutations, FLT3-ITDs, and the NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype. Results Patients with AML age 55 to 65 years with NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype treated in SWOG trials had a significantly improved 2-year overall survival (OS) as compared with those without this genotype (70% v 32%; P < .001). Moreover, patients age 55 to 65 years with NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype had a significantly improved 2-year OS as compared with those age > 65 years with this genotype (70% v 27%; P < .001); any potential survival benefit of this genotype in patients age > 65 years was marginal (27% v 16%; P = .33). In multivariable analysis, NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype remained independently associated with an improved OS in patients age 55 to 65 years (P = .002) but not in those age > 65 years (P = .82). These results were confirmed in validation analyses examining the NCRI/MRC patients. Conclusion NPM1-positive/FLT3-ITD–negative genotype remains a relatively

  8. Identification Bracelet Precipitated Acute Compartment Syndrome during Intravenous Infusion in an Obtunded Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Wahib; Chaucer, Benjamin; Felek, Suleyman; Arsura, Edward L.; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious condition requiring immediate medical care. A lack of urgent medical treatment can result in serious complications such as loss of function and even amputation. While the pathophysiology of acute compartment syndrome is well understood, numerous potential causes are still being discovered. A rare cause of acute compartment syndrome is IV infiltration. We present a case of acute compartment syndrome resulting from intravenous infusion due to proximal placement of a patient identification bracelet. We conclude that both routine evaluation for IV infiltration and proximal placement of IV lines are essential for prevention of acute compartment syndrome. PMID:26904308

  9. Medical futility and care of dying patients.

    PubMed Central

    Jecker, N S

    1995-01-01

    In this article, I address ethical concerns related to forgoing futile medical treatment in terminally ill and dying patients. Any discussion of medical futility should emphasize that health professionals and health care institutions have ethical responsibilities regarding medical futility. Among the topics I address are communicating with patients and families, resolving possible conflicts, and developing professional standards. Finally, I explore why acknowledging the futility of life-prolonging medical interventions can be so difficult for patients, families, and health professionals. PMID:7571593

  10. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. PMID:26243789

  11. Medical mitigation strategies for acute radiation exposure during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2006-02-01

    The United States Government has recently refocused their space program on manned missions to the Moon by 2018 and later to Mars. While there are many potential risks associated with exploration-class missions, one of the most serious and unpredictable is the effect of acute space radiation exposure, and the space program must make every reasonable effort to mitigate this risk. The two cosmic sources of radiation that could impact a mission outside the Earth's magnetic field are solar particle events (SPE) and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). Either can cause acute and chronic medical illness. Numerous researchers are currently examining the ability of GCR exposure to induce the development of genetic changes that lead to malignancies and other delayed effects. However, relatively little has been published on the medical management of an acute SPE event and the potential impact on the mission and crew. This review paper will provide the readers with medical management options for an acute radiation event based on recommendations from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and evidence-based critical analysis of the scientific literature. It is the goal of this paper to stimulate debate regarding the definition of safety parameters for exploration-class missions to determine the level of medical care necessary to provide for the crew that will undertake such missions. PMID:16491581

  12. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  13. Stigma Among California's Medical Marijuana Patients

    PubMed Central

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2014-01-01

    The enactment of California's Proposition 215 stipulates that patients may use marijuana for medical reasons, provided that it is recommended by a physician. Yet, medical marijuana patients risk being stigmatized for this practice. This paper examines the way in which medical marijuana patients perceive and process stigma, and how it affects their interactions and experiences with others. Eighteen semi-structured interviews of medical marijuana patients were carried out using a semi-structured interview guide. Most patients circumvented their own physicians in obtaining a recommendation to use medicinal marijuana, and also used a host of strategies in order to justify their medical marijuana use to family, friends and colleagues in order to stave off potential stigma. The stigmatization of medical marijuana thus has a profound effect on how patients seek treatment, and whether they seek medical marijuana treatment at all. PMID:25715067

  14. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  15. Assessing Compliance With Mercaptopurine Treatment in Younger Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies compliance to a mercaptopurine treatment intervention compared to standard of care in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission. Assessing ways to help patients who have acute lymphoblastic leukemia to take their medications as prescribed may help them in taking their medications more consistently and may improve treatment outcomes. |

  16. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  17. Medical health and medication use in elderly dental patients.

    PubMed

    Jainkittivong, Aree; Aneksuk, Vilaiwan; Langlais, Robert P

    2004-02-15

    The objectives of this study were to obtain information on the medical conditions and medications used among elderly Thai dental patients and to investigate the relationship between the findings in relation to age and sex. The information regarding medical conditions and medication use was obtained from interviews of 510 dental patients aged 60 years and older. The incidence of medical conditions was 82.5%; women had a significantly higher incidence of medical conditions (86.5%) than men (76.5%). The incidence of medical conditions did not differ among the three age groups. Overall, cardiovascular disease was the leading problem (33.7%) with hypertension being the major component (26.1%). The prevalent problems were bone/joint disorders (32.4%), allergies (18.2%), diabetes mellitus (14.5%), and eye and ear problems (14.3%). In our sample, 65.5% reported taking medications, with an average of 1.5 drug groups per person. The average number of medications taken increased as age increased. Women took medications more frequently than men (70% vs. 58.5%). The four most prevalent drugs were cardiovascular agents (32%), endocrinologic drugs (14.5%), nutritional therapeutics (12.9%), and drugs acting on the musculoskeletal system (11.4%). The present study supports the findings of previous reports in that the presence of medical conditions is high in the elderly and the incidence of medication use increases with advancing age. PMID:14973558

  18. Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy on medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes: the long-term result

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To explore the intraocular pressure-lowering effect and complications of diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (DLTSC) followed by phacotrabeculectomy on medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes. Methods Nine eyes of nine medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure patients were enrolled. All the patients underwent cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy to control the prolonged acute attack. Data were recorded prospectively and then analyzed retrospectively. The reduction in intraocular pressure, improvement of vision and the complications were evaluated. Results After DLTSC, the IOP of all the patients were reduced, but all were above 21 mmHg under topical anti-glaucoma medications. After phacotrabeculectomy, the IOP of all the patients was decreased. At the final visit, the vision of all the patients was improved and the IOP of all the patients was below 21 mmHg without anti-glaucoma medications. There were no complications during the DLTSC and phacotrabeculectomy. Uveitis was the common complications after the both procedures, which were resolved by medication treatment. Conclusion Diode laser transscleral cyclophotocoagulation followed by phacotrabeculectomy is an alternative procedure to control the intraocular pressure of medically unresponsive acute primary angle closure eyes with few complications. PMID:24606842

  19. [Documented nursing diagnoses for medical clinic patients].

    PubMed

    Fontes, Cassiana Mendes Bertoncello; da Cruz, Diná Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a descriptive study, based on nursing records, of nursing diagnoses documented three months after the implementation of the NANDA-I classification at the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário (HU-USP) and proposes outcomes and interventions for the 3 most frequent diagnoses. The convenience sample (34% of the month's admissions) consisted of 30 charts of patients admitted in the Medical Clinic in August of 2004 (60% female, average age 60.9 +/- 23.1 years, mean length of stay = 5.8 +/- 2.7 days). The diagnoses documented on the admission day were manually transcribed from the charts and analyzed according to their frequency. There were 144 diagnoses (31 categories), with an average of 4.8 +/- 4.0 diagnoses per patient (range = 1-10). The most frequent were: acute pain (66.7%), impaired tissue integrity (63.3%), ineffective airway clearance (43.3%), risk of impaired skin integrity (36.7%), and impaired skin integrity (33.3%). The proposed outcomes and interventions are presented. PMID:17977375

  20. Air medical transport of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Essebag, Vidal; Halabi, Abdul R; Churchill-Smith, Michael; Lutchmedial, Sohrab

    2003-11-01

    The air medical transport of cardiac patients is a rapidly expanding practice. For various medical, social, and economic indications, patients are being flown longer distances at commercial altitudes, including international and intercontinental flights. There are data supporting the use of short-distance helicopter flights early in the course of a cardiac event for patients needing emergent transfer for percutaneous coronary intervention or aortocoronary bypass. When considering elective long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients for social or economic reasons, it is necessary to weigh the benefits against the potential risks of flight. A few recent studies suggest that long-distance air medical transport is safe under certain circumstances. Current guidelines for air travel after myocardial infarction do not address the use of medical escorts or air ambulances equipped with intensive care facilities. Further research using larger prospective studies is needed to better define criteria for safe long-distance air medical transport of cardiac patients. PMID:14605071

  1. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  2. Medical prevention of recurrent acute otitis media: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Marchisio, Paola; Nazzari, Erica; Torretta, Sara; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common pediatric diseases; almost all children experience at least one episode, and a third have two or more episodes in the first three years of life. The disease burden of AOM has important medical, social and economic effects. AOM requires considerable financial assistance due to needing at least one doctor visit and a prescription for antipyretics and/or antibiotics. AOM is also associated with high indirect costs, which are mostly related to lost days of work for one parent. Moreover, due to its acute symptoms and frequent recurrences, AOM considerably impacts both the child and family's quality of life. AOM prevention, particularly recurrent AOM (rAOM), is a primary goal of pediatric practice. In this paper, we review current evidence regarding the efficacy of medical treatments and vaccines for preventing rAOM and suggest the best approaches for AOM-prone children. PMID:24678887

  3. Medical Interpreting: Improving Communication with Your Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebble, Helen

    The guide is designed for physicians and other medical practitioners who need to work with medical interpreters to improve communication with patients. Special attention is given to the Australian context. An introductory section discusses the need for medical interpreters and explains the guide's organization. Subsequent sections address these…

  4. Resilience as a correlate of acute stress disorder symptoms in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Meister, Rebecca E; Weber, Tania; Princip, Mary; Schnyder, Ulrich; Barth, Jürgen; Znoj, Hansjörg; Schmid, Jean-Paul; von Känel, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Myocardial infarction (MI) may be experienced as a traumatic event causing acute stress disorder (ASD). This mental disorder has an impact on the daily life of patients and is associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Trait resilience has been shown to be a protective factor for post-traumatic stress disorder, but its association with ASD in patients with MI is elusive and was examined in this study. Methods We investigated 71 consecutive patients with acute MI within 48 h of having stable haemodynamic conditions established and for 3 months thereafter. All patients completed the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Resilience Scale to self-rate the severity of ASD symptoms and trait resilience, respectively. Results Hierarchical regression analysis showed that greater resilience was associated with lower symptoms of ASD independent of covariates (b=−0.22, p<0.05). Post hoc analysis revealed resilience level to be inversely associated with the ASD symptom clusters of re-experiencing (b=−0.05, p<0.05) and arousal (b=−0.09, p<0.05), but not with dissociation and avoidance. Conclusions The findings suggest that patients with acute MI with higher trait resilience experience relatively fewer symptoms of ASD during MI. Resilience was particularly associated with re-experiencing and arousal symptoms. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of resilience as a potentially important correlate of ASD in the context of traumatic situations such as acute MI. These results emphasise the importance of identifying patients with low resilience in medical settings and to offer them adequate support. PMID:26568834

  5. Physiologic imaging in acute stroke: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Clinton D; Stephens, Marcus; Zuckerman, Scott L; Waitara, Magarya S; Morone, Peter J; Dewan, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is changing, as endovascular intervention becomes an important adjunct to tissue plasminogen activator. An increasing number of sophisticated physiologic imaging techniques have unique advantages and applications in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment-decision making of acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we first highlight the strengths, weaknesses, and possible indications for various stroke imaging techniques. How acute imaging findings in each modality have been used to predict functional outcome is discussed. Furthermore, there is an increasing emphasis on using these state-of-the-art imaging modalities to offer maximal patient benefit through IV therapy, endovascular thrombolytics, and clot retrieval. We review the burgeoning literature in the determination of stroke treatment based on acute, physiologic imaging findings. PMID:26063695

  6. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Jyoti Narayan; Gurjar, Mohan; Harde, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49%) had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  7. Utilization of medical services by psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Norfleet, M A; Burnell, G M

    1981-03-01

    The relationship between medical and psychiatric utilization of services was examined in a two-year study of two groups of psychiatric patients: high users of psychiatric services (more than ten visits in one year) and low users of psychiatric services (ten or fewer visits in one year). The high-utilization group made more than 60 per cent of the total psychiatric visits in the two-year period, but only 21 per cent of the total medical visits. However, patients in this group increased their utilization of medical services when psychiatric utilization was reduced, raising the question of whether high-utilization patients tend to substitute medical visits for psychiatric visits. In contrast, patients in the low-utilization group were able to hold their medical utilization constant when they reduced psychiatric utilization. Analysis of factors influencing utilization patterns might allow illness behavior in patients to be predetermined and lead to better and more cost-effective health care. PMID:7203418

  8. CLINICAL AND THERAPEUTIC CORRELATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SLIGHT ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    MUNHOZ-FILHO, Clewis Henri; BATIGÁLIA, Fernando; FUNES, Hamilton Luiz Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas due to enzymatic autodigestion which can cause necrosis or multiple organ failure; its pathophysiology is not fully known yet. Aim To evaluate the correlation between clinical and therapeutic data in patients with mild acute pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective study in 55 medical records of patients admitted with acute mild pancreatitis was realized to analyze the association between age, leukocytosis, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase, glucose, antibiotics, time admission and Ranson´s scores. Results There was a positive association between less intensive care (strict hydration, analgesia and monitoring of vital signs), early antibiotic therapy (monotherapy), early return to diet after 48 hours and laboratory control of the serum amylase and lipase (high in the first week and decreasing after 10 days, without any prognostic value). Conclusions Changes in the management of patients with mild acute pancreatitis, such as enteral nutrition, rational use of lower spectrum antibiotics and intensive care, have contributed significantly to the reduction of hospitalization time and mortality. PMID:25861064

  9. A retrospective study of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Etiological diagnosis is an important part of the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. Hantavirus infection is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, which is easy to ignore. There is a need to analyze clinical features of acute pancreatitis caused by Hantavirus. Methods This is a retrospective study conducted from May 1, 2006 to May 31, 2012 on patients diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome at our hospital. We reviewed these patients medical records, laboratory results and radiologic examinations to determine the prevalence and summarize clinical features of acute pancreatitis in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Results A total of 218 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome during the 6-year study period. Only 2.8% (6/218) of the total hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome patients were diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. The first symptom for all six of the patients with acute pancreatitis was fever. All six patients experienced hemorrhage and thrombocytopenia during the disease course, which was different from general acute pancreatitis. In addition, we presented two misdiagnosed clinical cases. Conclusions Acute pancreatitis is not a frequent complication in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Clinicians should be alerted to the possibility of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when acute pancreatitis patients with epidemiological data have high fever before abdominal pain. PMID:24345089

  10. Music as Medicine: The Therapeutic Potential of Music for Acute Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Supnet, Charlene; Crow, April; Stutzman, Sonja; Olson, DaiWai

    2016-04-01

    Nurses caring for patients with acute stroke are likely to administer both music and medication with therapeutic intent. The administration of medication is based on accumulated scientific evidence and tailored to the needs of each patient. However, the therapeutic use of music is generally based on good intentions and anecdotal evidence. This review summarizes and examines the current literature regarding the effectiveness of music in the treatment of critically ill patients and the use of music in neurologically injured patients. The rationale for hypothesis-driven research to explore therapeutic music intervention in acute stroke is compelling. PMID:27037347

  11. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders. PMID:23815842

  12. Medication safety in acute care in Australia: where are we now? Part 2: a review of strategies and activities for improving medication safety 2002-2008

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Susan J; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper presents Part 2 of a literature review examining medication safety in the Australian acute care setting. This review was undertaken for the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, updating the 2002 national report on medication safety. Part 2 of the review examined the Australian evidence base for approaches to build safer medication systems in acute care. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify Australian studies and programs published from 2002 to 2008 which examined strategies and activities for improving medication safety in acute care. Results and conclusion Since 2002 there has been significant progress in strategies to improve prescription writing in hospitals with the introduction of a National Inpatient Medication Chart. There are also systems in place to ensure a nationally coordinated approach to the ongoing optimisation of the chart. Progress has been made with Australian research examining the implementation of computerised prescribing systems with clinical decision support. These studies have highlighted barriers and facilitators to the introduction of such systems that can inform wider implementation. However, Australian studies assessing outcomes of this strategy on medication incidents or patient outcomes are still lacking. In studies assessing education for reducing medication errors, academic detailing has been demonstrated to reduce errors in prescriptions for Schedule 8 medicines and a program was shown to be effective in reducing error prone prescribing abbreviations. Published studies continue to support the role of clinical pharmacist services in improving medication safety. Studies on strategies to improve communication between different care settings, such as liaison pharmacist services, have focussed on implementation issues now that funding is available for community-based services. Double checking versus single-checking by nurses and patient self-administration in hospital has been

  13. Treatment of acute bronchospasm in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E

    2005-12-01

    Both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often underdiagnosed and undertreated among the elderly. Patient compliance with treatments plans and medication schedules are often less than ideal. This paper presents results from clinical studies examining levalbuterol and racemic albuterol use among elderly patients who have asthma or COPD. PMID:19667714

  14. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30-35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes "holy water" green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for "body cleansing" and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  15. Methylene Blue for Acute Septic Cardiomyopathy in a Burned Patient.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Joseph J; Burger, Christina F

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this case summary was to describe the use of methylene blue (MB) in a burned patient with acute septic cardiomyopathy. A 60-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Burn Intensive Care Unit with 45% TBSA burns after a house explosion. During the course of his care, he experienced hypotension that was refractory to fluid therapy and vasoactive medications. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed new acute systolic dysfunction with concurrent elevated systemic vascular resistance (SVR). High-dose inotropic agents did not improve cardiac function, and septic shock rendered him a poor candidate for mechanical intra-aortic balloon pump support. MB was administered to sensitize the myocardium to catecholamines and improve contractility with the goal of weaning the other vasoactive medications and diuresing for afterload reduction when hemodynamic stability was achieved. MB has been described in critical care medicine predominately for vasoplegia after cardiopulmonary bypass and vasodilatory septic shock., Our patient had acute septic cardiomyopathy that was refractory to standard pharmacologic approaches to inotropy with concurrent elevated SVR. Hypothesizing the differential temporal effect of inducible nitric oxide synthase on the vasculature and myocardium, we administered MB to improve contractility and support the impending vasodilatory effects of distributive shock. Although MB is not a new drug, the application for septic cardiomyopathy with a supranormal SVR is a unique application. Because of the risk profile associated with MB, we recommend drug monitoring utilizing serial echocardiography and/or right heart catheterization. PMID:25798807

  16. Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

  17. Patient Characteristics Associated with Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Rolnick, Sharon J; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Hedblom, Brita D.; Asche, Stephen E.; Bruzek, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite evidence indicating therapeutic benefit for adhering to a prescribed regimen, many patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Non-adherence often leads to morbidity and to higher health care costs. The objective of the study was to assess patient characteristics associated with medication adherence across eight diseases. Design Retrospective data from a repository within an integrated health system was used to identify patients ≥18 years of age with ICD-9-CM codes for primary or secondary diagnoses for any of eight conditions (depression, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, multiple sclerosis, cancer, or osteoporosis). Electronic pharmacy data was then obtained for 128 medications used for treatment. Methods Medication possession ratios (MPR) were calculated for those with one condition and one drug (n=15,334) and then for the total population having any of the eight diseases (n=31,636). The proportion of patients adherent (MPR ≥80%) was summarized by patient and living-area (census) characteristics. Bivariate associations between drug adherence and patient characteristics (age, sex, race, education, and comorbidity) were tested using contingency tables and chi-square tests. Logistic regression analysis examined predictors of adherence from patient and living area characteristics. Results Medication adherence for those with one condition was higher in males, Caucasians, older patients, and those living in areas with higher education rates and higher income. In the total population, adherence increased with lower comorbidity and increased number of medications. Substantial variation in adherence was found by condition with the lowest adherence for diabetes (51%) and asthma (33%). Conclusions The expectation of high adherence due to a covered pharmacy benefit, and to enhanced medication access did not hold. Differences in medication adherence were found across condition and by

  18. Early Medication Nonadherence After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights into Actionable Opportunities from the TRANSLATE-ACS Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Robin; Peterson, Eric D.; Honeycutt, Emily; Chin, Chee Tang; Effron, Mark B.; Zettler, Marjorie; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Henry, Timothy D.; Wang, Tracy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to prescribed evidence-based medications after acute myocardial infarction (MI) can contribute to worse outcomes and higher costs. We sought to better understand the modifiable factors contributing to early nonadherence of evidence-based medications after acute MI. Methods and Results We assessed 7,425 acute MI patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at 216 United States hospitals participating in TRANSLATE-ACS between 04/2010–05/2012. Using the validated Morisky instrument to assess cardiovascular medication adherence at 6 weeks post-MI, we stratified patients into self-reported high (score 8), moderate (score 6–7), and low (score <6) adherence groups. Moderate and low adherence was reported in 25% and 4% of patients, respectively. One-third of low adherence patients described missing doses of antiplatelet therapy at least twice a week after PCI. Signs of depression and patient-reported financial hardship due to medication expenses were independently associated with a higher likelihood of medication nonadherence. Patients were more likely to be adherent at 6 weeks if they had follow-up appointments made prior to discharge and had a provider explain potential side effects of their medications. Lower medication adherence may be associated with a higher risk of 3-month death/readmission (adjusted HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98, 1.87) although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Even early after MI, a substantial proportion of patients report suboptimal adherence to prescribed medications. Tailored patient education and pre-discharge planning may represent actionable opportunities to optimize patient adherence and clinical outcomes. Clinical Trial Registry Information clinical trial #NCT01088503; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01088503 PMID:26038524

  19. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    PubMed

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  20. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Heidi L.; Leykum, Luci K.; Mattison, Melissa L. P.; Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Meltzer, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalists and others acute care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients (ACOP) Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through four steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a Partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of ten research questions in the following areas: advanced care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision-making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training. PMID:25877486

  1. Medical illness in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Goldman, L S

    1999-01-01

    Research into the relationship between physical illness and schizophrenia has revealed that patients with schizophrenia may be at decreased risk for certain disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and allergies, but at increased risk for others, including substance abuse and polydipsia. Although such knowledge may ultimately help determine the underlying causes of schizophrenia, the principal concern of practicing clinicians should be to diagnose and treat medical comorbidity in individual patients. Nearly 50% of patients with schizophrenia have a comorbid medical condition, but many of these illnesses are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. A fragmented health care system, lack of access to care, patient inability to clearly appreciate or describe a medical problem, and patient reluctance to discuss such problems all contribute to the lack of attention to medical problems in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatrists and primary care practitioners who treat patients with schizophrenia should make an effort to uncover medical illnesses by using a structured interview or routine physical examination whenever a patient is seen for care. PMID:10548136

  2. Medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie V

    2016-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia and due to a variety of factors including lack of insight, psychopathology, substance use disorder, issues associated with treatment, stigma, fragmentation of care, cultural influences, and socioeconomic status. Among this population, nonadherence is problematic because it can lead to decompensation or exacerbation of symptoms, relapse, rehospitalization or greater use of emergency psychiatric services, functional decline, and increased risk of death. Psychoeducational approaches alone are ineffective, but in combination with behavioral interventions, appear to be effective. Involving the patient's support system, in addition to other interventions, can improve treatment adherence. Many medication-related factors, such as effectiveness and tolerability of antipsychotics, regimen complexity, and past medication trials impact appropriate medication use. Therefore, optimizing the patient's pharmacotherapeutic regimens can improve adherence. Additional factors favorably influencing adherence include involving the patient in their treatment, fostering a therapeutic alliance, implementing/using reminder systems, and addressing substance use disorder. Medication nonadherence arises from multiple reasons that vary between patients. Thus, the most effective strategies to improve adherence are multifactorial and may involve both psychoeducational and behavioral techniques, as well as previously listed approaches. Strategies should be targeted toward the patient and their support system, whenever possible, to further improve the chances of appropriate medication use. Recognizing that all patients with schizophrenia are at risk for medication nonadherence is important. No one technique has been shown to be most effective; therefore, the risk for nonadherence should continually be assessed and multiple strategies should be targeted to the patient (and caregiver) and repeatedly implemented throughout the course

  3. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages in geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Antonio; Montoya, Mariano J; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Serrano, Andrés; Molina, Joaquín; Parrilla, Pascual

    2005-05-01

    Age is a risk factor in acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhages (LGIH). The objectives here were to analyze: (1) diagnostic and therapeutic handling, (2) related morbidity and mortality, (3) the indications for surgery, and (4) the evolution of acute LGIH in patients > or =80 years. Forty-three patients >80 years with acute LGIH were reviewed retrospectively. In 86% (n = 37) related comorbidities were found, in 9% (n = 4) there had been prior colorectal surgery, 19% (n = 8) were antiaggregated, and 7% (n = 3) were anticoagulated. One hundred thirty-two cases of acute LGIH in patients <80 years were used as a control group. Student's t test and the chi-square test were applied. On arrival at the emergency ward 11 cases (26%) had hemodynamic instability and 8 of these were stabilized using conservative measures. In 39 cases an endoscopy was performed, allowing for an etiological diagnosis in 59% (n = 23) of cases, above all in those carried out in an urgent or semiurgent way. The arteriography permitted an etiological diagnosis in two of the four cases in which it was carried out. In seven patients (16%) urgent surgery was indicated: three were hemorrhoidectomies, three were subtotal colectomies, and one was a resection of the small intestine. The morbidity rate was 10% (n = 4) in the patients who were not treated and 14% (n = 1) in those treated, with a mortality rate of 8% (n = 3) and 14% (n = 1), respectively. The rate of relapse of bleeding after discharge from hospital was 42% (n = 18), with nine of these needing to be readmitted into hospital. In comparison with the control group, they present a different bleeding etiology (diverticulosis as opposed to the benign anal-rectal and small intestinal pathology in the younger population; P = 0.017), surgery is indicated with less frequency (9 versus 33%; P = 0.007), and there is a higher relapse rate (42 versus 26%; P = 0.045). Acute LGIH in geriatric patients relents in most cases with the use of conservative

  4. Older patients in the acute care setting: rural and metropolitan nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices.

    PubMed

    Courtney, M; Tong, S; Walsh, A

    2000-04-01

    Many studies reporting nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients in long-term care settings have used instruments designed for older people. However, nurses' attitudes toward older patients are not as positive as their attitudes toward older people. Few studies investigate acute care nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward older patients. In order to address these shortcomings, a self-report questionnaire was developed to determine nurses' knowledge of, and attitudes and practices toward, older patients in both rural and metropolitan acute care settings. Rural nurses were more knowledgeable about older patients' activities during hospitalisation, the likelihood of them developing postoperative complications and the improbability of their reporting incontinence. Rural nurses also reported more positive practices regarding pain management and restraint usage. However, metropolitan nurses reported more positive attitudes toward sleeping medications, decision making, discharge planning and the benefits of acute gerontological units, and were more knowledgeable about older patients' bowel changes in the acute care setting. PMID:11111426

  5. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease.

    PubMed

    Squiers, John J; Edwards, Anthony G; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient's peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  6. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  7. Thrombolytics in acute ischaemic stroke: a guide to patient selection and optimum use.

    PubMed

    Adams, H P

    2000-02-01

    Intravenously administered alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator; rtPA) is the only medical treatment that has been approved for the management of acute ischaemic stroke. Although rtPA has demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes of patients with a wide range of neurological impairments, it cannot be given with impunity. Thrombolytic therapy is associated with a considerable risk of intracranial bleeding that is likely to be catastrophic. Careful selection of patients to treat and intensive ancillary care are the keys for successful administration of rtPA. An algorithm for selection is based on the interval from the onset of stroke, history of recent medical illnesses or use of medications, findings of the medical and neurological examinations and the results of laboratory and brain imaging studies. Because rtPA must be given within 3 hours of onset of stroke, most patients cannot be treated. Thus, additional therapies are needed for treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:18034518

  8. Obstetric Acute Kidney Injury; A Three Year Experience at a Medical College Hospital in North Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, K.S.; Gorikhan, Gousia; M.M., Umadi; S.T., Kalsad; M.P., Madhavaranga; Dambal, Amrut; Padaki, Samata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury is a rare and sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy, the incidence of which has been declining worldwide, though still high in developing countries. There are recent observations of increasing incidence in some developed countries attributed to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have analysed the records of all patients referred to the dialysis unit of a medical college hospital in Karnataka for acute kidney injury related to pregnancy. AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury were adapted. Age, parity, gestational age, causative factors for acute kidney injury, mode of delivery, access to antenatal care, operative procedures, blood component transfusions, number of haemodialysis, time for initiation of haemodialysis, duration of hospital stay and mortality were analysed by finding mean, standard deviation and standard error. Results: Fifteen patients out of 21563 who delivered in our hospital developed acute kidney injury. These (n=15) were out of 149 patients of acute kidney injury of various aetiologies who underwent haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014. Of these two were unregistered for antenatal care. Ten were multiparous, Eleven were from rural background, one had home delivery, six had vaginal delivery, seven had caesarean section and two had second trimester abortion. Placental abruption with intrauterine death was the commonest Cause in 9 out of 15 cases. All had severe anaemia. Patients received a mean of 3.9 (SD+/- 2.4) sessions of haemodialysis. Eleven patients recovered completely, two died and two left against medical advice. Conclusion: Obstetric acute kidney injury is associated with poor access to antenatal care, multiparity and rural background. Placental abruption is the commonest cause of obstetric acute kidney injury. Blood component transfusions, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs and early initiation of haemodialysis are

  9. Patient Preferences for Information on Post-Acute Care Services.

    PubMed

    Sefcik, Justine S; Nock, Rebecca H; Flores, Emilia J; Chase, Jo-Ana D; Bradway, Christine; Potashnik, Sheryl; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the current study was to explore what hospitalized patients would like to know about post-acute care (PAC) services to ultimately help them make an informed decision when offered PAC options. Thirty hospitalized adults 55 and older in a Northeastern U.S. academic medical center participated in a qualitative descriptive study with conventional content analysis as the analytical technique. Three themes emerged: (a) receiving practical information about the services, (b) understanding "how it relates to me," and (c) having opportunities to understand PAC options. Study findings inform clinicians what information should be included when discussing PAC options with older adults. Improving the quality of discharge planning discussions may better inform patient decision making and, as a result, increase the numbers of patients who accept a plan of care that supports recovery, meets their needs, and results in improved quality of life and fewer readmissions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(4):175-182.]. PMID:26815304

  10. Electronic Medical Record-Based Predictive Model for Acute Kidney Injury in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Laszczyńska, Olga; Severo, Milton; Azevedo, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are at risk for increased morbidity and mortality. Lack of specific treatment has meant that efforts have focused on early diagnosis and timely treatment. Advanced algorithms for clinical assistance including AKI prediction models have potential to provide accurate risk estimates. In this project, we aim to provide a clinical decision supporting system (CDSS) based on a self-learning predictive model for AKI in patients of an acute care hospital. Data of all in-patient episodes in adults admitted will be analysed using "data mining" techniques to build a prediction model. The subsequent machine-learning process including two algorithms for data stream and concept drift will refine the predictive ability of the model. Simulation studies on the model will be used to quantify the expected impact of several scenarios of change in factors that influence AKI incidence. The proposed dynamic CDSS will apply to future in-hospital AKI surveillance in clinical practice. PMID:27577501

  11. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  12. IRAD experience on surgical type A acute dissection patients: results and predictors of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Patel, Himanshu J.; Gleason, Thomas G.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Myrmel, Truls; Desai, Nimesh; Korach, Amit; Panza, Antonello; Bavaria, Joe; Khoynezhad, Ali; Woznicki, Elise; Montgomery, Dan; Isselbacher, Eric M.; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Fattori, Rossella; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Eagle, Kim A.; Trimarchi, Santi

    2016-01-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection (TAAD) is a disease that has a catastrophic impact on a patient’s life and emergent surgery represents a key goal of early treatment. Despite continuous improvements in imaging techniques, medical therapy and surgical management, early mortality in patients undergoing TAAD repair still remains high, ranging from 17% to 26%. In this setting, the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD), the largest worldwide registry for acute aortic dissection, was established to assess clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of TAAD patients. The present review aimed to evaluate and comment on outcomes of TAAD surgery as reported from IRAD series. PMID:27563547

  13. [Diagnosing the cause of acute dyspnea in elderly patients: role of biomarkers in emergencies].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Legrain, Sylvie; Ray, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the leading causes of emergency hospitalization of elderly patients. Clinical diagnostic procedures are difficult in this geriatric population. Acute heart failure is the most frequent cause of acute dyspnea in geriatric patients. The use of plasma B natriuretic peptide (BNP) assays in the general population has profoundly improved its medical management. There has also been progress recently for other frequent causes of dyspnea in the elderly, including infection and venous thromboembolic disease. Procalcitonin assays may be useful as a prognostic factor for infectious disease. Nevertheless, the real value of BNP assays in geriatric populations must be clarified by interventional studies. PMID:19297125

  14. Secure Internet video conferencing for assessing acute medical problems in a nursing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, M.; Schadow, G.; Lindbergh, D.; Warvel, J.; Abernathy, G.; Dexter, P.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although video-based teleconferencing is becoming more widespread in the medical profession, especially for scheduled consultations, applications for rapid assessment of acute medical problems are rare. Use of such a video system in a nursing facility may be especially beneficial, because physicians are often not immediately available to evaluate patients. We have assembled and tested a portable, wireless conferencing system to prepare for a randomized trial of the system s influence on resource utilization and satisfaction. The system includes a rolling cart with video conferencing hardware and software, a remotely controllable digital camera, light, wireless network, and battery. A semi-automated paging system informs physicians of patient s study status and indications for conferencing. Data transmission occurs wirelessly in the nursing home and then through Internet cables to the physician s home. This provides sufficient bandwidth to support quality motion images. IPsec secures communications. Despite human and technical challenges, this system is affordable and functional. Images Figure 1 PMID:11825286

  15. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  16. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  17. Medical decision making for the incompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Drane, J F; Roth, R B

    1987-12-01

    In America competent adult patients have a right to refuse unwanted medical treatments. For incompetent patients who have made no advance directive, the family ordinarily makes decisions about medical treatments. But in many healthcare facilities, problems arise in choosing a surrogate to make decisions for an incompetent patient and in working with that surrogate. Concrete, step-by-step procedures for resolving conflict are needed. Every effort should be made to have competent patients fill out advance directives or indicate their treatment preferences in the event of loss of competence. Family members may not override decisions made by competent patients, but anyone closely involved with the patients' care may question their competence. The physician generally assesses the patients' competence, but sometimes the courts are involved. The physician may be the appropriate person to choose a surrogate for a patient with limited competence or to make decisions for a totally incompetent patient. The surrogate may be a relative, close friend, physician who knows the patient well, or someone provided by the hospital or government. Treatment decisions are made within the surrogate-patient-physician triad. When different value judgments about the proper treatment conflict, the surrogate may have to mediate to restore physician-patient communication, or institutional proceedings through the ethics committee may be needed to resolve disputes quickly, amicably, and at low cost. As a last resort, the case may be referred to the courts. PMID:10285412

  18. Acute mountain sickness: medical problems associated with acute and subacute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C

    2006-11-01

    This article summarises the medical problems of travel to altitudes above 3000 m. These are caused by chronic hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), a self limiting common illness is almost part of normal acclimatisation--a transient condition lasting for several days. However, in <2% of people staying above 4000 m, serious illnesses related to hypoxia develop--high altitude pulmonary oedema and cerebral oedema. These are potentially fatal but can be largely avoided by gradual ascent. Short vacations, pressure from travel companies and peer groups often encourage ascent to 4000 m more rapidly than is prudent. Sensible guidelines for ascent are outlined, clinical features, management and treatment of these conditions. PMID:17099095

  19. Why do patients engage in medical tourism?

    PubMed

    Runnels, Vivien; Carrera, P M

    2012-12-01

    Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients' unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is accessed. In order to beneficially employ the opportunities medical tourism offers, and address and contain possible threats and harms, an informed decision is crucial. This paper aims to enhance the current knowledge on medical tourism by isolating the focal content of the decisions that patients make. Based on the existing literature, it proposes a sequential decision-making process in opting for or against medical care abroad, and engaging in medical tourism, including considerations of the required treatments, location of treatment, and quality and safety issues attendant to seeking care. Accordingly, it comments on the imperative of access to health information and the current regulatory environment which impact on this increasingly popular and complex form of accessing and providing medical care. PMID:23007007

  20. Medication adherence among adult patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik M; Alyousif, Sarah M; Alshabanah, Najla; Albekairy, Abdulkareem M; Alharbi, Shemylan; Alhejaili, Fayze F; Alsayyari, Abdullah A; Qandil, Abeer Ma; Qandil, Amjad M

    2014-07-01

    Medication adherence was assessed in 89 patients on hemodialysis (HD) at the King Abdul Aziz Medical City using an Arabic version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MASS-8). The results of the study revealed that 31.46% and 40.45% of the participants showed low and medium adherence, respectively, while 28.09% showed high medication adherence. Accordingly, 71.91% of the patients visiting the dialysis unit were considered medication non-adherent. While being of older age (P = 0.012), being married (P = 0.012) increased the level of adherence, being of medium level of education (P = 0.024) decreased adherence levels. On the other hand, gender, presence of a care-giver, number of members in the household and employment status seems to have no effect on the level of medication adherence. These results call upon the practitioners in HD units to develop intervention programs that can increase the level of medication adherence. PMID:24969185

  1. Acute Splenic Sequestration Crisis in a 70-Year-Old Patient With Hemoglobin SC Disease

    PubMed Central

    Squiers, John J.; Edwards, Anthony G.; Parra, Alberto; Hofmann, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old African American female with a past medical history significant for chronic bilateral shoulder pain and reported sickle cell trait presented with acute-onset bilateral thoracolumbar pain radiating to her left arm. Two days after admission, Hematology was consulted for severely worsening microcytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Examination of the patient’s peripheral blood smear from admission revealed no cell sickling, spherocytes, or schistocytes. Some targeting was noted. A Coombs test was negative. The patient was eventually transferred to the medical intensive care unit in respiratory distress. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed a diagnosis of hemoglobin SC disease. A diagnosis of acute splenic sequestration crisis complicated by acute chest syndrome was crystallized, and red blood cell exchange transfusion was performed. Further research is necessary to fully elucidate the pathophysiology behind acute splenic sequestration crisis, and the role of splenectomy to treat hemoglobin SC disease patients should be better defined. PMID:27047980

  2. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  3. Acute Kidney Injury in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Charles; Singhania, Girish; Bihorac, Azra

    2015-10-01

    Perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common, morbid, and costly surgical complication. Current efforts to understand and manage AKI in surgical patients focus on prevention, mitigation of further injury when AKI has occurred, treatment of associated conditions, and facilitation of renal recovery. Lesser severity AKI is now understood to be much more common, and more morbid, than was previously thought. The ability to detect AKI within hours of onset would be helpful in protecting the kidney and in preserving renal function, and several imaging and biomarker modalities are currently being evaluated. PMID:26410139

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  5. A sustained quality improvement program reduces nephrotoxic medication-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L; Mottes, Theresa; Simpson, Kendria; Barclay, Cynthia; Muething, Stephen; Haslam, David B; Kirkendall, Eric S

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to nephrotoxic medication is among the most common causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients. Here we conducted a prospective quality improvement project implementing a systematic Electronic Health Record screening and decision support process (trigger) in our quaternary pediatric inpatient hospital. Eligible patients were noncritically ill hospitalized children receiving an intravenous aminoglycoside for more than 3 days or more than 3 nephrotoxins simultaneously (exposure) from September 2011 through March 2015. Pharmacists recommended daily serum creatinine monitoring in exposed patients after appearance on the trigger report and AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria. A total of 1749 patients accounted for 2358 separate hospital admissions during which a total of 3243 episodes of nephrotoxin exposure were identified with 170 patients (9.7%) experiencing 2 or more exposures. A total of 575 individual AKI episodes occurred over the 43-month study period. Overall, the exposure rate decreased by 38% (11.63-7.24 exposures/1000 patient days), and the AKI rate decreased by 64% (2.96-1.06 episodes/1000 patient days). Assuming initial baseline exposure rates would have persisted without our project implementation, we estimate 633 exposures and 398 AKI episodes were avoided. Thus, systematic surveillance for nephrotoxic medication exposure and near real-time AKI risk can lead to sustained reductions in avoidable harm. These interventions and outcomes are translatable to other pediatric and nonpediatric hospitalized settings. PMID:27217196

  6. CURVES: a mnemonic for determining medical decision-making capacity and providing emergency treatment in the acute setting.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Czarny, Matthew J; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    The evaluation of medical decision-making capacity and provision of emergency treatment in the acute care setting may present a significant challenge for both physicians-in-training and attending physicians. Although absolutely essential to the proper care of patients, recalling criteria for decision-making capacity may prove cumbersome during a medical emergency. Likewise, the requirements for providing emergency treatment must be fulfilled. This article presents a mnemonic (CURVES: Choose and Communicate, Understand, Reason, Value, Emergency, Surrogate) that addresses the abilities a patient must possess in order to have decision-making capacity, as well as the essentials of emergency treatment. It may be used in conjunction with, or in place of, lengthier capacity-assessment tools, particularly when time is of the essence. In addition, the proposed tool assists the practitioner in deciding whether emergency treatment may be administered, and in documenting medical decisions made during an acute event. PMID:20133288

  7. [Positioning of patients with acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Bein, T

    2012-11-01

    The collapse of lung tissue, edema and intrapulmonary shunt are the main symptoms in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. The techniques of ventilation in a prone position and continuous lateral rotational therapy (CLRT) are based on these pathophysiological changes. Ventilation in a prone position was found to improve ventilation and perfusion relationships and reduction in the pleural pressure gradient. In hypoxemic lung failure (PaO(2)/FIO(2) <100) a prone position was found to improve oxygenation as a rescue measure and to improve survival. In contrast CLRT is considered to be an early therapeutic or prophylactic measure aimed at prevention of ventilation-associated complications. In trauma patients these beneficial effects were demonstrated in several studies. Positioning therapy can be accompanied by potentially serious complications (e.g. face and skin ulceration, accidental loss of tubes and catheters and cardiac arrhythmias) and its use requires routine management and exact knowledge of indications and risks. PMID:23086293

  8. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding: A 15-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors.A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996-2000), T2 (2001-2005), and T3 (2006-2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate.Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality.Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were

  9. The medical student and the suicidal patient.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, N A

    1997-01-01

    Today's medical students are being confronted with ethical situations of far greater complexity than were their predecessors and yet the medical education system does little to prepare students for the ethical dilemmas which they inevitably face when entering the hospital environment. The following article addresses the issues surrounding a case where a patient has told a student in confidence of his plans to commit suicide. What should the student do? The only way for the student to prevent death is by breaking confidentiality because the student has insufficient clinical experience to provide adequate guidance. However, this requires ignoring the patient's right to autonomy, a right enshrined in both case law and medical ethics. Clearly the student's ethical, moral and legal position must be carefully evaluated. PMID:9358346

  10. Interactive Algorithms for Teaching and Learning Acute Medicine in the Network of Medical Faculties MEFANET

    PubMed Central

    Štourač, Petr; Komenda, Martin; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina; Gregor, Jakub; Hůlek, Richard; Smékalová, Olga; Křikava, Ivo; Štoudek, Roman; Dušek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical Faculties Network (MEFANET) has established itself as the authority for setting standards for medical educators in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, 2 independent countries with similar languages that once comprised a federation and that still retain the same curricular structure for medical education. One of the basic goals of the network is to advance medical teaching and learning with the use of modern information and communication technologies. Objective We present the education portal AKUTNE.CZ as an important part of the MEFANET’s content. Our focus is primarily on simulation-based tools for teaching and learning acute medicine issues. Methods Three fundamental elements of the MEFANET e-publishing system are described: (1) medical disciplines linker, (2) authentication/authorization framework, and (3) multidimensional quality assessment. A new set of tools for technology-enhanced learning have been introduced recently: Sandbox (works in progress), WikiLectures (collaborative content authoring), Moodle-MEFANET (central learning management system), and Serious Games (virtual casuistics and interactive algorithms). The latest development in MEFANET is designed for indexing metadata about simulation-based learning objects, also known as electronic virtual patients or virtual clinical cases. The simulations assume the form of interactive algorithms for teaching and learning acute medicine. An anonymous questionnaire of 10 items was used to explore students’ attitudes and interests in using the interactive algorithms as part of their medical or health care studies. Data collection was conducted over 10 days in February 2013. Results In total, 25 interactive algorithms in the Czech and English languages have been developed and published on the AKUTNE.CZ education portal to allow the users to test and improve their knowledge and skills in the field of acute medicine. In the feedback survey, 62 participants completed the online questionnaire (13

  11. Pulmonary embolism and acute cytomegalovirus infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Del Borgo, Cosmo; Gianfreda, Romina; Belvisi, Valeria; Citton, Rita; Soscia, Fabrizio; Notarianni, Ermanno; Tieghi, Tiziana; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria

    2010-12-01

    A case of an immunocompetent man with acute CMV infection associated with a pulmonary embolism is described. Acute CMV infection could be a risk factor for developing thromboembolism. Pulmonary embolism should be included in differential diagnosis in patients with acute CMV infections and pulmonary opacities. PMID:21196823

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  13. The New Zealand national junior doctors' strike: implications for the provision of acute hospital medical services.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Geoffrey; McCann, Kieran; Freeman, Peter; Beasley, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The New Zealand junior doctors' strike provided an opportunity to consider strategies that might be employed to overcome the international shortage of junior doctors. This article reports the experience of the emergency department (ED) and internal medicine (IM) services at Wellington Hospital during the national strike, in which medical services were primarily provided by specialist consultants in addition to, or as part of, their routine work. During the strike, elective admissions and outpatient clinics were mostly cancelled. In the ED, the waiting times and length of stay were markedly reduced. In IM, the proportion of patients admitted to the short stay unit rather than the general medical wards increased. Notwithstanding the different work circumstances, in both services one senior doctor carried the workload of at least two junior doctors. The deployment of additional senior medical staff to acute hospital services could greatly reduce the total number of doctors required. This strategy would have implications in terms of supporting acute medicine specialty initiatives, training, quality of care and funding. PMID:18624033

  14. Managing patients with acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Shanggar; Gillatt, David

    2011-04-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR) is more than ten times more common in men than women. In men it tends to occur in the elderly; the risk of AUR is higher in men > 70 years. The causes in men can be divided into precipitated or occurring spontaneously. These can be further divided according to the mechanism i.e. obstructive, neurological and myogenic. Spontaneous AUR, caused by progression of BPH leading to a mechanical obstruction of the bladder outlet, is the most common cause of AUR. The typical presentation of AUR is a patient complaining of a sudden inability to urinate associated with progressive abdominal distension which is usually painful. The pain increases in intensity with increasing distension of the bladder. An abdominal examination should reveal a distended bladder which can be confirmed by a dull percussion note. A digital rectal examination is vital to gain information on prostatic enlargement (benign or malignant), faecal load in rectum, anal tone and presence of other masses. Urinalysis and culture should be carried out on a sample obtained after catheterisation to rule out infection. Renal function should be assessed to see if there has been damage to the upper tracts. It is better not to perform a PSA test in this situation as it will invariably be raised due to distension of the bladder and catheter insertion. If catheter insertion fails then a urological consultation is required for insertion of a suprapubic catheter. Admission is essential if the patient is: unwell with urosepsis; has abnormal renal function needing investigation and fluid monitoring; has acute neurological problems; or cannot take care of the catheter. Trial without catheter needs to be planned and the ideal time to do this is within 2-3 days so that the patient can pass urine naturally. PMID:21789984

  15. Medication regimen complexity and readmissions after hospitalization for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Karam, Nada; Bradford, Chad; Lor, Kajua B; Barnett, Mitchell; Ha, Michelle; Rizos, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Readmission rate is increasingly being viewed as a key indicator of health system performance. Medication regimen complexity index scores may be predictive of readmissions; however, few studies have examined this potential association. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether medication regimen complexity index is associated with all-cause 30-day readmission after admission for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: This study was an institutional review board–approved, multi-center, case–control study. Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were randomly selected for inclusion. Patients were excluded if they discharged against medical advice or expired during their index visit. Block randomization was utilized for equal representation of index diagnosis and site. Discharge medication regimen complexity index scores were compared between subjects with readmission versus those without. Medication regimen complexity index score was then used as a predictor in logistic regression modeling for readmission. Results: Seven hundred and fifty-six patients were randomly selected for inclusion, and 101 (13.4%) readmitted within 30 days. The readmission group had higher medication regimen complexity index scores than the no-readmission group (p < 0.01). However, after controlling for demographics, disease state, length of stay, site, and medication count, medication regimen complexity index was no longer a significant predictor of readmission (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.97–1.01) or revisit (odds ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02). Conclusion: There is little evidence to support the use of medication regimen complexity index in readmission prediction when other measures are available. Medication regimen complexity index may lack

  16. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  17. The role of glycemia in acute heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seferović, Jelena P; Milinković, Ivan; Tešić, Milorad; Ristić, Arsen; Lalić, Nebojša; Simeunović, Dejan; Zivković, Ivana; Di Somma, Salvatore; Seferovic, Petar M

    2014-10-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the most important cardiovascular syndromes associated with high cardiovascular morbidity, and is the major cause of admission in emergency departments worldwide. The clinical complexity of AHF has significantly increased, mostly due to the comorbidities: diabetes, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, renal insufficiency and anemia. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated a frequent association of AHF and diabetes. Since AHF is a very heterogeneous condition, it is important to identify clinical and laboratory parameters useful for risk stratification of these populations. Hyperglycemia may be one of the most convenient, since it is widely measured, easily interpreted, and inexpensive. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS), arrhythmias and poor compliance to chronic medications are considered to be the most frequent precipitating factors of AHF in diabetics. Several studies identified diabetes as the most prominent independent predictor of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The following parameters were identified as the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with AHF and diabetes: older age, systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg, ACS, non-compliance, history of hypertension, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <50%, serum creatinine >1.5 mg/dL, marked elevation of natriuretic peptides, hyponatremia, treatment at admission without ACE inhibitors/ARBs/β-blockers, and no percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) as a treatment modality. The most frequent cause of AHF is ACS, both with ST segment elevation (STEMI) or without (NSTEMI). Hyperglycemia is very common in these patients and although frequently unrecognized and untreated, has a large in-hospital and mortality significance. PMID:24988247

  18. Regimen complexity and medication nonadherence in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Corsonello, Andrea; Pedone, Claudio; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Lucchetti, Maria; Garasto, Sabrina; Carbone, Claudia; Greco, Cosetta; Fabbietti, Paolo; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether the number of daily administrations of individual drugs, as a measure of regimen complexity, contributes to the profile of an elderly patient who adheres poorly to the prescribed therapy. Population: Six hundred ninety patients over 64 years who were consecutively admitted to 11 acute medical care and three long term/rehabilitation wards in Italy. Main outcome measure: Self-reported adherence to drugs taken at home before admission was measured by a single question assessment for each listed drug supplemented with a latter question about the circumstances of the missed administration. For cognitively impaired patients the question was put to patients’ relatives or caregivers. Methods: A structured multidimensional assessment was performed to identify nonadherence and its potential correlates. Correlates of nonadherence were identified by multivariable logistic regression. Results: We recorded 44 cases (6.4%) of nonadherence to at least one drug. Being assisted by foreign caregivers (OR 2.17; 95% CI 1.02–4.63) and the use of at least one multiple daily dosing drug (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.24–7.17) were significant independent correlates of medication nonadherence, while age, selected indexes of frailty and the cumulative number of prescribed drugs were not. Conclusion: Regimen complexity and type of assistance are independent correlates of medication nonadherence. PMID:19436625

  19. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum. PMID:27028498

  20. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  1. Treatment Satisfaction Among Patients Taking Antidepressant Medication.

    PubMed

    López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; López Gallardo, Yolanda; Párraga Martínez, Ignacio; Del Campo Del Campo, José María; Villena Ferrer, Alejandro; Morena Rayo, Susana

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to assess treatment satisfaction among patients on antidepressants, ascertaining whether there might be an association with depressive symptomatology and other variables. Cross-sectional study conducted on 564 adult patients taking antidepressant medication. Satisfaction with antidepressant treatment was assessed using the Assessment of Satisfaction with Antidepressant Treatment Questionnaire (ESTA/Evaluación de la Satisfacción con el Tratamiento Antidepresivo). A moderate negative correlation was observed between satisfaction and intensity of depressive symptoms, as assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg scale. A weak negative correlation was observed between greater satisfaction and less favourable views about taking medication. Satisfaction scale scores were higher among those who took antidepressant medication for 1 year or more versus shorter periods. Most patients reported being satisfied with the antidepressant treatment but the level of satisfaction was higher among those who presented with less marked depressive symptoms, received longer-term treatment and viewed drug treatments favourably. Treatment satisfaction is one of the patient-reported outcome measures that can serve to complement clinical evaluation of depressive disorders. PMID:25833726

  2. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  3. Research on patient safety: falls and medications.

    PubMed

    Boddice, Sandra Dawn; Kogan, Polina

    2009-10-01

    Below you will find summaries of published research describing investigations into patient safety issues related to falls and medications. The first summary provides details on the incidence of falls associated with the use of walkers and canes. This is followed by a summary of a fall-prevention intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of widespread dissemination of evidence-based strategies in a community in Connecticut. The third write up provides information on three classes of medications that are associated with a significant number of emergency room visits. The last summary describes a pharmacist-managed medication reconciliation intervention pilot program. For additional details about the study findings and interventions, we encourage readers to review the original articles. PMID:19820661

  4. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    PubMed Central

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alazzawi, Aouf AbdlRahman; Abraham, Abraham; Singh, Prit Pal; Narayan, Narayan Anantha; Rajarao, Mamatha Punjee; Khdir, Mohammed Ahmed; Abdlraheem, Mohamad; Siddiqui, Aftab Ahmed; Soliman, Hisham; Elkadi, Osama Abdellatif; Bichu, Ruchir Kumar; Al Lawati, Kumayl Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF) as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE) project. Methods Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57%) were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF) while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%), coronary artery disease (55%), and diabetes mellitus (53%). Ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45%) with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF) patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical therapy was

  5. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = −0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = −0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = −0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = −0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = −0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  6. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications in Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Behnood-Rod, Azin; Rabbanifar, Omid; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Saadat, Habibollah; Moharamzad, Yashar; Morisky, Donald E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Appropriate adherence to medication is still a challenging issue for hypertensive patients. We determined adherence to antihypertensive(s) and its associated factors among 280 Iranian patients. Methods. They were recruited consecutively from private and university health centers and pharmacies in four cities. The validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was administered to measure adherence. Results. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.75 (±1.88). About half of the sample (139 cases, 49.6%) showed low adherence (MMAS-8 score < 6). There was a negative linear association between the MMAS-8 score and systolic BP (r = -0.231, P < 0.001) as well as diastolic BP (r = -0.280, P < 0.001). In linear regression model, overweight/obesity (B = -0.52, P = 0.02), previous history of admission to emergency services due to hypertensive crisis (B = -0.79, P = 0.001), and getting medication directly from drugstore without refill prescription in hand (B = -0.51, P = 0.04) were factors recognized to have statistically significant association with the MMAS-8 score. Conclusion. Antihypertensive adherence was unsatisfactory. We suggest that health care providers pay special attention and make use of the aforementioned findings in their routine visits of hypertensive patients to recognize those who are vulnerable to poor adherence. PMID:27069676

  7. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  8. Acute Hypoxic Test in Patients with Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Shatylo, Valerii B; Serebrovska, Tatiana V; Gavalko, Anna V; Egorov, Egor; Korkushko, Oleg V

    2016-06-01

    Shatylo, Valerii B., Tetiana V. Serebrovska, Anna V. Gavalko, Egor Egorov, and Oleg V. Korkushko. Acute hypoxic test in patients with prediabetes. High Alt Med Biol. 17:101-107, 2016.-Prediabetes is a state of impaired carbohydrate metabolism when not all of the symptoms required to label a person as diabetic are present, but blood glucose is higher than in healthy subjects. Recent evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) might provide a cost-effective strategy for improving metabolic functioning. One of the most important aspects of the successful IHT application is individualized approach to hypoxic dose and regimen prescription. To establish the relationships between indices of carbohydrate metabolism and individual resistance to hypoxia, the acute hypoxic test (AHT, breathing gas mixture with 12% O2 during 20 minutes) was performed in 33 healthy volunteers (mean age, 63.0, range, 44-76; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) less than 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours postoral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) glycemia less than 7.8 mmol/L) and 30 patients with impaired glucose metabolism (mean age, 65.5, range, 44-75; FPG from 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L and 2 hours post-OGTT glycemia from 7.8 to 11 mmol/L). Negative correlation was found between the SaO2 level at 20th minute AHT and FPG (r = -0.83; p < 0.01) and insulin (r = -0.27; p < 0.05), as well as 2 hours post-OGTT glucose and insulin levels (r = -0.75 and -0.40, respectively). Longer recovery time and less effective functioning of respiratory and cardiovascular systems were also registered in patients with prediabetes showing that their cardiovascular resilience is impaired compared to normoglycemic controls. These patterns of relationship must be considered when assigning the individual modes of IHT. PMID:27213550

  9. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  10. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step. PMID:26282932

  11. Characteristics of acute care utilization of a Delaware adult sickle cell disease patient population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nina; Bellot, Jennifer; Senu-Oke, Oluseyi; Ballas, Samir K

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that is chronic in nature and manifests itself through many facets of the patient's life. Comprehensive specialty centers have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care for patients who have chronic medical conditions such as heart failure and SCD. The purpose of this practice inquiry was to analyze de-identified data for acute care episodes involving SCD in order to create a detailed picture of acute care utilization for adult patients in Delaware with SCD from 2007 to 2009. Gaining a better understanding of acute care utilization for adults with SCD may provide evidence to improve access to high-quality health care services for this vulnerable patient population in the state of Delaware. PMID:23965046

  12. Paperless medical records: reinventing the patient experience.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Mary Ellen

    2004-01-01

    At North Shore Magnetic Imaging Center, the patient paper medical record system was becoming very cumbersome, and it served as a source of frustration for everyone involved: patients, technologists, radiologists, and staff members. The center's mapping of a typical patient experience indicated that, from the initial phone call scheduling an exam to a completed visit (claim processed and payment received), a record could be handled by as many as 20 sets of hands! In June 2002, the center's growth and a concern that patients were losing a one-on-one experience with the medical staff led to an evaluation of workflow processes existing at that time. The evaluation began with a survey of staff members, center management, radiologists, and referring physicians. Their responses indicated 3 common themes: stress, overload, and frustration over systems in place. Comments from the survey were grouped into 3 areas: Continue to Do, Stop Doing, and Start Doing. The Start Doing responses provided solid objectives. The center set out to establish a breakthrough project that included all stakeholders--patients, staff, management, and radiologists. The Reinvention Project had 2 primary goals: move to a paperless environment and increase the level of patient care. The project was divided into internal and external teams. The internal team, called the Reinvention Team, was responsible for the actual hands-on aspects of the process. There were numerous external teams; each had defined roles and specific outcomes for achievement. The external teams' responsibilities included implementing an Internet protocol telephone system; researching voice recognition; restructuring job descriptions, training manuals, and performance evaluations; and conducting a patient-centered focus group. PMID:15259685

  13. Selecting the optimal antithrombotic regimen for patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Shailja V; Keeley, Ellen C

    2009-01-01

    The wide variety of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents available for clinical use has made choosing the optimal antithrombotic regimen for patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention a complex task. While there is no single best regimen, from a risk-benefit ratio standpoint, particular regimens may be considered optimal for different patients. We review the mechanisms of action for the commonly prescribed antithrombotic medications, summarize pertinent data from randomized trials on their use in acute coronary syndromes, and provide an algorithm (incorporating data from these trials as well as risk assessment instruments) that will help guide the decision-making process. PMID:19707287

  14. Emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain among Tanzanian patients

    PubMed Central

    Nyerere, Joachim W; Matee, Mecky I; Simon, Elison NM

    2006-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, oral health services are mostly in the form of dental extractions aimed at alleviating acute dental pain. Conservative methods of alleviating acute dental pain are virtually non-existent. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to determine treatment success of emergency pulpotomy in relieving acute dental pain. Methods Setting: School of Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Study design: Longitudinal study. Participants: 180 patients who presented with dental pain due to acute irreversible pulpitis during the study period between July and August 2001. Treatment and evaluation: Patients were treated by emergency pulpotomy on permanent posterior teeth and were evaluated for pain after one, three and six week's post-treatment. Pain, if present, was categorised as either mild or acute. Results Of the patients with treated premolars, 25 (13.9%) patients did not experience pain at all while 19 (10.6%) experienced mild pain. None of the patients with treated premolars experienced acute pain. Among 136 patients with treated molars 56 (31%) did not experience any pain, 76 (42.2%) experienced mild pain and the other 4 (2.2%) suffered acute pain. Conclusion The short term treatment success of emergency pulpotomy was high being 100% for premolars and 97.1% for molars, suggesting that it can be recommended as a measure to alleviate acute dental pain while other conservative treatment options are being considered. PMID:16426455

  15. Pulmonary embolism in an immunocompetent patient with acute cytomegalovirus colitis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurs commonly in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but is usually asymptomatic in the latter. Vascular events associated with acute CMV infection have been described, but are rare. Hence, such events are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary embolism secondary to acute CMV colitis in an immunocompetent 78-year-old man. The patient presented with fever and diarrhea. Colonic ulcers were diagnosed based on colonoscopy findings, and CMV was the proven etiology on pathological examination. The patient subsequently experienced acute respiratory failure. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed based on the chest radiography and computed tomography findings. A diagnosis of acute CMV colitis complicated by pulmonary embolism was made. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous administration of unfractionated heparin and intravenous ganciclovir. PMID:27175121

  16. Clinical service desires of medical cannabis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical cannabis dispensaries following the social or hybrid model offer supplementary holistic services in addition to dispensing medical cannabis. Historically, alternative physical health services have been the norm for these dispensaries, including services such as yoga, acupuncture, or chiropractor visits. A clinical service dearth remains for medical cannabis patients seeking substance use, misuse, dependence, and mental health services. This study examined patient desires for various clinical services and level of willingness to participate in specific clinical services. Methods Anonymous survey data (N = 303) were collected at Harborside Health Center (HHC), a medical cannabis dispensary in Oakland, CA. The sample was 70% male, 48% Caucasian and 21% African American. The mean male age was 38 years old and female mean age was 30. Sixty two percent of the male participants and 44% of the female participants are single. Sixteen percent of the population reported having a domestic partner. Forty six percent of the participants are employed full time, 41% have completed at least some college, and 49% make less than $40,000 a year. Results A significant portion of the sample, 62%, indicated a desire to participate in free clinical services at HHC, 34% would like more information about substances and use, and 41% want to learn more about reducing harms from substance use. About one quarter of the participants marked "would" or "likely would" participate in individual services such as consultation. Approximately 20% indicated "would" or "likely would" participate in psycho-educational forums, harm reduction information sharing sessions, online support groups, and coping, life, and social skills group. There was little interest in traditional NA/AA 12-step groups or adapted 12-step groups. Conclusions Desired clinical services can be qualified as a combination of harm reduction, educational, skills-based, peer support and therapeutic individual and group

  17. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  18. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  19. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE. PMID:24576517

  20. RFID authentication protocol to enhance patient medication safety.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sonam Devgan; Awasthi, Amit K

    2013-12-01

    Medication errors can cause substantial harm to patients. Automated patient medication system with RFID technology is purposely used to reduce the medication error, to improve the patient safety, to provide personalized patient medication and identification and also to provide counterfeit protection to the patients. In order to enhance medication safety for patients we propose a new dynamic ID based lightweight RFID authentication protocol. Due to low storage capacity and limited computational and communicational capacity of tags, only pseudo random number generator function, one way hash function and bitwise Xor operation are used in our authentication protocol. The proposed protocol is practical, secure and efficient for health care domain. PMID:24122350

  1. Ensuring patient satisfaction in medical groups.

    PubMed

    Choong, P

    2000-01-01

    Delivering satisfaction to patients has become increasingly important among professionals in the medical community. However, administrators in medical group practices charged with the task of nurturing customer satisfaction are often required to allocate their limited funds across an array of initiatives intended to ensure the delivery of the right amount and types of services to improve satisfaction among their customers. This requires the ability to locate areas that yield the greatest response per unit of investment. This paper shows that the impact of attribute performance on satisfaction is asymmetric. Positive attribute performance is shown to have a smaller impact on satisfaction than negative attribute performance. The paper also discusses how an understanding of this asymmetry will enable administrators to allocate their resources more wisely as they decide whether to maintain or increase attribute-level performance. PMID:10787726

  2. Substance P and Acute Pain in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Barbara; Siewruk, Katarzyna; Lisowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a limited information about the role of Substance P (SP) in acute pain nociception following surgical stimulation in patients with a chronic inflammatory state not to mention the link between this neuropeptide level changes and intensity of pain. The goal of the research was to find the correlation between SP level changes and acute pain intensity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. Material and Methods Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled in the study. The correlation between acute pain intensity and concentration of SP in serum as well as in drainage fluid from postoperative wound was assessed in patients with RA who underwent Total Knee Replacement (TKA) under spinal anesthesia. Results In patients with RA a correlation between intensity of acute pain and serum SP was found postoperatively, whereas there was no correlation between intensity of acute pain and concentration of SP in drainage fluid. Conclusions 1. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP serum concentration was found postoperatively in patients with RA. 2. The correlation between acute pain intensity and SP concentration in drainage fluid was not found postoperatively in patients with RA. PMID:26731421

  3. A Matter of Trust: Patient Barriers to Primary Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinski, J. M.; Kesselheim, A. S.; Frolkis, J. P.; Wescott, P.; Allen-Coleman, C.; Fischer, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary medication adherence occurs when a patient properly fills the first prescription for a new medication. Primary adherence only occurs about three-quarters of the time for antihypertensive medications. We assessed patients' barriers to primary adherence and attributes of patient-provider discussions that might improve primary adherence…

  4. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  5. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  6. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acalculous cholecystitis in a neutropenic patient after chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ejduk, Anna; Wróblewski, Tadeusz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (ACC) is most frequently reported in critically ill patients following sepsis, extensive injury or surgery. It is rather uncommon as a chemotherapy-induced complication, which is usually life-threatening in neutropenic patients subjected to myelosuppressive therapy. A 23-year-old patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was subjected to myelosuppressive chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, pegaspargase). After the first chemotherapy cycle the patient was neutropenic and feverish; she presented with vomiting and pain in the right epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder with wall thickening up to 14 mm. The ACC was diagnosed. Medical therapy included a broad spectrum antibiotic regimen and granulocyte-colony stimulating factors. On the second day after ACC diagnosis the patient's general condition worsened. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. The resected gallbladder showed no signs of bacterial or leukemic infiltrates. The postoperative course was uneventful. In the management of neutropenic patients with ACC surgical treatment is as important as pharmacological therapy. PMID:25337176

  7. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  8. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  9. Acute renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Sherman, W H; Osserman, E F; Appel, G B

    1984-02-01

    In the past, patients with multiple myeloma and acute renal failure have had a poor prognosis. Few patients recovered renal function and fewer still survived for prolonged time periods. This report describes the course of 10 patients with multiple myeloma and true acute renal failure treated during the decade 1970 to 1980, and reviews recent reports concerning this association. The use of radiographic contrast agents is no longer the primary predisposing factor to acute renal failure in the myeloma population. Rather, infection, hypercalcemia, and dehydration in the presence of light chain excretion are the major conditions precipitating the renal failure. Despite severe renal failure requiring dialysis, many patients may regain good renal function. Factors associated with a good or poor prognosis in this population are reviewed. The prognosis in patients with myeloma and acute renal failure has greatly improved in recent years, and prolonged survival may occur. PMID:6695948

  10. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute and acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Aron, Jonathan; Agarwal, Banwari; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The number of patients developing liver failure; acute on chronic liver failure and acute liver failure continues to increase, along with the demand for donor livers for transplantation. As such there is a clinical need to develop effective extracorporeal devices to support patients with acute liver failure or acute-on-chronic liver failure to allow time for hepatocyte regeneration, and so avoiding the need for liver transplantation, or to bridge the patient to liver transplantation, and also potentially to provide symptomatic relief for patients with cirrhosis not suitable for transplantation. Currently devices can be divided into those designed to remove toxins, including plasma exchange, high permeability dialyzers and adsorption columns or membranes, coupled with replacement of plasma proteins; albumin dialysis systems; and bioartificial devices which may provide some of the biological functions of the liver. In the future we expect combinations of these devices in clinical practice, due to the developments in bioartificial scaffolds. PMID:26894968

  11. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic. PMID:26894117

  12. [Urinalysis in patients at the early stage of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybak, Katarzyna; Sporek, Mateusz; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Mazur-Laskowska, Małgorzata; Dumnicka, Paulina; Walocha, Jerzy; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuźniewski, Marek; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Urinalysis is a routine and cheap laboratory test that provides clinically useful information in patients with acute abdominal conditions, including acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between the results of urinalysis and the course of the disease among 65 patients with acute pancreatitis (34 men and 31 women, mean age 61 ± 19 years) at the early phase of the disease, i.e. during the first 72 hours from the onset of symptoms. Mild acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 47 patients, moderately severe in 13 and severe in 5. The most prevalent abnormalities were proteinuria (43% of patients), high urinary bilirubin (20%), erythrocytes (18%), glucose (18%) and leukocytes (17%). High urinary protein and low specific gravity were associated with more severe acute disease and with acute kidney injury. The severity of bilirubinuria and proteinuria were positively correlated with urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL). Urinalysis should be routinely performed in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:27197429

  13. Predicting mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Gelder, Jelle; Lucke, Jacinta A; Heim, Noor; de Craen, Antonius J M; Lourens, Shantaily D; Steyerberg, Ewout W; de Groot, Bas; Fogteloo, Anne J; Blauw, Gerard J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2016-06-01

    Acutely hospitalized older patients have an increased risk of mortality, but at the moment of presentation this risk is difficult to assess. Early identification of patients at high risk might increase the awareness of the physician, and enable tailored decision-making. Existing screening instruments mainly use either geriatric factors or severity of disease for prognostication. Predictive performance of these instruments is moderate, which hampers successive interventions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all patients aged 70 years and over who were acutely hospitalized in the Acute Medical Unit of the Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands in 2012. We developed a prediction model for 90-day mortality that combines vital signs and laboratory test results reflecting severity of disease with geriatric factors, represented by comorbidities and number of medications. Among 517 patients, 94 patients (18.2 %) died within 90 days after admission. Six predictors of mortality were included in a model for mortality: oxygen saturation, Charlson comorbidity index, thrombocytes, urea, C-reactive protein and non-fasting glucose. The prediction model performs satisfactorily with an 0.738 (0.667-0.798). Using this model, 53 % of the patients in the highest risk decile (N = 51) were deceased within 90 days. In conclusion, we are able to predict 90-day mortality in acutely hospitalized older patients using a model with directly available clinical data describing disease severity and geriatric factors. After further validation, such a model might be used in clinical decision making in older patients. PMID:26825335

  14. [The nutrition of acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Sebe, Mayu

    2016-03-01

    In this session, we describe the acute phase in patients with metabolic syndrome from two sides; acute disease that occurs higher in patients with metabolic syndrome such as colonary heart disease and stroke, and acute aggravation of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome. The electrolyte imbalance is frequently detected in critical ill patients. It is reported that the extreme abnormalities of ionized calcium concentrations are independent predictors of mortality. In addition, from clinical database MIMIC-Ⅱ,calcium supplementation improves clinical outcome in intensive care unit patients. Although metabolic syndrome; lifestyle-related disease, is a chronic disease, the possibility of falling into acute disease by having it becomes very high and improvement of electrolyte imbalance, especially hypocalcaemia is expected to effective on clinical outcome. PMID:26923986

  15. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  16. Application of pattern recognition tools for classifying acute coronary syndrome: an integrated medical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The classification of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), using artificial intelligence (AI), has recently drawn the attention of the medical researchers. Using this approach, patients with myocardial infarction can be differentiated from those with unstable angina. The present study aims to develop an integrated model, based on the feature selection and classification, for the automatic classification of ACS. Methods A dataset containing medical records of 809 patients suspected to suffer from ACS was used. For each subject, 266 clinical factors were collected. At first, a feature selection was performed based on interviews with 20 cardiologists; thereby 40 seminal features for classifying ACS were selected. Next, a feature selection algorithm was also applied to detect a subset of the features with the best classification accuracy. As a result, the feature numbers considerably reduced to only seven. Lastly, based on the seven selected features, eight various common pattern recognition tools for classification of ACS were used. Results The performance of the aforementioned classifiers was compared based on their accuracy computed from their confusion matrices. Among these methods, the multi-layer perceptron showed the best performance with the 83.2% accuracy. Conclusion The results reveal that an integrated AI-based feature selection and classification approach is an effective method for the early and accurate classification of ACS and ultimately a timely diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:24044669

  17. Splenic actinomycotic abscess in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y; Chen, Y-C; Tang, J-L; Lin, W-C; Su, I-J; Tien, H-F

    2002-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium. Actinomyces organisms are important constituents of the normal flora of mucous membranes and are considered opportunistic pathogens. The three major clinical presentations of actinomycosis include the cervicofacial, thoracic, and abdominopelvic regions. Actinomycosis infection in patients with febrile neutropenia is uncommon and actinomycosis splenic involvement in acute leukemia patients is very rare. We describe a man with acute myeloid leukemia and splenic actinomycotic abscess that developed after chemotherapy following prolonged neutropenia. PMID:12373356

  18. Clinical management of patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is a common and serious complication of congenital and acquired heart disease, and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. When a patient is admitted to the hospital with acute heart failure, there are several important goals for the hospital admission, including maintaining adequate perfusion, establishing the underlying aetiology for the heart failure, patient and family education, and discharge from the hospital in a stable condition. The pathway to home discharge is variable and may include inotropic therapy, mechanical circulatory support, and/or heart transplantation. This review will cover the epidemiology, presentation, and management of acute heart failure in children. PMID:26377712

  19. The Prevalence of Natural Health Product Use in Patients with Acute Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alherbish, Aws; Charrois, Theresa L.; Ackman, Margaret L.; Tsuyuki, Ross T.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural health products (NHP) use may have implications with respect to adverse effects, drug interactions and adherence yet the prevalence of NHP use by patients with acute cardiovascular disease and the best method to ascertain this information is unknown. Objective To identify the best method to ascertain information on NHP, and the prevalence of use in a population with acute cardiovascular disease. Methods Structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of consecutive patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease to the University of Alberta Hospital during January 2009. NHP use was explored using structured and open-ended questions based on Health Canada's definition of NHP. The medical record was reviewed, and documentation of NHP use by physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, compared against the gold-standard structured interview. Results 88 patients were interviewed (mean age 62 years, standard deviation [SD 14]; 80% male; 41% admitted for acute coronary syndromes). Common co-morbidities included hypertension (59%), diabetes (26%) and renal impairment (19%). NHP use was common (78% of patients) and 75% of NHP users reported daily use. The category of NHP most commonly used was vitamins and minerals (73%) followed by herbal products (20%), traditional medicines including Chinese medicines (9%), homeopathic preparations (1%) and other products including amino acids, essential fatty acids and probiotics (35%). In a multivariable model, only older age was associated with increased NHP use (OR 1.5 per age decile [95%CI 1.03 to 2.2]). When compared to the interview, the highest rate of NHP documentation was the pharmacist history (41%). NHP were documented in 22% of patients by the physician and 19% by the nurse. Conclusions NHP use is common in patients admitted with acute cardiovascular disease. However, health professionals do not commonly identify NHP as part of the medication profile despite its potential importance. Structured

  20. Carotid interventions (CEA and CAS) in acute stroke patients: which procedure on which patient.

    PubMed

    Darling, Ralph C; Warner, Courtney; Yeh, Chin C; Shah, Melissa D; Hnath, Jeffrey C; Shah, Dhiraj M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of carotid bifurcation disease in patients presenting with acute stroke has been a controversial issue over the past four decades. Classically, patients were asked to wait four to six weeks before intervention was entertained in order for the brain to stabilize and the risks of intervention to be minimized. Unfortunately, up to 20% of patients will have a secondary event after their index event and the window of opportunity to save potentially salvageable ischemic tissue will be missed. Early reports had demonstrated poor results with intervention. However, more recently, institutions such as ours have demonstrated excellent results with early intervention in patients who present with stable mild to moderate stroke with an NIH stroke scale less than 15 and preferably less than 10, present with stroke and ipsilateral carotid artery lesion of 50% or greater. Also more recently, we have been aggressively treating patients with larger ulcerative plaques even if the stenosis approaches 50%. In our and others experiences, patients who are treated at institutions that have comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) where they have a multidisciplinary system that consists of vascular surgeons, neuro interventionalists, stroke neurologists, specifically trained stroke nursing staff and a neuro intensive ICU have had optimal results. Early assessment, diagnosis of stroke with recognition of cause of embolization is mandatory but patient selection is extremely important; finding those patients who will benefit the most from urgent intervention. Most studies have demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy in these patients. More recent studies have demonstrated acceptable results with carotid stenting, especially in smaller lesions, those less than 1.2 centimeters. Early intervention should be avoided in most patients who are obtunded or with an NIH stroke scale greater than 15 or who do not have any "brain at risk" to salvage. These patients may be better served by

  1. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohammed H; Al-Ansari, Mariam A

    2007-04-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  2. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Mohammed H.; Al-Ansari, Mariam A.

    2007-01-01

    A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas. PMID:19727350

  3. Impetigo presenting as an acute necrotizing swelling of the lower lip in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Mohammed; Halsnad, Moorthy; Fowell, Christopher; Millar, Brian G

    2012-06-01

    The authors present an unusual case of an acute swelling of the lower lip and septicemia in a 35-year-old, recent immigrant male arriving from India. The patient presented in our emergency department with a 48-hour history of a worsening, painful swelling of the lower lip. On presentation, he was pyrexial and the lip was found to be acutely inflamed with honey-colored crusting, pustular lesions, and induration . A diagnosis of impetigo leading to necrosis of the lip was established, a rare phenomenon potentially resulting in significant tissue destruction. Appropriate medical management achieved a good outcome and prevented disabling tissue loss of the orofacial region. PMID:22677026

  4. Perforated appendicitis masquerading as acute pancreatitis in a morbidly obese patient.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael-J; Akoh, Jacob-A

    2008-03-21

    Diagnosis and treatment of common conditions in morbidly obese patients still pose a challenge to physicians and surgeons. Sometimes too much reliance is put on investigations that can lead to a misdiagnosis. This case demonstrates an obese woman admitted under the medical team with a presumed diagnosis of pneumonia, who was later found to have an acute abdomen and raised amylase, which led to an assumed diagnosis of pancreatitis. She died within 24 h of admission and post mortem confirmed the cause of death as systemic sepsis due to perforated appendicitis, with no evidence of pancreatitis. Significantly elevated serum amylase level may occur in non-pancreatitic acute abdomen. PMID:18350613

  5. Campylobacter jejuni Bacteremia in a Patient With Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Anvarinejad, Mojtaba; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Pouladfar, Gholam Reza; Dehyadegari, Mohammad Ali; Mardaneh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter jejuni is a slender, motile, non-spore-forming, helical-shaped, gram-negative bacterium. It is one of the most common causes of human gastroenteritis in the world. The aim of this study was to present a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), who was infected with Campylobacter jejuni. Case Presentation We describe the medical records of a pediatric ALL patient with bacteremia caused by C. jejuni, who was diagnosed at Amir hospital, Shiraz, Iran. This 14-year-old male visited the emergency department of Amir hospital with night sweats, severe polar high-grade fever, reduced appetite, and nausea in August 2013. Given the suspected presence of an anaerobic or microaerophilic microorganism, aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were performed using an automated blood cultivator, the BACTEC 9240 system. In order to characterize the isolate, diagnostic biochemical tests were used. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done with the disk diffusion method. The primary culture was found to be positive for Campylobacter, and the subculture of the solid plate yielded a confluent growth of colonies typical for Campylobacter, which was identified as C. jejuni by morphological and biochemical tests. The isolate was resistant to ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, cephalexin, piperacillin/tazobactam, nalidixic acid, aztreonam, cefuroxime, cefixime, ceftazidime, and tobramycin. Conclusions C. jejuni should be considered in the differential diagnosis as a potential cause of bacteremia in immunosuppressed patients. In cases where the BACTEC result is positive in aerobic conditions but the organism cannot be isolated, an anaerobic culture medium is suggested, especially in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27621914

  6. Medical confidentiality and the competent patient.

    PubMed

    Niveau, Gerard; Burkhardt, Sandra; Chiesa, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Confidentiality is both a fundamental principle of medical ethics and a legal obligation. In exceptional situations not covered by legal provisions, doctors may want to waive confidentiality against the wishes of the patient. Swiss law calls for an authority to rule on such cases. In the Canton of Geneva this authority is the Commission for Professional Confidentiality. This paper concerns 41 cases managed by this commission. The study shows that the majority of these requests to the Commission concern the reporting of patients who are not incompetent but need the protection of a legal guardianship. In rare cases, there is another interest higher than confidentiality: public order or functioning of justice. The Commission found that the measure requested was justified in the majority of cases brought before it. This study focuses on exceptional cases but it throws into relief the conflict between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the need for patient protection and social justice on the other. PMID:23300253

  7. Cumulative Cardiovascular Polypharmacy Is Associated With the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shin; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Polypharmacy is common in the elderly due to multimorbidity and interventions. However, the temporal association between polypharmacy and renal outcomes is rarely addressed and recognized. We investigated the association between cardiovascular (CV) polypharmacy and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients.We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system to investigate the relationship between cumulative CV medications in the 3 months before admission and risk of AKI in the elderly at their admission to general medical wards in a single center. Community-dwelling elderly patients (>60 years) were prospectively enrolled and classified according to the number of preadmission CV medications. CV polypharmacy was defined as use of 2 or more CV medications.We enrolled 152 patients, 48% with AKI (based upon Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] classification) and 64% with CV polypharmacy. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients taking more CV medications (0 drugs: 33%; 1 drug: 50%; 2 drugs: 57%; 3 or more drugs: 60%; P = 0.05) before admission. Patients with higher KDIGO grades also took more preadmission CV medications (P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients who used 1 or more CV medications before admission had increased risk of AKI at admission (1 drug: odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, P = 0.2; 2 drugs: OR = 4.74, P = 0.03; 3 or more drugs: OR = 5.92, P = 0.02), and that CV polypharmacy is associated with higher risk of AKI (OR 2.58; P = 0.02). Each additional CV medication increased the risk for AKI by 30%.We found that elderly patients taking more CV medications are associated with risk of adverse renal events. Further study to evaluate whether interventions that reduce polypharmacy could reduce the incidence of geriatric AKI is urgently needed. PMID:26252287

  8. Predictors of medication errors among elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Picone, Debra Matsen; Titler, Marita G; Dochterman, Joanne; Shever, Leah; Kim, Taikyoung; Abramowitz, Paul; Kanak, Mary; Qin, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors are a serious safety concern and most errors are preventable. A retrospective study design was employed to describe medication errors experienced during 10187 hospitalizations of elderly patients admitted to a Midwest teaching hospital between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001 and to determine the factors predictive of medication errors. The model considered patient characteristics, clinical conditions, interventions, and nursing unit characteristics. The dependent variable, medication error, was measured using a voluntary incident reporting system. There were 861 medication errors; 96% may have been preventable. Most errors were omissions errors (48.8%) and the source was administration (54%) or transcription errors (38%). Variables associated with a medication error included unique number of medications (polypharmacy), patient gender and race, RN staffing changes, medical and nursing interventions, and specific pharmacological agents. Further validation of this explanatory model and focused interventions may help decrease the incidence of medication errors. PMID:18305099

  9. [Strategies for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Huang, Zhiping; Xu, Dong; Gong, Wenjie; Tang, Yuan; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2016-02-01

    Long-term therapy should be administrated for patients with schizophrenia and the medication adherence is very important for the prognosis and outcome in these patients. In this study, we screened the literatures from various databases in accordance with our search criteria. A total of 11 literatures with the results of reliability and validity regarding the measurement of schizophrenia medication adherence were enrolled in our analysis. Based on the measurements, they were classified into subjective methods and objective ones. The objective methods include blood plasma and urine concentrations, pharmacy records, pill counts and Medication Event Monitoring System. The subjective methods include Drug Attitude Inventory, Rating of Medication Influences Scale, Brief Evaluation of Medication Influences and Beliefs, the Brief Adherence Rating Scale, Medication Adherence Rating Scale, and Morisky scales. In general, single method for measuring medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia is limited. We recommend researchers to use 2 or more methods when measuring the medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26932222

  10. The Effects of Preexisting Medical Comorbidities on Mortality and Length of Hospital Stay in Acute Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, Brett D.; Singh, Vijay A.; Halonen, Jill; Diallo, Alfa; Milner, Stephen M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether and to what extent preexisting medical comorbidities influence mortality risk and length of hospitalization in patients with acute burn injury. Summary Background Data: The effects on mortality and length of stay of a number of important medical comorbidities have not been examined in acute burn injury. Existing studies that have investigated the effects of medical comorbidities on outcomes in acute burn injury have produced inconsistent results, chiefly due to the use of relatively small samples from single burn centers. Methods: Records of 31,338 adults who were admitted with acute burn injury to 70 burn centers from the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, were reviewed. A burn-specific list of medical comorbidities was derived from diagnoses included in the Charlson Index of Comorbidities and the Elixhauser method of comorbidity measurement. Logistic regression was used to assess the effects of preexisting medical conditions on mortality, controlling for demographic and burn injury characteristics. Ordinal least squares regression with a logarithmic transformation of the dependent variable was used to assess the relationship of comorbidities with length of stay. Results: In-hospital mortality was significantly predicted by HIV/AIDS (odds ratio [OR] = 10.2), renal disease (OR = 5.1), liver disease (OR = 4.8), metastatic cancer (OR = 4.6), pulmonary circulation disorders (OR = 2.9), congestive heart failure (OR = 2.4), obesity (OR = 2.1), non-metastatic malignancies (OR = 2.1), peripheral vascular disorders (OR = 1.8), alcohol abuse (OR = 1.8), neurological disorders (OR = 1.6), and cardiac arrhythmias (OR = 1.5). Increased length of hospital stay among survivors was significantly predicted by paralysis (90% increase), dementia (60%), peptic ulcer disease (53%), other neurological disorders (52%), HIV/AIDS (49%), renal disease (44%), a psychiatric diagnosis (42%), cerebrovascular disease (41%), cardiac arrhythmias

  11. Rosuvastatin Reduces Blood Viscosity in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Lae-Young; Jung, Jin-Mu; Kim, Yi-Shik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Chae, Jei-Keon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Dal-Sik; Kim, Won-Ho; Ko, Jae-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Wall shear stress contributes to atherosclerosis progression and plaque rupture. There are limited studies for statin as a major contributing factor on whole blood viscosity (WBV) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study investigates the effect of statin on WBV in ACS patients. Subjects and Methods We prospectively enrolled 189 consecutive patients (mean age, 61.3±10.9 years; 132 males; ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, n=52; non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, n=84; unstable angina n=53). Patients were divided into two groups (group I: previous use of statins for at least 3 months, n=51; group II: statin-naïve patients, n=138). Blood viscosities at shear rates of 1 s-1 (diastolic blood viscosity; DBV) and 300 s-1 (systolic blood viscosity; SBV) were measured at baseline and one month after statin treatment. Rosuvastatin was administered to patients after enrollment (mean daily dose, 16.2±4.9 mg). Results Baseline WBV was significantly higher in group II ([SBV: group I vs group II, 40.8±5.9 mP vs. 44.2±7.4 mP, p=0.003], [DBV: 262.2±67.8 mP vs. 296.9±76.0 mP, p=0.002]). WBV in group II was significantly lower one month after statin treatment ([SBV: 42.0±4.7 mP, p=0.012, DBV: 281.4±52.6 mP, p=0.044]). However, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was not associated with WBV in both baseline (SBV: R2=0.074, p=0.326; DBV: R2=0.073, p=0.337) and after one month follow up (SBV: R2=0.104, p=0.265; DBV: R2=0.112, p=0.232). Conclusion Previous statin medication is an important determinant in lowering WBV in patients with ACS. However, one month of rosuvastatin decreased WBV in statin-naïve ACS patients. PMID:27014344

  12. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tujios, Shannan R.; Hynan, Linda S.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Larson, Anne M.; Seremba, Emmanuel; Sanders, Corron M.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) frequently develop renal dysfunction, yet its overall incidence and outcomes have not been fully assessed. We investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients with ALF, using defined criteria to identify risk factors and to evaluate its effect on overall outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of data from 1604 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, from 1998 through 2010. Patients were classified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, as well as for etiology of liver failure (acetaminophen-based, ischemic, and all others). RESULTS Seventy percent of patients with ALF developed AKI, and 30% received renal replacement therapy (RRT). Patients with severe AKI had higher international normalized ratio values than those without renal dysfunction (P < .001), and a higher proportion had advanced-grade coma (coma grades 3 or 4; P < .001) or presented with hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy (P < .001). A greater proportion of patients with acetaminophen-induced ALF had severe kidney injury than of patients with other etiologies of ALF; 34% required RRT, compared with 25% of patients with ALF not associated with acetaminophen or ischemia (P < .002). Of the patients with ALF who were alive at 3 weeks after study entry, significantly fewer with AKI survived for 1 year. Although AKI reduced the overall survival time, more than 50% of patients with acetaminophen-associated or ischemic ALF survived without liver transplantation (even with RRT), compared with 19% of patients with ALF attribute to other causes (P < .001). Only 4% of patients requiring RRT became dependent on dialysis. CONCLUSIONS Based on a retrospective analysis of data from more than 1600 patients, AKI is common in patients with ALF and affects short- and long-term outcomes, but rarely results in chronic kidney disease. Acetaminophen-induced kidney injury is frequent, but patients have

  13. Use of emergency medical services in the second gulf registry of acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    AlHabib, Khalid F; Alfaleh, Hussam; Hersi, Ahmad; Kashour, Tarek; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Saif, Shukri Al; Almahmeed, Wael; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Thalib, Lukman

    2014-09-01

    Data are scarce regarding emergency medical service (EMS) usage by patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Arabian Gulf region. This 9-month in-hospital prospective ACS registry was conducted in Arabian Gulf countries, with 30-day and 1-year follow-up mortality rates. Of 5184 patients with ACS, 1293 (25%) arrived at the hospital by EMS. The EMS group (vs non-EMS) was more likely to be male, have cardiac arrest on presentation, be current or exsmokers, and have moderate or severe left ventricular dysfunction and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The EMS group had higher crude mortality rates during hospitalization and after hospital discharge but not after adjustment for clinical factors and treatments. The EMSs are underused in the Arabian Gulf region. Short- and long-term mortality rates in patients with ACS are similar between those who used and did not use EMS. Quality improvement in the EMS infrastructure and establishment of integrated STEMI networks are urgently needed. PMID:24019088

  14. Effect of patients' age on management of acute intracranial haematoma: prospective national study

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Philip T; Smith, Rik D; Parke, Timothy R J

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the management of head injuries differs between patients aged ⩾65 years and those <65. Design Prospective observational national study over four years. Setting 25 Scottish hospitals that admit trauma patients. Participants 527 trauma patients with extradural or acute subdural haematomas. Main outcome measures Time to cranial computed tomography in the first hospital attended, rates of transfer to neurosurgical care, rates of neurosurgical intervention, length of time to operation, and mortality in inpatients in the three months after admission. Results Patients aged ⩾65 years had lower survival rates than patients <65 years. Rates were 15/18 (83%) v 165/167 (99%) for extradural haematoma (P=0.007) and 61/93 (66%) v 229/249 (92%) for acute subdural haematoma (P<0.001). Older patients were less likely to be transferred to specialist neurosurgical care (10 (56%) v 142 (85%) for extradural haematoma (P=0.005) and 56 (60%) v 192 (77%) for subdural haematoma (P=0.004)). There was no significant difference between age groups in the incidence of neurosurgical interventions in patients who were transferred. Logistic regression analysis showed that age had a significant independent effect on transfer and on survival. Older patients had higher rates of coexisting medical conditions than younger patients, but when severity of injury, initial physiological status at presentation, or previous health were controlled for in a log linear analysis, transfer rates were still lower in older patients than in younger patients (P<0.001). Conclusions Compared with those aged under 65 years, people aged 65 and over have a worse prognosis after head injury complicated by intracranial haematoma. The decision to transfer such patients to neurosurgical care seems to be biased against older patients. What is already known on this topicOlder patients with acute intracranial haematomas have significantly higher mortality and poorer functional outcome than

  15. The Environmental Context of Patient Safety and Medical Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholey, Douglas; Moscovice, Ira; Hietpas, Terry; Holtzman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    The environmental context of patient safety and medical errors was explored with specific interest in rural settings. Special attention was paid to unique features of rural health care organizations and their environment that relate to the patient safety issue and medical errors (including the distribution of patients, types of adverse events…

  16. Medical Student Attitudes toward Geriatric Medicine and Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrotta, Peter; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The influence of factual knowledge about the aged, general attitudes toward the aged, and personal contact with the aged on first-year medical students' attitudes toward geriatric patients and geriatric medicine was examined. Entering medical students indicated a preference for working with younger patients rather than aged patients. (Author/MLW)

  17. [Patients' rights act. Consequences for medical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ulsenheimer, K

    2014-02-01

    With the justification that the treatment and medical liability act suffers from a lack of transparency and reliability due to being characterized by many isolated decisions, in 2013 this was made into statute law in the form of the patients rights act in the German Civil Code (BGB). It was considered that "currently existing comprehensive rights of patients" would be strengthened through clarity and "legal transparency" and that the practical "implementation" would be improved. That this target will be achieved with these new statutory provisions is doubtful. Instead of more clarity, transparency and legal security, there now exists substantial need for interpretation of many aspects which will keep courts and lawyers occupied for many years. Furthermore, this has given rise to more bureaucratization of medicine with the compulsion to fulfil new formalities in clinics and doctors' offices. In this article the most important regulations for physicians will be presented and explained. Due to limited space and with due respect to the readership a subtle legal analysis of the regulations will be dispensed with. PMID:24499957

  18. [Sequential changes in acute phase reactant proteins and complement activation in patients with acute head injuries].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Matsuura, H; Nakazawa, S

    1987-12-01

    The role of immunological mechanisms in head injury is not clearly defined. In this study we investigated the immunological function in patients with acute head injuries. Serum acute phase reactant proteins (APRP), complement activation and immunoglobulines as immunological parameters were studied. APRP are produced in the liver and increase in cancer patients as well as those with acute and chronic inflammations, trauma and autoimmune diseases. APRP are known to be one of the immunosuppressive factors in the serum. Forty patients with acute head injuries were studied. Thirty-four patients were male and six patients were female, ages ranged from 12 to 81 years. Serial blood samples were obtained during the first seven days of trauma. The Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) were recorded at the time of admission for all patients. Clinical outcome was assessed at the time of discharge according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale. The "good" group consisted of patients with good recovery or moderate disability. The "bad" group consisted of patients with severe disability, persistent vegetative state and death. The concentrations of immunoglobulines (IgG, IgM, IgA) were within normal range and humoral immunity was not affected. Complement activation at the time of admission was closely related to GCS (p less than 0.01), but the levels of C4, C3, and C3 activator except for these of CH50 were within normal range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2451531

  19. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in medically ill patients: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Turpie, Alexander G G; Leizorovicz, Alain

    2006-01-01

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalised medically ill patients is often underestimated, despite the fact that it remains a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in this group. It is not well recognised that the risk of VTE in many hospitalised medically ill patients is at least as high as in populations after surgery. This may partly be attributed to the clinically silent nature of VTE in many patients, and the difficulty in predicting which patients might develop symptoms or fatal pulmonary embolism. Two large studies, Prospective Evaluation of Dalteparin Efficacy for Prevention of VTE in Immobilized Patients Trial and prophylaxis in MEDical patients with ENOXaparin, have shown that low‐molecular‐weight heparins provide effective thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients, without increasing bleeding risk. Recent guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians recommend that acutely medically ill patients admitted with congestive heart failure or severe respiratory disease, or those who are confined to bed and have at least one additional risk factor for VTE, should receive thromboprophylaxis. PMID:17148703

  1. Acute visual loss in a patient with optic disc drusen.

    PubMed

    Tan, Deborah Kl; Tow, Sharon Lc

    2013-01-01

    Here we report a case of sudden, unilateral, painless visual loss in a middle-aged patient. A 45-year-old gentleman with no known past medical history presented with acute painless left visual impairment. Clinically, he was found to have a left optic neuropathy associated with a swollen and hyperemic left optic disc. The right optic disc was noted to be small and crowded, and both optic discs were noted to have irregular margins. Humphrey perimetry revealed a constricted visual field in the left eye. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed autofluorescence, and B-scan ultrasonography showed hyperreflectivity within both nerve heads. Blood investigations for underlying ischemic and inflammatory markers revealed evidence of hyperlipidemia but were otherwise normal. A diagnosis of left nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAAION) was made, with associated optic disc drusen and hyperlipidemia. NAAION typically occurs in eyes with small, structurally crowded optic discs. The coexistence of optic disc drusen and vascular risk factors may further augment the risk of developing NAAION. PMID:23658477

  2. [The organizational technologies of quality support of emergency and acute medical care in megalopolis: Moscow case].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the issues of emergency medical care in conditions of megalopolis on the example of the Moscow A.S. Putchkov emergency and acute medical care station. The analysis is applied to such new organizational technologies as the automatic navigational dispatcher system of field brigades 'management, the zoning of transport mains according accessibility of emergency medical are stations, the organization of emergency medical posts on the most conducive to accident areas of megalopolis, the integrated municipal inter-warning system in case of road accidents. PMID:22279806

  3. [Equilibrium function in patients with acute sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Pal'chun, V T; Ganichkina, I Ia; Luchikhin, L A; Derevianko, S N

    2002-01-01

    Equilibrium function was investigated with computer-assisted stabilography (CS) in patients with acute neurosensory hypoacusis. This new diagnostic tool was employed in combination with extended vestibulometric and audiologic examinations. Correlations were found between stabilographic and vestibulometric findings. CS is recommended as a method of screening diagnosis in examination of patients with imbalanced equilibrium. PMID:12227024

  4. Acute ethanol intoxication and the trauma patient: hemodynamic pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John; McCray, Victor; Davis, James; Jackson, Lascienya; Danos, Leigh Ann

    2011-09-01

    Many trauma patients are acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Animal studies have demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication inhibits the normal release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasopressin in response to acute hemorrhage. Ethanol also increases nitric oxide release and inhibits antidiuretic hormone secretion. This article studies the effects of alcohol intoxication (measured by blood alcohol level, BAL) on the presentation and resuscitation of trauma patients with blunt hepatic injuries. A retrospective registry and chart review was conducted of all patients who presented with blunt liver injuries at an ACS-verified, level I trauma center. Data collected included admission BAL, systolic blood pressure, hematocrit, International Normalized Ratio (INR), liver injury grade, Injury Severity Score (ISS), intravenous fluid and blood product requirements, base deficit, and mortality. From September 2002 to May 2008, 723 patients were admitted with blunt hepatic injuries. Admission BAL was obtained in 569 patients, with 149 having levels >0.08%. Intoxicated patients were more likely to be hypotensive on admission (p = 0.01) despite a lower liver injury grade and no significant difference in ISS. There was no significant difference in the percent of intoxicated patients requiring blood transfusion. However, when blood was given, intoxicated patients required significantly more units of packed red blood cells (PRBC) than their nonintoxicated counterparts (p = 0.01). Intoxicated patients also required more intravenous fluid during their resuscitation (p = 0.002). Alcohol intoxication may impair the ability of blunt trauma patients to compensate for acute blood loss, making them more likely to be hypotensive on admission and increasing their PRBC and intravenous fluid requirements. All trauma patients should have BAL drawn upon admission and their resuscitation should be performed with an understanding of the physiologic alterations associated with acute alcohol

  5. Translating Research into Practice Intervention Improves Management of Acute Pain in Older Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Titler, Marita G; Herr, Keela; Brooks, John M; Xie, Xian-Jin; Ardery, Gail; Schilling, Margo L; Marsh, J Lawrence; Everett, Linda Q; Clarke, William R

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention to (a) promote adoption, by physicians and nurses, of evidence-based (EB) acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults, (b) decrease barriers to use of EB acute pain management practices, and (c) decrease pain intensity of older hospitalized adults. Study Design Experimental design with the hospital as the unit of randomization. Study Setting Twelve acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Data Sources (a) Medical records (MRs) of patients ≥65 years or older with a hip fracture admitted before and following implementation of the TRIP intervention and (b) physicians and nurses who care for those patients. Data Collection Data were abstracted from MRs and questions distributed to nurses and physicians. Principal Findings The Summative Index for Quality of Acute Pain Care (0–18 scale) was significantly higher for the experimental (10.1) than comparison group (8.4) at the end of the TRIP implementation phase. At the end of the TRIP implementation phase, patients in the experimental group had a lower mean pain intensity rating than those in the comparison group (p<.0001). Conclusion The TRIP intervention improved quality of acute pain management of older adults hospitalized with a hip fracture. PMID:19146568

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  7. Nonantithrombotic medical options in acute coronary syndromes: old agents and new lines on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Soukoulis, Victor; Boden, William E; Smith, Sidney C; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-06-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) constitute a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to ST-segment myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia in this context occurs as a result of an abrupt decrease in coronary blood flow and resultant imbalance in the myocardial oxygen supply-demand relationship. Coronary blood flow is further compromised by other mechanisms that increase coronary vascular resistance or reduce coronary driving pressure. The goals of treatment are to decrease myocardial oxygen demand, increase coronary blood flow and oxygen supply, and limit myocardial injury. Treatments are generally divided into disease-modifying agents or interventions that improve hard clinical outcomes and other strategies that can reduce ischemia. In addition to traditional drugs such as β-blockers and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, newer agents have expanded the number of molecular pathways targeted for treatment of ACS. Ranolazine, trimetazidine, nicorandil, and ivabradine are medications that have been shown to reduce myocardial ischemia through diverse mechanisms and have been tested in limited fashion in patients with ACS. Attenuating the no-reflow phenomenon and reducing the injury compounded by acute reperfusion after a period of coronary occlusion are active areas of research. Additionally, interventions aimed at ischemic pre- and postconditioning may be useful means by which to limit myocardial infarct size. Trials are also underway to examine altered metabolic and oxygen-related pathways in ACS. This review will discuss traditional and newer anti-ischemic therapies for patients with ACS, exclusive of revascularization, antithrombotic agents, and the use of high-intensity statins. PMID:24902977

  8. Improving Medical Education: Improving Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugsley, Lesley; McCrorie, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Is medical education unique among all other educational disciplines? Why does it not seem to conform to the rules laid down by universities for every other faculty? We explore the ways in which particular elements pertaining to medical education have been perceived historically and consider the ways in which medical educators and students have…

  9. Acute Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Coadministration of Levofloxacin and Simvastatin in a Patient with Normal Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Paparoupa, Maria; Pietrzak, Sebastian; Gillissen, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of severe acute rhabdomyolysis in association with coadministration of levofloxacin and simvastatin in a patient with normal renal function. A 70-year-old Caucasian male was treated due to community acquired pneumonia with levofloxacin in a dosage of 500 mg once and then twice a day. On the 8th day of hospitalization the patient presented with acute severe rhabdomyolysis requiring an intensive care support. After discontinuation of levofloxacin and concomitant medication with simvastatin 80 mg/day, clinical and laboratory effects were totally reversible. Up to now, levofloxacin has been reported to induce rhabdomyolysis mainly in patients with impaired renal function, as the medication has a predominant renal elimination. In our case renal function remained normal during the severe clinical course. According to a recent case report rhabdomyolysis was observed due to interaction of simvastatin and ciprofloxacin. To our best knowledge this is the first case of interaction between simvastatin and levofloxacin to be reported. This case emphasizes the need of close monitoring of creatine kinase in patients under more than one potentially myotoxic medication especially when patients develop muscle weakness. PMID:25140181

  10. Etiology and Outcome of Acute Intestinal Obstruction: A Review of 367 Patients in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Souvik, Adhikari; Zahid Hossein, Mohammed; Amitabha, Das; Nilanjan, Mitra; Udipta, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: The etiology of acute intestinal obstruction, which is one of the commonest surgical emergencies, varies between countries and has also changed over the decades. We aimed to provide a complete epidemiological description of acute intestinal obstruction in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern India. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients admitted in our unit with a diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction between the years 2005 and 2008 at Medical College, Calcutta. The study comprised of 367 patients. Results: Acute intestinal obstruction was the diagnosis in 9.87% of all patients admitted with males (75.20%) grossly outnumbering females. The commonest age group affected was 20-60 years. In our patients, the main cause of obstruction was obstructed hernia followed by malignancy with adhesions coming third. Intestinal tuberculosis was an important cause for obstruction in our patients comprising 14.17% of patients. Conservative management was advocated in 79 patients while the rest underwent surgery. Postoperative complications occurred in 95 patients and of these, 38 patients had a single complication and the rest, more than 1. The main complications were wound infection, basal atelectasis, burst abdomen and prolonged ileus. The mortality rate was 7.35% (27 patients). The highest mortality occurred in those with intestinal tuberculosis. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the pattern of intestinal obstruction differs from the Western world with obstructed hernias being the most important cause and also emphasizes the fact that intestinal tuberculosis assumes a prominent role. It also highlights the necessity of using universal precautions because of the ever increasing number of HIV patients in those with intestinal obstruction. PMID:20871195

  11. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-03-01

    The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively.We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis.Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age <18, a (CCI) <2, medical center admission, and a longer time to recurrence were correlated with using laparoscopy to treat recurrence. Neither type of appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach.In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity. PMID:27015200

  12. Early start renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury-Universal panacea or another case of over medicalization?

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Despite advances in medical practice and renal replacement therapy, the mortality of patients who develop acute kidney injury remains high. In the field of cardiology, the management of myocardial infarction has evolved from one of conservative bed rest to primary coronary intervention. As renal replacement therapy is now generally available, the question arises whether earlier intervention could lead to improved patient outcomes. The evidence to date is primarily centered on retrospective observational reports, with the majority reporting increased patient survival for earlier intervention. However, these reports are typically based on small numbers of patients and differ in the etiology of acute kidney injury, patient comorbidity, and definitions of what constitutes "early" start. To date, there is less than a handful of prospective randomized studies published in the modern era. Again these are small studies, with differing patient populations, and definitions of "early" start, but generally do not show any significant advantage for an "early" start approach. As such until adequately powered prospective trial data become available, the decision to initiate renal replacement therapy should be made by the traditional review of patient history, repeated clinical assessments, and trends in biochemical data. PMID:26448386

  13. [Concept analysis of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-Ying; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy plays an important role in the management of chronic diseases. However, many patients with chronic disease do not adhere to their medication regimen. This results in worsening symptoms and frequent re-hospitalizations. As a result, healthcare providers may view these patients as bad. Medication adherence is a complex concept. Analyzing this concept may assist nurses to improve patient-centered care. This paper uses Walker & Avant's method to conduct a concept analysis of medication adherence. Results show the defining attributes of medication adherence as: (1) knowing and agreeing to the medication; (2) communicating and negotiating the regimen; and (3) active, continuous involvement in and appraisal of the treatment effect. Identified antecedents of medication adherence included the patient having: (1) a prescribed medication regimen; (2) cognitive and action abilities in her / his role as a patient; and (3) level of preparation for medication treatment. Identified consequences of medication adherence include: (1) improving symptom control; (2) decreasing re-hospitalizations and mortality; (3) reducing medical care costs; (4) restoring self-esteem; and (5) diminishing depression. It is hoped that this concept analysis provides a reference for nurses to achieve a better understanding of medication adherence and further improve nursing practice. PMID:24899565

  14. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-I; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Ya-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Acute hyperglycemia is a frequent finding in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients with AMI remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed patients' medical records to obtain demographic data, clinical presentation, major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), several clinical scores and laboratory data, including the plasma glucose level at initial presentation and HbA1c levels. The glycemic gap, which represents changes in serum glucose levels during the index event, was calculated from the glucose level upon ED admission minus the HbA1c-derived average glucose (ADAG). We enrolled 331 patients after the review of medical records. An elevated glycemic gap between admission serum glucose levels and ADAG were associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients. The glycemic gap showed superior discriminative power regarding the development of MACEs when compared with the admission glucose level. The calculation of the glycemic gap may increase the discriminative powers of established clinical scoring systems in diabetic patients presenting to the ED with AMI. In conclusion, the glycemic gap could be used as an adjunct parameter to assess the severity and prognosis of diabetic patients presenting with AMI. However, the usefulness of the glycemic gap should be further explored in prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27291987

  15. Quick identification of acute chest pain patients study (QICS)

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Hendrik M; de Jong, Gonda; Tio, René A; Nieuwland, Wybe; Kema, Ido P; van der Horst, Iwan CC; Oudkerk, Mattijs; Zijlstra, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with acute chest pain are often referred to the emergency ward and extensively investigated. Investigations are costly and could induce unnecessary complications, especially with invasive diagnostics. Nevertheless, chest pain patients have high mortalities. Fast identification of high-risk patients is crucial. Therefore several strategies have been developed including specific symptoms, signs, laboratory measurements, and imaging. Methods/Design The Quick Identification of acute Chest pain Study (QICS) will investigate whether a combined use of specific symptoms and signs, electrocardiography, routine and new laboratory measures, adjunctive imaging including electron beam (EBT) computed tomography (CT) and contrast multislice CT (MSCT) will have a high diagnostic yield for patients with acute chest pain. All patients will be investigated according a standardized protocol in the Emergency Department. Serum and plasma will be frozen for future analysis for a wide range of biomarkers at a later time point. The primary endpoint is the safe recognition of low-risk chest pain patients directly at presentation. Secondary endpoint is the identification of a wide range of sensitive predictive clinical markers, chemical biomarkers and radiological markers in acute chest pain patients. Chemical biomarkers will be compared to quantitative CT measurements of coronary atherosclerosis as a surrogate endpoint. Chemical biomarkers will also be compared in head to head comparison and for their additional value. Discussion This will be a very extensive investigation of a wide range of risk predictors in acute chest pain patients. New reliable fast and cheap diagnostic algorithm resulting from the test results might improve chest pain patients' prognosis, and reduce unnecessary costs and diagnostic complications. PMID:19527487

  16. What do patients want from acute migraine treatment?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rm

    2004-01-01

    Clinical observations have shown that migraine is a progressive disorder, both within an acute attack, and within the disease itself. Rates of diagnosis for migraine have increased in the last decade, but more than half of migraineurs remain undiagnosed. Patient expectations of migraine therapies have also increased (patients require rapid and sustained pain relief with a treatment that has good tolerability), and can differ greatly from those of physicians. Management decisions should be made with these expectations in mind, to enhance patient outcomes and compliance with treatment. Improved understanding of acute migraine attack pathophysiology has led to the strategy of early treatment to modify both the progression of the current attack and, potentially, the progression of the disease itself in the individual. The triptans are effective acute migraine therapies. Each agent has its own distinct profile of efficacy and tolerability, enabling individualization of treatment. PMID:15595989

  17. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a pediatric patient with acute intermittent porphyria: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Olutunmbi, Yetunde; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Galvez, Jorge A; Simpao, Allan F

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques placed under general anesthesia have not been reported in pediatric patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). A 9-year-old male with AIP presented for right inguinal herniorraphy. Family history included one relative's death after anesthesia. Preoperative preparation included reviewing medications safe for AIP patients, minimizing known AIP triggers (fasting, stress) and ensuring access to rescue medications. Intraoperative management included a propofol induction with the patient's mother present in the operating room. We performed an ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block under general anesthesia. The surgery proceeded without complications and the patient did not demonstrate signs of an AIP crisis. PMID:25137868

  18. Capgras-like syndrome in a patient with an acute urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Salviati, Massimo; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Macrì, Francesco; Fojanesi, Marta; Minichino, Amedeo; Gallo, Mariana; De Michele, Francesco; Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Biondi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of delusional phenomena in which patients misidentify familiar persons, objects, or themselves, believing that they have been replaced or transformed. In 25%–40% of cases, misidentification syndromes have been reported in association with organic illness. We report an acute episode of Capgras-like delusion lasting 8 days, focused on the idea that people were robots with human bodies, in association with an acute urinary infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report associating urinary tract infection with Capgras-like syndrome. Awareness of the prevalence of delusional misidentification syndromes associated with acute medical illness should promote diligence on the part of clinicians in recognizing this disorder. PMID:23355784

  19. Sleep Disturbances in Acutely Ill Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Tanner, J Mark; Dumont, Natalie A

    2016-06-01

    Intensive care units may place acutely ill patients with cancer at additional risk for sleep loss and associated negative effects. Research suggests that communication about sleep in patients with cancer is suboptimal and sleep problems are not regularly assessed or adequately treated throughout the cancer trajectory. However, many sleep problems and fatigue can be managed effectively. This article synthesizes the current literature regarding the prevalence, cause, and risk factors that contribute to sleep disturbance in the context of acute cancer care. It describes the consequences of poor sleep and discusses appropriate assessment and treatment options. PMID:27215362

  20. How can we keep patients with dementia safe in our acute hospitals? A review of challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    George, Jim; Long, Susannah; Vincent, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining patient safety in acute hospitals is a global health challenge. Traditionally, patient safety measures have been concentrated on critical care and surgical patients. In this review the medical literature was reviewed over the last ten years on aspects of patient safety specifically related to patients with dementia. Patients with dementia do badly in hospital with frequent adverse events resulting in the geriatric syndromes of falls, delirium and loss of function with increased length of stay and increased mortality. Contributory factors include inadequate assessment and treatment, inappropriate intervention, discrimination, low staff levels and lack of staff training. Unfortunately there is no one simple solution to this problem, but what is needed is a multifactorial, multilevel approach at the seven levels of care – patient, task, staff, team, environment, organisation and institution. Improving safety and quality of care for patients with dementia in acute hospitals will benefit all patients and is an urgent priority for the NHS. PMID:23759885

  1. Blood pressure control. Improving medication compliance among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Krevolin, Larry; Ilagan, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Medication compliance among individuals with hypertension symbolizes a growing concern within the medical community. It is said that roughly 50% of hypertensive patients in the United States do not comply with their medication regimen. Uncontrolled hypertension in turn can lead to kidney failure and other complications. Because compliance to medication regimens is complex and difficult to ascertain, solutions to this problem must be multifactorial. PMID:26454916

  2. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. PMID:20135072

  3. Effectively implementing FDA medication alerts utilizing patient centered medical home clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Barbara J; Diez, Heidi L; Bostwick, Jolene R; Kales, Helen C; Zivin, Kara; Dalack, Gregory W; Fluent, Tom E; Standiford, Connie J; Stano, Claire; Mi Choe, Hae

    2016-03-01

    FDA medication alerts can be successfully implemented within patient centered medical home (PCMH) clinics utilizing clinical pharmacists. Targeted selection of high-risk patients from an electronic database allows PCMH pharmacists to prioritize assessments. Trusting relationships between PCMH clinical pharmacists and primary care providers facilitates high response rates to pharmacist recommendations. This health system approach led by PCMH pharmacists provides a framework for proactive responses to FDA safety alerts and medication related quality measure improvement. PMID:27001101

  4. Lactate and lactate clearance in acute cardiac care patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Picariello, Claudio; Dini, Carlotta Sorini; Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlactataemia is commonly used as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in intensive care settings. Recent studies documented that serial lactate measurements over time (or lactate clearance), may be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value for risk stratification in different pathological conditions. While the negative prognostic role of hyperlactataemia in several critical ill diseases (such as sepsis and trauma) is well established, data in patients with acute cardiac conditions (i.e. acute coronary syndromes) are scarce and controversial. The present paper provides an overview of the current available evidence on the clinical role of lactic acid levels and lactate clearance in acute cardiac settings (acute coronary syndromes, cardiogenic shock, cardiac surgery), focusing on its prognostic role. PMID:24062898

  5. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  6. Ontology-Driven Monitoring of Patient's Vital Signs Enabling Personalized Medical Detection and Alert

    PubMed Central

    Hristoskova, Anna; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Zacharioudakis, Giorgos; Tsiknakis, Manolis; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge related to caring for patients with chronic conditions is the early detection of exacerbations of the disease. Medical personnel should be contacted immediately in order to intervene in time before an acute state is reached, ensuring patient safety. This paper proposes an approach to an ambient intelligence (AmI) framework supporting real-time remote monitoring of patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF). Its novelty is the integration of: (i) personalized monitoring of the patients health status and risk stage; (ii) intelligent alerting of the dedicated physician through the construction of medical workflows on-the-fly; and (iii) dynamic adaptation of the vital signs’ monitoring environment on any available device or smart phone located in close proximity to the physician depending on new medical measurements, additional disease specifications or the failure of the infrastructure. The intelligence lies in the adoption of semantics providing for a personalized and automated emergency alerting that smoothly interacts with the physician, regardless of his location, ensuring timely intervention during an emergency. It is evaluated on a medical emergency scenario, where in the case of exceeded patient thresholds, medical personnel are localized and contacted, presenting ad hoc information on the patient's condition on the most suited device within the physician's reach. PMID:24445411

  7. Do medical patients need to receive pharmacologic prophylaxis for the prevention of venous thromboembolism?

    PubMed

    Ageno, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with reduced mobility are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which can occur during hospitalization or after discharge. A number of clinical trials and meta-analyses have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis with anticoagulant drugs in these patients significantly reduces the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism as compared to placebo or no treatment, without significant increase in the risk of major bleeding. Thus, the use of anticoagulant prophylaxis is recommended for all high risk medical patients during hospitalization. To identify these high risk patients, clinicians may use the inclusion criteria applied in the trials, with a selection that is mostly qualitative, or risk assessment models, with a selection that is both qualitative and quantitative. With both approaches, about 40 % of medical patients would be at increased risk of venous thrombosis. Because in the real world medical patients tend to be much older and with more comorbidities than in clinical trials, patient selection needs to also take into account risk factors for bleeding. Among others, estimation of creatinine clearance appears to be particularly important to prevent excessive exposure to anticoagulant drugs. Finally, although the risk of venous thrombosis may persist in some patients after hospital discharge, clinical trials assessing extended prophylaxis in this setting have failed to show a convincing clinical benefit with this approach. PMID:23073856

  8. Prescribing new medications: A taxonomy of physician–patient communication

    PubMed Central

    TARN, DERJUNG M.; HERITAGE, JOHN; PATERNITI, DEBORA A.; HAYS, RON D.; KRAVITZ, RICHARD L.; WENGER, NEIL S.

    2009-01-01

    Physician-patient communication about new medications can influence patient medication adherence. Little is known about the detailed content of conversations about new medications, or about how physicians and patients word information when discussing new medications. Yet nuances in communication may influence patient comprehension and affect behaviour. A comprehensive coding framework delineating the intricacies of physician-patient discussions is needed to better understand the range of communication about new prescriptions. This study used analytic induction to analyse 185 audiotaped outpatient encounters, during which 243 new medications were prescribed by family physicians, internists and cardiologists in two healthcare settings. Seventy-six codes were developed to demonstrate the range of physician counselling about information concerning new prescriptions, such as medication name, purpose, directions for use, side effects, acquisition and monitoring. The conversational content represented by the codes can be used to understand the breadth of conversations regarding new medications, identify sources of potential patient misunderstandings when medication instructions are conveyed, and inform recommendations for desired communication content. The coding system also can be used to measure the quality of new medication discussions for linkage to outcomes and can inform interventions to improve communication when prescribing new drugs. PMID:19644569

  9. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wen-I; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Ya-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Acute hyperglycemia is a frequent finding in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients with AMI remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ medical records to obtain demographic data, clinical presentation, major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), several clinical scores and laboratory data, including the plasma glucose level at initial presentation and HbA1c levels. The glycemic gap, which represents changes in serum glucose levels during the index event, was calculated from the glucose level upon ED admission minus the HbA1c-derived average glucose (ADAG). We enrolled 331 patients after the review of medical records. An elevated glycemic gap between admission serum glucose levels and ADAG were associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients. The glycemic gap showed superior discriminative power regarding the development of MACEs when compared with the admission glucose level. The calculation of the glycemic gap may increase the discriminative powers of established clinical scoring systems in diabetic patients presenting to the ED with AMI. In conclusion, the glycemic gap could be used as an adjunct parameter to assess the severity and prognosis of diabetic patients presenting with AMI. However, the usefulness of the glycemic gap should be further explored in prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27291987

  10. How do terminally ill patients at home take their medication?

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G

    1999-11-01

    Compliance with prescribed medication was assessed in 111 terminally ill patients referred to a community palliative care team using semistructured interviews and pill counting. One-hundred-and-six patients were prescribed a total of 597 drugs; of these patients, 64 (60%) were noncompliant. Thirty-five patients (33%) took less medication than prescribed, usually due to experiencing, or anxieties about, adverse events; the commonest drugs involved were analgesics. Seventeen patients (16%) took additional medication, usually purchased over the counter in response to inadequate symptom control or to adverse events from other drugs; the most common preparations were vitamins and analgesics. Twelve patients (11%) both took less medication than prescribed and also purchased medication over the counter. Most patients (90%) had two or more prescribers; patients who saw their general practitioners as their main prescriber were more likely to adhere to their prescribed medication. Patients who omitted and/or reduced their medication were more likely to see the hospital as their main prescriber. Drugs prescribed four times daily were most likely to be omitted and/or reduced. PMID:10715753

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  12. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Kenneth C.; Salami, Taofeek A.; Kpolugbo, James U.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission

  13. The Multidisciplinary Swallowing Team Approach Decreases Pneumonia Onset in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Shiro; Hirayama, Junko; Nakamori, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kubo, Satoshi; Nagano, Yuka; Nagao, Akiko; Yamane, Naoya; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Takamoto, Megumi; Ueno, Hiroki; Ochi, Kazuhide; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in acute stroke patients at high rates, and many of them develop aspiration pneumonia. Team approaches with the cooperation of various professionals have the power to improve the quality of medical care, utilizing the specialized knowledge and skills of each professional. In our hospital, a multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team was organized. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of a team approach on dysphagia by comparing the rates of pneumonia in acute stroke patients prior to and post team organization. All consecutive acute stroke patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2014 were registered. We analyzed the difference in the rate of pneumonia onset between the periods before team organization (prior period) and after team organization (post period). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the predictors of pneumonia. We recruited 132 acute stroke patients from the prior period and 173 patients from the post period. Pneumonia onset was less frequent in the post period compared with the prior period (6.9% vs. 15.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Based on a multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was determined that a swallowing team approach was related to pneumonia onset independent from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (adjusted hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.84, p = 0.02). The multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team effectively decreased the pneumonia onset in acute stroke patients. PMID:27138162

  14. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  15. Acute kidney injury from cherry concentrate in a patient with CKD.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Randy L

    2014-03-01

    Nutraceuticals are supplements and medical foods that offer numerous health benefits. However, these substances may have adverse effects on multiple organ systems, leading to significant morbidity. I present a patient with chronic kidney disease who experienced hemodynamically mediated acute kidney injury and hyperkalemia after daily consumption of cherry concentrate. The method of injury was most likely cyclooxygenase inhibition by the compounds in cherries that mimic the mechanism of action of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications. Ceasing cherry concentrate consumption led to improvements in both the patient's hyperkalemia and kidney injury. Physicians should be aware of the potentially harmful side effects of cherry concentrate and approach the use of cherry extract or concentrate with caution in patients with underlying kidney disease. PMID:24290246

  16. Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Hyoguchi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-10-01

    Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about medication. We used two questionnaires to compare the results from the deaf participants with those from the HH and hearing participants. We found that before the lecture, the deaf participants' understanding of medication use was lower than that of the HH and hearing participants. The deaf participants' knowledge increased after the lecture, but did not improve to the level exhibited by the HH participants. However, the deaf participants felt confident using medication despite their low comprehension levels. In conclusion, adjusting the medication information provided by pharmacists according to the recipient's reading level could help improve deaf patients' knowledge; however, such measures might not increase deaf patients' comprehension levels sufficiently. PMID:27262170

  17. Characteristics and clinical outcome of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ya-Li; Tian, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen-Ge; Cheng, Dan-Ying; Yang, Yan-Fang; Gao, Hong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinicopathological characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity among Chinese patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code for acute kidney injury (AKI) (584.5 or 584.9) and for acute liver injury (ALI) (570.0 or 573.3) from January 2004 to December 2013. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of AKI and ALI and to quantify NSAID administration. RESULTS: Seven of 59 patients (11.8%) were identified with acute hepato-nephrotoxicity induced by NSAIDs. Five patients (71.4%) received over the recommended NSAIDs dose. Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere AKI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), a high prevalence of alcohol use (71.4%) and positive hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers (85.7%). Compared with NSAIDs-associated mere ALI, the risk factors of NSAIDs-induced acute hepato-nephrotoxicity are age older than 60 years (57.1%), increased extracellular volume depletion (71.4%), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor combined use (57.1%). Acute interstitial nephritis and acute tubulointerstitial disease were apparent in three out of six (42.9%) kidney biopsy patients, respectively. Acute hepatitis was found in four out of six (66.7%) liver biopsy patients. Overall complete recovery occurred in four patients within a mean of 118.25 ± 55.42 d. CONCLUSION: The injury typically occurred after an overdose of NSAIDs. The risk factors include age older than 60 years, alcohol use, positive HBV markers, extracellular volume depletion and RAAS inhibitor combined use. PMID:25320533

  18. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  19. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective. PMID:26981295

  20. Psychiatric Symptoms and Acute Care Service Utilization over the Course of the Year Following Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Admission: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Hough, Catherine L.; Zatzick, Douglas; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if the presence of in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms, as well as substantial depressive or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms at 3-months post-intensive care unit (ICU), are associated with increased acute care service utilization over the course of the year following medical-surgical ICU admission. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Patients 150 patients ≥ 18 years old admitted to medical-surgical ICUs for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results Participants were interviewed in-hospital to ascertain substantial acute stress symptoms using the PTSD Checklist-civilian version (PCL-C). Substantial depressive and PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the PCL-C respectively at 3 months post-ICU. The number of rehospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits were ascertained at 3 and 12 months post-ICU using the Cornell Services Index. After adjusting for participant and clinical characteristics, in-hospital substantial acute stress symptoms were independently associated with greater risk of an additional hospitalization (Relative Risk [RR]: 3.00, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.80, 4.99) over the year post-ICU. Substantial PTSD symptoms at 3 months post-ICU were independently associated with greater risk of an additional ER visit during the subsequent 9 months (RR: 2.29, 95%CI: 1.09, 4.84) even after adjusting for both rehospitalizations and ER visits between the index hospitalization and 3 months post-ICU. Conclusions Post-ICU psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased acute care service utilization during the year after a medical-surgical ICU admission. Early interventions for at-risk ICU survivors may improve longer-term outcomes and reduce subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:25083985

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid proteome of patients with acute Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Warren, H. Shaw

    2012-01-01

    During acute Lyme disease, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of meningitis and other neurologic symptoms. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing a deep view into the proteome for patients diagnosed with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified differences in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. We identified 108 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease from controls. Comparison between infected patients and control subjects revealed differences in proteins in the CSF associated with cell death localized to brain synapses and others that likely originate from brain parenchyma. PMID:22900834

  2. The nocebo effect: patient expectations and medication side effects.

    PubMed

    Faasse, Kate; Petrie, Keith J

    2013-09-01

    Expectation of treatment side effects is consistently linked with those symptoms being realised. Patient expectations, including those generated by the informed consent process, can have a large influence on the side effects that patients feel after starting a new medical treatment. Such symptoms may be the result of the nocebo effect, whereby the expectation of side effects leads to them being experienced. Side effects may also be due to the misattribution of pre-existing or unrelated symptoms to the new medication. Medical professionals' own negative beliefs about a treatment, especially generic drugs, may further enhance patients' expectations of adverse effects. The news media may also influence expectations, particularly when media attention is directed towards a health or medication scare. This field of research has ethical and clinical implications for both medical professionals and the news media with respect to the level and type of information about treatment side effects that is provided to patients or members of the public. PMID:23842213

  3. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  4. The artful management of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jay; Schiffer, Charles A

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia in older patients has historically had a dismal 10-15% long-term survival rate. Although patient frailty plays a role in this disappointing outcome, the primary driver of poor results remains the resistance of disease to current therapies. The optimal management of this difficult-to-treat disease should include a careful consideration of disease, patient and treatment factors. Disease factors include cytogenetic and molecular features and the history of an antecedent hematological disorder. Patient factors include age, performance status, comorbid conditions and individual patient preference. We favor intensive induction in most fit older patients but alternatives such as hypomethylating agents and low-dose cytarabine may be considered in patients with other comorbidities. Enrollment of patients into well designed clinical trials addressing important questions remains of utmost importance in order to advance the understanding and treatment of this disease although the best means of drug development remains a challenging dilemma. PMID:26878693

  5. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  6. Lack of association of acute phase response proteins with hormone levels and antidepressant medication in perimenopausal depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depression is associated with higher plasma levels of positive acute-phase proteins, as well as with lower plasma levels of negative acute-phase proteins. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of acute-phase response proteins and whether these levels are influenced by reproductive hormones and antidepressant medication in the perimenopausal depression. Methods Sixty-five women (age range: 40–58 years old) participated in this study. All women were in the perimenopausal phase. The diagnosis of depression was made through a psychiatric interview and with the aid of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17 (HAM-D 17). The acute-phase response proteins, such as haptoglobin (HP), transferrine (TRf), α1-antitrypsin, complement protein 3 (C3), complement protein 4 (C4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and the reproductive hormones, for example follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol (E2), were analyzed using standard laboratory methods. Pearson’s correlations were applied to evaluate the relationship between acute-phase proteins and hormones. Results Perimenopausal women were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of normal controls, the second one involved depressed perimenopausal women, who were taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the third one included depressed women that were not treated with SSRIs. Depressed women in perimenopause, when being compared to non-depressed women, did not differ as to serum levels of acute-phase proteins. There was a positive correlation between HP and E2 in depressed perimenopausal women, who were not taking SSRIs. Conclusions The lack of association between acute-phase proteins and depressive mood mentioned in this study does not support previous findings in patients with major depression. This negative finding in perimenopausal depression indicates either the absence or a more complex nature of the interactions between acute-phase proteins

  7. Postmortem diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in patients with acute respiratory failure - demographics, etiologic and pulmonary histologic analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Matos Soeiro, Alexandre; Ruppert, Aline D; Canzian, Mauro; Capelozzi, Vera L; Serrano, Carlos V

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Acute respiratory failure is present in 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction and is responsible for 20% to 30% of the fatal post-acute myocardial infarction. The role of inflammation associated with pulmonary edema as a cause of acute respiratory failure post-acute myocardial infarction remains to be determined. We aimed to describe the demographics, etiologic data and histological pulmonary findings obtained through autopsies of patients who died during the period from 1990 to 2008 due to acute respiratory failure with no diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction during life. METHODS: This study considers 4,223 autopsies of patients who died of acute respiratory failure that was not preceded by any particular diagnosis while they were alive. The diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was given in 218 (4.63%) patients. The age, sex and major associated diseases were recorded for each patient. Pulmonary histopathology was categorized as follows: diffuse alveolar damage, pulmonary edema, alveolar hemorrhage and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial pneumonia. The odds ratio of acute myocardial infarction associated with specific histopathology was determined by logistic regression. RESULTS: In total, 147 men were included in the study. The mean age at the time of death was 64 years. Pulmonary histopathology revealed pulmonary edema as well as the presence of diffuse alveolar damage in 72.9% of patients. Bacterial bronchopneumonia was present in 11.9% of patients, systemic arterial hypertension in 10.1% and dilated cardiomyopathy in 6.9%. A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant positive association between acute myocardial infarction with diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary edema. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we demonstrated that in autopsies of patients with acute respiratory failure as the cause of death, 5% were diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Pulmonary histology revealed a significant inflammatory response, which has

  8. Approach to Adult Patients with Acute Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    DeVos, Elizabeth; Jacobson, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Undifferentiated patients in respiratory distress require immediate attention in the emergency department. Using a thorough history and clinical examination, clinicians can determine the most likely causes of dyspnea. Understanding the pathophysiology of the most common diseases contributing to dyspnea guides rational testing and informed, expedited treatment decisions. PMID:26614245

  9. Routine HIV testing in acute medical admissions in a high prevalence area reduces morbidity and mortality of HIV: a full cycle audit.

    PubMed

    Hill-Tout, Rachel; Cormack, Ian; Elgalib, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Late HIV diagnosis in the UK remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In line with British HIV Association recommendations, we implemented routine HIV Screening in Croydon University Hospital Acute Medical Unit in London after an audit in 2011 revealed very high levels of late diagnosis. Our re-audit assessed the impact of Acute Medical Unit screening and found that patients identified by screening, compared to those tested due to clinical suspicion of HIV, were significantly less likely to be diagnosed late, had fewer AIDS-defining illnesses and shorter hospital admissions. In addition, screening identified patients who were not in traditional 'high-risk' groups and patients who had defaulted HIV care and who subsequently re-engaged with care. PMID:26378190

  10. Acute confusional state caused by Hashimoto's encephalopathy in a patient with hypothyroidism: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nookala, Vinod; Srivastava, Anupam; Qazizadeh, Salim; Fischman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Hashimoto's Encephalopathy is an unusual condition associated with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. This immune-mediated, steroid-dependent entity was first described thirty years ago. In this case report, we discuss the importance of considering this diagnosis in the evaluation of confusion. Case presentation The patient is a 55-year-old African-American woman residing in United States, who was admitted to the hospital with a four-day history of mental status changes. Her past medical history was significant for type II Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and Hypothyroidism. There was no reported seizure activity. The patient's vital signs were stable on admission. On examination, the patient was awake, alert, oriented to place and time. Her neurological examination revealed agraphia and dyslexia. Her speech showed lack of fluency and hesitation. Her complete blood count and electrolytes were within normal limits. The patient's brain CT scan did not reveal any significant findings. Her Magnetic Resonance Imaging only revealed mild chronic microangiopathy, which caused by “small vessel disease.” Her Electroencephalogram did not reveal any finding consistent with seizure activity. Cerebral spinal fluid analysis was likewise did not reveal a cause for this patient's acute onset of confusion. In contrast to the above negative finding, this patient's Thyroid stimulating hormone was discovered to be 15 UIU/ml. She was subsequently given 1000 mg of intravenous Methylprednisolone daily for 3 days. This three-day course of high-dose, intravenous steroids resulted complete resolution of the patient's symptoms. She was then discharged on an eleven-day course of oral prednisone 60 mg. Conclusion Hashimoto's Encephalopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis of an acute confusional state since it is responsive to steroid therapy and represents a readily reversible cause acute mental status changes. Clues to this diagnosis include elevated antithyroid

  11. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  12. Parkinson syndrome. A significant risk factor in the patient with acute surgical disorder.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Pfefferman, R

    1992-01-01

    Ten Parkinsonic patients presenting with acute surgical disease were studied to determine the effects of both conditions on each other and the patient's outcome. Severe motion and communication disturbances led, invariably, to a delay in seeking medical assistance, with most of the patients' presenting symptoms and signs being non-specific and misleading. As a result half the patients presented already in a state of septic shock, and a correct preoperative diagnosis could be achieved in three patients only. The functional status significantly deteriorated in six patients, in four of whom a prolonged rehabilitation course was necessary. Although there was no immediate perioperative mortality, morbidity was significant as 50% and 100% major "surgery-related" and "Parkinson-related" complications accordingly. It is concluded that the coexistence of acute surgical disease with Parkinson syndrome has a profound adverse effect on the patient's outcome. High index of suspicion, early mobilisation, intense physiotherapy and early resumption of the anti-Parkinson drugs are the key points in the management of these patients. PMID:1478816

  13. Clinical significance of lactate in acute cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Valente, Serafina; Chiostri, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lactate, as a metabolite of easy and quick assessment, has been studied over time in critically ill patients in order to evaluate its prognostic ability. The present review is focused on the prognostic role of lactate levels in acute cardiac patients (that is with acute coronary syndrome, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, non including post cardiac surgery patients). In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with mechanical revascularization, hyperlactatemia identified a subset of patients at higher risk for early death and in-hospital complications, being strictly related mainly to hemodynamic derangement. The prognostic impact of hyperlactatemia on mortality has been documented in patients with cardiogenic shock and in those with cardiac arrest even if there is no cut-off value of lactate to be associated with worse outcome or to guide resuscitation or hemodynamic management. Therapeutic hypothermia seems to affect per se lactate values which have been shown to progressively decrease during hypothermia. The mechanism(s) accounting for lactate levels during hypothemia seem to be multiple ranging from the metabolic effects of reduced temperatures to the hemodynamic effects of hypothermia (i.e., reduced need of vasopressor agents). Serial lactate measurements over time, or lactate clearance, have been reported to be clinically more reliable than lactate absolute value also in acute cardiac patients. Despite differences in study design, timing of lactate measurements and type of acute cardiac conditions (i.e., cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, refractory cardiac arrest), available evidence strongly suggests that higher lactate levels can be observed on admission in non-survivors and that higher lactate clearance is associated with better outcome. PMID:26322188

  14. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Oscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. TRANSLATION: This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001. PMID:18474088

  15. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Desirée Pérez; Díaz, Juan Óscar Fernández; Bobes, Carmen Maciá

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. Translation This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001 PMID:18474088

  16. Acute Multiple Arteriovenous Thromboses in a Patient with Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Sayaka; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Kishimoto, Miyako; Ikeda, Nahoko; Inoue, Kaori; Ihana, Noriko; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Noto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the most serious acute complications of diabetes mellitus. An arterial thrombotic tendency from DKA is relatively common; however, the occurrence of acute multiple arteriovenous thromboses is rare. We herein report the case of a 49-year-old man with DKA complicated by multiple thromboses. After transfer to our emergency room with DKA, the patient developed sudden abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed near-complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein, splenic artery, and right femoral artery. This occurrence highlights the need for considering the risk of thrombosis during the initial treatment for DKA. PMID:26278296

  17. A case of recurrent arrhythmia in an acute pancreatitis patient--pathophysiological explanation using shortage of 'repolarization reserve'.

    PubMed

    Uvelin, Arsen; Hajduković, Danica; Vrsajkov, Vladimir; Kolak, Radmila; Lazukić, Aleksandra; Vicković, Sanja; Gojković, Zoran

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of a patient with acute pancreatitis who developed serious heart rhythm abnormalities on three occasions, two of which were associated with administration of the first generation antihistamine chloropyramine, and the third one with hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia. Dysrhythmic events consisted of bigeminy, multifocal ventricular extrasystoles and torsades de pointes-like ventricular tachycardia. Electrocardiographic changes in acute pancreatitis in the absence of previous heart disease can occur in more than half of the cases. Antihistamines are medications that are known to produce heart rhythm disturbances, especially the second generation drugs astemizole and terfenadine. This is the first report of chloropyramine causing dysrhythmia. It seems that acute pancreatitis patients are especially prone to heart dysrhythmia caused by different factors such as electrolyte disturbances and pronounced vagal tone. Acute pancreatitis may be added to the list of risk factors with altered 'repolarization reserve', predisposing to drug-induced QT interval prolongation and possible torsades de pointes occurrence. PMID:24697004

  18. Patient decision making in the face of conflicting medication information

    PubMed Central

    Elstad, Emily; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Devellis, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    When patients consult more than one source of information about their medications, they may encounter conflicting information. Although conflicting information has been associated with negative outcomes, including worse medication adherence, little is known about how patients make health decisions when they receive conflicting information. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making strategies that individuals with arthritis use when they receive conflicting medication information. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 20 men and women with arthritis. Interview vignettes posed scenarios involving conflicting information from different sources (e.g., doctor, pharmacist, and relative), and respondents were asked how they would respond to the situation. Data analysis involved inductive coding to identify emergent themes and deductive contextualization to make meaning from the emergent themes. In response to conflicting medication information, patients used rules of thumb, trial and error, weighed benefits and risks, and sought more information, especially from a doctor. Patients relied heavily on trial and error when there was no conflicting information involved in the vignette. In contrast, patients used rules of thumb as a unique response to conflicting information. These findings increase our understanding of what patients do when they receive conflicting medication information. Given that patient exposure to conflicting information is likely to increase alongside the proliferation of medication information on the Internet, patients may benefit from assistance in identifying the most appropriate decision strategies for dealing with conflicting information, including information about best information sources. PMID:22943889

  19. Associations between patient factors and medication adherence: A Jordanian experience

    PubMed Central

    Basheti, Iman A.; Hait, Sami Saqf El; Qunaibi, Eyad A.; Aburuz, Salah; Bulatova, Nailya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of patient characteristics and health beliefs on their medication adherence. Methods: Patients (n=167) with chronic conditions (mean age 58.9; SD=13.54, 53% males) were recruited from March 2009- to March 2010 using a cross sectional study design. Data collected included patients’ demographics, medical conditions, medications therapeutic regimen, frequency of physician visits and health beliefs. Patient self-reported adherence to medications was assessed by the researcher using a validated and published scale. Treatment related problems (TRPs) were evaluated for each patient by competent clinical pharmacists. Associations between patient characteristics/health beliefs with adherence were explored. Results: About half of the patients (46.1%) were non-adherent. A significant association was found between lower adherence and higher number of disease states (p<0.001), higher number of medications (p=0.001), and higher number of identified TRPs (p = 0.003). Patient adherence was positively affected by older age, higher educational level, and higher number of physician visits per month, while it was negatively affected by reporting difficulties with getting prescription refills on time. Conclusion: This study identified different factors that may negatively affect adherence, including higher number of medications and disease states, higher number of identified TRPs and inability to getting prescription refills on time. Hence, more care needs to be provided to patients with complex therapeutic regimens in order to enhance adherence. PMID:27011772

  20. Drug and alcohol abuse in patients with acute burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Swenson, J R; Dimsdale, J E; Rockwell, E; Carroll, W; Hansbrough, J

    1991-01-01

    We reviewed records of adult patients admitted to our burn unit who were reported to abuse drugs or alcohol from 1985 to 1988. The proportion of patients reported as abusing drugs increased significantly from 1987 to 1988, compared to previous years. However, there was no increase in the proportion of patients reported to abuse alcohol. Patients identified as abusing drugs had longer hospital stays, compared to patients who were not reported to abuse substances. Methamphetamine and cocaine were the drugs most often abused by patients who abused drugs or both drugs and alcohol. Mechanisms of burn injury in these patients included "accidental" burn injury related to acute intoxication, and self-injury due to psychosis or depression. PMID:1882020

  1. Shared medical appointments: increasing patient access without increasing physician hours.

    PubMed

    Bronson, David L; Maxwell, Richard A

    2004-05-01

    Shared medical visits are a new concept in patient care. Doctors perform a series of one-on-one patient encounters in a group setting during a 90-minute visit and manage and advise each patient in front of the others. Patients benefit from improved access to their physician and significantly increased education, while providers can boost their access and productivity without increasing hours. Such group visits are voluntary and for established patients only. PMID:15195773

  2. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia for Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prebet, Thomas; Gore, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a remarkable disease in which leukemogenesis is driven by the PML-RARα oncogene and for which targeted treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–based therapy allows substantial chance of cure. APL is seen in a small subset of older patients, with age representing one of the most important prognostic factors for outcome of treatment. Unlike other acute leukemias, the inferior outcomes for APL in older patients relates less to changes in disease biology and more to increased toxicity of ATRA and chemotherapy combination regimens used to induce hematologic and molecular responses. Risk-adapted strategies that use less-toxic agents, such as arsenic trioxide, allow treatment of older patients, with greater efficiency and better chances of cure. PMID:21393443

  3. Improving patients' and staff's experiences of acute care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Rob; Crawshaw, Jacob; Hood, Chloe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this audit was to assess the effect of the Quality Mark programme on the quality of acute care received by older patients by comparing the experiences of staff and older adults before and after the programme. Data from 31 wards in 12 acute hospitals were collected over two stages. Patients and staff completed questionnaires on the perceived quality of care on the ward. Patients rated improved experiences of nutrition, staff availability and dignity. Staff received an increase in training and reported better access to support, increased time and skill to deliver care and improved morale, leadership and teamwork. Problems remained with ward comfort and mealtimes. Overall, results indicated an improvement in ratings of care quality in most domains during Quality Mark data collection. Further audits need to explore ways of improving ward comfort and mealtime experience. PMID:25727634

  4. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  5. Neuroanatomical Predictors of Awakening in Acutely Comatose Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Robert G.; Buitrago, Manuel M.; Duckworth, Josh; Chonka, Zachary D.; Puttgen, H. Adrian; Stevens, Robert D.; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lateral brain displacement has been associated with loss of consciousness and poor outcome in a range of acute neurologic disorders. We studied the association between lateral brain displacement and awakening from acute coma. Methods This prospective observational study included all new onset coma patients admitted to the Neurosciences Critical Care Unit (NCCU) over 12 consecutive months. Head computed tomography (CT) scans were analyzed independently at coma onset, after awakening, and at follow-up. Primary outcome measure was awakening, defined as the ability to follow commands before hospital discharge. Secondary outcome measures were discharge Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), modified Rankin Scale, Glasgow Outcome Scale, and hospital and NCCU lengths of stay. Results Of the 85 patients studied, the mean age was 58 ± 16 years, 51% were female, and 78% had cerebrovascular etiology of coma. Fifty-one percent of patients had midline shift on head CT at coma onset and 43 (51%) patients awakened. In a multivariate analysis, independent predictors of awakening were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.039, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.002–1.079, p = 0.040), higher GCS score at coma onset (OR = 1.455, 95% CI = 1.157–1.831, p = 0.001), nontraumatic coma etiology (OR = 4.464, 95% CI = 1.011–19.608, p = 0.048), lesser pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 1.316, 95% CI = 1.073–1.615, p = 0.009), and reduction or no increase in pineal shift on follow-up CT (OR = 11.628, 95% CI = 2.207–62.500, p = 0.004). Interpretation Reversal and/or limitation of lateral brain displacement are associated with acute awakening in comatose patients. These findings suggest objective parameters to guide prognosis and treatment in patients with acute onset of coma. PMID:25628166

  6. Improving acute care for patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kate

    People with dementia are more likely to experience a decline in function, fall or fracture when admitted to hospital than the general hospital population. Informal carers' views were sought on the care their relative with dementia received in hospital. Participants were concerned about a lack of essential nursing care, harmful incidents, a decline in patient function, poor staff communication and carers' needs not being acknowledged. Care can be improved through further training, more effective communication, consideration of the appropriate place to care for people and more use of carers' knowledge. PMID:27017677

  7. Medical Cannabis in Arizona: Patient Characteristics, Perceptions, and Impressions of Medical Cannabis Legalization.

    PubMed

    Troutt, William D; DiDonato, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made toward understanding the benefits of medical cannabis. However, less is known about medical cannabis patients themselves. Prior research has uncovered many important patient characteristics, but most of that work has been conducted with participants in California, who may not represent medical cannabis patients throughout the United States. Furthermore, it is unknown if medical cannabis legalization, which typically imposes strict regulations on cannabis cultivation and sale, impacts patients' experiences acquiring and using cannabis. The goal of this study was to address these limitations by (1) examining the characteristics, perceptions, and behaviors of medical cannabis patients in Arizona; and (2) questioning participants with a history of cannabis use regarding their experiences with cannabis before and after legalization. Patients in Arizona share many characteristics with those in California, but also key differences, such as average age and degree of cannabis consumption. Participants also had positive perceptions of the effect of medical cannabis legalization, reporting that feelings of safety and awareness were higher after legalization compared to before. The results are discussed in relation to evidence from patients in other states and in terms of their potential policy implications. PMID:26317379

  8. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  9. Developing image-based electronic patient records for collaborative medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xiaomeng; Yu, Fenghai; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lian, Ping; Sun, Kun; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). We have successfully used this system two times for the teleconsultation on Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Shanghai Xinhua Hospital and Shanghai Infection Hospital. During the consultation, both the physicians in infection control area and the experts outside the control area could interactively study, manipulate and navigate the EPR of the SARS patients to make more precise diagnosis on images with this system assisting. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications.

  10. Nickel concentrations in serum of patients with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, C.N. Jr.; Linden, J.V.; Hopfer, S.M.; Crisostomo, M.C.; Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel was measured, by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry, in sera from (a) 30 healthy adults, (b) 54 patients with acute myocardial infarction, (c) 33 patients with unstable angina pectoris without infarction, and (d) five patients with coronary atherosclerosis who developed cardiac ischemia during treadmill exercise. Mean (and SD) concentrations in Group a were 0.3 (0.3) ..mu..g/L (range <0.05-1.1 ..mu..g/L). Within 72 h after hospital admission, hypernickelemia (Ni greater than or equal to 1.2 ..mu..g/L) was found in 41 patients of group b (76%) and in 16 patients of group c (48%). Hypernickelemia was found before and after exercise in one patient of Group d (20%). Peak values averaged 3.0 ..mu..g/L (range 0.4-21 ..mu..g/L) in Group b, 1.5 ..mu..g/L (range <0.05-3.3 ..mu..g/L) in Group c. In Group b, the mean time interval between the peak values for creatine kinase activity and for nickel was 18 h. Serum nickel concentrations were unrelated to age, sex, time of day, cigarette smoking, medications, clinical complications, or outcome. Mechanisms and sources of release of nickel into the serum of patients with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris are conjectural, but hypernickelemia may be related to the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial injury. 25 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Patient Referrals: A Behavioral Outcome of Continuing Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, J. Maurice; And Others

    1978-01-01

    One method for evaluating an aspect of physician practice behavior, patient referrals, resulting from continuing medical education programs on cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch is described. Data presented provide strong support for the effectiveness of continuing education in modifying physician practice behavior. (LBH)

  12. Shared medical appointments: An innovative approach to patient care.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Cora A

    2015-09-13

    This article provides an overview of shared medical appointments, an innovative approach to managing patients with chronic conditions. The Diabetes Shared Medical Appointment of the Veterans Affairs Loma Linda Healthcare System, conducted by an interprofessional team and led by a nurse practitioner, is described. PMID:26274879

  13. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  14. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students’ Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Nabilou, Bahram; Feizi, Aram; Seyedin, Hesam

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students’ perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students studying medicine, nursing, and midwifery were recruited through census for the study. A questionnaire was used for collecting data, which were then analyzed through SPSS statistical software (version 16.0), using Chi-square test, Spearman correlation coefficient, F and LSD tests. A total of 121 questionnaires were completed, and 50% of the students demonstrated good knowledge about patient safety. The relationships between students’ attitudes to patient safety and years of study, sex and course were significant (0.003, 0.001 and 0.017, respectively). F and LSD tests indicated that regarding the difference between the mean scores of perceptions of patient safety and attitudes to patient safety education, there was a significant difference among medical and nursing/midwifery students. Little knowledge of students regarding patient safety indicates the inefficiency of informal education to fill the gap; therefore, it is recommended to consider patient safety in the curriculums of all medical and paramedical sciences and formulate better policies for patient safety. PMID:26322897

  15. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  16. Medication reconciliation at patient admission: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Antonio E.; Lombardi, Natália F.; Andrzejevski, Vânia S.; Frandoloso, Gibran; Correr, Cassyano J.; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure length of hospital stay (LHS) in patients receiving medication reconciliation. Secondary characteristics included analysis of number of preadmission medications, medications prescribed at admission, number of discrepancies, and pharmacists interventions done and accepted by the attending physician. Methods: A 6 month, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Patients admitted to general wards were randomized to receive usual care or medication reconciliation, performed within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Results: The randomization process assigned 68 patients to UC and 65 to MR. LHS was 10±15 days in usual care and 9±16 days in medication reconciliation (p=0.620). The total number of discrepancies was 327 in the medication reconciliation group, comprising 52.6% of unintentional discrepancies. Physicians accepted approximately 75.0% of the interventions. Conclusion: These results highlight weakness at patient transition care levels in a public teaching hospital. LHS, the primary outcome, should be further investigated in larger studies. Medication reconciliation was well accepted by physicians and it is a useful tool to find and correct discrepancies, minimizing the risk of adverse drug events and improving patient safety. PMID:27011775

  17. Anhedonia Predicts Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Mortality in Patients 1 Year After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Karina W.; Burg, Matthew M.; Kronish, Ian M.; Shimbo, Daichi; Dettenborn, Lucia; Mehran, Roxana; Vorchheimer, David; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Lespérance, Francois; Rieckmann, Nina

    2010-01-01

    Context Depression is a consistent predictor of recurrent events and mortality in ACS patients, but it has 2 core diagnostic criteria with distinct biological correlates—depressed mood and anhedonia. Objective To determine if depressed mood and/or anhedonia (loss of pleasure or interest) predict 1-year medical outcomes for patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). Design Observational cohort study of post-ACS patients hospitalized between May 2003 and June 2005. Within one week of admission, patients underwent a structured psychiatric interview to assess clinically impairing depressed mood, anhedonia, and major depressive episode (MDE); also assessed were the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score, Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, antidepressant use, and depressive symptom severity. Setting Coronary care and cardiac care step-down units of 3 university hospitals in New York and Connecticut. Participants Consecutive sample of 453 ACS patients (aged 25–93 years; 42% women). Main Outcomes Measures All-cause mortality (ACM) and documented major adverse cardiac events (MACE; myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or urgent revascularization) were actively surveyed for 1 year after admission. Results There were 67 events (16 deaths and 51 MACE; 14.8%). 108 (24%) and 77 (17%) patients with anhedonia and depressed mood, respectively. After controlling for sex, age, and medical covariates, anhedonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.16–2.14; P<.01) and MDE (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–2.04; P=.02) were significant predictors of combined MACE/ACM, but depressed mood was not. Anhedonia continued to significantly predict outcomes controlling for MDE diagnosis and depressive symptom severity, each of which were no longer significant. Conclusions Anhedonia identifies risk for MACE/ACM beyond that of established medical prognostic indicators

  18. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives. PMID:25895240

  19. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  20. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. Material/Methods Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. Results The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  1. Correlates of syncope in patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Yaser; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh; Alemzadeh-Ansari, Mohammad-Javad; Seyyedi, Seyyed Reza; Shirani, Shapoor; Soudaee, Mehdi; Ghaffari-Marandi, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Identification of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), as a cause of syncope, is important and may be life saving. We prospectively analyzed data on 335 patients with acute PTE. Relationships between syncope secondary to acute PTE and clinical findings, risk factors, and imaging modalities were analyzed. Of the 335 patients, 36 (10.7%) had syncope at presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher frequency of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction (94.3% vs 72.1%, respectively; P value = .004) and saddle embolism (24.2% vs 10.9%, respectively; P value = .044). Frequency of RV dysfunction was similar between patients with and without saddle embolism. Although not significant, more patients with syncope had a history of previous PTE (P value = .086). By multivariable analysis, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were independent correlates of syncope in patients with PTE. In-hospital mortality was not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, among patients with PTE, RV dysfunction and saddle embolism were the independent correlates of syncope. PMID:24989710

  2. Glaucoma Patient Expression of Medication Problems and Nonadherence

    PubMed Central

    Slota, Catherine; Sayner, Robyn; Vitko, Michelle; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Blalock, Susan J.; Robin, Alan L.; Muir, Kelly W.; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Sleath, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine if patient demographic factors influenced self-reporting of medication side effects, difficulty with drop instillation and nonadherence to glaucoma therapy. Methods English-speaking adult glaucoma patients (n=279) from six ophthalmology clinics were enrolled. Patients’ medical visits were videotaped and patients were interviewed immediately afterwards by research assistants. The videotapes were transcribed verbatim and coded to identify patients who expressed problems with medication side effects, eye drop administration, and non-adherence during the glaucoma office visits. Generalized estimating equations were performed to identify whether patient characteristics were associated with expression of problems with glaucoma medication and medication non-adherence during the office visit. Results Patients with lower health literacy were significantly less likely to express problems with side effects (OR (95%CI) = 0.47 (0.25, 0.88)) and eye drop administration (OR (95%CI) = 0.26 (0.11, 0.63)) during the visit. Patients who reported eye drop administration and side effect problems during the interview were significantly more likely to express these problems to their ophthalmologists, (OR (95%CI) = 3.13 (1.82, 5.37)); (OR (95%CI) = 1.86 (1.12, 3.08)) respectively. Patients who expressed a problem with eye drop administration and with side effects were significantly more likely to express medication non-adherence to their ophthalmologist (OR (95%CI) = 2.89 (1.44, 5.80)); (OR (95%CI) = 2.03 (1.16, 3.54)). Patients who reported greater than 80% medication adherence during the interview were significantly less likely to express non-adherence to their ophthalmologist (OR (95%CI) = 0.22 (0.12, 0.40)). Conclusions Eye care providers should be aware that glaucoma patients with lower health literacy are less likely to express problems with side effects and eye drop administration. Providers should work with patients to assess

  3. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the treatment of acute pain in remote environments: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Scaife, Courtney L; Weber, David C; Windsor, Jeremy S; Wheeler, Albert R; Smith, William R; Wedmore, Ian; McIntosh, Scott E; Lieberman, James R

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of pain in austere environments. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence as defined by criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Remote Environments published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(1):41-49. PMID:25498266

  4. Risk factors for early readmission to acute care for persons with schizophrenia taking antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Boaz, Timothy L; Becker, Marion Ann; Andel, Ross; Van Dorn, Richard A; Choi, Jiyoon; Sikirica, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The study examined risk factors for readmission to acute care among Florida Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. METHODS Medicaid and service use data for 2004 to 2008 were used to identify adults with schizophrenia discharged from hospitals and crisis units who were taking antipsychotics. Data were extracted on demographic characteristics, service use before admission, psychopharmacologic treatment after discharge, and readmission to acute behavioral health care. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated readmission risk in the 30 days after discharge and in the period after 30 days for participants not readmitted in the first 30 days. RESULTS The mean±SD age of the 3,563 participants was 43.4±11.1; 61% were male, and 38% were white. Participants had 6,633 inpatient episodes; duration of hospitalization was 10.6±7.0 days. Readmission occurred for 84% of episodes, 23% within 30 days. Variables associated with an increased readmission risk in the first 30 days were shorter hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR]=1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.10-1.27, p<.001), shorter time on medication before discharge (HR=1.19, CI=1.06-1.35, p=.003), greater prehospitalization use of acute care (HR=2.64, CI=2.29-3.05, p<.001), serious general medical comorbidity (HR=1.21, CI=1.06-1.38, p=.005), and prior substance abuse treatment (HR=1.58, CI=1.37-1.83, p<.001). After 30 days, hospitalization duration and time on medication were not significant risk factors. CONCLUSIONS Short hospital stays for persons with schizophrenia may be associated with risk of early readmission, possibly because the person is insufficiently stabilized. More chronic risk factors include prior acute care, general medical comorbidity, and substance abuse. PMID:23945797

  5. Infected pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic fluid collections: serendipitous response to antibiotics and medical therapy in three patients.

    PubMed

    Dubner, H; Steinberg, W; Hill, M; Bassi, C; Chardavoyne, R; Bank, S

    1996-04-01

    Three patients with clinical and radiologic evidence of pancreatic necrosis or peripancreatic fluid collections/inflammatory masses who were advised to have surgery on the basis of bacterial infection on skinny-needle aspiration of the pancreas but were deemed medically unstable or refused operative intervention were treated with intensive antibiotic therapy. All three patients survived the attack of acute pancreatitis with infection on medical therapy alone. This suggests that occasional patients with infected necrosis and/or peripancreatic collections/inflammatory masses may respond to antibiotics, especially those antibiotics that have recently been shown to have a high penetration into pancreatic tissue. PMID:8830338

  6. Medication Repurposing in Pediatric Patients: Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gaps in pediatric therapeutics often result in off-label use and specifically, novel uses for existing medications, termed “drug repurposing.” Drug Information (DI) queries to a Pediatric Medication Resource Center of a large metropolitan pediatric hospital in New York and inherent difficulties in retrieving evidence-based information prompted a review of current medication repurposing for pediatric patients. The objective included characterization of innovative off-label use of medications Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 1 or more indications to treat a totally different disorder or indication in pediatric patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to retrieve publications describing repurposed medications in pediatric patients. Excluded was FDA-approved indications used off-label in pediatric patients (e.g., different dose), preclinical data, adult use only, and experimental use. Evidence quality was classified using a modified American Academy of Neurology Level of Evidence. Results were analyzed using χ2 at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Over 2000 references were retrieved and reviewed. A total of 101 medications repurposed for novel off-label uses for pediatric patients were identified: 38 for neonates, 74 for children, and 52 for adolescents. Neonates and infants were least likely to receive a medication for a repurposed use. Strong or intermediate evidence existed in 80.2% of cases. The evidence was weak in 19.8%. No significant relationship was observed between the pediatric age group and strength of the literature. Most repurposed uses pertained to generic or widely used medications. Less than 5% of medications were first marketed after 2011. CONCLUSIONS: While not exhaustive, the present study represents the most comprehensive listing of novel uses exclusive to pediatric patients. Further research is needed to identify the frequency of repurposed uses. The valuable DI role of pharmacists in assessing repurposed

  7. Obesity and the orthopedic trauma patient: a review of the risks and challenges in medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Mulcahey, Mary K; Appleyard, Deborah V; Schiller, Jonathan R; Born, Christopher T

    2011-02-01

    The medical and surgical care of obese trauma patients presents a variety of unique and important challenges. Over the past 30 years, this population has increased dramatically in number, and the optimization of their care demands the attention of the medical community. The problems of caring for an obese trauma patient begin before the actual traumatic event occurs due to their substantially higher incidence of serious comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiopulmonary issues. In the setting of trauma, important considerations for the obese patient include careful and expeditious preoperative medical optimization; appropriate deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis; planning for and preventing operative and postoperative challenges (eg, pulmonary and wound complications); and ensuring adequate hospital equipment and staffing resources in the acute and rehabilitative phases of care. This article outlines the scope of the obesity epidemic, reviews the medical consequences of obesity, and highlights surgical considerations specific to the care of orthopedic injuries in the obese trauma patient. PMID:21441770

  8. Long-Term Outcome of Critically Ill Adult Patients with Acute Epiglottitis

    PubMed Central

    Hernu, Romain; Baudry, Thomas; Bohé, Julien; Piriou, Vincent; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Disant, François; Argaud, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute epiglottitis is a potentially life threatening disease, with a growing incidence in the adult population. Its long-term outcome after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization has rarely been studied. Methodology and Principal Findings Thirty-four adult patients admitted for acute epiglottitis were included in this retrospective multicentric study. The mean age was 44±12 years (sex ratio: 5.8). Sixteen patients (47%) had a history of smoking while 8 (24%) had no previous medical history. The average time of disease progression before ICU was 2.6±3.6 days. The main reasons for hospitalization were continuous monitoring (17 cases, 50%) and acute respiratory distress (10 cases, 29%). Microbiological documentation could be made in 9 cases (26%), with Streptococcus spp. present in 7 cases (21%). Organ failure at ICU admission occurred in 8 cases (24%). Thirteen patients (38%) required respiratory assistance during ICU stay; 9 (26%) required surgery. Two patients (6%) died following hypoxemic cardiac arrest. Five patients (15%) had sequelae at 1 year. Patients requiring respiratory assistance had a longer duration of symptoms and more frequent anti inflammatory use before ICU admission and sequelae at 1 year (p<0.05 versus non-ventilated patients). After logistic regression analysis, only exposure to anti-inflammatory drugs before admission was independently associated with airway intervention (OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.06-23.16). Conclusions and Significance The profile of the cases consisted of young smoking men with little comorbidity. Streptococcus spp. infection represented the main etiology. Outcome was favorable if early respiratory tract protection could be performed in good conditions. Morbidity and sequelae were greater in patients requiring airway intervention. PMID:25945804

  9. Creatinine clearance and adverse hospital outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes: findings from the global registry of acute coronary events (GRACE)

    PubMed Central

    Santopinto, J J; Fox, K A A; Goldberg, R J; Budaj, A; Piñero, G; Avezum, A; Gulba, D; Esteban, J; Gore, J M; Johnson, J; Gurfinkel, E P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether creatinine clearance at the time of hospital admission is an independent predictor of hospital mortality and adverse outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Design: A prospective multicentre observational study, GRACE (global registry of acute coronary events), of patients with the full spectrum of ACS. Setting: Ninety four hospitals of varying size and capability in 14 countries across four continents. Patients: 11 774 patients hospitalised with ACS, including ST and non-ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina. Main outcome measures: Demographic and clinical characteristics, medication use, and in-hospital outcomes were compared for patients with creatinine clearance rates of > 60 ml/min (normal and minimally impaired renal function), 30–60 ml/min (moderate renal dysfunction), and < 30 ml/min (severe renal dysfunction). Results: Patients with moderate or severe renal dysfunction were older, were more likely to be women, and presented to participating hospitals with more comorbidities than those with normal or minimally impaired renal function. In comparison with patients with normal or minimally impaired renal function, patients with moderate renal dysfunction were twice as likely to die (odds ratio 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.55 to 2.81) and those with severe renal dysfunction almost four times more likely to die (odds ratio 3.71, 95% confidence interval 2.57 to 5.37) after adjustment for other potentially confounding variables. The risk of major bleeding episodes increased as renal function worsened. Conclusion: In patients with ACS, creatinine clearance is an important independent predictor of hospital death and major bleeding. These data reinforce the importance of increased surveillance efforts and use of targeted intervention strategies in patients with acute coronary disease complicated by renal dysfunction. PMID:12923009

  10. Computational modeling to predict nitrogen balance during acute metabolic decompensation in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Erin L; Hall, Kevin D; McGuire, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional management of acute metabolic decompensation in amino acid inborn errors of metabolism (AA IEM) aims to restore nitrogen balance. While nutritional recommendations have been published, they have never been rigorously evaluated. Furthermore, despite these recommendations, there is a wide variation in the nutritional strategies employed amongst providers, particularly regarding the inclusion of parenteral lipids for protein-free caloric support. Since randomized clinical trials during acute metabolic decompensation are difficult and potentially dangerous, mathematical modeling of metabolism can serve as a surrogate for the preclinical evaluation of nutritional interventions aimed at restoring nitrogen balance during acute decompensation in AA IEM. A validated computational model of human macronutrient metabolism was adapted to predict nitrogen balance in response to various nutritional interventions in a simulated patient with a urea cycle disorder (UCD) during acute metabolic decompensation due to dietary non-adherence or infection. The nutritional interventions were constructed from published recommendations as well as clinical anecdotes. Overall, dextrose alone (DEX) was predicted to be better at restoring nitrogen balance and limiting nitrogen excretion during dietary non-adherence and infection scenarios, suggesting that the published recommended nutritional strategy involving dextrose and parenteral lipids (ISO) may be suboptimal. The implications for patients with AA IEM are that the medical course during acute metabolic decompensation may be influenced by the choice of protein-free caloric support. These results are also applicable to intensive care patients undergoing catabolism (postoperative phase or sepsis), where parenteral nutritional support aimed at restoring nitrogen balance may be more tailored regarding metabolic fuel selection. PMID:26260782

  11. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members

  12. Acute Response to Unilateral Unipolar Electrical Carotid Sinus Stimulation in Patients With Resistant Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Brinkmann, Julia; Menne, Jan; Kaufeld, Jessica; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Beige, Joachim; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Diedrich, André; Haller, Hermann; Jordan, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral bipolar electric carotid sinus stimulation acutely reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension but is no longer available. The second-generation device uses a smaller unilateral unipolar disk electrode to reduce invasiveness while saving battery life. We hypothesized that the second-generation device acutely lowers BP and MSNA in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Eighteen treatment-resistant hypertensive patients (9 women/9 men; 53±11 years; 33±5 kg/m(2)) on stable medications have been included in the study. We monitored finger and brachial BP, heart rate, and MSNA. Without stimulation, BP was 165±31/91±18 mm Hg, heart rate was 75±17 bpm, and MSNA was 48±14 bursts per minute. Acute stimulation with intensities producing side effects that were tolerable in the short term elicited interindividually variable changes in systolic BP (-16.9±15.0 mm Hg; range, 0.0 to -40.8 mm Hg; P=0.002), heart rate (-3.6±3.6 bpm; P=0.004), and MSNA (-2.0±5.8 bursts per minute; P=0.375). Stimulation intensities had to be lowered in 12 patients to avoid side effects at the expense of efficacy (systolic BP, -6.3±7.0 mm Hg; range, 2.8 to -14.5 mm Hg; P=0.028 and heart rate, -1.5±2.3 bpm; P=0.078; comparison against responses with side effects). Reductions in diastolic BP and MSNA (total activity) were correlated (r(2)=0.329; P=0.025). In our patient cohort, unilateral unipolar electric baroreflex stimulation acutely lowered BP. However, side effects may limit efficacy. The approach should be tested in a controlled comparative study. PMID:26831195

  13. Mechanical ventilation of patients with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sessler, C N

    1998-10-01

    Ventilatory management of patients with acute lung injury (ALI), particularly its most severe subset, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is complex. Newer lung protective strategies emphasize measures to enhance alveolar recruitment and avoid alveolar overdistention, thus minimizing the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Key components of such strategies include the use of smaller-than-conventional tidal volumes which maintain peak transpulmonary pressure below the pressure associated with overdistention, and titration of positive end-expiratory pressure to promote maximal alveolar recruitment. Novel techniques, including prone positioning, inverse ratio ventilation, tracheal gas insufflation, and high frequency ventilation, are considerations in severe ARDS. No single approach is best for all patients; adjustment of ventilatory parameters to individual characteristics, such as lung mechanics and gas exchange, is required. PMID:9891634

  14. Underuse of invasive procedures among Medicaid patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Philbin, E F; McCullough, P A; DiSalvo, T G; Dec, G W; Jenkins, P L; Weaver, W D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to determine whether underuse of cardiac procedures among Medicaid patients with acute myocardial infarction is explained by or is independent of fundamental differences in age, race, or sex distribution; income, coexistent illness; or location of care. METHODS: Administrative data from 226 hospitals in New York were examined for 11,579 individuals hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Use of various cardiac procedures was compared among Medicaid patients and patients with other forms of insurance. RESULTS: Medicaid patients were older, were more frequently African American and female, and had lower median household incomes. They also had a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, lung disease, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease. After adjustment for these and other factors, Medicaid patients were less likely to undergo cardiac catheterization, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, and any revascularization procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Factors other than age, race, sex, income, coexistent illness, and location of care account for lower use of invasive procedures among Medicaid patients. The influence of Medicaid insurance on medical practice and process of care deserves investigation. PMID:11441735

  15. Automated medical problem list generation: towards a patient timeline.

    PubMed

    Bui, Alex A T; Taira, Ricky K; El-Saden, Suzie; Dordoni, Alicia; Aberle, Denise R

    2004-01-01

    The problem-oriented electronic medical record has been investigated as an alternative to source-oriented organization of patient data. At the core of a problem-oriented view is the medical problem list. Maintenance of the medical problem list is often manual, making it highly user dependent. We detail the beginnings of an automated medical problem list generator based on ICD-9: given a set of ICD-9 codes associated with a patient record, the system maps the codes (and related data) to an anatomy-centric hierarchy. 1 million patient encounters from an outpatient setting were reviewed to generate a unique set of 7,890 ICD-9 codes. Natural language processing of the ICD-9 string descriptions identified 1,981 anatomical terms, which were subsequently mapped to one of 21 anatomical categories. The output of the medical problem list generator was then used to create a problem-oriented, gestalt view of a patient's medical record. Preliminary evaluation of the generator revealed 100% recall, but only 60% precision. This initial work has highlighted several issues in defining a medical problem list, including questions of granularity and performance trade-offs. PMID:15360880

  16. Medical students' and doctors' attitudes towards older patients and their care in hospital settings: a conceptualisation

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Rajvinder; Griffiths, Amanda; Cox, Tom; Conroy, Simon; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: despite assertions in reports from governmental and charitable bodies that negative staff attitudes towards older patients may contribute to inequitable healthcare provision for older patients when compared with younger patients (those aged under 65 years), the research literature does not describe these attitudes in any detail. Objective: this study explored and conceptualised attitudes towards older patients using in-depth interviews. Methods: twenty-five semi-structured interviews with medical students and hospital-based doctors in a UK acute teaching hospital were conducted. Participants were asked about their beliefs, emotions and behavioural tendencies towards older patients, in line with the psychological literature on the definition of attitudes (affective, cognitive and behavioural information). Data were analysed thematically. Results: attitudes towards older patients and their care could be conceptualised under the headings: (i) beliefs about older patients; (ii) older patients' unique needs and the skills required to care for them and (iii) emotions and satisfaction with caring for older patients. Conclusions: our findings outlined common beliefs and stereotypes specific to older patients, as opposed to older people in general. Older patients had unique needs concerning their healthcare. Participants typically described negative emotions about caring for older patients, but the sources of dissatisfaction largely related to the organisational setting and system in which the care is delivered to these patients. This study marks one of the first in-depth attempts to explore attitudes towards older patients in UK hospital settings. PMID:26185282

  17. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Understanding patient management: the need for medication adherence and persistence.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yc

    2008-01-01

    Poor patient adherence to medication is one of the major factors contributing to poor disease control, in particular in asymptomatic chronic diseases like hypertension and dyslipidaemia. The physical and economic burden on patients and the health care system as a result of non-adherence is great. It is estimated that poor adherence to hypertension medication accounts for as many as 7.1 million preventable deaths annually. Hence recognising and identifying non-adherence is the first step to addressing this problem. Medication adherence can be measured in various ways including self-report to electronic monitoring. In order to be more successful in managing non-adherence, attention must be paid to barriers to adherence, namely the interplay of patient factors, the health care providers themselves and the health care system itself. Taking these into account will probably have the greatest impact on improving medication adherence. Consequently strategies to help overcome these barriers are of paramount importance. Some of these strategies will include education of patients, improving communication between patients and health care providers, improving dose scheduling, providing drugs with less adverse effects, and improving accessibility to health care. Poor mediation adherence continues to be a huge challenge. While the patient is ultimately responsible for the taking of medication, good communication, involving the patient in decision making about their care and simplifying drug regimens go a long way in improving it. PMID:25606104

  19. Medication adherence issues in patients treated for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Ruben D; Alvarez, Melissa T; Wittnebel, Leonard D; Sorenson, Helen; Wettstein, Richard; Vines, David L; Sikkema-Ortiz, Jennifer; Gardner, Donna D; Wilkins, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Although medical treatment of COPD has advanced, nonadherence to medication regimens poses a significant barrier to optimal management. Underuse, overuse, and improper use continue to be the most common causes of poor adherence to therapy. An average of 40%–60% of patients with COPD adheres to the prescribed regimen and only 1 out of 10 patients with a metered dose inhaler performs all essential steps correctly. Adherence to therapy is multifactorial and involves both the patient and the primary care provider. The effect of patient instruction on inhaler adherence and rescue medication utilization in patients with COPD does not seem to parallel the good results reported in patients with asthma. While use of a combined inhaler may facilitate adherence to medications and improve efficacy, pharmacoeconomic factors may influence patient’s selection of both the device and the regimen. Patient’s health beliefs, experiences, and behaviors play a significant role in adherence to pharmacological therapy. This manuscript reviews important aspects associated with medication adherence in patients with COPD and identifies some predictors of poor adherence. PMID:18990964

  20. Utstein-Style Template for Uniform Data Reporting of Acute Medical Response in Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Debacker, Michel; Hubloue, Ives; Dhondt, Erwin; Rockenschaub, Gerald; Rüter, Anders; Codreanu, Tudor; Koenig, Kristi L.; Schultz, Carl; Peleg, Kobi; Halpern, Pinchas; Stratton, Samuel; Della Corte, Francesco; Delooz, Herman; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Colombo, Davide; Castrèn, Maaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Task Force on Quality Control of Disaster Management (WADEM) published guidelines for evaluation and research on health disaster management and recommended the development of a uniform data reporting tool. Standardized and complete reporting of data related to disaster medical response activities will facilitate the interpretation of results, comparisons between medical response systems and quality improvement in the management of disaster victims. Methods: Over a two-year period, a group of 16 experts in the fields of research, education, ethics and operational aspects of disaster medical management from 8 countries carried out a consensus process based on a modified Delphi method and Utstein-style technique. Results: The EMDM Academy Consensus Group produced an Utstein-style template for uniform data reporting of acute disaster medical response, including 15 data elements with indicators, that can be used for both research and quality improvement. Conclusion: It is anticipated that the Utstein-style template will enable better and more accurate completion of reports on disaster medical response and contribute to further scientific evidence and knowledge related to disaster medical management in order to optimize medical response system interventions and to improve outcomes of disaster victims. PMID:23066513

  1. Acute management of poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage patients

    PubMed Central

    Eleftherios, Archavlis; Carvi y Nievas, Mario Nazareno

    2007-01-01

    Poor condition subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients present a high mortality and morbidity. In this study, we reviewed the acute interventional (surgical and endovascular) management of 109 SAH-poor condition patients, who were treated as early as logistically possible after confirming stable circulation parameters. Patients over the age of 70 years, without clinical response to painful stimulation were excluded. We recognized at least 3 different postinterventional therapeutic approaches: (1) Norm- or hypovolemic, normotensive hemodilution in 30 patients with space-occupying intracranial hematomas as well as in 31 cases with acute cerebro-spinal-fluid obstruction. (2) Normovolemic, hypertensive hemodilution after unilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 surgical- and 2 endovascular-treated patients with focalized space occupying lesions and reduced cerebral perfusion. (3) Hypovolemic, normo-, or hypertensive hemodilution after bilateral decompressive craniotomy in 23 cases with massive brain-swelling. We observed a reduced mortality (21%). The overall late outcome was favorable in 56% and unfavorable in 23%. Selective aggressive treatment adapted to increase the cerebral perfusion, seems to be an effective therapy to improve the survival and outcome of several poor condition SAH-patients. PMID:18200827

  2. Effect of Thoracentesis on Intubated Patients with Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Matthew B; Serna-Gallegos, Derek; Ault, Mark; Khan, Ahsan; Chung, Rex; Ley, Eric J; Melo, Nicolas; Margulies, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusions occur frequently in mechanically ventilated patients, but no consensus exists regarding the clinical benefit of effusion drainage. We sought to determine the impact of thoracentesis on gas exchange in patients with differing severities of acute lung injury (ALI). A retrospective analysis was conducted on therapeutic thoracenteses performed on intubated patients in an adult surgical intensive care unit of a tertiary center. Effusions judged by ultrasound to be 400 mL or larger were drained. Subjects were divided into groups based on their initial P:F ratios: normal >300, ALI 200 to 300, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) <200. Baseline characteristics, physiologic variables, arterial blood gases, and ventilator settings before and after the intervention were analyzed. The primary end point was the change in measures of oxygenation. Significant improvements in P:F ratios (mean ± SD) were seen only in patients with ARDS (50.4 ± 38.5, P = 0.001) and ALI (90.6 ± 161.7, P = 0.022). Statistically significant improvement was observed in the pO2 (31.1, P = 0.005) and O2 saturation (4.1, P < 0.001) of the ARDS group. The volume of effusion removed did not correlate with changes in individual patient's oxygenation. These data support the role of therapeutic thoracentesis for intubated patients with abnormal P:F ratios. PMID:27099064

  3. Paramedical risk framing during field referral of acute stroke and S-T elevation myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Campeau, Anthony Gerard

    2016-06-01

    Field referral of emergency ambulance patients by paramedics on a widespread basis is a relatively new aspect of paramedicine. Its implementation involves a significant revision to paramedics' clinical responsibilities and level of interaction with medical specialists. Using grounded theory methodology, this qualitative study uses interviews with paramedics from Ontario, Canada, to explore the framing of risk associated with these referrals in the context of caring for patients with two high-stakes medical conditions: acute stroke and S-T elevation myocardial infarction. The results outline how paramedics have incorporated risk framing into their practice. PMID:26819329

  4. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Incorporating patients' preferences into medical decision making.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Liana

    2013-02-01

    Current models of care emphasize the importance of including patients' values in the decision-making process. This is particularly important for decisions for which there are few data supporting a clear strategy or treatment choice. Constructing preferences for complex decisions requires that patients be able to consider multiple trade-offs between specific risks and benefits. Several marketing research techniques have been recently applied to heath care settings to facilitate this process. Most can be programmed to generate patients' preferences or priorities, which can then be used to improve patient-physician communication. In this article, we will describe some of the currently available approaches that have been successfully used in the health care setting. We provide case examples to illustrate the potential value of adopting each of these approaches in clinical practice. PMID:23132890

  6. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Nieman, Koen; Hoffmann, Udo

    2015-04-14

    The efficient and reliable evaluation of patients with acute chest pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department. Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography may play a major role, since it permits ruling out coronary artery disease with high accuracy if performed with expertise in properly selected and prepared patients. Several randomized trials have established early cardiac CT as a viable safe and potentially more efficient alternative to functional testing in the evaluation of acute chest pain. Ongoing investigations explore whether advanced anatomic and functional assessments such as high-risk coronary plaque, resting myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function, or the simulation of the fractional coronary flow reserve will add information to the anatomic assessment for stenosis, which would allow expanding the benefits of cardiac CT from triage to treatment decisions. Especially, the combination of high-sensitive troponins and coronary computed tomography angiography may play a valuable role in future strategies for the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain. PMID:25687351

  7. Influence of heart failure on the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction in southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    DENG, FUXUE; XIA, YONG; FU, MICHAEL; HU, YUNFENG; JIA, FANG; RAHARDJO, YEFFRY; DUAN, YINGYI; HE, LINJING; CHANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    The impact of heart failure (HF) on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients from southwestern China remains unclear. The present study aimed to compare in-hospital cardiovascular events, mortality and clinical therapies in AMI patients with or without HF in southwestern China. In total, 591 patients with AMI hospitalized between February 2009 and December 2012 were examined; those with a history of HF were excluded. The patients were divided into four groups according to AMI type (ST-elevated or non-ST-elevated AMI) and the presence of HF during hospitalization. Clinical characteristics, in-hospital cardiovascular events, mortality, coronary angiography and treatment were compared. Clinical therapies, specifically evidence-based drug use were analyzed in patients with HF during hospitalization, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and β-blockers (BBs). AMI patients with HF had a higher frequency of co-morbidities, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, longer length of hospital stay and a greater risk of in-hospital mortality compared with AMI patients without HF. AMI patients with HF were less likely to be examined by cardiac angiography or treated with reperfusion therapy or recommended medications. AMI patients with HF co-treated with ACEIs and BBs had a significantly higher survival rate (94.4 vs. 67.5%; P<0.001) compared with untreated patients or patients treated with either ACEIs or BBs alone. Logistic regression analysis revealed that HF and cardiogenic shock in patients with AMI were the strongest predictors of in-hospital mortality. AMI patients with HF were at a higher risk of adverse outcomes. Cardiac angiography and timely standard recommended medications were associated with improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27284294

  8. Direct Medical Cost of Influenza-Related Hospitalizations among Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Cases in Three Provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Lidong; Li, Zhong; Feng, Ao; Jin, Hui; Wang, Shiyuan; Su, Qiru; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. Methods Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital’s Hospital Information System (HIS) and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range) and median (interquartile range [IQR]) costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years), adults (16–64 years) and elderly (≥65 years) groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. Results A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range) direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80–$27,545) for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR) direct medical cost was $231 ($164), $854 ($890), and $2,263 ($7,803) for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. Conclusion Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies. PMID:23717485

  9. Inflammatory biomarkers predicting prognosis in patients with acute dyspnea☆☆☆★

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Karolin; Gränsbo, Klas; Lund, Nathalie; Peyman, Marjaneh; Tegner, Lena; Toni-Bengtsson, Maria; Wieloch, Mattias; Melander, Olle

    2016-01-01

    Objective/Purpose The objective was to identify inflammatory biomarkers that predict risk of 90-day mortality in patients with acute dyspnea. Method We analyzed 25 inflammatory biomarkers, in plasma, in 407 adult patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with acute dyspnea and related them to risk of 90-day mortality using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, C-reactive protein, and Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System–Adult score. Results Fifty patients (12%) died within 90 day from admission. Two strong and independent biomarker signals were detected: The hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for 90-day mortality per 1-SD increment of interleukin-8 (IL-8) was 2.20 (1.67-2.90) (P = 2.5 × 10− 8) and for growth differentiation factor–15 (GDF-15) was 3.45 (2.18-5.45) (P = 1.3 × 10− 7) A Biomarker Mortality Risk Score (BMRS) summing standardized and weighted values of IL-8 and GDF-15 revealed that of patients belonging to quartile 1 (Q1) of the BMRS, only 1 patient died, whereas 32 patients died among those belonging to quartile 4. Each 1-SD increment of the BMRS was associated with a hazard ratio of 3.79 (2.50-5.73) (P = 2 × 10− 10) for 90-day mortality, and the point estimate was 13 times higher in Q4 as compared with Q1 of the BMRS (Ptrend over quartiles = 2 × 10− 6). Conclusion Interleukin-8 and GDF-15 are strongly and independently related to risk of 90-day mortality in unselected patients admitted to the ED because of acute dyspnea, suggesting that they may guide first-line physicians at the ED in risk assessment which in turn could lead to more accurate level of care and treatment intensity. PMID:26740417

  10. Herpes zoster-associated acute urinary retention in immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Hortense, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster-associated urinary retention is an uncommon event related to virus infection of the S2-S4 dermatome. The possible major reasons are ipsilateral hemicystitis, neuritis-induced or myelitis-associated virus infection. We report a case of a 65-year-old immunocompetent female patient who presented an acute urinary retention after four days under treatment with valacyclovir for gluteal herpes zoster. The patient had to use a vesical catheter, was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids and fully recovered after eight weeks. PMID:25387508

  11. [Tulozin in combined treatment of patients with acute urinary retention].

    PubMed

    Avdoshin, V P; Andriukhin, M I; Mikhaĭlikov, T G; Ol'shanskaia, E V; Khunov, A Z

    2009-01-01

    There is much evidence that tulozin promotes recovery of spontaneous urination, Qmax and is effective in combined treatment of patients with acute retention of urine caused by prostatic adenoma. Tulozin produces positive changes in the lower urinary tract symptoms. Rare occurrence of side effects enables long-term treatment and achievement of good therapeutic response. Tulozin is recommended for patients of younger age, with minimal comorbid pathology, hypotonic with orthostatic reactions, history of side effects in the treatment of other alpha-adrenoblockers, in comorbid hypertention, hypercholesterolemia, retrograde ejaculation, low potention, overactive bladder, prostatitis, after prostatic TUR, transvesical adenomectomy. PMID:19824378

  12. Incident reporting in post-operative patients managed by acute pain service

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syeda Fauzia; Hamid, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Incident reporting is a reliable and inexpensive tool used in anaesthesia to identify errors in patient management. A hospital incident reporting system was already present in our hospital, but we were unable to find any incident related to acute pain management. Hence, acute pain service (APS) was started for voluntary incident reporting in post-operative patients to identify critical incidents, review the root cause and suggest remedial measures. Methods: All post-operative patients managed by APS were included in this observational study. A proforma was developed by APS, which included information about the type of incident (equipment and patient-related, human errors), severity of incident, person responsible and suggestions to prevent the same incident in the future. Patients and medical staff were informed about the reporting system. Whenever an incident was identified, a proforma was filled out by APS resident and data entered in SPSS programme. Results: Total of 98 (1.80%) incidents were reported in 5432 patients managed by APS during 3 years period. Average age of the patients was 46 ± 17 years. Majority of incidents were related to epidural care (71%) and occurred in surgical wards (87%). Most of the incidents occurred due to human error and infusion delivery set-related defects. Conclusion: Incident reporting proved to be a feasible method of improving quality care in developing countries. It not only provides valuable information about areas which needed improvement, but also helped in developing strategies to improve care. Knowledge and attitudes of medical and paramedical staff are identified as the targeted area for improvement. PMID:26903672

  13. Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Acute Variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Moataz; EL-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; EL-Ghannam, Maged; El Ray, Ahmed; Ali, Abdel Aziz; Taleb, Hoda Abu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhotic patients remains a serious, unsolved problem, and the risk factors for acute variceal bleeding (AVB) in HCC patients remain unclear. This study aimed to determine the in-hospital mortality (IHM) and factors influencing the clinical outcomes of AVB in patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC. Methods This was a retrospective, non-randomized, clinical study that was conducted in 2014. The study was conducted on 70 patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC presenting by acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIH). All patients were examined endoscopically within 24 hours from presentation and bleeding varices accounted for AUGIH. Full medical history, clinical examination, and laboratory and radiologic data were collected from admission charts, and hospital medical records were statistically analyzed with SSPS version 22. Results Thirty-two patients (45.7%) survived and 38 died (54.3%). Survivors are more likely to be Child-Pugh class A or B, and the non-survivors were class C. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was highly predictive of IHM at an optimized cut-off value of ≥ 12.9. Higher esophageal varices grades and presence of active bleeding on index endoscopy were significant (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors compared to survivors. Complications of liver cirrhosis and associated major comorbidity were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the non-survivors than the survivors. Univariate logistic regression analysis identified higher Grade Esophageal Varices and number of transfused packed red blood cells units as two independent predictors of IHM. Conclusions IHM was particularly high (54.3%) among HCC patients with AVB who had MELD score > 12.9, higher grade Esophageal Varices, active bleeding on index endoscopy, more increased needs for blood transfusion, longer hospital stay, decompensated liver disease with major comorbidity. PMID:26516439

  14. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  15. Medical rota changes and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Bohler, Iain; George Mackenzie Jardine, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of clinical guidelines to improve patient care is highly dependent on the ability of hospital teams to interpret and implement advised standards of care. Trimester and bi-annual rotation changes often see transference and loss of acquired experience and knowledge from wards with ensuing shortfalls in patient safety and care quality. Such shortfalls were noticed in the ability of our unit to adhere to national venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis measures. A prospective quality improvement audit was embarked upon to address this. An initial audit of VTE prophylaxis in 112 patients demonstrated just 71% compliance with suggested measures. Errors were predominantly medical in origin and secondary to poor understanding, interpretation, and knowledge of VTE guidelines. Errors were also noted in nursing and patient compliance to measures. Repeated re-auditing demonstrated increased error (following initial improvement post audit) after periods of medical staff rotation. Through education of junior medical and nursing staff, and of patients, the unit was able to achieve 100% compliance. Rota changes often induce conflict of interest between maintaining adequate services and high levels of patient care or providing suitable and informed induction programmes for new medical staff. Emphasised education of VTE prophylaxis guidelines has now become part of induction of junior medical staff, whilst ward based measures ensure daily compliance. The success of the audit strategy has led to its use throughout other surgical units within the hospital. PMID:26734265

  16. Correlation Between the Type of Acute Coronary Syndrome With the Needs of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Polikandrioti, Maria; Goudevenos, John; Michalis, Lampros K.; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Georgiadi, Elpida; Karakostas, Kostas; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS) comprise life-threatening health problems that demand emergency care and immediate intervention. As patients are abruptly transitioning from healthy state into suffering, they consequently experience several needs, mainly attributed to the type of the syndrome including the therapeutic regimen. Objectives: To access the correlation between the type of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with the needs of hospitalized patients. Methods: A sample of 454 hospitalized patients with ACS, recruited from 4 hospitals in Greece, was enrolled in the study. Data were collected by the completion of questionnaire which apart from socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, it also included the questionnaire “Needs of hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease” which is consisted 6 subscales: a) need for support and guidance, b) need for information from the medical-nursing staff, c) need for being in contact with other patient groups and ensuring communication with relatives, d) need for individualized treatment and for the patient’s personal participation to his/her treatment e) need to meet the emotional and physical needs f) need to trust the medical-nursing staff. Statistical methods used were Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, chi2 test of independence, Kruskal wallis-test and multiple regression. Results: The type of ACS was statistically significant correlated with the place of residence (p=0.002), management of disease (p<0.001) and prior experience of hospitalization (p=0.003). All six needs were statistically significantly correlated with the type of ACS, (p<0.001 for the need for support and guidance, p<0.001 for the need to be informed from the medical and nursing staff, p<0.001 for the need for being in contact with other patient groups, and ensuring communication with relatives, p<0.001 for the need for individualized treatment and for the patient’s personal participation to his/her treatment, p<0.001 for the need

  17. The Use of Virtual Patients in Medical School Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cendan, Juan; Lok, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The demonstration of patient-based cases using automated technology [virtual patients (VPs)] has been available to health science educators for a number of decades. Despite the promise of VPs as an easily accessible and moldable platform, their widespread acceptance and integration into medical curricula have been slow. Here, the authors review…

  18. Medications Do Not Necessarily Normalize Cognition in ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gualtieri, C. Thomas; Johnson, Lynda G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Although ADHD medications are effective for the behavioral components of the disorder, little information exists concerning their effects on cognition, especially in community samples. Method: A cross-sectional study of ADHD patients treated with three different ADHD drugs was conducted. Patients' performance on a computerized…

  19. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  20. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene. PMID:26837258

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Distress in patients with acute leukemia: A concept analysis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.; Rosenzweig, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with acute leukemia require immediate and aggressive in-patient treatment that results in many weeks to months of hospitalization. Thus, it is not surprising that distress has been found in as many as 45.5% of patients. While distress is a regularly reported outcome measure in clinical research, currently there is a lack of a clear consistent and universal definition of this concept. Objective The purpose of this article is to examine the current state of the science surrounding the concept of distress and propose a model of distress for patients with acute leukemia. Interventions/Methods The Walker and Avant framework was used to guide the analysis of the concept of distress in patients with AL. The findings from this analysis were then used to generate a model guided by the current science. Results Distress in AL is generally accepted as multi-dimensional, quantifiable, subjective and temporal. Antecedents to distress include: demographics; intrinsic factors; social support; disease progression; treatment; and communication. Consequences to distress include: decreased quality of life; patient outcomes; as well as the severity of physical and psychological symptoms. Conclusions Distress is an outcome measure that is frequently assessed and reported within the literature. The operationalization of distress varies by investigator, limiting its generalizabiliy. Implications for Practice The proposed conceptual model may be used to guide further research on distress in patients with AL at high risk for negative outcomes. Improved understanding of patient distress may guide interventions aimed at managing the psychosocial needs for patients receiving treatment for AL. PMID:23632470

  4. Managing medical comorbidities in patients with depression to improve prognosis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E

    2016-02-01

    Medical comorbidities contribute to poor antidepressant response, treatment resistance, and poor outcomes in many patients with depression. Depression can co-occur with thyroid conditions, chronic pain conditions, central nervous system disorders, and more. Inflammatory conditions such as diabetes and obesity are also associated with depression, and the connection between inflammation and depression may lead to testing that could better match patients to specific antidepressant treatment. Interventions for patients with depression and a comorbid medical condition include careful selection of antidepressant therapy as well as psychotherapy and adjunctive agents. PMID:26829434

  5. Medical management of the patient with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mask, A G

    2000-06-01

    Cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and periodontal disease have been established as major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Dentists and physicians should work aggressively to educate periodontitis patients about this relationship in an effort to improve the quality of health and contribute to their long-term survival. Blood pressure should be checked at the initial dental visit and at each subsequent visit in patients whose blood pressure is found to be high and/or has a history of hypertension. Dental and medical assistants should receive in-service training to assure competency in measuring blood pressures. All staff should be certified in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Emergency protocol procedures should be in writing and rehearsed regularly. Patients should take their blood pressure medication as usual on the day of the dental procedure. It is helpful for the patients to bring all medications to the office for review at the time of the dental procedure. Good communication should be established between the dentist and physician to maximize good dental and physical health. Because the patient with periodontal disease is at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, a standardized form should be developed for the convenient exchange of vital information, including but not limited to: blood pressure, medications, allergies, medical conditions and pertinent highlights of dental procedures. Minimize stress in patients with coronary artery disease. This includes providing solid local anesthesia, avoidance of intravascular medication injections, and encouraging relaxation techniques. Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated in patients with valvular heart disease but does not guarantee the prevention of endocarditis. These patients should be alerted to monitor any symptoms such as fever, chills or shortness of breath. It has also been documented that toothbrushing, flossing and home plaque removers can cause transient bacteremia in

  6. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  7. Medical Malpractice: Reform for Today's Patients and Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Jason A; Korzick, Karen A; Beech, Kristen; Wood, Kenneth E

    2016-01-01

    The current system of medical malpractice does a poor job of serving the best interests of physicians or patients. Economic and societal forces are shifting the nature of health care from the individual physician to a system of health care professionals, characterized by accountable care organizations. In particular, more physicians are employed, quality and outcomes are routinely measured, and reimbursement is moving to value-based purchasing. Medical malpractice likewise needs to transition to a new model that is consistent with the modern era of patient-centered care. Collective accountability, the concept that patient care is the responsibility of all the members of the health care organization, requires malpractice reform that reflects a systems-based practice of medicine. Enterprise liability, coupled with medical error communication and resolution programs, provides the legal framework necessary for the patient-centered practice of medicine in today's environment. PMID:26391747

  8. An analysis of clinical process measures for acute healthcare delivery in Appalachia: The Roane Medical Center experience

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Karla Rae; Hancock, John S; Sills, Eric Scott

    2006-01-01

    Objective To survey management of selected emergency healthcare needs in a Tennessee community hospital. Materials and methods In this descriptive report, discharges and associated standard process measures were retrospectively studied for Roane Medical Center (RMC) in Harriman, Tennessee (pop. 6,757). Hospital data were extracted from a nationwide database of short-term acute care hospitals to measure 16 quality performance measures in myocardial infarction (MI), heart failure, and pneumonia during the 14 month interval ending March 2005. The data also permitted comparisons with state and national reference groups. Results Of RMC patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 94% received aspirin on arrival, a figure higher than both state (85%) and national (91%) averages. Assessment of left ventricular dysfunction among heart failure patients was also higher at RMC (98%) than the state (74%) or national (79%) average. For RMC pneumonia patients, 79% received antibiotics within 4 h of admission, which compared favorably with State (76%) and national (75%) average. RMC scored higher on 13 of 16 clinical process measures (p<0.01, sign test analysis, >95% CI) compared to state and national averages. Discussion Although acute health care needs are often met with limited resources in medically underserved regions, RMC performed above state and national average for most process measures assessed in this review. Our data were derived from one facility and the associated findings may not be applicable in other healthcare settings. Further studies are planned to track other parameters and specific clinical outcomes at RMC, as well as to identify specific institutional policies that facilitate attainment of target quality measures. PMID:16571127

  9. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  10. Allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplants for patients with relapsed acute leukemia: long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Raiola, A M; Ibatici, A; di Grazia, C; Dominietto, A; Piaggio, G; Podesta, M; Bruno, B; Lombardi, A; Frassoni, F; Viscoli, C; Sacchi, N; Van Lint, M T

    2007-03-01

    We assessed the long-term outcome of patients with relapsed acute myeloid (n=86) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n=66), undergoing an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in our unit. The median blast count in the marrow was 30%. Conditioning regimen included total body irradiation (TBI) (10-12 Gy) in 115 patients. The donor was a matched donor (n=132) or a family mismatched donor (n=20). Twenty-two patients (15%) survive disease free, with a median follow-up of 14 years: 18 are off medications. The cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality is 40% and the cumulative incidence of relapse related death (RRD) is 45%. In multivariate analysis of survival, favorable predictors were chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) (P=0.0003), donor other than family mismatched (P=0.02), donor age less than 34 years (P=0.02) and blast count less than 30% (P=0.07). Patients with all four favorable predictors had a 54% survival. In multivariate analysis of relapse, protective variables were the use of TBI (P=0.005) and cGvHD (P=0.01). This study confirms that a fraction of relapsed leukemias is cured with an allogeneic transplant: selection of patients with a blast count <30%, identification of young, human leukocyte antigen-matched donors and the use of total body radiation may significantly improve the outcome. PMID:17277788

  11. Continued Dispensing: what medications do patients believe should be available?

    PubMed

    Abukres, Salem Hasn; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continued Dispensing (CD) is a new medication supply method for certain medications in Australia. It aims to prevent treatment interruption as a result of patients' inability to obtain a new valid prescription. The only currently eligible patients for this service are statin and/or oral contraceptives users who have been using these medications for 6 months or more, have not utilized the CD method during the last 12 months, and cannot obtain an immediate appointment with the prescriber in order to get a new prescription. This study aimed to investigate patients' attitudes towards potential extension and expansion of this medication supply method. Methods. A randomly selected 301 users of these medications from all Australian States were recruited using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI). Result. The response rate was 79%. The majority of the participants (73.3%) did not agree with current restriction on CD utilization frequency. They also supported, to varying degrees, inclusion of all the proposed medications (support ranged from 44.2-78.4%). In this regard, participants who suffered from a specific disease did not differ significantly from those without the disease except in case of patients with depression (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Participants of this study strongly supported both CD extension and expansion. A future critical review of the current version of CD is highly recommended in order to enhance CD capability to achieve its goals. PMID:26019994

  12. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

  14. Improving the acute care of COPD patients across Gloucestershire: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig; Cushley, Claire; Redler, Kasey; Mitchell, Claire; Aynsley Day, Elizabeth; Mansfield, Helen; Nye, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Admissions for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present a significant proportion of patients in the acute medical take. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) provides guidelines for time specific interventions, that should be delivered to those with an acute exacerbation of COPD through the admission care bundle. These include correct diagnosis, correct assessment of oxygenation, early administration of treatment, recognition of respiratory failure, and specialist review. Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (GHNHSFT) chose improvement in acute COPD care to be a local Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme, which enables commissioners to reward excellence by linking a proportion of English healthcare providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals. The effects of initiatives put in place by senior clinicians had waned, and further improvements were required to meet the CQUIN target. The aim of the scheme was to improve compliance with the BTS guidelines and CQUIN scheme for patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Specific bundle paperwork to be used for all patients admitted to the Trust with an exacerbation of COPD was introduced to the Trust in June 2014, with training and education of medical staff at that time. This had improved compliance rates from 10% to 63% by September 2014. Compliance with each intervention was audited through the examination of notes of patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Compliance rates had plateaued over the last three months, and so a focus group involving junior medical staff met in September 2014 to try to increase awareness further, in order to drive greater improvements in care, and meet the CQUIN requirements. Their strategies were implemented, and then compliance with the CQUIN requirements was reaudited as described above. The December 2014 audit results showed a further improvement in overall COPD care, with 73% of patients

  15. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  17. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  18. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  19. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, localization, treatment received, ictus onset, hospitalization time, discharge date, and date of first evaluation at the rehabilitation center. The Modified Rankin Scale in 90 days after ictus was utilized to measure functional incapacity with the individuals divided into two groups, before and after acute stroke unit implementation (2010). Functional incapacity was compared between before and after acute stroke unit implementation by the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test. [Results] The medical records of 170 patients were evaluated. In the group evaluated after 2010, the patients were significantly older and presented a shorter time between hospitalization and discharge, shorter time until the first evaluation in rehabilitation, and increased percentage of mild incapacity (Modified Rankin Scale = 0 to 2). [Conclusion] After acute stroke unit implementation, the patients treated in the rehabilitation section presented a shorter hospitalization time and rehabilitation delay and less functional incapacity. PMID:26355915

  20. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  1. Colchicine Acutely Suppresses Local Cardiac Production of Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients With an Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Gonzalo J; Robertson, Stacy; Barraclough, Jennifer; Xia, Qiong; Mallat, Ziad; Bursill, Christina; Celermajer, David S; Patel, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, and downstream IL-6 are key inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Colchicine is believed to block the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex responsible for the production of IL-1β and IL-18. In vivo effects of colchicine on cardiac cytokine release have not been previously studied. This study aimed to (1) assess the local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), stable coronary artery disease and in controls; and (2) determine whether acute administration of colchicine inhibits their production. Methods and Results Forty ACS patients, 33 with stable coronary artery disease, and 10 controls, were included. ACS and stable coronary artery disease patients were randomized to oral colchicine treatment (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 hour later) or no colchicine, 6 to 24 hours prior to cardiac catheterization. Blood samples from the coronary sinus, aortic root (arterial), and lower right atrium (venous) were collected and tested for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 using ELISA. In ACS patients, coronary sinus levels of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were significantly higher than arterial and venous levels (P=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Transcoronary (coronary sinus-arterial) gradients for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 were highest in ACS patients and lowest in controls (P=0.077, 0.033, and 0.014, respectively). Colchicine administration significantly reduced transcoronary gradients of all 3 cytokines in ACS patients by 40% to 88% (P=0.028, 0.032, and 0.032, for IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6, respectively). Conclusions ACS patients exhibit increased local cardiac production of inflammatory cytokines. Short-term colchicine administration rapidly and significantly reduces levels of these cytokines. PMID:26304941

  2. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  3. Patient safety through intelligent procedures in medication: the PSIP project.

    PubMed

    Beuscart, Régis; McNair, Peter; Brender, Jytte

    2009-01-01

    The European project Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) aims at preventing medical errors. The objective are: (1) to facilitate the systematic production of epidemiological knowledge on Adverse Drug Events (ADE) and (2) to improve the entire medication cycle in a hospital environment. The first sub-objective is to produce knowledge on ADE: to know, as exactly as possible, per hospital, per medical department, their number, type, consequences and causes, including human factors. Data Mining of structured hospital data bases, and semantic mining of free-texts will provide a list of observed ADE, with frequencies and probabilities, thus giving a better understanding of potential risks. The second sub-objective is to develop innovative knowledge based on the mining results and to deliver professionals and patients contextualized alerts and recommendations fitting the local risk parameters. This knowledge will be implemented in a PSIP-Platform independent of existing ICT applications. PMID:19745230

  4. Impaired interhemispheric connectivity in medication-naive patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Jiang, Wenyan; Ren, Ling; Ouyang, Xuan; Jiang, Yifeng; Wu, Feng; Kong, Lingtao; Womer, Fay; Liu, Zhening; Blumberg, Hilary P.; Tang, Yanqing; Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the anterior interhemispheric connections provided by the corpus callosum (CC) have long been implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). The purpose of this study was to investigate interhemispheric connectivity in medication-naive patients with MDD by measuring fractional anisotropy in the CC with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques. Methods We obtained DTI scans from medication-naive patients with MDD and from matched healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy values were compared using semiautomatic region of interest methods to localize the regional CC differences between these 2 groups. Results We enrolled 27 patients and 27 controls in our study. Fractional anisotropy values were significantly lower in the anterior genu of the CC in the MDD group than in the control group (p = 0.009, corrected); results were not significantly different in any other CC subregions. Limitations As patients with MDD were already experiencing acute episodes, future studies of individuals at risk for MDD are warranted to elucidate the interhemispheric connectivity abnormalities associated with the predisposition to MDD. Conclusion The findings demonstrate abnormalities in the structural integrity of the anterior genu of the CC in medication-naive individuals with MDD, which may contribute to impairment of interhemispheric connectivity in patients with this disorder. PMID:22498077

  5. Eight challenges faced by general practitioners caring for patients after an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair; Thompson, Peter L

    2014-11-17

    The general practitioner is essential in the management of the patient who has recently been discharged from hospital following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), particularly as duration of hospital stay is shorter than in previous decades. GPs caring for patients after an ACS face numerous challenges. Often, the first of these is insufficient or delayed documentation from the discharging hospital, although electronic discharge summaries are alleviating this problem. Post-ACS patients often have comorbidities, and GPs play a key role in managing these. Patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy who need surgery, and post-ACS patients with atrial fibrillation, require particular care from GPs. Patients will often approach their GP for advice on the safety of other drugs, such as smoking cessation medication, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for erectile dysfunction. For patients complaining of persistent lethargy after an ACS, GPs must consider several differential diagnoses, including depression, hypotension, hypovolaemia, and side effects of β-blockers. GPs play an important ongoing role in ensuring that target cholesterol levels are reached with statin therapy; this includes ensuring long-term adherence. They may also need to advise patients who want to stop statin therapy, usually due to perceived side effects. Many of these challenges can be met with improved and respectful communication between the hospital, the treating cardiologist and the GP. The patient needs to be closely involved in the decision-making process, particularly when balancing the risks of bleeding versus thrombosis. PMID:25390497

  6. Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality for Patients with Acute Leukemia Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Danielle; Christian, Michael; Ibrahimova, Narmin; Kumar, Vikram; Jacob, Gabriella; Kiss, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives were to describe the management and outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) patients admitted to the ICU and to identify predictors of ICU mortality. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected from the medical records of all patients with AML or ALL admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital ICU from August 2009 to December 2012. Results. 151 AL patients (117 AML, 34 ALL) were admitted to the ICU. Mean age was 54 (SD 15) years, median APACHE II score was 27 (IQR 22–33), and 50% were female. While in ICU, 128 (85%) patients had sepsis and 56 (37%) had ARDS. The majority of patients required invasive organ support: 94 (62%) required mechanical ventilation while 23 (15%) received renal replacement therapy. Multivariable analysis identified SOFA score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.38) and invasive ventilation (OR 9.64, 95% CI 3.39–27.4) as independent predictors of ICU mortality. Ninety-four (62%) patients survived to ICU discharge. Only 39% of these 94 patients discharged were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Conclusions. AL patients admitted to the ICU had a 62% ICU survival rate; yet only 25% of cohort patients were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Higher admission SOFA scores and invasive ventilation are independently associated with a greater risk of dying in the ICU. PMID:27445524

  7. Patients' perspectives on medical information: results of an informal survey.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kavitha

    2007-01-01

    The autonomy of patients in making medical decisions is increasingly recognised globally, but is not fully adhered to in India. Information is the first step for a patient to be able to make a decision on his or her health care. The objective of this survey was to ascertain patients' perspectives on the amount of information given to them by health professionals. The results of interviews with 222 patients show that perspectives vary, often according to the diagnosis. The amount of information given and the manner in which it is given are often not acceptable to the patient. PMID:18630214

  8. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Promoting patient-centred fundamental care in acute healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Feo, Rebecca; Kitson, Alison

    2016-05-01

    Meeting patients' fundamental care needs is essential for optimal safety and recovery and positive experiences within any healthcare setting. There is growing international evidence, however, that these fundamentals are often poorly executed in acute care settings, resulting in patient safety threats, poorer and costly care outcomes, and dehumanising experiences for patients and families. Whilst care standards and policy initiatives are attempting to address these issues, their impact has been limited. This discussion paper explores, through a series of propositions, why fundamental care can be overlooked in sophisticated, high technology acute care settings. We argue that the central problem lies in the invisibility and subsequent devaluing of fundamental care. Such care is perceived to involve simple tasks that require little skill to execute and have minimal impact on patient outcomes. The propositions explore the potential origins of this prevailing perception, focusing upon the impact of the biomedical model, the consequences of managerial approaches that drive healthcare cultures, and the devaluing of fundamental care by nurses themselves. These multiple sources of invisibility and devaluing surrounding fundamental care have rendered the concept underdeveloped and misunderstood both conceptually and theoretically. Likewise, there remains minimal role clarification around who should be responsible for and deliver such care, and a dearth of empirical evidence and evidence-based metrics. In explicating these propositions, we argue that key to transforming the delivery of acute healthcare is a substantial shift in the conceptualisation of fundamental care. The propositions present a cogent argument that counters the prevailing perception that fundamental care is basic and does not require systematic investigation. We conclude by calling for the explicit valuing and embedding of fundamental care in healthcare education, research, practice and policy. Without this

  10. [Patients' complaints against medical staff: a modern phenomenon?].

    PubMed

    Cartier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    According to the National Archives (Eure-et-Loir, France) which are prior to 1790, the study of legal medical cases does show complaints of patients against medical staff and particularly against surgeons. The three main complaints were negligence, carelessness, or simply ignorance. The grounds for complaining decreased as Medicine became more and more based on new scientific data available for common people. PMID:17162934

  11. Effects of Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment in Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Hsin; Chen, Shao-Yuan; Wang, Vinchi; Chen, Chao-Ching; Wang, Kaw-Chen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chien; Lu, Kuo-Cheng; Yip, Ping-Keung; Ma, Wen-Ya; Liu, Chuan-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    The role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke is controversial. This prospective study assessed the efficacy and safety of HBOT as adjuvant treatment on 46 acute ischemic stroke in patients who did not receive thrombolytic therapy. The HBOT group (n = 16) received conventional medical treatment with 10 sessions of adjunctive HBOT within 3–5 days after stroke onset, while the control group (n = 30) received the same treatment but without HBOT. Early (around two weeks after onset) and late (one month after onset) outcomes (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, NIHSS scores) and efficacy (changes of NIHSS scores) of HBOT were evaluated. The baseline clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Both early and late outcomes of the HBOT group showed significant difference (P ≤ 0.001). In the control group, there was only significant difference in early outcome (P = 0.004). For early efficacy, there was no difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores between the two groups (P = 0.140) but there was statistically significant difference when comparing changes of NIHSS scores at one month (P ≤ 0.001). The HBOT used in this study may be effective for patients with acute ischemic stroke and is a safe and harmless adjunctive treatment. PMID:22919348

  12. Management of acute heart failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio; Arrigo, Mattia; Tolppanen, Heli; Gayat, Etienne; Laribi, Said; Metra, Marco; Seronde, Marie France; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is the most common cause of unplanned hospital admissions, and is associated with high mortality rates. Over the next few decades, the combination of improved cardiovascular disease survival and progressive ageing of the population will further increase the prevalence of AHF in developed countries. New recommendations on the management of AHF have been published recently, but as elderly patients are under-represented in clinical trials, and scientific evidence is often lacking, the diagnosis and management of AHF in this population is challenging. The clinical presentation of AHF, especially in patients aged>85years, differs substantially from that in younger patients, with unspecific symptoms, such as fatigue and confusion, often overriding dyspnoea. Older patients also have a different risk profile compared with younger patients: often heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and infection as the most frequent precipitating factor of AHF. Moreover, co-morbidities, disability and frailty are common, and increase morbidity, recovery time, readmission rates and mortality; their presence should be detected during a geriatric assessment. Diagnostics and treatment for AHF should be tailored according to cardiopulmonary and geriatric status, giving special attention to the patient's preferences for care. Whereas many elderly AHF patients may be managed similarly to younger patients, different strategies should be applied in the presence of relevant co-morbidities, disability and frailty. The option of palliative care should be considered at an early stage, to avoid unnecessary and harmful diagnostics and treatments. PMID:27185193

  13. Understanding Patient Portal Use: Implications for Medication Management

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Wallston, Kenneth A; Johnson, Kevin B; Elasy, Tom A

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet can be leveraged to provide disease management support, including medication adherence promotion that, when tailored, can effectively improve adherence to medications. The growing adoption of patient portals represents an opportunity to support medication management and adherence more broadly, but virtually no data exist about the real and potential impact of existing portals on these outcomes. Objective We sought to (1) understand who uses an existing patient portal and reasons for use and nonuse, (2) understand how portal users are using a portal to manage their medications, and (3) explore participants’ ideas for improving portal functionality for medication management and adherence support. Methods A total of 75 adults with type 2 diabetes participated in a mixed-methods study involving focus groups, a survey, and a medical chart review. We used quantitative data to identify differences between portal users and nonusers, and to test the relationship between the frequency of portal use and glycemic control among users. We used qualitative methods to understand how and why participants use a portal and their ideas for improving its medication management functionality. Results Of the enrolled participants, 81% (61/75) attended a focus group and/or completed a survey; portal users were more likely than nonusers to participate in that capacity (Fisher exact test; P=.01). Users were also more likely than nonusers to be Caucasian/white (Fisher exact test; P<.001), have higher incomes (Fisher exact test; P=.005), and be privately insured (Fisher exact test; P<.001). Users also tended to have more education than nonusers (Mann–Whitney U; P=.05), although this relationship was not significant at P<.05. Among users, more frequent use of a portal was associated with better A1C (Spearman rho =–0.30; P=.02). Reasons for nonuse included not knowing about the portal (n=3), not having access to a computer (n=3), or having a family member serve as

  14. Clinical features of ankylosing spondylitis associated with acute anterior uveitis in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shu-Xing; Yin, Xiao-Lei; Yuan, Rong-Di; Zheng, Zheng; Huo, Yan; Zou, Huan

    2012-01-01

    AIM To characterize the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of uveitis associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Chinese patients. METHODS Two hundred and three patients with uveitis associated with AS followed-up in the Third Military Medical University Daping Hospital between 2005 and 2010 were retrospectively evaluated in this study. Complete ophthalmological examinations were evaluated at baseline and during the follow-up period. The gender, age, follow-up time, mean frequency of uveitis onset, and accompanying eye examination findings, history, demographical parameters were reviewed. All the patients presented complete clinical and radiologic (sacroiliac, lumbar, dorsal and cervical spine, knee, ankle, shoulder, hip, elbow) evaluation. HLA-B27 typing was also searched. RESULTS There were 203 patients diagnosed with AS associated uveitis. All showed sacroiliac X-ray changes indicative of AS. There were 184 male and 19 female patients. The average age of patients was 35±12 (range 18–50). Mean follow-up period was 2.4 years (1-5 years). Acute anterior uveitis was the most common type of uveitis in both genders. 121 eyes presented unilateral involvement (55.2%), and 92 eyes presented bilateral involvement (45.3%) with onset alternately. 22 eyes occurred hypopyon, 16 eyes were found anterior vitreous cells, 7 eyes were noted reactive macular edema or exudation, 29 eyes presented posterior synechiae of iris, and 14 eyes presented cataract, 9 eyes presented secondary glaucoma, 2 eyes presented bend corneal degeneration and 1 eyes presented atrophy of eyeball. At the final visit, uveitis was well controlled in most patients. CONCLUSION AS associated with uveitis in Chinese patients mainly manifests as acute anterior uveitis. A combination of corticosteroids with other mydriasis agents is effective for most AS associated with uveitis patients. In general, the prognosis is good in these cases. PMID:22762042

  15. Relationship of platelet indices with acute stent thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balli, Mehmet; Taşolar, Hakan; Çetin, Mustafa; Cagliyan, Caglar Emre; Gözükara, Mehmet Yavuz; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Elbasan, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite major advances in stent technology and antithrombotic therapy, the development of stent thrombosis continues to be a major problem in patients who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Although a few studies have investigated the relationship between early stent thrombosis and platelet activity, the relationship between acute stent thrombosis (AST) (within the first 24 h) and platelet indices is unclear. Aim We investigated the relationship between AST development and platelet indices in acute coronary syndrome patients. Material and methods In our case-control study, 33 patients who underwent PCI with subsequent AST development and 59 patients without AST were selected by propensity analysis. We compared the clinical, angiographic, and laboratory data between the AST and control groups. Results Mean platelet volume (MPV) (p=0.002) and platelet distribution width (p=0.014) were significantly higher and platelet count (p=0.017) was significantly lower in the AST group. Logistic regression analyses showed that MPV was a significant independent predictor of AST (OR = 1.67; 95% CI: 1.11–2.51; p=0.013). In the ROC analyses, the cut-off value of MPV to detect AST was > 9.1 fl with a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 42.4%, a positive predictive value of 46.9% and a negative predictive value of 89.3% (AUC: 0.687, 95% CI: 0.582–0.780, p=0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that baseline MPV predicts the development of AST in patients with ACS. Mean platelet volume therefore might be an easily accessible marker in the identification of patients at high risk for the development of AST. PMID:26677364

  16. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children. PMID:25352538

  17. Role of Doppler Ultrasonography and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdulwahid G; Elkhader, Bahaaedin A; Saade, Charbel; Fagiri, Maram A; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z

    2016-01-01

    This research was designate with an intention to find the role of Doppler ultrasonography (DUS) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with acute scrotum. A sum of 80 (mean age 23±2.1 years) consequential patients were recruited for a period of six months between July 2015 and January 2016 in this prospective study. Collected data confined age, medical history, and clinical symptoms. DUS was performed with a linear array transducer (10-15 MHz) connected to HI vision Avius ultrasound unit; Hitachi. CRP was measured using turbidimetric analysis through the Cobas Integra analyzer system (Test CRPL2, 0-293); Roche Diagnostics. Statistical analysis was accomplished using the standard Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 for Windows; Microsoft. Fitted achievement values for DUS in the diagnosis of testicular torsion, epididymo-orchitis, and varicocele were respectively 100%, 91% and 88% for sensitivity, 92%, 71%, and 90% for specificity, and 94%, 83%, and 89% for accuracy. An increased in the serum CRP level (63.2±40.2 mg/L) was seen in an inflammatory cause of the acute scrotum. In contrast, there was no increase in CRP level (8±3.1 mg/L) in the non-inflammatory cases (P < 0.0001). Scrotal DUS is a highly precise preoperative diagnostic instrument, thereby confirm its course application in the incipient triage of patients with acute scrotum. Serum level of CRP can afford useful advice for differentiation between inflammatory and other reasons of the acute scrotum. PMID:27530575

  18. Watermarking medical images with anonymous patient identification to verify authenticity.

    PubMed

    Coatrieux, Gouenou; Quantin, Catherine; Montagner, Julien; Fassa, Maniane; Allaert, François-André; Roux, Christian

    2008-01-01

    When dealing with medical image management, there is a need to ensure information authenticity and dependability. Being able to verify the information belongs to the correct patient and is issued from the right source is a major concern. Verification can help to reduce the risk of errors when identifying documents in daily practice or when sending a patient's Electronic Health Record. At the same time, patient privacy issues may appear during the verification process when the verifier accesses patient data without appropriate authorization. In this paper we discuss the combination of watermarking with different identifiers ranging from DICOM standard UID to an Anonymous European Patient Identifier in order to improve medical image protection in terms of authenticity and maintainability. PMID:18487808

  19. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  20. Pharmacists’ perspectives on promoting medication adherence among patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kibicho, Jennifer W.; Owczarzak, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To provide pharmacists’ perspectives on medication adherence barriers for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and to describe pharmacists’ strategies for promoting adherence to antiretroviral medications. Design Multisite, qualitative, descriptive study. Setting Four midwestern U.S. states, from August through October 2009. Participants 19 pharmacists at 10 pharmacies providing services to patients with HIV. Intervention Pharmacists were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide. Main outcome measures Barriers to medication adherence, pharmacist interventions, challenges to promoting adherence. Results Pharmacists reported a range of adherence barriers that were patient specific (e.g., cognitive factors, lack of social support), therapy related (e.g., adverse effects, intolerable medications), and structural level (e.g., strained provider relationships). They used a combination of individually tailored, patient-specific interventions that identified and resolved adherence barriers and actively anticipated and addressed potential adherence barriers. Pharmacist interventions included medication-specific education to enhance patient self-efficacy, follow-up calls to monitor adherence, practical and social support to motivate adherence, and patient referrals to other health care providers. However, the pharmacists faced internal (e.g., lack of time, lack of trained personnel) and external (e.g., insurance policies that disallowed patient enrollment in automatic prescription refill program) challenges. Conclusion Pharmacists in community settings went beyond prescription drug counseling mandated by law to provide additional pharmacy services that were tailored to the needs of patients with HIV. Given that many individuals with HIV are living longer, more research is needed on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of pharmacists’ interventions in clinical practice, in order to inform insurance reimbursement policies. PMID

  1. [Rhabdomyolysis in a medical student induced by body-building exercise (rhabdomyolysis following acute muscular exertion)].

    PubMed

    Arányi, J; Radó, J

    1992-08-01

    A medical student sportsman had been admitted to the hospital because of weakness and painful swelling of the muscle as well as dark urine appearing after carrying out an excessive body-building performance. On the basis of indirect evidences pigmenturia "per exclusionem" was a manifestation of urinary myoglobin excretion. The development of an "acute exertional rhabdomyolysis" was confirmed by the increased serum enzyme levels and myoglobinuria. The outcome of the illness was fortunate, as acute renal failure could be avoided. On the basis of survey of the literature it can be stated, that this presumably frequently occurring, but rarely recognized disease may have importance from clinical, sporting medicine and pathophysiological point of view. PMID:1495807

  2. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  3. Prehospital delay in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Sultana, Papia; Wong, Aaron Sung Lung; Chan, Kim Poh; Pek, Pin Pin; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2011-10-01

    To characterize prehospital delays in patients presenting with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Asia. A retrospective review of 273 patients with diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; symptom to door (S2D) time was described in two ways, time from first onset of symptoms; and time from the onset of the worst episode to presentation at emergency department. The median first onset S2D time was 173 min (interquartile range 80-350 min); and median worst episode S2D time was 131 min (interquartile range 70-261 min). Patients with prehospital delay tended to use their own transport compared with the no delay group (P=0.026, 95% confidence interval=0.02-0.24). There was no difference in S2D times for typical compared with atypical symptoms. A large proportion of patients experienced delay in seeking medical care after the onset of acute coronary symptoms. Self-transport was associated with delay. PMID:21317785

  4. Acute hepatic injury with amphotericin B deoxycholate in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jamie L; Bell, Allison M

    2016-01-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is rarely used due to its adverse effect profile, which includes nephrotoxicity, infusion-related reactions, and hepatotoxicity. The incidence of hepatotoxicity related to AmBd is 18-23%, but the reports of this adverse effect are mainly in immunocompromised patients receiving chemotherapy. We report a case of AmBd-related acute hepatic injury in an immunocompetent male with multiple medical problems. The patient initially had acute hepatic injury likely caused by poor nutritional status and a diagnosis of failure to thrive, but was recovering. He was also diagnosed with bilateral renal fungal mycetomas and received systemic treatment initially with micafungin and then fluconazole after urine cultures returned with the growth of Candida glabrata. Therapy was expanded to systemic AmBd when the fungal balls persisted. The patient subsequently developed hepatic re-injury with 1 dose of AmBd, and the therapy was discontinued. Caution should be exerted when utilizing AmBd in treating patients with previous hepatic injury. PMID:27440960

  5. Acute hepatic injury with amphotericin B deoxycholate in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jamie L.; Bell, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBd) is rarely used due to its adverse effect profile, which includes nephrotoxicity, infusion-related reactions, and hepatotoxicity. The incidence of hepatotoxicity related to AmBd is 18–23%, but the reports of this adverse effect are mainly in immunocompromised patients receiving chemotherapy. We report a case of AmBd-related acute hepatic injury in an immunocompetent male with multiple medical problems. The patient initially had acute hepatic injury likely caused by poor nutritional status and a diagnosis of failure to thrive, but was recovering. He was also diagnosed with bilateral renal fungal mycetomas and received systemic treatment initially with micafungin and then fluconazole after urine cultures returned with the growth of Candida glabrata. Therapy was expanded to systemic AmBd when the fungal balls persisted. The patient subsequently developed hepatic re-injury with 1 dose of AmBd, and the therapy was discontinued. Caution should be exerted when utilizing AmBd in treating patients with previous hepatic injury.

  6. [Patient-centered medicine for tuberculosis medical services].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akira; Narita, Tomoyo

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 edition of Specific Guiding Principles for Tuberculosis Prevention calls for a streamlined medical services system capable of providing medical care that is customized to the patient's needs. The new 21st Century Japanese version of the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) expands the indication of DOTS to all tuberculosis (TB) patients in need of treatment. Hospital DOTS consists of comprehensive, patient-centered support provided by a DOTS care team. For DOTS in the field, health care providers should select optimal administration support based on patient profiles and local circumstances. In accordance with medical fee revisions for 2012, basic inpatient fees have been raised and new standards for TB hospitals have been established, the result of efforts made by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis and other associated groups. It is important that the medical care system be improved so that patients can actively engage themselves as a member of the team, for the ultimate goal of practicing patient-centered medicine. We have organized this symposium to explore the best ways for practicing patient-centered medicine in treating TB. It is our sincere hope that this symposium will lead to improved medical treatment for TB patients. 1. Providing patient-centered TB service via utilization of collaborative care pathway: Akiko MATSUOKA (Hiroshima Prefectural Tobu Public Health Center) We have been using two types of collaborative care pathway as one of the means of providing patient-centered TB services since 2008. The first is the clinical pathway, which is mainly used by TB specialist doctors to communicate with local practitioners on future treatment plan (e.g. medication and treatment duration) of patients. The clinical pathway was first piloted in Onomichi district and its use was later expanded to the whole of Hiroshima prefecture. The second is the regional care pathway, which is used to share treatment progress, test results and other

  7. Acute, Severe Cryptosporidiosis in an Immunocompetent Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Tallant, Caitlin; Huddleston, Patrick; Alshanberi, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Severe diarrheal illness in children can be attributed to a number of different microbiological agents. Without appropriate microbiological testing of stool samples, patients who present with multiple days of severe diarrhea might have a delay in proper diagnosis and treatment. Here, we report a case of an immunocompetent pediatric patient presenting with acute cryptosporidiosis. Humans and bovine species are known hosts of cryptosporidium and several studies have evaluated the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidium from cattle to humans. Adding diagnostic tests for cryptosporidium like Ziehl-Neelsen staining of stool or fecal rapid antigen detection techniques should be considered in the workup of patients presenting with undifferentiated, severe diarrheal illness, especially in those who have close contact with livestock. PMID:27478580

  8. Skin nodules in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Hutin, Pascal; Le Gal, Solène; Guillerm, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections cause a significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe the case of a patient with skin fusariosis and a probable cerebral toxoplasmosis after UCB stem cell transplantation for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium species (spp) infections are difficult to treat. To date, there has been no consensus on the treatment of fusariosis and the management of its side effects. Given the negative pretransplant Toxoplasma serology in this case, identifying the origin of the Toxoplasma infection was challenging. All usual transmission routes were screened for and ruled out. The patient's positive outcome was not consistent with that of the literature reporting 60% mortality due to each infection. PMID:24408938

  9. Quality of Life of Patients After an Acute Coronary Event: Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Cristiane Maria Carvalho Costa; Macedo, Luciana Bilitario; Gomes, Lilian Tapioca Jones Cunha; de Oliveira, Paula Luzia Seixas Pereira; Albuquerque, Iana Verena Santana; Lemos, Amanda Queiroz; Brasil, Cristina Aires; Prado, Eloisa Pires Ferreira; Macedo, Pedro Santiago; de Oliveira, Francisco Tiago Oliveira; dos Reis, Helena Franca Correia; Darze, Eduardo Sahade; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

    2014-01-01

    Background The acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has a high morbi-mortality rate, including physical deficiencies and functional limitations with impact on quality of life. Cardiovascular rehabilitation 1 (CVR1) should begin as early as possible, to enable improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. Previous studies have shown association of cardiovascular diseases with quality of life, in which depression and anxiety are the domains most altered. The aim of the study is to verify the impact of an acute coronary event on quality of life at the moment of hospital discharge. Methodology This was a cross-sectional study, with ACS patients hospitalized in ICU of a private hospital in the city of Salvador, Brazil, submitted to CVR1. The quality of life questionnaire Euroqol-5D was applied on discharge from hospital. Patients included in the study were those with ACV, who had medical permission to walk, had not been submitted to acute surgical treatment, were time and space oriented, and over the age of 18 years. Patients excluded from the study were those with cognitive, orthopedic and neurological problems, who used orthesis on a lower limb, and were in any condition of risk at the time of beginning with CVR1. Data were collected by a previously trained ICU team. Results Data were collected of 63 patients who revealed compromise in the domains of pain/feeling ill (20.63%) and anxiety/depression (38.09%). Statistical significance was observed in the association between sex and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01), sex and anxiety/depression (P < 0.01), diabetes and mobility (P < 0.01), hereditary factors and anxiety/depression (p < 0.01), BMI and pain/feeling ill (P < 0.01). Conclusion In this sample of patients, on discharge from hospital after ACS, the pain/feeling ill and anxiety/depression domains were shown to be compromised. PMID:25110540

  10. Evaluating A Patient-Centered Medical Home From the Patient's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Moody-Thomas, Sarah; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Horswell, Ronald; Griffin, Willene P.; Coleman, Mary T.; Herwehe, Jane; Besse, Jay A.; Willis, Kathleen H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The medical home is an organizational approach for improving care, improving patient experience, and reducing costs. The purpose of this qualitative project was to obtain input from patients that could be used to improve their experiences in the medical home for ongoing disease management and health improvement and to obtain their recommendations for the most effective methods to involve patients in shaping system policies, procedures, and practices consistent with patient- and family-centered care principles. Methods We conducted cognitive interviews to complete patient experience surveys, structured focus groups, and exit surveys. A sample of 32 adults participated in cognitive interviews (n=15) and structured focus groups (n=17) using the nominal group technique (NGT). Exit surveys collected demographic information and input from patients about opportunities for their involvement in shaping medical homes. Results Cognitive interviews, NGT sessions, and exit surveys revealed patient-perceived strengths and inadequacies within the medical home. Better access to care, including more efficient appointment scheduling and reduced wait times to see a physician once patients arrived for scheduled appointments, was identified as a necessary improvement. Patients' positive perceptions included how the medical home helps them reach their health goals and their overall satisfaction with the quality of care received. Conclusion The input received from patients through the methods used in this project was useful in revealing needed improvements within a medical home and, if resolved, will ensure that all patients have access to the kind of care that works for them. PMID:24052763

  11. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  12. Medical pluralism in India: patient choice or no other options?

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Helen E

    2009-01-01

    The maldistribution of biomedical services creates a dilemma for Indian patients. They encounter a bewildering array of medical services, ranging from qualified traditional medical practitioners to untrained, self-taught purveyors of medicines and cures. Research on Indian healthcare has decried the inefficient distribution of services in rural and urban areas. The studies discussed here reveal the ground reality of the consequences of limited choices for patients, characterised as "forced pluralism," with no state regulation of type of care, quality of care, or credentials of practitioners. PMID:19653589

  13. Ongoing patient randomization: an innovation in medical care research.

    PubMed Central

    Cargill, V; Cohen, D; Kroenke, K; Neuhauser, D

    1986-01-01

    Hospitals often have rotational assignment of patients to one of several similar provider care teams. The research potential of these arrangements has gone unnoticed. By changing to random assignment of patients and physicians to provider care teams (firms) this kind of organization can be used for sequential, randomized clinical trials which are ethical and efficient. The paper describes such arrangements at three different hospitals: Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Brooke Army Medical Center, and University Hospitals of Cleveland. Associated methodologic issues are discussed. This is a new, more widely applicable method for medical care research. PMID:3546202

  14. Acute severe cardiac failure complicating myocardial infarction. Experience with 100 patients referred for consideration of mechanical left ventricular assistance.

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, M F; Chang, V P; Windsor, H M; Shanahan, M X; Hickie, J B; Morgan, J J; Gunning, J F; Seldon, A W; Hall, G V; Michell, G; Goldfarb, D; Harrision, D G

    1975-01-01

    One hundred patients were referred with suspected acute cardiac failure following acute myocardial infarction. The diagnosis was confirmed in 72: 31 of these patients underwent elective medical treatment, with 2 survivors (6%); 41 were accepted for counter pulsation, but 9 died before this could be initiated and another 2 died shortly after vain attempts to pass the balloon catheter were abandoned; 30 patients underwent counterpulsation with 14 hospital survivors (47%). Survivor status was usually good. Results of counter pulsation were better in patients who were not shocked (with 5/5 survivors) than in those who were in shock (with 9 of 25 survivors). Results support the view that counterpulsation (alone or combined with corrective surgery) may play an important role in the complications of myocardial infarction provided intervention is early. PMID:1078977

  15. Acute Thrombotic Mesenteric Ischemia: Primary Endovascular Treatment in Eight Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gagniere, Johan; Favrolt, Gregory; Alfidja, Agaiecha; Kastler, Adrian; Chabrot, Pascal; Cassagnes, Lucie; Buc, Emmanuel; Pezet, Denis; Boyer, Louis

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with initial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) {+-} stenting as valuable options in the acute setting. Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, eight patients with abdominal angio-MDCT-scan proven thrombotic AMI benefited from initial PTA {+-} stenting. We retrospectively assessed clinical and radiological findings and their management. Seven patients presented thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery, and in one patient both mesenteric arteries were occluded. All patients underwent initial PTA and stenting, except one who had balloon PTA alone. One patient was treated by additional in situ thrombolysis. Results: Technical success was obtained in all patients. Three patients required subsequent surgery (37.5%), two of whom had severe radiological findings (pneumatosis intestinalis and/or portal venous gas). Two patients (25%) died: both had NIDD, an ASA score {>=}4, and severe radiologic findings. Satisfactory arterial patency was observed after a follow-up of 15 (range, 11-17) months in five patients who did not require subsequent surgery, four of whom had abdominal guarding but no severe CT scan findings. One patient had an ileocecal stenosis 60 days after the procedure. Conclusions: Initial PTA {+-} stenting is a valuable alternative to surgery for patients with thrombotic AMI even for those with clinical peritoneal irritation signs and/or severe radiologic findings. Early surgery is indicated if clinical condition does not improve after PTA. The decision of a subsequent surgery must be lead by early clinical status reevaluation. In case of underlying atherosclerotic lesion, stenting should be performed after initial balloon dilatation.

  16. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  17. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  18. How to Apply the AHS Evidence Assessment of the Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults to your Patient with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Davenport, William Jeptha; Marmura, Michael J; Schwedt, Todd J; Silberstein, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The "Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults: The American Headache Society Evidence Assessment of Migraine Pharmacotherapies" provides levels of evidence for medication efficacy for acute treatment of migraine. The goal of this companion paper is to provide guidance on how to choose between evidence-based treatment options, and, based on the clinical characteristics of the patient and their migraine attacks, to provide guidance on designing an individualized strategy for managing migraine attacks. The acute pharmacological treatments described in the American Headache Society evidence assessment can be divided into those initially taken by the patient during the headache phase of the migraine attack, those taken by the patient later in the attack when initial treatments fail, and those administered intravenously or intramuscularly in urgent care settings. Medications taken initially by patients in the headache phase include nonspecific analgesics such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), triptans, and dihydroergotamine (DHE). A stratified approach to treatment is advised, with the choice of medication based on the patient's treatment needs, taking into consideration the attack severity, presence of associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, and the degree of migraine-related disability. Individuals with migraine may find reassurance in having a "back-up plan" in the event of an initial acute treatment failure. For those individuals who had a partial response to the initial acute treatment, a second dose might be indicated. When the initial treatment does not provide meaningful and sustained benefits, a treatment from a different medication class is typically chosen. Depending upon the initial treatment used, this might include NSAIDs, triptans, or DHE. Opioids or acetaminophen in combination with codeine or tramadol can be considered as part of the "back-up plan," provided they are used infrequently. When all patient administered

  19. Medical Home Characteristics and the Pediatric Patient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, Deborah; Gunter, Kathryn E.; Nocon, Robert S.; Gao, Yue; Jin, Janel; Fairchild, Paige; Chin, Marshall H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has roots in pediatrics, yet we know little about the experience of pediatric patients in PCMH settings. Objective To examine the association between clinic PCMH characteristics and pediatric patient experience as reported by parents. Research Design We assessed the cross-sectional correlation between clinic PCMH characteristics and pediatric patient experience in 24 clinics randomly selected from the Safety Net Medical Home Initiative, a 5-state PCMH demonstration project. PCMH characteristics were measured with surveys of randomly selected providers and staff; surveys generated 0 (worst) to 100 (best) scores for five subscales, and a total score. Patient experience was measured through surveying parents of pediatric patients. Questions from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Clinician & Group (CAHPS-CG) instrument produced 4 patient experience measures: timeliness, physician communication, staff helpfulness, and overall rating. To investigate the relationship between PCMH characteristics and patient experience, we used generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation structure. Results We included 440 parents and 214 providers and staff in the analysis. Total PCMH score was not associated with parents’ assessment of patient experience; however, PCMH subscales were associated with patient experience in different directions. In particular, quality improvement activities undertaken by clinics were strongly associated with positive ratings of patient experience, while patient care management activities were associated with more negative reports of patient experience. Conclusions Future work should bolster features of the PCMH that work well for patients while investigating which PCMH features negatively impact patient experience, to yield a better patient experience overall. PMID:25310639

  20. Adherence to antihypertensive medications and health outcomes among newly treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Esposti, Luca Degli; Saragoni, Stefania; Benemei, Silvia; Batacchi, Paolo; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Di Bari, Mauro; Marchionni, Niccolò; Sturani, Alessandra; Buda, Stefano; Esposti, Ezio Degli

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and the association between adherence to AHT, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity in a large cohort of patients newly treated with antihypertensives in a clinical practice setting. Methods: An administrative database kept by the Local Health Unit of Florence (Italy) listing patient baseline characteristics, drug prescription, and hospital admission information was used to perform a population-based retrospective study including patients newly treated with antihypertensives, ≥18 years of age, with a first prescription between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. Patients using antihypertensives for secondary prevention of CV disease, occasional spot users, and patients with early CV events, were excluded from the study cohort. Adherence to AHT was calculated and classified as poor, moderate, good, and excellent. A Cox regression model was conducted to determine the association among adherence to AHT and risk of all-cause mortality, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction. Results: A total of 31,306 patients, 15,031 men (48.0%), and 16,275 women (52.0%), with a mean age of 60.2 ± 14.5 years was included in the study. Adherence to AHT was poor in 8038 patients (25.7% of included patients), moderate in 4640 (14.8%), good in 5651 (18.1%), and excellent in 12,977 (41.5%). Compared with patients with poor adherence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1), the risk of all-cause death, stroke, or acute myocardial infarction was significantly lower in patients with good (HR = 0.69, P < 0.001) and excellent adherence (HR = 0.53, P < 0.001). Conclusions: These findings indicate that suboptimal adherence to AHT occurs in a substantial proportion of patients and is associated with poor health outcomes already in primary prevention of CV diseases. For health authorities, this preliminary evidence underlines the need for monitoring and improving medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:21935332

  1. Ceftriaxone-Induced Acute Encephalopathy in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Safadi, Sami; Mao, Michael; Dillon, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Encephalopathy is a rare side effect of third and fourth generation cephalosporins. Renal failure and preexisting neurological disease are notable risk factors. Recognition is important as discontinuing the offending agent usually resolves symptoms. We present a case of acute encephalopathy in a patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) who received intravenous ceftriaxone for peritonitis. This case illustrates the potential severe neurologic effects of cephalosporins, which are recommended by international guidelines as first-line antimicrobial therapy for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. PMID:25544915

  2. Acute hemolysis in a patient with a newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adrian G; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a 62-year-old of Egyptian origin who presented with sudden, severe and symptomatic anemia requiring hospitalization shortly after beginning concurrent radiation and temozolomide for his newly diagnosed glioblastoma. He had also recently been started on steroids, anticonvulsants and Pneumocystis jirovecii prophylaxis. He was ultimately diagnosed with G6PD deficiency with an acute hemolytic anemia precipitated by dapsone. Screening for G6PD deficiency should be considered in high-risk patient populations where P. jirovecii prophylaxis is planned. PMID:27230975

  3. [Immune and enzyme disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Briskin, B S; Iarovaia, G A; Savchenko, Z I; Rybakov, G S; Khalidov, O Kh; Mkhitarova, L A; Suplotova, A A

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of immune and enzyme disorders in 85 patients with acute pancreatitis shows that persistent imbalance of immunoregulatory T-lymphocytes with suppression predominance; reduction of all immunoglobulines number, imbalance in phagocytic immunity with height of absorbing activity of neutropils and stimultaneous decrease of their digestive capacity are prognostically unfavourable for high risk of pyonecrotic complications and lethal outcome. It is necessary to include immunocorrectors in combined therapy. Direct assessment of leukocytic elastase activity and alpha-IP level in blood plasma permits to evaluate spreading of inflammatory process and it severity, efficacy and prognosis of treatment. PMID:11521303

  4. Graduated compression stockings to prevent venous thromboembolism in hospital: evidence from patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Kearon, Clive; O'Donnell, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is the most common preventable cause of death in hospital patients and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is cost-saving in high-risk patients. Low-dose anticoagulation is very effective at preventing VTE but increases bleeding. Graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices are also used to prevent VTE and do not increase bleeding, which makes their use appealing in patients who cannot tolerate bleeding, such as patients with acute stroke. Studies that evaluated mechanical methods of preventing VTE were small and mainly used asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT), detected using screening tests, as the study outcome. The recently published CLOTS Trial 1 (Clots in Legs Or sTockings after Stroke) compared thigh-level compression stockings with no stockings in about 2500 patients with stroke and immobility, and found that thigh-level stockings were not effective. Indirectly, the findings of this study question the ability of stockings to prevent VTE in other patient groups, including those after surgery. CLOTS 1 compared thigh-level and below-knee stockings in about 3000 patients with acute stroke. Given that thigh-level stockings were ineffective in CLOTS 1, it is surprising that they were more effective than below-knee stockings in CLOTS Trial 2. A possible explanation is that below-knee stockings increase DVT, although this seems unlikely. CLOTS 1 and CLOTS 2 question whether graduated compression stockings prevent VTE and suggest the need for further trials evaluating their efficacy in medical and surgical patients. PMID:21346697

  5. Disclosing harmful medical errors to patients: tackling three tough cases.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas H; Bell, Sigall K; Smith, Kelly M; Mello, Michelle M; McDonald, Timothy B

    2009-09-01

    A gap exists between recommendations to disclose errors to patients and current practice. This gap may reflect important, yet unanswered questions about implementing disclosure principles. We explore some of these unanswered questions by presenting three real cases that pose challenging disclosure dilemmas. The first case involves a pancreas transplant that failed due to the pancreas graft being discarded, an error that was not disclosed partly because the family did not ask clarifying questions. Relying on patient or family questions to determine the content of disclosure is problematic. We propose a standard of materiality that can help clinicians to decide what information to disclose. The second case involves a fatal diagnostic error that the patient's widower was unaware had happened. The error was not disclosed out of concern that disclosure would cause the widower more harm than good. This case highlights how institutions can overlook patients' and families' needs following errors and emphasizes that benevolent deception has little role in disclosure. Institutions should consider whether involving neutral third parties could make disclosures more patient centered. The third case presents an intraoperative cardiac arrest due to a large air embolism where uncertainty around the clinical event was high and complicated the disclosure. Uncertainty is common to many medical errors but should not deter open conversations with patients and families about what is and is not known about the event. Continued discussion within the medical profession about applying disclosure principles to real-world cases can help to better meet patients' and families' needs following medical errors. PMID:19736193

  6. Customer satisfaction in medical service encounters -- a comparison between obstetrics and gynecology patients and general medical patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Weng, Hui-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hsu, Tsuen-Ho

    2006-03-01

    This study is concerned with the "service encounter", and seeks to describe, by use of the Service Encounter Evaluation Model, how the processes involved in the service encounter affect customer satisfaction. Its findings have implications for management practice and research directions, and recommendations are made. With the implementation of a national health insurance scheme, an ever-prospering economy and continually improving educational levels in Taiwan, demand among citizens for good health and medical care is ever increasing. Obstetrics and gynecology patients often differ greatly from general patients, in terms of their moods and emotions. This research involved an empirical study, whose subjects were 590 customers of general clinics and 339 customers of gynecology clinics, in various medical centers in southern Taiwan. By factor analysis, the study established four influencing factors, which were "Medical professionals", "Nursing professionals", "Service personnel" and "Space and facilities". Using the Linear Structural Relation Model (LISREL), it found that medical professionals, nursing professionals, service personnel and space and facilities were effective predictors of medical treatment satisfaction. We also found that the greatest positive impact on overall medical treatment satisfaction resulted from rises in satisfaction with medical professionals, but that the least impact was achieved in relation to service personnel in the general and gynecology clinics. PMID:16547902

  7. Optimal perioperative medical management of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saket; Maldonado, Yasdet; Taylor, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    Perioperative medical management of patients undergoing vascular surgery can be challenging because they represent the surgical population at highest risk. β-Blockers should be continued perioperatively in patients already taking them preoperatively. Statins may be used in the perioperative period in patients who are not on statin therapy preoperatively. Institutional guidelines should be used to guide insulin replacement. Recent research suggests that measurement of troponins may provide some risk stratification in clinically stable patients following vascular surgery. Multimodal pain therapy including nonopioid strategies is necessary to improve the efficacy of pain relief and decrease the risk of side effects and complications. PMID:25113724

  8. Acute cocaine-related health problems in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency departments may be a useful information source to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with acute cocaine-related medical problems. We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of 165 acute, laboratory-confirmed cocaine intoxications admitted to an urban emergency department in Switzerland between January 2007 and March 2011. Results A total of 165 patients with a mean age of 32 years were included. Most patients were male (73%) and unemployed (65%). Only a minority (16%) had abused cocaine alone while 84% of the patients had used at least one additional substance, most commonly ethanol (41%), opioids (38%), or cannabis (36%) as confirmed by their detection in blood samples. The most frequently reported symptoms were chest pain (21%), palpitations (19%), anxiety (36%) and restlessness (36%). Psychiatric symptoms were present in 64%. Hypertension and tachycardia were observed in 53% and 44% of the patients, respectively. Severe poisonings only occurred in patients with multiple substance intoxication (15%). Severe intoxications were non-significantly more frequent with injected drug use compared to nasal, oral, or inhalational drug use. Severe complications included acute myocardial infarction (2 cases), stroke (one case), and seizures (3 cases). Most patients (75%) were discharged home within 24 h after admission. A psychiatric evaluation in the ED was performed in 24% of the patients and 19% were referred to a psychiatric clinic. Conclusions Patients with acute cocaine intoxication often used cocaine together with ethanol and opioids and presented with sympathomimetic toxicity and/or psychiatric disorders. Severe acute toxicity was more frequent with multiple substance use. Toxicity was typically short-lasting but psychiatric evaluation and referral was often needed. PMID:24666782

  9. Medical Student Volunteerism Addresses Patients' Social Needs: A Novel Approach to Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Onyekere, Chinwe; Ross, Sandra; Namba, Alexa; Ross, Justin C.; Mann, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare providers must be equipped to recognize and address patients' psychosocial needs to improve overall health outcomes. To give future healthcare providers the tools and training necessary to identify and address psychosocial issues, Lankenau Medical Center in partnership with the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine designed the Medical Student Advocate (MSA) program. Methods: The MSA program places volunteer second-year osteopathic medical students in care coordination teams at Lankenau Medical Associates, a primary care practice serving a diverse patient population in the Philadelphia, PA, region. As active members of the team, MSAs are referred high-risk patients who have resource needs such as food, employment, child care, and transportation. MSAs work collaboratively with patients and the multidisciplinary team to address patients' nonmedical needs. Results: From August 2013 to August 2015, 31 osteopathic medical students volunteered for the MSA program and served 369 patients with 720 identified needs. Faculty and participating medical students report that the MSA program provided an enhanced understanding of the holistic nature of patient care and a comprehensive view of patient needs. Conclusion: The MSA program provides students with a unique educational opportunity that encompasses early exposure to patient interaction, social determinants of health, population health, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Students develop skills to help them build patient relationships, understand the psychosocial factors shaping health outcomes, and engage with other healthcare professionals. This work in the preclinical years provides students with the knowledge to help them perform more effectively in the changing healthcare environment. PMID:27046404

  10. Inequalities in care in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shabnam; Simms, Alexander; Batin, Phillip; Kurian, John; Gale, Chris P

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the single largest cause of death in developed countries. Guidelines exist for the management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), yet despite these, significant inequalities exist in the care of these patients. The elderly, deprived socioeconomic groups, females and non-caucasians are the patient populations where practice tends to deviate more frequently from the evidence base. Elderly patients often had higher mortality rates after having an AMI compared to younger patients. They also tended to present with symptoms that were not entirely consistent with an AMI, thus partially contributing to the inequalities in care that is seen between younger and older patients. Furthermore the lack of guidelines in the elderly age group presenting with AMI can often make decision making challenging and may account for the discrepancies in care that are prevalent between younger and older patients. Other patients such as those from a lower socioeconomic group, i.e., low income and less than high school education often had poorer health and reduced life expectancy compared to patients from a higher socioeconomic group after an AMI. Lower socioeconomic status was also seen to be contributing to racial and geographical variation is the care in AMI patients. Females with an AMI were treated less aggressively and had poorer outcomes when compared to males. However even when females were treated in the same way they continued to have higher in hospital mortality which suggests that gender may well account for differences in outcomes. The purpose of this review is to identify the inequalities in care for patients who present with an AMI and explore potential reasons for why these occur. Greater attention to the management and a better understanding of the root causes of these inequalities in care may help to reduce morbidity and mortality rates associated with AMI. PMID:26730295

  11. Treatment of acute diarrhoea: update of guidelines based on a critical interuniversity assessment of medications and current practices.

    PubMed

    Urbain, D; Belaiche, J; De Vos, M; Fiasse, R; Hiele, M; Huijghebaert, S; Jacobs, F; Malonne, H; Speelman, P; Van Gompel, A; Van Gossum, A; Van Wijngaerden, E

    2003-01-01

    Further to a thorough analysis of the problem of acute diarrhoea and the therapeutic options, recommendations were defined following a multidisciplinary approach. These guidelines take into account the reality of frequent self-medication. They further differ as a function of age (children, primarily treated by ORS and for whom self-medication is not advised versus adults who can self-medicate), symptoms (uncomplicated diarrhoea versus dysentery) and location where the diarrhoea is contracted (at home or when travelling). PMID:14618952

  12. Jehovah's Witness patients within the German medical landscape.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    Blood transfusions belong to standard and commonly utilised biomedical procedures. Jehovah's Witnesses' transfusion refusals are often referred to in bioethical and medical textbooks. Members of this globally active religious organisation do not, however, challenge biomedical diagnosis and treatment as such. A result of both their trust in and their interpretation of the Bible, they question only this medical treatment. In spite of the global presence of this religious community and its uniformly practised teachings, including those pertaining to blood, experiences and choices of Jehovah's Witness patients have been understudied. Drawing on a nine-month fieldwork with Jehovah's Witnesses and physicians in Germany (mainly in Berlin) between 2010 and 2012, the paper addresses treatment choices made by Witness patients and their relationship with physicians. In light of the long tradition of 'medical heterodoxy' established in German culture and society, Germany constitutes an ideal point of departure for such a study. By utilising the concept of 'medical landscape' it is argued that Jehovah's Witnesses in my field site find themselves at the intersection of different medical landscapes: in the 'immediate' surroundings of the German healthcare system that is open to different 'treatment modalities', and that of the United States, which favours biomedicine. The paper also argues that Jehovah's Witnesses' position towards blood transfusions can further be used as a lens to shed light on the German (bio)medical landscape itself. PMID:27321252

  13. Continued Dispensing: what medications do patients believe should be available?

    PubMed Central

    Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continued Dispensing (CD) is a new medication supply method for certain medications in Australia. It aims to prevent treatment interruption as a result of patients’ inability to obtain a new valid prescription. The only currently eligible patients for this service are statin and/or oral contraceptives users who have been using these medications for 6 months or more, have not utilized the CD method during the last 12 months, and cannot obtain an immediate appointment with the prescriber in order to get a new prescription. This study aimed to investigate patients’ attitudes towards potential extension and expansion of this medication supply method. Methods. A randomly selected 301 users of these medications from all Australian States were recruited using Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI). Result. The response rate was 79%. The majority of the participants (73.3%) did not agree with current restriction on CD utilization frequency. They also supported, to varying degrees, inclusion of all the proposed medications (support ranged from 44.2–78.4%). In this regard, participants who suffered from a specific disease did not differ significantly from those without the disease except in case of patients with depression (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Participants of this study strongly supported both CD extension and expansion. A future critical review of the current version of CD is highly recommended in order to enhance CD capability to achieve its goals. PMID:26019994

  14. Retrospective comparison of nebulized levalbuterol and albuterol for adverse events in patients with acute airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Vanessa L; Frazee, Lawrence A

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare the mean change in heart rate (HR) of patients with acute airflow obstruction treated with nebulized levalbuterol vs. albuterol. The study was conducted at the Akron General Medical Center, a 537-bed adult tertiary care teaching and research medical center. The participants were patients (> or = 18 years old) presenting to the emergency department with acute airflow obstruction. This was a retrospective chart review. Treatment groups received either levalbuterol (0.63 mg) or albuterol (2.5 mg). Respiratory care notes record HRs before and after nebulization of levalbuterol or albuterol. Primary analysis was conducted on days 1 and 3 of therapy to determine whether there is a difference between levalbuterol and albuterol with regard to mean change in HR with each treatment. In the primary analysis data, 35 subjects in each treatment group were compared. The mean age (+/- SD) was 65 +/- 16.4 and 68 +/- 16.5 for levalbuterol and albuterol, respectively. On day 1 of therapy, the difference in the mean change in HR with albuterol compared with levalbuterol was 1.0 bpm (95% CI, -1.6 to 3.7). On day 3, a statistically significant difference occurred in mean change in HR between treatment groups at 2.7 bpm (95% CI, 0.02 to 5.4). An increase in HR of 2.7 bpm by albuterol compared with levalbuterol on day 3 of therapy was the only significant finding among the analyses. However, this finding did not demonstrate dangerous elevations in HR following treatment with albuterol. Even the upper end of the confidence interval range at 5.4 bpm does not support a clinically significant difference in tachycardia with the pure isomer compared with the racemic mixture during acute airway obstruction. PMID:12975718

  15. A Cloud Computing Based Patient Centric Medical Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Henehan, Nathan; Somashekarappa, Vivek; Pandya, A. S.; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    This chapter discusses an emerging concept of a cloud computing based Patient Centric Medical Information System framework that will allow various authorized users to securely access patient records from various Care Delivery Organizations (CDOs) such as hospitals, urgent care centers, doctors, laboratories, imaging centers among others, from any location. Such a system must seamlessly integrate all patient records including images such as CT-SCANS and MRI'S which can easily be accessed from any location and reviewed by any authorized user. In such a scenario the storage and transmission of medical records will have be conducted in a totally secure and safe environment with a very high standard of data integrity, protecting patient privacy and complying with all Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  16. Violent Behavior among hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ochitill, H N; Krieger, M

    1982-02-01

    To characterize violent behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients, we reviewed documented violent incidents at the San Francisco General Hospital during a two-year period. Twenty-nine incidents of verbal and physical violence occurred. One patient was gravely ill and three were delirious. All the incidents were associated with increased levels of tension and loss of impulse control. In most cases, contention with the staff regarding pain medication or ward regulations was a precipitating event. Of the 28 patients with mental disorders, 19 were substance abusers, six had organic brain syndrome, tw had neurosis, and one had schizophrenia. The findings suggest that physicians should be more sensitive to patient characteristics and to the situational characteristics of the violent incident. Explicit measures that anticipate and reduce violent behavior are reviewed. PMID:7058353

  17. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide-directed ultrafiltration improves care in acutely hospitalized dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tapolyai, Mihály; Uysal, Aşkin; Maeweathers, Gail; Bahta, Elias; Dossabhoy, Neville R

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study in 19 consecutive acutely hospitalized dialysis patients, ultrafiltration (UF) volume was determined by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Patients were ultrafiltrated daily until they achieved a target BNP level <500 pg/mL. The UF volumes ranged from 2 to 5 L per session. All patients were male veterans aged 68+/-11 years (mean +/- SD), 74% were diabetic, 47% were African Americans, 58% underwent prevalent dialysis, and 53% had an arteriovenous fistula. Left ventricular ejection fraction on 2-dimensional echocardiography was 43.8%+/-27.9% (n=16). The admission BNP was 2412+/-1479 pg/mL (range, 561-5000 pg/mL) and BNP at hospital discharge was 1245+/-1173 pg/mL (range, 345-5000 pg/mL) (nonparametric Wilcoxon P=.0013). Admission weight was 88.9+/-27.9 kg and at discharge was 78.1+/-25.6 kg (P=.0002). The number of antihypertensive medications taken was 3.8+/-2.0 at admission and 2.3+/-1.7 at discharge (P=.0005). The number of patients with >2 blood pressure medications decreased from 14 to 6 (Fisher exact test, P=.02). The systolic/diastolic/mean arterial blood pressure decreased from admission to discharge (153.6+/-43.8/80.6+/-21.8/102.4+/-27.3 to 132.1+/-27.9/68.9+/-14.6/89.9+/-16.5 mm Hg; P=.0222/.0139/.0329, respectively). Although all patients were volume-overloaded at admission according to BNP criteria (>500), only 42% were identified as having heart failure. BNP-directed UF is safe because it minimizes symptomatic hypotension, identifies occult congestive heart failure in a large number of patients, and significantly reduces blood pressure in addition to reducing body weight and number of medications used. PMID:19522962

  19. A Virtual Patient Representation in the Medical Rehabilitation Domain.

    PubMed

    Gal, Norbert; Andrei, Diana; Poenaru, Dan V; Stoicu-Tivadar, Vasile; Gal-Nădăşan, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a virtual patient (VP) for the medical rehabilitation domain using the digital representation of the real life patient's matchstick skeleton. This virtual patient is used to analyze and track the recovery of the orthopedic patient with malicious posture problems. The creation of the digital patient was realized using a markerless depth camera, the Microsoft Kinect. The gathered data was saved in to a BVH type motion capture file. This file records not only the skeletal structure of the patient but its movements as well from witch the adduction, rotation and flexion angles of the joints can be analyzed. The data is stored in structured text format making it suitable to be used in telemedicine. The results confirm the utility and usability of the digital patient in clinical reasoning and in educational applications. PMID:27577360

  20. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  1. Physicians’ Attitudes regarding Patient Access to Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Rowan, Belle; Weed, Matt; James, Brent; Clayton, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Prior to the implementation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) web access for patients at a large integrated delivery systems, we surveyed physicians’ attitudes. Our web based questionnaire revealed largely positive attitudes about access. The exceptions included abnormal reports, progress notes, and e-care. A factor analysis identified the group of physicians who didn’t view patients as partners felt most negative about the process. PMID:14728337

  2. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  3. Feasibility of Remote Ischemic Peri-conditioning during Air Medical Transport of STEMI Patients.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Wayne, Max; Guyette, Francis X; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Toma, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic peri-conditioning (RIPC) has gained interest as a means of reducing ischemic injury in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who are undergoing emergent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, process, and patient-related factors related to the delivery of RIPC during air medical transport of STEMI patients to tertiary pPCI centers. We performed a retrospective review of procedural outcomes of a cohort of STEMI patients who received RIPC as part of a clinical protocol in a multi-state air medical service over 16 months (March 2013 to June 2014). Eligible patients were transported to two tertiary PCI centers and received up to four cycles of RIPC by inflating a blood pressure cuff on an upper arm to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes and subsequently deflating the cuff for 5 minutes. Data regarding feasibility, process variables, patient comfort, and occurrence of hypotension were obtained from prehospital records and prospectively completed quality improvement surveys. The primary outcome was whether at least 3 cycles of RIPC were completed by air medical transport crews prior to pPCI. Secondary outcomes included the number of cycles completed prior to pPCI, time spent with the patient prior to transport (bedside time), patient discomfort level, and incidence of hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) during the procedure. RIPC was initiated in 99 patients (91 interfacility, 8 scene transports) and 83 (83.3%) received 3 or 4 cycles of RIPC, delivered over 25-35 minutes. Median bedside time for interfacility transfers was 8 minutes (IQR 7, 10). More than half of patients reported no pain related to the procedure (N = 53, 53.3%), whereas 5 (5.1%) patients reported discomfort greater than 5 out of 10. Two patients developed hypotension while receiving RIPC and both had experienced hypotension prior to initiation of RIPC. RIPC is feasible and safe to implement for STEMI patients

  4. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Simon, Melissa A; Samaras, Athena T; Nonzee, Narissa J; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients' interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus-community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  5. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  6. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18–25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25–30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician’s attention. PMID:26392780

  7. The clinical analysis of acute pancreatitis in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy after operation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanlei; Han, Zhen; Shao, Limei; Li, Yunling; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Yuehuan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication in postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 (oxaliplatin + calcium folinate +5-FU [5-fluorouracil]) chemotherapy. In this paper, a total of 62 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were observed after the burst of acute pancreatitis. Surgery of the 62 cases of colorectal cancer patients was completed successfully. But when they underwent FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, five patients got acute pancreatitis (8.06%), four (6.45%) had mild acute pancreatitis, and one (1.61%) had severe acute pancreatitis, of which two were males (3.23%) and three females (4.84%). No patients (0.00%) had acute pancreatitis on the 1st day after chemotherapy; one patient (1.61%) got it in the first 2 and 3 days after chemotherapy; and three others (4.83%) got it in the first 4 days after chemotherapy. In the 62 patients with malignant tumors, the body mass index (BMI) was less than 18 (underweight) in six of them, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (33.33%); the BMI was 18-25 (normal weight) in 34 cases, with one case (2.94%) of acute pancreatitis; the BMI was 25-30 (overweight) in 13 cases, with 0 cases (0.00%) of acute pancreatitis; and the BMI was ≥30 (obese) in nine patients, with two cases of acute pancreatitis (22.22%). After symptomatic treatment, four patients were cured and one died; the mortality rate was 1.61%. Most of them appeared in the first 4 days after chemotherapy; the probability of this complication is significantly higher in slim and obese patients than in normal weight patients. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients after FOLFOX6 chemotherapy have a sudden onset of acute pancreatitis occult, especially in patients with severe acute pancreatitis; the symptoms are difficult to control, there is high mortality and it is worthy of clinician's attention. PMID:26392780

  8. Patient-doctor relationship: Changing perspectives and medical litigation.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, K

    2009-07-01

    The patient doctor relational dimer has become complex with the hierarchical or fiduciary manner changing to an equal or un equal relationship. Trust and control are interchangeable, leading to increased patient requirements for disclosure and expectations of a cafeteria approach in diagnoses and management of his/her bodily condition. From any mismatch, there is a potential for medical litigation. In this context, the rise of global consumerism, the explosion of information available on the internet, and the changed manner of the medical profession from being shrouded in mystic / ceremony to trifurcation of medical services to doctoral diagnoses and management, ancillary pharmacy industry, and paramedical services like nursing, counselling and the new age quackery have contributed to this dimer. PMID:19881132

  9. Patient-doctor relationship: Changing perspectives and medical litigation

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, K.

    2009-01-01

    The patient doctor relational dimer has become complex with the hierarchical or fiduciary manner changing to an equal or un equal relationship. Trust and control are interchangeable, leading to increased patient requirements for disclosure and expectations of a cafeteria approach in diagnoses and management of his/her bodily condition. From any mismatch, there is a potential for medical litigation. In this context, the rise of global consumerism, the explosion of information available on the internet, and the changed manner of the medical profession from being shrouded in mystic / ceremony to trifurcation of medical services to doctoral diagnoses and management, ancillary pharmacy industry, and paramedical services like nursing, counselling and the new age quackery have contributed to this dimer. PMID:19881132

  10. Time trend in depression diagnoses among acute coronary syndrome patients and a reference population from 2001 to 2009 in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Mårtensson, Solvej; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Prescott, Eva; Osler, Merete

    2016-07-01

    Introduction In the last decade a range of recommendations to increase awareness of depression in acute coronary syndrome patients have been published. To test the impact of those recommendations we examine and compare recent time trends in depression among acute coronary syndrome patients and a reference population. Methods 87 218 patients registered with acute coronary syndrome from 2001-2009 in Denmark and a match reference population were followed through hospital registries and medication prescriptions for early (≤30 days), intermediate (31 days to 6 months) and later (6 months to 2 years) depression in the acute coronary syndrome population and overall depression in the reference population. Cox regression models were used to compare hazard ratios (HRs) for depression over calendar years. Results During the study period, 11.0% and 6.2% were diagnosed with depression in the acute coronary syndrome population and in the reference population, respectively. For the acute coronary syndrome population, the adjusted HRs increased for early (HR (95% CI) 1.04 (1.01-1.06)) and intermediate depression (HR (95% CI) 1.01 (1.00-1.03)), whereas the adjusted HRs did not change for later depression (HR (95% CI) 0.99 (0.98-1.00)). For the reference population the adjusted HRs for depression increased through the study period (HR (95% CI) 1.01 (1.01-1.03)). Conclusion Increase in diagnoses of depressions within 6 months of acute coronary syndrome may be explained by increased focus on depression in this patient group in combination with increased awareness of depression in the general population. PMID:26750515

  11. Physician and patient perceptions of cultural competency and medical compliance.

    PubMed

    Ohana, S; Mash, R

    2015-12-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care. Echo New Studio 2007; 91:18-28) might reduce this phenomenon. Structured questionnaires were distributed to 90 physicians working in outpatient clinics in a central hospital in Israel, and to 417 of their patients. Each physician had four to six sampled patients.The findings showed a significant negative correlation (r = -0.50, P < 0.05) between the physicians' perception of their cultural competence and the patients' perception of physician competence. The more patients perceive the physician as culturally competent, the more they comply with their medical recommendations. In addition, the findings show that ethnicity significantly affects patients' perception of the cultural competence of physicians, and their satisfaction with the medical care they receive. PMID:26590243

  12. Smartphone medication adherence apps: Potential benefits to patients and providers

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Lindsey; Heldenbrand, Seth; Anderson, Paul; Gubbins, Paul O.; Martin, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of medication adherence, discuss the potential for smartphone medication adherence applications (adherence apps) to improve medication nonadherence, evaluate features of adherence apps across operating systems (OSs), and identify future opportunities and barriers facing adherence apps. Practice description Medication nonadherence is a common, complex, and costly problem that contributes to poor treatment outcomes and consumes health care resources. Nonadherence is difficult to measure precisely, and interventions to mitigate it have been largely unsuccessful. Practice innovation Using smartphone adherence apps represents a novel approach to improving adherence. This readily available technology offers many features that can be designed to help patients and health care providers improve medication-taking behavior. Main outcome measures Currently available apps were identified from the three main smartphone OSs (Apple, Android, and Blackberry). In addition, desirable features for adherence apps were identified and ranked by perceived importance to user desirability using a three-point rating system: 1, modest; 2, moderate; or 3, high. The 10 highest-rated apps were installed and subjected to user testing to assess app attributes using a standard medication regimen. Results 160 adherence apps were identified and ranked. These apps were most prevalent for the Android OS. Adherence apps with advanced functionality were more prevalent on the Apple iPhone OS. Among all apps, MyMedSchedule, MyMeds, and RxmindMe rated the highest because of their basic medication reminder features coupled with their enhanced levels of functionality. Conclusion Despite being untested, medication apps represent a possible strategy that pharmacists can recommend to nonadherent patients and incorporate into their practice. PMID:23571625

  13. Physician and Patient Perceptions of Cultural Competency and Medical Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohana, S.; Mash, R.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between the different perceptions of medical teams and their patients of the cultural competence of physicians, and the influence of this relationship on the conflict between them. Physicians' cultural competence (Noble A. Linguistic and cultural mediation of social services. Cultural competence of health care.…

  14. Using Standardized Patients to Educate Medical Students about Organ Donation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Anker, Ashley E.; Soriano, Rainier; Friedman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Medical students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine participated in an intervention designed to promote knowledge and improved communication skills related to cadaveric organ donation. The intervention required students to interact with a standardized patient for approximately 10 minutes and respond to questions posed about organ donation in a…

  15. [Surgical revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Beyersdorf, F; Sarai, K; Mitrev, Z; Eckel, L; Maul, F D; Wendt, T; Satter, P

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study was done to assess the results of emergency revascularization in patients with acute myocardial infarction. In addition, the influence of the mode of reperfusion was investigated in terms of morbidity and mortality. Between January 1987 and May 1992, 75 consecutive patients with acute coronary occlusion (in 87% PTCA-failure) received one of two different reperfusion protocols during emergency aortocoronary bypass operation. In 36 patients, the reperfusate was normal blood given at systemic pressure (uncontrolled reperfusion); in 39 patients, the ischemic area was initially reperfused for 20 minutes with a blood cardioplegic solution (substrate-enriched, hyperosmolar, hypocalcemic, alkalotic, diltiazem-enriched) given at 37 degrees C and at a perfusion pressure of 50 mmHg. Thereafter, the heart was kept in the beating empty state for 30 minutes before extra-corporeal circulation was discontinued (controlled reperfusion). Regional contractility (echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography), electrocardiogram (ECG), release of creatine kinase and MB-isoenzyme of creatine kinase as well as hospital mortality were assessed. Quantification of regional contractility was done with a scoring system from 0 (normokinesis) to 4 (dyskinesis). Data are expressed as mean +/- standard error of the mean (SEM). Both groups were well matched for age, sex, and the distribution of the occluded artery. In the controlled reperfusion group, there was a higher incidence of additional significant stenosis (2.2 +/- 0.1 vs 1.7 +/- 0.1) and cardiogenic shock (36% vs 17%). Furthermore, the interval between coronary occlusion and reperfusion was longer in the controlled reperfusion group (4.1 +/- 0.3 vs 3.3 +/- 0.3 hrs; p > 0.05). Regional contractility returned to normal after controlled reperfusion (score 0.8 +/- 0.2; normokinesis = 0, slight hypokinesis = 1). In contrast, regional contractility remained depressed severely after uncontrolled reperfusion with normal

  16. Antihypertensive medication exposure and cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Shireman, Theresa I.; Phadnis, Milind A.; Wetmore, James B.; Zhou, Xinhua; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Our understanding of the effectiveness of cardioprotective medications in maintenance dialysis patients is based upon drug exposures assessed at a single point in time. We employed a novel, time-dependent approach to modeling medication use over time to examine outcomes in a large national cohort. Methods We linked Medicaid prescription claims with United States Renal Data System registry data and Medicare claims for 52,922 hypertensive maintenance dialysis patients. All-cause mortality and a combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) endpoint were modeled as functions of exposure to cardioprotective antihypertensive medications (renin angiotensin system antagonists, β-adrenergic blockers, and calcium channel blockers) measured with three time-dependent covariates (weekly exposure status; proportion of prior weeks with exposure; and number of switches in exposure status) and with propensity-adjustment. Results Current cardioprotective medication exposure status as compared to not exposed was associated with lower adjusted hazard ratios (AHR) for mortality, though the magnitude depended upon the proportion of prior weeks with medication (duration) and the number of switches between active and non-active use (switches) (AHR range, 0.54-0.90). Combined CVD-endpoints depended upon the proportion of weeks on medication: AHR = 1.18 for 10% and AHR = 0.90 for 90% of weeks. Combined CVD-endpoint was also lower for patients with fewer switches. Conclusions Effectiveness depends not only on having a drug available but is tempered by duration and stability of use, likely reflecting variation in clinical stability and patient behavior. PMID:25139551

  17. Prognosis and treatment of patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vassilios; Burroughs, Andrew K; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2014-07-01

    Despite alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most acute manifestation of alcohol-related liver disease, its treatment remains controversial. Corticosteroids, given either as monotherapy or together with N-acetylecysteine, have been associated with a moderate short-term survival benefit in patients with severe disease. The Maddrey's discriminant function; Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score; age, bilirubin, INR and creatinine score; and the Model for end-stage liver disease have been proposed for stratifying prognosis in AH enabling selection of the patients to treat. Definition of treatment non-responders using the Lille model after 7 days of therapy may prevent a detrimental impact of prolonged corticosteroids. Pentoxifylline is an effective alternative reducing the occurrence of hepatorenal syndrome. Emerging evidence supports use of liver transplantation in a strictly selected subset of corticosteroid non-responders. PMID:24716632

  18. A Patient with Acute Kidney Pain and High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Soulen, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    This case presented challenging diagnostic and management issues in a young healthy man who presented with abdominal pain and new-onset hypertension. The differential diagnosis evolved over the course of the clinical presentation. The patient had severe vascular involvement of his renal and basal cerebral arteries that initially was assumed to be due to a vasculitic process or hypercoagulable state. Finally it became apparent that the patient did not have a systemic illness but rather a localized vascular disease most likely due to segmental arterial mediolysis, a rare, under-recognized condition that can potentially be fatal. This condition is often difficult to distinguish from fibromuscular dysplasia. It is important to recognize and correctly diagnose the condition, particularly in the acute phase of the disease, because delay in diagnosis can contribute to morbidity and mortality. PMID:25583291

  19. Acute chest pain in a patient treated with capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Camaro, C; Danse, P W; Bosker, H A

    2009-08-01

    A 61-year-old male with a history of metastatic colorectal cancer was referred to our hospital for primary coronary intervention because of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography, however, revealed no significant stenoses. When asked, the patient revealed that capecitabine (Xeloda(R)) was started by his oncologist one day before admission. It is known that this oral 5-FU analogue drug, used in metastatic colorectal cancer, can cause coronary artery spasms. The main treatment of capecitabine-induced vasospasm is discontinuation of the drug. Indeed, after cessation of the drug the patient remained free of symptoms and the ECG abnormalities normalised. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:288-91.). PMID:19789697

  20. [Acute massive pulmonary embolism in a patient using clavis panax].

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Isa Oner; Arslan, Sakir; Cağırcı, Göksel; Yılmaz, Akar

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, the use of herbal combinations, plant extracts or food supplements has increased in our country and all over the world. However, there is not enough data to determine the effective doses of these substances in the composition of herbal preparations, or their effects on metabolism and drug interactions. With the widespread use of herbal combinations, life-threatening side effects and clinical manifestations that arise from them have been reported. Herein we present a case with acute massive pulmonary embolism while using an herbal combination in the context of Tribulus terrestris, Avena sativa and Panax ginseng. A 41-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department with the complaint of sudden onset of dyspnea and syncope. As a result of investigations (blood gases, echocardiography, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy) he was diagnosed with an acute massive pulmonary embolism. The patient's use of panax did not pose as a risk factor for the pulmonary embolism. He was given thrombolytic therapy and shortness of breath improved. At the pre-discharge the patient was informed of the risks associated with the herbal combination, especially panax. Coumadin was started and he was discharged for the INR checks to come. PMID:23760126

  1. Clinical potential of elacytarabine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rein, Lindsay A M; Rizzieri, David A

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been treated for over four decades with standard induction chemotherapy including seven days of cytosine arabinoside (cytarabine, ara-C) infusion. Cytarabine, while effective in killing leukemic cells, is subject to development of several resistance mechanisms rendering the drug ineffective in many patients. Elacytarabine, a lipophilic 5'-elaidic acid ester or nucleoside analogue of cytosine arabinoside, was created with the intent of overcoming resistance mechanisms including reduced expression of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) required for cytarabine entry into cells, as well as increased activity of cytidine deaminase (CDA) which breaks down the active metabolite of cytarabine, ara-CTP. Elacytarabine enters cells independently of transporters, has a longer half life compared with cytarabine and is not subject to deactivation by CDA. Preclinical data were encouraging although subsequent clinical studies have failed to show superiority of elacytarabine compared with standard of care as monotherapy in patients with AML. Clinical trials utilizing elacytarabine in combination with anthracyclines are ongoing. Use of hENT1 expression as a predictive marker for cytarabine or elacytarabine response has been studied with no conclusive validation to date. Despite promising early results, the jury is still out in regards to this novel agent as an effective alternative to standard cytarabine therapy in acute leukemias, especially in combination with additional agents such as anthracyclines. PMID:25469211

  2. Primary coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Popma, J J; Chuang, Y C; Satler, L F; Kleiber, B; Leon, M B

    1994-01-01

    In some patients with acute myocardial infarction, thrombolytic therapy may be limited by its failure to reperfuse the occluded artery, by recurrent ischemia (despite initially successful reperfusion), and by major hemorrhagic complications. Primary coronary angioplasty may circumvent these limitations. This article reviews the results of primary angioplasty reported in patients with myocardial infarction and makes recommendations for its use. The review includes pertinent articles found in the English language literature from July 1987 to July 1993 on MEDLINE. Nonrandomized series of primary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction have demonstrated high procedural success rates (86% to 99%) and infrequent recurrent ischemia (4%). Two randomized trials comparing primary angioplasty and thrombolytic therapy have shown that primary angioplasty results in lower mortality, less recurrent ischemia, shorter length of hospital stay, and improved left ventricular function. Two other randomized studies have shown little benefit from primary angioplasty on myocardial salvage, recurrent ischemia, or ventricular function. One major limitation of primary angioplasty is that it requires 24-hour availability of a catheterization laboratory and experienced surgical personnel. Primary angioplasty may be the preferred approach in patients with extensive myocardial infarction who have immediate (< 120 min) access to a cardiac catheterization laboratory with experienced personnel. Patients having 1) contraindications to thrombolytic therapy, 2) cardiogenic shock, 3) prior coronary bypass surgery, or 4) "stuttering" onset of pain may also benefit from primary angioplasty. Poor candidates for this procedure are those with a small myocardial infarction, those in whom undue delays in access to a cardiac catheterization facility would be expected, or those with complex coronary anatomy, including left main coronary artery disease. PMID:8061539

  3. Cytomegalovirus in Plasma of Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskaya, E. A.; Grivel, J.C.; Maryukhnich, E. V.; Lebedeva, A. M.; Ivanova, O. I.; Savvinova, P. P.; Shpektor, A. V.; Margolis, L. B.; Vasilieva, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and local and systemic inflammation, including accumulation of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques and upregulation of blood cytokines (e.g., C-reactive protein (CRP)), has been known for more than 100 years. The atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory response has been traditionally considered as an immune system reaction to low-density lipoproteins. At the same time, some data have indicated a potential involvement of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the activation and progression of atherosclerosis-associated inflammation, leading to ACS. However, these data have been tangential and mainly concerned the relationship between a coronary artery disease (CAD) prognosis and the anti-CMV antibody titer. We assumed that ACS might be associated with CMV reactivation and virus release into the bloodstream. The study’s aim was to test this assumption through a comparison of the plasma CMV DNA level in patients with various CAD forms and in healthy subjects. To our knowledge, no similar research has been undertaken yet. A total of 150 subjects (97 CAD patients and 53 healthy subjects) were examined. Real- time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the number of plasma CMV DNA copies. We demonstrated that the number of plasma CMV genome copies in ACS patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (p = 0.01). The CMV genome copy number was correlated with the plasma CRP level (p = 0.002). These findings indicate a potential relationship between CMV activation and atherosclerosis exacerbation that, in turn, leads to the development of unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction. Monitoring of the CMV plasma level in CAD patients may be helpful in the development of new therapeutic approaches to coronary atherosclerosis treatment. PMID:27437144

  4. Acute Cryptococcal Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in a Patient on Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Gundacker, Nathan D.; Jordan, Stephen J.; Jones, Benjamin A.; Drwiega, Joseph C.; Pappas, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is the first case of acute immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-associated cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in a patient on natalizumab for multiple sclerosis. The patient developed acute cerebral edema after initiation of amphotericin B. We propose several mechanisms that explain the acuity of IRIS in this specific patient population and suggest possible therapies. PMID:27006962

  5. Increased NK Cell Maturation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chretien, Anne-Sophie; Granjeaud, Samuel; Gondois-Rey, Françoise; Harbi, Samia; Orlanducci, Florence; Blaise, Didier; Vey, Norbert; Arnoulet, Christine; Fauriat, Cyril; Olive, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune alterations in cancer patients is a major challenge and requires precise phenotypic study of immune subsets. Improvement of knowledge regarding the biology of natural killer (NK) cells and technical advances leads to the generation of high dimensional dataset. High dimensional flow cytometry requires tools adapted to complex dataset analyses. This study presents an example of NK cell maturation analysis in Healthy Volunteers (HV) and patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with an automated procedure using the FLOCK algorithm. This procedure enabled to automatically identify NK cell subsets according to maturation profiles, with 2D mapping of a four-dimensional dataset. Differences were highlighted in AML patients compared to HV, with an overall increase of NK maturation. Among patients, a strong heterogeneity in NK cell maturation defined three distinct profiles. Overall, automatic gating with FLOCK algorithm is a recent procedure, which enables fast and reliable identification of cell populations from high-dimensional cytometry data. Such tools are necessary for immune subset characterization and standardization of data analyses. This tool is adapted to new immune cell subsets discovery, and may lead to a better knowledge of NK cell defects in cancer patients. Overall, 2D mapping of NK maturation profiles enabled fast and reliable identification of NK cell subsets. PMID:26594214

  6. Critical management decisions in patients with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd

    2008-11-01

    Few admissions to the ICU present a greater clinical challenge than the patient with acute liver failure (ALF), the syndrome of abrupt loss of liver function in a previously unaffected individual. Although advances in the intensive care management of patients with ALF have improved survival, the prognosis of ALF remains poor, with a 33% mortality rate and a 25% liver transplant rate in the United States. ALF adversely affects nearly every organ system, with most deaths occurring from sepsis and subsequent multiorgan system failure, and cerebral edema, resulting in intracranial hypertension (ICH) and brainstem herniation. Unfortunately, the optimal management of ALF remains poorly defined, and practices are often based on local experience and case reports rather than on randomized, controlled clinical trials. The paramount question in any patient presenting with ALF remains defining an etiology, since specific antidotes can save lives and spare the liver. This article will consider recent advances in the assignment of an etiology, the administration of etiology-specific treatment to abate the liver injury, and the management of complications (eg, infection, cerebral edema, and the bleeding diathesis) in patients with ALF. New data on the administration of N-acetylcysteine to patients with non-acetaminophen ALF, the treatment of ICH, and assessment of the need for liver transplantation will also be presented. PMID:18988787

  7. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed. PMID:26317762

  8. Contribution of Transjugular Liver Biopsy in Patients with the Clinical Presentation of Acute Liver Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Luca, Angelo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Minervini, Marta Ida; Vizzini, Giovanni; Arcadipane, Antonio; Gridelli, Bruno

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. Acute liver failure (ALF) treated with conservative therapy has a poor prognosis, although individual survival varies greatly. In these patients, the eligibility for liver transplantation must be quickly decided. The aim of this study was to assess the role of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) in the management of patients with the clinical presentation of ALF. Methods. Seventeen patients with the clinical presentation of ALF were referred to our institution during a 52 month period. A TJLB was performed using the Cook Quick-Core needle biopsy. Clinical data, procedural complications, and histologic findings were evaluated. Results. Causes of ALF were virus hepatitis B infection in 7 patients, drug toxicity in 4, mushroom in 1, Wilson's disease in 1, and unknown origin in 4. TJLB was technically successful in all patients without procedure-related complications. Tissue specimens were satisfactory for diagnosis in all cases. In 14 of 17 patients the initial clinical diagnosis was confirmed by TJLB; in 3 patients the initial diagnosis was altered by the presence of unknown cirrhosis. Seven patients with necrosis <60% were successfully treated with medical therapy; 6 patients with submassive or massive necrosis ({>=}85%) were treated with liver transplantation. Four patients died, 3 had cirrhosis, and 1 had submassive necrosis. There was a strict statistical correlation (r = 0.972, p < 0.0001) between the amount of necrosis at the frozen section examination and the necrosis found at routine histologic examination. The average time for TJLB and frozen section examination was 80 min. Conclusion. In patients with the clinical presentation of ALF, submassive or massive liver necrosis and cirrhosis are predictors of poor prognosis. TLJB using an automated device and frozen section examination can be a quick and effective tool in clinical decision-making, especially in deciding patient selection and the best timing for liver transplantation.

  9. 'Outsourced' patients and their companions: stories from forced medical travellers.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I describe the experience of 'outsourced' patients who are sent by their governments or insurers through contractual arrangements to a hospital in another country for treatment. I present case studies of nine patients and their accompanying families from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) who were interviewed in a Thai hospital as part of a broader study of medical travel from patients' perspectives. The health systems of the GCC suffer shortages in infrastructure, human resources and management skills, and as a consequence patients with particular needs, especially in neurology, orthopaedics and oncology may be sent overseas for treatment. Patients experience long stays overseas producing a considerable burden to their families supporting them. Such patients complicate notions of medical travel but their status also contrasts markedly from stereotypes held about Gulf patients within Thailand. Despite their appreciation of government sponsoring, for many patients the experience of care in Thailand underscored perceived inadequacies of their home health systems and governments. For some, outsourcing represented a betrayal of the obligations of their states to its citizens. PMID:25646738

  10. Patient Navigators: Agents of Creating Community-Nested Patient-Centered Medical Homes for Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Melissa A.; Samaras, Athena T.; Nonzee, Narissa J.; Hajjar, Nadia; Frankovich, Carmi; Bularzik, Charito; Murphy, Kara; Endress, Richard; Tom, Laura S.; Dong, XinQi

    2016-01-01

    Patient navigation is an internationally utilized, culturally grounded, and multifaceted strategy to optimize patients’ interface with the health-care team and system. The DuPage County Patient Navigation Collaborative (DPNC) is a campus–community partnership designed to improve access to care among uninsured breast and cervical cancer patients in DuPage County, IL. Importantly, the DPNC connects community-based social service delivery with the patient-centered medical home to achieve a community-nested patient-centered medical home model for cancer care. While the patient navigator experience has been qualitatively documented, the literature pertaining to patient navigation has largely focused on efficacy outcomes and program cost effectiveness. Here, we uniquely highlight stories of women enrolled in the DPNC, told from the perspective of patient navigators, to shed light on the myriad barriers that DPNC patients faced and document the strategies DPNC patient navigators implemented. PMID:27594792

  11. NATIONAL INCIDENCE OF MEDICAL TRANSFER: PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS AND REGIONAL VARIATION.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Andrew P; Schiltz, Nicholas; Koroukian, Siran M; Madigan, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study was to establish and describe the national incidence, cost, and outcomes of patients that undergo medical transfer. Using discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2011, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the dataset was analyzed using weighted frequency distribution. Approximately 1.6 million patients are transferred yearly. Transferred patients experience a mean length of stay of 9.3 days (std dv 13.5) versus 4.3 days for patients not transferred (std dv 6.0), and cost more than twice as much (mean $19,234) versus those not transferred (mean $9,469). Additionally, patients who undergo inter-facility transfer cost an additional $15.8 billion annually. Interhospital patient transfers require closer scrutiny regarding appropriateness and future policy implications. PMID:27079058

  12. Prevalence and predictors of medication non-adherence among Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Lai-Ming Hui, Christy; Wing-Yan Poon, Venessa; Shuk-Kuen Kwok, Vivian; Chang, Wing-Chung; Kit-Wa Chan, Sherry; Ho-Ming Lee, Edwin; Yu-Hai Chen, Eric

    2015-08-30

    Medication non-adherence is one of the major obstacles to recovery in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to identify the predictors and rates of medication non-adherence in the first and second year after the start of treatment (baseline) in urban Chinese FEP patients. Relevant information on medication non-adherence and potential baseline predictors, including demographic variables, clinical measures, violence/suicide attempts, stressful life experiences, intervention received, and follow-up attendance, were collected from case records of 1400 FEP patients in Hong Kong. The non-adherence rate was 16.2% in year 1 and 15.4% in year 2. Regression analyses revealed the predictors for non-adherence in year 1 were no hospitalization at baseline, non-schizophrenia diagnosis, and more years of education. Predictors of non-adherence in year 2 included acute/subacute onset and older age of onset. Predictors common in both years were defaulting from psychiatric follow-up during baseline, standard psychiatric care (no early intervention), and lower positive symptoms severity at baseline. In assessing non-adherence risk and for planning phase-specific early interventions for FEP, particularly in a Chinese context, healthcare professionals should consider the common and specific predictors for non-adherence identified in the first and second years of treatment and should not overlook patients with less clinically severe symptoms. PMID:26099660

  13. An analytics approach to designing patient centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Ajorlou, Saeede; Shams, Issac; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Recently the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has become a popular team based approach focused on delivering more streamlined care to patients. In current practices of medical homes, a clinical based prediction frame is recommended because it can help match the portfolio capacity of PCMH teams with the actual load generated by a set of patients. Without such balances in clinical supply and demand, issues such as excessive under and over utilization of physicians, long waiting time for receiving the appropriate treatment, and non-continuity of care will eliminate many advantages of the medical home strategy. In this paper, by using the hierarchical generalized linear model with multivariate responses, we develop a clinical workload prediction model for care portfolio demands in a Bayesian framework. The model allows for heterogeneous variances and unstructured covariance matrices for nested random effects that arise through complex hierarchical care systems. We show that using a multivariate approach substantially enhances the precision of workload predictions at both primary and non primary care levels. We also demonstrate that care demands depend not only on patient demographics but also on other utilization factors, such as length of stay. Our analyses of a recent data from Veteran Health Administration further indicate that risk adjustment for patient health conditions can considerably improve the prediction power of the model. PMID:24942633

  14. The Meaning of Patient Experiences of Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kornelsen, Jude; Atkins, Chloe; Brownell, Keith; Woollard, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Current diagnostic models in medical practice do not adequately account for patient symptoms that cannot be classified. At the moment, when all known diagnostic possibilities have been excluded, physicians-and patients-confront uncertainty in diagnosis, which gives rise to the label of Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). This phenomenological study, conducted by two research teams in two geographic locations, sought to explore patients' experiences of prolonged uncertainty in diagnosis. Participants in this study described their experiences with and consequences of MUPS primarily in relation to levels of acuity and acceptance of uncertainty, the latter loosely correlated to length of time since onset of symptoms (the longer the time, the more forbearance participants expressed). We identified three experiential periods including the active search for a diagnosis, living with MUPS, and, finally, acceptance/resignation of their condition. Findings point to the heightened importance of the therapeutic relationship when dealing with uncertainty. PMID:25583957

  15. [Medical intervention for attempted suicide patients in emergency room].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Emergency department is an important location for suicide prevention activities. Past history of attempted suicides or deliberate self-harms is a predictable risk factor for future suicide completion. In Japan, most of the attempted suicide patients (ASP) are transported to the emergency hospitals. Therefore, the more improvement of intervention skills for ASP are needed. Emergency medical staffs are expected to communicate patients with warm and calm attitudes. To confirm the presence or absence of suicidal ideation, risk factors are important. If patients are suicidal, emergency physicians should not hesitate to consult to the psychiatrist. PMID:26915259

  16. Sleep Apnea Prevalence in Acute Myocardial Infarction - the Sleep Apnea in Post Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients (SAPAMI) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ludka, Ondrej; Stepanova, Radka; Vyskocilova, Martina; Galkova, Lujza; Mikolaskova, Monika; Belehrad, Milos; Kostalova, Jana; Mihalova, Zuzana; Drozdova, Adela; Hlasensky, Jiri; Gacik, Michal; Pudilova, Lucie; Mikusova, Tereza; Fischerova, Blanka; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima; Kara, Tomas; Spinar, Jindrich; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Background While sleep apnea (SA) might be a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, recent data suggest that SA is severely underdiagnosed in patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). There is limited evidence about day-night variation of onset of MI on dependence of having SA. We therefore investigated the prevalence of SA and examined the day-night variation of onset of MI in acute MI patients. Methods We prospectively studied 782 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute MI. All subjects underwent sleep evaluations using a portable device after at least 48 hours post-admission. Using the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), groups were defined as patients without SA (<5 events/hour), mild SA (5–15 events/hour), moderate SA (15–30 events/hour), and severe SA (≥30 events/hour). Results Almost all patients (98%) underwent urgent coronary angiography and 91% of patients underwent primary PCI. Using a threshold of AHI ≥ 5 events/hour, SA was present in 65.7% of patients after acute MI. Mild SA was present in 32.6%, moderate in 20.4% and severe in 12.7%. The day-night variation in the onset of MI in all groups of SA patients was similar to that observed in non-SA patients. From 6AM–12PM, the frequency of MI was higher in both SA and non-SA patients, as compared to the interval from 12AM–6AM (all p<0.05). Conclusion There is a high prevalence of SA in patients presenting with acute MI. Peak time of MI onset in SA patients was between 6AM–noon, similar to that in the general population. Whether diagnosis and treatment of SA after MI will significantly improve outcomes in these patients remains to be determined. PMID:25064202

  17. Impact of prescribed medications on patient safety in older people

    PubMed Central

    Anathhanam, Sujo; Powis, Rachel A.; Robson, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate prescribing for older adults presents unique challenges to the prescriber. An understanding of the scale of the problems and contributing factors is essential when designing interventions to improve patient safety. The altered pharmacology of ageing, the existence of multiple medical conditions and the exclusion of elderly patients from many trials render this subgroup of the population particularly vulnerable to underprescribing and overprescribing. Adverse drug events are common, causing significant morbidity and mortality as well as having economic implications. ‘High-risk’ medications such as opioids, anticoagulants and antipsychotics can have benefits in this group of patients but strategies to optimize their safety are required. Tools exist that help to identify those at risk of adverse drug reactions and to screen for inappropriate prescribing. Developments in information technology are ongoing, and it is hoped that these may enhance the process of medication reconciliation across healthcare transitions and alert the prescriber to potential adverse drug events. This review addresses commonly encountered issues when prescribing for older people, considers strategies to improve medication safety and offers a list of ‘top tips’ to aid the clinician. PMID:25083234

  18. Hyperamylasemia as an Early Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Acute Paraquat Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Rong; Li, Changbin; Hu, Dayong; Xue, Wen; Wu, Tianfu; Mohan, Chandra; Peng, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ) is a non-selective and fast-acting contact herbicide which has been widely used in developing countries. Hyperamylasemia was reported in patients with PQ poisoning. This study investigated the predictive value and clinical characteristics of hyperamylasemia in patients with PQ poisoning. Material/Methods This study included 87 patients with acute PQ poisoning admitted from July 2012 to May 2015. Data were collected from medical records. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted to analyze the discriminatory potential of serum amylase with respect to 90-day mortality. Results Of 87 patients, 29 patients had elevated serum amylase. We found that serum amylase was significantly higher among patients with AKI than those with non-AKI (p<0.001), and was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=3.644; 95% [CI], 1.684–7.881; p=0.001). The area under the ROC curve for the serum amylase (area under curve [AUC]=0.796; 95% [CI], 0.690–0.903) had a better discriminatory potential than plasma PQ concentration (0.698;0.570–0.825) or urinary PQ concentration (0.647;0.514–0.781) in predicting 90-day mortality. Conclusions Hyperamylasemia is a valuable early predictor of 90-day mortality in PQ poisoning. PMID:27101346

  19. Does Treatment Impact Health Outcomes for Patients After Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Umbrasienė, Jelena; Vanagas, Giedrius; Venclovienė, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mortality rates for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients are still very high all over the world. Our study aimed to investigate the impact of ACS treatment on cardiovascular (CV) mortality eight years following ACS. Methods: A retrospective cohort study with a total of 613 patients was used. The data was collected from databases and medical records. An evidence-based treatment (EBT) algorithm was used based on the ESC guidelines. Logistic regression analysis and standardized odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for the risk assessment, with a p level < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The median follow-up time in this study was 7.6 years. During follow-up 48.9% of the patients (n = 300) died from CV and 207 (69%) for a relevant reason. For monotherapy ACE inhibitors and β-blockers, and for fixed dose combined drugs ACE inhibitors and diuretics, were most frequently used. EBT was provided to 37.8% of patients. The EBT use (HR 0.541, CI 0.394–0.742, p < 0.001) during follow-up period was important for reducing CV mortality in ACS patients. Conclusions: The combined use of EBT significantly improved outcomes. The recurrent myocardial infarction and percutaneous coronary intervention patients were more frequent in EBT and it was beneficial for reducing CV mortality. PMID:26035661

  20. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  1. Fate of Central Venous Catheters Used for Acute Extracorporeal Treatment in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients: A Single Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Rus, Rina R; Premru, Vladimir; Novljan, Gregor; Grošelj-Grenc, Mojca; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Renal replacement treatment (RRT) is required in severe acute kidney injury, and a functioning central venous catheter (CVC) is crucial. Twenty-eight children younger than 16 years have been treated at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana between 2003 and 2012 with either acute hemodialysis (HD) and/or plasma exchange (PE), and were included in our study. The age of the patients ranged from 2 days to 14.1 years. Sixty-six CVCs were inserted (52% de novo, 48% guide wire). The sites of insertion were the jugular vein in 20% and the femoral vein in 80%. Catheters were in function from 1 day to 27 days. The most common cause for CVC removal or exchange was catheter dysfunction (50%). CVCs were mostly inserted in the femoral vein, which is the preferred site of insertion in acute HD/PE because of the smaller number of complications. PMID:27312920

  2. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  3. Patients, society, and the increase in self medication.

    PubMed Central

    Blenkinsopp, A.; Bradley, C.

    1996-01-01

    Self medication with over the counter medicines has long been a feature of the lay health system. With the reclassification of certain drugs, the public can buy preparations that were previously available only prescription. Sales of over the counter medicines are now equivalent to a third of the NHS drugs bill; governments throughout the world see self medication as a way of shifting some of the cost of health care onto consumers. The trend towards increased self care and with it the increasing empowerment of patients has many potential benefits; collaboration between doctors and pharmacists will be critical. Images p631-a PMID:8595343

  4. The changes involved in patient-centered medical home transformation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Edward H; Coleman, Katie; Reid, Robert J; Phillips, Kathryn; Abrams, Melinda K; Sugarman, Jonathan R

    2012-06-01

    In 2007, the major primary care professional societies collaboratively introduced a new model of primary care: the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). The published document outlines the basic attributes and expectations of a PCMH but not with the specificity needed to help interested clinicians and administrators make the necessary changes to their practice. To identify the specific changes required to become a medical home, the authors reviewed literature and sought the opinions of two multi-stakeholder groups. This article describes the eight consensus change concepts and 32 key changes that emerged from this process, and the evidence supporting their inclusion. PMID:22608865

  5. Patients with non-diagnostic hyperamylasaemia must be investigated and managed as per acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Huw G; Jardine, Nicky; Williamson, Jeremy; Puntis, Malcolm CA; Morris-Stiff, Gareth J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The identification of hyperamylasaemia insufficient to confidently diagnose acute pancreatitis in patients with epigastric pain poses a clinical dilemma. The aim of this study was to identify a cohort of such patients and review their presentation, investigation and outcome. Design Patients admitted through the emergency surgical intake during a 12-month period with serum amylase levels of 100–400 IU/L were identified and case notes reviewed to confirm those presenting with upper abdominal pain. Subsequent radiological and biochemical investigations were recorded. Participants A total of 25 patients with non-diagnostic hyperamylasaemia. Setting Ward patients in a University Hospital. Main outcome measures Amylase level, eventual diagnosis, drug history. Results Twenty-five patients were identified with a mean age of 46.7 years. The median serum amylase level was 230 IU/L (range 102–358 IU/L). Twenty-two patients underwent transabdominal ultrasound at presentation, with gallstones identified in nine cases. The remaining three had documented gallstones and were awaiting elective cholecystectomy. Of the 13 patients with no evidence of cholelithiasis, six were taking medications known to cause pancreatitis, seven patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scans that identified chronic pancreatitis in three, and were non-diagnostic in four cases. These four patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the biliary tree identifying microlithiasis in one but no pathology in the remaining three cases. Conclusions Patients with hyperamylasaemia not diagnostic of pancreatitis should be carefully investigated, as gallstones will be identified in at least 50%. An accurate drug history is also invaluable. PMID:22299073

  6. [Disglycemia in patients with acute kidney injury in the ICU].

    PubMed

    Fiaccadori, E; Sabatino, A; Morabito, S; Bozzoli, L; Donadio, C; Maggiore, U; Regolisti, G

    2015-01-01

    Derangements of glucose metabolism are common among critically ill patients. Critical illness- associated hyperglycemia (CIAH) is characterized by raised blood glucose levels in association with an acute event that is reversible after resolution of the underlying disease. CIAH has many causes, such as changes in counter-regulatory hormone status, release of sepsis mediators, insulin resistance, drugs and nutritional factors. It is associated with increased mortality risk. This association appears to be strongly influenced by diabetes mellitus as a comorbidity, suggesting the need for an accurate individualization of glycemic targets according to baseline glycemic status. Hypoglycemia is also very common in this clinical context and it has a negative prognostic impact. Many studies based on intensive insulin treatment protocols targeting normal blood glucose values have in fact documented both an increased incidence of hypoglycemia and an increased mortality risk. Finally, glycemic control in the ICU is made even more complex in the presence of acute kidney injury. On one hand, there is in fact a reduction of both the renal clearance of insulin and of gluconeogenesis by the kidney. On the other hand, the frequent need for renal replacement therapy (dialysis / hemofiltration) may result in an energy intake excess, under the form of citrate, lactate and glucose in the dialysate/reinfusion fluids. With regard to the possible renal protective effects afforded by intensive glycemic control protocols, the presently available evidence does not support a reduction in the incidence of AKI and/or the need for RRT with this approach, when compared with standard glucose control. Thus, the most recent guidelines now suggest higher blood glucose targets (<180 mg/dl or 140-180 mg/dl) than in the past (80-110 mg/dl). Albeit with limited evidence, it seems reasonable to extend these indications also to patients with AKI in the intensive care unit. Further studies are needed in order

  7. Pain management among medical in-patients in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Muula, Adamson S; Misiri, Humphreys E

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain is a leading symptom which influences patients to seek medical attention. The management of pain among patients attending in-patient care in southern African countries has been little described. Information regarding the prevalence of pain and the quality of its management may be useful in guiding clinical decisions, training of health workers and health care quality improvements. Methods A hospital-based audit was conducted to estimate the prevalence of pain and examine the quality of its management among patients admitted to adult medical wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were abstracted from ward charts of consecutive patients' who had been either been discharged or had died within a specified period. Characteristics of interest included; socio-demographic data, presence or absence of pain at admission, characterization or description of pain when present, and drug treatment given. Data were analyzed to obtain frequencies and proportions of the characteristics and assess the prevalence of pain and quality of care. Results A total of 121 patients' case notes were reviewed and the prevalence of pain was recorded for 91 (75.2%) of the patients. Clinicians had recorded pertinent information regarding pain management with the following frequency: pain severity or intensity 5/91 (5.5%), alleviating factors 5 (5.5%), pain radiation 7 (7.7%), exacerbating factors in 9 (9.9%) and periodicity in 43 (47.3%) of the cases. Males with pain were more than 3 times more likely to receive analgesic as compared to females, p < 0.01. Paracetamol was the commonest analgesic prescribed. Conclusion Inadequate management of pain among patients attending medical wards at QECH was found. There is need for prospective studies to further characterize pain management and identify pain management gaps in Malawi. Interviews of clinicians and documentation of observations within clinical practice are likely to be of value. PMID

  8. Geriatric Patients With Fractures Below the Hip are Medically Similar to Geriatric Patients With Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Harmeeth S.; Copeland, Marilyn E.; Crist, Brett D.; Volgas, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated fractures below the hip to a cohort of geriatric patients with operatively managed isolated hip fractures. All patients greater than 59 years of age admitted to our institution for surgical care of an isolated lower extremity fracture during a 3-year period were included. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: BTH (fracture below the subtrochanteric region of the femur) and HIP (proximal femoral fracture at subtrochanteric region or proximal). We identified 141 patients included in cohort BTH and 205 patients included in cohort HIP. HIP patients were older (P < .01) and less obese (P < .01) but were otherwise very similar. An extensive comorbidity review revealed that the 2 cohorts were similar, with the exception of an increased incidence of dementia (P = .012) or glaucoma (P = .04) in HIP patients and of peripheral neuropathy (P = .014) in BTH patients. HIP patients were more likely to be under active antiosteoporotic medication management and were more likely to be receiving pharmacological anticoagulation at the time of admission. HIP patients and BTH patients were similar with regard to necessity of assistance with ambulation preinjury, but HIP patients were less likely to reside independently at home than were BTH patients (P < .001). HIP patients were also less likely to be discharged directly home from the hospital (P < .001). Geriatric patients with fractures below the hip are medically similar to geriatric patients with hip fracture. Medical comanagement protocols have been extensively published that improve care of geriatric patients with hip fracture; consideration should be given to similar protocol-driven medical comanagement programs for geriatric patients with fractures below the hip. PMID:26246950

  9. Short-term prognostic factors in the patients after acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinliang; Liu, Yingfeng; Yuan, Yong; Feng, Li; Ning, Ye

    2015-01-01

    To explore risk factors of short-term prognosis of acute heart failure (AHF) patients and compare the difference between acute heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (AHFREF) and acute heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (AHFPEF). A retrospective analysis of medical records of AHF patients was performed. Eligible patients were at the age of more than 18 years old, excluding malignancy, acute pulmonary embolism, heart valve diseases (such as mild valvular regurgitation), severe renal insufficiency, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) < 300 pg/ml. AHFREF group (LVEF < 0.5) and AHFPEF group (LVEF ≥ 0.5) were classified depending on the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). The involved patients were followed up via telephone contact and consult of medical recording. Unfavorable prognosis was defined upon the cardiac death and re-hospitalization within 6 months; otherwise they had a favorable prognosis. We analyzed the impact factors of short-term prognosis, including patient's age, gender, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, NT-proBNP, blood glucose, heart ultrasound LVEF, cardiothoracic ration in chest radiograph, history of hypertension, coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus, for multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 130 AHF patients were included in the analysis, including 79 male (60.8%) and 51 female (39.2%). The average age of all involved patients was 74.0 years [M (P 25, P 75) = 64.0, 80.0]. Fifteen cases (11.5%) had unfavorable prognosis and 35 cases (27.0%) had favorable prognosis in the AHFREF group, while the cases in the AHFPEF group were respectively 31 (23.8%) and 49 (37.7%). There was no significant difference in the short-term prognosis between the two groups (χ (2) = 1.030, P = 0.310). The short-term prognosis in AHF patients was mainly influenced by NT-proBNP (r = -0.263, P = 0.035), blood glucose (r = -0.090, P = 0.049) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0

  10. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  12. Metronidazole pharmacokinetics in patients with acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A A; Kong, C B; Gurr, F W; Sabto, J; Spicer, W J; McLean, A J

    1984-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of intravenous metronidazole were studied in six patients with acute renal failure. In two of the patients a single dose (500 mg) of metronidazole was administered, whereas in four patients the steady-state pharmacokinetics were studied after four days therapy of 500 mg twice daily. Plasma concentrations of metronidazole and its hydroxy and acetic acid metabolites were measured by a specific and sensitive HPLC method. The volume of distribution was 0.65 +/- 0.13 l/kg (mean +/- S.D.), elimination half-life was 9.9 +/- 2.5 h and total plasma clearance was 55.5 +/- 17.7 ml/min. Renal clearance was almost non-existent (1.4 +/- 1.4 ml/min), whereas non-renal clearance was 54.0 +/- 18.2 ml/min. Steady-state plasma concentrations of metronidazole were 15.3 +/- 3.8 mg/l, the hydroxy metabolite were 17.4 +/- 2.0 mg/l and the acetic acid metabolite were 1.2 +/- 0.8 mg/l. In the patients studied, a dosing regimen of 500 mg twice daily resulted in therapeutically adequate blood levels of metronidazole. PMID:6706889

  13. Therapeutic drug monitoring of aminoglycosides in acute myeloid leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Mareville, Julie; Gay, Julie; Cliquennois, Emmanuel; Herbaux, Charles; Pasquier, Florence; Allorge, Delphine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Berthon, Céline; Alfandari, Serge

    2012-05-01

    International guidelines limit the use of aminoglycosides in febrile neutropenia to severe situations. We retrospectively reviewed the use of aminoglycosides in adult acute myeloid leukaemia patients admitted in 2009. Our guidelines include precise indications (severe sepsis, shock, drug resistance), dosing regimens (once-daily 20 mg/kg/day amikacin, 5 mg/kg/day gentamicin), durations of treatment, drug monitoring timing, and target C(max) concentrations (40 mg/l amikacin, 20 mg/l gentamicin). Thirty-one patients received 46 aminoglycoside courses: 31 amikacin and 15 gentamicin. The mean prescribed dosage was 19 ± 2.8 mg/kg/day for amikacin and 4.7 ± 0.9 mg/kg/day for gentamicin. The mean duration of use was 2.9 days for both drugs. The mean C(max) for amikacin was 47 ± 13 mg/l and for gentamicin was 13.6 ± 7.5 mg/l. In compliant regimens, all amikacin patients and a third of gentamicin patients had adequate C(max). Among 23 isolated pathogens, 65.5% were susceptible to both drugs and 11.5% to amikacin only. This vindicates the 20 mg/kg/day amikacin dosage and suggests a need to increase the gentamicin dosage. PMID:22235869

  14. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  15. Geographic Differences in Patients in a Global Acute Heart Failure Clinical Trial (from the ASCEND-HF Trial).

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Heizer, Gretchen M; Armstrong, Paul W; Clausell, Nadine; Corbalan, Ramon; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Dickstein, Kenneth; Dunlap, Mark E; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Howlett, Jonathan G; Komajda, Michel; Krum, Henry; Lombardi, Carlo; Fonarow, Gregg C; McMurray, John J V; Nieminen, Markku S; Swedberg, Karl; Voors, Adriaan A; Starling, Randall C; Teerlink, John R; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of countries and geographical regions are involved in major clinical trials. Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide in Decompensated Heart Failure is the largest trial in acutely decompensated heart failure (HF) with patients from 5 geographical regions: North America (NA), Latin America (LA), Western Europe (WE), Central Europe (CE), and Asia-Pacific (AP). Data from the 5 geographical areas were compared including baseline characteristics, medications, 30-day outcomes (mortality and mortality or HF hospitalization), and 180-day mortality. Of the 7,141 study patients, 3,243 (45.4%) were from NA (average of 15.2 patients/site), 1,762 (24.7%) from AP (28.4 patients/site), 967 (13.5%) from CE (20.2 patients/site), 665 (9.3%) from LA (17.1 patients/site), and 504 (7.1%) from WE (14.4 patients/site). There were marked differences in co-morbidities, clinical profile, medication use, length of stay, 30-day event rates, and 180-day mortality by region. Compared with NA, the adjusted risk for death or HF hospitalization at 30 days was significantly lower in CE (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.64), WE (OR 0.52 95% CI 0.35 to 0.75), and AP (OR 0.62 95% CI 0.48 to 0.79) and numerically lower in LA (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.04) with similar results for 180-day mortality. In conclusion, in patients with acutely decompensated HF, major differences in baseline characteristics, treatments, length of the hospital stay, and 30-day HF rehospitalization rates, and 180-day mortality were found in patients enrolled from different geographical areas. PMID:27108685

  16. Physicians’ Decision Making Roles for an Acutely Unstable Critically and Terminally Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Jamie; White, Douglas B.; Mohan, Deepika; Arnold, Robert M.; Barnato, Amber E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is substantial variation in use of life sustaining technologies in patients near the end of life but little is known about variation in physicians’ initial ICU admission and intubation decision making processes. Objective To describe variation in hospital-based physicians’ communication behaviors and decision making roles for ICU admission and intubation decisions for an acutely unstable critically and terminally ill patient. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of transcribed simulation encounters from a multi-center observational study of physician decision making. The simulation depicted a 78 year-old man with metastatic gastric cancer and life threatening hypoxia. He has stable underlying preferences against ICU admission and intubation that he or his wife will report if asked. We coded encounters for communication behaviors (providing medical information, eliciting preferences/values, engaging the patient/surrogate in deliberation, and providing treatment recommendations) and used a previously-developed framework to classify subject physicians into four mutually-exclusive decision-making roles: informative (providing medical information only), facilitative (information + eliciting preferences/values + guiding surrogate to apply preferences/values), collaborative (information + eliciting + guiding + making a recommendation) and directive (making an independent treatment decision). Subjects 24 emergency physicians, 37 hospitalists, and 37 intensivists from 3 US academic medical centers. Results Subject physicians average 12.4 (SD 9.0) years since graduation from medical school. 38/98(39%) physicians sent the patient to the ICU, and 9/98(9%) ultimately decided to intubate. Most (93/98 (95%)) provided at least some medical information, but few explained the short-term prognosis with (26/98 (27%)) or without intubation (37/98 (38%)). Many (80/98 (82%)) elicited the patient's intubation preferences, but few (35/98 (36%)) explored the

  17. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Medical Complications and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    Care of patients with HIV infection starts with diagnosis as soon as possible, preferably at or near the time of acute infection. Opportunistic infections, malignancies, and other conditions develop progressively over time, particularly in untreated patients. The AIDS-defining opportunistic infections most common in the United States include Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, Candida esophagitis, toxoplasmic encephalitis, tuberculosis, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, cryptococcal meningitis, and cytomegalovirus retinitis. Specific prophylaxis regimens exist for several opportunistic infections, and effective antiretroviral therapy reduces the risk of most others. Other AIDS-defining conditions include wasting syndrome and HIV encephalopathy. AIDS-defining malignancies include Kaposi sarcoma, systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma, and invasive cervical cancer. Although not an AIDS-defining condition, anal cancer is common in patients with HIV infection. Other HIV-related conditions include thrombocytopenia, recurrent bacterial respiratory infections, HIV-associated nephropathy, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. PMID:27092563

  18. Respect for patient autonomy as a medical virtue.

    PubMed

    Cook, Thomas; Mavroudis, Constantine D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Mavroudis, Constantine

    2015-12-01

    Respect for patient autonomy is an important and indispensable principle in the ethical practice of clinical medicine. Legal tenets recognise the centrality of this principle and the inherent right of patients of sound mind - properly informed - to make their own personal medical decisions. In the course of everyday medical practice, however, challenging cases may result in ethical dilemmas for the patient, the physician, and society. Resolution of these dilemmas requires a thorough understanding of the underlying principles that allow the clinician to make informed decisions and to offer considered therapeutic options to the patient. We argue in this paper that there is also need for a transition of moral competency from understanding principles to attaining virtue in the classic Aristotelian tradition. Achieving moral virtue is based on a lifetime of learning, practising, and watching how others, who have achieved virtue, act and perform their duties. We further claim that learning moral virtue in medical practice is best realised by incorporating the lessons learnt during daily rounds where frank discussions and considered resolutions can occur under the leadership of senior practitioners who have achieved a semblance of moral excellence. PMID:26675613

  19. Patient safety: helping medical students understand error in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Patey, Rona; Flin, Rhona; Cut