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Sample records for acute medical unit

  1. Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS) - point of care ultrasound for the Acute Medical Unit.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Dachsel, Martin; Matsa, Ramprasad; Tabiowo, Eugene; Walden, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Point of care ultrasound (POCU) is becoming increasingly popular as an extension to clinical examination techniques. Specific POCU training pathways have been developed in specialties such as Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine (CORE Emergency Ultrasound and Core UltraSound Intensive Care, for example), but until this time there has not been a curriculum for the acutely unwell medical patient outside of Critical Care. We describe the development of Focused Acute Medicine Ultrasound (FAMUS), a curriculum designed specifically for the Acute Physician to learn ultrasound techniques to aid in the management of the unwell adult patient. We detail both the outline of the curriculum and the process involved for a candidate to achieve FAMUS accreditation. It is anticipated this will appeal to both Acute Medical Unit (AMU) clinicians and general physicians who deal with the unwell or deteriorating medical or surgical patient. In time, the aspiration is for FAMUS to become a core part of the AIM curriculum.

  2. Acute fulminant necrotizing amoebic colitis: a potentially fatal cause of diarrhoea on the Acute Medical Unit.

    PubMed

    Desai, Purav; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani

    2011-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a common presenting complaint to the Acute Medical Unit. We report a case of acute fulminant necrotizing amebic colitis in a 73 year old man with no recent travel history preceding his admission. Such cases are often difficult to diagnose and hence associated with a high mortality, unless treated promptly and appropriately. This case report highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment.

  3. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    PubMed Central

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  4. Adolescents and young adults on the acute medical unit: how might we do it better?

    PubMed

    Albon, Lorraine; Vaughan, Louella

    2014-12-01

    It is a common perception that young people do not become ill and do not pose a challenge in the unscheduled healthcare setting. The research, however, increasingly suggests that young adults and adolescents (YAAs) are a highly vulnerable group, with poorer outcomes than either older adults or children, and distinct healthcare needs. The acute medical unit (AMU) setting poses particular challenges to the care of this patient group. To improve care and patient experience, adult clinicians need to look critically at their services and seek to adapt them to meet the needs of YAAs. This requires cooperation and linkage with local paediatric and emergency services, as well as the input of other relevant stakeholder groups. Staff on AMUs also need to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes to communicate effectively and address the developmental and health needs of YAAs and their parents/carers at times of high risk and stress.

  5. An evaluation process for an electronic bar code medication administration information system in an acute care unit.

    PubMed

    Bargren, Michelle; Lu, Der-Fa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to present an evaluation process and recommendations for addressing the gaps found with the implementation of a new bar code medication administration (BCMA) technology in a busy acute care hospital unit. The case study analyzes workflow procedures associated with administration of medications in an inpatient labor and delivery care unit before and one year after implementation of BCMA technology. The comparison reveals a twofold increase in workflow procedures for nursing staff because of the new technology. System gaps are identified from a nursing user's perspective, and recommendations are offered to close those gaps.

  6. Effectiveness of acute geriatric units on functional decline, living at home, and case fatality among older patients admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-García, Francisco M; López-Arrieta, Jesús; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of acute geriatric units compared with conventional care units in adults aged 65 or more admitted to hospital for acute medical disorders. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library up to 31 August 2008, and references from published literature. Review methods Randomised trials, non-randomised trials, and case-control studies were included. Exclusions were studies based on administrative databases, those that assessed care for a single disorder, those that evaluated acute and subacute care units, and those in which patients were admitted to the acute geriatric unit after three or more days of being admitted to hospital. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. Results 11 studies were included of which five were randomised trials, four non-randomised trials, and two case-control studies. The randomised trials showed that compared with older people admitted to conventional care units those admitted to acute geriatric units had a lower risk of functional decline at discharge (combined odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.68 to 0.99) and were more likely to live at home after discharge (1.30, 1.11 to 1.52), with no differences in case fatality (0.83, 0.60 to 1.14). The global analysis of all studies, including non-randomised trials, showed similar results. Conclusions Care of people aged 65 or more with acute medical disorders in acute geriatric units produces a functional benefit compared with conventional hospital care, and increases the likelihood of living at home after discharge. PMID:19164393

  7. Investigation of the degree of organisational influence on patient experience scores in acute medical admission units in all acute hospitals in England using multilevel hierarchical regression modelling

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies found that hospital and specialty have limited influence on patient experience scores, and patient level factors are more important. This could be due to heterogeneity of experience delivery across subunits within organisations. We aimed to determine whether organisation level factors have greater impact if scores for the same subspecialty microsystem are analysed in each hospital. Setting Acute medical admission units in all NHS Acute Trusts in England. Participants We analysed patient experience data from the English Adult Inpatient Survey which is administered to 850 patients annually in each acute NHS Trusts in England. We selected all 8753 patients who returned the survey and who were emergency medical admissions and stayed in their admission unit for 1–2 nights, so as to isolate the experience delivered during the acute admission process. Primary and secondary outcome measures We used multilevel logistic regression to determine the apportioned influence of host organisation and of organisation level factors (size and teaching status), and patient level factors (demographics, presence of long-term conditions and disabilities). We selected ‘being treated with respect and dignity’ and ‘pain control’ as primary outcome parameters. Other Picker Domain question scores were analysed as secondary parameters. Results The proportion of overall variance attributable at organisational level was small; 0.5% (NS) for respect and dignity, 0.4% (NS) for pain control. Long-standing conditions and consequent disabilities were associated with low scores. Other item scores also showed that most influence was from patient level factors. Conclusions When a single microsystem, the acute medical admission process, is isolated, variance in experience scores is mainly explainable by patient level factors with limited organisational level influence. This has implications for the use of generic patient experience surveys for comparison between

  8. A UK wide survey on attitudes to point of care ultrasound training amongst clinicians working on the Acute Medical Unit.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Matsa, Ramprasad; Lawrenson, Philip; Messenger, Jenny; Walden, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The use of point of care ultrasound (POCU) is increasing across a number of specialties, becoming mandatory within some specialist training programmes (for example respiratory and emergency medicine). Despite this, there are few data looking at the prevalence of use or the training clinicians have undertaken; this survey sought to address this. It shows that the majority of POCU undertaken on the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) is without formal accreditation, with significant arriers to training highlighted including a lack of supervision, time and equipment. For those who undertook POCU, it was shown to regularly speed up clinical decision making, while 76.3% respondents believed a lack of access to POCU out of hours may affect patient safety. The data provide support to the concept of developing AMU specific POCU accreditation, to ensure robust and safe use of this modality on the AMU.

  9. The Identification of Seniors at Risk (ISAR) score to predict clinical outcomes and health service costs in older people discharged from UK acute medical units

    PubMed Central

    Edmans, Judi; Bradshaw, Lucy; Gladman, John R. F.; Franklin, Matthew; Berdunov, Vladislav; Elliott, Rachel; Conroy, Simon P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: tools are required to identify high-risk older people in acute emergency settings so that appropriate services can be directed towards them. Objective: to evaluate whether the Identification of Seniors At Risk (ISAR) predicts the clinical outcomes and health and social services costs of older people discharged from acute medical units. Design: an observational cohort study using receiver–operator curve analysis to compare baseline ISAR to an adverse clinical outcome at 90 days (where an adverse outcome was any of death, institutionalisation, hospital readmission, increased dependency in activities of daily living (decrease of 2 or more points on the Barthel ADL Index), reduced mental well-being (increase of 2 or more points on the 12-point General Health Questionnaire) or reduced quality of life (reduction in the EuroQol-5D) and high health and social services costs over 90 days estimated from routine electronic service records. Setting: two acute medical units in the East Midlands, UK. Participants: a total of 667 patients aged ≥70 discharged from acute medical units. Results: an adverse outcome at 90 days was observed in 76% of participants. The ISAR was poor at predicting adverse outcomes (AUC: 0.60, 95% CI: 0.54–0.65) and fair for health and social care costs (AUC: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.59–0.81). Conclusions: adverse outcomes are common in older people discharged from acute medical units in the UK; the poor predictive ability of the ISAR in older people discharged from acute medical units makes it unsuitable as a sole tool in clinical decision-making. PMID:23666405

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of a Specialist Geriatric Medical Intervention for Frail Older People Discharged from Acute Medical Units: Economic Evaluation in a Two-Centre Randomised Controlled Trial (AMIGOS)

    PubMed Central

    Tanajewski, Lukasz; Franklin, Matthew; Gkountouras, Georgios; Berdunov, Vladislav; Edmans, Judi; Conroy, Simon; Bradshaw, Lucy E.; Gladman, John R. F.; Elliott, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor outcomes and high resource-use are observed for frail older people discharged from acute medical units. A specialist geriatric medical intervention, to facilitate Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, was developed to reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes and associated high resource-use in this group in the post-discharge period. Objective To examine the costs and cost-effectiveness of a specialist geriatric medical intervention for frail older people in the 90 days following discharge from an acute medical unit, compared with standard care. Methods Economic evaluation was conducted alongside a two-centre randomised controlled trial (AMIGOS). 433 patients (aged 70 or over) at risk of future health problems, discharged from acute medical units within 72 hours of attending hospital, were recruited in two general hospitals in Nottingham and Leicester, UK. Participants were randomised to the intervention, comprising geriatrician assessment in acute units and further specialist management, or to control where patients received no additional intervention over and above standard care. Primary outcome was incremental cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results We undertook cost-effectiveness analysis for 417 patients (intervention: 205). The difference in mean adjusted QALYs gained between groups at 3 months was -0.001 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.009, 0.007). Total adjusted secondary and social care costs, including direct costs of the intervention, at 3 months were £4412 (€5624, $6878) and £4110 (€5239, $6408) for the intervention and standard care groups, the incremental cost was £302 (95% CI: 193, 410) [€385, $471]. The intervention was dominated by standard care with probability of 62%, and with 0% probability of cost-effectiveness (at £20,000/QALY threshold). Conclusions The specialist geriatric medical intervention for frail older people discharged from acute medical unit was not cost-effective. Further research on

  11. Patient need at the heart of workforce planning: the use of supply and demand analysis in a large teaching hospital's acute medical unit.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, I R; Simmonds, M J R; Poole, L

    2012-08-01

    Timely medical assessment is integral to the safety and quality of healthcare delivery in acute medicine. Medical staff are an expensive resource. This study aimed to develop a modelling system that facilitated efficient workforce planning according to patient need on the acute medical unit. A realistic 24-hour 'supply' of junior doctors was calculated by adjusting the theoretical numbers on the rota for leave allowances, natural breaks and other ward duties by a combination of direct observation of working practice and junior doctor interviews. 'Demand' was analysed using detailed admission data. Supply and demand were then integrated with data from a survey of the time spent on the process of clerking and assessment of medical admissions. A robust modelling system that predicted the number of unclerked patients was developed. The utility of the model was assessed by demonstrating the impact of a regulation-compliant redesign of the rota using existing staff and by predicting the most efficient use of an additional shift. This simple modelling system has the potential to enhance quality of care and efficiency by linking workforce planning to patient need.

  12. Evaluation of risk factors in acute myocardial infarction patients admitted to the coronary care unit, Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya.

    PubMed

    Abduelkarem, A R; El-Shareif, H J; Sharif, S I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the risk factors for acute myocardial infarction in patients attending Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya. Records were reviewed for 622 patients with a mean age of 58.3 (SD 12.9) years. Diabetes mellitus (48.2%), hypertension (35.7%) and smoking (50.6%) were among the risk factors reported. There were 110 patients (17.7%) who died during hospitalization, mainly suffering cardiogenic shock (48.0%). The rate of use of thrombolytic therapy was low in patients who were female (40.4% versus 58.4% for males), older age (31.6% for those > 85 years versus 63.3% for patients < 55 years), diabetics (45.3% versus 62.0% for non-diabetic patients) and hypertensives (47.3% versus 57.8% for non-hypertensive patients). Prevention strategies should be implemented in order to improve the long-term prognosis and decrease overall morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease in Libyan patients.

  13. Evaluation of a Medical and Mental Health Unit compared with standard care for older people whose emergency admission to an acute general hospital is complicated by concurrent 'confusion': a controlled clinical trial. Acronym: TEAM: Trial of an Elderly Acute care Medical and mental health unit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with delirium and dementia admitted to general hospitals have poor outcomes, and their carers report poor experiences. We developed an acute geriatric medical ward into a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit over an eighteen month period. Additional specialist mental health staff were employed, other staff were trained in the 'person-centred' dementia care approach, a programme of meaningful activity was devised, the environment adapted to the needs of people with cognitive impairment, and attention given to communication with family carers. We hypothesise that patients managed on this ward will have better outcomes than those receiving standard care, and that such care will be cost-effective. Methods/design We will perform a controlled clinical trial comparing in-patient management on a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit with standard care. Study participants are patients over the age of 65, admitted as an emergency to a single general hospital, and identified on the Acute Medical Admissions Unit as being 'confused'. Sample size is 300 per group. The evaluation design has been adapted to accommodate pressures on bed management and patient flows. If beds are available on the specialist Unit, the clinical service allocates patients at random between the Unit and standard care on general or geriatric medical wards. Once admitted, randomised patients and their carers are invited to take part in a follow up study, and baseline data are collected. Quality of care and patient experience are assessed in a non-participant observer study. Outcomes are ascertained at a follow up home visit 90 days after randomisation, by a researcher blind to allocation. The primary outcome is days spent at home (for those admitted from home), or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home). Secondary outcomes include mortality, institutionalisation, resource use, and scaled outcome measures, including quality of life, cognitive function

  14. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    Aims There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. Methods The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51−0.99; P = 0.043). Conclusions Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients. PMID:26562780

  15. Decreasing Falls in Acute Care Medical Patients: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Leslie; Veenema, Tener Goodwin

    2017-02-06

    Falls in acute care medical patients are a complex problem impacted by the constantly changing risk factors affecting this population. This integrative literature review analyzes current evidence to determine factors that continue to make falls a top patient safety problem within the medical unit microsystem. The goal of this review is to develop an evidence-based structure to guide process improvement and effective use of organization resources.

  16. A Basic Camera Unit for Medical Photography

    PubMed Central

    Smialowski, Arthur; Currie, Donald J.

    1964-01-01

    A camera unit suitable for most medical photographic purposes is described. The unit comprises a single-lens reflex camera, an electronic flash unit and supplementary lenses. Simple instructions for use of th's basic unit are presented. The unit is entirely suitable for taking fine-quality photographs of most medical subjects by persons who have had little photographic training. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:14179542

  17. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. Aim To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Method Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Conclusions Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them. PMID:25626943

  18. Acute infantile motor unit disorder. Infantile botulism?

    PubMed

    Clay, S A; Ramseyer, J C; Fishman, L S; Sedgwick, R P

    1977-04-01

    Eight infants with an acute reversible motor unit disorder are described, including two infants from whom Clostridum botulinum type A was isolated from stool specimens. The clinical spectrum includes constipation, cranial nerve deficits, pupillary involvement, and generalized hypotonic weakness. There were no deaths, and all infants have had complete clinical recovery. A characteristic electromyographic (EMG) pattern was present in part until clinical recovery. This distinctive pattern consisted of brief, small, abundant for power exerted motor unit potentials. This EMG pattern in the context of the clinical syndrome may well be diagnostic for acute infantile motor unit disorder.

  19. Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction

  20. Attempts to improve treatment outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older patients: the results of the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, A H; Burnett, A K; Wheatley, K; Smith, A G; Hutchinson, R M; Clark, R E

    2001-09-01

    In an attempt to improve induction chemotherapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML),1314 patients were randomized to 1 of 3 induction treatments for 2 courses of DAT (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine) 3 + 10, ADE (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and etoposide) 10 + 3 + 5, or MAC (mitoxantrone-cytarabine). The remission rate in the DAT arm was significantly better than ADE (62% vs 50%; P =.002) or MAC (62% vs 55%; P =.04). This benefit was seen in patients younger and older than 70 years. There were no differences between the induction schedules with respect to overall survival at 5 years (12% vs 8% vs 10%). A total of 226 patients were randomized to receive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or placebo as supportive care from day 8 after the end of treatment course 1. The remission rate or survival were not improved by G-CSF, although the median number of days to recover neutrophils to 1.0 x 10(9)/L was reduced by 5 days. Patients who entered remission (n = 371) were randomized to stop after a third course (DAT 2 + 7) or after 6 courses, ie, a subsequent COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, and prednisolone), DAT 2 + 5, and COAP. The relapse risk (81% vs 73%), disease-free survival (16% vs 23%), and overall survival at 5 years (23% vs 22%) did not differ between the 3-course or 6-course arms. In addition to a treatment duration randomization, 362 patients were randomized to receive 12-month maintenance treatment with low-dose interferon, but no benefit was seen with respect to relapse risk, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  1. Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boards Representing the 70 medical boards of the United States and its territories. The Federation of State Medical ... the 70 medical and osteopathic boards of the United States and its territories. Since its founding, the FSMB ...

  2. Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Benomran, Fawzi

    2010-05-01

    Medical responsibility in the United Arab Emirates was formerly defined and governed according to Law 7 of 1975 for the practice of medical professions, which had been a part of civil law. The passing of Law 10 of 2008, namely the "Law on Medical Responsibility in UAE", enacted on 16th December 2008 created a new framework to deal with this issue. One of its provisions required medical practitioners to hold insurance policies, so that insurance companies pays damages to the plaintiff (patient) injured as a result of a physicians' negligence. This paper outlines the issue of medical responsibility and medical negligence. The author's translation of the new law into English is included so that its full text is available for the readers, especially expatriate doctors working in the UAE. Where appropriate, a brief comparison between the old law and new laws is also presented. The objective of this paper is to provide medical practitioners with basic information about the subject in general and to this legislation in particular. It is mandatory for doctors to realize inherent risks involved in the course of their practice. A basic knowledge of the law is required to avoid pitfalls and to safeguard oneself against errors arising from ignorance of the duties and rights of the professional person.

  3. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-15

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented.

  4. Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trageser, Katherine H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and fabrication associated with upgrades for the Medical Operations Workstation in the Habitat Demonstration Unit. The work spanned a ten week period. The upgrades will be used during the 2011 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. Upgrades include a deployable privacy curtain system, a deployable tray table, an easily accessible biological waste container, reorganization and labeling of the medical supplies, and installation of a retractable camera. All of the items were completed within the ten week period.

  5. Unit-Specific Rates of Hand Hygiene Opportunities in an Acute-Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Han, Angela; Conway, Laurie J; Moore, Christine; McCreight, Liz; Ragan, Kelsey; So, Jannice; Borgundvaag, Emily; Larocque, Mike; Coleman, Brenda L; McGeer, Allison

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the frequency of hand hygiene opportunities (HHOs) in multiple units of an acute-care hospital. DESIGN Prospective observational study. SETTING The adult intensive care unit (ICU), medical and surgical step-down units, medical and surgical units, and the postpartum mother-baby unit (MBU) of an academic acute-care hospital during May-August 2013, May-July 2014, and June-August 2015. PARTICIPANTS Healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS HHOs were recorded using direct observation in 1-hour intervals following Public Health Ontario guidelines. The frequency and distribution of HHOs per patient hour were determined for each unit according to time of day, indication, and profession. RESULTS In total, 3,422 HHOs were identified during 586 hours of observation. The mean numbers of HHOs per patient hour in the ICU were similar to those in the medical and surgical step-down units during the day and night, which were higher than the rates observed in medical and surgical units and the MBU. The rate of HHOs during the night significantly decreased compared with day (P92% of HHOs on medical and surgical units, compared to 67% of HHOs on the MBU. CONCLUSIONS Assessment of hand hygiene compliance using product utilization data requires knowledge of the appropriate opportunities for hand hygiene. We have provided a detailed characterization of these estimates across a wide range of inpatient settings as well as an examination of temporal variations in HHOs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:411-416.

  6. An examination of technical efficiency, quality, and patient safety in acute care nursing units.

    PubMed

    Mark, Barbara A; Jones, Cheryl Bland; Lindley, Lisa; Ozcan, Yasar A

    2009-08-01

    Using an innovative statistical approach-data envelopment analysis-the authors examined the technical efficiency of 226 medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units in 118 randomly selected acute care hospitals. The authors used the inputs of registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, and unlicensed hours of care; operating expenses; and number of beds on the unit. Outputs included case mix adjusted discharges, patient satisfaction (as a quality measure), and the rates of medication errors and patient falls (as measures of patient safety). This study found that 60% of units were operating at less than full efficiency. Key areas for improvement included slight reductions in labor hours and large reductions in medication errors and falls. The study findings indicate the importance of improving patient safety as a mechanism to simultaneously improve nursing unit efficiency.

  7. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  8. Malarial acute kidney injury in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kapil; Gupta, Shalu

    2012-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication of malaria which has a very high mortality rate. A retrospective analysis of medical record data of children treated for malarial AKI in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) was performed in order to evaluate the incidence, poor prognostic factors and outcome of AKI with malaria. Eighteen (48.6%) malarial patients had AKI (11 Plasmodium vivax positive, six P. falciparum positive and one mixed infection) with a male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The mean age was 75 ± 32 months (range, 1 month to 10 years). Oliguria was present in 61.1% and 55.5% required renal replacement therapy. Mortality was noted in 33.3% of patients and full recovery was achieved in 50% of patients. Oliguria, shock, central nervous system involvement, jaundice, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and acute respiratory distress syndrome emerged as bad prognostic factors in simple univariate analysis. Malaria patients with and without AKI differ significantly in terms of shock, ventilator requirement, mortality and length of PICU stay.

  9. Acute Surgical Unit at Auckland City Hospital: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsee, Li; Devaud, Marcelo; Middelberg, Lisa; Jones, Wayne; Civil, Ian

    2012-09-01

    Lack of timely assessment and access to acute operating rooms is a worldwide problem and also exists in New Zealand hospitals. To address these issues, an Acute Surgical Unit (ASU) was set up at Auckland City Hospital (ACH) in January 2009. This service has evolved and been modified to address the specific needs of acute surgical patients of ACH. Despite initial challenges inherent to setting up a new service, the Unit has been in steady operation and enhanced its performance over time. This paper is a descriptive analysis of the design of the ACH ASU and discusses some of the indications for streamlining acute surgical services at a large tertiary metropolitan hospital in New Zealand. Performance of the ASU has shown benefits for acute patients and the Hospital. The acute surgical rotation has also been beneficial for surgical training.

  10. Reducing serious injury from falls in two veterans' hospital medical-surgical units.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Patricia A; Hahm, Bridget; Collazo, Sonia; Gibson, Wanda; Janzen, Sandra; Powell-Cope, Gail; Rice, Fanny; Sarduy, Innette; Tyndall, Kyna; White, Susan V

    2009-01-01

    A large veteran's hospital participated in a year-long collaborative project across 9 hospitals to reduce serious injury from falls in acute care, targeting medical-surgical units. The primary objective of this project was to develop and test a set of interventions (bundles) to prevent serious physical injury (fractures and hemorrhagic bleeds) from patient falls. The interventions were implemented using tests of change on 2 medical-surgical units focused on engaging unit-based staff and combining innovations for vulnerable populations at greatest risk for injury if they fall.

  11. Resveratrol: A medical drug for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Qing-Yong

    2005-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound extracted from plants, inhibit inflammation when administered. It has direct effects on suppression of platelet coagulation and cytokines production in many experimental models. Because microcirculation occlusion and cytokines over-production is involved in many diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP), the discovery of resveratrol as platelet and cytokines inhibitors has shed light on the treatment of AP, which still has significant mortality and morbidity. It is anticipated that this natural polyphenol could serve as a therapeutic compound in managing AP through different pathways. PMID:15929163

  12. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-07-13

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2-3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5-12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10-20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10-12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are-prodromal: 0-2 days from exposure, latent: 2-20 days, and manifest illness: 21-60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome.

  13. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    López, Mario; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2–3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5–12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10–20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10–12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are—prodromal: 0–2 days from exposure, latent: 2–20 days, and manifest illness: 21–60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 μg/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. PMID:24376971

  14. Foreign Medical Schools Establish a Toehold in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1999-01-01

    Two foreign medical schools plan to open branch campuses in the United States. Opponents, including the American Medical Association and a physician group, argue that allowing unaccredited medical schools to operate here could jeopardize health care. The two institutions are distinctly different: a for-profit school in the West Indies, and a…

  15. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  16. Medical and Nonstroke Neurologic Causes of Acute, Continuous Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-08-01

    Most patients with the acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) have vestibular neuritis or stroke or, in the setting of trauma, a posttraumatic vestibular cause. Some medical and nonstroke causes of the AVS must also be considered. Multiple sclerosis is the most common diagnosis in this group. Other less common causes include cerebellar masses, inflammation and infection, mal de debarquement, various toxins, Wernicke disease, celiac-related dizziness, and bilateral vestibulopathy. Finally, there may be unmasking of prior posterior circulation events by various physiologic alterations such as alterations of temperature, blood pressure, electrolytes, or various medications, especially sedating agents.

  17. Accountable Care Units: A Disruptive Innovation in Acute Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Castle, Bryan W; Shapiro, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Accountable Care Units are a disruptive innovation that has moved care on acute care units from a traditional silo model, in which each discipline works separately from all others, to one in which multiple disciplines work together with patients and their families to move patients safely through their hospital stay. This article describes the "what," "how," and "why" of the Accountable Care Units model as it has evolved in different locations across a single health system and includes the lessons learned as different units and hospitals continue working to implement the model in their complex care environments.

  18. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  19. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  20. Acute treatment of mania: an update on new medications.

    PubMed

    Gajwani, Prashant; Kemp, David E; Muzina, David J; Xia, Guohua; Gao, Keming; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2006-12-01

    Acute mania is frequently a medical emergency requiring hospitalization for behavioral control, rapid resolution of irritability, agitation, de-escalation of mood, and decreasing of risk-taking behavior. Lithium efficacy in the management of acute mania was reported in 1949 and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. Chlorpromazine, from the class of typical antipsychotics, was approved for treatment of bipolar disorder in 1973. Typical antipsychotics were frequently used alone and as adjunct for the treatment of bipolar mania for the next 2 decades. Divalproex was approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute mania in 1994. Since the approval of olanzapine in 2000, all five atypical antipsychotics, namely risperidone (2003), quetiapine (2004), ziprasidone (2004), and aripiprazole (2004), have been approved by the FDA for the management of acute mania. Clozapine is the only atypical antipsychotic not FDA approved for any phase of bipolar disorder. This article will systematically review some of the major studies published, randomized controlled monotherapy, and adjunct therapy trials involving five atypical antipsychotics and newer anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  1. The predictive value of hierarchical cytogenetic classification in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): analysis of 1065 patients entered into the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, D; Walker, H; Harrison, G; Oliver, F; Chatters, S; Harrison, C J; Wheatley, K; Burnett, A K; Goldstone, A H

    2001-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults carries a poor prognosis, and the optimum treatment remains to be determined. In younger patients, treatment stratification is frequently based upon diagnostic karyotype, which was the most important prognostic factor in the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) AML10 trial. Considered here is whether karyotype is also predictive in older adults; this is done by studying 1065 cases from MRC AML11 (median age, 66 years). Three prognostic groups were distinguished on the basis of response to induction therapy and overall survival (OS). Those with t(15;17), t(8;21), or inv(16) composed the favorable risk group. Overall, these abnormalities predicted a superior complete remission (CR) rate (72%), reflecting relatively low levels of resistant disease (RD) (8%), and lower relapse risk (RR) (56%) associated with superior OS (34% at 5 years). Normal karyotype (CR, 63%; RD, 17%; RR, 78%; OS, 15%) and other noncomplex abnormalities (CR, 53%; RD, 32%; RR, 85%; OS, 10%) composed the intermediate group; while complex karyotype predicted an extremely poor prognosis (CR, 26%; RD, 56%; RR, 91%; OS, 2%). Combining MRC AML10 and AML11 (n = 2677) revealed that the most favorable changes were rarer in older patients (younger than 55 years, 24%; 55 years or older, 7%), while complex abnormalities were more common (6% vs 13%). This study suggests that hierarchical cytogenetic classification identifies biologically distinct subsets of AML that are represented in all age groups. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of karyotype as a critical independent determinant of outcome in older patients with AML, providing a potential framework for stratified treatment approaches.

  2. Psychiatry of the medically ill in the burn unit.

    PubMed

    Ilechukwu, Sunny T

    2002-03-01

    Clinical experience and burn survivor testimony show that the experience of being burned can be associated with catastrophic stress and lead to drastic permanent body image changes from scarring and limb-function loss. Close relatives, if not killed in the fire, often also experience clinically significant bystander stress. Closeness of relationships may be lost, and self-image may suffer. Property damage and loss of crucial resources may be associated with fires. Although many burns result from accidents, most result from preventable causes associated with psychiatric disorders, which include mood disorders, psychoses, cognitive disorders, and substance-use disorders. Burns then result from: Deliberate self-harm Impaired judgment and poor coordination associated with substance intoxication Risk-taking behavior Poor supervision of children and impaired elderly persons Careless handling of flammable materials. Many clinical syndromes, such as delirium, ASD, acute psychosis, suicidality, and pain need to be addressed by the consulting psychiatrist to facilitate surgical treatment of the burn injury. Other psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD, major depression, and adjustment disorder, need to be treated to expedite long-term adjustment. Hospital length of stay and RTW/RTS are major outcome variables. The psychiatry consultant can positively affect both variables substantially using both pharmacologic and psychosocial measures. The important role of psychiatric issues both before and after burn injury support the need for more consistent and comprehensive medical insurance coverage for psychiatric consultation to burn units and clinics. Burn Support Groups are an invaluable asset.

  3. Using evidence to improve satisfaction with medication side-effects education on a neuro-medical surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Susan L; Wirges, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is viewed as a significant indicator of quality of care. More specifically, improving patient satisfaction related to communication about medications and potential side effects can improve healthcare outcomes. Patient satisfaction scores related to medication side effects on a neuro-medical surgical unit were monitored following a quality improvement program. These patients frequently experience cognitive impairment and functional difficulties that can affect the way they understand and handle medications. The purpose of this quality improvement practice change was to (a) develop an educational approach for post acute neurosurgical patients and (b) evaluate whether the use of the approach is successful in improving patient satisfaction scores related to medication education on side effects. The quality improvement program interventions included (a) patient informational handouts inserted into admission folders, (b) nurse education about the importance of providing education on side effects to patient and discussion of their involvement with the program, (c) unit flyers with nurse education, and (d) various communications with bedside nurses through personal work mail and emails. The primary focus was for nurses to employ the "teach back" method to review and reinforce the medication side-effect teaching with patients. Evaluation of the data showed an increase in patient satisfaction after the implementation of the "Always Ask" program.

  4. Orthopaedic Teaching in United Kingdom Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Paola, M; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study of medical students' training in orthopedics. Discusss discrepancies between course content and duration and the deficiencies that exist in basic knowledge of anatomy relevant to orthopedics. Recommends that orthopedic courses should appear earlier in the curriculum and practice should be emphasized. (TW)

  5. United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-10

    environment, biting insects), or acquired by deliberate exposure to aerosols . Product Managers exploit domestic and foreign medical technology to remedy...Japanese encephalitis; hemorrhagic fevers and other diseases spread by aerosol (and rapid methods to identify the cause of illness); schistosomiasis...Center is contrasting for the first production run. 19 /, I • I 0 Rift Valley Fever Vaccine was prepared by growing the virus in cultured monkey kidney

  6. Medication use in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Emily M.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Clark, Reese H.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objective We provide an update on medication use in infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in the United States and examine how use has changed over time. Study Design We performed a retrospective review (2005–2010) of a large prospectively collected administrative database. Result Medications most commonly administered during the study period were ampicillin, gentamicin, caffeine citrate, vancomycin, beractant, furosemide, fentanyl, dopamine, midazolam, and calfactant (56–681 exposures per 1000 infants). Those with the greatest relative increase in use included azithromycin, sildenafil, and milrinone. Medications with the greatest relative decrease in use included theophylline, metoclopramide, and doxapram. Conclusion Medication use in the NICU has changed substantially over time, and only 35% of the most commonly prescribed medications are FDA-approved in infants. PMID:24347262

  7. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  8. Investigation into the reasons for preventable drug related admissions to a medical admissions unit: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R; Avery, A; Howard, P; Partridge, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the drugs and types of medicine management problems most frequently associated with preventable drug related admissions to an acute medical admissions unit. Design: Observation study. Setting: Medical admissions unit in a teaching hospital in Nottingham, UK. Participants: 4093 patients seen by pharmacists on the medical admissions unit between 1 January and 30 June 2001. Main outcome measures: Proportion of admissions that were drug related and preventable, classification of the underlying causes of preventable drug related admissions, and identification of drugs most commonly associated with preventable drug related admissions. Results: Of the admissions seen by pharmacists, 265 (6.5%) were judged to be drug related and 178 (67%) of these were judged to be preventable. Preventable admissions were mainly due to problems with prescribing (63 cases (35%)), monitoring (46 cases (26%)), and adherence to medication (53 cases (30%)). The drugs most commonly implicated were NSAIDs, antiplatelets, antiepileptics, hypoglycaemics, diuretics, inhaled corticosteroids, cardiac glycosides, and beta-blockers. Conclusions: Potentially preventable drug related morbidity was associated with 4.3% of admissions to a medical admissions unit. In 91% of cases these admissions were related to problems with either prescribing, monitoring, or adherence. PMID:12897361

  9. Etiology of acute diarrhea among United States Embassy personnel and dependents in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haberberger, R L; Lissner, C R; Podgore, J K; Mikhail, I A; Mansour, N S; Kemp, L; Spees, D; Glenn, J C; Hawn, R S; Woody, J N

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the enteropathogens causing acute diarrheal disease in Americans living in the North Africa/Middle East region during a 34-month period from February 12, 1985 to December 30, 1987 to guide preventive and therapeutic measures. Stool specimens were examined and an epidemiologic questionnaire was administered to patients with acute diarrhea at the Outpatient Health Unit of the United States Embassy in Cairo, Egypt. The subjects consisted of 126 American employees and dependents of the U. S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt with diarrhea of less than two-weeks duration. Subjects received routine medical care administered by the U.S. Embassy Medical staff. A possible etiologic agent was detected in 41% of the subjects. Enteroadherent Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated enteropathogen. A high degree of antimicrobial resistance was noted among the bacterial isolates, but all were susceptible to the quinolone antibiotics. Episodes of acute diarrhea occurring among American expatriates in Cairo, Egypt were primarily of bacterial etiology, but only a small portion were caused by the bacterial pathogens routinely identified in a standard clinical bacteriology laboratory. Most of the diarrheal episodes were due to noninvasive enteroadherent E. coli that may cause prolonged disease requiring antimicrobial therapy.

  10. An identification and brief advice programme for low-risk alcohol consumption in an acute medical setting: an implementation study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stuart A; Phekoo, Karen J; Grover, Vijay PB; Lovendoski, James; Anderson, Mike; Bowden-Jones, Owen; Foxton, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To implement an identification and brief advice (IBA) intervention to detect low-risk/hazardous alcohol consumption. Design Implementation was guided through the use of quality improvement tools and training. Setting This study was conducted over an 18-month period from April 2010 to September 2011 on a 42-bed acute medical unit at a central London acute hospital. Participants All medical patients over the age of 18 admitted to the acute assessment unit were eligible; any patient unable to provide a medical history either through language barriers or due to illness was excluded. Main outcome measures Percentage of medical patients admitted each week to the acute assessment unit who were screened for low-risk/hazardous alcohol consumption. Results Weekly data were analysed in time series run charts and cross-referenced to the date of educational sessions and their effect on the uptake of screening monitored. A demonstrable change in the mean percentage number of patients screened was observed in different time periods, 67.3–80.1%, following targeted teaching on the AAU. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the successful use of quality improvement methodology to guide the implementation of Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C), an IBA intervention, in the acute medical setting. The incorporation of the AUDIT-C into an admission document has been well accepted by the junior doctors, attaining an average (mean) of 80% of patients being screened using the tool. Targeted teaching of clinical staff involved in admitting patients appears to be the most effective method in improving uptake of IBA by junior doctors. PMID:23772314

  11. Medical relief activities conducted by Nippon Medical School in the acute phase of the Great East Japan Earthquake 2011.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Akira; Shuto, Yuki; Ando, Fumihiko; Shibata, Masafumi; Watanabe, Akihiro; Onda, Hidetaka; Masuno, Tomohiko; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    At 14:46 on March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami occurred off the coast of Honshu, Japan. In the acute phase of this catastrophe, one of our teams was deployed as a Tokyo Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) to Kudan Kaikan in Tokyo, where the ceiling of a large hall had partially collapsed as the result of the earthquake, to conduct triage at the scene: 6 casualties were assigned to the red category (immediate), which included 1 case of cardiopulmonary arrest and 1 of flail chest; 8 casualties in the yellow category (delayed); and 22 casualties in the green category (minor). One severely injured person was transported to our hospital. Separately, our medical team was deployed to Miyagi 2 hours after the earthquake in our multipurpose medical vehicle as part of Japan DMAT (J-DMAT). We were the first DMAT from the metropolitan area to arrive, but we were unable to start medical relief activities because the information infrastructure had been destroyed and no specific information had yet reached the local headquarters. Early next morning, J-DMAT decided to support Sendai Medical Center and search and rescue efforts in the affected area and to establish a staging care unit at Camp Kasuminome of the Japan Self-Defense Force. Our team joined others to establish the staging care unit. Because information was still confused until day 3 of the disaster and we could not adequately grasp onsite medical needs, our J-DMAT decided to provide onsite support at Ishinomaki Red Cross Hospital, a disaster base hospital, and relay information about its needs to the local J-DMAT headquarters. Although our medical relief teams were deployed as quickly as possible, we could not begin medical relief activities immediately owing to the severely damaged information infrastructure. Only satellite mobile phones could be operated, and information on the number of casualties and the severity of shortages of lifeline services could be obtained only through a "go and

  12. Variability in Medical Marijuana Laws in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bestrashniy, Jessica; Winters, Ken C.

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use and its distribution raise several complex health, social and legal issues in the United States. Marijuana is prohibited in only 23 states and pro-marijuana laws are likely to be introduced in these states in the future. Increased access to and legalization of medical marijuana may have an impact on recreational marijuana use and perception through increased availability and decreased restrictiveness around the drug. The authors undertook an analysis to characterize the policy features of medical marijuana legislation, including an emphasis on the types of medical conditions that are included in medical marijuana laws. A high degree of variability in terms of allowable medical conditions, limits on cultivation and possession, and restrictiveness of policies was discovered. Further research is needed to determine if this variability impacts recreational use in those states. PMID:26415061

  13. Variability in medical marijuana laws in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bestrashniy, Jessica; Winters, Ken C

    2015-09-01

    Marijuana use and its distribution raise several complex health, social, and legal issues in the United States. Marijuana is prohibited in only 23 states and promarijuana laws are likely to be introduced in these states in the future. Increased access to and legalization of medical marijuana may have an impact on recreational marijuana use and perception through increased availability and decreased restrictiveness around the drug. The authors undertook an analysis to characterize the policy features of medical marijuana legislation, including an emphasis on the types of medical conditions that are included in medical marijuana laws. A high degree of variability in terms of allowable medical conditions, limits on cultivation and possession, and restrictiveness of policies was discovered. Further research is needed to determine if this variability impacts recreational use in those states.

  14. Assessing the problem of counterfeit medications in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Jackson, G; Patel, S; Khan, S

    2012-03-01

    Counterfeit medicines pose an ever-increasing threat to public health, although precise tracking of illegal counterfeit prescription drug activity is difficult. Available data indicate that all types of medications have been targeted. Adverse health effects, including death, have resulted from using counterfeit medications; consumers who self-medicate without appropriate interactions with the healthcare system rarely receive adequate healthcare. The Internet provides a large, convenient route for counterfeiters to reach potential buyers with unregulated, often dangerous, products. The majority of medicines purchased via unverified Internet sites are counterfeit; often, these products lack the purported drug compound or have variable concentrations of active ingredients and sometimes contain dangerous toxins. Although many consumers acknowledge some degree of risk with purchasing medications via the Internet, speed, convenience and cost often prompt these purchases. Counterfeit medications also have been detected in the legitimate supply chain, but represent a significantly smaller proportion of sales than those purchased via the Internet. Pilot programmes in Europe have demonstrated that product verification systems prevent penetration of counterfeit products into the legitimate supply chain. Significant EU legislation, including stronger penalties for counterfeiting, is in development. In the United Kingdom, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) launched an initiative against counterfeit medication. Healthcare professionals should report suspected cases of counterfeit medication to the MHRA, be alert to threats to the medicine supply, and provide practical advice to patients about ordering medications online, including avoiding unregulated Internet pharmacies, and being suspicious of sites offering substantial discounts and prescription-only medication without a prescription.

  15. The Evolving Role of the Acute Assessment Unit - from inpatient to outpatient care.

    PubMed

    Connolly, V; Hamad, M; Scott, Y; Bramble, M

    2005-01-01

    Acute Assessment Units (AAUs) have been developed to meet the demand for emergency care. Traditionally, AAUs have been an admission route to secondary care but the role is now evolving to assessment. AAUs are complex and have many interactions both in hospitals and the community. The effective functioning of an AAU requires excellent clinical leadership, appropriate facilities, timely access to diagnostics and input from the multi-disciplinary team. Increasingly, AAUs will have to develop services which are not dependent on using hospital beds. A variety of emergency medical presentations can, with the appropriate resources, be delivered in an out-patient setting.

  16. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Benavente, O R; Patiño, O L; Peña, L B; Lugònes, H; Kalala, E; Meneclier, C R; Genovese, O; Sica, R E

    1989-09-01

    Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs) and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  17. Acute kidney injury burden in different clinical units: Data from nationwide survey in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shengqiang; Yang, Li; Mei, Changlin

    2017-01-01

    Background The inpatient morbidity and mortality of acute kidney injury (AKI) vary considerably in different clinical units, yet studies to compare the difference remain limited. Methods We compared the clinical characteristics of AKI in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), medical and surgical departments by using the data derived from the 2013 nationwide cross-sectional survey of AKI in China to capture variations among different clinical departments in recognition, management, and outcomes of AKI. Suspected AKI patients were identified based on changes in serum creatinine during hospitalization, and confirmed by reviewing medical records. Results The detection rate of AKI was the highest in ICU (22.46%), followed by the rates in medical (1.96%) and surgical departments (0.96%). However, the absolute number of cases was the largest in medical departments, which contributed to 50% of the cases. In medical departments, 78% of AKI cases were extensively distributed in cardiac, nephrology, oncology, gastroenterology, pneumology and neurology departments. In contrast, 87% of AKI cases in surgical departments were mainly from urology, general surgery and cardiothoracic departments. The in-time recognition rates were extremely low in all departments except nephrology. Only 10.5~15.0% AKI patients from non-nephrology departments received renal referral. Among all the death cases, 50% and 39% came from ICU and medical departments while only 11% from surgical departments. Older age, higher AKI stage and renal replacement therapy indication were identified as risk factors for high mortality in all departments. Delayed recognition and no renal referral were significantly associated with increased mortality in medical and ICU patients. Conclusions These findings suggest that ICU and medical departments are major affected departments in China with a large number of AKI cases and subsequent high mortality. The reality is more alarming considering the low awareness of AKI and the paucity

  18. Experiences of parenting a child with medical complexity in need of acute hospital care.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Monica; Ehnfors, Margareta; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Parents of children with medical complexity have described being responsible for providing advanced care for the child. When the child is acutely ill, they must rely on the health-care services during short or long periods of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to describe parental experiences of caring for their child with medical complexity during hospitalization for acute deterioration, specifically focussing on parental needs and their experiences of the attitudes of staff. Data were gathered through individual interviews and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The care period can be interpreted as a balancing act between acting as a caregiver and being in need of care. The parents needed skilled staff who could relieve them of medical responsibility, but they wanted to be involved in the care and in the decisions taken. They needed support, including relief, in order to meet their own needs and to be able to take care of their children. It was important that the child was treated with respect in order for the parent to trust the staff. An approach where staff view parents and children as a single unit, as recipients of care, would probably make the situation easier for these parents and children.

  19. Caring for migrant farm workers on medical-surgical units.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Maureen J

    2011-01-01

    Over 3 million migrant farm workers are employed in the United States. Many factors place them at risk for work-related disease and injury. Knowledge of workers' health issues can prepare medical-surgical nurses to anticipate and meet the needs of this underserved population.

  20. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  1. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease.

  2. Clinical Frailty Scale in an Acute Medicine Unit: a Simple Tool That Predicts Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Juma, Salina; Taabazuing, Mary-Margaret; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to external stressors. When frail older adults are admitted to hospital, they are at increased risk of adverse events including falls, delirium, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a practical and efficient tool for assessing frailty; however, its ability to predict outcomes has not been well studied within the acute medical service. Objective To examine the CFS in elderly patients admitted to the acute medical ward and its association with length of stay. Design Prospective cohort study in an acute care university hospital in London, Ontario, Canada, involving 75 patients over age 65, admitted to the general internal medicine clinical teaching units (CTU). Measurements Patient demographics were collected through chart review, and CFS score was assigned to each patient after brief clinician assessment. The CFS ranges from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill) based on descriptors and pictographs of activity and functional status. The CFS was collapsed into three categories: non-frail (CFS 1–4), mild-to-moderately frail (CFS 5–6), and severely frail (CFS 7–8). Outcomes of length of stay and 90-day readmission were gathered through the LHSC electronic patient record. Results Severe frailty was associated with longer lengths of stay (Mean = 12.6 ± 12.7 days) compared to mild-to-moderate frailty (mean = 11.2 ± 10.8 days), and non-frailty (mean = 4.1 ± 2.1 days, p = .014). This finding was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and number of medications. Participants with higher frailty scores showed higher readmission rates when compared with those with no frailty (31.2% for severely frail, vs. 34.2% for mild-to-moderately frail vs. 19% for non-frail) although there was no significant difference in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion The CFS helped identify patients that are more likely to have prolonged hospital stays on the acute medical ward. The CFS is an easy to use tool which

  3. Use of medications in the treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dennis, Robin L

    2006-01-01

    The prescription of medications continues to be one of the mainstays of treatment of acute low back pain episodes. The goals of the pharmacologic treatment for acute low back are reduction of pain and return of normal function. Often, nociception is a result of secondary inflammation and muscle spasm after acute injury of a structure of the spine, which may include muscle, tendon, ligament, disc, or bone. An understanding of the appropriate use of medications to address the underlying pain generator and the current evidence for using these medications is essential for any physician who sees and treats patients with acute low back pain.

  4. Variation of the Occupancy of Two Medical Units with the Amount of Sharing Between the Units

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rodger D.

    1968-01-01

    Prediction of gain in occupancy and reduction of overflow effected by sharing beds between two previously disjoint medical units is related to the number of beds in each unit and to a variable number of beds that each unit makes available to the other when not in use. The methodology, here applied to two wards at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, is applicable wherever it is desired to estimate the effect of making beds interchangeable between wards or services. PMID:5701983

  5. Acute inpatient palliative medicine in a cancer center: clinical problems and medical interventions--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Rivera, Nilo; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan; Davis, Mellar P

    2007-01-01

    The clinical characteristics and medical interventions of the 100 consecutive cancer admissions to the acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit at the Cleveland Clinic for 2 months are described. Median age was 62 years (range, 31 to 92 years). The male-female ratio was 1:1. Most admissions were referred by hematology-oncology and had prior antineoplastic therapy. Reasons for admission were symptom control and cancer-related complications. Patients underwent invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, hydration, transfusions, radiation, or chemotherapy, or a combination, during their admission. Most were discharged home with hospice care or had outpatient clinic follow-up. The mortality rate was 20%. Aggressive multidisciplinary management of symptoms, disease complications, comorbid conditions, and psychosocial problems were provided. Palliative medicine physicians provided continuity of care in the outpatient clinic and at home. An acute inpatient palliative medicine unit within a tertiary level medical center has a definable and important role in comprehensive cancer care.

  6. Medical Terminology of the Musculoskeletal System. Medical Records. Instructional Unit for the Medical Transcriber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, Minna L.

    Following an analysis of the task of transcribing as practiced in a health facility, this study guide was developed to teach the knowledge and skills required of a medical transcriber. The medical record department was identified as a major occupational area, and a task inventory for medical records was developed and used as a basis for a…

  7. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation.

  8. The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units.

    PubMed

    Rondeau-Lutz, Murielle; Weber, Jean-Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center (ADC) medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be "naturally" present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the "absent interpreter", this article takes into account the possible meanings of this situation: the recourse to professional interpreters in France is far from expected given cumulative evidence of its benefits; perceptions of illegal immigrants and medical habitus itself may both hamper the use of a third party; the ADCs are a very stressful place for healthcare professionals, with conflicting missions, political issues enmeshed with medical goals, and heavy affective burden that may lead to self-protection. Silencing voices of suffering others might be seen as the hidden indecent truth of the "absent interpreter". These reflections open a window to a larger issue with regard to the full range of medicine: what are the place, the role and the function of patient's words and narratives in contemporary medicine? The highly invested somatic perspective and its political corollary giving primacy to bare life harbor potential risks of obscuring speeches and undervaluing narratives.

  9. Medication Reconciliation in Patients Hospitalized in a Cardiology Unit

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Gabriella Fernandes; Santos, Gláucia Beisl Noblat de Carvalho; Rosa, Mário Borges; Noblat, Lúcia de Araújo Costa Beisl

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies. Method This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied) or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies. Results A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%). Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3%) were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7%) discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2%) were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%). Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6%) were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4%) were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4%) as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6%) were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm. Conclusion The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit. PMID:25531902

  10. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  11. [Medical entomology for the Armed services: preliminary results from the medical entomology unit].

    PubMed

    Pages, F; Girod, R

    2004-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases constitutes a threat to the operational capability of armed forces personnel operating outside or stationed overseas. To take this risk into account, the French armed forces medical corps created a medical entomology unit in 2003. The primary function of this unit is to monitor the entomological status of French military bases in sub-Saharan Africa (identification of vectors, study of vector behavior, and measurement of resistance to insecticides) as a means of maintaining an effective vector-control strategy. The French medical entomology unit takes part in the Impact Vector project aimed at evaluating the vector-borne disease risks for troops in combat situations, contributes its expertise to the investigation of epidemic disease, and participates in the development of a global strategy for vector-control for the armed services. To improve understanding and control of vector-borne disease risks, the unit provides basic training in medical entomology to army physicians, veterinarians, and pharmacists as well as to others involved in control programs. The purpose of this article is to present the results of the unit's first activities: investigation of a malaria epidemic that occurred in Ivory Coast in 2003, measurement of malaria exposure over a 4-month period in a combat group on duty in rural Africa, and initial evaluation of control techniques (spraying around living quarters and use of insecticide-impregnated battle dress).

  12. Pharmacy impact on medication reconciliation in the medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Brittany M.; Darko, William; Seabury, Robert; Probst, Luke A.; Miller, Christopher D.; Cwikla, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pharmacy-driven medication history (MH) programs have been shown to reduce the number of serious or potentially life-threatening (S/PLT) medication discrepancies (MDs) in many settings, but not Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Methods: MHs were repeated over a 6-week period. Demographics, number, and nature of MDs were documented. Discrepancy severity was graded using a previously published method. Primary outcome was the proportion of MHs containing >1 S/PLT MDs. Findings: Sixty-three MHs were repeated. Pharmacy MHs were less likely to contain ≥1 S/PLT MDs (0% vs. 50%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Pharmacy MHs contained fewer S/PLT MDs in this small sample. S/PLT MDs on admission and home medication lists were common in patients admitted to the medical ICU. Pharmacy-driven medication reconciliation (MR) reduced the number and frequency of these discrepancies. Further research is required to improve current MR procedures. PMID:27162810

  13. Managerial implications of calculating optimum nurse staffing in medical units.

    PubMed

    Bordoloi, S K; Weatherby, E J

    1999-01-01

    A critical managerial decision in health care organizations is the staffing decision. We offer a model to derive an optimum mix of different staff categories that minimizes total cost subject to constraints imposed by the patient acuity system and minimum staffing policies in a medical unit of Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, Alaska. We also indicate several managerial implications on how our results and their sensitivity analyses can be used effectively in decision making in a variety of categories.

  14. Acute mountain sickness: medical problems associated with acute and subacute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, C

    2006-01-01

    This article summarises the medical problems of travel to altitudes above 3000 m. These are caused by chronic hypoxia. Acute mountain sickness (AMS), a self limiting common illness is almost part of normal acclimatisation—a transient condition lasting for several days. However, in <2% of people staying above 4000 m, serious illnesses related to hypoxia develop – high altitude pulmonary oedema and cerebral oedema. These are potentially fatal but can be largely avoided by gradual ascent. Short vacations, pressure from travel companies and peer groups often encourage ascent to 4000 m more rapidly than is prudent. Sensible guidelines for ascent are outlined, clinical features, management and treatment of these conditions. PMID:17099095

  15. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  16. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose) fondaparinux.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Marcello; Porreca, Ettore

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH), or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily) of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients hospitalized in intensive care units with no contraindications, LMWH or UFH are recommended, with frequent and careful assessment of the risk of bleeding. In this review, we discuss the evidence for use of thromboprophylaxis for VTE in acutely ill hospitalized medical patients, with a focus on (low-dose) fondaparinux.

  17. United States medical students’ knowledge of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Brian J.; Usita, Paula M.; Edland, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A knowledge gap exists between general physicians and specialists in diagnosing and managing Alzheimer disease (AD). This gap is concerning due to the estimated rise in prevalence of AD and cost to the health care system. Medical school is a viable avenue to decrease the gap, educating future physicians before they specialize. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge level of students in their first and final years of medical school. Methods: Fourteen participating United States medical schools used e-mail student rosters to distribute an online survey of a quantitative cross-sectional assessment of knowledge about AD; 343 students participated. Knowledge was measured using the 12-item University of Alabama at Birmingham AD Knowledge Test for Health Professionals. General linear models were used to examine the effect of demographic variables and previous experience with AD on knowledge scores. Results: Only 2.5% of first year and 68.0% of final year students correctly scored ten or more items on the knowledge scale. Personal experience with AD predicted higher knowledge scores in final year students (P= 0.027). Conclusion: Knowledge deficiencies were common in final year medical students. Future studies to identify and evaluate the efficacy of AD education programs in medical schools are warranted. Identifying and disseminating effective programs may help close the knowledge gap. PMID:23750313

  18. Gaps in Drug Dosing for Obese Children: A Systematic Review of Commonly Prescribed Acute Care Medications

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Stevie; Siegel, David; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 1 out of 6 children in the United States is obese. This has important implications for drug dosing and safety, as pharmacokinetic (PK) changes are known to occur in obesity due to altered body composition and physiology. Inappropriate drug dosing can limit therapeutic efficacy and increase drug-related toxicity for obese children. Few systematic reviews examining PK and drug dosing in obese children have been performed. Methods We identified 25 acute care drugs from the Strategic National Stockpile and Acute Care Supportive Drugs List and performed a systematic review for each drug in 3 study populations: obese children (2–18 years of age), normal weight children, and obese adults. For each study population, we first reviewed a drug’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) label, followed by a systematic literature review. From the literature, we extracted drug PK data, biochemical properties, and dosing information. We then reviewed data in 3 age subpopulations (2–7 years, 8–12 years, and 13–18 years) for obese and normal weight children and by route of drug administration (intramuscular, intravenous, by mouth, and inhaled). If sufficient PK data were not available by age/route of administration, a data gap was identified. Findings Only 2/25 acute care drugs (8%) contained dosing information on the FDA label for each obese children and adults compared with 22/25 (88%) for normal weight children. We found no sufficient PK data in the literature for any of the acute care drugs in obese children. Sufficient PK data were found for 7/25 acute care drugs (28%) in normal weight children and 3/25 (12%) in obese adults. Implications Insufficient information exists to guide dosing in obese children for any of the acute care drugs reviewed. This knowledge gap is alarming, given the known PK changes that occur in the setting of obesity. Future clinical trials examining the PK of acute care medications in obese children should be prioritized. PMID

  19. Fall prevention practices in adult medical-surgical nursing units described by nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Shever, Leah L; Titler, Marita G; Mackin, Melissa Lehan; Kueny, Angela

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe nursing practices (e.g., assessment, interventions) around fall prevention, as perceived by nurse managers in adult, medical-surgical nursing units. One hundred forty nurse managers from 51 hospitals from across the United States participated. Descriptive frequencies are used to describe nurse manager responses. The most commonly used fall risk assessment tool was the Morse Fall Risk Assessment Tool (40%). The most common fall prevention interventions included bed alarms (90%), rounds (70%), sitters (68%), and relocating the patient closer to the nurses' station (56%). Twenty-nine percent of nurse managers identified physical restraints as an intervention to prevent falls whereas only 10% mentioned ambulation. No nurse manager identified that RN hours per patient-day were adjusted to prevent falls or fall-related injuries. More work is needed to build systems that ensure evidence-based nursing interventions are consistently applied in acute care.

  20. Emergency medical dispatching: rapid identification and treatment of acute myocardial infarction. National Heart Attack Alert Program Coordinating Committee Access to Care Subcommittee.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Emergency medical telephone calls (ie, those made to 9-1-1 or 7-digit emergency numbers) are directed to emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) who are responsible for quickly obtaining critical pieces of information from the caller, then activating an appropriate level of emergency medical services (EMS) response and providing the caller with patient care instructions until medical help arrives. The impact of well-trained, medically managed EMDs on the early care of potential acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is believed to be beneficial. However, standards for emergency medical dispatching vary widely across the nation. To improve emergency medical dispatching for AMI patients in the United States, this article by the Access to Care Subcommittee on behalf of the National Heart Attack Alert Program makes a number of recommendations regarding the use of medical dispatch protocols, provision of dispatch life support, EMD training, EMD certification, and emergency medical dispatch quality control and improvement processes.

  1. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel... States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project. This... MTF, and sustain readiness-related medical skills activities for the military providers....

  2. Markets and Medical Care: The United States, 1993–2005

    PubMed Central

    White, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Many studies arguing for or against markets to finance medical care investigate “market-oriented” measures such as cost sharing. This article looks at the experience in the American medical marketplace over more than a decade, showing how markets function as institutions in which participants who are self-seeking, but not perfectly rational, exercise power over other participants in the market. Cost experience here was driven more by market power over prices than by management of utilization. Instead of following any logic of efficiency or equity, system transformations were driven by beliefs about investment strategies. At least in the United States' labor and capital markets, competition has shown little ability to rationalize health care systems because its goals do not resemble those of the health care system most people want. PMID:17718663

  3. Radiation oncology: postgraduate medical education in the United States, 1988.

    PubMed

    Cox, J D; Flynn, D F; Pittman, D D; Brady, L W; del Regato, J A

    1989-06-01

    The fourteenth survey of postgraduate medical education in radiation oncology in the United States was conducted in the first three months of 1988. It revealed stability in the number of approved programs, positions offered, and physicians in training compared with 1986. The proportion of trainees who were U.S. citizens by birth rose to an all-time high of 88%, and the proportion of foreign medical graduates decreased to 9%. The proportion of women in residency has remained unchanged (24%) over the past 6 years. At present, approximately 150 physicians complete residency and enter practice each year, one-third of whom commence in an academic setting. A high proportion of recent graduates of approved programs successfully completes the examinations and becomes certified by the American Board of Radiology.

  4. Mobile medical care units: an innovative use of Medicare funding.

    PubMed

    Kelley-Gillespie, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Medicare is an underutilized payment source for home-delivered health care services for homebound elderly. An innovative service provision for home health care, Mobile Medical Care Units (MMCU), is presented. MMCU consist of a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals who are responsible for following the health care needs of their elderly patients on a continuous long-term basis across settings. This comprehensive care has significant impacts on homebound elderly and the health care industry. MMCU have the potential to be covered more inclusively by primary or supplemental health insurance plans, including Medicare, Medicaid, and HMO's, or by special funding from state aging departments.

  5. Combined medical-psychiatric inpatient units: evaluation of the Centre for the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Maier, A B; Wächtler, C; Hofmann, W

    2007-08-01

    Considering the large number of elderly patients in acute hospitals who receive medical as well as psychiatric treatment because of relevant comorbidity, adequate interdisciplinary treatment models have to be developed and applied. The Centre for Elderly, a cooperation project between the departments of geriatric and psychogeriatric medicine in a community hospital in Germany, was founded in 2000. In addition to traditionally structured units, the centre consists of interdisciplinary units. Patient-, staff- and hospital-related characteristics influenced by the reformation of both departments were evaluated by comparing hospital-based registry data records containing age, gender, main and minor diagnoses, length of stay and patient transferrals within the centre. Experts working at the centre were asked to take a stand on the development of the treatment quality, allocation of patients, diagnostic procedures, consultation services and information transmission. The number of admissions to the Centre for the Elderly increased within one year. The distribution of the main diagnose groups remained unchanged, with an overlap between the geriatric and psychogeriatric department consisting of the main diagnoses dementia and depression. The length of stay and the number of transferrals decreased significantly in both departments. The majority of the interviewed employees stated that the treatment quality and the allocation of patients were improved. We conclude that interdisciplinary treatment between the departments of psychiatry and geriatric medicine may contribute to the medical needs of subgroups of elderly inpatients suffering from medical-psychiatric comorbidity.

  6. Creating self-care units in the acute care setting: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shendell-Falik, N

    1990-02-01

    Creating an environment in which patient's responsibility for self is fostered and nurses can practice professional and autonomous nursing practice is a challenge in today's hospitals. Innovative systems and structures need to be developed to assure quality of patient care and a high quality work environment. Newark Beth Israel Medical Center responded to the many demands of the mid-1980s, including increasing acuity of patients hospitalized, personnel shortages in nursing, physical therapy and other disciplines, and diminishing dollars available to the health care institution, through the creation of Self-Care Units. This article reviews how they came about, the way in which Self-Care Units function within the acute care setting and the management philosophy and structure which make them work. The experience at Newark Beth Israel Medical Center demonstrates that the potential exists to put control back at the bedside with the patient and the health care team working with the patient to achieve mutual goals. The focus of care has shifted from a "doing for" to a "working with" patients to identify interventions which promote active participation in hospitalization and a sense of self responsibility.

  7. Procedures Performed by Emergency Medical Services in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jestin N; Karns, Christopher; Mann, N Clay; E Jacobson, Karen; Dai, Mengtao; Colleran, Caroline; Wang, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) must provide a wide range of care for patients in the out-of-hospital setting. Although previous work has detailed that EMS providers rarely perform certain procedures, (e.g., endotracheal intubation) there are limited data detailing the frequency of procedures across the breadth of EMS providers' scope of practice. We sought to characterize procedures performed by EMS in the United States. We conducted an analysis of the 2011 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) research data set, encompassing EMS emergency response data from 40 states and two territories. From these data, we report the number and incidence of EMS procedures. We also characterize procedures performed. There were 14,371,941 submitted EMS responses, of which 7,680,559 had complete information on procedures performed on adults. Of these, 4,206,360 EMS responses had procedures performed totaling 11,407,396 procedures. The most common procedures performed were peripheral venous access (28.4%), cardiac monitoring (16.1%) pulse oximetry (13.5%), and blood glucose analysis (10.4%). Procedures were performed most often in patients with traumatic injury (20.0%) followed by chest pain/discomfort (14.0%). Critical procedures (cardioversion, defibrillation, endotracheal intubation, etc.) were infrequently performed (n = 277,785, 2.4%). These data highlight the frequency with which EMS providers perform procedures across the United States. This may help to guide future EMS training and education efforts by highlighting the relative frequency and infrequency of specific procedures.

  8. [Effect of the change in the law of contract on the development of medical service units].

    PubMed

    Farnschläder, Josef; Stummer, Harald

    2012-01-01

    On January 1, 2004, the medical service unit was founded in Germany. However, one of the results of the reform in 2007 was that most of the advantages of medical service units were no longer idiosyncratic to this legal form, but granted to individual general practitioners as well. Since then, a decline in the foundation of medical service units by medical doctors can be observed. Today, the medical service unit rather seems to be a means for hospitals expanding in the intermediary medical sector and, maybe, a re-foundation of the former hospital-owned polyclinics.

  9. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  10. Working as a doctor when acutely ill: comments made by doctors responding to United Kingdom surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives We undertook multi-purpose surveys of doctors who qualified in the United Kingdom between 1993 and 2012. Doctors were asked specific questions about their careers and were asked to comment about any aspect of their training or work. We report doctors’ comments about working whilst acutely ill. Design Self-completed questionnaire surveys. Setting United Kingdom. Participants Nine cohorts of doctors, comprising all United Kingdom medical qualifiers of 1993, 1996, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2012. Main outcome measures Comments made by doctors about working when ill, in surveys one, five and 10 years after graduation. Results The response rate, overall, was 57.4% (38,613/67,224 doctors). Free-text comments were provided by 30.7% (11,859/38,613). Three-hundred and twenty one doctors (2.7% of those who wrote comments) wrote about working when feeling acutely ill. Working with Exhaustion/fatigue was the most frequent topic raised (195 doctors), followed by problems with Taking time off for illness (112), and general comments on Physical/mental health problems (66). Other topics raised included Support from others, Leaving or adapting/coping with the situation, Bullying, the Doctor’s ability to care for patients and Death/bereavement. Arrangements for cover due to illness were regarded as insufficient by some respondents; some wrote that doctors were expected to work harder and longer to cover for colleagues absent because of illness. Conclusions We recommend that employers ensure that it is not unduly difficult for doctors to take time off work when ill, and that employers review their strategies for covering ill doctors who are off work. PMID:27066264

  11. Key Considerations for the Success of Medical Education Research and Innovation Units in Canada: Unit Director Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varpio, Lara; Bidlake, Erin; Humphrey-Murto, Sue; Sutherland, Stephanie; Hamstra, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Growth in the field of medical education is evidenced by the proliferation of units dedicated to advancing Medical Education Research and Innovation (MERI). While a review of the literature discovered narrative accounts of MERI unit development, we found no systematic examinations of the dimensions of and structures that facilitate the success of…

  12. Diabetic ketoacidosis: Treatment in the intensive care unit or general medical/surgical ward?

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Yamely; Surani, Salim; Varon, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is defined as an acute metabolic disorder, which is characterized by an increased presence of circulating ketones, and the development of ketoacidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. This syndrome occurs as a result of insulin deficiency. Patients can be dramatically ill, however, with aggressive treatment, most patients recover rapidly. Despite being a low-risk condition, the development of acidosis, is one of the admission criteria to the intensive care unit (ICU) for these patients, in order to provide close monitoring, and recognize complications that could result from the use of aggressive therapy, such as continuous infusions if insulin. In some institutions, DKA is treated in the emergency department and general medical/surgical wards to avoid ICU overcrowding. PMID:28265341

  13. Medical and Scientific Illustration in the United States (US).

    PubMed

    Peres, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The field of Medical and Scientific Illustration in the United States is large and constantly changing. In 1974, when the author began his studies, everything about the field was different. At the time, a student in the U.S. could go to a number of Universities (4 year) or Colleges (2 year) to study this subject. More than forty years later, only a few programs still offer similar programs of study. The Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), where the author is a professor and Randolph Community College in North Carolina are all that remain from the more than ten that had operated. These two programs are very different from one another and there is not adequate space in this article to expand on these differences. Program details can be found online at: http://cias.rit.edu/schools/photographic-arts-sciences/undergraduate-biomedical-photographic-communications.

  14. Behavioural antecedents to pro re nata psychotropic medication administration on acute psychiatric wards.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Duncan; Robson, Deborah; Chaplin, Robert; Quirk, Alan; Bowers, Len

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the antecedents to administration of pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medication on acute psychiatric wards, with a particular focus on its use in response to patient aggression and other conflict behaviours. A sample of 522 adult in-patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2  weeks of admission. Two-thirds of patients received PRN medication during this period, but only 30% of administrations were preceded by patient conflict (usually aggression). Instead, it was typically administered to prevent escalation of patient behaviour and to help patients sleep. Overall, no conflict behaviours or further staff intervention occurred after 61% of PRN administrations. However, a successful outcome was less likely when medication was administered in response to patient aggression. The study concludes that improved monitoring, review procedures, training for nursing staff, and guidelines for the administration of PRN medications are needed.

  15. Joining the Conversation: Predictors of Success on the United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gohara, Sabry; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Jacob, Adam N.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Gandy, Robyn A.; Metting, Patricia J.; Gold, Jeffrey; Kleshinski, James; and James Kleshinski

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether models based on pre-admission testing, including performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), performance on required courses in the medical school curriculum, or a combination of both could accurately predict performance of medical students on the United States Medical Licensing…

  16. Challenges implementing bar-coded medication administration in the emergency room in comparison to medical surgical units.

    PubMed

    Glover, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Bar-coded medication administration has been successfully implemented and utilized to decrease medication errors at a number of hospitals in recent years. The purpose of this article was to discuss the varying success in utilization of bar-coded medication administration on medical-surgical units and in the emergency department. Utilization reports were analyzed to better understand the challenges between the units. Many factors negatively impacted utilization in the emergency department, including the inability to use bar-coded medication administration for verbal orders or to document medications distributed by the prescribing providers, unique aspects of emergency department nursing workflow, additional steps to chart when using bar-coded medication administration, and alert fatigue. Hardware problems affected all users. Bar-coded medication administration in its current form is more suitable for use on medical-surgical floors than in the emergency department. New solutions should be developed for bar-coded medication administration in the emergency department, keeping in mind requirements to chart medications when there is no order in the system, document medications distributed by prescribing providers, adapt to unpredictable nursing workflow, minimize steps to chart with bar-coded medication administration, limit alerts to those that are clinically meaningful, and choose reliable hardware with adequate bar-code scanning capability.

  17. Evaluation of a modified early warning system for acute medical admissions and comparison with C-reactive protein/albumin ratio as a predictor of patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Emily; Cairns, Eleanor; Hamilton, Jennifer; Kelly, Clive

    2009-02-01

    The modified early warning score (MEWS) was developed as a track and trigger tool for the prompt identification of seriously ill patients on an acute medical ward. This paper examines its value in the setting of an acute medical admissions unit (MAU) and compares it to biochemical markers of acute and chronic disease. Three hundred unselected acute admissions to the MAU of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, were assessed. Correlations between MEWS score and C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin separately were assessed, and then the relationship between MEWS and the CRP/albumin ratio across the age spectrum was examined. The findings demonstrated a strong correlation between the MEWS score and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.88, p<0.001) across the whole age spectrum. Length of stay correlated poorly with MEWS (r=0.08) and CRP/albumin ratio (r=0.15). Overall mortality was 5% and was predicted by both tools, with a MEWS score of >4 (relative risk (RR)=7.8) outperforming a CRP/albumin of >2 (RR=2.6). MEWS remains the gold standard for assessing outcome in acute medical admissions, but does have limitations in the elderly (those aged over 70 years). A raised CRP/albumin ratio was less sensitive for overall mortality than MEWS. It did, however, appear to be of greater value in the elderly, especially in those with acute exacerbations of chronic disease. Neither test accurately predicted length of stay.

  18. Ensuring timely thromboprophylaxis on a Medical Assessment Unit

    PubMed Central

    Akinbobuyi, Oluwatosin; shalders, louise; Nokes, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Health has defined hospital acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) as any VTE event occurring within 90 days of hospital admission or surgery. 1 Hospital acquired thrombosis (HAT) is common during and after hospital admission and is considered a major patient safety issue. Current NICE guideline (CG 92) 2010, recommends that medical patients assessed at risk of VTE should have pharmacological prophylaxis commenced as soon as possible after risk assessment has been completed and continued until the patient is no longer at increased risk of VTE. 2 This quality improvement project was carried out in the medical assessment unit in Derriford Hospital, Plymouth. We aimed to increase appropriate VTE pharmacological prophylaxis to 100% prescribed in 6 hours by the end of May 2016 using the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) methodology. The primary outcome measure was whether or not enoxaparin was given within 6 hours of admission. Analysis showed that a major contributing factor to the prolonged time interval was lack of awareness of the Trust VTE guidelines which had recently been updated in accordance with NICE recommendations. Baseline measurement demonstrated that 29% of patients had first dose of enoxaparin within the 6-hour target, with a mean delay of 12 hours 22 minutes. With implementation of an education programme and development of a local VTE prevention care pathway to raise awareness of the new guidelines, a significant improvement was achieved with 71% of patients meeting the 6-hour target in PDSA cycle 1 and 83% of patients in PDSA cycle 2. The average time interval also reduced to 5 hours 52 minutes in PDSA cycle 1 and 5 hours 7 minutes in PDSA cycle 2. In conclusion, through utilization of simple change methodology, enoxaparin prescribing practice significantly improved. Potentially this may reduce morbidity (and mortality) associated with HAT together with cost implications of its management. PMID:27933145

  19. Transsexual legal rights in the United States and United kingdom: employment, medical treatment, and civil status.

    PubMed

    Green, Richard

    2010-02-01

    Whereas hormonal and surgical sex change have been increasingly refined and accepted medically during the past 40 years, legal protections have only recently received attention. This overview focuses on employment, medical treatment, and civil status as male or female in the United States and the United Kingdom. Employment protection in the UK is assured since a court decision in 1994, but in the U.S. is generally uncertain and inconsistent between states. Health care, including surgery, under the UK National Health Service, is assured since a court decision in 1996. In the U.S., the absence of a national insurance program and the reluctance of private insurers to fund treatment remains an obstacle. Military personnel and prisoners are provided treatment in the UK but there is no military-provided treatment in the U.S. and prison treatment is limited. Change in birth certificate sex status is available in the UK since 2004. This permits heterosexual marriage as a person of the reassigned sex. In the U.S., whereas nearly all states permit birth certificate modification, obstacles remain to recognition across state jurisdictions. Some states forbid marriage for a transsexual as a person of their reassigned sex. This can impact on transsexuals as parents.

  20. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  1. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  2. Acute Pain Medicine in the United States: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Tighe, Patrick; Buckenmaier, Chester C.; Boezaart, Andre P.; Carr, Daniel B.; Clark, Laura L.; Herring, Andrew A.; Kent, Michael; Mackey, Sean; Mariano, Edward R.; Polomano, Rosemary C.; Reisfield, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consensus indicates that a comprehensive, multimodal, holistic approach is foundational to the practice of acute pain medicine (APM), but lack of uniform, evidence-based clinical pathways leads to undesirable variability throughout U. S. healthcare systems. Acute pain studies are inconsistently synthesized to guide educational programs. Advanced practice techniques involving regional anesthesia assume the presence of a physician-led, multidisciplinary acute pain service, which is often unavailable or inconsistently applied. This heterogeneity of educational and organizational standards may result in unnecessary patient pain and escalation of healthcare costs. Methods A multidisciplinary panel was nominated through the Acute Pain Medicine Shared Interest Group (APMSIG) of the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM). The panel met in Chicago, Illinois, in July 2014, to identify gaps and set priorities in APM research and education. Results The panel identified 3 areas of critical need: 1) an open-source acute pain data registry and clinical support tool to inform clinical decision making and resource allocation and to enhance research efforts; 2) a strong professional APM identity as an accredited subspecialty; and 3) educational goals targeted toward third-party payers, hospital administrators, and other key stakeholders to convey the importance of APM. Conclusion This report is the first step in a 3-year initiative aimed at creating conditions and incentives for the optimal provision of APM services to facilitate and enhance the quality of patient recovery after surgery, illness, or trauma. The ultimate goal is to reduce the conversion of acute pain to the debilitating disease of chronic pain. PMID:26535424

  3. Medically important arboviruses of the United States and Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Calisher, C H

    1994-01-01

    Of more than 500 arboviruses recognized worldwide, 5 were first isolated in Canada and 58 were first isolated in the United States. Six of these viruses are human pathogens: western equine encephalitis (WEE) and eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viruses (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) and Powassan (POW) viruses (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus), LaCrosse (LAC) virus (Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus), and Colorado tick fever (CTF) virus (Reoviridae, Coltivirus). Their scientific histories, geographic distributions, virology, epidemiology, vectors, vertebrate hosts, transmission, pathogenesis, clinical and differential diagnoses, control, treatment, and laboratory diagnosis are reviewed. In addition, mention is made of the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) complex viruses (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus), which periodically cause human and equine disease in North America. WEE, EEE, and SLE viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes between birds; POW and CTF viruses, between wild mammals by ticks; LAC virus, between small mammals by mosquitoes; and VEE viruses, between small or large mammals by mosquitoes. Human infections are tangential to the natural cycle. Such infections range from rare to focal but are relatively frequent where they occur. Epidemics of WEE, EEE, VEE, and SLE viruses have been recorded at periodic intervals, but prevalence of infections with LAC and CTF viruses typically are constant, related to the degree of exposure to infected vectors. Infections with POW virus appear to be rare. Adequate diagnostic tools are available, but treatment is mainly supportive, and greater efforts at educating the public and the medical community are suggested if infections are to be prevented. PMID:8118792

  4. Medical and surgical management of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ellis, B D; Kosmorsky, G S; Cohen, B H

    1994-12-01

    Two children with a recent history of viral illness developed visual loss secondary to optic neuritis. Clinical findings and neuroimaging were consistent with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). Markedly elevated opening pressures were noted on lumbar puncture. The patients demonstrated an initial favorable response to high-dose corticosteroid administration. Both had recurrence of symptoms after being tapered off oral corticosteroids. High-dose corticosteroids were reinstituted and a bilateral optic nerve sheath decompression was performed on one patient who developed profound visual loss. A second patient underwent a lumboperitoneal shunt. Both children had resolution of their symptoms and had a recovery of normal visual acuity.

  5. Medical Acute Complications of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Riku-Jaakko; Haapaniemi, Elena; Satopää, Jarno; Niemelä, Mika; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Background. Frequency and impact of medical complications on short-term mortality in young patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have gone unstudied. Methods. We reviewed data of all first-ever nontraumatic ICH patients between 16 and 49 years of age treated in our hospital between January 2000 and March 2010 to identify medical complications suffered. Logistic regression adjusted for known ICH prognosticators was used to identify medical complications associated with mortality. Results. Among the 325 eligible patients (59% males, median age 42 [interquartile range 34–47] years), infections were discovered in 90 (28%), venous thrombotic events in 13 (4%), cardiac complications in 4 (1%), renal failure in 59 (18%), hypoglycemia in 15 (5%), hyperglycemia in 165 (51%), hyponatremia in 146 (45%), hypernatremia in 91 (28%), hypopotassemia in 104 (32%), and hyperpotassemia in 27 (8%). Adjusted for known ICH prognosticators and diabetes, the only independent complication associated with 3-month mortality was hyperglycemia (plasma glucose >8.0 mmol/L) (odds ratio: 5.90, 95% confidence interval: 2.25–15.48, P < 0.001). Three or more separate complications suffered also associated with increased mortality (7.76, 1.42–42.49, P = 0.018). Conclusions. Hyperglycemia is a frequent complication of ICH in young adults and is independently associated with increased mortality. However, multiple separate complications increase mortality even further. PMID:25722917

  6. Extended duration of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: optimizing therapy?

    PubMed

    Turpie, A G G

    2007-01-01

    Summary. Patients who are hospitalized for an acute medical illness are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current evidence-based guidelines recommend prophylaxis with unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin in acutely ill medical patients who are admitted to hospital with congestive heart failure, severe respiratory disease, or who are bedridden with an additional VTE risk factor. The need for thromboprophylaxis is therefore clear in this patient population; however, the optimal duration of prophylaxis in these patients is less clear. In patients undergoing orthopedic or cancer surgery, extended-duration prophylaxis has been shown to be superior to placebo. To date, however, no large-scale clinical trials have assessed the benefits of extended-duration prophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients. This review therefore focuses on the VTE risk profile of acutely ill medical patients, examines the currently available literature for evidence of a potential benefit of extended-duration prophylaxis in these patients, and provides a rationale for the testing of such a hypothesis in a randomized clinical trial.

  7. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and the Delivery of Continuing Medical Education: Case Study from Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dave; Ryan, David; Sibbald, Gary; Rachlis, Anita; Davies, Sharon; Manchul, Lee; Parikh, Sagar

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) struck Toronto in the spring of 2003, causing many deaths, serious morbidity, forced quarantine of thousands of individuals, and the closure of all provincial hospitals for several weeks. Given the direction by public health authorities to cancel or postpone all continuing medical education…

  8. Chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia in adults: Medical Research Council.

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Two hundred and fifty patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were randomized between 2 regimens of chemotherapy: TRAP and BARTS III. Overall, patients randomized to TRAP, which was the more intensive of the 2 regimens, fared slightly better (P = 0.06) than those on BARTS III. However, the improvement in survival associated with more intensive chemotherapy was substantial only for patients who had favourable prognostic features at presentation, such as a normal total leucocyte count, or absence of palpable liver, or, especially, age under 40. Indeed, for patients under 40, those allocated to the more intensive regimen (TRAP) lived considerably longer than those allocated to BARTS III (P less than 0.002) while for patients over 40 there was no material difference in survival between patients on the 2 protocols. It thus appears that intensive chemotherapy is likely to be more effective when favourable prognostic features are recorded. PMID:365212

  9. The development of an outcomes management system for acute medical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B A; Grigonis, A M; Topper, M E; Morrison, M H

    1997-01-01

    In 1993, Continental Medical Systems, Inc. (CMS), a provider of comprehensive medical rehabilitation, developed the Total Outcomes and Prediction Program (TOPP) to measure and evaluate key medical rehabilitation outcomes, quality indicators, and patient satisfaction at its 37 acute rehabilitation hospitals. The broad purposes of TOPP are to manage patient treatment, improve the cost-effectiveness of care, and provide outcomes reporting for managed care and other interested parties. The challenge was to develop a system which could measure, evaluate, and report medical rehabilitation patient outcomes in a way that could be easily understood by multiple audiences, including payers, accrediting organizations, physicians, patients and families, case managers, and CMS clinical staff. Using data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation database, CMS created descriptive outcomes reports for each hospital and for the corporation overall, including performance statistics, outcomes report cards, and quality report cards. These initial reports, as well as updates, quarterly reports, and special ad hoc requests, provide CMS corporate and hospital staff with statistically valid and reliable information to manage the outcomes of medical rehabilitation treatment. TOPP has assisted CMS with meeting accreditation standards for outcomes management and measurement and has been used in managed care contract negotiations. Future TOPP efforts will integrate resource use data, medical acuity and outcomes from acute, subacute, and outpatient rehabilitation levels into CMS' outcomes reporting system.

  10. Nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN psychotropic medications in acute and forensic mental health settings.

    PubMed

    Barr, Lesley; Wynaden, Dianne; Heslop, Karen

    2017-03-24

    Many countries now have national mental health policies and guidelines to decrease or eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint yet the use of Pro Re Nata (PRN) medications has received less practice evaluation. This research aimed to identify mental health nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN medications with mental health consumers. Participants were working in forensic mental health and non-forensic acute mental health settings. The "Attitudes towards PRN medication use survey" was used and data were collected online. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package Social Sciences, Version 22.0. Practice differences between forensic and other acute mental health settings were identified related to the use of PRN medications to manage symptoms from nicotine, alcohol and other drug withdrawal. Differences related to the useage of comfort rooms and conducting comprehensive assessments of consumers' psychiatric symptoms were also detected. Qualitative findings highlighted the need for increased accountability for the prescribing and administration of PRN medications along with more nursing education/training to use alternative first line interventions. Nurses administering PRN medications should be vigilant regarding the indications for this practice to ensure they are facilitating the consumer's recovery by reducing the use of all forms of potentially restrictive practices in the hospital setting. The reasons for using PRN medications and PRN administration rates must be continually monitored to avoid practices such as high dose antipsychotics use and antipsychotic polypharmacy to ensure the efficacy of the consumers' management plans on their health care outcomes.

  11. Medical treatment of acute poisoning with organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jokanović, Milan

    2009-10-28

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) are used as pesticides and developed as warfare nerve agents such as tabun, soman, sarin, VX and others. Exposure to even small amounts of an OP can be fatal and death is usually caused by respiratory failure. The mechanism of OP poisoning involves inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to inactivation of the enzyme which has an important role in neurotransmission. AChE inhibition results in the accumulation of acetylcholine at cholinergic receptor sites, producing continuous stimulation of cholinergic fibers throughout the nervous systems. During more than five decades, pyridinium oximes have been developed as therapeutic agents used in the medical treatment of poisoning with OP. They act by reactivation of AChE inhibited by OP. However, they differ in their activity in poisoning with pesticides and warfare nerve agents and there is still no universal broad-spectrum oxime capable of protecting against all known OP. In spite of enormous efforts devoted to development of new pyridinium oximes as potential antidotes against poisoning with OP only four compounds so far have found its application in human medicine. Presently, a combination of an antimuscarinic agent, e.g. atropine, AChE reactivator such as one of the recommended pyridinium oximes (pralidoxime, trimedoxime, obidoxime and HI-6) and diazepam are used for the treatment of OP poisoning in humans. In this article the available data related to medical treatment of poisoning with OP pesticides are reviewed and the current recommendations are presented.

  12. Implementation of a Quality Assurance Program in a United States Army Medical Treatment Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-30

    The Medical Care Evaluation Committee would review all QA studies dealing with direct patient care concerns and make recommendations to the Executive...34 Quality Review Bulletin 5: 4-5, 1979. (2) United States Army, "Quality Assurance ( Medical Care Evaluation )" Army Regulation 40-400, change 1, Chapter...Trust, 1976. Government Publications 1. United States Army, "Quality Asurance ( Medical Care Evaluation ), Amy PReulation 40-400, change 1, chapter 10, June

  13. Acute Hyperglycemia Associated with Anti-Cancer Medication

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Yul

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia during chemotherapy occurs in approximately 10% to 30% of patients. Glucocorticoids and L-asparaginase are well known to cause acute hyperglycemia during chemotherapy. Long-term hyperglycemia is also frequently observed, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with L-asparaginase-based regimens and total body irradiation. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia often develops because of increased insulin resistance, diminished insulin secretion, and exaggerated hepatic glucose output. Screening strategies for this condition include random glucose testing, hemoglobin A1c testing, oral glucose loading, and fasting plasma glucose screens. The management of hyperglycemia starts with insulin or sulfonylurea, depending on the type, dose, and delivery of the glucocorticoid formulation. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are associated with a high incidence of hyperglycemia, ranging from 13% to 50%. Immunotherapy, such as anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibody treatment, induces hyperglycemia with a prevalence of 0.1%. The proposed mechanism of immunotherapy-induced hyperglycemia is an autoimmune process (insulitis). Withdrawal of the PD-1 inhibitor is the primary treatment for severe hyperglycemia. The efficacy of glucocorticoid therapy is not fully established and the decision to resume PD-1 inhibitor therapy depends on the severity of the hyperglycemia. Diabetic patients should achieve optimized glycemic control before initiating treatment, and glucose levels should be monitored periodically in patients initiating mTOR inhibitor or PD-1 inhibitor therapy. With regard to hyperglycemia caused by anti-cancer therapy, frequent monitoring and proper management are important for promoting the efficacy of anti-cancer therapy and improving patients' quality of life. PMID:28345313

  14. Predictors for Delayed Emergency Department Care in Medical Patients with Acute Infections – An International Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Amin, Devendra; Amin, Adina; Haubitz, Sebastian; Conca, Antoinette; Reutlinger, Barbara; Canavaggio, Pauline; Sauvin, Gabrielle; Bernard, Maguy; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In overcrowded emergency department (ED) care, short time to start effective antibiotic treatment has been evidenced to improve infection-related clinical outcomes. Our objective was to study factors associated with delays in initial ED care within an international prospective medical ED patient population presenting with acute infections. Methods We report data from an international prospective observational cohort study including patients with a main diagnosis of infection from three tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland, France and the United States (US). We studied predictors for delays in starting antibiotic treatment by using multivariate regression analyses. Results Overall, 544 medical ED patients with a main diagnosis of acute infection and antibiotic treatment were included, mainly pneumonia (n = 218; 40.1%), urinary tract (n = 141; 25.9%), and gastrointestinal infections (n = 58; 10.7%). The overall median time to start antibiotic therapy was 214 minutes (95% CI: 199, 228), with a median length of ED stay (ED LOS) of 322 minutes (95% CI: 308, 335). We found large variations of time to start antibiotic treatment depending on hospital centre and type of infection. The diagnosis of a gastrointestinal infection was the most significant predictor for delay in antibiotic treatment (+119 minutes compared to patients with pneumonia; 95% CI: 58, 181; p<0.001). Conclusions We found high variations in hospital ED performance in regard to start antibiotic treatment. The implementation of measures to reduce treatment times has the potential to improve patient care. PMID:27171476

  15. Advances in medical revascularisation treatments in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Asadi, H; Yan, B; Dowling, R; Wong, S; Mitchell, P

    2014-01-01

    Urgent reperfusion of the ischaemic brain is the aim of stroke treatment and there has been ongoing research to find a drug that can promote vessel recanalisation more completely and with less side effects. In this review article, the major studies which have validated the use and safety of tPA are discussed. The safety and efficacy of other thrombolytic and anticoagulative agents such as tenecteplase, desmoteplase, ancrod, tirofiban, abciximab, eptifibatide, and argatroban are also reviewed. Tenecteplase and desmoteplase are both plasminogen activators with higher fibrin affinity and longer half-life compared to alteplase. They have shown greater reperfusion rates and improved functional outcomes in preliminary studies. Argatroban is a direct thrombin inhibitor used as an adjunct to intravenous tPA and showed higher rates of complete recanalisation in the ARTTS study with further studies which are now ongoing. Adjuvant thrombolysis techniques using transcranial ultrasound are also being investigated and have shown higher rates of complete recanalisation, for example, in the CLOTBUST study. Overall, development in medical therapies for stroke is important due to the ease of administration compared to endovascular treatments, and the new treatments such as tenecteplase, desmoteplase, and adjuvant sonothrombolysis are showing promising results and await further large-scale clinical trials.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE SPORTS INJURIES AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS BY PHYSICAL THERAPISTS: ASSESSMENT VIA CASE SCENARIOS

    PubMed Central

    Karges, Joy Renae; Salsbery, Mitchell A.; Smith, Danna; Stanley, Erica J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Some physical therapists (PTs) provide services at sporting events, but there are limited studies investigating whether PTs are properly prepared to provide such services. The purpose of this study was to assess acute sports injury and medical condition management decision-making skills of PTs. Methods: A Web-based survey presented 17 case scenarios related to acute medical conditions and sport injuries. PTs from the Sports Physical Therapy Section of The American Physical Therapy Association were e-mailed a cover letter/Web link to the survey and invited to participate over a 30-day period. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0. Results: A total of 411 of 5158 PTs who were members of the Sports Physical Therapy Association in 2009 and had valid e-mail addresses completed the survey, of which 389 (7.5%) were appropriate for analysis. Over 75.0% of respondents felt “prepared” or “somewhat prepared” to provide immediate care for 13 out of 16 medical conditions, with seizures, spinal cord injuries, and internal organ injuries having the lowest percentages. Over 75.0% of the respondents made “appropriate” or “overly cautious” decisions for 11 of the 17 acute injury or medical condition cases. Conclusions: Results of the current study indicate that PTs felt more “prepared” and tended to make “appropriate” return to play decisions on the acute sports injury and medical condition case studies more often than coaches who participated in a similar study, regardless of level of importance of the game or whether the athlete was a starter vs. non-starter. However, for PTs who plan on assisting at sporting events, additional preparation/education may be recommended, such as what is taught in an emergency responder course. PMID:21904695

  17. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Acute Radiation Syndrome: Innovative Medical Approaches in Military Medicine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-30

    lymphoblastic leukemia: a randomized phase III trial. Blood. 1995;86(2):444–50. 36. Hu KX, Sun QY, Guo M, Ai HS. The radiation protection and therapy effects of...Literature 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical...MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13

  19. The role of medical management for acute intravascular hemolysis in patients supported on axial flow LVAD.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Deo, Salil; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Topilsky, Yan; Edwards, Brooks S; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle; Daly, Richard; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-01-01

    Continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used with good outcome. However, acute intravascular hemolysis due to thrombus in the pump remains a clinical challenge. We screened for LVAD-related intravascular hemolysis among 115 consecutive patients surviving HeartMateII implantation and investigated the role of medical therapy in resolving the hemolysis. Hemolytic events were identified in 7% of patients, 2-26 months after implant, manifested by peak lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels >6 times normal. With the institution of heparin and enhanced antiplatelet therapy, LDH levels receded rapidly reaching a stable trough level near baseline within 2 weeks with the resolution of clinical symptoms except in one patient who required additional therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Complications included transient renal failure, one splenic infarct, and a cerebrovascular attack after tPA. The acute event of hemolysis resolved with medical therapy, and all were successfully discharged. However, recurrent hemolysis was common (6/8 patients over the next 1-7 months). At the end of follow-up, three patients were transplanted, one patient died refusing LVAD exchange for recurrent hemolysis, and 4 remained alive on LVAD support. Medical treatment with intensification of anticoagulation can be effective in resolving the acute hemolytic event. However, a definitive long-term strategy should be planned because the recurrence rate is high.

  20. How we established a new undergraduate firm on a Medical Admissions Unit.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Tahir; Wallis, Simon; Higham, Jackie; Newton, Kate; Pugh, Mark; Woywodt, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Medical Admission Units (MAUs) were introduced in the UK in the 1980s primarily driven by a governance and service improvement agenda. In the UK this has led to the development of Acute Medicine as a specialty in its own right, together with a strong role of this specialty in postgraduate teaching. In contrast, the role of MAUs, if any, in undergraduate medical education is currently unclear. Prompted by an expansion of our undergraduate student numbers, our aim was to establish a Year 3 undergraduate firm on a 33-bedded MAU in a large academic teaching hospital in the National Health Service (NHS). Despite initial scepticism from clinicians, managers, and educators, the new firm placement on MAU became an instant success and continues to attract excellent feedback from our Year 3 undergraduate students. Students enjoy the bedside teaching with a high percentage of consultant-delivered teaching and also liked the involvement of Foundation Doctors. Here, we report our experience on how to make such a firm work, based on student feedback and the tutors' experience. We provide an overview and a step-by-step guide of how to construct a successful new undergraduate firm on a busy MAU. We also discuss opportunities and challenges and discuss the relevant literature. We conclude that undergraduate teaching is feasible and rewarding in an extremely busy MAU setting. We note that identifying enthusiastic educators within the MAU team, utilisation of peripheral learning opportunities, structured timetables and induction, and a robust framework for quality assurance are all crucial to success.

  1. Medical management of radiation victims in the United States.

    PubMed

    Davids, Matthew S; Case, Cullen; Confer, Dennis L; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Weinstock, David M

    2010-06-01

    Many governmental and non-governmental agencies are involved in the planning for radiation events in the U.S. We will focus on medical management after mass casualty events, specifically the involvement of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network (RITN), a voluntary consortium of medical centers across the continental U.S. RITN and its partners have established standardized approaches for the evaluation and treatment of radiation victims, which are now available online. Efforts are underway to streamline these processes, provide training to healthcare practitioners around the country, and harmonize with similar efforts around the world.

  2. Genetic analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: distinct clusters are circulating into the United States.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is associated with colony collapse disorder of honey bees. Nonetheless, its role in the pathogenesis of the disorder and its geographic distribution are unclear. Here, we report phylogenetic analysis of IAPV obtained from bees in the United States, Canada, Austral...

  3. Mandatory Continuing Veterinary Medical Education Requirements in the United States and Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale A.; Klingborg, Donald J.; Wright, Teressa

    2003-01-01

    Lists by state and province the current continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) requirements in the United States and Canada and provides additional analysis and comment on CVME requirements. (EV)

  4. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  5. Biochemistry in the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 Content Outline: Organ Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1997-01-01

    Examines the Organ Systems part of the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 Content Outline for its biochemical components. The General Principles part of the Content Outline of the examination does not match the basic science teaching in medical schools with organ system curricula. Suggests a place where the basic principles in…

  6. Interactive Algorithms for Teaching and Learning Acute Medicine in the Network of Medical Faculties MEFANET

    PubMed Central

    Štourač, Petr; Komenda, Martin; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina; Gregor, Jakub; Hůlek, Richard; Smékalová, Olga; Křikava, Ivo; Štoudek, Roman; Dušek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical Faculties Network (MEFANET) has established itself as the authority for setting standards for medical educators in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, 2 independent countries with similar languages that once comprised a federation and that still retain the same curricular structure for medical education. One of the basic goals of the network is to advance medical teaching and learning with the use of modern information and communication technologies. Objective We present the education portal AKUTNE.CZ as an important part of the MEFANET’s content. Our focus is primarily on simulation-based tools for teaching and learning acute medicine issues. Methods Three fundamental elements of the MEFANET e-publishing system are described: (1) medical disciplines linker, (2) authentication/authorization framework, and (3) multidimensional quality assessment. A new set of tools for technology-enhanced learning have been introduced recently: Sandbox (works in progress), WikiLectures (collaborative content authoring), Moodle-MEFANET (central learning management system), and Serious Games (virtual casuistics and interactive algorithms). The latest development in MEFANET is designed for indexing metadata about simulation-based learning objects, also known as electronic virtual patients or virtual clinical cases. The simulations assume the form of interactive algorithms for teaching and learning acute medicine. An anonymous questionnaire of 10 items was used to explore students’ attitudes and interests in using the interactive algorithms as part of their medical or health care studies. Data collection was conducted over 10 days in February 2013. Results In total, 25 interactive algorithms in the Czech and English languages have been developed and published on the AKUTNE.CZ education portal to allow the users to test and improve their knowledge and skills in the field of acute medicine. In the feedback survey, 62 participants completed the online questionnaire (13

  7. Medication Adherence Following Acute Coronary Syndrome: Does One Size Fit All?

    PubMed

    Bernal, Daniel D L; Bereznicki, Luke R E; Chalmers, Leanne; Castelino, Ronald L; Thompson, Angus; Davidson, Patricia M; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-02-01

    Guideline-based management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is well established, yet some may challenge that strict implementation of guideline recommendations can limit the individualization of therapy. The use of all recommended medications following ACS places a high burden of responsibility and cost on patients, particularly when these medications have not been previously prescribed. Without close attention to avoiding non-adherence to these medications, the full benefits of the guideline recommendations will not be realized in many patients. Using a case example, we discuss how the recognition of adherence barriers can be an effective and efficient process for identifying patients at risk of non-adherence following ACS. For those identified as at risk, the World Health Organization's model of adherence barriers is explored as a potentially useful tool to assist with individualization of therapy and promotion of adherence.

  8. Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Hester; Brazeau, Paulette; Stermac, Lana; Addison, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.

  9. Designing a "safe room" on a medical nursing unit floor.

    PubMed

    Corbin, David

    2009-01-01

    Building a "safe room" on a Medical Nursing floor to house high-risk patients as well as regular patients required inter-department cooperation and an understanding of the differences between a normal room renovation and that of a safe room. In this article, the author describes the kind of cooperation needed and the steps taken to successfully build and use the new safe room.

  10. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    is instilled to achieve maximum results in courses. Competency-based, patient outcome -oriented skills evaluation will replace the preponderance of...its goal-oriented use. Their introduction of these concepts allow for improved matching of simulation realism with desired outcomes . Johnson et...Technology Will Enhance Medical Education and 4 Training by the Year 2039 COL Randall G. Anderson Effects of Using Human Patient Simulator Versus a

  11. Knowledge translation: An interprofessional approach to integrating a pain consult team within an acute care unit.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Kira; Berall, Anna; Karuza, Jurgis; Senderovich, Helen; Perri, Giulia-Anna; Grossman, Daphna

    2016-11-01

    Management of pain in the frail elderly presents many challenges in both assessment and treatment, due to the presence of multiple co-morbidities, polypharmacy, and cognitive impairment. At Baycrest Health Sciences, a geriatric care centre, pain in its acute care unit had been managed through consultations with the pain team on a case-by-case basis. In an intervention informed by knowledge translation (KT), the pain specialists integrated within the social network of the acute care team for 6 months to disseminate their expertise. A survey was administered to staff on the unit before and after the intervention of the pain team to understand staff perceptions of pain management. Pre- and post-comparisons of the survey responses were analysed by using t-tests. This study provided some evidence for the success of this interprofessional education initiative through changes in staff confidence with respect to pain management. It also showed that embedding the pain team into the acute care team supported the KT process as an effective method of interprofessional team building. Incorporating the pain team into the acute care unit to provide training and ongoing decision support was a feasible strategy for KT and could be replicated in other clinical settings.

  12. Burden of acute gastroenteritis among children younger than 5 years of age – a survey among parents in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its high incidence among children under the age of five, little is known about the burden of pediatric gastroenteritis outside the medical setting. The objective of this study was to describe the burden of acute gastroenteritis among children residing in the United Arab Emirates, including those not receiving medical care. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional survey of 500 parents of children under 5 years of age who had suffered from acute gastroenteritis the preceding three months was conducted in the cities of Abu Dhabi and Al Ain. Data collected included respondent characteristics, disease symptoms, medical care sought, and parental expenditures and work loss. Data were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Results Vomiting and diarrhea episodes lasted on average between 3 and 4 days. Overall, 87% of parents sought medical care for their children; 10% of these cases required hospitalization with an average length of stay of 2.6 days. When medical care was sought, the average parental cost per gastroenteritis episode was US$64, 4.5 times higher than with home care only (US$14). Nearly 60% of this difference was attributable to co-payments and medication use: 69% of children used oral rehydration solution, 68% antiemetics, 65% antibiotics and 64% antidiarrheals. Overall, 38 parents missed work per 100 gastroenteritis episodes for an average of 1.4 days. Conclusions Given its high incidence, pediatric gastroenteritis has an important financial and productivity impact on parents in the United Arab Emirates. To reduce this impact, efforts should be made both to prevent acute gastroenteritis and to optimize its treatment. PMID:22708988

  13. Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J.; Glockmann, Anja; Fischer, Michael; Riley, David S.; Baars, Erik; Kiene, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    Objective Anthroposophic medications (AMED) are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections. Methods A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged ≥1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED. Results Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1) swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2) sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron® 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327) of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715) of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443) of applications. Conclusion In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated. PMID:21901075

  14. Risk Factors for Delirium During Acute and Subacute Stages of Various Disorders in Patients Admitted to Rehabilitation Units

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk factors for delirium in patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit for acute or subacute neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 537 patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit and selected 398 patients in the acute or subacute stage of various neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Among them, patients who had suffered from delirium were categorized into the delirium group (n=65), and the other patients were categorized into the non-delirium group (n=333). As potential risk factors for delirium, the patients' diagnosis, underlying disease, demographic data, hospital stay duration, surgery, and laboratory findings were reviewed, and the differences between the two groups with respect to independent risk factors were analyzed. Results The average age in the delirium group was higher; the hospital stay and pre-transfer periods were longer. A large proportion of the patients were admitted for musculoskeletal disorders, and many patients had diabetes mellitus, dementia, and depression as underlying diseases. Laboratory tests revealed increases in the white blood cells (WBC), glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the delirium group, while the hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorus, protein, albumin, and potassium levels were decreased. Depression, musculoskeletal disorders, traumatic brain injury, elevated WBC, BUN, AST, and CRP levels, and decreased potassium and phosphorus levels were identified as independent risk factors for delirium. Conclusion Risk factors treatable before delirium onset were identified in rehabilitation patients in acute and subacute stages of various disorders. Early diagnosis and prevention of these risk factors could decrease delirium occurrence and increase rehabilitation effectiveness. PMID:28119839

  15. Tele-orthopaedics: United States Army European Regional Medical Command.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jeffrey; Walker, Shaka; Melaas, David; Crane, Maria; Bacahui, Jacob; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is the provision of medical care over long distances by way of videoconferencing and other communication technologies. Staff at Vilseck U.S. Army Clinic set up a 3-month pilot real-time tele-orthopaedic clinic to determine if it was feasible to extend Orthopaedic specialty care over long distances. A full time physician assistant was located at the patient site and an orthopaedic surgeon was located at the Landstuhl or Heidelberg site. Patients were initially evaluated by the PA. Complex consults were reviewed by the PA and Orthopaedic surgeon via telephone or VTC. Patients meeting possible indications for surgery were then scheduled for a VTC consult with a surgeon.

  16. Radiology in World War II (Medical Department, United States Army)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    Improvised serialograph for gastric radiography ------------------------- 388 141 Army field unit adapted for examination of paranasal sinuses ...paranasal sinuses . 7. A cradle (fig. 32), to suspend the head of the patient beneath a cassette, so that roentgenography could be accomplished with the X-ray...was regarded as conservative. At many hospitals, it was the practice to make multiple exposures on single films, particularly in X-raying the sinuses

  17. Perspectives of patients on factors relating to adherence to post-acute coronary syndrome medical regimens

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Kerzner, Anne; Havranek, Edward P; Plomondon, Mary E; Fagan, Katherine M; McCreight, Marina S; Fehling, Kelty B; Williams, David J; Hamilton, Alison B; Albright, Karen; Blatchford, Patrick J; Mihalko-Corbitt, Renee; Bryson, Chris L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Kirshner, Miriam A; Giacco, Eric J Del; Ho, P Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor adherence to cardioprotective medications after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) hospitalization is associated with increased risk of rehospitalization and mortality. Clinical trials of multifaceted interventions have improved medication adherence with varying results. Patients’ perspectives on interventions could help researchers interpret inconsistent outcomes. Identifying factors that patients believe would improve adherence might inform the design of future interventions and make them more parsimonious and sustainable. The objective of this study was to obtain patients’ perspectives on adherence to medical regimens after experiencing an ACS event and their participation in a medication adherence randomized control trial following their hospitalization. Patients and methods Sixty-four in-depth interviews were conducted with ACS patients who participated in an efficacious, multifaceted, medication adherence randomized control trial. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative approach. Results Participants described their post-ACS event experiences and how they affected their adherence behaviors. Patients reported that adherence decisions were facilitated by mutually respectful and collaborative provider–patient treatment planning. Frequent interactions with providers and medication refill reminder calls supported improved adherence. Additional facilitators included having social support, adherence routines, and positive attitudes toward an ACS event. The majority of patients expressed that being active participants in health care decision-making contributed to their health. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that respectful collaborative communication can contribute to medication adherence after ACS hospitalization. These results suggest a potential role for training health-care providers, including pharmacists, social workers, registered nurses, etc, to elicit and acknowledge the patients’ views regarding medication

  18. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  19. A nonhuman primate model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome plus medical management.

    PubMed

    Farese, Ann M; Cohen, Melanie V; Katz, Barry P; Smith, Cassandra P; Jackson, William; Cohen, Daniel M; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    The development of medical countermeasures against the hematopoietic subsyndrome of the acute radiation syndrome requires well characterized and validated animal models. The model must define the radiation dose- and time-dependent relationships for mortality and major signs of morbidity to include other organ damage that may contribute to morbidity and mortality. Herein, the authors define these parameters for a nonhuman primate exposed to total body radiation and administered medical management. A blinded, randomized study (n = 48 rhesus macaques) determined the lethal dose-response relationship using bilateral 6 MV linear accelerator photon radiation to doses in the range of 7.20 to 8.90 Gy at 0.80 Gy min(-1). Following irradiation, animals were monitored for complete bloodcounts, body weight, temperature, diarrhea, and hydration status for 60 d. Animals were administered medical management consisting of intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, anti-diarrheals, analgesics, and nutrition. The primary endpoint was survival at 60 d post-irradiation; secondary endpoints included hematopoietic-related parameters, number of transfusions, incidence of documented infection, febrile neutropenia, severity of diarrhea, mean survival time of decedents, and tissue histology. The study defined an LD30/60 of 7.06 Gy, LD50/60 of 7.52 Gy, and an LD70/60 of 7.99 Gy with a relatively steep slope of 1.13 probits per linear dose. This study establishes a rhesus macaque model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome and shows the marked effect of medical management on increased survival and overall mean survival time for decedents. Furthermore, following a nuclear terrorist event, medical management may be the only treatment administered at its optimal schedule.

  20. A Nonhuman Primate Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome Plus Medical Management

    PubMed Central

    Farese, A.M.; Cohen, M.V.; Katz, B. P.; Smith, C. P.; Jackson, W.; Cohen, D. M.; MacVittie, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The development of medical countermeasures against the hematopoietic sub-syndrome of the acute radiation syndrome requires well characterized and validated animal models. The model must define the radiation dose- and time-dependent relationships for mortality and major signs of morbidity to include other organ damage that may contribute to the morbidity and mortality. Herein, we define these parameters for the nonhuman primate exposed to total-body radiation and administered medical management. A blinded, randomized study (n=48 rhesus macaques) determined the lethal dose response relationship using bilateral, 6 MV linear accelerator photon radiation to doses in the range of 7.20 to 8.90Gy at 0.80Gy minute−1. Following irradiation animals were monitored for complete blood counts, body weight, temperature, diarrhea, and hydration status for 60 days. Animals were administered medical management consisting of intravenous fluids, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, anti-diarrheals, analgesics and nutrition. The primary endpoint was survival at 60 days post irradiation; secondary endpoints included hematopoietic-related parameters, number of transfusions, incidence of documented infection, febrile neutropenia, severity of diarrhea, mean survival time of decedents and tissue histology. The study defined an LD30/60 of 7.06Gy, LD50/60 of 7.52Gy, and an LD70/60 of 7.99Gy with a relatively steep slope of 1.13 probits per linear dose. This study establishes a rhesus macaque model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome and shows the marked effect of medical management on increased survival and overall mean survival time for decedents. Furthermore, following a nuclear terrorist event, medical management may be the only treatment administered at its optimal schedule. PMID:22929469

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome: innovative medical approaches in military medicine.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Erik B; Varney, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    After a radiological or nuclear event, acute radiation syndrome (ARS) will present complex medical challenges that could involve the treatment of hundreds to thousands of patients. Current medical doctrine is based on limited clinical data and remains inadequate. Efforts to develop medical innovations that address ARS complications are unlikely to be generated by industry because of market uncertainties specific to this type of injury. A prospective strategy could be the integration of cellular therapy to meet the medical demands of ARS. The most clinically advanced cellular therapy to date is the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results of currently published investigations describing MSC safety and efficacy in a variety of injury and disease models demonstrate the unique qualities of this reparative cell population in adapting to the specific requirements of the damaged tissue in which the cells integrate. This report puts forward a rationale for the further evaluation of MSC therapy to address the current unmet medical needs of ARS. We propose that the exploration of this novel therapy for the treatment of the multivariate complications of ARS could be of invaluable benefit to military medicine.

  2. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  3. The Effect of Geographic Units of Analysis on Measuring Geographic Variation in Medical Services Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Heon; Hwang, Kyosang; Lee, Taesik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the effect of geographic units of analysis on measuring geographic variation in medical services utilization. For this purpose, we compared geographic variations in the rates of eight major procedures in administrative units (districts) and new areal units organized based on the actual health care use of the population in Korea. Methods: To compare geographic variation in geographic units of analysis, we calculated the age–sex standardized rates of eight major procedures (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, surgery after hip fracture, knee-replacement surgery, caesarean section, hysterectomy, computed tomography scan, and magnetic resonance imaging scan) from the National Health Insurance database in Korea for the 2013 period. Using the coefficient of variation, the extremal quotient, and the systematic component of variation, we measured geographic variation for these eight procedures in districts and new areal units. Results: Compared with districts, new areal units showed a reduction in geographic variation. Extremal quotients and inter-decile ratios for the eight procedures were lower in new areal units. While the coefficient of variation was lower for most procedures in new areal units, the pattern of change of the systematic component of variation between districts and new areal units differed among procedures. Conclusions: Geographic variation in medical service utilization could vary according to the geographic unit of analysis. To determine how geographic characteristics such as population size and number of geographic units affect geographic variation, further studies are needed. PMID:27499165

  4. Systematic review of safety checklists for use by medical care teams in acute hospital settings - limited evidence of effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a fundamental component of good quality health care. Checklists have been proposed as a method of improving patient safety. This systematic review, asked "In acute hospital settings, would the use of safety checklists applied by medical care teams, compared to not using checklists, improve patient safety?" Methods We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE for randomised controlled trials published in English before September 2009. Studies were selected and appraised by two reviewers independently in consultation with colleagues, using inclusion, exclusion and appraisal criteria established a priori. Results Nine cohort studies with historical controls studies from four hospital care settings were included-intensive care unit, emergency department, surgery, and acute care. The studies used a variety of designs of safety checklists, and implemented them in different ways, however most incorporated an educational component to teach the staff how to use the checklist. The studies assessed outcomes occurring a few weeks to a maximum of 12 months post-implementation, and these outcomes were diverse. The studies were generally of low to moderate quality and of low levels of evidence, with all but one of the studies containing a high risk of bias. The results of these studies suggest some improvements in patient safety arising from use of safety checklists, but these were not consistent across all studies or for all outcomes. Some studies showed no difference in outcomes between checklist use and standard care without a checklist. Due to the variations in setting, checklist design, educational training given, and outcomes measured, it was unfeasible to accurately summarise any trends across all studies. Conclusions The included studies suggest some benefits of using safety checklists to improve protocol adherence and patient safety, but due to the risk of bias in these studies, their results should be interpreted with

  5. Risk assessment models for venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stuck, Anna K; Spirk, David; Schaudt, Jil; Kucher, Nils

    2017-04-03

    Although the use of thromboprophylaxis is recommended for acutely ill medical patients at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), it remains unclear which risk assessment model (RAM) should be routinely used to identify at-risk patients requiring thromboprophylaxis. We therefore aimed to describe existing RAMs, and to compare these tools in terms of validity and applicability for clinical decision-making. We performed a comprehensive systematic search in MEDLINE from the date of initiation until May 2016 for studies in acutely ill medical patients investigating validity of RAMs for VTE. Two reviewers independently screened the title, abstract, and full text, and evaluated the characteristics of studies, and the composition, evidence of validation, and results on validity of the RAMs. We included 11 studies assessing eight RAMs: 4-Element RAM, Caprini RAM, a full logistic model, Geneva risk score, IMPROVE-RAM, Kucher Model, a "Multivariable Model", and Padua Prediction Score. The 4-Element RAM, IMPROVE-RAM, Multivariable Model, and full logistic model had derivation by identifying factors with predictive power. The other four RAMs were empirically generated based on consensus guidelines, published data, and clinical expertise. The Kucher Model, the Padua Prediction Score, the Geneva Risk Score and the IMPROVE-RAM underwent multicenter external validation. The Kucher Model, the Padua Prediction Score, and the Geneva Risk Score improved rates of thromboprophylaxis or clinical outcomes. In conclusion, existing RAMs to evaluate the need of thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients are difficult to compare and none fulfills the criteria of an ideal RAM. Nevertheless, the adequacy of thromboprophylaxis may be improved by implementing one of the validated RAMs.

  6. Allergie acute contact dermatitis due to Arnica tincture self-medication.

    PubMed

    Hörmann, H P; Korting, H C

    1995-04-01

    After repeated intermittent use of Arnica tincture for rosacea a 66-year-old patient developed acute allergic contact dermatitis with blistering upon the single application of Arnica tincture to the dorsum of the right hand for minor swelling. Contact allergy of the delayed type to Arnica tincture could be proven by patch testing. Early diagnosis and treatment prevented exacerbation and spreading of the disease. In view of the wide use of Arnica preparations, particularly for self-medication, and the notable sensitizing potential, Arnica tincture should be a regular component of patch test series, at least when drug allergy is suspected.

  7. Feasibility and Inter-Rater Reliability of Physical Performance Measures in Acutely Admitted Older Medical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina; Andersen, Ove; Bandholm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical performance measures can be used to predict functional decline and increased dependency in older persons. However, few studies have assessed the feasibility or reliability of such measures in hospitalized older patients. Here we assessed the feasibility and inter-rater reliability of four simple measures of physical performance in acutely admitted older medical patients. Design During the first 24 hours of hospitalization, the following were assessed twice by different raters in 52 (≥ 65 years) patients admitted for acute medical illness: isometric hand grip strength, 4-meter gait speed, 30-s chair stand and Cumulated Ambulation Score. Relative reliability was expressed as weighted kappa for the Cumulated Ambulation Score or as intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC1,1) and lower limit of the 95%-confidence interval (LL95%) for grip strength, gait speed, and 30-s chair stand. Absolute reliability was expressed as the standard error of measurement and the smallest real difference as a percentage of their respective means (SEM% and SRD%). Results The primary reasons for admission of the 52 included patients were infectious disease and cardiovascular illness. The mean± SD age was 78±8.3 years, and 73.1% were women. All patients performed grip strength and Cumulated Ambulation Score testing, 81% performed the gait speed test, and 54% completed the 30-s chair stand test (46% were unable to rise without using the armrests). No systematic bias was found between first and second tests or between raters. The weighted kappa for the Cumulated Ambulation Score was 0.76 (0.60–0.92). The ICC1,1 values were as follows: grip strength, 0.95 (LL95% 0.92); gait speed, 0.92 (LL95% 0.73), and 30-s chair stand, 0.82 (LL95% 0.67). The SEM% values for grip strength, gait speed, and 30-s chair stand were 8%, 7%, and 18%, and the SRD95% values were 22%, 17%, and 49%. Conclusion In acutely admitted older medical patients, grip strength, gait speed, and the

  8. An example of US Food and Drug Administration device regulation: medical devices indicated for use in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Peña, Carlos; Li, Khan; Felten, Richard; Ogden, Neil; Melkerson, Mark

    2007-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration has established requirements for protecting the public health by assuring the safety and effectiveness of a variety of medical products including drugs, devices, and biological products, and for promoting public health by expediting the approval of treatments that are safe and effective. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health is the center within the agency that is responsible for pre- and postmarket regulation of medical devices. In this article, we review current regulation of medical devices, research and development programs, pre- and postmarket perspectives, and future considerations of medical devices, particularly as they relate to devices targeting acute ischemic stroke as an example of the process. We also review the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's historical perspective of acute ischemic stroke trials and clinical trial design considerations used in prior studies that have led to US market clearance as they are related to currently marketed devices indicated for acute ischemic stroke.

  9. Antipsychotic Medications and Risk of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Schizophrenia: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Yang, Shu-Yu; Liao, Ya-Tang; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization in association with the use of certain antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia patients. Methods A nationwide cohort of 31,177 inpatients with schizophrenia between the ages of 18 and 65 years whose records were enrolled in the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan from 2000 to 2008 and were studied after encrypting the identifications. Cases (n = 147) were patients with subsequent acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization after their first psychiatric admission. Based on a nested case-control design, each case was matched with 20 controls for age, sex and the year of first psychiatric admission using risk-set sampling. The effects of antipsychotic agents on the development of acute coronary syndrome were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression and sensitivity analyses to confirm any association. Results We found that current use of aripiprazole (adjusted risk ratio [RR] = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.27–10.64, p<0.05) and chlorpromazine (adjusted RR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.40–6.24, p<0.001) were associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of developing acute coronary syndrome. Although haloperidol was associated with an increased risk (adjusted RR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.20–3.44, p<0.01), there was no clear dose-dependent relationship. These three antipsychotic agents were also associated with an increased risk in the first 30 days of use, and the risk decreased as the duration of therapy increased. Sensitivity analyses using propensity score-adjusted modeling showed that the results were similar to those of multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia who received aripiprazole, chlorpromazine, or haloperidol could have a potentially elevated risk of developing acute coronary syndrome, particularly at the start of therapy. PMID:27657540

  10. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES BIODOSIMETRY AND RADIOLOGICAL/NUCLEAR MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURE PROGRAMS.

    PubMed

    Homer, Mary J; Raulli, Robert; DiCarlo-Cohen, Andrea L; Esker, John; Hrdina, Chad; Maidment, Bert W; Moyer, Brian; Rios, Carmen; Macchiarini, Francesca; Prasanna, Pataje G; Wathen, Lynne

    2016-09-01

    The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is fully committed to the development of medical countermeasures to address national security threats from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear agents. Through the Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise, HHS has launched and managed a multi-agency, comprehensive effort to develop and operationalize medical countermeasures. Within HHS, development of medical countermeasures includes the National Institutes of Health (NIH), (led by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Preparedness and Response/Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA); with the Division of Medical Countermeasure Strategy and Requirements, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Food and Drug Administration as primary partners in this endeavor. This paper describes various programs and coordinating efforts of BARDA and NIH for the development of medical countermeasures for radiological and nuclear threats.

  11. A Multicenter Evaluation of Off-Label Medication Use and Associated Adverse Drug Reactions in Adult Medical Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Smithburger, Pamela L.; Buckley, Mitchell S.; Culver, Mark A.; Sokol, Sarah; Lat, Ishaq; Handler, Steven M.; Kirisci, Levent; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior research indicates off-label use is common in the intensive care unit (ICU); however the safety of off-label use has not been assessed. The study objective was to determine the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with off-label use and evaluate off-label use as a risk factor for the development of ADRs in an adult ICU population. Setting Medical ICUs at three academic medical centers Patients Adult patients (age ≥ 18 years old) receiving medication therapy Interventions All administered medications were evaluated for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved or off-label use. Patients were assessed daily for the development of an ADR through active surveillance. Three ADR assessment instruments were used to determine the probability of an ADR resulting from drug therapy. Severity and harm of the ADR were also assessed. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify a set of covariates that influenced the rate of ADRs. Measurements and Main Results Overall, 1654 patient days (327 patients) and 16,391 medications were evaluated, with 43% of medications being used off-label. One hundred and sixteen ADRs were categorized dichotomously (FDA or off-label), with 56% and 44% being associated with FDA approved and off-label use, respectively. The number of ADRs for medications administered and number of harmful and severe ADRs did not differ for medications used for FDA approved or off-label use (0.74% vs 0.67%, p = 0.336; 33 vs. 31 events, p=0.567; 24 vs. 24 events, p = 0.276). Age, sex, number of high-risk medications, number of off-label medications, and severity of illness score were included in the Cox proportional hazard regression. It was found that the rate of ADRs increases by 8% for every one additional off-label medication (HR = 1.08; 95 % CI: 1.018–1.154). Conclusion While ADRs do not occur more frequently with off-label use, ADR risk increases with each additional off-label medication used. PMID:25855897

  12. Secure Internet video conferencing for assessing acute medical problems in a nursing facility.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, M.; Schadow, G.; Lindbergh, D.; Warvel, J.; Abernathy, G.; Dexter, P.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although video-based teleconferencing is becoming more widespread in the medical profession, especially for scheduled consultations, applications for rapid assessment of acute medical problems are rare. Use of such a video system in a nursing facility may be especially beneficial, because physicians are often not immediately available to evaluate patients. We have assembled and tested a portable, wireless conferencing system to prepare for a randomized trial of the system s influence on resource utilization and satisfaction. The system includes a rolling cart with video conferencing hardware and software, a remotely controllable digital camera, light, wireless network, and battery. A semi-automated paging system informs physicians of patient s study status and indications for conferencing. Data transmission occurs wirelessly in the nursing home and then through Internet cables to the physician s home. This provides sufficient bandwidth to support quality motion images. IPsec secures communications. Despite human and technical challenges, this system is affordable and functional. Images Figure 1 PMID:11825286

  13. Key considerations for the success of Medical Education Research and Innovation units in Canada: unit director perceptions.

    PubMed

    Varpio, Lara; Bidlake, Erin; Humphrey-Murto, Sue; Sutherland, Stephanie; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2014-08-01

    Growth in the field of medical education is evidenced by the proliferation of units dedicated to advancing Medical Education Research and Innovation (MERI). While a review of the literature discovered narrative accounts of MERI unit development, we found no systematic examinations of the dimensions of and structures that facilitate the success of these units. We conducted qualitative interviews with the directors of 12 MERI units across Canada. Data were analyzed using qualitative description (Sandelowski in Res Nurs Health 23:334-340, 2000). Final analysis drew on Bourdieu's (Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1977; Media, culture and society: a critical reader. Sage, London, 1986; Language and symbolic power. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1991) concepts of field, habitus, and capital, and more recent research investigating the field of MERI (Albert in Acad Med 79:948-954, 2004; Albert et al. in Adv Health Sci Educ 12:103-115, 2007). When asked about the metrics by which they define their success, directors cited: teaching, faculty mentoring, building collaborations, delivering conference presentations, winning grant funding, and disseminating publications. Analyzed using Bourdieu's concepts, these metrics are discussed as forms of capital that have been legitimized in the MERI field. All directors, with the exception of one, described success as being comprised of elements (capital) at both ends of the service-research spectrum (i.e., Albert's PP-PU structure). Our analysis highlights the forms of habitus (i.e., behaviors, attitudes, demeanors) directors use to negotiate, strategize and position the unit within their local context. These findings may assist institutions in developing a new-or reorganizing an existing-MERI unit. We posit that a better understanding of these complex social structures can help units become savvy participants in the MERI field. With such insight, units can improve their academic output and

  14. Attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In psychiatry, most of the focus on patient aggression has been in adolescent and adult inpatient settings. This behaviour is also common in elderly people with mental illness, but little research has been conducted into this problem in old age psychiatry settings. The attitudes of clinical staff toward aggression may affect the way they manage this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of clinical staff toward the causes and management of aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient settings. Methods A convenience sample of clinical staff were recruited from three locked acute old age psychiatry inpatient units in Melbourne, Australia. They completed the Management of Aggression and Violence Scale, which assessed the causes and managment of aggression in psychiatric settings. Results Eighty-five staff completed the questionnaire, comprising registered nurses (61.1%, n = 52), enrolled nurses (27.1%, n = 23) and medical and allied health staff (11.8%, n = 10). A range of causative factors contributed to aggression. The respondents had a tendency to disagree that factors directly related to the patient contributed to this behaviour. They agreed patients were aggressive because of the environment they were in, other people contributed to them becoming aggressive, and patients from certain cultural groups were prone to these behaviours. However, there were mixed views about whether patient aggression could be prevented, and this type of behaviour took place because staff did not listen to patients. There was agreement medication was a valuable approach for the management of aggression, negotiation could be used more effectively in such challenging behaviour, and seclusion and physical restraint were sometimes used more than necessary. However, there was disagreement about whether the practice of secluding patients should be discontinued. Conclusions Aggression in acute old age psychiatry inpatient units occurs

  15. Medical education for alcohol and other drug abuse in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, D C

    1990-01-01

    Initiatives by individuals, private foundations and government have led to improvements in the United States in medical education dealing with alcohol and drug-related problems. Progress has been made, particularly in the past 5 years, in developing new medical school curricula and in faculty development. Greater activity by national professional organizations has helped raise the priority of training in alcohol- and drug-related areas for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. As an example, Project ADEPT (Alcohol and Drug Education for Physician Training in primary care) at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, is described. The importance of positive and motivated faculty role models and of skills training is emphasized. PMID:2224678

  16. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    PubMed

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously.

  17. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October-December 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    the end result, an effective leader must create a climate that stimulates positive change within his organization. He must have a vision that is clear...TX 78234-5078. CORRESPONDENCE: Manuscripts, photographs, official unit requests to receive copies, and unit address changes or deletions should be sent...US Army or US Army Medical Department positions, nor does the content change or supersede information in other Army Publications. The Journal reserves

  18. Variability in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury in the United Kingdom: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Sedgwick, Philip; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-03-20

    The aim of this study was to examine how traumatic spinal cord injury is managed in the United Kingdom via a questionnaire survey of all neurosurgical units. We contacted consultant neurosurgeons and neuroanesthetists in all neurosurgical centers that manage patients with acute spinal cord injury. Two clinical scenarios-of complete and incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries-were given to determine local treatment policies. There were 175 responders from the 33 centers (36% response rate). We ascertained neurosurgical views on urgency of transfer, timing of surgery, nature and aim of surgery, as well as neuroanesthetic views on type of anesthetic, essential intraoperative monitoring, drug treatment, and intensive care management. Approximately 70% of neurosurgeons will admit patients with incomplete spinal cord injury immediately, but only 40% will admit patients with complete spinal cord injury immediately. There is no consensus on the timing or even the role of surgery for incomplete or complete injuries. Most (96%) neuroanesthetists avoid anesthetics known to elevate intracranial pressure. What was deemed essential intraoperative monitoring, however, varied widely. Many (22%) neuroanesthetists do not routinely measure arterial blood pressure invasively, central venous pressure (85%), or cardiac output (94%) during surgery. There is no consensus among neuroanesthetists on the optimal levels of arterial blood pressure, or oxygen and carbon dioxide partial arterial pressure. We report wide variability among U.K. neurosurgeons and neuroanesthetists in their treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Our findings reflect the lack of Class 1 evidence that early surgical decompression and intensive medical management of patients with spinal cord injury improves neurological outcome.

  19. Over-the-counter medication patterns in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmad; Elsergany, Moetaz; El-Enein, Nagwa Abou; Alsuwaidi, Hamda; Ayoub, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-medication and acquisition of over-the-counter (OTC) medications are emerging community health issues. Besides being a cheap alternative for treating common illnesses, the behavior entails serious ramifications, such as medication wastage, increasing pathogen resistance, and adverse drug reactions. The present study was conducted to explore the extent of OTC medications in households in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates (UAE), including native UAE and expatriate families. Methods The study employed a population-based, cross-sectional, analytical study design. The study population included native and expatriate households residing in the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE. The snowball sampling technique was used, and the sample included a total of 335 households. Results Expatriate households acquired more OTC medications than did native households (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=1.7). The demographic determinants for expatriate households were number of family members (aOR=1.6), age of children in the family (aOR=1.8), and annual income (aOR=0.5). Expatriate households purchased more OTC medication practices than did native households (aOR=2.2). In the statistical sense, expatriate household practices were buying medication upon relatives’ advice (aOR=0.3), storage condition of medication (aOR=2.4), and disposal of expired medication (aOR=0.6). The highest percentages of OTC medications in native and expatriate households were those related to gastric and ear, nose, and throat illnesses. Conclusion The presence of OTC medications in expatriate households was two-fold more common than in native households in Sharjah, UAE. There were significant associations for behaviors related to the reasons why OTC medications were purchased and stored within the household for both native and expatriate families. PMID:24403846

  20. Surrogate medical decision making on behalf of a never-competent, profoundly intellectually disabled patient who is acutely ill.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    With the improvements in medical care and resultant increase in life expectancy of the intellectually disabled, it will become more common for healthcare providers to be confronted by ethical dilemmas in the care of this patient population. Many of the dilemmas will focus on what is in the best interest of patients who have never been able to express their wishes with regard to medical and end-of-life care and who should be empowered to exercise surrogate medical decision-making authority on their behalf. A case is presented that exemplifies the ethical and legal tensions surrounding surrogate medical decision making for acutely ill, never-competent, profoundly intellectually disabled patients.

  1. Medical costs of smoking in the United States: estimates, their validity, and their implications

    PubMed Central

    Warner, K.; Hodgson, T.; Carroll, C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare estimates of the medical costs of smoking in the United States and to consider their relevance to assessing the costs of smoking in developing countries and the net economic burden of smoking.
DATA SOURCES—A Medline search through early 1999 using keywords "smoking" and "cost", with review of article reference lists.
STUDY SELECTION—Peer-reviewed papers examining medical costs in a single year, covering the non-institutionalised American population.
DATA EXTRACTION—Methods underlying study estimates were identified, described, and compared with attributable expenditure methodology in the literature dealing with costs of illness. Differences in methods were associated with implied differences in findings.
DATA SYNTHESIS—With one exception, the studies find the annual medical costs of smoking to constitute approximately 6-8% of American personal health expenditures. The exception, a recent study, found much larger attributable expenditures. The lower estimates may reflect the limitation of analysis to costs associated with the principal smoking-related diseases. The higher estimate derives from analysis of smoking-attributable differences in all medical costs. However, the finding from the most recent study, also considering all medical costs, fell in the 6-8% range.
CONCLUSIONS—The medical costs of smoking in the United States equal, and may well exceed, the commonly referenced figure of 6-8%. This literature has direct methodological relevance to developing countries interested in assessing the magnitude of their current cost-of-smoking burden and their future burdens, with differences in tobacco use histories and the availability of chronic disease treatment affecting country-specific estimates. The debate over the use of gross or net medical cost estimates is likely to intensify with the proliferation of lawsuits against the tobacco industry to recover expenditures on tobacco-produced disease.


Keywords: medical

  2. [Replantation and revascularization in acute upper limb amputation--the Sheba Medical Center experience].

    PubMed

    Oron, Amir; Yaffe, Batia

    2008-01-01

    Replantation and revascularization in acute upper-limb amputations are well-accepted surgical techniques in hand surgery. All medical staff members treating patients in emergency settings should be familiar with the indications, timetable, setup and transportation of patients rendered suitable for such surgery. While replantation surgery is not considered a simple surgical procedure by any means, viability rates approach ninety percent. The amputated part should be wrapped with gauze soaked in saline, placed in a sterile plastic bag and then put in an ice-filled container. The patient should be transferred to a medical center with a team dedicated to performing replantation procedures, following notification in advance. Time from the initial insult to the initiation of treatment should be minimized. Combined efforts employed by the primary caregivers and the microsurgical team will lead to optimization of patient treatment and improve the final outcome. During the years 1991-2007 a total of 383 upper limb replantation or revascularization procedures were performed at the Sheba Medical Center and are presented in this article.

  3. Emergency medical support units to critical care transport teams in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean T

    2008-03-01

    Early in the author's deployment in the United States Air Force to southern Iraq, his unit was exposed to the first of many mass casualties sent to his Expeditionary Medical Support System unit. Within minutes of the injured military members' arrival, the four-bed evaluation station was transformed into an open bay trauma room where patients were treated and supported until they could be evacuated to more definitive care. Patients were transitioned with awe-inspiring speed and professionalism to Critical Care Air Transport teams for care during aeromedical evacuation. The lessons learned from the frequency of these events are valuable to any similar transport case with critically ill and injured patients.

  4. Perceptions of Continuing Medical Education, Professional Development, and Organizational Support in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younies, Hassan; Berham, Belal; Smith, Pamela C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper investigates the views of health care providers on continuous medical education (CME). To our knowledge, this is one of the first surveys to examine perspectives of CME in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: A 6-part questionnaire focused on the following areas of CME: the workshop leaders/trainers, the training…

  5. The Role of International Medical Graduate Psychiatrists in the United States Healthcare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulet, John Robin; Cassimatis, Emmanuel G.; Opalek, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Objective: International medical graduates (IMGs) make up a substantial proportion of the United States physician workforce, including psychiatrists in practice. The purpose of this study was to describe, based on current data, the characteristics and qualities of IMG psychiatrists who provide patient care in the US. Method: Physician data from…

  6. An Update on the Status of Anatomical Sciences Education in United States Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard L.; McBride, Jennifer M.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Curricular changes continue at United States medical schools and directors of gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses continue to adjust and modify their offerings. Developing and supplying data related to current trends in anatomical sciences education is important if informed decisions are going to…

  7. Evaluation of medical devices in thoracic radiograms in intensive care unit - time to pay attention!

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ana Sofia Linhares; Afonso, Maria da Graça Alves; Dinis, Mónica Ribeiro dos Santos Alves; dos Santos, Maria Cristina Granja Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and evaluate the correct positioning of the most commonly used medical devices as visualized in thoracic radiograms of patients in the intensive care unit of our center. Methods A literature search was conducted for the criteria used to evaluate the correct positioning of medical devices on thoracic radiograms. All the thoracic radiograms performed in the intensive care unit of our center over an 18-month period were analyzed. All admissions in which at least one thoracic radiogram was performed in the intensive care unit and in which at least one medical device was identifiable in the thoracic radiogram were included. One radiogram per admission was selected for analysis. The radiograms were evaluated by an independent observer. Results Out of the 2,312 thoracic radiograms analyzed, 568 were included in this study. Several medical devices were identified, including monitoring leads, endotracheal and tracheostomy tubes, central venous catheters, pacemakers and prosthetic cardiac valves. Of the central venous catheters that were identified, 33.6% of the subclavian and 23.8% of the jugular were malpositioned. Of the endotracheal tubes, 19.9% were malpositioned, while all the tracheostomy tubes were correctly positioned. Conclusion Malpositioning of central venous catheters and endotracheal tubes is frequently identified in radiograms of patients in an intensive care unit. This is relevant because malpositioned devices may be related to adverse events. In future studies, an association between malpositioning and adverse events should be investigated. PMID:27737432

  8. The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gishen, Kriya; Ovadia, Steven; Arzillo, Samantha; Avashia, Yash; Thaller, Seth R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

  9. 3D web based learning of medical equipment employed in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Aydın

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, both synchronous and asynchronous web based learning of 3D medical equipment models used in hospital intensive care unit have been described over the moodle course management system. 3D medical equipment models were designed with 3ds Max 2008, then converted to ASE format and added interactivity displayed with Viewpoint-Enliven. 3D models embedded in a web page in html format with dynamic interactivity-rotating, panning and zooming by dragging a mouse over images-and descriptive information is embedded to 3D model by using xml format. A pilot test course having 15 h was applied to technicians who is responsible for intensive care unit at Medical Devices Repairing and Maintenance Center (TABOM) of Turkish High Specialized Hospital.

  10. Smartphone and medical related App use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK): a regional survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Smartphone usage has spread to many settings including that of healthcare with numerous potential and realised benefits. The ability to download custom-built software applications (apps) has created a new wealth of clinical resources available to healthcare staff, providing evidence-based decisional tools to reduce medical errors. Previous literature has examined how smartphones can be utilised by both medical student and doctor populations, to enhance educational and workplace activities, with the potential to improve overall patient care. However, this literature has not examined smartphone acceptance and patterns of medical app usage within the student and junior doctor populations. Methods An online survey of medical student and foundation level junior doctor cohorts was undertaken within one United Kingdom healthcare region. Participants were asked whether they owned a Smartphone and if they used apps on their Smartphones to support their education and practice activities. Frequency of use and type of app used was also investigated. Open response questions explored participants’ views on apps that were desired or recommended and the characteristics of apps that were useful. Results 257 medical students and 131 junior doctors responded, equating to a response rate of 15.0% and 21.8% respectively. 79.0% (n=203/257) of medical students and 74.8% (n=98/131) of junior doctors owned a smartphone, with 56.6% (n=115/203) of students and 68.4% (n=67/98) of doctors owning an iPhone. The majority of students and doctors owned 1–5 medical related applications, with very few owning more than 10, and iPhone owners significantly more likely to own apps (Chi sq, p<0.001). Both populations showed similar trends of app usage of several times a day. Over 24hours apps were used for between 1–30 minutes for students and 1–20 minutes for doctors, students used disease diagnosis/management and drug reference apps, with doctors favouring clinical score

  11. Evaluation of the "make or buy" decision for oral solid unit-dose medications.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, A E

    1979-01-01

    Changing from one drug distribution system to another requires analysis of many standard operating procedures. Analysis of the "make or buy" decision, a form of break-even analysis, is necessary. A mathematical model is developed that considers the relevant costs and allows one to compare directly the commercially available unit-dose medication with your own repackaging process. The mathematical model is intended to aid in the decision of whether to make or buy a unit-dose form of medication. The relevant range of the model and the results are approximate but they give a good estimation of the costs involved. The information necessary to decide what form of unit-dose packaging suits your needs best and the ability to analyze the alternatives is implicit.

  12. Randomised controlled trial of a transprofessional healthcare role intervention in an acute medical setting.

    PubMed

    Kaltner, Melissa; Murtagh, Doug; Bennetts, Marguerite; Pighills, Alison; James, Julie; Scott, Annette

    2017-03-01

    As demand for health services increases, attention has turned to the development of alternate models of service delivery that maximise efficiency. These include skill sharing models, in which cross-professional skills are delivered by appropriately trained professionals. The usage of skill sharing models is increasing in some professions, but little evidence on efficacy currently exists. This article reports on an intervention of the use of a transprofessional role, which involved delivery of services from a range of health providers, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, speech pathology, podiatry, social work, and psychology, by a trained professional, developed and trialled in the acute medical setting in Toowoomba Hospital, Queensland, Australia. A single-blind randomised controlled trial examined the clinical efficacy of this skill shared service. Participants were allocated at random to either standard care (n = 29) or the new model of care (n = 29) groups and compared on a range of patient and service provision outcome measures. Descriptive outcomes indicated that patients receiving the new model of care underwent more comprehensive and prompt assessments in the health domains included than those in standard care, and demonstrated more positive health and functional outcomes at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up. Given the paucity of research on skill sharing, this study provides preliminary evidence of the effectiveness of skill shared roles in acute settings.

  13. The Role of Emergency Medical Services in Geriatrics: Bridging the Gap between Primary and Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Judah; McVey, Jennifer; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Caring for older adults is a major function of emergency medical services (EMS). Traditional EMS systems were designed to treat single acute conditions; this approach contrasts with best practices for the care of frail older adults. Care might be improved by the early identification of those who are frail and at highest risk for adverse outcomes. Paramedics are well positioned to play an important role via a more thorough evaluation of frailty (or vulnerability). These findings may inform both pre-hospital and subsequent emergency department (ED) based decisions. Innovative programs involving EMS, the ED, and primary care could reduce the workload on EDs while improving patient access to care, and ultimately patient outcomes. Some frail older adults will benefit from the resources and specialized knowledge provided by the ED, while others may be better helped in alternative ways, usually in coordination with primary care. Discerning between these groups is a challenge worthy of further inquiry. In either case, care should be timely, with a focus on identifying emergent or acute care needs, frailty evaluation, mobility assessments, identifying appropriate goals for treatment, promoting functional independence, and striving to have the patient return to their usual place of residence if this can be done safely. Paramedics are uniquely positioned to play a larger role in the care of our aging population. Improving paramedic education as it pertains to geriatrics is a critical next step.

  14. Undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to an acute assessment unit

    PubMed Central

    Eikhof, Karin D.; Olsen, Kristine R.; Wrengler, N. C. H.; Nielsen, Carl; Boedtger, Uffe; Titlestad, Ingrid L.; Weinreich, Ulla M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is very prevalent worldwide, yet underdiagnosed. Aim: This study investigates feasibility of performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission as well as the prevalence of undiagnosed COPD in the same cohort. Methods: During a two-week period, all patients admitted to three large acute assessment units were evaluated. Patients ≥ 18 years, able to perform spirometry, with no surgery to the thorax or abdomen within the last weeks and no known COPD was included. Patients with FEV1/FEV6 ≤ 0.7 or FEV1 < 80% or FEV6 < 80% were offered follow-up visit after 6 weeks. Results: Of the 1145 admitted patients, 46% were eligible: 28% of those had an abnormal spirometry. The offered follow-up visit was attended by 51% and in this group 17% were diagnosed with lung disease. COPD was the most prevalent diagnosis (73%), and 2/3 was in GOLD group A. In total, 75% of the patients with airflow obstruction at the initial examination remained obstructive. Conclusion: Performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission is feasible, abnormal findings are common, and COPD is the most prevalent diagnosis. PMID:28326181

  15. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  16. Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation increases therapy intensity and engagement and improves functional outcomes in post-acute rehabilitation of older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Host, Helen H.; Hildebrand, Mary W.; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Carpenter, Brian; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Baum, Carolyn A.; Dixon, David; Doré, Peter; Wendleton, Leah; Binder, Ellen F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives For millions of disabled older adults each year, post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) is a brief window of opportunity to regain enough function to return home and live independently. Too often this goal is not achieved, possibly due to therapy that is inadequately intense or engaging. This study tested Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation, an intervention designed to increase patient engagement in, and intensity of, daily physical and occupational therapy sessions in post-acute care rehabilitation. Design Randomized controlled trial of Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation versus standard-of-care rehabilitation. Setting Post-acute care unit of a skilled nursing facility in St Louis, MO. Participants 26 older adults admitted from a hospital for post-acute rehabilitation. Intervention Based on models of motivation and behavior change, Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation is a set of behavioral skills for physical and occupational therapists (PT/OT) that increase patient engagement and intensity, with the goal of improving functional outcome, through: (1) a patient-directed, interactive approach, (2) increased rehabilitation intensity, and (3) frequent feedback to patients on their effort and progress. Measurements Therapy intensity: assessment of patient active time in therapy sessions. Therapy engagement: Rehabilitation Participation Scale. Functional and performance outcomes: Barthel Index, gait speed, and six-minute walk. Results Participants randomized to Enhanced Medical Rehabilitation had higher intensity therapy and were more engaged in their rehabilitation sessions; they had more improvement in gait speed (improving from 0.08 to 0.38 meter/sec vs. 0.08 to 0.22 in standard of care,p=0.003) and six-minute walk (from 73 to 266 feet vs. 40 to 94 feet in standard of care, p=0.026), with a trend for better improvement of Barthel Index (+43 points vs. 26 points in standard of care, p=0.087), compared to participants randomized to standard

  17. Medical school libraries in the United States and Canada built between 1961 and 1971.

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, W K; Beatty, V L

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-four medical school libraries in the United States and Canada built between 1961 and 1971 were surveyed by means of questionnaires and visits. Results indicated that half of these libraries will have reached maximum functional capacity approximately six years after they moved into their new quarters. Space for technical processing is generally much less than required. Special features and examples of effective planning are described, and problems in arrangement, traffic patterns for people and materials, and the lack of logical expansion space are discussed. Comparisons are made with a similar survey of twenty medical school libraries made in 1961. Images PMID:1191825

  18. International medical graduate physicians in the United States: changes since 1981.

    PubMed

    Hart, L Gary; Skillman, Susan M; Fordyce, Meredith; Thompson, Matthew; Hagopian, Amy; Konrad, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Nearly a quarter of all active U.S. physicians are international medical graduates (IMGs)--physicians trained outside the United States and Canada. We describe changes in characteristics of IMGs from 1981 to 2001 and compare them with their U.S. medical graduate (USMG) counterparts. Since 1981, the leading source countries for IMGs have included India, the Philippines, and Mexico. IMGs were more likely to be generalists and to practice in designated underserved areas than USMGs but slightly less likely to practice in isolated small rural areas and persistent-poverty counties. IMGs are an important source of primary care physicians in rural and underserved areas.

  19. [The situational diagnosis of the medical units of Petróleos Mexicanos].

    PubMed

    García-Romero, H; Cordera-Pastor, A; Vargas-Martínez, J

    1993-01-01

    The Medical Service Management of Petróleos Mexicanos developed a situational diagnosis of 30 medical units in 1992. This evaluation covered 94 per cent of the institutional population. The basis for this evaluation was a formulary with more than 70 per cent closed questions and instructions with explicit explanations about them. The main points that the formulary investigated were: geography, demography, sociocultural and economics aspects, epidemiology, morbidity, mortality, preventive medicine, service availability and others. With this situational diagnosis we have been able to identify the main problems with a possible solution, presented in terms of planning, organization and execution of actions.

  20. Perspective: Anticipating the challenges of reforming the United States medical licensing examination.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Graham T; Tallia, Alfred F

    2010-03-01

    The practice of medicine is a shared social contract between the medical profession and the public. Assessments for licensure should reflect competencies that patients expect of their physicians and should be patient-centered and mirror the progressive nature of medical education. The National Board of Medical Examiners recently accepted the recommendations of the Committee to Review the United States Medical Licensing Examination Program to align the examination sequence with two patient-centered decision points: when a student enters into supervised graduate training, and when a physician receives initial licensure for unsupervised practice. The revised examination program would aim to evaluate for the presence of at least minimum proficiency in all competencies that are measurable in a valid, reliable manner at each decision point, including the scientific foundation of medical practice, the application of medical knowledge to patient care, and the clinical skills relevant to practice level, whether measured by standardized patient-based assessments or other formats. Students, educators, educational leaders, and program directors have raised legitimate concerns about the anticipated changes. The anticipated costs, the changes' effect on basic science education, their impact on dual-degree candidates and international medical graduates, and the utility of score reporting are each of concern. Anticipated benefits include a closer alignment of assessments with the expectations of patients and licensing authorities, closer integration of the sciences fundamental to medical practice throughout the examination sequence, and an increased breadth of competency assessment. The authors believe that the benefits to patients and the profession will outweigh the acknowledged challenges the changes will pose to medical education.

  1. "Separate, but almost equal": the Army's Negro medical field units in World War II.

    PubMed

    Marble, Sanders

    2012-01-01

    Before World War II, the Army had no African American medical units and no plans on how to utilize African American personnel. A first plan to sideline blacks into menial support positions was implemented but then overruled in the middle of the war. Separate units were formed, which performed some support functions, but also focused on preventive medicine work--mainly, insect control. Other duties included cross-loading litter patients in the evacuation chain, a laborious but morale-boosting job for which some units received commendations. Several ambulance companies were organized, performing solidly. In the face of official disapprobation and disinterest in African Americans serving, the men of these units sought to contribute to the war effort and took pride in doing their best.

  2. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ..., or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States... intervening period, the cost of medical care and treatment has increased substantially. That increase...

  3. Persistence with Secondary Prevention Medications after Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insights from the TRANSLATE-ACS Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Robin; Wang, Tracy Y.; Honeycutt, Emily; Henry, Timothy D.; Zettler, Marjorie; Chang, Michael; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Peterson, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent use of secondary prevention therapies after acute myocardial infarction (MI) is critical to optimizing long-term outcomes. Methods Medication persistence was assessed among 7,955 MI patients in 216 hospitals participating in the TRANSLATE-ACS study from 2010 to 2012. Persistence was defined as continuation of aspirin, adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors (ADPRi), beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), and statins from discharge to 6 months post-MI. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to determine factors associated with non-persistence, defined as <80% persistence with all medication classes. Results Overall, 31% of MI patients stopped taking a least one medication by 6 months. The most common reasons cited for medications discontinuation were side effects and physician instruction (57%), while financial concerns were cited in 8% overall. After multivariable modeling, black race (odds ratio [OR] 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.62), older age (OR 1.07; 95% CI 1.02–1.12), atrial fibrillation (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.33–2.09), dialysis (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.15–2.78), and depression (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.02–1.45) were associated with lower likelihood of persistence. Private insurance (OR 0.85, 95% 0.76–0.95), prescription cost assistance (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.54–0.75), and outpatient follow-up arranged prior to discharge (OR 0.89. 95% CI 0.80–0.99) were associated with higher persistence. Conclusions Nearly one-third of MI patients are no longer persistent with their prescribed medications by 6 months. Patients at high risk of non-persistence may be identified by clinical and sociodemographic features. These observations underscore key opportunities to optimize longitudinal use of secondary prevention therapies. PMID:26093865

  4. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center.

  5. E-Cigarette Topics Shared by Medical Professionals: A Comparison of Tweets from the United States and United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B

    2017-02-01

    Medical professionals are now relying on social media platforms like Twitter to express their recommendations for the use or avoidance of products like electronic cigarettes (e-cigs), which may have long-term health consequences for users. The goal of this study is to compare how physicians from the United States and the United Kingdom talk about e-cigs on Twitter and identify the topics that these groups perceive as salient. Comparing tweets from the U.S. and U.K. will allow for a better understanding of how medical professionals from these countries differ in their attitudes toward e-cigs. This information can be also used to inform policies designed to regulate the use of e-cigs. Using a text-mining program, we analyzed approximately 3,800 original tweets sent by physicians from the U.S. and the U.K. within a 1-year time span (June 2015 through June 2016). The program clustered the tweets by topics, which allowed us to categorize the topics by importance. Both sets of tweets contained debates about the degree to which e-cigs pose a threat to health, but the U.S. tweets emphasized the dangers of e-cig use for teens, while the U.K. tweets focused more on the potential that e-cigs have to be used as a smoking cessation aid. Doctors are using Twitter to share timely information about the potential risks, benefits, and regulations associated with e-cigs. Evaluating these tweets allows researchers to collect information about topics that doctors find important and make comparisons about how medical professionals from the U.S. and the U.K. regard e-cigs.

  6. Cleistanthus collinus poisoning: experience at a medical intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital in south India

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Alladi; Naik, G. Sivaram; Harikrishna, J.; Kumar, D. Prabath; Rao, M.H.; Sarma, K.V.S.; Guntupalli, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Ingestion of Cleistanthus collinus causes hypokalemia and cardiac arrhythmias leading to mortality in most cases. We undertook this retrospective study to evaluate the clinical presentation and predictors of outcome in critically ill patients admitted with C. collinus poisoning. Methods: The case records of 56 patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a tertiary care teaching hospital in south India (2000-2014) with C. collinus poisoning were retrospectively analysed. Results: The mean age of patients was 36.7±13.3 yr; there were 30 males. Salient clinical manifestations included hypokalemia (58%), neutrophilic leucocytosis (48.2%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (42.9%), acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation (AcRFMv) (32.1%), shock (21.4%); cardiac arrhythmias and neuromuscular weakness (19.6% each); 21 patients (37.5%) had adverse outcome. Longer time-lapsed from consumption to reaching emergency room [median (interquartile range)] (hours) [49 (22-97) vs. 28 (7-56), P=0.038]; higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score at presentation [14 (8.25-14.75) vs. 2 (0-6) P<0.001]; and presence of the following [odds ratio (95% confidence intervals)] at initial presentation: shock [37.40 (4.29-325.98), P=0.001]; AcRFMv [26.67 (5.86-121.39), P<0.001]; elevated alanine aminotransferase [5.71 (1.30-25.03), P=0.021]; metabolic acidosis [5.48 (1.68-17.89), P=0.005]; acute kidney injury (AKI) [5 (1.55-16.06), P=0.007]; hyponatremia [4.67 (1.25-17.44), P=0.022]; and neutrophilic leucocytosis [3.80 (1.02-14.21), P=0.047] predicted death. A significant (P<0.001) increasing trend in mortality was observed with increasing International Program on Chemical Safety Poisoning Severity Score (IPCS-CSS) grade. Interpretation & conclusions: C. collinus is a lethal poison associated with high mortality for which there is no specific antidote. Careful search and meticulous monitoring of the

  7. Preparing medical students for the changing healthcare environment in United States.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, G E

    2000-09-01

    Future graduates of medical schools in the United States will practice in healthcare environments increasingly predominated by managed care. Thus allopathic and osteopathic undergraduate and postgraduate residency training programs should begin to revise their respective curricula and conduct training in managed healthcare environments to prepare graduates for practice in managed care settings. The demand for curricular revision in medicine comes not only from prospective employers and government agencies, but from students and graduates. Educators, clinicians, and government officials have recently defined core competencies that are requisite to the education and preparation of future physicians through the work of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). This article discusses these core competencies and suggests strategies by which to implement them in undergraduate and graduate medical education.

  8. Medical aspects of drug misuse during one year in a rehabilitation unit

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The medical work in a voluntary drug rehabilitation unit near Glasgow was examined. During one year 174 residents were admitted of whom 103 (59%) developed illnesses which required medical treatment. The need for drug misusers to receive general medical services during and after drug misuse was confirmed. Although withdrawal from barbiturate misuse required the prescription of controlled drugs, opiate and other withdrawals were satisfactorily managed with psychological support and general care; substances which could be abused were not prescribed. Blood testing of 129 residents showed that 114 (88%) had evidence of previous hepatitis B infection, while only two had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody. The low prevalence of HIV antibody compared with the high prevalence that has been reported in Edinburgh suggests that the opportunity exists at the moment to limit the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome among Glasgow drug misusers. PMID:3656269

  9. Development and Evaluation of the Habitat Demonstration Unit Medical Operations Workstation and Opportunities for Future Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Robert L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA develops missions to leave Earth orbit and explore distant destinations (Mars, Moon, Asteroids) it is necessary to rethink human spaceflight paradigms in the life sciences. Standards developed for low earth orbit human spaceflight may not be fully applicable and in-space research may be required to develop new standards. Preventative and emergency medical care may require new capabilities never before used in space. Due to spacecraft volume limitations, this work area may also be shared with various animal and plant life science research. This paper explores the prototype Medical Operations Workstation within the NASA Habitat Demonstration Unit and discusses some of the lessons learned from field analogue missions involving the workstation. Keywords: Exploration, medical, health, crew, injury emergency, biology, animal, plant, science, preventative, emergency.

  10. Pharmacist Remote Review of Medication Prescriptions for Appropriateness in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Lazaryan, Moran; Abu-Kishk, Ibrahim; Rosenfeld-Yehoshua, Noa; Berkovitch, Sofia; Toledano, Michal; Reshef, Iris; Kanari, Tal; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Berkovitch, Matitiahu

    2016-01-01

    Background: One aspect of ordering and prescribing medication is the requirement for a trained professional to review medication orders or prescriptions for appropriateness. In practice, this review process is usually performed by a clinical pharmacist. However, in many medical centers there is a shortage of staff and a pharmacist is not always available. Objective: To determine whether remote review of medication orders by a pharmacist is a plausible method in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Methods: A pharmacist from the pharmacy department reviewed medication orders of patients admitted to our PICU over a 7-month period for appropriateness. A special form for medical orders was filled in and sent to the physician in the PICU, who replied informing whether the recommendation had been accepted. The time spent by the pharmacist for this activity was recorded. Results: The review time for one medical record was 8.9 (95% CI, 6.9–10.9) min. Every additional drug prescribed increased the total review time by 0.8 (95% CI, 0.45–1.11) min. The pharmacist filled in 186 forms on 117 admissions for 109 children. The median review time was 15 (12.8–18.8) and 12 (9–15) min, respectively, for patients with psychiatric-neurologic disorders compared to those without (p = 0.032). Usually, a daily workload of 240 min was needed for the pharmacist accompanying the round in contrast to 108 min per day needed to review all the medical records in 95% of the cases. The physician accepted 51.2%, rejected 11.9%, and made no comment on 36.9% of the recommendations. Conclusion: Hospitals facing budget shortages can carry out focused remote reviews of prescriptions by the pharmacist. PMID:27555821

  11. Comparison of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation IV to predict intensive care unit mortality

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bashu Dev; Shrestha, Gentle S.; Pradhan, Bishwas; Amatya, Roshana

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical assessment of severity of illness is an essential component of medical practice to predict the outcome of critically ill-patient. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) model is one of the widely used scoring systems. Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the Performance of APACHE II and IV scoring systems in our Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: A prospective study in 6 bedded ICU, including 76 patients all above 15 years. Subjects and Methods: APACHE II and APACHE IV scores were calculated based on the worst values in the first 24 h of admission. All enrolled patients were followed, and outcome was recorded as survivors or nonsurvivors. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 17. Results: The mean APACHE score was significantly higher among nonsurvivors than survivors (P < 0.005). Discrimination for APACHE II and APACHE IV was fair with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 and 0.79 respectively. The cut-off point with best Youden index for APACHE II was 17 and for APACHE IV was 85. Above cut-off point, mortality was higher for both models (P < 0.005). Hosmer–Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration for APACHE II than APACHE IV. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.748 (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Discrimination was better for APACHE IV than APACHE II model however Calibration was better for APACHE II than APACHE IV model in our study. There was good correlation between the two models observed in our study. PMID:25722550

  12. Cross-cultural medical education in the United States: key principles and experiences.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R; Cervantes, Marina C

    2009-09-01

    The field of cross-cultural care focuses on the ability to communicate effectively and provide quality health care to patients from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. In recent years, medical schools in the United States have increasingly recognized the growing importance of incorporating cross-cultural curricula into medical education. Cross-cultural medical education in the United States has emerged for four reasons: (1) the need for providers to have the skills to care for a diverse patient population; (2) the link between effective communication and health outcomes; (3) the presence of racial/ethnic disparities that are, in part, due to poor communication across cultures; and (4) medical school accreditation requirements. There are three major approaches to cross-cultural education: (1) the cultural sensitivity/awareness approach that focuses on attitudes; (2) the multicultural/categorical approach that focuses on knowledge; and (3) the cross-cultural approach that focuses on skills. The patient-based approach to cross-cultural care combines these three concepts into a framework that can be used to care for any patient, anytime, anywhere. Ultimately, if cross-cultural medical education is to evolve, students must believe it is important and understand that the categorical approach can lead to stereotyping; it should be taught using patient cases and highlighting clinical applications; it should be embedded in a longitudinal, developmentally appropriate fashion; and it should be integrated into the larger curriculum whenever possible. At the Harvard Medical School, we have tried to apply all of these lessons to our work, and we have started to develop a strategic integration process where we try to raise awareness, impart knowledge, and teach cross-cultural skills over the 4 years of schooling.

  13. Outcomes of an innovative model of acute delirium care: the Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU)

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mei Sian; Chan, Mark; Tay, Laura; Ding, Yew Yoong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Delirium is associated with poor outcomes following acute hospitalization. The Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU) is a specialized five-bedded unit for acute delirium care. It is modeled after the Delirium Room program, with adoption of core interventions from the Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythms and improve sleep in older inpatients. This study examined whether the GMU program improved outcomes in delirious patients. Method A total of 320 patients, including 47 pre-GMU, 234 GMU, and 39 concurrent control subjects, were studied. Clinical characteristics, cognitive status, functional status (Modified Barthel Index [MBI]), and chemical restraint-use data were obtained. We also looked at in-hospital complications of falls, pressure ulcers, nosocomial infection rate, and discharge destination. Secondary outcomes of family satisfaction (for the GMU subjects) were collected. Results There were no significant demographic differences between the three groups. Pre-GMU subjects had longer duration of delirium and length of stay. MBI improvement was most evident in the GMU compared with pre-GMU and control subjects (19.2±18.3, 7.5±11.2, 15.1±18.0, respectively) (P<0.05). The GMU subjects had a zero restraint rate, and pre-GMU subjects had higher antipsychotic dosages. This translated to lower pressure ulcer and nosocomial infection rate in the GMU (4.1% and 10.7%, respectively) and control (1.3% and 7.7%, respectively) subjects compared with the pre-GMU (9.1% and 23.4%, respectively) subjects (P<0.05). No differences were observed in mortality or discharge destination among the three groups. Caregivers of GMU subjects felt the multicomponent intervention to be useful, with scheduled activities voted the most beneficial in patient’s recovery from the delirium episode. Conclusion This study shows the benefits of a specialized delirium management unit for older persons. The GMU model is thus a relevant

  14. Rehab rounds: overcoming barriers to individualized psychosocial rehabilitation in an acute treatment unit of a state hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, A S; Dollieslager, L P

    2000-03-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation begins during the acute stages of a psychiatric disorder and continues throughout the person's lifetime, with the types of services flexibly keyed to the person's phase of illness, needs, and personal goals. During periods of relapse and exacerbation of symptoms, when hospitalization is often required, psychiatric rehabilitation should include the following five objectives: * Clarify how the person's own goals in life, such as a desire for more self-control, freedom of choice, privacy, and time with friends and family, can be served by inpatient treatment and symptom stabilization. * Educate the patient about the nature of his or her illness and how medications work to restore self-control. * Teach the patient about side effects and self-monitoring and negotiating about medication and its effects in a collaborative way with the psychiatrist and other members of the treatment team. * Connect with the family or other natural supports that the person has in the community. * Enable the patient to make appropriate aftercare plans for residential and continuing treatment needs after discharge. When rehabilitation is viewed from the vantage point of these objectives, the inextricable interweaving of "treatment" with "rehabilitation" becomes clear. Treatment and rehabilitation are two sides of the same. It is much easier to integrate psychiatric rehabilitation into more traditional methods of treatment than it is to reorganize a treatment program or facility so that it blends rehabilitation with prevailing treatment imperatives of pharmacotherapy, supervision, and security and safety. In previous Rehab Rounds columns, we have described examples of creative methods for bringing the principles and practices of psychiatric rehabilitation into the treatment milieu (1,2,3). Faced with regulatory criticism from governmental agencies, Dr. Dhillon and his colleagues at Eastern State Hospital in Williamsburg, Virginia, launched a vigorous initiative to

  15. Incidence and recognition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in a UK intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Charlotte; Singh, Nanak R; Worpole, Linda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Babar, Judith; Condliffe, Alison M; Gunning, Kevin E; Johnston, Andrew J; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    The reported incidence of ARDS is highly variable (2.5%–19% of intensive care unit (ICU) patients) and varies depending on study patient population used. We undertook a 6-month, prospective study to determine the incidence and outcome of ARDS in a UK adult University Hospital ICU. 344 patients were admitted during the study period, of these 43 (12.5%) were determined to have ARDS. Patients with ARDS had increased mortality at 28 days and 2 years post-diagnosis, and there was under-recognition of ARDS in both medical records and death certificattion. Our findings have implications for critical care resource planning. PMID:27552782

  16. [Despite medication, overdrive pacing is required to stabilize the electrical storm associated with acute coronary syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masanobu; Morimoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Kaori; Tateishi, Emi; Makino, Kanako; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Fukuhara, Shinya; Takase, Eiji

    2007-10-01

    A 75-year-old female complained of severe chest pain and was emergently admitted to our hospital because of anterior acute myocardial infarction. Emergent coronary angiography was performed and revealed occlusion in segment 7, so a stent was implanted. Lidocaine, carvedilol, amiodarone, magnesium, and nifekalant were administered successively because non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) frequently appeared like an electrical storm. After nifekalant administration, QTc was significantly prolonged and torsades de pointes was induced. Overdrive pacing was performed and finally the NSVT was completely controlled. If fatal arrhythmias such as NSVT show resistance to medication, overdrive pacing should be considered to stabilize the arrhythmia associated with acute coronary syndrome.

  17. Work-Time Exposure and Acute Injuries in Inshore Lobstermen of the Northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Scott; Buchholz, Bryan; Jenkins, Paul; Scribani, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to inform efforts to reduce risk for musculoskeletal disorders among commercial lobstermen by characterizing and quantifying injuries that occur to people while harvesting lobsters commercially in the Northeast United States. This study aimed to estimate a denominator of exposure to lobstering in full-time equivalents (FTE), to estimate a fatality rate, and to calculate incidence rates for acute injuries within the sample population. Captains were randomly selected from those licensed to fish in Maine and Massachusetts. Data on work exposure and injuries with rapid onset that occurred on the boat ("acute injuries") were collected using a survey, which was administered quarterly via phone or face-to-face interview with the captain. The quarterly survey assessed the number of weeks worked during the quarter, average crew size, number of trips per week, and average trip length in hours. In addition, this survey captured relevant information (body segment affected, type of injury, and whether treatment was received) on all acute injuries occurring during the quarter. FTE were estimated using fishermen days and fishermen hours. The annual FTE estimated using days was 2,557 and using hours was 2,855. As expected, the summer months (3rd quarter) had the highest FTE and the winter (1st quarter) the lowest FTE. Fall (4th quarter) and spring (2nd quarter) ranked second and third, respectively. The incidence rates for all injuries (49.7/100 FTE) and injuries requiring treatment (15.0/100 FTE) were much higher than those reported in other studies of fishing that used Coast Guard data.

  18. Medical Device Regulation: A Comparison of the United States and the European Union.

    PubMed

    Maak, Travis G; Wylie, James D

    2016-08-01

    Medical device regulation is a controversial topic in both the United States and the European Union. Many physicians and innovators in the United States cite a restrictive US FDA regulatory process as the reason for earlier and more rapid clinical advances in Europe. The FDA approval process mandates that a device be proved efficacious compared with a control or be substantially equivalent to a predicate device, whereas the European Union approval process mandates that the device perform its intended function. Stringent, peer-reviewed safety data have not been reported. However, after recent high-profile device failures, political pressure in both the United States and the European Union has favored more restrictive approval processes. Substantial reforms of the European Union process within the next 5 to 10 years will result in a more stringent approach to device regulation, similar to that of the FDA. Changes in the FDA regulatory process have been suggested but are not imminent.

  19. Measurement of serum melatonin in intensive care unit patients: changes in traumatic brain injury, trauma, and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Seifman, Marc A; Gomes, Keith; Nguyen, Phuong N; Bailey, Michael; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Cooper, David J; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone mainly produced by the pineal gland whose dysfunction leads to abnormal sleeping patterns. Changes in melatonin have been reported in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the impact of environmental conditions typical of the intensive care unit (ICU) has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to compare daily melatonin production in three patient populations treated at the ICU to differentiate the role of TBI versus ICU conditions. Forty-five patients were recruited and divided into severe TBI, trauma without TBI, medical conditions without trauma, and compared to healthy volunteers. Serum melatonin levels were measured at four daily intervals at 0400 h, 1000 h, 1600 h, and 2200 h for 7 days post-ICU admission by commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The geometric mean concentrations (95% confidence intervals) of melatonin in these groups showed no difference being 8.3 (6.3-11.0), 9.3 (7.0-12.3), and 8.9 (6.6-11.9) pg/mL, respectively, in TBI, trauma, and intensive care cohorts. All of these patient groups demonstrated decreased melatonin concentrations when compared to control patients. This study suggests that TBI as well as ICU conditions, may have a role in the dysfunction of melatonin. Monitoring and possibly substituting melatonin acutely in these settings may assist in ameliorating long-term sleep dysfunction in all of these groups, and possibly contribute to reducing secondary brain injury in severe TBI.

  20. Respiratory High-Dependency Care Units for the burden of acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    The burden of acute respiratory failure (ARF) has become one of the greatest epidemiological challenges for the modern health systems. Consistently, the imbalance between the increasing prevalence of acutely de-compensated respiratory diseases and the shortage of high-daily cost ICU beds has stimulated new health cost-effective solutions. Respiratory High-Dependency Care Units (RHDCU) provide a specialised environment for patients who require an "intermediate" level of care between the ICU and the ward, where non-invasive monitoring and assisted ventilation techniques are preferentially applied. Since they are dedicated to the management of "mono-organ" decompensations, treatment of ARF patients in RHDCU avoids the dangerous "under-assistance" in the ward and unnecessary "over-assistance" in ICU. RHDCUs provide a specialised quality of care for ARF with health resources optimisation and their spread throughout health systems has been driven by their high-level of expertise in non-invasive ventilation (NIV), weaning from invasive ventilation, tracheostomy care, and discharging planning for ventilator-dependent patients.

  1. Women in acute psychiatric units, their characteristics and needs: a review

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Michaela; Lau, Yasmine; Sethi, Faisil

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method Recent policy guidelines published by the Department of Health highlight the need to develop gender-sensitive psychiatric services. However, very little is currently known about the specific characteristics and needs of female patients entering acute psychiatric wards, particularly psychiatric intensive care units. This article aims to review the current literature on what is known about this group of patients. PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO were systematically searched using a number of key terms. Results A total of 27 articles were obtained. The findings were divided into four categories: admission characteristics, treatment needs, risk management and outcomes after discharge. Gender differences were found in diagnosis and presentation. Clinical implications The differences observed in the reviewed studies suggest that women may have different assessment and treatment needs, and ultimately, different philosophies of care. A dearth of studies in this area indicates that if services are to develop in line with government policies, more research is needed. PMID:27752346

  2. Acute Nonoccupational Pesticide-Related Illness and Injury - United States, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Namulanda, Gonza; Monti, Michele M; Mulay, Prakash; Higgins, Sheila; Lackovic, Michelle; Schwartz, Abby; Prado, Joanne Bonnar; Waltz, Justin; Mitchell, Yvette; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2016-10-14

    CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) collects data on acute pesticide-related illness and injury reported by 12 states (California, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Texas, and Washington). This report summarizes the data on illnesses and injuries arising from nonoccupational exposure to conventional pesticides that were reported during 2007-2011. Conventional pesticides include insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, and fumigants. They exclude disinfectants (e.g., chlorine and hypochlorites) and biological pesticides (1). This report is a part of the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks - United States, which encompasses various surveillance years but is being published in 2016 (2). The Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks appears in the same volume of MMWR as the annual Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases (3). In a separate report, data on illnesses and injuries from occupational exposure to conventional pesticides during 2007-2011 are summarized (4).

  3. Improving Medical Device Regulation: The United States and Europe in Perspective

    PubMed Central

    SORENSON, CORINNA; DRUMMOND, MICHAEL

    2014-01-01

    Context: Recent debates and events have brought into question the effectiveness of existing regulatory frameworks for medical devices in the United States and Europe to ensure their performance, safety, and quality. This article provides a comparative analysis of medical device regulation in the two jurisdictions, explores current reforms to improve the existing systems, and discusses additional actions that should be considered to fully meet this aim. Medical device regulation must be improved to safeguard public health and ensure that high-quality and effective technologies reach patients. Methods: We explored and analyzed medical device regulatory systems in the United States and Europe in accordance with the available gray and peer-reviewed literature and legislative documents. Findings: The two regulatory systems differ in their mandate and orientation, organization, pre-and postmarket evidence requirements, and transparency of process. Despite these differences, both jurisdictions face similar challenges for ensuring that only safe and effective devices reach the market, monitoring real-world use, and exchanging pertinent information on devices with key users such as clinicians and patients. To address these issues, reforms have recently been introduced or debated in the United States and Europe that are principally focused on strengthening regulatory processes, enhancing postmarket regulation through more robust surveillance systems, and improving the traceability and monitoring of devices. Some changes in premarket requirements for devices are being considered. Conclusions: Although the current reforms address some of the outstanding challenges in device regulation, additional steps are needed to improve existing policy. We examine a number of actions to be considered, such as requiring high-quality evidence of benefit for medium-and high-risk devices; moving toward greater centralization and coordination of regulatory approval in Europe; creating

  4. Acute care clinical pharmacy practice: unit- versus service-based models.

    PubMed

    Haas, Curtis E; Eckel, Stephen; Arif, Sally; Beringer, Paul M; Blake, Elizabeth W; Lardieri, Allison B; Lobo, Bob L; Mercer, Jessica M; Moye, Pamela; Orlando, Patricia L; Wargo, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    This commentary from the 2010 Task Force on Acute Care Practice Model of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy was developed to compare and contrast the "unit-based" and "service-based" orientation of the clinical pharmacist within an acute care pharmacy practice model and to offer an informed opinion concerning which should be preferred. The clinical pharmacy practice model must facilitate patient-centered care and therefore must position the pharmacist to be an active member of the interprofessional team focused on providing high-quality pharmaceutical care to the patient. Although both models may have advantages and disadvantages, the most important distinction pertains to the patient care role of the clinical pharmacist. The unit-based pharmacist is often in a position of reacting to an established order or decision and frequently is focused on task-oriented clinical services. By definition, the service-based clinical pharmacist functions as a member of the interprofessional team. As a team member, the pharmacist proactively contributes to the decision-making process and the development of patient-centered care plans. The service-based orientation of the pharmacist is consistent with both the practice vision embraced by ACCP and its definition of clinical pharmacy. The task force strongly recommends that institutions pursue a service-based pharmacy practice model to optimally deploy their clinical pharmacists. Those who elect to adopt this recommendation will face challenges in overcoming several resource, technologic, regulatory, and accreditation barriers. However, such challenges must be confronted if clinical pharmacists are to contribute fully to achieving optimal patient outcomes.

  5. Educational Gradients in Psychotropic Medication Use Among Older Adults in Costa Rica and the United States†

    PubMed Central

    Domino, Marisa E.; Dow, William H.; Coto-Yglesias, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective The relationship among education, psychiatric diagnoses and psychotropic medication use has been explored in the United States, but little is known about patterns in poorer countries, despite their high documented burden of mental illness. Educational gradients in diagnosis and psychotropic use were estimated in the United States and Costa Rica – a middle-income country with universal health insurance. Methods Analyses were conducted using data on older adults (ages 60+) in nationally representative surveys from each country: the 2005 U.S. Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (n=4788) and the 2005 Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (n=2827). Logistic regressions examined the effect of lower educational attainment, income and urban residence on diagnosis and on psychotropic medication use with and without an associated mental illness diagnosis. Results Rates of self-reported diagnoses were lower in the U.S. (12% U.S.; n=598) than in, Costa Rica (20%; n=526), but may reflect differences in survey wording. Measures of self-reported and screened depression decreased with education in both countries. Psychotropic medication use among those with diagnoses increased with education in Costa Rica only. Conclusions We find similar patterns of educational gradients in diagnosis and screening between the U.S. and Costa Rica, but different patterns of medication use by education. Differences in stigma and access to care may play an important role in explaining differences between the countries, though we did not find evidence that insurance affected educational gradients in the U.S. These analyses increase the evidence on the role of education in the use of the health care system. PMID:24932755

  6. Accommodating the medical use of marijuana: surveying the differing legal approaches in Australia, the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Bogdanoski, Tony

    2010-02-01

    While the scientific and medical communities continue to be divided on the therapeutic benefits and risks of cannabis use, anecdotal evidence from medical users themselves suggests that using cannabis is indeed improving their quality of life by alleviating their pain and discomfort. Notwithstanding the benefits anecdotally claimed by these medical users and the existence of some scientific studies confirming their claims, criminal drug laws in all Australian and most United States jurisdictions continue to prohibit the possession, cultivation and supply of cannabis even for medical purposes. However, in contrast to Australia and most parts of the United States, the medical use of cannabis has been legal in Canada for about a decade. This article reviews these differing legal and regulatory approaches to accommodating the medical use of cannabis (namely, marijuana) as well as some of the challenges involved in legalising it for medical purposes.

  7. Pre-Stage Acute Kidney Injury Can Predict Mortality and Medical Costs in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin Young; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    The significance of minimal increases in serum creatinine below the levels indicative of the acute kidney injury (AKI) stage is not well established. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-stage AKI (pre-AKI) on clinical outcomes. We enrolled a total of 21,261 patients who were admitted to the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013. Pre-AKI was defined as a 25–50% increase in peak serum creatinine levels from baseline levels during the hospital stay. In total, 5.4% of the patients had pre-AKI during admission. The patients with pre-AKI were predominantly female (55.0%) and had a lower body weight and lower baseline levels of serum creatinine (0.63 ± 0.18 mg/dl) than the patients with AKI and the patients without AKI (P < 0.001). The patients with pre-AKI had a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (25.1%) and malignancy (32.6%). The adjusted hazard ratio of in-hospital mortality for pre-AKI was 2.112 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.143 to 3.903]. In addition, patients with pre-AKI had an increased length of stay (7.7 ± 9.7 days in patients without AKI, 11.4 ± 11.4 days in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) and increased medical costs (4,061 ± 4,318 USD in patients without AKI, 4,966 ± 5,099 USD in patients with pre-AKI, P < 0.001) during admission. The adjusted hazard ratio of all-cause mortality for pre-AKI during the follow-up period of 2.0 ± 0.6 years was 1.473 (95% CI, 1.228 to 1.684). Although the adjusted hazard ratio of pre-AKI for overall mortality was not significant among the patients admitted to the surgery department or who underwent surgery, pre-AKI was significantly associated with mortality among the non-surgical patients (adjusted HR 1.542 [95% CI, 1.330 to 1.787]) and the patients admitted to the medical department (adjusted HR 1.384 [95% CI, 1.153 to 1.662]). Pre-AKI is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and increased medical costs during admission. More attention

  8. Why patient summaries in electronic health records do not provide the cognitive support necessary for nurses' handoffs on medical and surgical units: insights from interviews and observations.

    PubMed

    Staggers, Nancy; Clark, Lauren; Blaz, Jacquelyn W; Kapsandoy, Seraphine

    2011-09-01

    Patient care handoffs are cognitively intense activities, especially on medical and surgical units where nurses synthesize information across an average of four to five patients every shift. The objective of this study was to examine handoffs and nurses' use of computerized patient summary reports in an electronic health record after computerized provider order entry (CPOE) was installed. We observed and audio taped 93 patient handoffs on 25 occasions on 5 acute care units in 2 different facilities sharing a vendor's electronic health record. We found that the computerized patient summary report and the electronic health record were minimally used during the handoff and that the existing patient summary reports did not provide adequate cognitive support for nurses. The patient summary reports were incomplete, rigid and did not offer "at a glance" information, or help nurses encode information. We make recommendations about a redesign of patient summary reports and technology to support the cognitive needs of nurses during handoffs at the change of shift.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage: predictive factors of in-hospital mortality in patients treated in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Skok, P; Sinkovič, A

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, cohort study assessed the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) at the University Clinical Centre Maribor, Slovenia. Using univariate, multivariate and logistic regression methods the predictors of mortality in 54 upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage patients (47 men, mean ± SD age 61.6 ± 14.2 years) were investigated. The mean ± SD duration of treatment in the MICU was 2.8 ± 2.9 days and the mortality rate was 31.5%. Significant differences between nonsurvivors and survivors were observed in haemorrhagic shock, heart failure, infection, diastolic blood pressure at admission, haemoglobin and red blood cell count at admission, and lowest haemoglobin and red blood cell count during treatment. Heart failure (odds ratio 59.13) was the most significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. Haemorrhagic shock and the lowest red blood cell count during treatment were also important independent predictive factors of in-hospital mortality.

  10. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  11. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  12. Acute retinal necrosis in the United Kingdom: results of a prospective surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, T F; Silvestri, G; McDowell, C; Foot, B; McAvoy, C E

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) in the United Kingdom and to describe the demographics, management, and visual outcome in these patients. Methods This was a prospective study carried out by the British Ophthalmological Surveillance Unit (BOSU) between September 2007 and October 2008. Initial and 6-month questionnaires were sent to UK ophthalmologists who reported cases of ARN via the monthly BOSU report card system. Results In all, 45 confirmed cases (52 eyes) of ARN were reported in the 14-month study period, giving a minimum incidence of 0.63 cases per million population per year. There were 20 females and 25 males. Age ranged from 10 to 94 years. Eight patients had a history of herpetic CNS disease. Aqueous sampling was carried out in 13 patients, vitreous in 27, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 4. Varicella-zoster virus followed by herpes simplex were the most common causative agents. Treatment in 76% of the cases was with intravenous antivirals; however, 24% received only oral antivirals. In all, 47% of patients had intravitreal antiviral therapy. Visual outcome at 6 months was <6/60 in 48% of the affected eyes. Conclusion The minimum incidence of ARN in the UK is 0.63 cases per million. Patients with a history of herpetic CNS disease should be warned to immediately report any visual symptoms. There is increased use of oral and intravitreal antivirals in initial treatment. PMID:22281865

  13. Estimated Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries--United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Florence, Curtis; Simon, Thomas; Haegerich, Tamara; Luo, Feijun; Zhou, Chao

    2015-10-02

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences. In 2013, unintentional injury was the fourth leading cause of death, suicide was the tenth, and homicide was the sixteenth; these three causes accounted for approximately 187,000 deaths in the United States. To assess the economic impact of fatal injuries, CDC analyzed death data from the National Vital Statistics System for 2013, along with cost of injury data using the Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. This report updates a previous study that analyzed death data from the year 2000, and employs recently revised methodology for determining the costs of injury outcomes, which uses the most current economic data and incorporates improvements for estimating medical costs associated with injury. Number of deaths, crude and age-specific death rates, and total lifetime work-loss costs and medical costs were calculated for fatal injuries by sex, age group, intent (intentional versus unintentional), and mechanism of injury. During 2013, the rate of fatal injury was 61.0 per 100,000 population, with combined medical and work-loss costs exceeding $214 billion. Costs from fatal injuries represent approximately one third of the total $671 billion medical and work-loss costs associated with all injuries in 2013. The magnitude of the economic burden associated with injury-associated deaths underscores the need for effective prevention.

  14. [Continuous medical evaluation in a gynaecological and obstetrical unit: Our experience about scheduled caesarean].

    PubMed

    Davitian, C; Ducarme, G; Grossetti, A; Desfeux, P; Yver, C; Pejoan, H; Andre, M-C; Levardon, M; Bougeois, B; Luton, D

    2010-02-01

    Continuous medical evaluation (CME) is compulsory which aims to ameliorate and guarantee quality of care. This paper describes the experience of our unit during the different stages of evaluation that permit us to obtain our accreditation. Our evaluation dealt with the "amelioration of women's and newborn's care after scheduled caesarean section". A first retrospective study of files of scheduled caesareans allowed to update possible points of improvement, after application of adapted corrective actions, both at the medical and paramedical level. The second study, made after application of these actions, allowed to appreciate the results of our initiative of CME, to update new possible points of improvement, but also to notice certain limits in the achievement of the objectives.

  15. Sexually transmitted infections: a medical anthropological study from the Tari research unit 1990-1991.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes medical anthropological research conducted while I was based at the Tari Research Unit for six months in 1990-1991. The research aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the social factors surrounding the transmission of sexually transmitted infections, which had escalated following a local gold rush in 1989. Although HIV/AIDS was a very minor health issue in Papua New Guinea at that time, medical staff were aware of the likelihood of the disease becoming prevalent in the highlands in the near future. The research indicated that many people regarded sexually transmitted infections (STIs) as a nuisance, rather than a serious health risk. Discussions with chronic sufferers revealed that they were more concerned about the dangers of infertility than the immediate effects of the infections. The paper considers the risk-taking that the people of Tari, the Huli, were prepared to accept and suggests ways in which these risks might be minimized.

  16. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  17. Early Clinical Outcome of Acute Poisoning Cases Treated in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sulaj, Zihni; Prifti, Edvin; Demiraj, Aurel; Strakosha, Arjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of factors have influenced the significant incidence of morbidity and mortality of acute poisoning and the timely recognition and properly management of critically ill poisoned patients is a key component. The aim of this study is to reveal the reasons for ICU admission of acutely poisoned patients, the main factors influencing the course and outcome of patients in relation with clinical approaches applied, available resources and infrastructure of treatment. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study based on most reachable variables extracted from patients’ medical records and ED registers of patients admitted at the medical ICU of “Mother Teresa” University Hospital in Tirana over two (2012-2013) years. Demography, time of exposure, etiology and circumstances of poisonings, assessment and treatment, reasons for ICU admission, course and outcome were duly obtained. Results: The number of ICU treated patients was 118, consisting in 47.4% (56) males and 52.5% (62) females which represented 10.2% of poisoned patients admitted during this two-year-period in ED and 9.2% of other etiology ICU admitted patients. Mean was 42.6 years for males, and 38 years for females. About 55.9% were urban residents and 44% rural ones. The elapsed time from toxic exposure to treatment initiation had varied between 2-6 hours, 44% arrived in the hospital <4 hours. The toxic exposures were intentional in 87.2% of cases, with a male:female ratio was 0.8:1. Agrochemicals such as Aluminum phosphide and organophosphates were involved in 77.1% of cases. Cardiovascular collapse and respiratory failure were the main clinical syndromes encountered. Mechanical ventilation was required in 31.4% of patients. The length of ICU stay was 2.73 (0.96) days and the mortality was 54.2%. Conclusion: This study evidenced that highly lethal toxicants used in poisoning acts such as agrochemicals, high rate of suicide, notwithstanding the infrastructure and resources

  18. Acute effects of alcohol on unit activity in the motor cortex of freely moving rabbits: comparison with the limbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Y I; Grinchenko, Y V; Laukka, S; Järvilehto, T; Maz, V N

    1991-07-01

    Unit activity was recorded from the motor cortex of eight freely moving rabbits in order to examine the acute effect of ethanol (1 g kg-1) on organization of unit activity and to compare it with our earlier results from the limbic cortex. The rabbits performed a food-acquisition task in the experimental cage. Unit activity was recorded during behaviour in the control experiment followed by the alcohol experiment on the next day. After ethanol, behavioural mistakes and the duration of the behavioural cycle significantly increased. In the control experiments activation of 58% of the units had no constant relation to the phases of the behavioural cycle (non-involved units), whereas 42% of the units were constantly activated during certain phases (involved units). Two per cent of the latter units were activated in relation to newly learned behavioural acts (e.g. pedal pressing; L units), 28% in relation to food seizure and/or grinding (S units) and 12% in relation to certain movements during different behavioural acts (M units). Ethanol had no effect on the number of active units and the same relation between the number of non-involved and involved units or between the number of different types of involved units was found. However, the number of involved units decreased in the upper and increased in the lower cortical layers. Also the number of units with low background frequency increased, although the frequency within activations did not change. In our earlier study the number of active units in the limbic cortex decreased after ethanol by one third and the relation between the number of L and M units was reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Plant poisonings from herbal medication admitted to a Tunisian toxicologic intensive care unit, 1983-1998.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, C; Amamou, M; Thabet, H; Yacoub, M; Hedhili, A; Bescharnia, F; Ben Salah, N; Zhioua, M; Abdelmoumen, S; El Mekki Ben Brahim, N

    2000-06-01

    To collect data on Tunisian herbal toxicity we analysed 56 medical records of patients admitted to the toxicological intensive care unit from 1983 to 1998 following the ingestion of plants. The sex ratio of patients was 1:2, the mean age of patients was 26y (2 to 75y) and II species of plants were involved with Atractylis gummifera (32%), Datura stramonium (25%), Ricinus communis (9%), Nerium oleander (7%) and Peganum harmala (7%) most commonly infested. Poisonings involved neurological (91%), gastrointestinal (73%) and cardiovascular systems (18%). Treatment was mainly symptomatic. The only lethal cases of liver failure involved 16 Atractylis gummifera poisonings.

  20. [Health care units image development on the market of medical services].

    PubMed

    Kemicer-Chmielewska, Ewa; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    The cause for this document is to present a deliberation on public health facility image development on the medical services market. Marketization of the health service, growing awareness of Polish citizens and their expectation of high service quality as well as increased competition in the healthcare system market is the reason why health unit managers need to put a lot of strength and effort in sustaining or improving the image of the facility they run. Such action gives a chance for obtaining a competitive advantage.

  1. Pod Nursing on a Medical/Surgical Unit: Implementation and Outcomes Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Grunawalt, Julie C.; Bhullar, Sara; Bihlmeyer, Karen; Chang, Robert; Wood, Winnie

    2014-01-01

    A medical/surgical unit at the University of Michigan Health System implemented a pod nursing model of care to improve efficiency and patient and staff satisfaction. One centralized station was replaced with 4 satellites and supplies were relocated next to patient rooms. Patients were assigned to 2 nurses who worked as partners. Three patient (satisfaction, call lights, and falls) and nurse (satisfaction and overtime) outcomes improved after implementation. Efforts should be focused on addressing patient acuity imbalances across assignments and strengthening communication among the health care team. Studies are needed to test the model in larger and more diverse settings. PMID:24662689

  2. A patient with autism and severe depression: medical and ethical challenges for an adolescent medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Skinner, S Rachel; Ng, Cindy; McDonald, Ann; Walters, Tamara

    2005-10-17

    An adolescent with autism and intellectual disability presented with severe depression related to menstruation. Because of the complex medical, psychiatric and ethical issues involved, her care was coordinated by a hospital-based adolescent medicine unit. After trials of other therapies over an extended period and interdisciplinary and intersectoral case conferencing, it was decided that hysterectomy was the most appropriate management. This case highlights the complexity of adolescent health care in a tertiary hospital, the importance of intersectoral cooperation between hospital and community, and the integral role of interdisciplinary care of adolescent patients with chronic conditions.

  3. Impact of Medical Tourism on Cosmetic Surgery in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Franzblau, Lauren E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Developing countries have been attracting more international patients by building state-of-the-art facilities and offering sought-after healthcare services at a fraction of the cost of the US healthcare system. These price differentials matter most for elective procedures, including cosmetic surgeries, which are paid for out of pocket. It is unclear how this rise in medical tourism will affect the practice of plastic surgery, which encompasses a uniquely large number of elective procedures. By examining trends in the globalization of the cosmetic surgery market, we can better understand the current situation and what plastic surgeons in the United States can expect. In this article, we explore both domestic and foreign factors that affect surgical tourism and the current state of this industry. We also discuss how it may affect the practice of cosmetic surgery within the United States. PMID:25289258

  4. Antibiogram of Medical Intensive Care Unit at Tertiary Care Hospital Setting of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Qadeer, Aayesha; Akhtar, Aftab; Ain, Qurat Ul; Saadat, Shoab; Mansoor, Salman; Ishtiaq, Wasib; Ilyas, Abid; Khan, Ali Y; Ajam, Yousaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of micro-organisms causing sepsis as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of microorganisms isolated in a medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of 802 patients from a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan over a one-year period from August 2015 to August 2016. Specimens collected were from blood, urine, endotracheal secretions, catheter tips, tissue, pus swabs, cerebrospinal fluid, ascites, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and pleural fluid. All bacteria were identified by standard microbiological methods, and antibiotic sensitivity/resistance was performed using the disk diffusion technique, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Data was collected using a critical care unit electronic database and data analysis was done by using  the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 20 (IBM SPSS Statistics, Armonk, NY). Results: Gram-negative bacteria were more frequent as compared to gram-positive bacteria. Most common bacterial isolates were Acinetobacter (15.3%), Escherichia coli (15.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.2%), whereas Enterococcus (7%) and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (6.2%) were the two most common gram-positive bacteria. For Acinetobacter, colistin was the most effective antibiotic (3% resistance). For E.coli, colistin (0%), tigecycline (0%), amikacin (7%), and carbapenems (10%) showed low resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed low resistance to colistin (7%). For Klebsiella pneumoniae, low resistance was seen for tigecycline (0%) and minocycline (16%). Overall, ICU mortality was 31.3%, including miscellaneous cases. Conclusion: Gram-negative infections, especially by multidrug-resistant organisms, are on the rise in ICUs. Empirical antibiotics should be used according to the local

  5. Appendicectomies performed >48 hours after admission to a dedicated acute general surgical unit

    PubMed Central

    March, B; Gillies, D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute general surgical units (AGSUs) are changing the way in which acute appendicitis is managed. In the AGSU at John Hunter Hospital, some patients wait more than 48 hours from admission to undergo an appendicectomy, usually because they are not unwell enough to precipitate an operation before that time. We analysed this subgroup of appendicectomy patients to determine how effectively they are being managed and how this might be improved. Methods A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted of all patients who received an appendicectomy while admitted under the AGSU at John Hunter Hospital in the five years between January 2009 and December 2013. Results A total of 1,039 appendicectomies were performed in the study period, with 81 patients (7.8%) waiting >48 hours for their operation (delayed appendicectomy group). Overall, the negative appendicectomy (NA) rate was 21.6%; the NA rate in delayed appendicectomies was 50.62% and a non-therapeutic operation occurred in 47% of this group (n=38). No significant difference was found in the incidence of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis between patients having surgery in <48 hours and the delayed appendicectomy groups (11.2% vs 9.9%, p=0.85). A combination of negative diagnostic imaging result, a normal white cell count and normal C-reactive protein (ie a negative ‘triple test’) was the best predictor of a negative appendicectomy (p=0.0158, negative predictive value: 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.59–0.99), in the delayed appendicectomy group. Conclusions In the delayed appendicectomy group, the incidence of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis was not significantly different from that found in patients having appendicectomy performed sooner. However, the NA and non-therapeutic operation rates were unacceptably high. An appendix triple test can improve diagnostic accuracy significantly without an unacceptable rise in the rates of perforation/gangrenous appendicitis. PMID

  6. Acute HIV-1 Infection in the Southeastern United States: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Anna B.; Gay, Cynthia L.; McGee, Kara S.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Kerkau, Melissa G.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Fiscus, Susan A.; Ferrari, Guido; Margolis, David M.; Eron, Joseph J.; Hicks, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In 1998 a collaboration between Duke University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC) was founded to enhance identification of persons with acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). The Duke-UNC AHI Research Consortium Cohort consists of patients ≥18 years old with a positive nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and either a negative enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test or a positive EIA with a negative/indeterminate Western blot. Patients were referred to the cohort from acute care settings and state-funded HIV testing sites that use NAAT testing on pooled HIV-1 antibody-negative samples. Between 1998 and 2010, 155 patients with AHI were enrolled: 81 (52%) African-Americans, 63 (41%) white, non-Hispanics, 137 (88%) males, 108 (70%) men who have sex with men (MSM), and 18 (12%) females. The median age was 27 years (IQR 22–38). Most (n=138/155) reported symptoms with a median duration of 17.5 days. The median nadir CD4 count was 408 cells/mm3 (IQR 289–563); the median observed peak HIV-1 level was 726,859 copies/ml (IQR 167,585–3,565,728). The emergency department was the most frequent site of initial presentation (n=55/152; 3 missing data). AHI diagnosis was made at time of first contact in 62/137 (45%; 18 missing data) patients. This prospectively enrolled cohort is the largest group of patients with AHI reported from the Southeastern United States. The demographics reflect the epidemic of this geographic area with a high proportion of African-Americans, including young black MSM. Highlighting the challenges of diagnosing AHI, less than half of the patients were diagnosed at the first healthcare visit. Women made up a small proportion despite increasing numbers in our clinics. PMID:22839749

  7. End-of-Life and Palliative Care Issues in Medical and Nursing Schools in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing schools in the United States have traditionally had a limited emphasis on end-of-life care. The present study is a comparison of these 2 professional programs' current offerings on death education. Data were gathered via a mailed survey from the 122 medical schools in 2005 and the 580 baccalaureate nursing programs in 2006.…

  8. Mental Health and Resilience: Soldiers’ Perceptions about Psychotherapy, Medications, and Barriers to Care in the United States Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Perceptions about Psychotherapy , Medications, and Barriers to Care in the United States Military PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven Southwick, MD...SUBTITLE Mental Health and Resilience: Soldier’s Perceptions about 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Psychotherapy , Medications, and Barriers to...negative beliefs about psychotherapy , were found to contribute to decreased healthcare utilization, especially in Service Members with severe PTSD

  9. Combined assessment of thrombotic and haemorrhagic risk in acute medical patients.

    PubMed

    La Regina, Micaela; Orlandini, Francesco; Marchini, Francesca; Marinaro, Alessia; Bonacci, Rosanna; Bonanni, Paola; Corsini, Francesca; Ceraudo, Anna Maria; Pacetti, Edoarda; Scuotri, Lucia; Costabile, Davide; Dentali, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Acute medical patients have a high risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTE). Unfortunately, the fear of bleeding complications limits the use of antithrombotic prophylaxis in this setting. To stratify the VTE and haemorrhagic risk, two clinical scores (PADUA, IMPROVE) have recently been developed. However, it is not clear how many patients have a concomitant high VTE and haemorrhagic risk and what is the use of prophylaxis in this situation. To clarify these issues we performed a prospective cohort study enrolling consecutive patients admitted to internal medicine. Patients admitted to internal medicine (January to December 2013) were included. VTE and haemorrhagic risk were evaluated in all the included patients. Use and type of anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was recorded. A total of 1761 patients (mean age 77.6 years) were enrolled; 76.8% (95% CI 74.7-78.7) were at high VTE risk and 11.9% (95% CI 10.4-13.5) were at high haemorrhagic risk. Anti-thrombotic prophylaxis was used in 80.5% of patients at high VTE risk and in 6.5% at low VTE risk (p<0.001), and in 16.6% at high haemorrhagic risk and in 72.5% at low haemorrhagic risk (p<0.001). Prophylaxis was used in 20.4% at both high VTE and haemorrhagic risk and in 88.9% at high VTE risk but low haemorrhagic risk. At multivariate-analysis, use of prophylaxis appeared highly influenced by the VTE risk (OR 68.2, 95% CI 43.1 - 108.0). In conclusion, many patients admitted to internal medicine were at high risk of VTE. Since almost 90% of them were at low haemorrhagic risk, pharmacological prophylaxis may be safely prescribed in most of these patients.

  10. Principal results of the Medical Research Council's 8th acute myeloid leukaemia trial.

    PubMed

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Swirsky, D; Hayhoe, F G

    1986-11-29

    Between 1978 and 1983, 1127 patients with de-novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were entered into the Medical Research Council (MRC)'s 8th AML trial. All received the same induction therapy consisting of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and 6-thioguanine--DAT (1 + 5). The 67% who entered complete remission were randomised to consolidation with two or six further courses of DAT. Adults under the age of 55 were randomised for central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate. Finally, those still in remission after 1 year of cytarabine and 6-thioguanine (AT) maintenance were randomised to receive either late intensification with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, and prednisolone (COAP) or continued AT. The median survival for the whole group was 12 months; the median duration of first remission was 15 months, with relapse-free survival at 5 years estimated at 18%. The factors most strongly associated with poor survival were performance status and age at presentation, but even among those over 60 years of age, half went into remission. Six courses of DAT consolidation gave a small advantage over two courses in reducing the number of late relapses but no significant survival advantage. Late intensification showed a marginally significant advantage over continued AT maintenance. The incidence of CNS relapse was low and unaffected by prophylaxis. The second remission rate varied from 10% when the first remission was shorter than 6 months to 61% when it had continued for more than 2 years. 40 patients received histocompatible allogeneic bone-marrow transplants in first remission. There was a high procedure-related death rate, particularly among patients over 30 years of age. Thus, initially at least, the transplanted group had shorter survival than a comparable group of chemotherapy-treated patients. Treatment specifications remained unchanged throughout the trial but those enrolled in the later half of the trial had a better (p = 0

  11. Antimicrobial Stewardship in a Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Using Offsite Electronic Medical Record Audit.

    PubMed

    Beaulac, Kirthana; Corcione, Silvia; Epstein, Lauren; Davidson, Lisa E; Doron, Shira

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To offer antimicrobial stewardship to a long-term acute care hospital using telemedicine. METHODS We conducted an uninterrupted time-series analysis to measure the impact of antimicrobial stewardship on hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates and antimicrobial use. Simple linear regression was used to analyze changes in antimicrobial use; Poisson regression was used to estimate the incidence rate ratio in CDI rates. The preimplementation period was April 1, 2010-March 31, 2011; the postimplementation period was April 1, 2011-March 31, 2014. RESULTS During the preimplementation period, total antimicrobial usage was 266 defined daily doses (DDD)/1,000 patient-days (PD); it rose 4.54 (95% CI, -0.19 to 9.28) per month then significantly decreased from preimplementation to postimplementation (-6.58 DDD/1,000 PD [95% CI, -11.48 to -1.67]; P=.01). The same trend was observed for antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (-2.97 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, -5.65 to -0.30]; P=.03). There was a decrease in usage of anti-CDI antibiotics by 50.4 DDD/1,000 PD per month (95% CI, -71.4 to -29.2; P<.001) at program implementation that was maintained afterwards. Anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics increased after implementation (30.6 DDD/1,000 PD per month [95% CI, 4.9-56.3]; P=.02) but with ongoing education this trend reversed. Intervention was associated with a decrease in hospital-acquired CDI (incidence rate ratio, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.35-0.92]; P=.02). CONCLUSION Antimicrobial stewardship using an electronic medical record via remote access led to a significant decrease in antibacterial usage and a decrease in CDI rates.

  12. Reduced acute inpatient care was largest savings component of Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Khan, Nazmul; Tomcavage, Janet; Graf, Thomas R; Davis, Duane E; Steele, Glenn D

    2015-04-01

    Early evidence suggests that the patient-centered medical home has the potential to improve patient outcomes while reducing the cost of care. However, it is unclear how this care model achieves such desirable results, particularly its impact on cost. We estimated cost savings associated with Geisinger Health System's patient-centered medical home clinics by examining longitudinal clinic-level claims data from elderly Medicare patients attending the clinics over a ninety-month period (2006 through the first half of 2013). We also used these data to deconstruct savings into its main components (inpatient, outpatient, professional, and prescription drugs). During this period, total costs associated with patient-centered medical home exposure declined by approximately 7.9 percent; the largest source of this savings was acute inpatient care ($34, or 19 percent savings per member per month), which accounts for about 64 percent of the total estimated savings. This finding is further supported by the fact that longer exposure was also associated with lower acute inpatient admission rates. The results of this study suggest that patient-centered medical homes can lead to sustainable, long-term improvements in patient health outcomes and the cost of care.

  13. Simplified Acute Physiology Score II as Predictor of Mortality in Intensive Care Units: A Decision Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allyn, Jérôme; Ferdynus, Cyril; Bohrer, Michel; Dalban, Cécile; Valance, Dorothée; Allou, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background End-of-life decision-making in Intensive care Units (ICUs) is difficult. The main problems encountered are the lack of a reliable prediction score for death and the fact that the opinion of patients is rarely taken into consideration. The Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) is a recent method developed to evaluate the prediction models and which takes into account the wishes of patients (or surrogates) to expose themselves to the risk of obtaining a false result. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical usefulness, with DCA, of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) to predict ICU mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study from January 2011 to September 2015, in a medical-surgical 23-bed ICU at University Hospital. Performances of the SAPS II, a modified SAPS II (without AGE), and age to predict ICU mortality, were measured by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and DCA. Results Among the 4.370 patients admitted, 23.3% died in the ICU. Mean (standard deviation) age was 56.8 (16.7) years, and median (first-third quartile) SAPS II was 48 (34–65). Areas under ROC curves were 0.828 (0.813–0.843) for SAPS II, 0.814 (0.798–0.829) for modified SAPS II and of 0.627 (0.608–0.646) for age. DCA showed a net benefit whatever the probability threshold, especially under 0.5. Conclusion DCA shows the benefits of the SAPS II to predict ICU mortality, especially when the probability threshold is low. Complementary studies are needed to define the exact role that the SAPS II can play in end-of-life decision-making in ICUs. PMID:27741304

  14. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  15. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Kathryn A.; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Menon, David K.; Rowan, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT “Lab” model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research. PMID:25898072

  16. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities.

  17. The geriatric patient: use of acute geriatrics units in the emergency care of elderly patients in France.

    PubMed

    Somme, D; Lazarovici, C; Dramé, M; Blanc, P; Lang, P O; Gauvain, J B; Voisin, T; Gonthier, R; De Wazières, B; Jeandel, C; Couturier, P; Blanchard, F; Saint-Jean, O

    2011-01-01

    We studied the factors influencing the choice of admission to Geriatrics units, instead of other acute hospital units after an emergency visit. We report the results from a cohort of 1283 randomly selected patients aged >75 years hospitalized in emergency and representative of the French University hospital system. All patients underwent geriatric assessment. Baseline characteristics of patients admitted to Geriatrics and other units were compared. A center effect influencing the use of Geriatrics units during emergencies was also investigated. Admission to a Geriatrics unit during the acute care episode occurred in 499 cases (40.3%). By multivariate analysis, 4 factors were related to admission to a Geriatrics unit: cognitive disorder: odds ratio (OR)=1.79 (1.38-2.32) (95% confidence interval=95% CI); "failure to thrive" syndrome OR=1.54 (1.01-2.35), depression: OR=1.42 (1.12-1.83) or loss of Activities of Daily Living (ADL): OR=1.35 (1.04-1.75). The emergency volume of the hospital was inversely related to the use of Geriatrics units, with high variation that could be explained by other unstudied factors. In the French University Emergency Healthcare system, the "geriatrics patient" is defined by the existence of cognitive disorder, psychological symptoms or installed loss of autonomy. Nevertheless, considerable nation-wide variation was observed underlining the need to clarify and reinforce this discipline in the emergency healthcare system.

  18. An exploratory examination of medical gas booms versus traditional headwalls in intensive care unit design.

    PubMed

    Pati, Debajyoti; Evans, Jennie; Waggener, Laurie; Harvey, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Should power, medical gases, and monitoring and communications systems be located in a headwall or a ceiling-mounted boom in intensive care unit (ICU) rooms? Often, only the financial costs could be determined for the options, whereas data regarding its potential influence on teamwork, safety, and efficiency are lacking. Hence, purchase decisions are more arbitrary than evidence based. This study simulated care delivery in settings with a traditional headwall and a ceiling boom. Observed were the way the following elements were managed and the extent either system affected flexibility, ergonomics, and teamwork: tubing for intravenous fluids, medical gases, and suction drainage; monitoring leads and equipment power cords; and the medical equipment itself. Simulation runs involving 6 scenarios were conducted with the voluntary participation of 2 physicians, 2 nurse practitioners, 2 respiratory therapists, and 4 registered nurses at a children's tertiary care center in December 2007. Analysis suggests that booms have an advantage over headwalls in case of high-acuity ICU patients and when procedures are performed inside patient rooms. However, in case of lower-acuity ICU patients, as well as when procedures are not typically conducted in the patient room, booms may not provide a proportionate level of advantage when compared with the additional cost involved in its procurement.

  19. Medical errors in neonatal intensive care unit at Benha University Hospital, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, Ahmed N; Al-Azzouny, Mahmoud A; Soliman, Doaa R; Abed, Neveen T; Attia, Sameh S

    2017-02-21

    This study was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of Benha University Hospital, Egypt from 1 August 2012 to the 31 January 2013 to identify medical errors and to determine the risk factors and consequences of these errors. Errors were detected by follow-up of neonates and review of reports including nursing followup sheets, resident progression notes and investigation reports. We detected 3819 errors that affected 97% of neonates. Types of errors included 403 medication errors (10.55% of total errors), 652 errors in daily routine procedures (17.07%), 1042 errors in invasive procedures (27.28%), 68 errors in nutrition (1.78%), 63 equipment errors (1.64%), 260 administration errors (6.8%), 656 staffing errors (17.18%), 107 environmental errors (2.8%), 448 infection control errors (11.73%) and 120 nosocomial infection errors (3.14%). Medical errors were high in low birth weight, low gestational age neonates and increased with duration of admission.

  20. A Joint Venture Analysis for a Combined Acute/Chronic Hemodialysis Clinic at Tripler Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    Dialysis Clinic 12 blood vessel that intertwines with the urine collecting tube called a tubule. A chemical exchange takes place at the tubule to...required to perform the chronic and acute care dialysis mission. In the recent past, TAMC invested funds to upgrade the reverse osmosis units for the...D1798 DIALYSIS MACHINE W/REVERSE OSMOSIS 5 $ 17,906.23 $ 3,581.25 0201 2007 D1799 DIALYSIS MACHINE W/REVERSE OSMOSIS 5

  1. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  2. Standardizing Management of Adults with Delirium Hospitalized on Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Clay; Brooks, Kristen; Fourie, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Context Delirium is common among inpatients aged 65 years and older and is associated with multiple adverse consequences, including increased length of stay (LOS). However, delirium is frequently unrecognized and poorly understood. At one hospital, baseline management of delirium on medical-surgical units varied greatly, and psychiatric consultations focused exclusively on crisis management. Objective To implement a multidisciplinary program for rapid identification and proactive management of patients with delirium on medical-surgical units. Design A pilot from September 2010 to July 2012 included 920 unique patients, of whom 470 were seen by the delirium management team. A delirium management team included a redesigned role for consulting psychiatrists and a new clinical nurse specialist role; the team provided assistance with diagnosis and recommendations for nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management of delirium. Multidisciplinary education focused on delirium identification and management and nurses’ use of appropriate assessment tools. Electronic health record functions supported accurate problem list coding, referrals to the team, and standardized documentation. Main Outcome Measure Length of stay. Results During the study period, average LOS in the target population decreased from 8.5 days to 6.5 days (p = 0.001); average LOS for the Medical Center remained stable. Compared with patients whose delirium was diagnosed during the baseline period, patients who received a delirium diagnosis during the pilot period had a higher illness burden and were likelier to have a history of delirium and diagnosed dementia. Conclusion Program implementation was associated with reduced LOS among older inpatients with delirium. The delirium team is an effective model that can be quickly implemented with few additional resources. PMID:27644045

  3. Racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular medication use among older adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Qato, Dima M.; Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Conti, Rena M.; Schumm, L. Philip; Alexander, G. Caleb

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Despite persistent racial/ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) among older adults, information on whether there are similar disparities in the use of prescription and over-the-counter medications to prevent such disease is limited. We examined racial and ethnic disparities in the use of statins and aspirin among older adults at low, moderate, and high risk for CVD. Methods and Results In-home interviews, including a medication inventory, were administered between June 2005 and March 2006 to 3005 community-residing individuals, ages 57–85 years, drawn from a cross-sectional, nationally-representative probability sample of the United States. Based on a modified version of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) risk stratification guidelines, 1066 respondents were at high cardiovascular risk, 977 were at moderate risk, and 812 were at low risk. Rates of use were highest among respondents at high cardiovascular risk. Racial differences were highest among respondents at high risk with blacks less likely than whites to use statins (38% vs. 50%, p = 0.007) and aspirin (29% vs. 44%, p = 0.008). After controlling for age, gender, comorbidity, and socioeconomic, and access to care factors, racial/ethnic disparities persisted. In particular, blacks at highest risk were less likely than their white counterparts to use statins (odds ratio (OR) 0.65, confidence interval (CI) 0.46–0.90) or aspirin (OR 0.61, CI 0.37–0.98). Conclusions These results, based on an in-home survey of actual medication use, suggest widespread underuse of indicated preventive therapies among older adults at high cardiovascular risk in the United States. Racial/ethnic disparities in such use may contribute to documented disparities in cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:20681002

  4. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine is subjected worldwide to financial stringencies and organizational evaluations of cost-effectiveness. The various links in the chain of survival are affected differently. Bystander assistance or bystander CPR is available in only 30% of the emergencies, response intervals--if at all required by legislation--are observed to only a limited degree or are too extended for survival in cardiac arrest. A single emergency telephone number is lacking. Too many different phone numbers for emergency reporting result in confusion and delays. Organizational realities are not fully overcome and impair efficiency. The position of the emergency physician in the EMS System is inadequately defined, the qualification of too many emergency physicians are unsatisfactory. In spite of this, emergency physicians are frequently forced to answer out-of-hospital emergency calls. Conflicts between emergency physicians and EMTs may be overcome by providing both groups with comparable qualifications as well as by providing an explicit definition of emergency competence. A further source of conflict occurs at the juncture of prehospital and inhospital emergency care in the emergency department. Deficiencies on either side play a decisive role. At least in principle there are solutions to the deficiencies in the EMSS and in intensive care medicine. They are among others: Adequate financial compensation of emergency personnel, availability of sufficient numbers of highly qualified personnel, availability of a central receiving area with an adjacent emergency ward, constant information flow to the dispatch center on the number of available emergency beds, maintaining 5% of all beds as emergency beds, establishing intermediate care facilities. Efficiency of emergency physician activities can be demonstrated in polytraumatized patients or in patients with ventricular fibrillation or acute myocardial infarction, in patients with acute myocardial insufficiency and other emergency

  5. [The coordination of the work of medical units and institutions in the combat arms and services of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Ul'ianov, V A

    1995-04-01

    The transition to a territorial system of medical support needs to solve a problem of control over the work of all military medical establishments in the zone of responsibility of the base military hospital independently of their subordination to different fighting services. To meet these requirements it is necessary to create a coordination centre (group) in the base military hospital. Its basic task is to coordinate all medico-diagnostical, sanitary-hygienic and counter-epidemic measures in the zone of responsibility and also to supervise the special training of medical personnel. Another important task is to coordinate combat and mobilization readiness of medical units and establishments in the zone of responsibility.

  6. Reducing intraoperative red blood cell unit wastage in a large academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Gina M.; Woods, Marcella C.; France, Daniel J.; Austin, Thomas M.; Deegan, Robert J.; Paroskie, Allison; Booth, Garrett S.; Young, Pampee P.; Dmochowski, Roger R.; Sandberg, Warren S.; Pilla, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The wastage of red blood cell (RBC) units within the operative setting results in significant direct costs to health care organizations. Previous education-based efforts to reduce wastage were unsuccessful at our institution. We hypothesized that a quality and process improvement approach would result in sustained reductions in intraoperative RBC wastage in a large academic medical center. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Utilizing a failure mode and effects analysis supplemented with time and temperature data, key drivers of perioperative RBC wastage were identified and targeted for process improvement. RESULTS Multiple contributing factors, including improper storage and transport and lack of accurate, locally relevant RBC wastage event data were identified as significant contributors to ongoing intraoperative RBC unit wastage. Testing and implementation of improvements to the process of transport and storage of RBC units occurred in liver transplant and adult cardiac surgical areas due to their history of disproportionately high RBC wastage rates. Process interventions targeting local drivers of RBC wastage resulted in a significant reduction in RBC wastage (p <0.0001; adjusted odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.39), despite an increase in operative case volume over the period of the study. Studied process interventions were then introduced incrementally in the remainder of the perioperative areas. CONCLUSIONS These results show that a multidisciplinary team focused on the process of blood product ordering, transport, and storage was able to significantly reduce operative RBC wastage and its associated costs using quality and process improvement methods. PMID:26202213

  7. [Comparison of Aggressive Behavior, Compulsory Medication and Absconding Behavior Between Open and Closed door Policy in an Acute Psychiatric Ward].

    PubMed

    Cibis, Mara-Lena; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Müller, Sabine; Lang, Undine E; Schmidt, Yvonne; Heinz, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Objective According to legal requirements coercive treatment must be limited to acts necessary for the protection of patients and cannot be used for institutional interests. Here, we aimed to test the hypothesis that opening psychiatric wards can reduce the number of aggressive assaults and of coercive treatment without increasing absconding rates. Methods Numbers of absconding, coercive medication, fixation and special security actions were collected retrospectively and compared between phases of closed (N total = 409; N legally committed = 64) and 90 % of daytime opened (N total = 571; N legally committed = 99) doors in an acute psychiatric ward. Results During the phase of opened doors we observed significantly reduced aggressive assaults (p < 0,001) and coercive medication (p = 0,006) compared to the closed setting, while the absconding rate did not change (p = 0,20). Limitation Given the retrospective non-experimental design, no causal interpretations can be drawn. Conclusion The results suggest that open door is associated with reduction of aggressive assaults and coercive medication without increasing absconding rates. This speaks for a stronger implementation of open door policies in acute wards in order to preserve human rights in psychiatry. To collect more robust evidence for this thesis, longer phases should be monitored and moderating variables such as atmosphere and social cohesion should be assessed.

  8. The design and rationale for the Acute Medically Ill Venous Thromboembolism Prevention with Extended Duration Betrixaban (APEX) study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Harrington, Robert; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Hull, Russell; Gibson, C Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; Kitt, Michael M; Lorenz, Todd J

    2014-03-01

    Randomized clinical trials have identified a population of acute medically ill patients who remain at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) beyond the standard duration of therapy and hospital discharge. The aim of the APEX study is to determine whether extended administration of oral betrixaban (35-42 days) is superior to a standard short course of prophylaxis with subcutaneous enoxaparin (10 ± 4 days followed by placebo) in patients with known risk factors for post-discharge VTE. Patients initially are randomized to receive either betrixaban or enoxaparin (and matching placebo) in a double dummy design. Following a standard duration period of enoxaparin treatment (with placebo tablets) or betrixaban (with placebo injections), patients receive only betrixaban (or alternative matching placebo). Patients are considered for enrollment if they are older than 40 years, have a specified medical illness, and restricted mobility. They must also meet the APEX criteria for increased VTE risk (aged ≥75 years, baseline D-Dimer ≥2× upper the limit of "normal", or 2 additional ancillary risk factors for VTE). The primary efficacy end point is the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep venous thrombosis, symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, non-fatal (pulmonary embolus) pulmonary embolism, or VTE-related death through day 35. The primary safety outcome is the occurrence of major bleeding. We hypothesize that extended duration betrixaban VTE prophylaxis will be safe and more effective than standard short duration enoxaparin in preventing VTE in acute medically ill patients with known risk factors for post hospital discharge VTE.

  9. [Modern condition and prospects of improvement of the specialized medical care for acute bone marrow syndrome of radiation etiology].

    PubMed

    Khalimov, Iu Sh; Grebeniuk, A N; Legeza, V I; Karamullin, M A; Salukhov, V V

    2013-01-01

    It is shown, that tactics of treatment of acute marrow failure of radiant etiology is based, first of all, on measures of supporting, replaceable and stimulating therapy. The modern means, used for prophylactic and treatment of infectious complications, are resulted. Opportunities and restrictions of transfusion of donor thrombocytes and granulocytes, erythrocytes and chilled plasma are described. Therapeutic efficiency of transplantation of a bone marrow, cells of embryonic liver and stem cells of peripheral or umbilical cord blood is analyzed. It is shown, that the greatest prospects in perfection of the specialized medical aid at acute radiation syndrome are connected to complex application of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-3, granulocyte or granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulated factor, thrombopoietin and others cytokines.

  10. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis and other severe drug eruptions from over the counter medications: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kline, Amy; Fischer, Gayle

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis in an 11-year-old girl who used Duro-Tuss, an over-the-counter cough mixture containing pholcodine, and present a comprehensive review of the literature on severe drug reactions resulting from using non-prescription medications. This case reinforces the importance of taking a complete medication history.

  11. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients after the results of recent trials with the new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Davide; Benedetti, Raffaella; Ageno, Walter

    2013-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common potentially life-threatening complication in acutely ill medical patients; over 70 % of the fatal episodes of pulmonary embolism during hospitalization occur in non-surgical patients. In the absence of thromboprophylaxis, the incidence of venographically detected deep vein thrombosis is about 15 % in medical patients. Several trials and meta-analyses have clearly demonstrated the prophylactic role of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin and fondaparinux. Although over the past few years the knowledge of epidemiology, clinical features and prophylaxis in medical patients has significantly improved, there remain a number of controversial areas that require further investigation. Newer VTE risk assessment models have been proposed to select high risk hospitalized medical patients, but they still require external validation; scarce data are available to stratify patients to identify their individual bleeding risk. The optimal duration of thromboprophylaxis in medical patients is still a matter of debate; currently, extended prophylaxis after discharge is not recommended, but it may be required for subgroup of patients with persistently high VTE risk and a negligible risk of bleeding. Based on the results of recent studies, the new oral anticoagulants appear to have a very limited role, if any. However, a better risk stratification of patients who have a persistently increased risk of VTE is warranted to improve the risk to benefit profile of any anticoagulant drug to be used in this setting.

  12. Nurse-patient interaction in acute adult inpatient mental health units: a review and synthesis of qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Hunt, Glenn E; Horsfall, Jan; Deacon, Maureen

    2012-02-01

    Mental health nurses work with acutely unwell patients, and the busy setting is characterised by unpredictable events. This paper is a report of a review conducted to identify, analyse and synthesize research in adult acute inpatient mental health units, which focused on nurse-patient interaction. Several electronic databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify studies published from 1999-present. Qualitative studies published in English were included if they specifically investigated nurse-patient interaction in acute inpatient care in adult settings. Eighteen studies were included (23 papers). Findings were grouped into the following six categories: 1) sophisticated communication; 2) subtle discriminations; 3) managing security parameters; 4) ordinary communication; 5) reliance on colleagues; and 6) personal characteristics. These studies of acute inpatient mental health units reveal that nurse communication involves interpersonal approaches and modalities that exemplify highly developed communication and personal skills designed specifically for this challenging setting. Further quality research should focus on the conditions that enable the development of therapeutic interactional skills and the relationship of these skills to the nuanced context in which they are practiced.

  13. Ebola Preparedness Resources for Acute-Care Hospitals in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Study of Costs, Benefits, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Smit, Michael A; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Braun, Barbara I; Kusek, Linda L; Milstone, Aaron M; Morgan, Daniel J; Mermel, Leonard A

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess resource allocation and costs associated with US hospitals preparing for the possible spread of the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in the United States. METHODS A survey was sent to a stratified national probability sample (n=750) of US general medical/surgical hospitals selected from the American Hospital Association (AHA) list of hospitals. The survey was also sent to all children's general hospitals listed by the AHA (n=60). The survey assessed EVD preparation supply costs and overtime staff hours. The average national wage was multiplied by labor hours to calculate overtime labor costs. Additional information collected included challenges, benefits, and perceived value of EVD preparedness activities. RESULTS The average amount spent by hospitals on combined supply and overtime labor costs was $80,461 (n=133; 95% confidence interval [CI], $56,502-$104,419). Multivariate analysis indicated that small hospitals (mean, $76,167) spent more on staff overtime costs per 100 beds than large hospitals (mean, $15,737; P<.0001). The overall cost for acute-care hospitals in the United States to prepare for possible EVD cases was estimated to be $361,108,968. The leading challenge was difficulty obtaining supplies from vendors due to shortages (83%; 95% CI, 78%-88%) and the greatest benefit was improved knowledge about personal protective equipment (89%; 95% CI, 85%-93%). CONCLUSIONS The financial impact of EVD preparedness activities was substantial. Overtime cost in smaller hospitals was >3 times that in larger hospitals. Planning for emerging infectious disease identification, triage, and management should be conducted at regional and national levels in the United States to facilitate efficient and appropriate allocation of resources in acute-care facilities. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:405-410.

  14. Hyperbaric programs in the United States: Locations and capabilities of treating decompression sickness, arterial gas embolisms, and acute carbon monoxide poisoning: survey results.

    PubMed

    Chin, Walter; Jacoby, Laura; Simon, Olivia; Talati, Nisha; Wegrzyn, Gracelene; Jacoby, Rachelle; Proano, Jacob; Sprau, Susan E; Markovitz, Gerald; Hsu, Rita; Joo, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the primary treatment for arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness and acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Though there has been a proliferation of hyperbaric centers throughout the United States, a scarcity of centers equipped to treat emergency indications makes transport of patients necessary. To locate and characterize hyperbaric chambers capable of treating emergency cases, a survey of centers throughout the entire United States was conducted. Using Google, Yahoo, HyperbaricLink and the UHMS directory, a database for United States chambers was created. Four researchers called clinicians from the database to administer the survey. All centers were contacted for response until four calls went unreturned or a center declined to be included. The survey assessed chamber readiness to respond to high-acuity patients, including staff availability, use of medical equipment such as ventilators and intravenous infusion devices, and responding yes to treating hyperbaric emergencies within a 12-month period. Only 43 (11.9%, N = 361) centers had equipment, intravenous infusion pumps and ventilators, and staff necessary to treat high-acuity patients. Considering that a primary purpose of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the treatment of arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness, more hyperbaric centers nationwide should be able to accommodate these emergency cases quickly and safely.

  15. Acute Morbidity of Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer: The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mayahara, Hiroshi Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Kawaguchi, Atsuya; Oda, Yasue; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and influencing factors of acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal morbidities in patients with prostate cancer treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 287 patients with histologically proven Stage cT1-T4N0M0 prostate cancer were treated with proton therapy between 2003 and 2004. Of these, 204 (71%) received neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy. The patients were treated with 190-230-MeV protons using lateral-opposed techniques to a dose of 74 GyE. Dose-volume histogram analyses were performed. The incidence of acute morbidity was evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Clinical factors, including age, clinical target volume, initial prostate-specific antigen level, T stage, presence of diabetes mellitus, and the use of androgen suppression therapy, were investigated to determine whether those affected the incidence of acute GU morbidity. Results: None developed Grade 2 or higher acute gastrointestinal morbidity. In contrast, 111 (39%) and 4 (1%) patients experienced acute Grade 2 and Grade 3 GU morbidities, respectively. However, 87% of the patients were successfully relieved by the administration of a selective {alpha}-1 blocker. Multivariate analysis showed that a larger clinical target volume (p = 0.001) and the use of androgen suppression therapy (p = 0.017) were significant factors for the prediction of acute Grade 2-3 GU morbidity. Conclusion: In our experience with proton therapy, a low incidence of acute gastrointestinal morbidity was observed. In contrast, the incidence of acute GU morbidity was similar to that in other reports of photon radiotherapy. Additional follow-up is warranted to elucidate the long-term safety and efficacy of proton therapy for prostate cancer.

  16. Descriptive epidemiology of low-back pain and its related medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Deyo, R A; Tsui-Wu, Y J

    1987-04-01

    Accurate United States data on the prevalence of low-back pain (LBP) and its related medical care would assist health care planners, policy makers, and investigators. Data from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) were analyzed to provide such information. The cumulative lifetime prevalence of LBP lasting at least 2 weeks was 13.8%. In univariate analyses, important variations in prevalence were found by age, race, region, and educational status. Most persons with LBP sought care from general practitioners, with orthopaedists and chiropractors being the next most common sources of care. Sources of care, and in some cases therapy, varied among demographic subgroups. These data demonstrate substantial nonbiologic influences on the prevalence and treatment of LBP, and suggest an agenda for health services researchers.

  17. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates.

  18. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  19. Diurnal salivary cortisol measurement in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit in critically ill acute trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bartanusz, Viktor; Corneille, Michael G; Sordo, Salvador; Gildea, Marianne; Michalek, Joel E; Nair, Prakash V; Stewart, Ronald M; Jezova, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Acute trauma patients represent a specific subgroup of the critically ill population due to sudden and dramatic changes in homeostasis and consequently extreme demands on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Salivary cortisol is an accepted surrogate for serum free cortisol in the assessment of HPA axis function. The purpose of this study was (1) to establish the feasibility of salivary cortisol measurement in acute trauma patients in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit (NSICU), and (2) to determine the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in the acute phase after injury. Saliva from 50 acute trauma patients was prospectively collected twice a day at 6AM and 4PM during the first week after injury in the NSICU. Mean PM cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in subjects versus controls (p<0.001). Subjects failed to develop the expected PM versus AM decrease in cortisol concentration seen in controls (p=0.005). Salivary cortisol did not vary significantly with baseline Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, sex, injury type, ethnicity, or age. When comparing mean AM and PM salivary cortisol by GCS severity category (GCS ⩽8 and GCS >8) the AM salivary cortisol was significantly higher in patients with GCS ⩽8 (p=0.002). The results show a loss of diurnal cortisol variation in acute trauma patient in the NSICU during the first week of hospitalization. Patients with severe brain injury had higher morning cortisol levels than those with mild/moderate brain injury.

  20. Outcome in noncritically ill patients with acute kidney injury requiring dialysis: Effects of differing medical staffs and organizations.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, Riccardo Maria; Patera, Francesco; Battistoni, Sara; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) treatment has significantly increased in incidence over the years, with more than 400 new cases per million population/y, 2/3 of which concern noncritically ill patients. In these patients, there are little data on mortality or on information of care organization and its impact on outcome. Specialty training and integrated teams, as well as a high volume of activity, seem to be linked to better hospital outcome. The study investigates mortality of patients admitted to and in-care of nephrology (NEPHROpts), a closed-staff organization, and to other medical wards (MEDpts), representing a model of open-staff organization.This is a single center, case-control cohort study derived from a prospective epidemiology investigation on patients with AKI-D admitted to or in-care of the Hospital of Perugia during the period 2007 to 2014. Noncritically ill AKI-D patients were analyzed: inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined to avoid possible bias on the cause of hospital admittance and comorbidities, and a propensity score (PS) matching was performed.Six hundred fifty-four noncritically ill patients were observed and 296 fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria. PS matching resulted in 2 groups: 100 NEPHROpts and 100 MEDpts. Characteristics, comorbidities, acute kidney injury causes, risk-injury-failure acute kidney injury criteria, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 2) were similar. Mortality was 36%, and a difference was reported between NEPHROpts and MEDpts (20% vs 52%, χ = 23.2, P < 0.001). Patients who died differed in age, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen/s.Creatinine ratio, dialysis urea reduction rate (URR), SAPS 2 and Charlson score; they presented a higher rate of heart disease, and a larger proportion required noradrenaline/dopamine for shock. After correction for mortality risk factors, multivariate Cox analysis revealed that site of treatment (medical vs nephrology wards) represents an

  1. MEDICAL BRIGADES, GLOBAL HEALTH AND THE UNITED NATIONS: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND DEVELOPING NATIONS.

    PubMed

    Portman, Mark T; Martin, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Recently, recommendations have been made that global health initiatives change their focus from disease specific intervention to bolstering health systems and general health care. The aim of this is to ultimately increase access to primary care, clean water, education, hygiene, and prevent malnutrition, among other goals. While many major global health initiatives have followed this trend, so have many smaller scale programs including short-term medical brigades. Despite a trending increase in the number of privately run short-term medical brigades, until recently, little research has been done on the potential positive and negative effects that can arise from such programs. Now, guidelines have been initiated to create well-structured programs. When followed, these smaller scale initiatives can be successful in helping increase access to healthcare, sustainably strengthening communities in terms of general health. While recent legislation in the United States has addressed domestic policy in the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), the ACA should also consider some of the basic "sustainable" policies being implemented by international health care providers.

  2. Globalization of health care delivery in the United States through medical tourism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sameer; Breuing, Richard; Chahal, Rajneet

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights some of the inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system and determines what effect medical tourism has had on the U.S. and global health care supply chains. This study also calls attention to insufficient health communication efforts to inform uninsured or underinsured medical tourists about the benefits and risks and determines the managerial and cost implications of various surgical procedures on the global health care system into the future. This study evaluated 3 years (2005, 2007, and 2011) of actual and projected surgical cost data. The authors selected 3 countries for analysis: the United States, India, and Thailand. The surgeries chosen for evaluation were total knee replacement (knee arthroplasty), hip replacement (hip arthroplasty), and heart bypass (coronary artery bypass graft). Comparisons of costs were made using Monte Carlo simulation with variability encapsulated by triangular distributions. The results are staggering. In 2005, the amount of money lost to India and Thailand on just these 3 surgeries because of cost inefficiencies in the U.S. health care system was between 1.3 to 2 billion dollars. In 2011, because many more Americans are expected to travel overseas for health care, this amount is anticipated to rise to between 20 and 30.2 billion dollars. Therefore, more attention should be paid to health communication efforts that truly illustrate the benefits/risks of medical travel. The challenge of finding reliable data for surgeries performed and associated surgical cost estimates was mitigated by the use of a Monte Carlo simulation of triangular distributions. The implications from this study are clear: If the U.S. health care industry is unable to eliminate waste and inefficiency and thus curb rising costs, it will continue to lose surgical revenue to foreign health providers.

  3. Impact of a dedicated emergency surgical unit on early laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, S; Walsh, U; Qurashi, K; Liasis, L; Watfah, J; Sen, M; Gould, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergency general surgery (EGS) accounts for 50% of the surgical workload, and yet outcomes are variable and poorly recorded. The management of acute cholecystitis (AC) at a dedicated emergency surgical unit (ESU) was assessed as a performance target for EGS. Methods The outcomes for AC admissions were compared one year before and after inception of the ESU. The impact on cost and compliance with national guidance recommending early laparoscopic cholecystectomy (ELC) within seven days of diagnosis was assessed. Results The overall ELC rate increased from 26% for the 126 patients admitted in the pre-ESU period to 45% for the 152 patients admitted in the post-ESU period (p=0.001). With those unsuitable for ELC excluded, the ELC rate increased from 34% to 82% (p<0.001). The proportion of patients precluded from ELC for avoidable reasons, particularly owing to ‘surgeon preference/skill’, was reduced from 69% to 18% (p<0.001). The mean total length of stay (LOS) and postoperative LOS fell by 1.7 days (from 8.3 to 6.6 days, p=0.040) and 2 days (from 5.6 to 3.6 days, p=0.020) respectively. The higher ELC rate and the reduction in LOS produced additional tariff income (£111,930) and estimated savings in bed day (£90,440) and readmission (£27,252) costs. Conclusions A dedicated ESU incorporating national recommendations for EGS improves alignment of best practice with best evidence and can also result in financial rewards for a busy district general hospital. PMID:26673047

  4. Incidence of acute kidney injury in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Doaa; Abd-Elrahman, Hadeel; Shehab, Mohamed M; Abd-Elrheem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a six-month period from September 2011 to March 2012. This prospective study was performed on 250 neonates admitted to the NICU at the Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University. All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, including pre-natal, natal and post-natal history, with stress on symptoms suggestive of AKI. All neonates were examined thoroughly and the following investigations were performed: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, urine sodium and urine creatinine. AKI was diagnosed in 27 cases (10.8%), including 12 females and 15 males. 40.7% of the AKI cases were born after full-term pregnancy while 59.3% were pre-term babies. 29.6% of the AKI cases had oliguria, and there was male sex predominance, with a male-female ratio of 1.3:1. The cause of AKI was pre-renal in 96.3% and intrinsic renal in 3.7% of the cases. The predisposing factors for AKI were sepsis in 63% of the cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 55.6%, mechanical ventilation in 51.9%, peri-natal asphyxia in 18.5%, dehydration in 14.8%, surgical operation in 11.1%, congenital heart disease in 7.4%, sub-galeal hematoma in 3.7%, polycythemia in 3.7% and intra-ventricular hemorrhage in 3.7% of the cases. Our data suggest that pre-renal failure was the most common form of AKI in our patients. Early recognition of risk factors such as sepsis, peri-natal asphyxia or peri-operative problems and rapid effective treatment of contributing conditions will reduce the incidence of AKI in the neonatal period.

  5. [Acute alcohol intoxication among children and adolescents admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice during 2000-2010--preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Halla; Agnieszka, Zachurzok-Buczyńska; Gawlik, Aneta; Małecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol drinking at the young age is a risk factor of alcohol addiction later in life, and is connected with school problems, binge drinking, tobacco addiction, illegal drug use, violence, crime commitment, and risky sexual behaviors. Alcohol drinking in the last 12 months is declared by 78% Polish children. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of admissions due to alcohol intoxication to the Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Pediatric Center of Silesia and the identification of the risk factors of the acute alcohol intoxication among Polish children and adolescents. Ten-year retrospective study includes investigation of patients medical records from the Department of Pediatrics. Among 8048 patients hospitalized in the Department of Pediatrics between the years 2000-2010, 220 (2.7%) cases of acute alcohol poisoning occurred The detailed data analysis from 139 patients [66 (47.5%) girls, 73 (52,5%) boys] was done. In the years 2006-2010 the number of girls admitted to the department increased in comparison to boys. The largest group of patients was at age between 14 and 16 years [61 (44%) children]. The blood alcohol concentration at the moment of admission to the hospital was 0.1 to 4.0 per thousand. In most cases (92.8%) the alcohol intoxication was intentional. Five percent of them were suicide attempts. In the youngest group of children alcohol abuse was unintentional. 23 (16.5%) of patients initially needed admission to the intensive care unit. In 30 (21.6%) patient the family was incomplete and five times more often father was absent. The alcohol addiction occurs in 18 (13.0%) fathers and 10 (7.2%) mothers of our patients. It is concluded that over the last decade the number of girls admitted due to alcohol abuse increased. Children at school grade between 7-9 are intoxicated most often. One six of intoxicated patents needed hospitalization at intensive care unit.

  6. A Review of 21st Century Utility of a Biopsychosocial Model in United States Medical School Education

    PubMed Central

    Jaini, Paresh Atu; Lee, Jenny Seung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Current medical practice is grounded in a biomedical model that fails to effectively address multifaceted lifestyle and morbidogenic environmental components that are the root causes of contemporary chronic diseases. Utilizing the biopsychosocial (BPS) model in medical school training may produce competent healthcare providers to meet the challenge of rising chronic illnesses that are a result of these factors. This study explored the current trend of research on the utility of the BPS model in medical education and examined medical school curricula that have explicitly adopted the BPS model. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature was conducted on the BPS model and medical education since the 1970s using multiple databases. Descriptive analysis was used to illustrate findings regarding the trends of the BPS model in medical education and its utility in specific medical schools in the United States. Results Major findings illustrated a growing trend in research on the BPS model in medical education since the 1970s with literature in this area most visible since 2000. The same trend was established for the incorporation of psychosocial or behavioral and social science components in medical education. From our peer-reviewed literature search, only 5 medical schools featured utility of the BPS model in their curricula utilizing variable educational processes. Conclusion Although literature regarding the BPS model in medical education is growing, the explicit utility of the BPS model in medical school is limited. Our findings can stimulate educational processes and research endeavors to advance medical education and medical practice to ensure that future doctors can meet the challenge of rising lifestyle and environmental associated illnesses. PMID:26770891

  7. Time-To-Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome and Unit of First Contact in the ERICO Study

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Rafael Caire de Oliveira; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Kisukuri, Alan Loureiro Xavier; Brandão, Rodrigo Martins; Sitnik, Debora; Staniak, Henrique Lane; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Bensenor, Isabela Martins; Santos, Itamar de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Background To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies evaluating the influence of the unit of the first contact on the frequency and time of pharmacological treatment during an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) event. Objectives The main objective was to investigate if the unit of first contact influenced the frequency and time of aspirin treatment in the Strategy of Registry of Acute Coronary Syndrome (ERICO) study. Methods We analyzed the pharmacological treatment time in 830 ERICO participants - 700 individuals for whom the hospital was the unit of first contact and 130 who initially sought primary care units. We built logistic regression models to study whether the unit of first contact was associated with a treatment time of less than three hours. Results Individuals who went to primary care units received the first aspirin dose in those units in 75.6% of the cases. The remaining 24.4% received aspirin at the hospital. Despite this finding, individuals from primary care still had aspirin administered within three hours more frequently than those who went to the hospital (76.8% vs 52.6%; p<0.001 and 100% vs. 70.7%; p=0.001 for non ST-elevation ACS and ST-elevation myocardial infarction, respectively). In adjusted models, individuals coming from primary care were more likely to receive aspirin more quickly (odds ratio: 3.66; 95% confidence interval: 2.06-6.51). Conclusions In our setting, individuals from primary care were more likely to receive aspirin earlier. Enhancing the ability of primary care units to provide early treatment and safe transportation may be beneficial in similar settings. PMID:27849262

  8. Advancing science diplomacy: Indonesia and the US Naval Medical Research Unit.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank L

    2014-12-01

    Science diplomacy supposedly builds international cooperation through scientific and technical exchange. In practice, however, there are important but often overlooked instances where it might create conflict instead--as with accusations of espionage surrounding the US Naval Medical Research Unit 2 (NAMRU-2) in Indonesia. Did American science diplomacy backfire in Indonesia and, if so, why? Most literature fails to anticipate this possibility, let alone explain it, since science diplomacy is rarely subject to critical analysis. Rather than shun politics or, similarly, simply blame the demise of NAMRU-2 on the military or avian influenza, I consider both the successes and failures of this research unit in the context of Indonesia's transition to democracy and America's legacy from the Cold War. Based on this history, I propose that the effects of science diplomacy depend on strategic communication and exchange, as well as elite influence and material incentives. Therefore, by challenging the conventional wisdom about science diplomacy, NAMRU-2 can help advance the theory and practice of this potentially useful tool of statecraft.

  9. Implementation of unit-based interventions to improve teamwork and patient safety on a medical service.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Creden, Amanda J; Slade, Maureen E; Landler, Matthew P; Kulkarni, Nita; Lee, Jungwha; Vozenilek, John A; Pfeifer, Pamela; Eller, Susan; Wayne, Diane B; Williams, Mark V

    2015-01-01

    In a prior study involving 2 medical units, Structured Interdisciplinary Rounds (SIDRs) improved teamwork and reduced adverse events (AEs). SIDR was implemented on 5 additional units, and a pre- versus postintervention comparison was performed. SIDR combined a structured format for communication with daily interprofessional meetings. Teamwork was assessed using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (score range = 0-100), and AEs were identified using queries of information systems confirmed by 2 physician researchers. Paired analyses for 82 professionals completing surveys both pre and post implementation revealed improved teamwork (mean 76.8 ± 14.3 vs 80.5 ± 11.6; P = .02), which was driven mainly by nurses (76.4 ± 14.1 vs 80.8 ± 10.4; P = .009). The AE rate was similar across study periods (3.90 vs 4.07 per 100 patient days; adjusted IRR = 1.08; P = .60). SIDR improved teamwork yet did not reduce AEs. Higher baseline teamwork scores and lower AE rates than the prior study may reflect a positive cultural shift that began prior to the current study.

  10. A comparison of applicant and matriculant trends, and rising costs of medical education in United States medical schools and at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Elam, Carol L; Scott, Kimberly L; Gilbert, Linda A; Hartmann, Beth A

    2003-05-01

    This paper addresses fluctuations in the applicant and matriculant pools both across United States medical schools and at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) for 1992-2002. It also presents data regarding the increasing costs of a medical education. Over the past decade, both nationally and at the UKCOM, there has been an over-all reduction in the number of applicants to medical school. In this changing applicant pool, the percentage of female matriculants has increased both nationally and at the UKCOM. However, the number of underrepresented minorities applying to and matriculating in the US and at the UKCOM has dropped since the mid-1990s. Although the applicant pool has decreased in size over the time period examined, the academic quality of applicants as measured by the undergraduate grade point average and Medical College Admission Test scores has increased both nationally and at UKCOM. Costs of a medical education have risen over time, as has the debt burden of medical school graduates due to increasing undergraduate debt, consumer debt, and medical school tuition. Potential causes for and implication of these changing trends are discussed.

  11. Missed Nursing Care and Unit-Level Nurse Workload in the Acute and Post-Acute Settings.

    PubMed

    Orique, Sabrina B; Patty, Christopher M; Woods, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study replicates previous research on the nature and causes of missed nursing care and adds an explanatory variable: unit-level nurse workload (patient turnover percentage). The study was conducted in California, which legally mandates nurse staffing ratios. Findings demonstrated no significant relationship between patient turnover and missed nursing care.

  12. [Prehospital stage of medical aid to patients with acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment].

    PubMed

    Vertkin, A L; Morozov, S N; Fedorov, A I

    2013-01-01

    We studied effect of time on the outcome of acute coronary syndrome and elevated ST segment at the prehospital stage. Logistic regression analysis revealed two time-dependent predictors: "symptom-needle" time and total call service time. In patients undergoing prehospital thrombolysis, these indices (88 and 85 min respectively) reliably predicted the probability of fatal outcome. Their values of 71 and 77 min respectively predicted the risk of unfavourable outcome. The total call service time may serve as an indicator of the quality of work of an ambulance crew at the prehospital stage of management of acute coronary syndrome with elevated ST segment.

  13. Race/Ethnicity in Medical Education: An Analysis of a Question Bank for Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

    PubMed

    Ripp, Kelsey; Braun, Lundy

    2017-01-04

    Phenomenon: There is growing concern over racial/ethnic bias in clinical care, yet how best to reduce bias remains challenging, in part because the sources of bias in medical education are poorly understood. One possible source is the routinized use of race/ethnicity in lectures, assessment, and preparatory materials, including question banks for licensing examinations. Because students worldwide use question banks to prepare for the United States Medical Licensing Examination, we examined how race/ethnicity was used in one of the most commonly recommended question banks.

  14. Acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis: current prevalence at Hospital das Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School.

    PubMed

    Belczak, Sergio Quilici; Cleva, Roberto D E; Utiyama, Edivaldo M; Cecconello, Ivan; Rasslan, Samir; Parreira, José Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Postsurgical acute suppurative parotitis is a bacterial gland infection that occurs from a few days up to some weeks after abdominal surgical procedures. In this study, the authors analyze the prevalence of this complication in Hospital das Clínicas/São Paulo University Medical School by prospectively reviewing the charts of patients who underwent surgeries performed by the gastroenterological and general surgery staff from 1980 to 2005. Diagnosis of parotitis or sialoadenitis was analyzed. Sialolithiasis and chronic parotitis previous to hospitalization were exclusion criteria. In a total of 100,679 surgeries, 256 patients were diagnosed with parotitis or sialoadenitis. Nevertheless, only three cases of acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis associated with the surgery were identified giving an incidence of 0.0028%. All patients presented with risk factors such as malnutrition, immunosuppression, prolonged immobilization and dehydration. In the past, acute postsurgical suppurative parotitis was a relatively common complication after major abdominal surgeries. Its incidence decreased as a consequence of the improvement of perioperative antibiotic therapy and postoperative support. In spite of the current low incidence, we believe it is important to identify risks and diagnose as quick as possible, in order to introduce prompt and appropriate therapeutic measures and avoid potentially fatal complications with the evolution of the disease.

  15. Survival after Left Ventricular Free Wall Rupture in an Elderly Woman with Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated Only Medically

    PubMed Central

    Roa-Castro, Víctor Hugo; Molina-Bello, Ervin; Valenzuela-Suárez, Hector; Rotberg-Jagode, Tobías; Espinola-Zavaleta, Nilda

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle is rare and may occur as a result of transmural myocardial infarction. The course of rupture after acute myocardial infarction varies from a catastrophic event, with an acute tear leading to immediate death (acute rupture), or slow and incomplete tear leading to a late rupture (subacute rupture). Incomplete rupture may occur when the thrombus and haematoma together with the pericardium seal the rupture of the left ventricle and may develop into a pseudoaneurysm. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential in this condition. Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is the first-choice method for most patients with suspected left ventricular pseudoaneurysm (LVP) and suggests left ventricular rupture in 85% to 90% of patients. We report the case of an 87-year-old woman presenting with symptoms and findings of myocardial infarction and left ventricular free wall rupture with a pseudoaneurysm formation diagnosed by echocardiography and confirmed on CT, MRI, and NM. She received only intense medical treatment, because she refused surgery with a favorable outcome. After 24-month followup, she is in NYHA functional class II. The survival of this patient is due to the contained pseudoaneurysm by dense pericardial adhesions, related to her previous coronary bypass surgery. PMID:22953155

  16. Acute viral hepatitis in the United States-Mexico border region: data from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) Project, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Spradling, Philip R; Xing, Jian; Phippard, Alba; Fonseca-Ford, Maureen; Montiel, Sonia; Guzmán, Norma Luna; Campuzano, Roberto Vázquez; Vaughan, Gilberto; Xia, Guo-liang; Drobeniuc, Jan; Kamili, Saleem; Cortés-Alcalá, Ricardo; Waterman, Stephen H

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases in the United States (US)-Mexico border region. We analyzed characteristics of acute viral hepatitis cases collected from the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance Project from January 2000-December 2009. Over the study period, 1,437 acute hepatitis A, 311 acute hepatitis B, and 362 acute hepatitis C cases were reported from 5 Mexico and 2 US sites. Mexican hepatitis A cases most frequently reported close personal contact with a known case, whereas, US cases most often reported cross-border travel. Injection drug use was common among Mexican and US acute hepatitis B and C cases. Cross-border travel during the incubation period was common among acute viral hepatitis cases in both countries. Assiduous adherence to vaccination and prevention guidelines in the US is needed and strategic implementation of hepatitis vaccination and prevention programs south of the border should be considered.

  17. Assessing the usability of a telemedicine-based Medication Delivery Unit for older adults through inspection methods.

    PubMed

    Ligons, Frank M; Romagnoli, Katrina M; Browell, Suzanne; Hochheiser, Harry S; Handler, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Polypharmacy and medication non-adherence are common in older adults, potentially leading to medication-related problems and increased healthcare expenditures. Medication Delivery Units (MDUs) may improve adherence, but their interfaces may present usability challenges for older adults with age-related impairments. We used a combination of three inspection methods - heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, and simulated elderly interaction, to identify potential concerns with the usability of a commercially available telemedicine MDU. Each method revealed different problems, with repeated discoveries via different methods providing triangulated evidence. Despite the MDU's general usability, issues of varying severity were discovered. Significant usability issues associated with physical interactions with the MDU included loading and unloading the medication blister packs, and opening the delivered medication prior to administration. Less severe issues centered on small text sizes and poor user feedback. Further usability testing, involving older adults with a variety of impairments, is needed to validate findings.

  18. Assessing the Usability of a Telemedicine-based Medication Delivery Unit for Older Adults through Inspection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ligons, Frank M.; Romagnoli, Katrina M.; Browell, Suzanne; Hochheiser, Harry S.; Handler, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Polypharmacy and medication non-adherence are common in older adults, potentially leading to medication-related problems and increased healthcare expenditures. Medication Delivery Units (MDUs) may improve adherence, but their interfaces may present usability challenges for older adults with age-related impairments. We used a combination of three inspection methods – heuristic evaluation, cognitive walkthrough, and simulated elderly interaction, to identify potential concerns with the usability of a commercially available telemedicine MDU. Each method revealed different problems, with repeated discoveries via different methods providing triangulated evidence. Despite the MDU’s general usability, issues of varying severity were discovered. Significant usability issues associated with physical interactions with the MDU included loading and unloading the medication blister packs, and opening the delivered medication prior to administration. Less severe issues centered on small text sizes and poor user feedback. Further usability testing, involving older adults with a variety of impairments, is needed to validate findings. PMID:22195137

  19. A primer on medical education in the United States through the lens of a current resident physician

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physician training and standards for medical licensure differ widely across the globe. The medical education process in the United States (US) typically involves a minimum of 11 years of formal training and multiple standardized examinations between graduating from secondary school and becoming an attending physician with full medical licensure. Students in the US traditionally enter a 4-year medical school after completing an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, in contrast to most other countries where medical training begins after graduation from high school. Medical school seniors planning to practice medicine in the US must complete postgraduate clinical training, referred to as residency, within the specialty of their choosing. The duration of residency varies depending on specialty, typically lasting between 3 and 7 years. For subspecialty fields, additional clinical training is often required in the form of a fellowship. Many experts have called for changes in the medical education system to shorten medical training in the US, and reforms are ongoing in some institutions. However, physician education in the US generally remains a progression from undergraduate premedical coursework to 4 years of medical school, followed by residency training with an optional subspecialty fellowship. PMID:26605316

  20. A primer on medical education in the United States through the lens of a current resident physician

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Physician training and standards for medical licensure differ widely across the globe. The medical education process in the United States (US) typically involves a minimum of 11 years of formal training and multiple standardized examinations between graduating from secondary school and becoming an attending physician with full medical licensure. Students in the US traditionally enter a 4-year medical school after completing an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, in contrast to most other countries where medical training begins after graduation from high school. Medical school seniors planning to practice medicine in the US must complete postgraduate clinical training, referred to as residency, within the specialty of their choosing. The duration of residency varies depending on specialty, typically lasting between 3 and 7 years. For subspecialty fields, additional clinical training is often required in the form of a fellowship. Many experts have called for changes in the medical education system to shorten medical training in the US, and reforms are ongoing in some institutions. However, physician education in the US generally remains a progression from undergraduate premedical coursework to 4 years of medical school, followed by residency training with an optional subspecialty fellowship. PMID:26623123

  1. Medication Nonadherence is Associated with Increased Subsequent Acute Care Utilization among Medicaid Beneficiaries with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Candace H.; Yazdany, Jinoos; Guan, Hongshu; Solomon, Daniel H.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined whether nonadherence to hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) or immunosuppressive medications (IS) was associated with higher subsequent acute care utilization among Medicaid beneficiaries with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods We utilized U.S. Medicaid data from 2000–2006 to identify adults 18–64 years with SLE who were new users of HCQ or IS. We defined the index date as receipt of HCQ or IS without use in the prior six months. We measured adherence using the medication possession ratio (MPR), the proportion of days covered by total days supply dispensed, for one-year post-index date. Our outcomes were all-cause and SLE-related emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations in the subsequent year. We used multivariable Poisson regression models to examine the association between nonadherence (MPR<80%) and acute care utilization adjusting for sociodemographics and comorbidities. Results We identified 9,600 HCQ new users and 3,829 IS new users with SLE. The mean MPR for HCQ was 47.8% (SD 30.3) and for IS, 42.7% (SD 30.7). 79% of HCQ users and 83% of IS users were nonadherent (MPR<80%). In multivariable models, among HCQ users, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of ED visits was 1.55 (95% CI 1.43–1.69) and the IRR of hospitalizations was 1.37 (95% CI 1.25–1.50), comparing nonadherers to adherers. For IS users, the IRR of ED visits was 1.64 (95% CI 1.42–1.89) and of hospitalizations was 1.67 (95% CI 1.41–1.96) for nonadherers versus adherers. Conclusion In this cohort, nonadherence to HCQ and IS was common and was associated with significantly higher subsequent acute care utilization. PMID:26097166

  2. Impact of pharmaceutical care on pain and agitation in a medical intensive care unit in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Dilokpattanamongkol, Pitchaya; Tangsujaritvijit, Viratch; Suansanae, Thanarat; Suthisisang, Chuthamanee

    2017-03-29

    Background Currently, a lack of pharmaceutical care exists concerning pain and agitation in medical intensive care units (MICU) in Thailand. Pharmaceutical care focusing on analgesics/sedatives would improve clinical outcomes. Objective To investigate the impact of pharmaceutical care of pain and agitation on ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, ventilator days and mortality. Setting The MICU of a university hospital. Method A before/after study was conducted on mechanically ventilated patients receiving analgesics/sedatives. Medical chart reviews and data collection were conducted in the retrospective group (no pharmacists involved). In the prospective group, pharmacists involved with the critical care team helped select analgesics/sedatives for individual patients. Main outcome measure ICU LOS Results In total, 90 and 66 patients were enrolled in retrospective and prospective groups, respectively. The median duration of ICU LOS was reduced from 10.00 (2.00-72.00) in the retrospective group to 6.50 days (2.00-30.00) in the prospective group (p = 0.002). The median hospital stay was reduced from 30.50 days (2.00-119.00) in the retrospective group to 17.50 days (2.00-110.00) in the prospective group (p < 0.001). Also, the median ventilator days was reduced from 14.00 days (2.00-90.00) to 8.50 days (1.00-45.00), p = 0.008. Mortality was 53.03% in the prospective group and 46.67% in the retrospective group (p = 0.432). Conclusion Pharmacist participation in a critical care team resulted in a significant reduction in the duration of ICU LOS, hospital LOS and ventilator days, but not mortality.

  3. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment of Aggressive Patients Admitted to the Acute Behavioral Unit of a Community General Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Reade, Cynthia; Stoltzfus, Jill; Mittal, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive patients are not uncommon in acute inpatient behavioral health units of general hospitals. Prior research identifies various predictors associated with aggressive inpatient behavior. This prospective observational study examines the demographic and clinical characteristics of aggressive inpatients and the routine medications these patients were receiving at discharge. Method: Thirty-six adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV mental disorder who met 2 of 6 established inclusion criteria for high violence risk and a Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale score ≥ 4 were observed for a maximum of 28 days on the 23-bed case mix acute behavioral health unit of St Luke’s University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from January 2012 to May 2013. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and CGI-S; secondary measures were symptom outcome measures and demographic and clinical characteristics data. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Results: Younger males with a history of previous violence, psychiatric admissions, and symptoms of severe agitation were more at risk for aggressive behavior. Positive psychotic symptoms, a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, substance use, and comorbid personality disorders also increased risk. Significant improvements from baseline to last visit were observed for the CGI-S and MOAS (P < .001 for both), with a significant correlation between the MOAS and CGI-S at last visit (P < .001). Only the symptom of agitation was significantly correlated to MOAS scores at both baseline and last visit (P < .001). Conclusion: Patients significantly improved over time in both severity of illness and level of aggression. PMID:25317364

  4. Epidemiology of Acute Pancreatitis in Hospitalized Children in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Olyaee, Mojtaba; Anderson, Michael P.; Bitar, Anas; Steele, Marilyn I.; Bass, Pat F.; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest an increasing incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) in children. Our specific aims were to (i) estimate the recent secular trends, (ii) assess the disease burden, and (iii) define the demographics and comorbid conditions of AP in hospitalized children within the United States. Methods We used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for the years 2000 to 2009. Extracted data were weighted to generate national-level estimates. We used the Cochrane-Armitage test to analyze trends; cohort-matching to evaluate the association of AP and in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges; and multivariable logistic regression to test the association of AP and demographics and comorbid conditions. Results We identified 55,012 cases of AP in hospitalized children (1–20 years of age). The incidence of AP increased from 23.1 to 34.9 (cases per 10,000 hospitalizations per year; P<0.001) and for all-diagnoses 38.7 to 61.1 (P<0.001). There was an increasing trend in the incidence of both primary and all-diagnoses of AP (P<0.001). In-hospital mortality decreased (13.1 to 7.6 per 1,000 cases, P<0.001), median length of stay decreased (5 to 4 days, P<0.001), and median charges increased ($14,956 to $22,663, P<0.001). Children with AP compared to those without the disease had lower in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, aOR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.78–0.95), longer lengths of stay (aOR 2.42, 95% CI, 2.40–2.46), and higher charges (aOR 1.62, 95% CI, 1.59–1.65). AP was more likely to occur in children older than 5 years of age (aORs 2.81 to 5.25 for each 5-year age interval). Hepatobiliary disease was the comorbid condition with the greatest association with AP. Conclusions These results demonstrate a rising incidence of AP in hospitalized children. Despite improvements in mortality and length of stay, hospitalized children with AP have significant morbidity. PMID

  5. [Learning from the experiences of an arbitration unit for medical liability questions].

    PubMed

    Scheppokat, K D

    2005-03-01

    While other countries', e.g. the United States', experience with alternative dispute resolution (ADR) in medical malpractice has been disappointing, German physicians have instituted extrajudicial claims resolution as an alternative to civil litigation: Established by the Arztekammern (corporate bodies of professional self-governance) in the mid-1970s, the Schlichtungsstellen (SchlSt--claims resolution panels) offer patients and doctors, on a voluntary basis, proceedings directed toward achieving a settlement. The number of cases submitted to these panels has been constantly growing since. In 90% of cases decided upon by the panel, civil litigation was avoided. Doctors can, as exemplified by the operation of the SchlSt, tackle difficult and complex problems and solve them--without being funded or directed by outside agencies. What can be learnt from being, as a physician member, associated with a SchlSt for several years? (1) Physicians--as Eddy has pointed out--must make decisions about complex problems under difficult conditions on the basis of inadequate information. Expert testimony suffers from similar uncertainties. Decisions on individual cases cannot be improved by external and necessarily generalized ruling (disease management programs, other directives). (2) Errors and adverse events in medical care have to be accepted as principally unavoidable. Most claims heard by the panel have to do with operations and--in the non-surgical specialties--with invasive procedures. Medical tasks of high complexity, as many operative and invasive procedures indeed are, seem to have an inherent accident-proneness. Therefore decisions as to operations and invasive procedures should be weighed with utmost care. More is not always better (3) 25% of the patients filing claims with the SchlSt complain of deficient doctor-patient-communication. Failure of doctors and staff to communicate adequately with the patients and with their professional contacts plays an important role as

  6. Discharge behaviors of trapezius motor units during exposure to low and high levels of acute psychosocial stress

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Jennifer L; Maluf, Katrina S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute psychosocial stress on trapezius single motor unit discharge behaviors. Twenty-one healthy women performed feedback-controlled isometric contractions under conditions of low and high psychosocial stress in the same experimental session. Psychosocial stress was manipulated using a verbal math task combined with social evaluative threat which significantly increased perceived anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure (P<0.001). Motor unit discharge behaviors including the threshold and discharge rate at recruitment (7.7 (5.7) %MVC and 7.3 (6.8) pps, P>0.121, N=103) and derecruitment (6.0(4.4) %MVC and 6.5(4.1) pps, P>0.223, N=99), the mean (11.3 (2.3) pps, P=0.309, N=106) and variability (2.5 (0.91) pps, P=0.958, N=106) of discharge rate, and the proportion of motor units exhibiting double discharges (21%, P=0.446) did not change across stress conditions. Discharge rate modulation with changes in contraction intensity was highly variable and similar across stress conditions (P>0.308, N=89). Rate-rate modulation of concurrently active motor units was also highly variable (r=−0.84–1.00, N=75). Estimates of ΔF for motor unit pairs with rate-rate modulation ≥0.7 were positive and similar across stress conditions (4.7(2.0) pps, P=0.405, N=16). Results indicate that acute psychosocial stress does not alter trapezius motor unit discharge behaviors during a precisely controlled motor task in healthy women. PMID:20087201

  7. The medical examination in United States immigration applications: the potential use of genetic testing leads to heightened privacy concerns.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, A Maxwell

    2005-01-01

    The medical examination has been an integral part of the immigration application process since the passing of the Immigration Act of 1891. Failing the medical examination can result in denial of the application. Over the years the medical examination has been expanded to include questioning about diseases that are scientifically shown to be rooted in an individual's genetic makeup. Recent advances in the fields of genomics and bioinformatics are making accurate and precise screening for these conditions a reality. Government policymakers will soon be faced with decisions regarding whether or not to sanction the use of these newly-developed genetic tests in the immigration application procedure. The terror threat currently facing the United States may ultimately bolster the argument in favor of genetic testing and/or DNA collection of applicants. However, the possibility of a government mandate requiring genetic testing raises a host of ethical issues; including the threat of eugenics and privacy concerns. Genetic testing has the ability to uncover a wealth of sensitive medical information about an individual and currently there are no medical information privacy protections afforded to immigration applicants. This article examines the potential for genetic testing in the immigration application process and the ethical issues surrounding this testing. In particular, this article explores the existing framework of privacy protections afforded to individuals living in the United States and how this and newly-erected standards like those released by the Health and Human Services (HHS) might apply to individuals seeking to immigrate to the United States.

  8. Relationship of Delayed Parenteral Nutrition Protocol with the Clinical Outcomes in a Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hosun; Chung, Kyung Soo; Park, Moo Suk; Na, Sungwon

    2014-01-01

    Although parenteral nutrition (PN) is an important treatment for patients who are unable to tolerate enteral nutrition (EN), recent international guidelines recommended that PN should be reserved and initiated only after 7 days in well-nourished patients. This retrospective study was conducted to analyze the effect on clinical outcomes of a PN protocol with PN starting 4 days after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Eighty-one patients who were admitted from January to March of 2012 were included in the pre-protocol group, and 74 patients who were admitted from April to June of 2012 were included in the post-protocol group. There were no significant differences between the two groups when the age, gender, and admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were compared. Significantly fewer patients in the post-protocol group were provided PN (58.1% vs. 81.3%, p = 0.002), which was initiated significantly later than in the pre-protocol group (2.7 ± 2.2 days vs. 1.9 ± 2.0 days, p = 0.046). Five patients (6.2%) in the pre-protocol group acquired central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI) in the ICU, yet none of the patients in the post-protocol group developed CLA-BSI (p = 0.03). The duration of antibiotic therapy and ICU stay were significantly shorter in the post-protocol group than in the pre-protocol group. By delaying initiation of PN, short-term clinical outcomes including incidence of CLA-BSI, antibiotic use, and ICU stay might be improved. Further research should be conducted to investigate the long-term effects of the decreased nutrient intake resulting from delayed PN. PMID:24527418

  9. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  10. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  11. 20 CFR 404.462 - Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonpayment of hospital and medical insurance benefits of alien outside United States for more than 6 months. 404.462 Section 404.462 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Deductions; Reductions; and Nonpayments...

  12. Do International Medical Graduates (IMGs) "Fill the Gap" in Rural Primary Care in the United States? A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Matthew J.; Hagopian, Amy; Fordyce, Meredith; Hart, L. Gary

    2009-01-01

    Context: The contribution that international medical graduates (IMGs) make to reducing the rural-urban maldistribution of physicians in the United States is unclear. Quantifying the extent of such "gap filling" has significant implications for planning IMG workforce needs as well as other state and federal initiatives to increase the numbers of…

  13. A Daily Goals Tool to Facilitate Indirect Nurse-Physician Communication During Morning Rounds on a Medical-Surgical Unit.

    PubMed

    Perry, Veronica; Christiansen, Mollie; Simmons, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional bedside rounds are essential for patient-centered care. However, it may be difficult for nurses to round with physicians on medical-surgical units. Using a daily goals tool for indirect rounds improved nurse-physician communication and interprofessional care for patients.

  14. Mental health in the United States. Prevalence of diagnosis and medication treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder--United States, 2003.

    PubMed

    2005-09-02

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), previously known as attention deficit disorder, is a neurobehavioral disorder characterized by pervasive inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity that often results in substantial functional impairment. Prevalence estimates of ADHD in school-aged children have ranged from 2% to 18% in community samples. Although stimulant medications are an effective first-line treatment for ADHD , concern persists regarding the possible side effects and long-term health outcomes associated with stimulant consumption. Estimating the number of children who have had ADHD diagnosed and are currently taking medication for the disorder is an important step toward understanding the overall burden of ADHD in the United States. Previously, population-based estimates of medication treatment for ADHD were not available or were limited by their lack of generalizability. To estimate rates of parent-reported ADHD diagnosis and medication treatment for ADHD, CDC analyzed data from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, in 2003, approximately 4.4 million children aged 4-17 years were reported to have a history of ADHD diagnosis; of these, 2.5 million (56%) were reported to be taking medication for the disorder. Because both substantial health risks and benefits might be associated with medication treatment for ADHD, further study of this population of children with ADHD is needed.

  15. Discharge against Medical Advice at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Devpura, Bhanu; Bhadesia, Pranav; Desai, Sandeep; Phatak, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We explored reasons for discharged against medical advice (DAMA) of neonates from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) through in-depth interviews of the parents/guardians. Methods. Of 456 babies admitted to NICU during April 2014 to March 2015, 116 babies were DAMA. Parents of randomly selected 50 babies of these 116, residing within 50 kilometers, were approached for in-depth interviews at their homes. Audio recordings were done and manually transcribed, analyzed in detail to explore common threads leading to DAMA. Basic demographic information of the newborns was retrieved from hospital records. Results. The prevalence of DAMA was 25.4%. Of 50 parents approached, 41 in-depth interviews were completed. Nonaffordability (38.6%), no improvement (14.6%), poor prognosis (12%), and inappropriate behavior of the patient relation office personnel (10.6%) were major factors contributing to DAMA. Parents of 6.6% neonates wanted guarantee of survival and 5.3% parents reported poor behavior of nurses. No gender bias was observed related to DAMA. One-third of neonates (34.1%) were DAMA on first day of admission. Conclusions. The issue of DAMA needs attention. Besides nonaffordability and clinical characteristics of the baby, communication (breaking bad news, counseling, etc.) and lack of adequate infrastructure for relatives emerged as modifiable factors leading to DAMA. PMID:28003834

  16. An update on the status of anatomical sciences education in United States medical schools.

    PubMed

    Drake, Richard L; McBride, Jennifer M; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Curricular changes continue at United States medical schools and directors of gross anatomy, microscopic anatomy, neuroscience/neuroanatomy, and embryology courses continue to adjust and modify their offerings. Developing and supplying data related to current trends in anatomical sciences education is important if informed decisions are going to be made in a time of curricular and course revision. Thus, a survey was sent to course directors during the 2012-2013 academic years to gather information on total course hours, lecture and laboratory hours, the type of laboratory experiences, testing and competency evaluation, and the type of curricular approach used at their institution. The data gathered were compared to information obtained from previous surveys and conclusions reached were that only small or no change was observed in total course, lecture and laboratory hours in all four courses; more gross anatomy courses were part of an integrated curriculum since the previous survey; virtual microscopy with and without microscopes was the primary laboratory activity in microscopic anatomy courses; and neuroscience/neuroanatomy and embryology courses were unchanged.

  17. Multiple medication use in older patients in post-acute transitional care: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Runganga, Maureen; Peel, Nancye M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults with a range of comorbidities are often prescribed multiple medications, which may impact on their function and cognition and increase the potential for drug interactions and adverse events. Aims This study investigated the extent of polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate medications in patients receiving post-discharge transitional home care and explored the associations of polypharmacy with patient characteristics, functional outcomes, and frailty. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of 351 patients discharged home from hospital with support from six Transition Care Program (TCP) sites in two states of Australia. A comprehensive geriatric assessment was conducted at TCP admission and discharge using the interRAI Home Care assessment tool, with frailty measured using an index of 57 accumulated deficits. Medications from hospital discharge summaries were coded using the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Results Polypharmacy (5–9 drugs) was observed in 46.7% and hyperpolypharmacy (≥10 drugs) in 39.2% of patients. Increasing numbers of medications were associated with greater number of comorbid conditions, a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dizziness, and dyspnea and increased frailty. At discharge from the program, the non-polypharmacy group (<5 drugs) had improved outcomes in Activities of Daily Living, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living and fewer falls, which was mediated because of lower levels of frailty. The commonest drugs were analgesics (56.8%) and antiulcer drugs (52.7%). The commonest potentially inappropriate medications were tertiary tricyclic antidepressants. Conclusion Polypharmacy is common in older patients discharged from hospital. It is associated with frailty, falls, and poor functional outcomes. Efforts should be made to encourage regular medication reviews and

  18. A Business Case Analysis: Establishment of a Sub-Acute Ward for Tripler Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    comprises palliative care , rehabilitation medicine, psychogeriatrics, and geriatric evaluation and management. Non-acute care includes nursing home... Care Division for their assistance in gathering data. I would also like to thank Ms. Tessa Travers, and Mr. Donald McGue from the Resource Management...Services for her support in gathering data. Finally, I would like to express thanks to Mr. Richard Meiers, President of the Health Care Association of

  19. Acute renal failure secondary to ingestion of alternative medication in a patient with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulia, S; Gota, V; Kumar, Sangita D; Gupta, Sudeep

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients is widely prevalent and often underreported. Advanced stage of disease is significantly associated with CAM use. The concurrent use of alternative medicines and chemotherapy drugs has the potential to lead to toxicities as well as altered therapeutic activity due to unknown interactions. We report a case of early breast cancer who presented to us with non-oliguric acute renal failure related concurrent use of Ayurvedic medicines and adjuvant anthracycline based.

  20. [Medical treatment of acute hemorrhagic stroke--observation of 44 cases with FCMCK therapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, J

    1990-02-01

    Based on the analysis of heritable autoregulatory functions and adaptive developments which occur long course of in response to inner and outer environment, FCMCK therapy was first designed to mobilize the autoregulatory system and resist the stress of acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke. In this paper, 44 cases of acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke were treated with FCMCK therapy, with another 44 cases treated with mannitol as control. The result showed that the mortality rate of the treated group was 4.5% (2/44), significantly lower than that of the control (47.7%, 21/44, P less than 0.01). FCMCK therapy in acute hemorrhagic cerebral stroke has the following advantages: 1) effectiveness in maintenance of adequate blood pressure; 2) effectiveness in reduction of cardiac arrhythmias and other complications; 3) i.v. drip of Ca and repeated use of digitalis shows atoxic effect; and 4) respiratory failure improves without stopping i.v. drip of Mg. The mechanism of FCMCK therapy is briefly discussed by the authors.

  1. Does Obesity Predispose Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients to Venous Thromboembolism despite Prophylaxis? A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Peters, Bradley J; Dierkhising, Ross A; Mara, Kristin C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a significant issue in the critically ill population. There is little evidence directing the dosing of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis within this population. We aimed to determine whether obesity predisposes medical intensive care unit patients to venous thromboembolism despite standard chemoprophylaxis with 5000 international units of subcutaneous heparin three times daily. Results. We found a 60% increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) group compared to the BMI < 30 kg/m(2) group; however, this difference did not reach statistical significance. After further utilizing our risk model, neither obesity nor mechanical ventilation reached statistical significance; however, vasopressor administration was associated with a threefold risk. Conclusions. We can conclude that obesity did increase the rate of VTE, but not to a statistically significant level in this single center medical intensive care unit population.

  2. The acute medical management of detained Somali pirates and their captives.

    PubMed

    Schranz, Craig

    2012-09-01

    Over the last several years, piracy off the coast of East Africa has resulted in significant risks to merchant vessels and their crews. There have been multiple instances of both pirates being detained and captives being liberated by military vessels. The unique health concerns of this population have been minimally studied and military health providers must be prepared to identify and manage potential medical conditions. In an attempt to provide further guidance for providers, this article reviews the limited available literature and identifies potential health concerns of pirates and recently released captives. In addition to traumatic injuries, specific medical concerns that must be considered include infectious disease, wound management, dehydration, hypothermia, malnutrition, electrolyte disturbance, and potential psychiatric conditions. Infectious disease is also a major threat. Malaria, tuberculosis, and intestinal parasites likely pose the greatest risk. A careful medical screening along with an extensive intake history and physical examination are essential for rapid identification and initial management of this unique population.

  3. Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy in a 5-week-old boy referred to the Child Protection Unit.

    PubMed

    Hawkrigg, Sharon; Johnson, Alice; Flynn, James; Thom, Graham; Wright, Helen

    2014-06-01

    We describe the case of a 5-week-old infant boy presenting with purpura and oedema to both hands and torso. He was otherwise well, with no antecedent history of illness or trauma. Laboratory investigations were within normal limits. A review by the Child Protection Unit was organised during his admission for consideration of inflicted trauma as a cause of the lesions; this was felt most unlikely. A clinical diagnosis, following a dermatology consultation, of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHO) was made.

  4. Clinical and epidemiological study of stress hyperglycemia among medical intensive care unit patients in Central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jitendra; Chittawar, Sachin; Maniram, Ram Singh; Dubey, T. N.; Singh, Ambrish

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress hyperglycemia is common in patients presenting at the emergency medical ward and is associated with poor prognosis and increased risk of mortality. Aims and Objective: To study and determine the prevalence and factors associated with stress hyperglycemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed on 536 nondiabetic patients presented to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Gandhi Medical College and allied Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, between March 31, 2015, and May 28, 2015. A detailed history including demographic profile, presence of chronic disease, history of hospitalization and ICU admission, surgical status, and major reason for ICU admission (i.e., predominant diagnostic category) was collected. Hematological and other parameters based on profile of study population were also analyzed. Results: Out of 536 patients, 109 (20.33%) had stress hyperglycemia. Out of 109 patients with stress hyperglycemia, 87 (16.23%) patients had glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) <5.7% and 22 (4.10%) patients had HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. Mean age of the study population was 40.27 ± 1.44 years, with male dominance. Mean random blood glucose level was 181.46 ± 3.80 mg/dl. Frequency of stress hyperglycemia was 24.13% in stroke, 19.54% in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), 17.24% in chronic kidney disease (CKD), 12.64% in central nervous system (CNS) infection, 8.05% in chronic liver disease (CLD), and 8.05% in seizure patients. Association between stroke and stress hyperglycemia was significant (P = 0.036). Association between hospital stay more than 7 days and stress hyperglycemia was significant in stroke patients (P = 0.0029), CKD patients (P = 0.0036), CLD (P = 0.0099), and MODS patients (P = 0.0328). Conclusions: The factors associated with stress hyperglycemia were stroke, MODS, CKD, CNS infection, CLD, seizure patients, with prolonged hospital stay and expected proportion. PMID:28217513

  5. On-site availability of Legionella testing in acute care hospitals, United States.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Laurel E; Shaw, Kristin M S; McCollum, Jeffrey T; Dexter, Carol; Vagnone, Paula M Snippes; Thompson, Jamie H; Giambrone, Gregory; White, Benjamin; Thomas, Stepy; Carpenter, L Rand; Nichols, Megin; Parker, Erin; Petit, Susan; Hicks, Lauri A; Langley, Gayle E

    2014-07-01

    We surveyed 399 US acute care hospitals regarding availability of on-site Legionella testing; 300 (75.2%) did not offer Legionella testing on site. Availability varied according to hospital size and geographic location. On-site access to testing may improve detection of Legionnaires disease and inform patient management and prevention efforts.

  6. Implementing medical revalidation in the United Kingdom: Findings about organisational changes and impacts from a survey of Responsible Officers

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Alan; Bryce, Marie; Luscombe, Kayleigh; Tazzyman, Abigail; Tredinnick-Rowe, John; Archer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the implementation of medical revalidation in healthcare organisations in the United Kingdom and to examine reported changes and impacts on the quality of care. Design A cross-sectional online survey gathering both quantitative and qualitative data about structures and processes for medical revalidation and wider quality management in the organisations which employ or contract with doctors (termed ‘designated bodies’) from the senior doctor in each organisation with statutory responsibility for medical revalidation (termed the ‘Responsible Officer’). Setting United Kingdom Participants Responsible Officers in designated bodies in the United Kingdom. Five hundred and ninety-five survey invitations were sent and 374 completed surveys were returned (63%). Main outcome measures The role of Responsible Officers, the development of organisational mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement, decision-making on revalidation recommendations, impact of revalidation and mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement on clinical practice and suggested improvements to revalidation arrangements. Results Responsible Officers report that revalidation has had some impacts on the way medical performance is assured and improved, particularly strengthening appraisal and oversight of quality within organisations and having some impact on clinical practice. They suggest changes to make revalidation less ‘one size fits all’ and more responsive to individual, organisational and professional contexts. Conclusions Revalidation appears primarily to have improved systems for quality improvement and the management of poor performance to date. There is more to be done to ensure it produces wider benefits, particularly in relation to doctors who already perform well. PMID:28084166

  7. The social practice of rescue: the safety implications of acute illness trajectories and patient categorisation in medical and maternity settings.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Sandall, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The normative position in acute hospital care when a patient is seriously ill is to resuscitate and rescue. However, a number of UK and international reports have highlighted problems with the lack of timely recognition, treatment and referral of patients whose condition is deteriorating while being cared for on hospital wards. This article explores the social practice of rescue, and the structural and cultural influences that guide the categorisation and ordering of acutely ill patients in different hospital settings. We draw on Strauss et al.'s notion of the patient trajectory and link this with the impact of categorisation practices, thus extending insights beyond those gained from emergency department triage to care management processes further downstream on the hospital ward. Using ethnographic data collected from medical wards and maternity care settings in two UK inner city hospitals, we explore how differences in population, cultural norms, categorisation work and trajectories of clinical deterioration interlink and influence patient safety. An analysis of the variation in findings between care settings and patient groups enables us to consider socio-political influences and the specifics of how staff manage trade-offs linked to the enactment of core values such as safety and equity in practice.

  8. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jones, James F; Maloney, Elizabeth M; Boneva, Roumiana S; Jones, Ann-Britt; Reeves, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others) was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003). All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems) were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage) than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82). Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002). People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1.07, 2.16) and mind

  9. [Hospital management of acute respiratory failure: the role of the pulmonologist and of the respiratory intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2009-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is one of the most common and severe urgencies of the modern medicine which may require the application of mechanical ventilation and a careful monitoring of the patient's conditions. With the popularity of non-invasive ventilation and the interest of the pulmonologist for the care of the respiratory critical patient, in Italy there has been the spreading of Respiratory Intensive Care Units (RICU), which are as intermediate specialist structures in terms of intensity of care between the General Intensive Care Unit and the ordinary ward. In this article, the author analysed the cultural, scientific and organizational aspects of the central role played by the pulmonologist who's working in the RICU in the complex intra-hospital multi-disciplinary management of ARF.

  10. Understanding Electronic Medical Record Adoption in the United States: Communication and Sociocultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary L; Polit, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper adopts a communication and sociocultural perspective to analyze the factors behind the lag in electronic medical record (EMR) adoption in the United States. Much of the extant research on this topic has emphasized economic factors, particularly, lack of economic incentives, as the primary cause of the delay in EMR adoption. This prompted the Health Information Technology on Economic and Clinical Health Act that allow financial incentives through the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services for many health care organizations planning to adopt EMR. However, financial incentives alone have not solved the problem; many new innovations do not diffuse even when offered for free. Thus, this paper underlines the need to consider communication and sociocultural factors to develop a better understanding of the impediments of EMR adoption. Objective The objective of this paper was to develop a holistic understanding of EMR adoption by identifying and analyzing the impact of communication and sociocultural factors that operate at 3 levels: macro (environmental), meso (organizational), and micro (individual). Methods We use the systems approach to focus on the 3 levels (macro, meso, and micro) and developed propositions at each level drawing on the communication and sociocultural perspectives. Results Our analysis resulted in 10 propositions that connect communication and sociocultural aspects with EMR adoption. Conclusions This paper brings perspectives from the social sciences that have largely been missing in the extant literature of health information technology (HIT) adoption. In doing so, it implies how communication and sociocultural factors may complement (and in some instances, reinforce) the impact of economic factors on HIT adoption. PMID:23612390

  11. Identification of Phthalates in Medications and Dietary Supplement Formulations in the United States and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Chaplin, Erica L.; Hauser, Russ; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In animal studies, some ortho-phthalates, including di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), have been shown to be reproductive and developmental toxicants. Human studies show widespread population exposure to background levels of phthalates. Limited evidence suggests that particularly high exposure levels may result from orally ingested medicinal products containing phthalates as excipients (inactive ingredients). Objective: In this study we aimed to identify and describe the scope of prescription (RX) and nonprescription (over-the-counter; OTC) medicinal products and dietary supplements marketed in the United States and Canada since 1995 that include phthalates as excipients. Methods: We used lists of modified-release drug products to identify potential drug products. Inclusion of phthalates was verified using available electronic databases, print references, published package inserts, product packages, and direct communication from manufacturers. Additional products were identified using Internet searches utilizing keywords for phthalates. Results: Based on labeling information, 6 RX drug products included DBP as an excipient, and 45 specified the use of diethyl phthalate (DEP). Phthalate polymers with no known toxicity—hypromellose phthalate (HMP), cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP), and polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP)—were included in 75 RX products. Three OTC drug and dietary supplement products listed DBP, 64 listed DEP, and > 90 indicated inclusion of polymers. Conclusions: Numerous RX and OTC drug products and supplements from a wide range of therapeutic categories may use DBP or DEP as excipients in oral dosage forms. The potential effects of human exposure to these phthalates through medications are unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:22169271

  12. Transmission Dynamics of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Medical Intensive Care Unit in India

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Solomon; Verghis, Rejina Mariam; Antonisamy, Belavendra; Sowmyanarayanan, Thuppal Varadachari; Brahmadathan, Kootallur Narayanan; Kang, Gagandeep; Cooper, Ben Symons

    2011-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a global pathogen and an important but seldom investigated cause of morbidity and mortality in lower and middle-income countries where it can place a major burden on limited resources. Quantifying nosocomial transmission in resource-poor settings is difficult because molecular typing methods are prohibitively expensive. Mechanistic statistical models can overcome this problem with minimal cost. We analyse the transmission dynamics of MRSA in a hospital in south India using one such approach and provide conservative estimates of the organism's economic burden. Methods and Findings Fifty months of MRSA infection data were collected retrospectively from a Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) in a tertiary hospital in Vellore, south India. Data were analysed using a previously described structured hidden Markov model. Seventy-two patients developed MRSA infections and, of these, 49 (68%) died in the MICU. We estimated that 4.2% (95%CI 1.0, 19.0) of patients were MRSA-positive when admitted, that there were 0.39 MRSA infections per colonized patient month (0.06, 0.73), and that the ward-level reproduction number for MRSA was 0.42 (0.08, 2.04). Anti-MRSA antibiotic treatment costs alone averaged $124/patient, over three times the monthly income of more than 40% of the Indian population. Conclusions Our analysis of routine data provides the first estimate of the nosocomial transmission potential of MRSA in India. The high levels of transmission estimated underline the need for cost-effective interventions to reduce MRSA transmission in hospital settings in low and middle income countries. PMID:21750700

  13. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  14. Emergency Medical Treatment Needs: Chronic and Acute Exposure to Hazardous Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Written-Material Resources Distribution List I I .tti. --1..... INDEX OF FIGURES 1 ~ Page 1 Sample Posting from RTECS Under Category "Moderate - Eye...Irritation 8 INDEX OF TABLES 1 Chemical Classes Listed in Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology 6 2 Categories Used in the RTECS Data Bank 7 3 Matrix of...readily available, unbiased listing of chemicals in order * to correlate medical guidelines with chemical classification groups. The starting point for

  15. Long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome with chronic renal dysfunction treated in different therapy units at department of cardiology: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cong; Sheng, Zulong; Yao, Yuyu; Wang, Xin; Yu, Chaojun; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary care unit is common in hospitals and clinical centers which offer intensive care and therapy for severe coronary artery disease patients. However, if coronary care unit could improve the long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome patients with renal dysfunction remain unknown. Accordingly, we designed this study to evaluate the differences of incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction who treated in coronary care unit or normal unit. The primary end point was all cause mortality. A total of 414 acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction involved in the study. The results showed that during 12-48 months follow-up, death of any cause occurred in 1.8% patients (4 of 247) in coronary care unit group, as compared with 1.8% in the normal group (3 of 167) (hazard ratio, 1.098; 95% confidence interval, 0.246 to 4.904; P=0.903). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the risk of death (P=0.903), revascularization (P=0.948), stroke (P=0.542), heart failure (P=0.198). This trial firstly revealed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit and normal units. Our study showed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit obtained no significant benefits compared with patients in normal units, although there was a declining tendency of the risk of major adverse cardiovascular effectswith patients in coronary care unit.

  16. Long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome with chronic renal dysfunction treated in different therapy units at department of cardiology: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Cong; Sheng, Zulong; Yao, Yuyu; Wang, Xin; Yu, Chaojun; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary care unit is common in hospitals and clinical centers which offer intensive care and therapy for severe coronary artery disease patients. However, if coronary care unit could improve the long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome patients with renal dysfunction remain unknown. Accordingly, we designed this study to evaluate the differences of incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction who treated in coronary care unit or normal unit. The primary end point was all cause mortality. A total of 414 acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction involved in the study. The results showed that during 12-48 months follow-up, death of any cause occurred in 1.8% patients (4 of 247) in coronary care unit group, as compared with 1.8% in the normal group (3 of 167) (hazard ratio, 1.098; 95% confidence interval, 0.246 to 4.904; P=0.903). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the risk of death (P=0.903), revascularization (P=0.948), stroke (P=0.542), heart failure (P=0.198). This trial firstly revealed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit and normal units. Our study showed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit obtained no significant benefits compared with patients in normal units, although there was a declining tendency of the risk of major adverse cardiovascular effectswith patients in coronary care unit. PMID:26770436

  17. [Subgroup analysis results of platelet inhibition trial in acute coronary syndrome patients (PLATO) who underwent intervention or medical treatment].

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Enbiya

    2013-04-01

    Antiplatelet agents are among the most important drug classes in reducing mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Ticagrelor is the first reversible and direct acting P2Y(12) receptor inhibitor with an earlier onset of action compared to clopidogrel. The PLATO study (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) with ticagrelor was conducted with a design providing consistency with the current clinical practice, including all forms of ACS and a wide spectrum of treatment options in 18624 patients from 862 centers in 43 countries. Of these patients, 13408 underwent interventional procedures (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 6732/6676) (PLATO-INVASIVE). As reported by the investigator, non-invasive treatment strategy was planned for 5216 patients (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 2601/2615). However, 2040 patients in this group received interventional treatment during the follow-up (PLATO-NON-INVASIVE/MEDICAL TREATMENT). 1261 patients requiring surgical treatment underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) within 7 days after the discontinuation of study treatment (ticagrelor/clopidogrel; 632/629) (PLATO-CABG). The results of these three subgroups were consistent with the main PLATO study results, demonstrating that ticagrelor reduced the primary (cardiovascular death, myocardial Infarction and stroke) and secondary composite endpoints without increasing bleeding compared with clopidogrel. Ticagrelor fulfills an important unmet need regarding antiplatelet effectiveness in patients with ACS. This review evaluates the INVASIVE and MEDICAL subgroup studies of the PLATO study.

  18. Impaired neuroendocrine and immune response to acute stress in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Janine A E M; Fluitman, Sjoerd B A H A; Lijmer, Jeroen G; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Westenberg, Herman G M; Kahn, René S; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about how the biological stress response systems--the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and the immune system--function during psychosis. Results of studies on the effect of stress on the immune and autonomic system in patients with schizophrenia are inconsistent. The present study investigates whether the stress response is impaired in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis. Ten male patients with a first episode of psychosis and 15 controls were exposed to the stress of public speaking. Parameters of the ANS (heart rate and catecholamines), the HPA axis (plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] and cortisol), and the immune system (number and activity of natural killer [NK] cells) were measured. Peak responses were calculated to examine the relationship between stress-induced activation of the different systems. Subjective stress and anxiety before and during the task were assessed. Patients and controls displayed similar autonomic responses to acute stress. However, there was an impaired HPA axis response, slow onset and return of ACTH, and flattened cortisol response and a reduced increase in number NK cells and NK cell activity in patients with a first episode of psychosis. Furthermore, in patients, the relationship between the different stress response systems was weaker or absent compared with controls. These findings indicate that impairments in stress processing are associated with the endophenotype of psychosis and are not a result of illness progression or antipsychotic medication.

  19. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  20. Management of medical technology: case study of a major acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian; Smale, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results of a Capital Equipment Management Plan undertaken at a major acute hospital in Australia. By classifying existing equipment using a threshold replacement value into Major and Minor items, detailed planning information was collected for 527 items of Major equipment representing 80% of the hospital's total equipment stock. A number of meaningful views of this significant asset base are presented, and a prioritisation method used to provide recommendations for future equipment replacement and acquisition for a 5 year planning period. The survey work to identify and document actual equipment items provides a convincing argument for the funding levels required for capital equipment replacement and acquisition, and evidence for the extent of technology reliance in modern health care facilities.

  1. Pheochromocytoma presenting as acute decompensated heart failure reversed with medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mulla, Christopher M; Marik, Paul Ellis

    2012-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented to hospital with acute chest pain, hypertension, tachycardia and an elevated serum creatinine. She developed respiratory distress requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. She progressed to multiorgan failure due to decompensated congestive heart failure. Echocardiography demonstrated global hypokinesis and an ejection fraction of <10%. Her cardiac function improved with fluid resuscitation and β blockade, and she was eventually discharged home. She was readmitted a few days later with pancreatitis after presenting with nausea, abdominal pain and hypertension. During hospitalisation she had paroxysms of headache, nausea and diaphoresis associated with hypertension and tachycardia. A CT scan of her abdomen revealed an adrenal mass and serum metanephrine studies confirmed the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. After fluid resuscitation and sympathetic blockade her ejection fraction improved to 55%. The patient underwent an uneventful adrenalectomy and made a complete recovery. PMID:22814979

  2. Acute effects of dynamic exercises on the relationship between the motor unit firing rate and the recruitment threshold.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Wages, Nathan P

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of concentric versus eccentric exercise on motor control strategies. Fifteen men performed six sets of 10 repetitions of maximal concentric exercises or eccentric isokinetic exercises with their dominant elbow flexors on separate experimental visits. Before and after the exercise, maximal strength testing and submaximal trapezoid isometric contractions (40% of the maximal force) were performed. Both exercise conditions caused significant strength loss in the elbow flexors, but the loss was greater following the eccentric exercise (t=2.401, P=.031). The surface electromyographic signals obtained from the submaximal trapezoid isometric contractions were decomposed into individual motor unit action potential trains. For each submaximal trapezoid isometric contraction, the relationship between the average motor unit firing rate and the recruitment threshold was examined using linear regression analysis. In contrast to the concentric exercise, which did not cause significant changes in the mean linear slope coefficient and y-intercept of the linear regression line, the eccentric exercise resulted in a lower mean linear slope and an increased mean y-intercept, thereby indicating that increasing the firing rates of low-threshold motor units may be more important than recruiting high-threshold motor units to compensate for eccentric exercise-induced strength loss.

  3. Diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury: deficiencies in the knowledge base of non-specialist, trainee medical staff.

    PubMed

    Muniraju, T M; Lillicrap, M H; Horrocks, J L; Fisher, J M; Clark, R M W; Kanagasundaram, N S

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced education has been recommended to improve non-specialist management of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the extent of any gaps in knowledge has yet to be defined fully. The aim of this study was to assess understanding of trainee doctors in the prevention, diagnosis and initial management of AKI. An anonymised questionnaire was completed by hospital-based trainees across Newcastle Renal Unit's catchment area. Responses were evaluated against a panel of pre-defined ideal answers. The median score was 9.5 out of 20 (n = 146; range 0-17) and was lower in more junior trainees. Fifty percent of trainees could not define AKI, 30% could not name more than two risk factors for AKI and 37% could not name even one indication for renal referral. These serious gaps in knowledge highlight the need for enhanced education aimed at all training grades. Organisational changes may also be required to optimise patient safety.

  4. [The process of death in the intensive care unit (ICU). From a medical, thanatological and legislative point of view].

    PubMed

    Kaneko-Wada, Francisco de J Takao; Domínguez-Cherit, Guillermo; Colmenares-Vásquez, Ariadna Marcela; Santana-Martínez, Paola; Gutiérrez-Mejía, Juan; Arroliga, Alejandro C

    2015-01-01

    Traditional goals in the intensive care unit are to reduce morbidity and mortality. Despite medical and technological advances, death in the intensive care unit remains commonplace and the modern critical care team should be familiar with palliative care and legislation in Mexico. Preserving the dignity of patients, avoiding harm, and maintaining communication with the relatives is fundamental. There is no unique, universally accepted technical approach in the management of the terminal critical care patient, so it is important to individualize each case and define objectives together under the legal framework in Mexico.

  5. Attaining resident duty hours compliance: the acute care nurse practitioners program at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Scott; Wali, Soma; Thomas, Peggy; Cope, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    The institution of resident duty hours limits by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has made it difficult for some programs to cover inpatient teaching services. The medical literature is replete with editorials criticizing the hour limits and the resulting problems but is nearly silent on the topic of constructive solutions to compliance. In this article, the authors describe a new program, initiated in 2003 at the Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, of using acute care nurse practitioners to allow for compliance with the "24 + 6" continuous duty hours limit, as well as the 80-hour workweek limit. Each post-call team is assigned a nurse practitioner for the day, allowing residents to sign out by 2 pm while ensuring quality care for patients. Nurse practitioners participate in evaluation of residents and, in turn, are evaluated by them. Using this system, the authors report 99% compliance with ACGME work-hour restrictions, with average work hours for inpatient ward residents decreasing from 84 to 76 hours per week. Physician satisfaction with the new system is high; anonymous evaluation by residents and faculty returned average scores of 8.8 out of 9 possible points. The authors report that using nurse practitioners on post-call days provides excellent, continuous patient care without impinging on scheduling and without sacrificing responsibility, continuity, or education for the residents. This system has several potential advantages over previously described work-hour solutions. Addition of a nurse practitioner to the post-call team is an effective solution to the problem of compliance with resident duty hours limitations.

  6. Overcoming the Challenges of Conducting Early Feasibility Studies of Medical Devices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Holmes, David R; Califf, Robert; Farb, Andrew; Abel, Dorothy; Mack, Michael; Syrek Jensen, Tamara; Zuckerman, Bram; Leon, Martin; Shuren, Jeff

    2016-10-25

    Initial clinical studies of new medical technologies involve a complex balance of research participant benefits versus risks and costs of uncertainty when novel concepts are tested. The Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health has recently introduced the Early Feasibility Study (EFS) Program for facilitating the conduct of these studies under the Investigational Device Exemption regulations. However, a systematic approach is needed to successfully implement this program while affording appropriate preservation of the rights and interests of patients. For this to succeed, a holistic reform of the clinical studies ecosystem for performing early-stage clinical research in the United States is necessary. The authors review the current landscape of the U.S. EFS and make recommendations for developing an efficient EFS process to meet the goal of improving access to early-stage, potentially beneficial medical devices in the United States.

  7. Influence of signal colored hand disinfectant dispensers on hand hygiene compliance at a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, Simone; Häfner, Helga; Schröder, Jörg; Nowicki, Katharina; Lemmen, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    To assess the influence of signal colors on hand disinfectant dispenser activities, health care workers (HCWs) at a medical intensive care unit were analyzed for a total of 20 weeks with 8 weeks before and 12 weeks after exchange to signal color. No significant increase in hand rubs (HRs) per patient day (PD) was observed (about 40 HRs/PD); however, HCW-adjusted compliance showed a 6% increase with signal colored devices. Therefore, colored devices may help to improve hand hygiene compliance.

  8. [Peculiarities of forensic medical expertise in a situation of massive salmonellosis morbidity in a military unit].

    PubMed

    Shirokova, L V; Pinchuk, P V

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose to consider infectious diseases as mass clinical conditions in both normative-legal and medical contexts. Peculiarities of commission and comprehensive inspections carried out in situations of massive infectious morbidity among servicemen are illustrated by examples of the work of state forensic medical organizations and investigative authorities of the Russian Defense Ministry.

  9. USB drives for communication of medical information in a pediatric dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Christine B; Breen, Christine; Pradhan, Madhura; Green, Cynthia; Kaplan, Bernard S; Meyers, Kevin E C

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of using universal serial bus (USB) drives for communicating medical information between parents of children receiving dialysis and medical personnel during clinical encounters. When surveyed, parents and pediatric resident physicians supported the use of USB drives and were willing to use the devices. The utilization rate of USB drives was 57%.

  10. Work Unit Determination for Staffing Requirements in Occupational Therapy within Army Medical Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    As an indicator of manpower productivity in Occupational Therapy clinics at Army MTFs, the clinic visit has been used. However, in recent years...medical records, chart audits, peer review, and the need for additional records and reports have all impacted on the occupational therapist’s time. Thus...Medical Treatment Facility); Manpower utilization; Health care, Occupational therapy clinic manpower staffing.

  11. Influence of Clerkship on Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry across Cultures: United States and Qatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgut, F. Tuna; Polan, H. Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assure adequate treatment for patients with mental illness worldwide, medical schools must impart positive attitudes toward psychiatry. The authors examined the effect of culture on changes in attitudes toward psychiatry among medical students receiving the same psychiatry clerkship curriculum in two different countries. Methods: A…

  12. Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups.

  13. Saving President Reagan's life. The need for an organized emergency medical system in the United States to save lives of all casualties.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Gebhart, Jocelynn H

    2004-01-01

    We are describing a heretofore untold narrative description of the emergency medical plan that saved the life of President Reagan on March 30th 1981. In 1976, Dr. Richard Edlich, director of the Emergency Medical Services at the University of Virginia Medical Center, wrote an editorial on the need for an emergency medical plan for the President of the United States. One year later Dr. Edlich enlisted the help of five distinguished experts in emergency medical systems in our nation to develop an emergency medical plan for the President of the United States. This published emergency medical plan was coauthored by Dr. David Boyd, the Director of Emergency Medical Services of the Department of Public Health and Welfare. Dr. Boyd wisely alerted both the Department of Health and Welfare as well as the White House staff, including Secret Service, of this plan. Realizing the importance of immediate emergency care, the Secret Service agent wisely recommended that the wounded President Reagan be immediately transported to the George Washington University Health Center, which has skilled emergency physicians as well as trauma surgeons, who saved the President's life. Realizing the benefits of this emergency medical plan that saved the life of the President of the United States, Drs. Edlich, Britt, and Wish will now be coordinating a medical narrative report that describes the development of emergency medical systems in the United States as well as modern trauma care in our nation.

  14. The Development of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in an independent sample of older acute medical patients: refinement and validation using the Rasch model (part 2).

    PubMed

    de Morton, Natalie A; Davidson, Megan; Keating, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the refinement and validation of the 17-item DEMMI in an independent sample of older acute medical patients. Instrument refinement was based on Rasch analysis and input from clinicians and researchers. The refined DEMMI was tested on 106 older general medical patients and a total of 312 mobility assessments were conducted. Based on the results of this study a further 2 items were removed and the 15 item DEMMI was adopted. The Rasch measurement properties of the DEMMI were consistent with estimates obtained from the instrument development sample. No differential item functioning was identified and an interval level scoring system was established. The DEMMI is the first mobility instrument for older people to be developed, refined and validated using the Rasch model. This study confirms that the DEMMI provides clinicians and researchers with a unidimensional instrument for measuring and monitoring changes in mobility of hospitalised older acute medical patients.

  15. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    PubMed

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  16. Good cop, bad cop: federal prosecution of state-legalized medical marijuana use after United States v. Lopez.

    PubMed

    Newbern, A E

    2000-10-01

    The Supreme Court's recent decisions in United States v. Lopez and United States v. Morrison articulate a vision of federalism under which Congress's regulatory authority under the Commerce Clause is severely limited in favor of returning traditional areas of state concern, particularly criminal law enforcement, to local or state control. The Court's decisions in these cases coincide with ballot initiatives legalizing the medical use of marijuana garnering a majority of the vote in California, Arizona, Alaska, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Maine, and Washington D.C. Those who use marijuana for medical purposes under sanction of state law, however, still face the threat of federal prosecution under the Controlled Substances Act. Medical marijuana proponents have traditionally, and unsuccessfully, contested federal prosecution using individual rights arguments under theories of equal protection or substantive due process. This Comment argues that after Lopez and Morrison, the federal government's authority to regulate intrastate use of marijuana for medicinal purposes is not the foregone conclusion it once was. The author suggests that proponents of medical marijuana use should invoke the federalism arguments of Lopez and Morrison and argue for state legislative independence from the federal government on this issue.

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  18. The quality of medical care during an acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pradan, Liana; Ferreira, Ivone; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality, with a substantial economic impact. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) represent a dramatic event in the course of the disease; is an important cause of morbidity and the fourth cause of mortality worldwide. During the hospitalization for AECOPD mortality is 10%. AECOPD are also associated with a significant reduction of functional capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite these alarming evidence-based data the response of the healthcare system globally is not adequate to the gravity of the situation. A recently published study done in a Canadian hospital reveals that the treatment of the AECOPD is sub-optimal. The management of the COPD exacerbations prior, during and after the hospitalization showed inadequate adherence of the physicians (respirologists, internists and hospitalists) to the current guidelines. This review outlines the worrisome findings of this study and the proposed measures suggested by the authors in order to optimize the management of AECOPD.

  19. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Comparison of Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants radioprotection potency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliev, Slava; Popov, Dmitri; Lisenkov, Nikolai

    Introduction: This experimental study of biological effects of the Antiradiation Vaccine and Antioxidants which were used for prophylaxis and treatment of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by high doses of the low-LET radiation. An important role of Reactive Oxyden Species (Singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anions and bio-radicals)in development of the Acute Radiation Syndromes could be defined as a "central dogma" of radiobiology. Oxida-tion and damages of lipids, proteins, DNA, and RNA are playing active role in development of postradiation apoptosis. However, the therapeutic role of antioxidants in modification of a postradiation injury caused by high doses of radiation remains controversial.Previous stud-ies had revealed that antioxidants did not increase a survival rate of mammals with severe forms of the Acute Radiation Syndromes caused by High Doses of the low-LET radiation. The Antiradiation Vaccine(ARV) contains toxoid forms of the Radiation Toxins(RT) from the Specific Radiation Determinants Group (SRD). The RT SRD has toxic and antigenic prop-erties at the same time and stimulates a specific antibody elaboration and humoral response form activated acquired immune system. The blocking antiradiation antibodies induce an im-munologically specific effect and have inhibiting effects on radiation induced neuro-toxicity, vascular-toxicity, gastrointestinal toxcity, hematopoietic toxicity, and radiation induced cytol-ysis of selected groups of cells that are sensitive to radiation. Methods and materials: Scheme of experiments: 1. Irradiated animals with development of Cerebrovascular ARS (Cv-ARS), Cardiovascular ARS (Cr-ARS) Gastrointestinal ARS(GI-ARS), Hematopoietic ARS (H-ARS) -control -were treated with placebo administration. 2. Irradiated animals were treated with antioxidants prophylaxisis and treatment of Cv-ARS, Cr-SRS, GI-ARS, Hp-ARS forms of the ARS. 3. irradiated animals were treated with radioprotection by Antiradiation Vaccine

  20. Traditional Chinese Medication Qiliqiangxin attenuates cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lichan; Shen, Sutong; Fu, Siyi; Fang, Hongyi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Das, Saumya; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Zhou, Yonglan; Kong, Xiangqing; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    In a multicenter randomized double-blind study we demonstrated that Qiliqiangxin (QLQX), a traditional Chinese medicine, had a protective effect in heart failure patients. However, whether and via which mechanism QLQX attenuates cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is still unclear. AMI was created by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in mice. Treating the mice in the initial 3 days after AMI with QLQX did not change infarct size. However, QLQX treatment ameliorated adverse cardiac remodeling 3 weeks after AMI including better preservation of cardiac function, decreased apoptosis and reduced fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was down-regulated in control animals after AMI and up-regulated by QLQX administration. Interestingly, expression of AKT, SAPK/JNK, and ERK was not altered by QLQX treatment. Inhibition of PPARγ reduced the beneficial effects of QLQX in AMI remodeling, whereas activation of PPARγ failed to provide additional improvement in the presence of QLQX, suggesting a key role for PPARγ in the effects of QLQX during cardiac remodeling after AMI. This study indicates that QLQX attenuates cardiac remodeling after AMI by increasing PPARγ levels. Taken together, QLQX warrants further investigation as as a therapeutic intervention to mitigate remodeling and heart failure after AMI. PMID:25669146

  1. Molecular Diagnosis of Chagas Disease in Colombia: Parasitic Loads and Discrete Typing Units in Patients from Acute and Chronic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Flórez, Carolina; Olivera, Mario; Valencia, Carlos; Zambrano, Pilar; León, Cielo; Ramírez, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Chagas disease is complex due to the dynamics of parasitemia in the clinical phases of the disease. The molecular tests have been considered promissory because they detect the parasite in all clinical phases. Trypanosoma cruzi presents significant genetic variability and is classified into six Discrete Typing Units TcI-TcVI (DTUs) with the emergence of foreseen genotypes within TcI as TcIDom and TcI Sylvatic. The objective of this study was to determine the operating characteristics of molecular tests (conventional and Real Time PCR) for the detection of T. cruzi DNA, parasitic loads and DTUs in a large cohort of Colombian patients from acute and chronic phases. Methodology/Principal Findings Samples were obtained from 708 patients in all clinical phases. Standard diagnosis (direct and serological tests) and molecular tests (conventional PCR and quantitative PCR) targeting the nuclear satellite DNA region. The genotyping was performed by PCR using the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sa, 18S and A10 regions. The operating capabilities showed that performance of qPCR was higher compared to cPCR. Likewise, the performance of qPCR was significantly higher in acute phase compared with chronic phase. The median parasitic loads detected were 4.69 and 1.33 parasite equivalents/mL for acute and chronic phases. The main DTU identified was TcI (74.2%). TcIDom genotype was significantly more frequent in chronic phase compared to acute phase (82.1% vs 16.6%). The median parasitic load for TcIDom was significantly higher compared with TcI Sylvatic in chronic phase (2.58 vs.0.75 parasite equivalents/ml). Conclusions/Significance The molecular tests are a precise tool to complement the standard diagnosis of Chagas disease, specifically in acute phase showing high discriminative power. However, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of molecular tests in chronic phase. The frequency and parasitemia of TcIDom genotype in chronic

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition with multiple causes and a high mortality rate. Approximately 150,000 cases are reported in the United States annually, making ARDS a public health concern. Management of the condition is complex because of its severity, and medical imaging is essential for both the diagnosis and management of ARDS. This article introduces common signs, symptoms, risk factors, and causes of ARDS. Diagnostic criteria, histopathology, treatment strategies, and prognostic information also are discussed. The article explains the value of medical imaging studies of ARDS, especially radiography, computed tomography, and ultrasonography.

  3. Prevalence of Alcohol-Interactive Prescription Medication Use among Current Drinkers: United States, 1999–2010

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Rosalind A.; Dong, Chuanhui; White, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of Americans consume alcoholic beverages. Alcohol interacts negatively with numerous commonly prescribed medications. Yet, on a population level, little is known about use of alcohol interactive (AI) prescription medications among drinkers. Purpose To determine the prevalence of AI prescription medication use among current drinkers in the US population. Methods Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999–2010); 26,657 adults aged ≥20 years had data on past year alcohol consumption and past month prescription medication use. Analyses were adjusted for covariates: age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and smoking. Statistical procedures accounted for survey stratification, clustering, and non-response. Analyses were weighted to be nationally representative. Results The unadjusted total prevalence of AI medication use was 42.8% (95% CI [CI] 41.5–44.0). Among current drinkers, adjusted prevalence was 41.5% (CI 40.3–42.7). Among participants aged ≥65 total prevalence of AI medication use was 78.6% (CI 77.3–79.9) and adjusted prevalence among current drinkers was 77.8% (CI 75.7–79.7). The AI medications most commonly used by current drinkers were cardiovascular agents, central nervous system (CNS) agents, and metabolic agents. Conclusions Our results suggest that there could be substantial simultaneous exposure to alcohol and AI prescription medications in the US population. Given the adverse health risks of combining alcohol with AI prescription medications, future efforts are needed to collect data to determine actual simultaneous prevalence. PMID:25597432

  4. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  5. The Most Commonly Dispensed Prescription Medications Among Pregnant Women Enrolled in the United States Medicaid Program

    PubMed Central

    Palmsten, Kristin; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Chambers, Christina D; Mogun, Helen; Lai, Sophia; Gilmer, Todd P; Huybrechts, Krista F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the 20 most common prescription medications and the 10 most common prescription medications classified in the former U.S. Food and Drug Administration categories D or X dispensed to pregnant women enrolled in the U.S. Medicaid program. Methods We conducted a cohort study of 1,106,757 pregnant women with live births using 2000-2007 Medicaid Analytic eXtract data. We used outpatient pharmacy records to identify medication dispensings and reported the proportion of pregnancies that were dispensed at least one prescription medication. Maternal age and race and ethnicity–stratified estimates were compared using prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results During pregnancy, 82.5% of the cohort had a dispensing for one or more prescription medication. The most commonly dispensed medications during pregnancy included nitrofurantoin (21.6%), metronidazole (19.4%), amoxicillin (18.0%), azithromycin (16.9%), and promethazine (13.5%). Proportions were highest among younger women for several medications; eg, nitrofurantoin (23.9% vs 15.4%; PR: 1.55, CI: 1.52-1.58), metronidazole (20.7% vs 12.0%; PR: 1.73, CI: 1.69-1.77), and azithromycin (21.1% vs 11.0%; PR: 1.93, CI: 1.89-1.97) were more common among women younger than 20 than among women aged 35 years or older. Proportions were highest among white women with some exceptions; eg, compared with white women, metronidazole was more common among black women (29.8% vs 14.4%; PR: 2.07, CI: 2.05-2.09). Excluding fertility treatments, 42.0% had at least one dispensing for a D or X medication during pregnancy. Codeine (11.9%) and hydrocodone (10.2%) were the most common D medications. Conclusions Medications used to treat infections were the most commonly dispensed prescription medications. Dispensing of commonly used prescription medications during pregnancy varied by maternal age and race–ethnicity. PMID:26244530

  6. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome: recommendations of the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group.

    PubMed

    Waselenko, Jamie K; MacVittie, Thomas J; Blakely, William F; Pesik, Nicki; Wiley, Albert L; Dickerson, William E; Tsu, Horace; Confer, Dennis L; Coleman, C Norman; Seed, Thomas; Lowry, Patrick; Armitage, James O; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2004-06-15

    Physicians, hospitals, and other health care facilities will assume the responsibility for aiding individuals injured by a terrorist act involving radioactive material. Scenarios have been developed for such acts that include a range of exposures resulting in few to many casualties. This consensus document was developed by the Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group to provide a framework for physicians in internal medicine and the medical subspecialties to evaluate and manage large-scale radiation injuries. Individual radiation dose is assessed by determining the time to onset and severity of nausea and vomiting, decline in absolute lymphocyte count over several hours or days after exposure, and appearance of chromosome aberrations (including dicentrics and ring forms) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Documentation of clinical signs and symptoms (affecting the hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, cerebrovascular, and cutaneous systems) over time is essential for triage of victims, selection of therapy, and assignment of prognosis. Recommendations based on radiation dose and physiologic response are made for treatment of the hematopoietic syndrome. Therapy includes treatment with hematopoietic cytokines; blood transfusion; and, in selected cases, stem-cell transplantation. Additional medical management based on the evolution of clinical signs and symptoms includes the use of antimicrobial agents (quinolones, antiviral therapy, and antifungal agents), antiemetic agents, and analgesic agents. Because of the strong psychological impact of a possible radiation exposure, psychosocial support will be required for those exposed, regardless of the dose, as well as for family and friends. Treatment of pregnant women must account for risk to the fetus. For terrorist or accidental events involving exposure to radioiodines, prophylaxis against malignant disease of the thyroid is also recommended, particularly for children and adolescents.

  7. [Use of enoximone in patients with acute and subacute heart failure in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Holubarsch, C; Pieske, B; Hasenfuss, G; Just, H

    1994-01-01

    The phosphodiesterase inhibitor enoximone has both vasodilating and positive inotropic pharmacological properties. The balance between vasodilation and positive inotropism may be different between the various types of heart failure as well as the various stages of heart failure. Therefore, we investigated the effect of intravenous application of enoximone (1 mg/kg body weight) in a cohort of patients (n = 10) suffering from acute or subacute heart failure mainly due to ischemia or hypoxia. All patients had high left ventricular filling pressure, low cardiac output and were pretreated with intravenous dobutamine. Enoximone increased cardiac output from 3.2 +/- 1.2 to 5.5 +/- 2.2 l/min, increased heart rate from 94 +/- 20 to 100 +/- 18 beats/min, decreased systemic peripheral resistance from 1770 +/- 861 to 931 +/- 340 dyn.sec.cm-5 and decreased pulmonary wedge pressure from 24 +/- 5 to 20 +/- 6 mmHg, significantly. However, systolic aortic pressure, systolic pulmonary pressure and right atrial pressure were not significantly altered. We conclude that in a selected group of patients enoximone-given intravenously and acutely in the intensive care unity-can induce beneficial effects on central hemodynamics without critical falls in perfusion pressure.

  8. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective.

  9. Feasibility Study for the Establishment of a Nurse Administered Unit at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Nursing Units; Nurse Managed Unit; Nurse Administered Unit; Nursing; Hospital; Cost Containment...health, manage care in certain illnesses, and plan and promote the maintenance of health. Recent ,tudies conducted by the federal Office of Technical... management of patients who no longer require daily physician care, but need substantial nursing care before returning to their previous living

  10. Identification of microorganisms on mobile phones of intensive care unit health care workers and medical students in the tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Kotris, Ivan; Drenjančević, Domagoj; Talapko, Jasminka; Bukovski, Suzana

    2017-02-01

    Aim To identify and investigate a difference between microorganisms present on intensive care unit (ICU) health care workers' (HCW, doctors, nurses or medical technicians) and medical students' mobile phones as well as to investigate a difference between the frequency and the way of cleaning mobile phones. Methods Fifty swabs were collected from HCWs who work in the ICU (University Hospital Centre Osijek) and 60 swabs from medical students (School of Medicine, University of Osijek). Microorganisms were identified according to standard microbiological methods and biochemical tests to the genus/species level. Results Out of 110 processed mobile phones, mobile phones microorganisms were not detected on 25 (22.7%), 15 (25%) students' and 10 (20%) HCW's mobile phones. No statistically significant difference was found between the number of isolated bacteria between the HCW' and students' mobile phones (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between both HCW and students and frequency of cleaning their mobile phones (p<0.001). A significant difference was also obtained with the way of cleaning mobile phones between HCWs and students (p<0.001). Conclusion The most common isolated microorganisms in both groups were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and Staphylococcus aureus. Most HCWs cleaned their mobile phones at least once a week, 35 (52.0%), and most medical students several times per year, 20 (33.3%). HCW clean their mobile phones with alcohol disinfectant in 26 (40.0%) and medical students with dry cloth in 20 (33.3%) cases.

  11. USMLE (United States medical licensing examination) step 1 examination. Legal vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Templeton, B

    1996-06-01

    Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the courts have ruled that sponsors of job entry assessment procedures must demonstrate the absence of discrimination against minorities. If an assessment discriminates, the courts may prohibit the use of the assessment unless the assessment is linked to a job analysis and exhibits validity. In 1994, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) instituted a three-step USMLE examination program as a single pathway for medical licensure. The Step 1 examination is not linked to a physician job analysis, exhibits lower scores for minority groups, and lacks construct validity. To avoid the chaos and expense of a protracted legal challenge, the FSMB and the NBME may need to revise the Step 1 examination, or discontinue it as a requirement of medical licensure.

  12. Healthcare Reform and the Next Generation: United States Medical Student Attitudes toward the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Huntoon, Kristin M.; McCluney, Colin J.; Scannell, Christopher A.; Wiley, Elizabeth A.; Bruno, Richard; Andrews, Allen; Gorman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Context Over one year after passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), legislators, healthcare experts, physicians, and the general public continue to debate the implications of the law and its repeal. The PPACA will have a significant impact on future physicians, yet medical student perspectives on the legislation have not been well documented. Objective To evaluate medical students' understanding of and attitudes toward healthcare reform and the PPACA including issues of quality, access and cost. Design, Setting, and Participants An anonymous electronic survey was sent to medical students at 10 medical schools (total of 6982 students) between October–December 2010, with 1232 students responding and a response rate of 18%. Main Outcome Measures Medical students' views and attitudes regarding the PPACA and related topics, measured with Likert scale and open response items. Results Of medical students surveyed, 94.8% agreed that the existing United States healthcare system needs to be reformed, 31.4% believed the PPACA will improve healthcare quality, while 20.9% disagreed and almost half (47.7%) were unsure if quality will be improved. Two thirds (67.6%) believed that the PPACA will increase access, 6.5% disagreed and the remaining 25.9% were unsure. With regard to containing healthcare costs, 45.4% of participants indicated that they are unsure if the provisions of the PPACA will do so. Overall, 80.1% of respondents indicated that they support the PPACA, and 78.3% also indicated that they did not feel that reform efforts had gone far enough. A majority of respondents (58.8%) opposed repeal of the PPACA, while 15.0% supported repeal, and 26.1% were undecided. Conclusion The overwhelming majority of medical students recognized healthcare reform is needed and expressed support for the PPACA but echoed concerns about whether it will address issues of quality or cost containment. PMID:21931604

  13. The Color of Debt: Racial Disparities in Anticipated Medical Student Debt in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dugger, Robert A.; El-Sayed, Abdulrahman M.; Dogra, Anjali; Messina, Catherine; Bronson, Richard; Galea, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Context The cost of American medical education has increased substantially over the past decade. Given racial/ethnic inequalities in access to financial resources, it is plausible that increases in student debt burden resulting from these increases in cost may not be borne equally. Objective To evaluate racial/ethnic disparities in medical student debt. Design, Setting, and Participants Authors collected self-reported data from a non-representative sample of 2414 medical students enrolled at 111/159 accredited US medical schools between December 1st 2010 and March 27th 2011. After weighting for representativeness by race and class year and calculating crude anticipated debt by racial/ethnic category, authors fit multivariable regression models of debt by race/ethnicity adjusted for potential confounders. Main Outcome Measures Anticipated educational debt upon graduation greater than $150,000. Results 62.1% of medical students anticipated debt in excess of $150,000 upon graduation. The proportion of Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians reporting anticipated educational debt in excess of $150,000 was 77.3%, 65.1%, 57.2% and 50.2%, respectively. Both Black and White medical students demonstrated a significantly higher likelihood of anticipated debt in excess of $150,000 when compared to Asians [Blacks (OR = 2.7, 1.3–5.6), Whites (OR = 1.7, 1.3–2.2)] in adjusted models. Conclusion Black medical students had significantly higher anticipated debt than Asian students. This finding has implications for understanding differential enrollment among minority groups in US medical schools. PMID:24019975

  14. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July-September 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Bariatric Surgery at Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina. He has made deployments as a general surgeon to both Iraq and Afghanistan. LTC...saving surgery (hypotension with penetrating neck and torso trauma).27,28 Medical Evacuation Times 1. The golden hour was a “best guess” rule-of...GLOSSARY ATLS - advanced trauma life support MEDEVAC - military medical evacuation DCS - damage control surgery RTS - revised trauma score EM

  15. Relevance of stroke code, stroke unit and stroke networks in organization of acute stroke care--the Madrid acute stroke care program.

    PubMed

    Alonso de Leciñana-Cases, María; Gil-Núñez, Antonio; Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is a neurological emergency. The early administration of specific treatment improves the prognosis of the patients. Emergency care systems with early warning for the hospital regarding patients who are candidates for this treatment (stroke code) increases the number of patients treated. Currently, reperfusion via thrombolysis for ischemic stroke and attention in stroke units are the bases of treatment. Healthcare professionals and health provision authorities need to work together to organize systems that ensure continuous quality care for the patients during the whole process of their disease. To implement this, there needs to be an appropriate analysis of the requirements and resources with the objective of their adjustment for efficient use. It is necessary to provide adequate information and continuous training for all professionals who are involved in stroke care, including primary care physicians, extrahospital emergency teams and all physicians involved in the care of stroke patients within the hospital. The neurologist has the function of coordinating the protocols of intrahospital care. These organizational plans should also take into account the process beyond the acute phase, to ensure the appropriate application of measures of secondary prevention, rehabilitation, and chronic care of the patients that remain in a dependent state. We describe here the stroke care program in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

  16. Secondary analysis of data can inform care delivery for Indigenous women in an acute mental health inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Pat; Cunningham, Teresa; Lowell, Anne; Nagel, Tricia; Dunn, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    There is a paucity of research exploring Indigenous women's experiences in acute mental health inpatient services in Australia. Even less is known of Indigenous women's experience of seclusion events, as published data are rarely disaggregated by both indigeneity and gender. This research used secondary analysis of pre-existing datasets to identify any quantifiable difference in recorded experience between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, and between Indigenous women and Indigenous men in an acute mental health inpatient unit. Standard separation data of age, length of stay, legal status, and discharge diagnosis were analysed, as were seclusion register data of age, seclusion grounds, and number of seclusion events. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, and where warranted, inferential statistical methods used SPSS software to apply analysis of variance/multivariate analysis of variance testing. The results showed evidence that secondary analysis of existing datasets can provide a rich source of information to describe the experience of target groups, and to guide service planning and delivery of individualized, culturally-secure mental health care at a local level. The results are discussed, service and policy development implications are explored, and suggestions for further research are offered.

  17. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  18. Implementing an interdisciplinary electronic documentation system at two pilot units within an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Rena; Dalzel, Shelley; Kitzul, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    An electronic interdisciplinary clinical documentation system that includes assessments and some clinical interventions was designed and implemented on two pilot units. This paper describes the procedures for designing the screens, implementing the system, and integrating the electronic documentation system with the workflow of nursing staff. The results of this pilot project are outlined and implications for future efforts are examined.

  19. European consensus on the medical management of acute radiation syndrome and analysis of the radiation accidents in Belgium and Senegal.

    PubMed

    Gourmelon, Patrick; Benderitter, Marc; Bertho, Jean Marc; Huet, Christelle; Gorin, Norbert Claude; De Revel, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    A European consensus concerning the medical management of mass radiation exposure was obtained in 2005 during a conference held by the European Group for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, and the University of Ulm. At the conference, a two-step triage strategy to deal with large masses of radiation-exposed patients was designed. The first step of this strategy concerns the first 48 h and involves scoring the patients exclusively on the basis of their clinical symptoms and biological data. This allows the non-irradiated bystanders and outpatient candidates to be identified. The remaining patients are hospitalized and diagnosis is confirmed after the first 48-h period according to the METREPOL (Medical Treatment Protocols for radiation accident victims) scale. This grades the patients according to the severity of their symptoms. It was also agreed that in the case of acute radiation syndrome (ARS), emergency hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is not necessary. Instead, cytokines that promote hematological reconstruction should be administered as early as possible for 14-21 d. Crucial tests for determining whether the patient has residual hematopoiesis are physical dose reconstructions combined with daily blood count analyses. It was agreed that HSC transplantation should only be considered if severe aplasia persists after cytokine treatment. Two recent cases of accidental radiation exposure that were managed successfully by following the European consensus with modification are reviewed here. Thus, a European standard for the evaluation and treatment of ARS victims is now available. This standard may be suitable for application around the world.

  20. Medical professionalism in China and the United States: a transcultural interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Smith, Kirk L; Cong, Yali; Hu, Linying; Tucker, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    As in other societies, medical professionalism in the Peoples' Republic of China has been rapidly evolving. One of the major events in this process was the endorsement in 2005 of the document, "Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium: A Physician Charter," by the Chinese Medical Doctor Association (hereafter, the Charter)(1). More recently, a national survey, the first on such a large scale, was conducted on Chinese physicians' attitudes toward the fundamental principles and core commitments put forward in the Charter. Based on empirical findings from that study and comparing them to the published results of a similar American survey, the authors offer an in-depth interpretation of significant cross-cultural differences and important transcultural commonalities. The broader historical, socio-economic, and ethical issues relating to salient Chinese cultural practices such as family consent, familism (the custom of deferring decisions to family members), and the withholding of medical information, as well as controversial topics such as not respecting patients' autonomy, are examined. The Chinese Survey found that Chinese physicians supported the principles of the Charter in general. Here we argue that Chinese culture and traditional medical ethics are broadly compatible with the moral commitments demanded by modern medical professionalism. Methodologically and theoretically-recognizing the problems inherent in the hoary but still popular habit of dichotomizing cultures and in relativism-a transcultural approach is adopted that gives greater (due) weight to the internal moral diversity present within every culture, the common ground shared by different cultures, and the primacy of morality. Genuine cross-cultural dialogue, including a constructive Chinese-American dialogue in the area of medical professionalism, is not only possible, but necessary.

  1. Health based exclusion grounds in United States immigration policy: homosexuals, HIV infection and the medical examination of aliens.

    PubMed

    Shoop, L G

    1993-01-01

    The 1990 Immigration Act formally removed homosexuality from its longstanding position on the list of health-based exclusion grounds in United States immigration policy. Since the early 1900s when health-based exclusion grounds were introduced, a long history of excluding homosexuals has persisted. While the 1990 Congress clearly intended to remove the homosexual exclusion, public support for this controversial new policy is tenuous. As the HIV/AIDS pandemic spreads out of control, prejudice against homosexuals runs deeper than ever in American society. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a recent addition to the list of dangerous contagious diseases for which aliens may be excluded from the United States. Compelling social and economic grounds support its inclusion. The nexus between HIV and homosexuality, however, raises questions as to the immigration status of homosexuals and other persons seeking entry into the United States who, although not infected, are at a high risk of contracting HIV> Although the exclusion of HIV-infected aliens may be a reasonable means of combating the spread of HIV within the United States, it must not be used as a rationale to exclude individuals who may be at risk of contracting HIV. The medical examination of aliens must be tailored to meet the 1990 Immigration Act's objective of preventing the exclusion of homosexuals. Section I of this Note examines the factors influencing United States immigration policy as it relates to homosexuals. Section II provides background information on United States immigration policy, including the origins of the power to exclude aliens from entry into the United States and the allocation of this power within the federal government. Section II also focuses on the procedures by which aliens are excluded for health-related reasons. Section III explores both the historic exclusion of homosexuals from entry into the United States and the repudiation of this discriminatory policy in the 1990 Immigration

  2. An analysis of Japan Disaster Medical Assistance Team (J-DMAT) deployments in comparison with those of J-DMAT's counterpart in the United States (US-DMAT).

    PubMed

    Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    Lessons learned from the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake of 1995 underscored the necessity of establishing Disaster Medical Assistance Teams (DMATs) in Japan, and in 2005, the Japanese government's Central Disaster Prevention Council revised its Basic Disaster Management Plan to include full deployment of DMATs in disaster areas. Defining a DMAT as a trained, mobile, self-contained medical team that can act in the acute phase of a disaster (48 to 72 hours after its occurrence) to provide medical treatment in the devastated area, the revised plan called for the training of DMAT personnel for rapid deployment to any area of the country hit by a disaster. This paper presents descriptive data on the number and types of missions carried out by Japan DMAT (J-DMAT) in its first 5 years, and clarifies how J-DMAT differs from its counterpart in the United States (US-DMAT). The DMAT that the present authors belong to has been deployed for 2 natural disasters and 1 man-made disaster, and the operations carried out during these deployments are analyzed. Reports on J-DMAT activities published from 2004 through 2009 by the Japanese Association for Disaster Medicine are also included in the analysis. After training courses for J-DMAT personnel started in fiscal 2004, J-DMATs were deployed for 8 disasters in a period of 4 years. Five of these were natural disasters, and 3 man-made. Of the 5 natural disasters, 3 were earthquakes, and of the 3 man-made disasters, 2 were derailment accidents. Unlike in the United States, where hurricanes and floods account for the greatest number of DMAT deployments, earthquakes cause the largest number of disasters in Japan. Because Japan is small in comparison with the US (Japan has about 1/25 the land area of the US), most J-DMATs head for devastated areas by car from their respective hospitals. This is one reason why J-DMATs are smaller and more agile than US-DMATs. Another difference is that J-DMATs' activities following earthquakes involve

  3. The young patient with acute bloody diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ninan, S; Hamlin, J

    2014-01-01

    Acute bloody diarrhoea may be commonly encountered in the acute medical unit. Among young patients, the main differential diagnoses are acute infectious colitis, and first presentation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A combination of clinical, laboratory, radiological, endoscopic and histological investigations are required to make the diagnosis. If inflammatory bowel disease is suspected, then the patient should be admitted to a specialist gastroenterology ward and receive input from the surgical team, IBD nurses and specialist stoma nurses. Intravenous steroid therapy for acute severe disease should be started before stool cultures are back unless there is a strong clinical suspicion of amoebiasis. All patients require thromboprophylaxis and close attention paid to fluid balance and nutritional requirements. Daily clinical review is required. The Travis criteria may be employed at day 3 to assess the likelihood of requiring surgery and plans for rescue therapy, medical or surgical should be made between day 3-7 if the patient is not responding adequately to initial medical therapy.

  4. Discrimination against international medical graduates in the United States residency program selection process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Available evidence suggests that international medical graduates have improved the availability of U.S. health care while maintaining academic standards. We wondered whether studies had been conducted to address how international graduates were treated in the post-graduate selection process compared to U.S. graduates. Methods We conducted a Medline search for research on the selection process. Results Two studies provide strong evidence that psychiatry and family practice programs respond to identical requests for applications at least 80% more often for U.S. medical graduates than for international graduates. In a third study, a survey of surgical program directors, over 70% perceived that there was discrimination against international graduates in the selection process. Conclusions There is sufficient evidence to support action against discrimination in the selection process. Medical organizations should publish explicit proscriptions of discrimination against international medical graduates (as the American Psychiatric Association has done) and promote them in diversity statements. They should develop uniform and transparent policies for program directors to use to select applicants that minimize the possibility of non-academic discrimination, and the accreditation organization should monitor whether it is occurring. Whether there should be protectionism for U.S. graduates or whether post-graduate medical education should be an unfettered meritocracy needs to be openly discussed by medicine and society. PMID:20100347

  5. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    PubMed

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  6. Community Health Workers as Allies in Hypertension Self-Management and Medication Adherence in the United States, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Brownstein, J. Nell; Satsangi, Anamika; Escoffery, Cam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rates of hypertension control remain low among underserved populations in the United States; moreover, disparities in hypertension-related cardiovascular disease death are increasing. Community health workers (CHWs) can address barriers to hypertension control among underrepresented and diverse populations. We identify unique roles CHWs play in hypertension self-management and medication adherence. Methods In 2014, we conducted a mixed methods study with an online survey of 265 CHWs and 23 telephone interviews. The survey and interview guide contained questions about CHWs’ roles in hypertension self-management and hypertension medication adherence. We used descriptive statistics to analyze survey data and used inductive thematic analysis for the qualitative data. Results CHWs described working in partnership with patients and various health care providers to assist people in hypertension self-management. Roles were flexible and multifaceted but patient-driven. CHWs used various delivery methods to assist patients in overcoming barriers to medication adherence. CHWs interacted with patients primarily through individual clinical sessions or home visits. On average, they visit about 8 times per month, about 40 minutes per visit, over 7 months. CHWs often addressed barriers related to medicine-taking and refills and support patient–provider communications. Conclusion Results from this study will help health care professionals, policy makers, and academics better understand the work of CHWs. CHWs are important provider allies for improving hypertension prevention and self-management, especially among underserved and diverse populations in the United States. PMID:28033090

  7. Medical management of acute ocular hypertension in a western screech owl (Megascops kennicottii).

    PubMed

    Jayson, Stephanie; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Petritz, Olivia; Freeman, Kate; Maggs, David J

    2014-03-01

    A wild young adult western screech owl (Megascops kennicottii) of unknown sex was presented for evaluation of an abnormal left eye (OS). Ophthalmic examination OS revealed raised intraocular pressure (37 mm Hg; reference interval 7-16 mm Hg), mydriasis, conjunctival and episcleral hyperemia, shallow anterior chamber due to anterior displacement of the lens and iris, rubeosis iridis, and engorgement of the pecten. The intraocular pressure in the right eye (OD) was 11 mm Hg. Multifocal pale, variably translucent, curvilinear to vermiform opacities were observed in the medial and ventral peripheral regions of the retina OD, consistent with focal retinitis. Mannitol (0.46 g/kg IV) was administered over 10 minutes. Forty minutes later, the intraocular pressure was 27 mm Hg OS and 13 mm Hg OD. Dorzolamide (one drop OS q12h), diclofenac (one drop OU q8-12h), and meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg PO q24h) were administered for 3 days. The intraocular pressure OS was within normal limits 1 day (11 mm Hg), 7 days (13 mm Hg), and 4 weeks (14 mm Hg) after this treatment. Complications arising during hospitalization and rehabilitation included superficial corneal ulceration of both eyes presumed secondary to trauma on being caught and superficial damage to a talon. The owl was released after a period of rehabilitation. Characteristic presenting signs as well as response to therapy suggest aqueous misdirection was the cause of ocular hypertension in this owl. To our knowledge, this is the first report of suspected aqueous misdirection and its medical management in a raptor.

  8. Results of a prospective multicentre myeloablative double-unit cord blood transplantation trial in adult patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Juliet N; Fei, Mingwei; Karanes, Chatchada; Horwitz, Mitchell; Devine, Steven; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Holter, Jennifer; Adams, Alexia; Logan, Brent; Navarro, Willis H; Riches, Marcie

    2015-02-01

    Double-unit cord blood (CB) grafts may improve engraftment and relapse risk in adults with haematological malignancies. We performed a prospective high-dose myeloablative double-unit CB transplantation (CBT) trial in adults with high-risk acute leukaemia or myelodysplasia (MDS) between 2007 and 2011. The primary aim was to establish the 1-year overall survival in a multi-centre setting. Fifty-six patients (31 acute myeloid leukaemia, 19 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 4 other acute leukaemias, 2 myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS]) were transplanted at 10 centres. The median infused total nucleated cell doses were 2·62 (larger unit) and 2·02 (smaller unit) x 10(7) /kg. The cumulative incidence of day 100 neutrophil engraftment was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80-96). Day 180 grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence was 64% (95%CI: 51-76) and 36% (95%CI: 24-49) of patients had chronic GVHD by 3-years. At 3-years post-transplant, the transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 39% (95%CI: 26-52), and the 3-year relapse incidence was 11% (95%CI: 4-21). With a median 37-month (range 23-71) follow-up of survivors, the 3-year disease-free survival was 50% (95%CI: 37-63). Double-unit CBT is a viable alternative therapy for high-risk acute leukaemia/ MDS in patients lacking a matched unrelated donor. This is especially important for minority patients. The relapse incidence was low but strategies to ameliorate TRM are needed.

  9. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients; Public... prophylaxis and/or treatment of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients....

  10. Factors associated with the recovery of activities of daily living after hospitalization for acute medical illness: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Ryohei; Watanabe, Hiroki; Tsutsumi, Madoka; Kanamori, Takeshige; Maeno, Tetsuhiro; Yanagi, Hisako

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the factors associated with the recovery rate of activities of daily living of elderly patients hospitalized for acute medical illness. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 238 elderly patients were enrolled in this study. The main outcome measure was the functional independence measure score which was used as an assessment of activities of daily living. The participants were divided into 2 groups based on their activities of daily living before onset: the independent group and the partially dependent group. The participants of each group were further divided into 2 subgroups based on recovery rates of activities of daily living: the high-recovery group (80%) and the low-recovery group (<80%). The factors associated with the recovery rate were examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. [Results] The factors associated with the recovery rate were: days of inactivity and cognitive status at the start of rehabilitation for the independent group, and days of inactivity and nutritional status at the start of rehabilitation for the partially dependent group. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that the important factors for return to normal activities of daily living are: days of inactivity and cognitive status for the independent group; and days of inactivity and management of nutrition for the partially dependent group. PMID:27821931

  11. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene.

  12. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants.

  13. Skill set requirements for nurses deployed with an expeditionary medical unit based on lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, John J; Newell, Kimberly J

    2008-03-01

    Based in Kuwait 3 years apart, the authors recount how nurses and corps staff, along with their physician counterparts, came together to form well-run medical facilities under adverse circumstances. Their respective hospitals became competent organizations because of specific formulas for success, along with preparation, identification of required skill sets, and making improvements based on experience. This article describes the training of medical, nursing, and corps staff, the facilities and resources required for managing casualties, and some of the more commonly encountered combat injuries and conditions.

  14. Unmet Needs for Ancillary Services Among Hispanics/Latinos Receiving HIV Medical Care - United States, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Lauren C; DeGroote, Nicholas P; Shouse, R Luke; Valleroy, Linda A; Prejean, Joseph; Bradley, Heather

    2016-10-14

    The prevalence of diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is more than twice as high as the prevalence among non-Hispanic whites (1). Services that support retention in HIV medical care and assist with day-to-day living, referred to here as ancillary services, help persons living with HIV access HIV medical care, adhere to HIV treatment, and attain HIV viral suppression. The needs for these ancillary services among Hispanics/Latinos are not well described (2). To obtain nationally representative estimates of and reasons for unmet needs for such services among Hispanic/Latino adults receiving outpatient HIV medical care during 2013-2014, CDC analyzed data from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP). The analysis found that Hispanics/Latinos in all age and sexual orientation/behavior subgroups reported substantial unmet needs, including 24% needing dental care, 21% needing eye or vision care, 15% needing food and nutrition services, and 9% needing transportation assistance. Addressing unmet needs for ancillary services among Hispanics/Latinos living with HIV might help increase access to HIV care, improve health outcomes, and reduce health disparities.

  15. Subterranean medicine: an inquiry into underground medical treatment protocols in cave rescue situations in national parks in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hooker, K; Shalit, M

    2000-01-01

    Caving and spelunking have become increasingly popular over the years, with hundreds of thousands of amateur spelunkers across the country visiting caves. National parks in the United States offer hundreds of caves for all levels of spelunkers and, in fact, many national parks boast caves as either their main or major attraction. In an effort to increase visitor safety and establish subterranean medical treatment protocols, we began an investigation into cave rescue, medical protocols, previously published recommendations concerning cave safety, and visitor and rescue statistics in the national parks. Our inquiry provided little guidance from either the literature or the present US National Parks database for treating underground injuries. However, 2 predominant trends did appear. First, despite the nearly 2 million visitors to the caves in the 14 parks surveyed, there were only about 200 total calls for medical care. The vast number of those calls were for minor injuries. Second, no strict evidence-based treatment protocols for underground injuries exist, probably because they are not feasible. A caving incident database for the national parks would facilitate suggestions for preventative measures for the minor injuries and would help catalog the creative solutions for the rare serious subterranean medical incident.

  16. [Initiation to military medical corps activity modalities: a teaching unit providing a new approach to recruiting reserve pharmacists].

    PubMed

    Labrude, P

    2004-07-01

    During the last ten Years, major reforms have been implemented in the French armies due to discontinuation of mandatory enlistment. For the medical corps, recruitment and training for reservists has ceased since the national school for reserve officers in Libourne was closed. During this same time, the number of foreign engagements of the French armies has revealed the need for available young reserve officers in the medical corps. Reserve training of students in medicine, pharmacy, odontology, or nursing has been considered and different possibilities considered. One option is to develop a teaching unit during the third Year of the curriculum allowing volunteer students to become junior officers. For pharmacy students, specific training on drug supply, nuclear, biological and chemical weapons and terrorism as well as clinical chemistry, toxicology, and hygiene are also organized.

  17. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  18. Cathepsin L acutely alters microvessel integrity within the neurovascular unit during focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu-Huan; Kanazawa, Masato; Hung, Stephanie Y; Wang, Xiaoyun; Fukuda, Shunichi; Koziol, James A; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    During focal cerebral ischemia, the degradation of microvessel basal lamina matrix occurs acutely and is associated with edema formation and microhemorrhage. These events have been attributed to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). However, both known protease generation and ligand specificities suggest other participants. Using cerebral tissues from a non-human primate focal ischemia model and primary murine brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and microglia in culture, the effects of active cathepsin L have been defined. Within 2 hours of ischemia onset cathepsin L, but not cathepsin B, activity appears in the ischemic core, around microvessels, within regions of neuron injury and cathepsin L expression. In in vitro studies, cathepsin L activity is generated during experimental ischemia in microglia, but not astrocytes or endothelial cells. In the acidic ischemic core, cathepsin L release is significantly increased with time. A novel ex vivo assay showed that cathepsin L released from microglia during ischemia degrades microvessel matrix, and interacts with MMP activity. Hence, the loss of microvessel matrix during ischemia is explained by microglial cathepsin L release in the acidic core during injury evolution. The roles of cathepsin L and its interactions with specific MMP activities during ischemia are relevant to strategies to reduce microvessel injury and hemorrhage. PMID:26198177

  19. Renal assist device and treatment of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Issa, Naim; Messer, Jennifer; Paganini, Emil P

    2007-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and serious complication of sepsis in ICU patients and is associated with a very high mortality. Despite the advent of sophisticated renal replacement therapies (RRT) employing high-dose hemofiltration and high-flux membranes, mortality and morbidity from sepsis-induced AKI remained high. Moreover, these dialytic modalities could not substitute for the important functions of renal tubular cells in decreasing sepsis-induced AKI biological dysregulations. The results from the in vitro and preclinical animal model studies were very intriguing and led to the development of a bioartificial kidney consisting of a renal tubule assist device containing human proximal tubular cells (RAD) added in tandem to a continuous venovenous hemofiltration circuit. The results from the phase I safety trial and the recent phase II clinical trial showed that the RAD not only can replace many of the indispensable biological kidney functions, but also modify the natural history of sepsis-induced AKI by ameliorating patient survival.

  20. The Magnitude of Medical Problems of the Elderly in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Harold M.

    1975-01-01

    Medical problems of older Americans are described, based on the types of illnesses and their frequency among the elderly. Those 65 years of age and older are defined as elderly, placing 20 million of the 203 million Americans in this category (1970 census). The major causes of chronic conditions in the elderly and the percent of those 65-74 years…

  1. An Assessment of Interorganizational Relations between Naval Medical Command Northeast Region and Its Subordinate Units.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION ................................... 1 Conditions Which Prompted This Study ........... 1 Statement of the Research Problem...j.. I. Introduction Conditions Which Prompted This Study Established in 1983, the Navy Medical Command Northeast Region is...organization and thus, managing this form of interorganizational relationship is more public relations or marketing oriented. This focus relates to what has been

  2. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July-September 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever , lym- phogranuloma venereum, lymphocytic choriomenin- gitis, rabies, ornithosis, equine encephalomyelitis, and St. Louis...including nausea and vomiting and sought medical attention. Her symptoms progressed to include fever , salivation, and diffi culty in swallow- ing...higher elevations of the mountains due to an increase in average air temperature. Mongoose throughout the Caribbean islands, where they are an

  3. High prevalence of respiratory viral infections in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit for acute respiratory infections as detected by nucleic acid-based assays.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia.

  4. High Prevalence of Respiratory Viral Infections in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit for Acute Respiratory Infections as Detected by Nucleic Acid-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia. PMID:15635014

  5. The business of palliative medicine--part 4: Potential impact of an acute-care palliative medicine inpatient unit in a tertiary care cancer center.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Declan

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a hematology/oncology computerized discharge database was qualitatively and quantitatively reviewed using an empirical methodology. The goal was to identify potential patients for admission to a planned acute-care, palliative medicine inpatient unit. Patients were identified by the International Classifications of Disease (ICD-9) codes. A large heterogenous population, comprising up to 40 percent of annual discharges from the Hematology/Oncology service, was identified. If management decided to add an acute-care, palliative medicine unit to the hospital, these are the patients who would benefit. The study predicted a significant change in patient profile, acuity, complexity, and resource utilization in current palliative care services. This study technique predicted the actual clinical load of the acute-care unit when it opened and was very helpful in program development. Our model predicted that 695 patients would be admitted to the acute-care palliative medicine unit in the first year of operation; 655 patients were actually admitted during this time.

  6. Efficacy of an expanded ventilator bundle for the reduction of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Blamoun, John; Alfakir, Maria; Rella, Marie E; Wojcik, Janice M; Solis, Roberto A; Anees Khan, M; DeBari, Vincent A

    2009-03-01

    The ventilator bundle (VB) includes a group of clinical maneuvers (head-of-bed elevation, "sedation vacation," deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, and peptic ulcer disease prophylaxis) to improve outcomes in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. We modified the standard VB in our medical intensive care unit to include a group of respiratory therapist-driven protocols and, postimplementation, observed a statistically significant (P = .0006) reduction in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), from a median of 14.1 cases/10(3) ventilator-days (interquartile range [IQR] = 12.1 to 20.6) to 0 cases/10(3) ventilator-days (IQR = 0 to 1.1).

  7. Prospective survey of acute osteoarticular infections in a French paediatric orthopedic surgery unit.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, A; Al Khoury, H; Dana, C; Quesne, G; Berche, P; Glorion, C; Péjin, Z

    2013-09-01

    The epidemiology of acute paediatric osteoarticular infections (OAI) has recently evolved, mainly due to the improvement of microbiological diagnosis. We conducted a prospective study to analyse the recent epidemiology and the clinical evolution of paediatric OAI in order to validate the adequacy of our probabilistic first-line antibiotic treatment (intraveinous cefamandole + gentamicin). All children suspected of community acquired OAI were included and followed-up for 3 years. The etiologic diagnosis was based on blood cultures, joint aspirations and bone punctures. All osteoarticular (OA) samples were systematically inoculated into blood culture bottles. Real-time universal 16S rRNA and PCR targeted on Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes were performed twice a week. From 17 March 2007 to 26 February 2009, 98 septic arthritis, 70 osteomyelitis, 23 osteoarthritis and six spondylodiscitis were analysed. A portal of entry was suspected in 44% of cases, including 55% of otorhinolaryngological infections. C reactive protein was the most sensitive inflammatory marker. PCR increased by 54% the performance of bacteriological diagnosis. Among the patients completely investigated (blood culture and OAI samples), there were 63% documented OAI. The main pathogens found were K. kingae (52%), S. aureus (28%), S. pyogenes (7%), S. pneumoniae (3%) and Streptococcus agalactiae (2%). All isolated bacteria were sensitive to the probabilist treatment and outcome was favorable. PCR has significantly improved the performance and the delay of IOA diagnosis in children, for which K. kingae turned out to be the first causative agent. The probabilistic treatment was active against the main bacteria responsible for paediatric OAI.

  8. Use of Curricular and Extracurricular Assessments to Predict Performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1: A Multi-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandy, Robyn A.; Herial, Nabeel A.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Metting, Patricia J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies student performance predictions based on the United States Medical Licensure Exam (USMLE) Step 1. Subjects were second-year medical students from academic years of 2002 through 2006 (n = 711). Three measures of basic science knowledge (two curricular and one extracurricular) were evaluated as predictors of USMLE Step 1 scores.…

  9. Multicenter Approach to Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States: The North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2)

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Adam, Slivka; Hawes, Robert H.; Brand, Randall E.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Money, Mary E.; Banks, Peter A.; Bishop, Michele D.; Baillie, John; Sherman, Stuart; DiSario, James; Burton, Frank R.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Gelrud, Andres; Lo, Simon K.; DeMeo, Mark T.; Steinberg, William M.; Kochman, Michael L.; Etemad, Babak; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Elinoff, Beth; Greer, Julia B.; O’Connell, Michael; Lamb, Janette; Barmada, M. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are complex syndromes associated with numerous etiologies, clinical variables and complications. We developed the North American Pancreatitis Study 2 (NAPS2) to be sufficiently powered to understand the complex environmental, metabolic and genetic mechanisms underlying RAP and CP. Methods Between August 2000 and September 2006, a consortium of 20 expert academic and private sites prospectively ascertained 1,000 human subjects with RAP or CP, plus 695 controls (spouse, family, friend or unrelated). Standardized questionnaires were completed by both the physicians and study subjects and blood was drawn for genomic DNA and biomarker studies. All data were double-entered into a database and systematically reviewed to minimize errors and include missing data. Results A total of 1,000 subjects (460 RAP, 540 CP) and 695 controls who completed consent forms and questionnaires and donated blood samples comprised the final dataset. Data were organized according to diagnosis, supporting documentation, etiological classification, clinical signs and symptoms (including pain patterns and duration, and quality of life), past medical history, family history, environmental exposures (including alcohol and tobacco use), medication use and therapeutic interventions. Upon achieving the target enrollment, data were organized and classified to facilitate future analysis. The approaches, rationale and datasets are described, along with final demographic results. Conclusion The NAPS2 consortium has successfully completed a prospective ascertainment of 1,000 subjects with RAP and CP from the USA. These data will be useful in elucidating the environmental, metabolic and genetic conditions, and to investigate the complex interactions that underlie RAP and CP. PMID:18765957

  10. Differences in managerial behaviour between head nurses and medical directors in intensive care units in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pepermans, R; Mentens, C; Goedee, M; Jegers, M; van Roy, K

    2001-01-01

    We attempt to determine whether differences appear between the managerial behaviour of European intensive care head nurses on the one side and medical directors on the other. In order to come up with a managerial job and competency analysis of ICU managers, observations and interviews were performed. Additionally, focus groups consisting of ICU experts were organized. The results are discussed according to managerial behaviour taxonomies and existing competency models. There seems to be some differentiation between the two managerial positions studied. Head nurses are more involved in planning/coordinating and motivating/reinforcing activities, whereas medical directors are more involved in socializing/politicking, decision making/problem solving, interaction with others and disciplining.

  11. Medical Diplomacy in the United States Army: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    analysis of various forms of narrative data, to include journal articles, white papers, theses, web blogs, manuscripts, and point papers on health...collection of qualitative data from the sources listed above. Narrative analysis stresses that the researcher must know the data well, so all sources were...medical exercise during this period was in Honduras, where US forces worked directly with Honduran military and civilian health personnel to bring

  12. Views of Medical Physics in the United Kingdom and Ireland, 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-19

    scientific personnel and contractors. It is not considered part of the scien- tific literatur, and should not be cited as such. APPW=VD FOR PUBLIC...cervix. At the General Infirmary, duties of the Medical Physics department include both teaching and research. Being a part of the hospital, the...the use of w- mesons for radiotherapy. There will be a n- meson beam as part of the new spallation neutron source at the Rutherford Laboratory. The

  13. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. April-June 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    April – June 2010 39 THE ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT JOURNAL energy of the radiation dose on the radiation badge, a thermoluminescent dosimeter, was...to maintain all doses (patient, physician, and the general public) using the ALARA principle. Using a Panasonic thermoluminescent dosimetry system...US Army uses a thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system to measure and characterize this exposure. The TLD system is provided by the US Army

  14. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  15. Acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in the intensive care unit: impact on prognostic assessment for shared decision making.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2011-07-01

    A 69-year-old female was receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute renal failure (ARF) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Consultation was requested from the palliative medicine service to facilitate a shared decision-making process regarding goals of care. Clinician responsibility in shared decision making includes the formulation and expression of a prognostic assessment providing the necessary perspective for a spokesperson to match patient values with treatment options. For this patient, ARF requiring RRT in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment. A prognostic assessment should include the outcomes of most importance to a discussion of goals of care: mortality risk and survivor functional status, in this case including renal recovery. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to document published data regarding these outcomes for adult patients receiving RRT for ARF in the ICU. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined mean values for short-term mortality, long-term mortality, renal-function recovery of short-term survivors, and renal-function recovery of long-term survivors were 51.7%, 68.6%, 82.0%, and 88.4%, respectively. This case example illustrates a process for formulating and expressing a prognostic assessment for an ICU patient requiring RRT for ARF. Data from the literature review provide baseline information that requires adjustment to reflect specific patient circumstances. The nature of the acute primary process, comorbidities, and severity of illness are key modifiers. Finally, the prognostic assessment is expressed during a family meeting using recommended principles of communication.

  16. How Does Medical Care in Sweden Compare with that in the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puretz, Donald H.

    1976-01-01

    While comparisons are difficult, Sweden's socialized health care delivery system produces superior health results when compared with the United States, and its concentration on optimization of cost-benefit ratios, with centralized research, planning, and resource aid, presents concepts the U.S. could adopt while maintaining free-enterprise…

  17. Patients with ischaemic, mixed and nephrotoxic acute tubular necrosis in the intensive care unit – a homogeneous population?

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Wilson JQ; Zanetta, Dirce MT; Pires, Antonio C; Lobo, Suzana MA; Lima, Emerson Q; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) is usually studied as a single entity, without distinguishing between ischaemic, nephrotoxic and mixed aetiologies. In the present study we evaluated the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ATN by aetiological group. Method We conducted a retrospective comparison of clinical features, mortality rates and risk factors for mortality for the three types of ATN in patients admitted to the general intensive care unit of a university hospital between 1997 and 2000. Results Of 593 patients with acute renal failure, 524 (88%) were classified as having ATN. Their mean age was 58 years, 68% were male and 52% were surgical patients. The overall mortality rate was 62%. A total of 265 patients (51%) had ischaemic ATN, 201 (38%) had mixed ATN, and 58 (11%) had nephrotoxic ATN. There were no differences among groups in terms of age, sex, APACHE II score and reason for ICU admission. Multiple organ failure was more frequent among patients with ischaemic (46%) and mixed ATN (55%) than in those with nephrotoxic ATN (7%; P < 0.0001). The complications of acute renal failure (such as, gastrointestinal bleeding, acidosis, oliguria and hypervolaemia) were more prevalent in ischaemic and mixed ATN patients. Mortality was higher for ischaemic (66%; P = 0.001) and mixed ATN (63%; P = 0.0001) than for nephrotoxic ATN (38%). When ischaemic ATN patients, mixed ATN patients and all patients combined were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression, the independent factors for mortality identified were different except for oliguria, which was the only variable universally associated with death (odds ratio [OR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.64–5.49 [P = 0.0003] for ischaemic ATN; OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.04–3.68 [P = 0.036] for mixed ATN; and OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.60–3.76 [P < 0.001] for all patients combined]). Conclusion The frequency of isolated nephrotoxic ATN was low, with ischaemic and mixed ATN accounting for almost 90% of cases. The

  18. Reconstruction of the Radiation Emergency Medical System From the Acute to the Sub-acute Phases After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Crisis.

    PubMed

    Ojino, Mayo; Ishii, Masami

    2014-02-01

    The radiation emergency medical system in Japan ceased to function as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, which has commonly become known as the "Fukushima Accident." In this paper, we review the reconstruction processes of the radiation emergency medical system in order of events and examine the ongoing challenges to overcoming deficiencies and reinforcing the system by reviewing relevant literature, including the official documents of the investigation committees of the National Diet of Japan, the Japanese government, and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, as well as technical papers written by the doctors involved in radiation emergency medical activities in Fukushima. Our review has revealed that the reconstruction was achieved in 6 stages from March 11 to July 1, 2011: (1) Re-establishment of an off-site center (March 13), (2) Re-establishment of a secondary radiation emergency hospital (March 14), (3) Reconstruction of the initial response system for radiation emergency care (April 2), (4) Reinforcement of the off-site center and stationing of disaster medical advisors at the off-site center (April 4), (5) Reinforcement of the medical care system and an increase in the number of hospitals for non-contaminated patients (From April 2 to June 23), and (6) Enhancement of the medical care system in the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of a new medical care system, involving both industrial medicine and emergency medicine (July 1). Medical resources such as voluntary efforts, academic societies, a local community medical system and university hospitals involved in medical care activities on 6 stages originally had not planned. In the future, radiation emergency medical systems should be evaluated with these 6 stages as a basis, in order to reinforce and enrich both the existing and backup systems so that minimal harm will come to nuclear power plant workers or evacuees and that they will receive proper care. This

  19. Neighborhood Influences on Emergency Medical Services Use for Acute Stroke – A Population-based Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, William J.; Levine, Deborah A.; Kerber, Kevin A.; Zahuranec, Darin B.; Burke, James; Baek, Jonggyu; Sanchez, Brisa; Smith, Melinda A; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Lisabeth, Lynda

    2015-01-01

    Objective Delay to hospital arrival limits acute stroke treatment. Use of emergency medical service (EMS) is key in ensuring timely stroke care. We aimed to identify low-EMS utilizing neighborhoods and to evaluate whether neighborhood-level factors were associated with (EMS) use. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project, a population-based stroke surveillance study of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage cases presenting to emergency departments in Nueces County, Texas. The primary outcome was arrival by EMS. The primary exposures were neighborhood resident age, poverty, and violent crime. We estimated the association of neighborhood level factors with EMS use using hierarchical logistic regression, controlling for individual factors (stroke severity, ethnicity and age). Results During 2000-2009 there were 4004 identified strokes, with EMS use data available for 3474. Nearly half (49%) of stroke cases arrived by EMS. Adjusted stroke EMS utilization was lower in neighborhoods with higher family income (OR 0.86 95% CI 0.75-0.97) and a larger percentage of older adults (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.56-0.89). Individual factors associated with stroke EMS use included white race (OR 1.41 95% CI 1.13-1.76) and older age (OR 1.36 per 10-year age increment, 95% CI 1.27-1.46). The proportion of neighborhood stroke cases arriving by EMS ranged from 17% to 71%. The fully adjusted model only explained 0.3% (95% CI 0-1.1%) of neighborhood EMS stroke use variance, indicating that individual factors are more strongly associated with stroke EMS use than neighborhood factors. Conclusions While some neighborhood-level factors were associated with EMS use, patient-level factors explained nearly all variability in stroke EMS use. In this community, strategies to increase EMS use should target individuals rather than specific neighborhoods. PMID:26386884

  20. Student perception about working in rural United States/Canada after graduation: a study in an offshore Caribbean medical school

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi; Dubey, Arun K; Nandy, Atanu; Herz, Burton L; Little, Brian W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rural residents of the United States (US) and Canada face problems in accessing healthcare. International medical graduates (IMGs) play an important role in delivering rural healthcare. IMGs from Caribbean medical schools have the highest proportion of physicians in primary care.  Xavier University School of Medicines admits students from the US, Canada and other countries to the undergraduate medical (MD) course and also offers a premedical program. The present study was conducted to obtain student perception about working in rural US/Canada after graduation.   Methods: The study was conducted among premedical and preclinical undergraduate medical (MD) students during October 2014. The questionnaire used was modified from a previous study. Semester of study, gender, nationality, place of residence and occupation of parents were noted. Information about whether students plan to work in rural US/Canada after graduation, possible reasons why doctors are reluctant to work in rural areas, how the government can encourage rural practice, possible problems respondents anticipate while working in rural areas were among the topics studied. Results: Ninety nine of the 108 students (91.7%) participated. Forty respondents were in favor of working in rural US/Canada after graduation. Respondents mentioned good housing, regular electricity, water supply, telecommunication facilities, and schools for education of children as important conditions to be fulfilled. The government should provide higher salaries to rural doctors, help with loan repayment, and provide opportunities for professional growth.  Potential problems mentioned were difficulty in being accepted by the rural community, problems in convincing patients to follow medical advice, lack of exposure to rural life among the respondents, and cultural issues. Conclusions: About 40% of respondents would consider working in rural US/Canada. Conditions required to be fulfilled have been mentioned above

  1. The Effect of an Electronic SBAR Communication Tool on Documentation of Acute Events in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Panesar, Rahul S; Albert, Ben; Messina, Catherine; Parker, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation (SBAR) handoff tool is designed to improve communication. The effects of integrating an electronic medical record (EMR) with a SBAR template are unclear. The research team hypothesizes that an electronic SBAR template improves documentation and communication between nurses and physicians. In all, 84 patient events were recorded from 542 admissions to the pediatric intensive care unit. Three time periods were studied: (a) paper documentation only, (b) electronic documentation, and (c) electronic documentation with an SBAR template. Documentation quality was assessed using a 4-point scoring system. The frequency of event notes increased progressively during the 3 study periods. Mean quality scores improved significantly from paper documentation to EMR free-text notes and to electronic SBAR-template notes, as did nurse and attending physician notification. The implementation of an electronic SBAR note is associated with more complete documentation and increased frequency of documentation of communication among nurses and physicians.

  2. The Addiction Treatment Unit: a dual diagnosis program at the California Medical Facility--a descriptive report.

    PubMed

    Katz, R I

    1999-01-01

    The Addiction Treatment Unit is a dual diagnosis program which exists in the California Department of Corrections. It is housed in the California Medical Facility in Vacaville, California. Program residents must meet the diagnostic criteria of having a major mental disorder substantiated by a DSM-IV Axis I diagnosis and also meet the criteria for a substance abuse/dependence disorder. All patients are housed in one wing of the facility, which is based on the format of a modified therapeutic community and focuses on the concept of recovery. A multidisciplinary treatment team comprised of a psychiatrist, a psychologist, a social worker and a psychiatric technician delivers clinical interventions, including individual and group therapy as well as medication management. The focus of the drug treatment aspect is an Alcoholics Anonymous/Narcotics Anonymous approach based on 12-Step philosophy. Research involving other therapeutic communities running in prisons is discussed as is the aspect of dual diagnosis programs. Logistical and environmental constraints which pose challenges to running the Addiction Treatment Unit are considered. A summary section reflects on aspects which have been successful, what has not worked or has been changed and upcoming program revisions.

  3. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals.

  4. A review of alternatives to di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate-containing medical devices in the neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Van Vliet, EDS; Reitano, EM; Chhabra, JS; Bergen, GP; Whyatt, RM

    2012-01-01

    Objective To conduct an extensive literature and toxicological database review on substitute compounds and available alternative medical products to replace polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and/or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and conduct a DEHP-medical inventory analysis at a large metropolitan neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design A systematic search for DEHP-free alternative products was performed using online databases. An informal audit of a large metropolitan NICU was undertaken in 2005 and 2006; 21 products were identified that could potentially contain DEHP. Availability of DEHP-free alternatives was determined through company websites and phone interviews. Result Two alternative approaches are available for replacing DEHP in NICU medical products: (1) replacement by DEHP-free plasticizers; and (2) replacement of PVC entirely through the use of other polymers. Both approaches seem to provide less harmful substitutes to DEHP, but support PVC-free polymers as the preferred alternative. However, significant data gaps exist, particularly for the alternative polymers. In all, 10 out of 21 (48%) products in the NICU audit were DEHP-free; six consisted of alternative polymers and four of alternative plasticizers. Of the remaining 11 products, only three were available without DEHP at the time of the audit. Conclusion Because of significant data gaps, systematic toxicological testing of DEHP-free alternatives is imperative. Continued development of alternative products is also needed. PMID:21311501

  5. Assessing the impact of cognitive impairment on the usability of an electronic medication delivery unit in an assisted living population

    PubMed Central

    Ligons, Frank M.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Handler, Steven M.; Romagnoli, Katrina M.; Hochheiser, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between cognitive status and the usability of an integrated medication delivery unit (MDU) in older adults who reside in an Assisted Living Facility (ALF). Methods Subjects were recruited from a single ALF in Pittsburgh, PA. Usability testing sessions required subjects to execute tasks essential to using EMMA® (Electronic Medication Management Assistant), a Class II Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approved integrated MDU. Video coding allowed for quantification of usability errors observed during the testing sessions. Each subject's cognitive status was assessed using the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE®) with scores <24 indicating cognitive impairment. Functional status was assessed using the Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) questionnaire, and a global assessment of subjective usability was assessed by completing the System Usability Scale (SUS). Non-parametric statistics and correlation analysis were used to determine whether significant differences existed between cognitively impaired and non-impaired subjects. Results Nineteen subjects were recruited and completed the protocol. The subject pool was primarily white, female, 80+ and in possession of above average education. There was a significant relationship between MMSE® scores and the percentage of task success (z = −2.03, p = 0.04). Subjects with MMSE® scores of 24+ (no cognitive impairment) successfully completed an average of 69.0% of tasks vs. the 34.7% performance for those in the cognitively impaired group (<24). Six of the unimpaired group also succeeded at meeting the 85% (6 out of 7 correct) threshold, while none of the impaired group was able to. No subject with cognitive impairments (<24 MMSE®) completed more than 5/7 (71.4%) of their tasks. Two of the impaired subjects failed all of the tasks. Three of the MMSE®'s subsections (Date, Location and Spell ‘world’ backwards) were found to be significantly related (p < 0.05) to the

  6. Receipt of HIV/STD Prevention Counseling by HIV-Infected Adults Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Yuko; ZHU, Julia; CREPAZ, Nicole; BEER, Linda; PURCELL, David W.; JOHNSON, Christopher H.; VALVERDE, Eduardo E.; SKARBINSKI, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objective Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Design Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Methods Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. Results About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a health care provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. Conclusions HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines. PMID:24056066

  7. Skill Set Requirements for Nurses Deployed with an Expeditionary Medical Unit Based on Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    followed by a trip to the Battalion Aid Station, Forward Resuscitation Surgical Support unit, or Shock Trauma Platoon . At these stations, a physi- cian...prior months of February and March revealed that chest pain, appendicitis/status-post appen- dectomy, hernia /status-post hernia repair, and cellulitis...of the Alaris MedSystem III infusion pump (Cardinal Health, Dublin, Ohio), cellulitis, care of the patient with wounds, hernias /status-posthernia

  8. A Generalized Simulation Model for a Typical Medical Treatment Facility Obstetrical Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    performance. As a result of this model, decision-makers will now have access to information on system performance as well as insight into the effects of...identify unit effectiveness as well as the ability to predict future performance. As a result of this model, decision- makers will now have access to...2-1 Scheduling Outpatient Services: A Linear Program- ming Approach. .. .. .. .. .. .. .... .... ....... 2-2 A Cost-Effective Method of Delivering

  9. United States Army Reserve in Operation Desert Storm. Reservists of the Army Medical Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-23

    Federal Force Eisenhower, she and an officer nurse and 14 other enlisted personnel were reassigned, told to drive to their new post , and despite the...urgency of the situation, allowed 14 days leave en route. Upon arrival at Fort Bliss, SFC Ruthrauff and other NCOs had to find housing off post because the...at Brc,:ke and ended up working at various posts all over CONUS. The unit became in effect a replacement battalion that was looked to by Health

  10. Accounting for fetal death: vital statistics and the medicalization of pregnancy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, Lauren

    2013-09-01

    Recent reports by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have decried the high rate of fetal mortality in the contemporary United States. Much of the data about fetal and infant deaths, as well as other poor pregnancy outcomes, are tabulated and tracked through vital statistics. In this article, I demonstrate how notions of fetal death became increasingly tied to the surveillance of maternal bodies through the tabulating and tracking of vital statistics in the middle part of the twentieth century. Using a historical analysis of the revisions to the United States Standard Certificate of Live Birth, and the United States Standard Report of Fetal Death, I examine how the categories of analysis utilized in these documents becomes integrally linked to contemporary ideas about fetal and perinatal death, gestational age, and prematurity. While it is evident that there are relationships between maternal behavior and birth outcomes, in this article I interrogate the ways in which the surveillance of maternal bodies through vital statistics has naturalized these relationships.

  11. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  12. Physiotherapists' Perceptions of and Experiences with the Discharge Planning Process in Acute-Care General Internal Medicine Units in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Uyeno, Jennifer; Heck, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine discharge planning of patients in general internal medicine units in Ontario acute-care hospitals from the perspective of physiotherapists. Methods: A cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire was sent to participants in November 2011. Respondents' demographic characteristics and ranking of factors were analyzed using descriptive statistics; t-tests were performed to determine between-group differences (based on demographic characteristics). Responses to open-ended questions were coded to identify themes. Results: Mobility status was identified as the key factor in determining discharge readiness; other factors included the availability of social support and community resources. While inter-professional communication was identified as important, processes were often informal. Discharge policies, timely availability of other discharge options, and pressure for early discharge were identified as affecting discharge planning. Respondents also noted a lack of training in discharge planning; accounts of ethical dilemmas experienced by respondents supported these themes. Conclusions: Physiotherapists consider many factors beyond the patient's physical function during the discharge planning process. The improvement of team communication and resource allocation should be considered to deal with the realities of discharge planning. PMID:25125778

  13. A day in the life: a case series of acute care palliative medicine--the Cleveland model.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Heintz, Jessica; Legrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care in advanced disease is complex. Knowledge and experience of symptom control and management of multiple complications are essential. An interdisciplinary team is also required to meet the medical and psychosocial needs in life-limiting illness. Acute care palliative medicine is a new concept in the spectrum of palliative care services. Acute care palliative medicine, integrated into a tertiary academic medical center, provides expert medical management and specialized care as part of the spectrum of acute medical care services to this challenging patient population. The authors describe a case series to provide a snapshot of a typical day in an acute care inpatient palliative medicine unit. The cases illustrate the sophisticated medical care involved for each individual and the important skill sets of the palliative medicine specialist required to provide high-quality acute medical care for the very ill.

  14. [The expertise evaluation of organization of rendering of acute, emergency and urgent medical care in rural regions of Novosibirsk oblast'].

    PubMed

    Ivaninskiĭ, O I; Sharapov, I V; Sadovoĭ, M A

    2013-01-01

    The most problematic spheres in the resource support of emergency medical care to rural residents are the completeness of staff of physicians in rural medical surgeries, community hospitals and departments of emergency medical care in central district hospitals. The provision of feldsher obstetrics posts with sanitary motor transport and medical equipment is yet another problematic sphere. The main troubles during provision of emergency medical care at feldsher obstetrics posts are related to surgery treatment. The organization of emergency and urgent medical care suffers of many unresolved problems related to informational program support at feldsher obstetrics posts, polyclinics of central district hospitals.

  15. Complementary and alternative medical therapies for interstitial cystitis: an update from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Megan Danielle; Shah, Nima M.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) has shifted from organ-specific to a multifactorial, multidisciplinary and individualized approach. Patients with refractory and debilitating symptoms may respond to complementary and alternative medical treatments (CAM). Through CAM therapies, practitioners assist the patient to be at the center of their care, empowering them to be emotionally and physically involved. Multi-disciplinary care, including urology, gynecology, gastroenterology, neurology, psychology, physiotherapy and pain medicine, is also identified to be the crux of adequate management of patients with chronic pelvic pain because of its variable etiology. The purpose of this review is to emphasize these changes and discuss management strategies. PMID:26816868

  16. [Practice and research into multi-unit teaching of Medical Genetics.].

    PubMed

    Du, Shao-Ling; Xu, Si-Bin; Gong, Lei; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Ping; Lin, Ai-Qin

    2010-10-01

    In order to fully arise the enthusiasm of students in active learning and promote their development, we attempted such multiple class teaching methods in teaching medical science of genetics as elaboration of the basic theory of genetics, synopsis on the advance of this field, application of multimedia teaching, case-based teaching, role-play change in class teaching, instructions on writing of reviewing articles and academic assessment by diverse examination. The results suggest that multiple teaching methods can greatly enhance the efficiency of class teaching and comprehensively cultivate the academic ability of the students as well as improve the quality of teachers. Compared with the conventional class teaching, students are much interested in giving lessons by case-based study, CAI teaching and role change of teachers and students in class teaching, which resulted in improvement of self-disciplined study of students, problem settlement, class performance, awareness of the importance of scientific research and reinforcement of team work.

  17. Effect of PACS/CR on cost of care and length of stay in a medical intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlotz, Curtis P.; Kundel, Harold L.; Brikman, Inna; Pratt, Hugh M.; Redfern, Regina O.; Horii, Steven C.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    1996-05-01

    Our purpose was to determine the economic effects associated with the introduction of PACS and computed radiology (CR) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Clinical and financial data were collected over a period of 6 months, both before and after the introduction of PACS/CR in our medical intensive care unit. Administrative claims data resulting from the MICU stay of each patient enrolled in our study were transferred online to our research database from the administrative databases of our hospital and its affiliated clinical practices. These data included all charge entries, sociodemographic data, admissions/discharge/transfer chronologies, ICD9 diagnostic and procedure codes, and diagnostic related groups. APACHE III scores and other case mix adjusters were computed from the diagnostic codes, and from the contemporaneous medical record. Departmental charge to cost ratios and the Medicare Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule were used to estimate costs from hospital and professional charges. Data were analyzed using both the patient and the exam as the unit of analysis. Univariate analyses by patient show that patients enrolled during the PACS periods were similar to those enrolled during the Film periods in age, sex, APACHE III score, and other measures of case mix. No significant differences in unadjusted median length of stay between the two Film and two PACS periods were detected. Likewise, no significant differences in unadjusted total hospital and professional costs were found between the Film and PACS periods. In our univariate analyses by exam, we focused on the subgroup of exams that had triggered primary clinical actions in any period. Those action-triggering exams were divided into two groups according to whether the referring clinician elected to obtain imaging results from the workstation or from the usual channels. Patients whose imaging results were obtain from the workstation had significantly lower professional costs in the 7 days

  18. Trends in use of medical abortion in the United States: reanalysis of surveillance data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    Pazol, Karen; Creanga, Andreea A.; Zane, Suzanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Background With changing patterns and increasing use of medical abortion in the United States, it is important to have accurate statistics on the use of this method regularly available. This study assesses the accuracy of medical abortion data reported annually to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and describes trends over time in the use of medical abortion relative to other methods. Study Design This analysis included data reported to CDC for 2001–2008. Year-specific analyses included all states that monitored medical abortion for a given year, while trend analyses were restricted to states that monitored medical abortion continuously from 2001 to 2008. Data quality and completeness were assessed by (a) examining abortions reported with an unspecified method type within the gestational age limit for medical abortion (med-eligible abortions) and (b) comparing the percentage of all abortions and med-eligible abortions reported to CDC as medical abortions with estimates based on published mifepristone sales data for the United States from 2001 to 2007. Results During 2001–2008, the percentage of med-eligible abortions reported to CDC with an unspecified method type remained low (1.0%–2.2%); CDC data and mifepristone sales estimates for 2001–2007 demonstrated strong agreement [all abortions: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.983; med-eligible abortions: ICC=0.988]. During 2001–2008, the percentage of abortions reported to CDC as medical abortions increased (p<.001 for all abortions and for med-eligible abortions). Among states that reported medical abortions for 2008, 15% of all abortions and 23% of med-eligible abortions were reported as medical abortions. Conclusion CDC’s Abortion Surveillance System provides an important annual data source that accurately describes the use of medical abortion relative to other methods in the United States. PMID:22770796

  19. Chemotherapy Order Entry by a Clinical Support Pharmacy Technician in an Outpatient Medical Day Unit

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Heather; Broadfield, Larry; Harding, Claudia; Heukshorst, Shelley; Sweetapple, Jennifer; Rolle, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pharmacy technicians are expanding their scope of practice, often in partnership with pharmacists. In oncology, such a shift in responsibilities may lead to workflow efficiencies, but may also cause concerns about patient risk and medication errors. Objectives: The primary objective was to compare the time spent on order entry and order-entry checking before and after training of a clinical support pharmacy technician (CSPT) to perform chemotherapy order entry. The secondary objectives were to document workflow interruptions and to assess medication errors. Methods: This before-and-after observational study investigated chemotherapy order entry for ambulatory oncology patients. Order entry was performed by pharmacists before the process change (phase 1) and by 1 CSPT after the change (phase 2); order-entry checking was performed by a pharmacist during both phases. The tasks were timed by an independent observer using a personal digital assistant. A convenience sample of 125 orders was targeted for each phase. Data were exported to Microsoft Excel software, and timing differences for each task were tested with an unpaired t test. Results: Totals of 143 and 128 individual orders were timed for order entry during phase 1 (pharmacist) and phase 2 (CSPT), respectively. The mean total time to perform order entry was greater during phase 1 (1:37 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.044). Totals of 144 and 122 individual orders were timed for order-entry checking (by a pharmacist) in phases 1 and 2, respectively, and there was no difference in mean total time for order-entry checking (1:21 min versus 1:20 min; p = 0.69). There were 33 interruptions not related to order entry (totalling 39:38 min) during phase 1 and 25 interruptions (totalling 30:08 min) during phase 2. Three errors were observed during order entry in phase 1 and one error during order-entry checking in phase 2; the errors were rated as having no effect on patient care. Conclusions: Chemotherapy order

  20. Treating parents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the effects of behavioral parent training and acute stimulant medication treatment on parent-child interactions.

    PubMed

    Babinski, Dara E; Waxmonsky, James G; Pelham, William E

    2014-10-01

    This multiple baseline study evaluated the efficacy of behavioral parent training (BPT) for 12 parents (M age = 39.17 years; 91% mothers) and their children (ages 6-12; 83% boys) both with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and also explored the acute effect of stimulant medication for parents before and after BPT. Parents rated their own and their children's symptoms and impairment and were stabilized on optimally dosed medication. Then, parents discontinued medication and were randomly assigned to a 3, 4, or 5 week baseline (BL), during which they provided twice-weekly ratings of their impairment, parenting, and their child's behavior. Following BL, parents and their children completed two laboratory tasks, once on their optimally dosed medication and once on a placebo to assess observable effects of medication on parent-child behavior, and they completed additional assessments of family functioning. Parents then completed eight BPT sessions, during which they were unmedicated. Twice-weekly ratings of parent and child behavior were collected during BPT and additional ratings were collected upon completing BPT. Two more parent-child tasks with and without parent medication were conducted upon BPT completion to assess the observable effects of BPT and BPT plus medication. Ten (83.33%) parents completed the trial. Improvements in parent and child behavior were observed, and parents reported improved child behavior with BPT. Few benefits of BPT emerged through parent reports of parent functioning, with the exception of inconsistent discipline, and no medication or interaction effects emerged. These results, although preliminary, suggest that some parents with ADHD benefit from BPT. While pharmacological treatment is the most common intervention for adults with ADHD, further examination of psychosocial treatments for adults is needed.

  1. Assessing the Performance of a Medical Intensive Care Unit: A 5-year single-center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Anushiravani, Amir; Masoompour, Seyed Masoom

    2017-01-01

    Patient care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is complex and expensive, serving to provide optimal outcome as well as the adequate use of resources. Our objective was to determine variables associated with admission practices, processes of care, and clinical outcomes for critically ill patients. Admission records of a 10-bed ICU were gathered during a 5-year period. Variables such as average length of stay, bed turnover, bed occupancy rate, and turnover interval were evaluated. Of the 1719 patients evaluated, 54% were men. Mortality was highest between 10 pm and 2 am. There was no significant difference in ICU mortality during different days of the week. We showed that nonoffice hour admissions were not associated with poorer clinical outcomes, and significant differences in ICU mortality and ICU length of stay were not seen. Moreover, hospital mortality rates were not significantly higher for patients admitted to our ICU on weekends, at nights, or any day of the week.

  2. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bojalil, R; Guiscafré, H; Espinosa, P; Viniegra, L; Martínez, H; Palafox, M; Gutiérrez, G

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  3. Medical exposure assessment: the global approach of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation.

    PubMed

    Shannoun, F

    2015-07-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established in 1955 to systematically collect, evaluate, publish and share data on the global levels and effects of ionizing radiation from natural and artificial sources. Regular surveys have been conducted to determinate the frequencies of medical radiological procedure, the number of equipment and staffing and the level of global exposure using the health care level (HCL) extrapolation model. UNSCEAR surveys revealed a range of issues relating to participation, survey process, data quality and analysis. Thus, UNSCEAR developed an improvement strategy to address the existing deficiencies in data quality and collection. The major element of this strategy is the introduction of an on-line platform to facilitate the data collection and archiving process. It is anticipated that the number of countries participating in UNSCEAR's surveys will increase in the future, particularly from HCL II-IV countries.

  4. Commercial support of continuing medical education in the United States: the politics of doubt, the value of studies.

    PubMed

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The continuing medical education (CME) system of the United States is being questioned for its integrity. Leaders in medicine and in government are asking about the effectiveness of CME, the influence of commercial support, and the value of CME credit and accreditation in assuring CME courses offer valid content, free of commercial bias. Nationally accredited CME organizations received $1.2B in commercial support during 2007, much of it associated with CME in formats shown to be less effective for improving clinical behavior and patient outcomes. There are few reliable data to respond to careful criticism. In 2007, U.S. expenditures for health exceed $2.2 trillion, with physicians responsible for clinical decisions that account for a large part of the spending. Approximately $4013 was spent per physician on CME. Rigorous studies are required to describe and explain relationships of CME accreditation and credit to better education and improved patient outcomes.

  5. Drip-and-Ship Thrombolytic Therapy Supported by the Telestroke System for Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Living in Medically Under-served Areas

    PubMed Central

    KAGEJI, Teruyoshi; OBATA, Fumiaki; OKA, Hirofumi; KANEMATSU, Yasuhisa; TABATA, Ryo; TANI, Kenji; BANDO, Hiroyasu; NAGAHIRO, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    There are a few stroke specialists in medically under-served areas in Japan. Consequently, in remote area patients may not receive thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (iv rt-PA), the standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Using a mobile telestroke support system (TSS) that accesses the internet via a smart phone, we implemented iv rt-PA infusion therapy under a drip-and-ship protocol to treat the stroke patients in medically under-served areas. The physicians at the Tokushima Prefectural Kaifu Hospital (TPKH), located in rural Japan, can relay CT or MRI scans and other patient data via their smart phone to off-site stroke specialists. In the course of 34 months, we used the TSS in 321 emergencies. A total of 9 of 188 (4.8%) with acute ischemic stroke, received iv rt-PA infusion therapy using a mobile TSS; in 5 among these (55.6%), we obtained partial or complete recanalization of occluded arteries. None suffered post-treatment hemorrhage and their average NIH stroke score fell from 14.6 at the time of admission to 6.8 at 24 h post-infusion. The drip-and-ship protocol contributed to the safe and effective treatment of the stroke patients living in medically under-served rural areas. PMID:27333939

  6. Posttraumatic stress following acute medical trauma in children: A proposed model of bio-psycho-social processes during the peri-trauma period

    PubMed Central

    Marsac, Meghan L.; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Widaman, Keith; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children worldwide experience acute medical events. Children’s responses to these events range from transient distress to significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS). While many models suggest explanations for the development and maintenance of PTSS in adults, very few have focused on children. Current models of child PTSS are primarily restricted to the post-trauma period, thus neglecting the critical peri-trauma period when screening and preventive interventions may be most easily implemented. Research on PTSS in response to pediatric medical trauma typically examines predictors in isolation, often overlooking potentially important interactions. This paper proposes a new model utilizing the bio-psycho-social framework and focusing on peri-trauma processes of acute medical events. Understanding the relationships among bio-psycho-social factors during peri-trauma can inform early identification of at-risk children, preventive interventions, and clinical care. Recommendations for future research, including the need to examine PTSS in the context of multiple influences, are discussed. PMID:25217001

  7. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards). Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization), received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward. PMID:28164113

  8. Nonpharmacological Interventions Targeted at Delirium Risk Factors, Delivered by Trained Volunteers (Medical and Psychology Students), Reduced Need for Antipsychotic Medications and the Length of Hospital Stay in Aged Patients Admitted to an Acute Internal Medicine Ward: Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Stanislaw; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Rewiuk, Krzysztof; Halicka, Monika; Kalwak, Weronika; Rybak, Paulina; Grodzicki, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Effectiveness of nonpharmacological multicomponent prevention delivered by trained volunteers (medical and psychology students), targeted at delirium risk factors in geriatric inpatients, was assessed at an internal medicine ward in Poland. Patients and Methods. Participants were recruited to intervention and control groups at the internal medicine ward (inclusion criteria: age ≥ 75, acute medical condition, basic orientation, and logical contact on admission; exclusion criteria: life expectancy < 24 hours, surgical hospitalization, isolation due to infectious disease, and discharge to other medical wards). Every day trained volunteers delivered a multicomponent standardized intervention targeted at risk factors of in-hospital complications to the intervention group. The control group, selected using a retrospective individual matching strategy (1 : 1 ratio, regarding age, gender, and time of hospitalization), received standard care. Outcome Measures. Hospitalization time, deaths, falls, delirium episodes, and antipsychotic prescriptions were assessed retrospectively from medical documentation. Results. 130 patients (38.4% males) participated in the study, with 65 in the intervention group. Antipsychotic medications were initiated less frequently in the intervention group compared to the control group. There was a trend towards a shorter hospitalization time and a not statistically significant decrease in deaths in the intervention group. Conclusion. Nonpharmacological multicomponent intervention targeted at delirium risk factors effectively reduced length of hospitalization and need for initiating antipsychotic treatment in elderly patients at the internal medicine ward.

  9. Potential drug-drug interactions in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohammad; Khan, Farmanullah; Noor, Sidra; Haider, Iqbal; Haq, Inam-Ul; Ali, Zahid; Shah, Zahir; Hassam, Mohsin

    2016-10-01

    Background Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) present with severe and life-threatening illnesses. Most of them suffer from various comorbidities. They usually receive complex pharmacotherapy with large number of medicines which increase the risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Objective The present report aimed to investigate prevalence and levels of potential DDIs (pDDIs) in medical ICU. Methods Medications profiles of 416 patients were checked for pDDIs using Micromedex Drug-Reax(®). Prevalence, levels of severity and levels of documentation were reported. Results Of total 416 patients, 310 were exposed to pDDIs (overall prevalence = 74.5 %). Likewise, a prevalence rate of 13.9 % was recorded for contraindicated pDDIs, 52.2 % for major pDDI and 58.4 % for moderate pDDI. This study reported 740 interacting drug pairs that were presented in total 1686 pDDIs. Of 1686 pDDIs, 4.3 % were of contraindicated severity, 33.8 % of major severity and 49.6 % of moderate severity, whereas 45.5 % were of fair scientific evidence and 41.4 % of good scientific evidence. Conclusion In this study, pDDIs were found highly prevalent in ICU patients at a rate of 74.5 %. Most of the pDDIs had moderate severity; however, substantial number of interactions (38.1 %) had major and contraindicated severity.

  10. Evaluation of nurses' errors associated in the preparation and administration of medication in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M P; Cotting, J; Pannatier, A

    1998-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency and the types of errors which occur regarding the preparation and the administration of medication and to identify the main causes of these errors in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at the University Hospital in Lausanne (Switzerland). In this prospective study, based on the observation of nurses' activities, the data were collected over a period of 10 weeks. The error classification was based on the American Society of Hospital Pharmacy (ASHP) definitions. The frequency of errors was calculated as the sum of all noted errors divided by the total administered drugs, plus the sum of all omitted drugs, multiplied by 100. The sum of all given doses plus all omitted doses gives the 'total opportunity for errors'. This total was 275 and the total frequency of errors was 26.9%. The most frequent errors were wrong-time errors (32.4%), wrong-administration-technique errors (32.4%) and preparation errors (23.0%). In relation with other studies conducted under comparable conditions, a lesser number of omissions and wrong-time errors were observed. On the contrary, administration-technique and dose-preparation errors were more frequent at our hospital. A program of systematic assistance and survey by professional pharmacists could improve the quality of the preparation and administration of medication in the PICU.

  11. Analysis of the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission in cardiology units: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Natália Fracaro; Mendes, Antonio Eduardo Matoso; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; Reis, Wálleri Christini Torelli; Fávero, Maria Luiza Drechsel; Correr, Cassyano Januário

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: this observational study aimed to describe the discrepancies identified during medication reconciliation on patient admission to cardiology units in a large hospital. Methods: the medication history of patients was collected within 48 hours after admission, and intentional and unintentional discrepancies were classified as omission, duplication, dose, frequency, timing, and route of drug administration. Results: most of the patients evaluated were women (58.0%) with a mean age of 59 years, and 75.5% of the patients had a Charlson comorbidity index score between 1 and 3. Of the 117 discrepancies found, 50.4% were unintentional. Of these, 61.0% involved omission, 18.6% involved dosage, 18.6% involved timing, and 1.7% involved the route of drug administration. Conclusion: this study revealed a high prevalence of discrepancies, most of which were related to omissions, and 50% were unintentional. These results reveal the number of drugs that are not reincorporated into the treatment of patients, which can have important clinical consequences. PMID:27533269

  12. Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Dialysis outside the Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger-Mähr, Hannelore; Zitt, Emanuel; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of patients suffering from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) is increasing. Whereas causes and outcome of AKI-D in the intensive care unit (ICU) are described extensively, few data exist about AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU. Aim of this study was to identify the causes of AKI-D, determine in-depth the comorbid conditions and outcome of this particular patient group and identify possibilities for its prevention. Methods We retrospectively studied all AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU in a single nephrology referral center between January 2010 and June 2015. Data on comorbid conditions, renal function and drug therapy prior to AKI-D, and possible causal events were collected. Patients were grouped into those with renal hypoperfusion as the predominant cause of AKI-D (hemodynamic group) and those with other causes (non-hemodynamic group). Results During 66 months 128 patients (57% male, mean age 69.3 years) were treated. AKI-D was community-acquired in 70.3%. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (62.5%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (58.9%), coronary artery disease (CAD) (46.1%), diabetes (35.9%) and heart failure (34.1%). Most patients were prescribed diuretics (61.7%) and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RASI) (57.8%); 46.1% had a combination of both. In the 88 patients with hemodynamic AKI-D (68.8%) the most frequent initiating events were diarrhea (39.8%), infections (17.0%) and acute heart failure (13.6%). In the 40 patients with non-hemodynamic AKI-D (31.2%) interstitial nephritis (n = 15) was the prominent diagnosis. Patients with hemodynamic AKI-D were older (72.6 vs. 62.1 years, p = 0.001), suffered more often from CKD (68.2% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), CAD (54.5% vs. 27.5%, p = 0.004) and diabetes (42.0% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.033), and were more frequently on diuretics (75.0% vs. 32.5%, p<0.001), RASI (67.0% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.002) or their combination (58.0% vs. 20.0%, p<0

  13. Screening difficult-to-reach populations for tuberculosis using a mobile medical unit, Punjab India.

    PubMed

    Binepal, G; Agarwal, P; Kaur, N; Singh, B; Bhagat, V; Verma, R P; Satyanarayana, S; Oeltmann, J E; Moonan, P K

    2015-12-21

    Contexte : En Inde, la Mission nationale santé a fourni une unité médicale mobile (MMU) par district dans l'état du Penjab afin d'offrir des services de soins de santé primaires aux populations difficilement accessibles.Objectifs : Déterminer le nombre de patients présumés atteints de la tuberculose (TB) et le nombre de cas de TB détectés et traités parmi les patients qui ont utilisé les services de la MMU de mai à décembre 2012 dans le district de Mohali de l'état du Penjab, Inde.Méthodes : Une étude transversale a été réalisée et l'étude des registres des consultations, du laboratoire, de la radiologie et des services de TB de la MMU a permis de compter le nombre de personnes présumées atteintes de TB et le nombre de personnes ayant eu un diagnostic de TB.Résultats : Un total de 8346 patients ont fréquenté la MMU, dont 663 (8%) avaient des symptômes suggérant une TB. Parmi ces derniers, 540 (81%) ont bénéficié d'une recherche de TB pulmonaire grâce à un examen de l'expectoration ou à une radiographie pulmonaire. Au total, 58 (11%) patients ont eu des preuves cliniques ou biologiques de TB pulmonaire, dont 21 (36%) ont mis en route un traitement de la tuberculose.Conclusion : Comme les MMU font partie intégrante du système de santé publique général, ces unités ont le potentiel de détecter les cas de TB parmi les populations « difficiles à atteindre ». De plus amples recherches sont requises afin d'optimiser le diagnostic de la TB dans les MMU pour accélérer la mise en route du traitement de la TB.

  14. Professional Experiences of International Medical Graduates Practicing Primary Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Bernheim, Susannah May; Berg, David; Gozu, Aysegul; Curry, Leslie Ann

    2010-01-01

    Background International medical graduates (IMGs) comprise approximately 25% of the US physician workforce, with significant representation in primary care and care of vulnerable populations. Despite the central role of IMGs in the US healthcare system, understanding of their professional experiences is limited. Objective To characterize the professional experiences of non-US born IMGs from limited-resource nations practicing primary care in the US. Design Qualitative study based on in-depth in-person interviews. Participants Purposeful sample of IMGs (n = 25) diverse in country of origin, length of practice in the US, specialty (internal medicine, family medicine and pediatrics), age and gender. Participants were currently practicing primary care physicians in New York, New Jersey or Connecticut. Approach A standardized interview guide was used to explore professional experiences of IMGs. Key Results Four recurrent and unifying themes characterize these experiences: 1) IMGs experience both overt and subtle forms of workplace bias and discrimination; 2) IMGs recognize professional limitations as part of “the deal”; 3) IMGs describe challenges in the transition to the culture and practice of medicine in the US; 4) IMGs bring unique skills and advantages to the workplace. Conclusions Our data reveal that IMGs face workplace challenges throughout their careers. Despite diversity in professional background and demographic characteristics, IMGs in our study reported common experiences in the transition to and practice of medicine in the US. Findings suggest that both workforce and workplace interventions are needed to enable IMG physicians to sustain their essential and growing role in the US healthcare system. Finally, commonalities with experiences of other minority groups within the US healthcare system suggest that optimizing IMGs’ experiences may also improve the experiences of an increasingly diverse healthcare workforce. PMID:20502974

  15. Patient and Family Perceptions of Physical Therapy in the Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sottile, Peter D; Nordon-Craft, Amy; Malone, Daniel; Schenkman, Margaret; Moss, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patient and family member perceptions of physical therapy (PT) in the intensive care unit and the factors that influence their degree of satisfaction have not been described. Methods A panel of experts developed a questionnaire that assessed patient and family perceptions of PT. Critically ill patients and their family members were asked to complete the survey. Patient and family member scores were compared and stratified by age, gender, and mechanical ventilation for greater than 14 days compared to 14 days or less. Results A total of 55 patients and 49 family members completed the survey. Patients and family members reported that PT was necessary and beneficial to recovery, despite associating PT with difficulty, exertion, and discomfort. Patient perceptions were similar regardless of age or gender. Family members underestimated a patient's enjoyment of PT (p=0.03). For individuals who required prolonged mechanical ventilation (>14 days), patients reported that PT was more difficult (p=0.03), less enjoyable (p=0.049), and family members reported PT as causing greater discomfort (p=0.005). Additionally, family members of patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation felt that PT was less beneficial (p=0.01). Conclusions Physical therapy is perceived as necessary and beneficial to recovery by critically ill patients and family members. PMID:26038155

  16. Mapping Antimicrobial Stewardship in Undergraduate Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, Nursing and Veterinary Education in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Drumright, Lydia N.; Gharbi, Myriam; Farrell, Susan; Holmes, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the teaching of antimicrobial stewardship (AS) in undergraduate healthcare educational degree programmes in the United Kingdom (UK). Participants and Methods Cross-sectional survey of undergraduate programmes in human and veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and nursing in the UK. The main outcome measures included prevalence of AS teaching; stewardship principles taught; estimated hours apportioned; mode of content delivery and teaching strategies; evaluation methodologies; and frequency of multidisciplinary learning. Results 80% (112/140) of programmes responded adequately. The majority of programmes teach AS principles (88/109, 80.7%). ‘Adopting necessary infection prevention and control precautions’ was the most frequently taught principle (83/88, 94.3%), followed by 'timely collection of microbiological samples for microscopy, culture and sensitivity’ (73/88, 82.9%) and ‘minimisation of unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing’ (72/88, 81.8%). The ‘use of intravenous administration only to patients who are severely ill, or unable to tolerate oral treatment’ was reported in ~50% of courses. Only 32/88 (36.3%) programmes included all recommended principles. Discussion Antimicrobial stewardship principles are included in most undergraduate healthcare and veterinary degree programmes in the UK. However, future professionals responsible for using antimicrobials receive disparate education. Education may be boosted by standardisation and strengthening of less frequently discussed principles. PMID:26928009

  17. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  18. Delayed intensive care unit admission is associated with increased mortality in patients with cancer with acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Mokart, Djamel; Lambert, Jérôme; Schnell, David; Fouché, Louis; Rabbat, Antoine; Kouatchet, Achille; Lemiale, Virginie; Vincent, François; Lengliné, Etienne; Bruneel, Fabrice; Pene, Frederic; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2013-08-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the leading reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to identify early predictors of death in patients with cancer admitted to the ICU for ARF who were not intubated at admission. We conducted analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial including 219 patients with cancer with ARF in which day-28 mortality was a secondary endpoint. Mortality at day 28 was 31.1%. By multivariate analysis, independent predictors of day-28 mortality were: age (odds ratio [OR] 1.30/10 years, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.01-1.68], p = 0.04), more than one line of chemotherapy (OR 2.14, 95% CI [1.08-4.21], p = 0.03), time between respiratory symptoms onset and ICU admission > 2 days (OR 2.50, 95% CI [1.25-5.02], p = 0.01), oxygen flow at admission (OR 1.07/L, 95% CI [1.00-1.14], p = 0.04) and extra-respiratory symptoms (OR 2.84, 95%CI [1.30-6.21], p = 0.01). After adjustment for the logistic organ dysfunction (LOD) score at admission, only time between respiratory symptoms onset and ICU admission > 2 days and LOD score were independently associated with day-28 mortality. Determinants of death include both factors non-amenable to change, and delay in ARF management. These results suggest that early intensive care management of patients with cancer with ARF may translate to better survival.

  19. Frequency of and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Associated With Vancomycin Use in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bresee, Lauren C.; Kraft, Timothy; Ross, B. Catherine; Dersch-Mills, Deonne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Published information evaluating frequency of and risk factors for vancomycin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) population is conflicting. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to describe the proportion of our PICU patients who developed AKI with intravenous (IV) vancomycin. The secondary objective was to describe the associated potential risk factors. METHODS: Pediatric patients (0–18 years) who received their first IV vancomycin dose in the PICU were evaluated in this retrospective chart review. AKI was defined based on Pediatric-Modified RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria. Patient demographics, vancomycin trough concentrations, concomitant nephrotoxins, and estimated creatinine clearance changes were analyzed. RESULTS: Of 265 patients included, the primary outcome of AKI (defined by meeting any pRIFLE criteria) occurred in 62 (23.4%) patients (48 category R, 11 category I, 3 category F). Patients who received vancomycin treatment for = 5 days were more likely to develop AKI (unadjusted odds ratio [uOR]: 2.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–5.73), as were patients with a maximum vancomycin trough level = 20 mg/L (OR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.54–5.78) and patients on 1 (uOR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12–4.66) or more concurrent nephrotoxin (uOR: 3.11; 95% CI: 1.43–6.77). Among nephrotoxins, patients receiving furosemide concomitantly with vancomycin were more likely to develop AKI (uOR: 3.47; 95% CI: 1.92–6.27). After adjustment, only furosemide was a significant predictor of risk of AKI/AKI (adjusted OR: 3.52; 95% CI: 1.88–6.62). The study was limited by its retrospective and observational design, and confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who were receiving vancomycin with concurrent furosemide were at highest risk of developing AKI. PMID:28018150

  20. Does breastfeeding reduce acute procedural pain in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit? A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Holsti, Liisa; Oberlander, Timothy F; Brant, Rollin

    2011-11-01

    Managing acute procedural pain effectively in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit remains a significant problem. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of breastfeeding for reducing pain and to determine if breastfeeding skills were altered after this treatment. Fifty-seven infants born at 30-36 weeks gestational age were randomized to be breastfed (BF) or to be given a soother during blood collection. Changes in the Behavioral Indicators of Infant Pain (BIIP) and in mean heart rate (HR) across 3 phases of blood collection were measured. In the BF group, the Premature Infant Breastfeeding Behaviors (PIBBS) scale was scored before and 24 hours after blood collection. Longitudinal regression analysis was used to compare changes in Lance/squeeze and Recovery phases of blood collection between groups, with gestational age at birth, baseline BIIP scores, and mean HR included as covariates. Differences in PIBBS scores were assessed using a paired t-test. Relationships between PIBBS scores, BIIP scores, and HR were evaluated with Pearson correlations. No differences between treatment groups were found: BIIP (P=0.44, confidence interval [CI] -1.60-0.69); HR (P=0.73, CI -7.0-10.0). Infants in the BF group showed improved PIBBS scores after the treatment (P<0.01, CI -2.7 to -0.2). Lower BIIP scores during the Lance/squeeze were associated significantly with more mature sucking patterns (r=-0.39, P<0.05). Breastfeeding during blood collection did not reduce pain indices or interfere with the acquisition of breastfeeding skills. Exploratory analyses indicate there may be benefit for infants with mature breastfeeding abilities.

  1. Revenue, relationships and routines: the social organization of acute myocardial infarction patient transfers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Veinot, Tiffany C; Bosk, Emily A; Unnikrishnan, K P; Iwashyna, Theodore J

    2012-11-01

    Heart attack, or acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is a leading cause of death in the United States (U.S.). The most effective therapy for AMI is rapid revascularization: the mechanical opening of the clogged artery in the heart. Forty-four percent of patients with AMI who are admitted to a non-revascularization hospital in the U.S. are transferred to a hospital with that capacity. Yet, we know little about the process by which community hospitals complete these transfers, and why publicly available hospital quality data plays a small role in community hospitals' choice of transfer destinations. Therefore, we investigated how community hospital staff implement patient transfers and select destinations. We conducted a mixed methods study involving: interviews with staff at three community hospitals (n = 25) in a Midwestern state and analysis of U.S. national Medicare records for 1996-2006. Community hospitals in the U.S., including our field sites, typically had longstanding relationships with one key receiving hospital. Community hospitals addressed the need for rapid AMI patient transfers by routinizing the collective, interhospital work process. Routinization reduced staff uncertainty, coordinated their efforts and conserved their cognitive resources for patient care. While destination selection was nominally a physician role, the decision was routinized, such that staff immediately contacted a "usual" transfer destination upon AMI diagnosis. Transfer destination selection was primarily driven at an institutional level by organizational concerns and bed supply, rather than physician choice or patient preference. Transfer routinization emerged as a form of social order that invoked tradeoffs between process speed and efficiency and patient-centered, quality-driven decision making. We consider the implications of routinization and institutional imperatives for health policy, quality improvement and health informatics interventions.

  2. State Medical Marijuana Laws and Adolescent Marijuana Use in The United States: 1991 – 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Wall, Melanie; Keyes, Katherine M.; Cerdá, Magdalena; Schulenberg, John; O’Malley, Patrick M.; Galea, Sandro; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Feng, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    Background Adolescent marijuana use is associated with adverse later-life consequences, so identifying factors underlying adolescent use is of substantial public health importance. The relationship of U.S. state medical marijuana laws (MML) to adolescent marijuana use has been controversial. Such laws could convey a message about marijuana acceptability that increases marijuana use soon after passage, even if implementation is delayed or the law narrowly limits use. We used 24 years of U.S. national data to examine the relationship between state MML and adolescent marijuana use. Methods Data came from 1,098,270 U.S. adolescents in 8th, 10th, and 12th grade in the national Monitoring the Future annual surveys conducted between 1991–2014. The main outcome was any marijuana use in the prior 30 days. Using multilevel regression modeling, we examined marijuana use in adolescents nested within states, including whether marijuana use was higher overall in states that ever passed a MML up to 2014, and whether the risk of use changed after state MML were passed. Individual-, school- and state-level covariates were controlled. Findings Overall, marijuana use was more prevalent in states that enacted MML up to 2014 than in other states (AOR=1.27, 95%CI=1.07–1.51). Pre- and post-MML risk did not differ in the full sample (AOR=0.92, 95%CI=0.82–1.04). A significant interaction (p<0.001) indicated differential post-MML risk by grade. In 8th graders, post-MML use decreased (AOR=0.73, 95%CI=0.63–0.84), while no significant change occurred in 10th or 12th graders. Results were generally robust across sensitivity analyses. Interpretation Previous evidence and this study show that MML passage does not result in increased adolescent marijuana use. However, overall, adolescent use is higher in states that ever enacted MML than in other states. State-level risk factors other than MML may contribute to both marijuana use and MML, warranting investigation. An observed 8th

  3. Pilot Study of the SPRINT Glycemic Control Protocol in a Hungarian Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Benyo, Balazs; Illyés, Attila; Némedi, Noémi Szabó; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Havas, Attila; Kovacs, Levente; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Stress-induced hyperglycemia increases morbidity and mortality. Tight control can reduce mortality but has proven difficult to achieve. The SPRINT (Specialized Relative Insulin and Nutrition Tables) protocol is the only protocol that reduced both mortality and hypoglycemia by modulating both insulin and nutrition, but it has not been tested in independent hospitals. Methods SPRINT was used for 12 adult intensive care unit patients (949 h) at Kálmán Pándy Hospital (Gyula, Hungary) as a clinical practice assessment. Insulin recommendations (0–6 U/h) were administered via constant infusion rather than bolus delivery. Nutrition was administered per local standard protocol, weaning parenteral to enteral nutrition, but was modulated per SPRINT recommendations. Measurement was every 1 to 2 h, per protocol. Glycemic performance is assessed by percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in glycemic bands for the cohort and per patient. Safety from hypoglycemia is assessed by numbers of patients with BG < 2.2 (severe) and %BG < 3.0 and < 4.0 mmol/liter (moderate and light). Clinical effort is assessed by measurements per day. Results are median (interquartile range). Results There were 742 measurements over 1088 h of control (16.4 measurements/day), which is similar to clinical SPRINT results (16.2/day). Per-patient hours of control were 65 (50–95) h. Initial per-patient BG was 10.5 (7.9–11.2) mmol/liter. All patients (100%) reached 6.1 mmol/liter. Cohort BG was 6.3 (5.5–7.5) mmol/liter, with 42.2%, 65.1% and 77.6% of BG in the 4.0–6.1, 4.0–7.0, and 4.0–8.0 mmol/liter bands. Per-patient, median percentage time in these bands was 40.2 (26.7–51.5)%, 62.5 (46.0–75.7)%, and 74.7 (61.6.8–87.8)%, respectively. No patients had BG < 2.2 mmol/liter, and the %BG < 4.0 mmol/liter was 1.9%. These results were achieved using 3.0 (3.0–5.0) U/h of insulin with 7.4 (4.4–10.2) g/h of dextrose administration (all sources) for the cohort. Per

  4. The Self-Perception and Usage of Medical Apps amongst Medical Students in the United States: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mobile medical software applications (apps) are used for clinical decision-making at the point of care. Objectives. To determine (1) the usage, reliability, and popularity of mobile medical apps and (2) medical students' perceptions of app usage effect on the quality of patient-provider interaction in healthcare settings. Methods. An anonymous web-based survey was distributed to medical students. Frequency of use, type of app used, and perceptions of reliability were assessed via univariate analysis. Results. Seven hundred thirty-one medical students responded, equating to a response rate of 29%. The majority (90%) of participants thought that medical apps enhance clinical knowledge, and 61% said that medical apps are as reliable as textbooks. While students thought that medical apps save time, improve the care of their patients, and improve diagnostic accuracy, 53% of participants believed that mobile device use in front of colleagues and patients makes one appear less competent. Conclusion. While medical students believe in the utility and reliability of medical apps, they were hesitant to use them out of fear of appearing less engaged. Higher levels of training correlated with a greater degree of comfort when using medical apps in front of patients. PMID:27688752

  5. Strict glycaemic control in patients hospitalised in a mixed medical and surgical intensive care unit: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    De La Rosa, Gisela Del Carmen; Donado, Jorge Hernando; Restrepo, Alvaro Humberto; Quintero, Alvaro Mauricio; González, Luis Gabriel; Saldarriaga, Nora Elena; Bedoya, Marisol; Toro, Juan Manuel; Velásquez, Jorge Byron; Valencia, Juan Carlos; Arango, Clara Maria; Aleman, Pablo Henrique; Vasquez, Esdras Martin; Chavarriaga, Juan Carlos; Yepes, Andrés; Pulido, William; Cadavid, Carlos Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill patients can develop hyperglycaemia even if they do not have diabetes. Intensive insulin therapy decreases morbidity and mortality rates in patients in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) and decreases morbidity in patients in a medical ICU. The effect of this therapy on patients in a mixed medical/surgical ICU is unknown. Our goal was to assess whether the effect of intensive insulin therapy, compared with standard therapy, decreases morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalised in a mixed ICU. Methods This is a prospective, randomised, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial in a medical/surgical ICU. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either intensive insulin therapy to maintain glucose levels between 80 and 110 mg/dl (4.4 to 6.1 mmol/l) or standard insulin therapy to maintain glucose levels between 180 and 200 mg/dl (10 and 11.1 mmol/l). The primary end point was mortality at 28 days. Results Over a period of 30 months, 504 patients were enrolled. The 28-day mortality rate was 32.4% (81 of 250) in the standard insulin therapy group and 36.6% (93 of 254) in the intensive insulin therapy group (Relative Risk [RR]: 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85 to 1.42). The ICU mortality in the standard insulin therapy group was 31.2% (78 of 250) and 33.1% (84 of 254) in the intensive insulin therapy group (RR: 1.06; 95%CI: 0.82 to 1.36). There was no statistically significant reduction in the rate of ICU-acquired infections: 33.2% in the standard insulin therapy group compared with 27.17% in the intensive insulin therapy group (RR: 0.82; 95%CI: 0.63 to 1.07). The rate of hypoglycaemia (≤ 40 mg/dl) was 1.7% in the standard insulin therapy group and 8.5% in the intensive insulin therapy group (RR: 5.04; 95% CI: 1.20 to 21.12). Conclusions IIT used to maintain glucose levels within normal limits did not reduce morbidity or mortality of patients admitted to a mixed medical/surgical ICU. Furthermore, this therapy increased the

  6. Experience with using second life for medical education in a family and community medicine education unit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The application of new technologies to the education of health professionals is both a challenge and a necessity. Virtual worlds are increasingly being explored as a support for education. Aim: The aim of this work is to study the suitability of Second Life (SL) as an educational tool for primary healthcare professionals. Methods Design: Qualitative study of accredited clinical sessions in SL included in a continuing professional development (CPD) programme for primary healthcare professionals. Location: Zaragoza I Zone Family and Community Medicine Education Unit (EU) and 9 health centres operated by the Aragonese Health Service, Aragon, Spain. Method: The EU held two training workshops in SL for 16 healthcare professionals from 9 health centres by means of two workshops, and requested them to facilitate clinical sessions in SL. Attendance was open to all personnel from the EU and the 9 health centres. After a trail period of clinical sessions held at 5 health centres between May and November 2010, the CPD-accredited clinical sessions were held at 9 health centres between February and April 2011. Participants: 76 healthcare professionals attended the CPD-accredited clinical sessions in SL. Main measurements: Questionnaire on completion of the clinical sessions. Results Response rate: 42-100%. Questionnaire completed by each health centre on completion of the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Access to SL: 2 centres were unable to gain access. Sound problems: 0% (0/9). Image problems: 0% (0/9). Voice/text chat: used in 100% (10/9); 0 incidents. Questionnaire completed by participants in the CPD-accredited clinical sessions: Preference for SL as a tool: 100% (76/76). Strengths of this method: 74% (56/76) considered it eliminated the need to travel; 68% (52/76) believed it made more effective use of educational resources; and 47% (36/76) considered it improved accessibility. Weaknesses: 91% (69/76) experienced technical problems, while; 9% (7/76) thought

  7. Deaths and Medical Visits Attributable to Environmental Pollution in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald Gibson, Jacqueline; Thomsen, Jens; Launay, Frederic; Harder, Elizabeth; DeFelice, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background This study estimates the potential health gains achievable in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with improved controls on environmental pollution. The UAE is an emerging economy in which population health risks have shifted rapidly from infectious diseases to chronic conditions observed in developed nations. The UAE government commissioned this work as part of an environmental health strategic planning project intended to address this shift in the nature of the country’s disease burden. Methods and Findings We assessed the burden of disease attributable to six environmental exposure routes outdoor air, indoor air, drinking water, coastal water, occupational environments, and climate change. For every exposure route, we integrated UAE environmental monitoring and public health data in a spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulation model to estimate the annual disease burden attributable to selected pollutants. The assessment included the entire UAE population (4.5 million for the year of analysis). The study found that outdoor air pollution was the leading contributor to mortality, with 651 attributable deaths (95% confidence interval [CI] 143–1,440), or 7.3% of all deaths. Indoor air pollution and occupational exposures were the second and third leading contributors to mortality, with 153 (95% CI 85–216) and 46 attributable deaths (95% CI 26–72), respectively. The leading contributor to health-care facility visits was drinking water pollution, to which 46,600 (95% CI 15,300–61,400) health-care facility visits were attributed (about 15% of the visits for all the diseases considered in this study). Major study limitations included (1) a lack of information needed to translate health-care facility visits to quality-adjusted-life-year estimates and (2) insufficient spatial coverage of environmental data. Conclusions Based on international comparisons, the UAE’s environmental disease burden is low for all factors except outdoor air pollution. From a

  8. Impact of using physiotherapy self-referral in the medical-surgical neurological intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Catharine; Muc, Lisa; Heck, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objectif : Décrire la pratique de référence en physiothérapie (PT) dans une unité des soins intensifs médico-chirurgicaux neurologiques (USIMSN) dans un grand hôpital d'enseignement de soins quaternaires avant et après la mise en œuvre de l'autoréférence en PT (avant et après respectivement). Méthodes : On a étudié les dossiers pour déterminer les patients de l'USIMSN qui ont reçu des traitement de PT avant (n=90) et après (n=100) afin de recueillir des données sur l'opportunité, le nombre de références et la durée du séjour (DDS) à l'USIMSN; on a procédé à des tests t pour déterminer les différences entre les groupes. Résultats : L'âge moyen des patients de l'USIMSN référés en PT s'établissait à 60,6 (ET 18,6) ans, et 59,5% étaient des hommes. En PT, les intéressés ont reçu des traitements portant sur l'appareil cardiorespiratoire (39% avant, 51,1% après), sur la mobilité (22% avant, 28,8% après) et combinés (39% avant, 20% après). Dans l'ensemble, le nombre de jours écoulés entre l'admission à l'USIMSN et le début des traitements de PT, et la DDS à l'USIMSN, ne présentaient pas de différence significative entre le traitement avant et après. Dans le cas des patients (n=50) qui ont bénéficié d'une autoréférence précoce en PT (dans les 7 jours de l'admission à l'USIMSN) après par rapport aux patients référés par un médecin seulement (n=83) avant, on a constaté une diminution importante (p=0,01) du temps écoulé avant le début du traitement PT qui s'est établie à 1,4 jour (3,2 avant, 1,8 après). Conclusions : L'autoréférence en PT a augmenté à la fois le nombre de patients bénéficiant d'un accès plus opportun aux services de PT et la prestation de traitements à un groupe reporté de patients qui n'avaient pas été référés auparavant. Des études futures doivent évaluer l'incidence des méthodes de référence dans tout un éventail de groupes cliniques.

  9. Acute-phase proteins in relation to neuropsychiatric symptoms and use of psychotropic medication in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, J A; Hubers, A A M; van Duijn, E; Cobbaert, C M; Roos, R A C; van der Mast, R C; Giltay, E J

    2014-08-01

    Activation of the innate immune system has been postulated in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). We studied serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and low albumin as positive and negative acute-phase proteins in HD. Multivariate linear and logistic regression was used to study the association between acute-phase protein levels in relation to clinical, neuropsychiatric, cognitive, and psychotropic use characteristics in a cohort consisting of 122 HD mutation carriers and 42 controls at first biomarker measurement, and 85 HD mutation carriers and 32 controls at second biomarker measurement. Significant associations were found between acute-phase protein levels and Total Functioning Capacity (TFC) score, severity of apathy, cognitive impairment, and the use of antipsychotics. Interestingly, all significant results with neuropsychiatric symptoms disappeared after additional adjusting for antipsychotic use. High sensitivity CRP levels were highest and albumin levels were lowest in mutation carriers who continuously used antipsychotics during follow-up versus those that had never used antipsychotics (mean difference for CRP 1.4 SE mg/L; P=0.04; mean difference for albumin 3 SE g/L; P<0.001). The associations found between acute-phase proteins and TFC score, apathy, and cognitive impairment could mainly be attributed to the use of antipsychotics. This study provides evidence that HD mutation carriers who use antipsychotics are prone to develop an acute-phase response.

  10. Medications After the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... intensive care unit (NICU) > Medications after the NICU Medications after the NICU E-mail to a friend ... from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) on medication for apnea, reflux or respiratory problems. Apnea is ...

  11. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury and associations with short- and long-term outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Jennifer A.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is strongly associated with increased mortality and other adverse outcomes. Medical researchers have intensively investigated novel biomarkers to predict short- and long-term outcomes of acute kidney injury in many patient care settings, such as cardiac surgery, intensive care units, heart failure, and transplant. Future research should focus on leveraging this relationship to improve enrollment for clinical trials of acute kidney injury. PMID:27239295

  12. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  13. Abraham Flexner of Kentucky, his report, Medical Education in the United States and Canada, and the historical questions raised by the report.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Edward C; Perman, Jay A; Wilson, Emery A

    2010-02-01

    One hundred years ago, the time was right and the need was critical for medical education reform. Medical education had become a commercial enterprise with proprietary schools of variable quality, lectures delivered in crowded classrooms, and often no laboratory instruction or patient contact. Progress in science, technology, and the quality of medical care, along with political will and philanthropic support, contributed to the circumstances under which Abraham Flexner produced his report. Flexner was dismayed by the quality of many of the medical schools he visited in preparing the report. Many of the recommendations in Medical Education in the United States and Canada are still relevant, especially those concerning the physician as a practitioner whose purpose is more societal and preventive than individual and curative. Flexner helped establish standards for prerequisite education, framed medical school admission criteria, aided in the design of a curriculum introduced by the basic and followed by the clinical sciences, stipulated the resources necessary for medical education, and emphasized medical school affiliation with both a university and a strong clinical system. He proposed integration of basic and clinical sciences leading to contextual learning, active rather than passive learning, and the importance of philanthropy. Flexner's report poses several questions for the historian: How were his views on African American medical education shaped by his post-Civil War upbringing in Louisville? Was the report original or derivative? Why did it have such a large impact? This article describes Flexner's early life and the report's methodology and considers several of the historical questions.

  14. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  15. An Evaluation of Physician-to-Patient Communication Training in Medical Schools across the United States: A Status Report on the Nation's Efforts to Promote Health Literacy by Adding Health Literacy Courses to Medical School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Andrea P.

    2012-01-01

    This research study employed a mixed method sequential approach and investigated the number of Schools of Medicine within the United States that offer health literacy as a component of their curriculum and a course of study within the academic setting. Data were gathered from medical school surveys and personal interviews. Curriculum content,…

  16. Recreational use of erectile dysfunction medications in undergraduate men in the United States: characteristics and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Harte, Christopher B; Meston, Cindy M

    2011-06-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that erectile dysfunction medications (EDMs) have become increasingly used as a sexual enhancement aid among men without a medical indication. Recreational EDM use has been associated with increased sexual risk behaviors, an increased risk for STIs, including incident HIV infection, and high rates of concomitant illicit drug use. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and associated risk factors for recreational EDM use among young, healthy, undergraduate men. A cross-sectional sample of 1,944 men were recruited from 497 undergraduate institutions within the Unites States between January 2006 and May 2007. The survey assessed patterns of EDM use, as well as demographic, substance use, and sexual behavior characteristics. Four percent of participants had recreationally used an EDM at some point in their lives, with 1.4% reporting current use. The majority of recreational EDM users reported mixing EDMs with illicit drugs and particularly during risky sexual behaviors. Recreational EDM use was independently associated with increased age, gay, or bisexual sexual orientation, drug abuse, lifetime number of sex partners, and lifetime number of "one-night stands." Recreational EDM users also reported a 2.5-fold rate of erectile difficulties compared to nonusers. Overall, recreational use of EDMs was associated with sexual risk behaviors and substance abuse; however, a relatively small proportion of undergraduates reported using EDMs. Results also suggest that a sizable portion of recreational EDM users are heterosexual men, and that use does not solely occur within the environments of venues that cater to men having sex with men.

  17. Recreational Use of Erectile Dysfunction Medications in Undergraduate Men in the United States: Characteristics and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Harte, Christopher B.

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that erectile dysfunction medications (EDMs) have become increasingly used as a sexual enhancement aid among men without a medical indication. Recreational EDM use has been associated with increased sexual risk behaviors, an increased risk for STIs, including incident HIV infection, and high rates of concomitant illicit drug use. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and associated risk factors for recreational EDM use among young, healthy, undergraduate men. A cross-sectional sample of 1,944 men were recruited from 497 undergraduate institutions within the Unites States between January 2006 and May 2007. The survey assessed patterns of EDM use, as well as demographic, substance use, and sexual behavior characteristics. Four percent of participants had recreationally used an EDM at some point in their lives, with 1.4% reporting current use. The majority of recreational EDM users reported mixing EDMs with illicit drugs and particularly during risky sexual behaviors. Recreational EDM use was independently associated with increased age, gay, or bisexual sexual orientation, drug abuse, lifetime number of sex partners, and lifetime number of “one-night stands.” Recreational EDM users also reported a 2.5-fold rate of erectile difficulties compared to nonusers. Overall, recreational use of EDMs was associated with sexual risk behaviors and substance abuse; however, a relatively small proportion of undergraduates reported using EDMs. Results also suggest that a sizable portion of recreational EDM users are heterosexual men, and that use does not solely occur within the environments of venues that cater to men having sex with men. PMID:20358273

  18. Men victim of sexual assault of concern into the first Emergency Medical Unit for Victims of Assaults in France.

    PubMed

    Hiquet, J; Gromb-Monnoyeur, S

    2013-10-01

    Although it accounts for only a small part of activity in the field of victimology, the provision of support for male victims of sexual assault is regularly discussed in the literature. Authors, English-speaking for the most part, all agree that this phenomenon has been largely underestimated, owing to the stigmatization victims suffer after the facts have been disclosed. The same authors agree that this type of assault is far from being inconsequential, from both a physical and a psychological perspective. The following retrospective and descriptive study, conducted at the Bordeaux CHU (Bordeaux University Hospital), aims to draw a comparison between the distinctive characteristics of male sexual assault victims treated at the CAUVA (Centre d'Accueil en Urgence des Victimes d'Agression - Emergency Medical Unit for Victims of Assaults) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, those identified in the existing scientific literature. The victims are predominantly young men, unconnected with their attackers, and more often than not the attacks take place on the public highway. Forensic treatment is provided within the seven days following the assault, which raises the question of the assessment of infection risks, including HIV transmission. Most of the time, the victims will not undergo a full psychological appraisal, though authors are unanimous that such assaults do indeed have heavy repercussions. Improving our services for such victims will require suitable training for staff, covering initial reception, general assessment and the drafting of the forensic medical report, as well as encouragement to lodge a complaint. This process should give priority to multidisciplinary centers, especially dedicated to shelter-providing, information, counseling and victim support. This will also entail information and awareness campaigns for the general population, and the homosexual community in particular. Finally, we should not be afraid to envisage an investigation into this

  19. Facilitators and Barriers to Initiating Change in Medical Intensive Care Unit Survivors with Alcohol Use Disorders: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brendan J.; Jones, Jacqueline; Cook, Paul; Tian, Karen; Moss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Alcohol abuse and dependence are collectively referred to as alcohol use disorders (AUD). An AUD is present in up to one third of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). We sought to understand the barriers and facilitators to change in ICU survivors with an AUD in order to provide a foundation upon which to tailor alcohol-related interventions. Methods We utilized a qualitative approach with a broad constructivist framework, conducting semistructured interviews in medical ICU survivors with an AUD. Patients were included if they were admitted to one of two medical ICUs and were excluded if they refused participation, were unable to participate, or did not speak English. Digitally recorded and professionally transcribed interviews were analyzed using a general inductive approach and grouped into themes. Results Nineteen patients were included with an average age of 51 [interquartile range (IQR) 36–51] years and an average APACHE II score of 9 [IQR 5–13]; 68% were Caucasian, 74% were male, and the most common reason for admission was alcohol withdrawal (n = 8). We identified five facilitators of change: empathy of the inpatient healthcare environment, recognition of accumulating problems, religion, pressure from others to stop drinking, and trigger events. We identified 3 barriers to change: missed opportunities, psychiatric comorbidity, and cognitive dysfunction. Social networks were identified as either a barrier or facilitator to change depending on the specific context. Conclusions Alcohol-related interventions to motivate and sustain behavior change could be tailored to ICU survivors by accounting for unique barriers and facilitators. PMID:23876701

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE COURSE IN IMPROVING STUDENT PHYSICAL THERAPISTS' AND LICENSED PHYSICAL THERAPISTS' DECISION‐MAKING RELATED TO ACUTE SPORTS INJURIES AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Patrick Stephen; Hauer, Patrick L.; Blom, Heather; Burcham, Jared; Myers, Amanda K.; Grimsrud, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of the American Red Cross Emergency Response Course (ARC ERC) in improving decision‐making skills of physical therapists (PTs) and third semester clinical doctorate student physical therapists (SPTs) when assessing acute sports injuries and medical conditions. Methods: An existing questionnaire was modified, with permission from the original authors of the instrument. The questionnaire was administered to PTs and SPTs before the start of and immediately after the completion of 5 different ARC ERCs. The overall percentages of “Appropriate” responses for the 17 case scenarios were calculated for each participant for the pre‐and post‐tests. Participants also rated their perceived level of preparedness for managing various conditions using a 5‐point Likert Scale (ranging from Prepared to Unprepared). The overall percentage of “Prepared/Somewhat Prepared” responses for the 16 medical conditions was calculated for each participant for the pre‐and post‐tests. In addition, mean Likert scale scores were calculated for level of perceived preparedness for each of the 16 medical conditions. Paired t‐tests, calculated with SPSS 20.0, were used to analyze the data. Results: 37 of 37 (100.0%) of eligible PTs and 45 of 48 (93.8%) of eligible SPTs completed the pre‐ and post‐test questionnaires. The percentage of “Appropriate” responses for all 17 cases in the aggregate (PTs: 76.8% pre‐test, 89.0% post‐test; SPTs: 68.5%, 84.3%), as well as the percentage of “Prepared/Somewhat Prepared” responses for all conditions in the aggregate (PTs: 67.5%, 96.5%; SPTs: 37.1%, 90.6%) were significantly different from pre‐test to post‐test (P = .000). There was also a significant difference (P < .05) in the mean overall preparedness Likert scale scores from pre‐test to post‐test for each medical condition for the SPT's, and 15 of the 16 medical conditions (muscle strains: P = .119) for the PTs. Conclusions: The

  1. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E.; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician’s experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  2. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias.

    PubMed

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician's experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes.

  3. Impact of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange on Hemodynamic Parameters in Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lahmer, Tobias; Messer, Marlena; Schnappauf, Christopher; Rasch, Sebastian; Fekecs, Lisa; Beitz, Analena; Eser, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is an extracorporeal treatment with reported beneficial as well as detrimental effects on circulation. However, there is a lack of data using advanced hemodynamic monitoring during TPE. Therefore, we investigated the effects of TPE on hemodynamic parameters derived from transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) as well as the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). We compared hemodynamic parameters obtained before and after a total of 30 sessions of TPE treatment in 10 intensive care unit patients. Among standard hemodynamic parameters, heart rate (P < 0.012) and systolic blood pressure (P < 0.008) significantly increase, whereas neither mean arterial pressure nor diastolic blood pressure was altered after TPE. The TPTD-derived cardiac function parameters, cardiac index (CI; P = 0.035), cardiac power index (CPI; P = 0.008), global ejection fraction (GEF; P = 0.002), and stroke volume index (SVI; P = 0.014), were significantly higher after TPE. Furthermore, systemic vascular index significantly increased (P < 0.042). Among the cardiac preload parameters, central venous pressure was significantly lower after TPE (P < 0.001), while the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) did not change. Contractility marker dPmax did not change. Finally, TPE application did not significantly alter the pulmonary hydration and permeability parameters, extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index. Vasopressor dose was not statistically significantly altered. Considering increases in SVI, CI, GEF, and CPI and stable values for GEDVI, EVLWI, and dPmax, our data do not give any hint for hemodynamic impairment or TRALI.

  4. Investigation and management of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii spread in a French medical intensive care unit: one outbreak may hide another.

    PubMed

    Bourigault, Céline; Corvec, Stéphane; Bretonnière, Cédric; Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Crémet, Lise; Marraillac, Julie; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bemer, Pascale; Le Gallou, Florence; Reynaud, Alain; Boutoille, David; Villers, Daniel; Lepelletier, Didier

    2013-07-01

    An outbreak in a medical intensive care unit was due to an OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii strain imported from a repatriate hospitalized in Singapore. This outbreak revealed another multidrug resistant epidemic strain that had been present in the hospital for 2 years. Both outbreaks were controlled after 9 months of an extensive infection control program.

  5. Medical Treatment for Minor Children: The Roles of Parents, the State, the Child, and the Supreme Court of the United States, and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutchfield, Charles F.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The roles of the state, the parent, the United States Supreme Court, and the child in the decision-making process relating to medical treatment of minor children are outlined and analyzed in four articles. Several case studies, recommendations and opposing viewpoints are presented. (Author/JAC)

  6. Ultralight Cut-Paper-Based Self-Charging Power Unit for Self-Powered Portable Electronic and Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hengyu; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Wen, Zhen; Chen, Jie; Liu, Guanlin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-12

    The development of lightweight, superportable, and sustainable power sources has become an urgent need for most modern personal electronics. Here, we report a cut-paper-based self-charging power unit (PC-SCPU) that is capable of simultaneously harvesting and storing energy from body movement by combining a paper-based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and a supercapacitor (SC), respectively. Utilizing the paper as the substrate with an assembled cut-paper architecture, an ultralight rhombic-shaped TENG is achieved with highly specific mass/volume charge output (82 nC g(-1)/75 nC cm(-3)) compared with the traditional acrylic-based TENG (5.7 nC g(-1)/5.8 nC cm(-3)), which can effectively charge the SC (∼1 mF) to ∼1 V in minutes. This wallet-contained PC-SCPU is then demonstrated as a sustainable power source for driving wearable and portable electronic devices such as a wireless remote control, electric watch, or temperature sensor. This study presents a potential paper-based portable SCPU for practical and medical applications.

  7. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6%) who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB), or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients. PMID:22966970

  8. Use of Medication Prescribed for Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties among Children Aged 6-17 Years in the United ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Use of prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties varied by sex, ... Use of prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties varied by poverty ...

  9. Imaging of nontraumatic acute hip pain in children: multimodality approach with attention to the reduction of medical radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Zahir U; DeFlorio, Robert; Catanzano, Tara M

    2014-08-01

    Nontraumatic acute hip pain in children is common. However, the presentation and etiology is variable, including difficulty with weight bearing and abnormal gait. Barriers in communication, multiple possible etiologies, and age-specific anatomical variations of the pediatric hip make the evaluation of hip pain in children a difficult clinical diagnosis. Multimodality radiologic approach plays an important role for the evaluation of these children. However, owing to the complexity of pediatric hip disease, children sometimes undergo multiple radiologic examinations, resulting in delay in diagnosis and increased radiation dose. This article focuses on the illustration and discussion of common causes of acute hip pain or limp in children. Current recommendations for the imaging of these patients with specific attention to the ALARA (as low radiation as reasonably achievable) principle of radiation exposure are considered. Examples of the entities discussed are provided.

  10. Graduate medical education in trauma/critical care and acute care surgery: defining goals for a new workforce.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Edward; Rogers, Selwyn O

    2012-08-01

    The increasing need for skilled emergency surgical providers, coupled with decreasing experience in emergency surgery among trainees, has led to significant shortages in the availability of such surgeons. In response to this crisis, surgical leaders have developed a comprehensive curriculum and a set of professional standards to guide the training of a new specialist: the acute care surgeon. This article reviews the development and goals for Fellowship training of this new specialty.

  11. The Association between Medical Education Accreditation and Examination Performance of Internationally Educated Physicians Seeking Certification in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zanten, Marta; Boulet, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to examine medical education accreditation practices around the world, with special focus on the Caribbean, and to explore the association between medical school accreditation and graduates' examination performance. In addition to other requirements, graduates of international medical schools seeking to enter…

  12. A Brief Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medical Elongated Needle Therapy on Acute Spinal Cord Injury and Its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mengxuan; Chen, Rongliang; Quan, Renfu; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Jinwei; Yang, Zhongbao; Yang, Disheng

    2013-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury is one of the most common and complicated diseases among human spinal injury. We aimed to explore the effect of point-through-point acupuncture therapy with elongated needles on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits and its possible mechanism. Adult rabbits were randomly divided into a model group, elongated needle therapy group, and blank group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the protein levels of Fas and caspase-3 in the model group were significantly higher than those in the blank group at each time point (P < 0.05) and significantly lower than those in the elongated needle therapy group on the 3rd and 5th days after operation (P < 0.05). RT-PCR showed that Fas and caspase-3 mRNA levels in the model group and elongated needle therapy group were significantly higher than those in the blank group (P < 0.05, 0.01). The mRNA levels of Fas and caspase-3 in the elongated needle therapy group were significantly lower than those in model group on the 3rd day (P < 0.05, 0.01). Therefore, we confirmed that elongated needle therapy has an obvious effect on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits. Its mechanism is made possible by inhibiting the expression of the Fas→caspase-3 cascade, thereby inhibiting cell apoptosis after spinal cord injury. PMID:24348723

  13. Patient and System-Related Delays of Emergency Medical Services Use in Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Results from the Third Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE-3Ps)

    PubMed Central

    AlHabib, Khalid F.; Sulaiman, Kadhim; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Almahmeed, Wael; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A.; Amin, Haitham; Al Jarallah, Mohammed; Alfaleh, Hussam F.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Hersi, Ahmad; Kashour, Tarek; Al Aseri, Zohair; Ullah, Anhar; Altaradi, Hani B.; Nur Asfina, Kazi; Welsh, Robert C.; Yusuf, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about Emergency Medical Services (EMS) use and pre-hospital triage of patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Arabian Gulf countries. Methods Clinical arrival and acute care within 24 h of STEMI symptom onset were compared between patients transferred by EMS (Red Crescent and Inter-Hospital) and those transferred by non-EMS means. Data were retrieved from a prospective registry of 36 hospitals in 6 Arabian Gulf countries, from January 2014 to January 2015. Results We enrolled 2,928 patients; mean age, 52.7 (SD ±11.8) years; 90% men; and 61.7% non-Arabian Gulf citizens. Only 753 patients (25.7%) used EMS; which was mostly via Inter-Hospital EMS (22%) rather than direct transfer from the scene to the hospital by the Red Crescent (3.7%). Compared to the non-EMS group, the EMS group was more likely to arrive initially at a primary or secondary health care facility; thus, they had longer median symptom-onset-to-emergency department arrival times (218 vs. 158 min; p˂.001); they were more likely to receive primary percutaneous coronary interventions (62% vs. 40.5%, p = 0.02); they had shorter door-to-needle times (38 vs. 42 min; p = .04); and shorter door-to-balloon times (47 vs. 83 min; p˂.001). High EMS use was independently predicted mostly by primary/secondary school educational levels and low or moderate socioeconomic status. Low EMS use was predicted by a history of angina and history of percutaneous coronary intervention. The groups had similar in-hospital deaths and outcomes. Conclusion Most acute STEMI patients in the Arabian Gulf region did not use EMS services. Improving Red Crescent infrastructure, establishing integrated STEMI networks, and launching educational public campaigns are top health care system priorities. PMID:26807577

  14. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit: impact on managing uncertainty for patient-centered communication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert F; Gustin, Jillian

    2013-09-01

    A case of acute lung injury (ALI) progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation (ETMV) is presented. The palliative medicine service was asked to address concerns expressed by the patient's spouse reflecting uncertainty regarding outcome expectations. Acknowledging and confronting the uncertainties of a critical illness is an essential component of patient-centered communication. Addressing and managing uncertainty for the case scenario requires consideration of both short- and long-term outcomes including mortality, ventilator independence, and adverse effects on quality of life for survivors. In this paper, ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU was used as a focal point for preparing a prognostic assessment incorporating these issues. This assessment was based on a review of recently published literature regarding mortality and ventilator independence of survivors for adult patients receiving ETMV for ALI/ARDS in the ICU. In the studies reviewed, long-term survival reported at 60 days to 1 year was 50-73% with greater than 84% of the survivors in each study breathing independently. Selected articles discussing outcomes other than mortality or recovery of respiratory function, particularly quality of life implications for ALI/ARDS survivors, were also reviewed. A case of of ALI/ARDS requiring ETMV in the ICU is used to illustrate the situation of an incapacitated critically ill patient where the outcome is uncertain. Patient-centered communication should acknowledge and address this uncertainty. Managing uncertainty consists of effectively expressing a carefully formulated prognostic assessment and using sound communication principles to alleviate the distress associated with the uncertain outcome probabilities.

  15. The relationship between business process re-engineering and Internet usage: survey of acute care hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    1999-12-01

    The data from a national survey of acute care hospitals was used for analysis. Hatcher discusses the complete questionnaire, data collection procedure, and sample selection. The relationship between business process re-engineering, total quality management, innovation system approaches, and Internet usage and potential usage will be reported and discussed.

  16. Views of United States Physicians and Members of the American Medical Association House of Delegates on Physician-assisted Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Simon N; Brown, Byron W; Brody, Howard; Alcser, Kirsten H; Bachman, Jerald G; Greely, Henry T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To ascertain the views of physicians and physician leaders toward the legalization of physician-assisted suicide. DESIGN Confidential mail questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS A nationwide random sample of physicians of all ages and specialties, and all members of the American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates as of April 1996. MEASUREMENTS Demographic and practice characteristics and attitude toward legalization of physician-assisted suicide. MAIN RESULTS Usable questionnaires were r