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Sample records for acute microvascular plasticity

  1. Microvascular Plasticity: Angiogenesis in Health and Disease--Preface.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W; Pries, Axel R

    2016-02-01

    This Special Topic Issue is concerned with the mechanisms that determine the structure of microvascular networks. The vast number of vessels and the highly plastic character of the microcirculation give evidence that microvascular network structures emerge as a result of responses of individual vessels and cells to the local stimuli that they experience, through a combination of angiogenesis, remodeling and pruning. The articles in this issue of Microcirculation address a range of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26639099

  2. Acute Alcohol Intoxication-Induced Microvascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Travis M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol intoxication can increase inflammation and worsen injury, yet the mechanisms involved are not clear. We investigated whether acute alcohol intoxication elevates microvascular permeability, and investigated potential signaling mechanisms in endothelial cells that may be involved. Methods Conscious rats received a 2.5 g/kg alcohol bolus via gastric catheters to produce acute intoxication. Microvascular leakage of intravenously administered FITC-albumin from the mesenteric microcirculation was assessed by intravital microscopy. Endothelial-specific mechanisms were studied using cultured endothelial cell monolayers. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of barrier function, before and after treatment with alcohol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Pharmacologic agents were used to test the roles of alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), rho kinase (ROCK), and exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac). VE-cadherin localization was investigated to assess junctional integrity. Rac1 and RhoA activation were assessed by ELISA assays. Results Alcohol significantly increased FITC-albumin extravasation from the mesenteric microcirculation. Alcohol also significantly decreased TER and disrupted VE-cadherin organization at junctions. Acetaldehyde significantly decreased TER, but inhibition of ADH or application of a superoxide dismutase mimetic failed to prevent alcohol-induced decreases in TER. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, but not MLCK or ROCK, significantly attenuated the alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction. Alcohol rapidly decreased GTP-bound Rac1 but not RhoA during the drop in TER. Activation of Epac increased TER, but did not prevent alcohol from decreasing TER. However, activation of Epac after initiation of alcohol-induced barrier dysfunction quickly resolved TER to baseline levels. Conclusions Our results suggest that alcohol intoxication increases

  3. Coronary microvascular obstruction in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Scalone, Giancarla; Lerman, Amir; Crea, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The success of a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction depends on the functional and structural integrity of coronary microcirculation. Coronary microvascular dysfunction and obstruction (CMVO) occurs in up to half of patients submitted to apparently successful primary PCI and is associated to a much worse outcome. The current review summarizes the complex mechanisms responsible for CMVO, including pre-existing coronary microvascular dysfunction, and highlights the current limitations in the assessment of microvascular function. More importantly, at the light of the substantial failure of trials hitherto published on the treatment of CMVO, this review proposes a novel integrated therapeutic approach, which should overcome the limitations of previous studies.

  4. Microvascular resistance of the culprit coronary artery in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, David; Haig, Caroline; Carberry, Jaclyn; McCartney, Peter; Welsh, Paul; Ahmed, Nadeem; McEntegart, Margaret; Petrie, Mark C.; Eteiba, Hany; Lindsay, Mitchell; Hood, Stuart; Watkins, Stuart; Rauhalammi, Samuli M.O.; Mordi, Ify; Ford, Ian; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Sattar, Naveed; Oldroyd, Keith G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Failed myocardial reperfusion is common and prognostically important after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The purpose of this study was to investigate coronary flow reserve (CFR), a measure of vasodilator capacity, and the index of microvascular resistance (IMR; mmHg × s) in the culprit artery of STEMI survivors. METHODS. IMR (n = 288) and CFR (n = 283; mean age [SD], 60 [12] years) were measured acutely using guide wire–based thermodilution. Cardiac MRI disclosed left ventricular pathology, function, and volumes at 2 days (n = 281) and 6 months after STEMI (n = 264). All-cause death or first heart failure hospitalization was independently adjudicated (median follow-up 845 days). RESULTS. Myocardial hemorrhage and microvascular obstruction occurred in 89 (42%) and 114 (54%) patients with evaluable T2*-MRI maps. IMR and CFR were associated with microvascular pathology (none vs. microvascular obstruction only vs. microvascular obstruction and myocardial hemorrhage) (median [interquartile range], IMR: 17 [12.0–33.0] vs. 17 [13.0–39.0] vs. 37 [21.0–63.0], P < 0.001; CFR: 1.7 [1.4–2.5] vs. 1.5 [1.1–1.8] vs. 1.4 [1.0–1.8], P < 0.001), whereas thrombolysis in myocardial infarction blush grade was not. IMR was a multivariable associate of changes in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (regression coefficient [95% CI] 0.13 [0.01, 0.24]; P = 0.036), whereas CFR was not (P = 0.160). IMR (5 units) was a multivariable associate of all-cause death or heart failure hospitalization (n = 30 events; hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.09 [1.04, 1.14]; P < 0.001), whereas CFR (P = 0.124) and thrombolysis in myocardial infarction blush grade (P = 0.613) were not. IMR had similar prognostic value for these outcomes as <50% ST-segment resolution on the ECG. CONCLUSIONS. IMR is more closely associated with microvascular pathology, left ventricular remodeling, and health outcomes than the angiogram or CFR. TRIAL REGISTRATION. NCT02072850. FUNDING. A

  5. Microvascular resistance of the culprit coronary artery in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, David; Haig, Caroline; Carberry, Jaclyn; McCartney, Peter; Welsh, Paul; Ahmed, Nadeem; McEntegart, Margaret; Petrie, Mark C.; Eteiba, Hany; Lindsay, Mitchell; Hood, Stuart; Watkins, Stuart; Rauhalammi, Samuli M.O.; Mordi, Ify; Ford, Ian; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Sattar, Naveed; Oldroyd, Keith G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Failed myocardial reperfusion is common and prognostically important after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The purpose of this study was to investigate coronary flow reserve (CFR), a measure of vasodilator capacity, and the index of microvascular resistance (IMR; mmHg × s) in the culprit artery of STEMI survivors. METHODS. IMR (n = 288) and CFR (n = 283; mean age [SD], 60 [12] years) were measured acutely using guide wire–based thermodilution. Cardiac MRI disclosed left ventricular pathology, function, and volumes at 2 days (n = 281) and 6 months after STEMI (n = 264). All-cause death or first heart failure hospitalization was independently adjudicated (median follow-up 845 days). RESULTS. Myocardial hemorrhage and microvascular obstruction occurred in 89 (42%) and 114 (54%) patients with evaluable T2*-MRI maps. IMR and CFR were associated with microvascular pathology (none vs. microvascular obstruction only vs. microvascular obstruction and myocardial hemorrhage) (median [interquartile range], IMR: 17 [12.0–33.0] vs. 17 [13.0–39.0] vs. 37 [21.0–63.0], P < 0.001; CFR: 1.7 [1.4–2.5] vs. 1.5 [1.1–1.8] vs. 1.4 [1.0–1.8], P < 0.001), whereas thrombolysis in myocardial infarction blush grade was not. IMR was a multivariable associate of changes in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (regression coefficient [95% CI] 0.13 [0.01, 0.24]; P = 0.036), whereas CFR was not (P = 0.160). IMR (5 units) was a multivariable associate of all-cause death or heart failure hospitalization (n = 30 events; hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.09 [1.04, 1.14]; P < 0.001), whereas CFR (P = 0.124) and thrombolysis in myocardial infarction blush grade (P = 0.613) were not. IMR had similar prognostic value for these outcomes as <50% ST-segment resolution on the ECG. CONCLUSIONS. IMR is more closely associated with microvascular pathology, left ventricular remodeling, and health outcomes than the angiogram or CFR. TRIAL REGISTRATION. NCT02072850. FUNDING. A

  6. Microvascular inflammation and acute tubular necrosis are major histologic features of hantavirus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Gnemmi, Viviane; Verine, Jérôme; Vrigneaud, Laurence; Glowacki, François; Ratsimbazafy, Anderson; Copin, Marie-Christine; Dewilde, Anny; Buob, David

    2015-06-01

    Hantavirus nephropathy (HVN) is an uncommon etiology of acute renal failure due to hantavirus infection. Pathological features suggestive of HVN historically reported are medullary interstitial hemorrhages in a background of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). However, interstitial hemorrhages may be lacking because of medullary sampling error. This emphasizes that other pathological criteria may be of interest. We performed a retrospective clinicopathological study of 17 serologically proven HVN cases with renal biopsy from 2 nephrology centers in northern France. Histologic analysis was completed by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD3, anti-CD68, and anti-CD34 antibodies. Three control groups were not related to hantavirus infection: acute tubular necrosis (ATN) of ischemic or toxic etiology and AIN were used for comparison. Renal biopsy analysis showed that almost all HVN cases with medullary sampling (9/10) displayed interstitial hemorrhages, whereas focal hemorrhages were detected in 2 of the 7 "cortex-only" specimens. ATN was common, as it was present in 15 (88.2%) of 17 HVN cases. By contrast, interstitial inflammation was scarce with no inflammation or only slight inflammation, representing 15 (88.2%) of 17 cases. Moreover, HVN showed inflammation of renal microvessels with cortical peritubular capillaritis and medullary vasa recta inflammation; peritubular capillaritis was significantly higher in HVN after comparison with ischemic and toxic ATN controls (P = .0001 and P = .003, respectively), but not with AIN controls. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted the involvement of T cells and macrophages in renal microvascular inflammation related to HVN. Our study showed that microvascular inflammation, especially cortical peritubular capillaritis, and ATN are important histologic features of HVN. PMID:25791582

  7. A prospective case-control study to investigate retinal microvascular changes in acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Petrina; Lye, David C; Yeo, Tun Kuan; Cheung, Carol Y; Thein, Tun-Linn; Wong, Joshua G; Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Ling-Jun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Gan, Victor C; Leo, Yee-Sin; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can affect the microcirculation by direct viral infection or activation of inflammation. We aimed to determine whether measured retinal vascular parameters were associated with acute dengue infection. Patients with acute dengue were recruited from Communicable Diseases Center, Singapore and age-gender-ethnicity matched healthy controls were selected from a population-based study. Retinal photographs were taken on recruitment and convalescence. A spectrum of quantitative retinal microvascular parameters (retinal vascular caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity and branching angle) was measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. (Singapore I Vessel Assessment, version 3.0). We included 62 dengue patients and 127 controls. Dengue cases were more likely to have wider retinal arteriolar and venular calibers (158.3 μm vs 144.3 μm, p < 0.001; 227.7 μm vs 212.8 μm, p < 0.001; respectively), higher arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions (1.271 vs 1.249, p = 0.002; 1.268 vs. 1.230, p < 0.001, respectively), higher arteriolar and venular tortuosity (0.730 vs 0.546 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; 0.849 vs 0.658 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; respectively), compared to controls. Resolution of acute dengue coincided with decrease in retinal vascular calibers and venular fractal dimension. Dengue patients have altered microvascular network in the retina; these changes may reflect pathophysiological processes in the immune system.

  8. Signal Intensity of Superb Microvascular Imaging Correlates with the Severity of Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis is critical for the management of this condition. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) enables the assessment of slow blood flow of small vessels without any contrast medium. An 84-year-old man visited our hospital with right upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography showed a slight thickening of the gallbladder. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein levels were elevated. He was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis and treated conservatively with antibiotics. Two days later, his condition worsened and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) was performed. The patient recovered and was discharged, and his drainage was withdrawn 7 days later. On admission, color-coded SMI (cSMI) showed pulsatory signals on the slightly thickened gallbladder wall. On the day of PTGBD, the intensity of the signal on cSMI had increased. Once the patient was cured, no further signal was observed on the gallbladder wall with either cSMI or mSMI. In conclusion, the strong pulsatory signal correlated with the severity of acute cholecystitis observed with cSMI and mSMI. Illustrating the signal intensity is useful for the evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis. PMID:27721732

  9. Acute Cutaneous Microvascular Flow Responses to Whole-Body Tilting in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    The transition from upright to head-down tilt (HDT) posture in humans increases blood pressure superior to the heart and decreases pressure inferior to the heart. Consequently, above heart level, myogenic arteriolar tone probably increases with HDT, in opposition to the withdrawal of baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic tone. We hypothesized that due to antagonism between central and local controls, the response of the facial cutaneous micro- circulation to acute postural change will be weaker than that in the leg, where these two mechanisms reinforce each other. Cutaneous microvascular flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry simultaneously at the shin and the neck of 7 male and 3 female subjects. Subjects underwent a stepwise tilt protocol from standing control to 54 deg head-up tilt (HUT), 30 deg, 12 deg, 0 deg, -6 deg (HDT), -12 deg, -6 deg, 0 deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 54 deg, and standing, for 30-sec periods with 10-sec transitions between postures. Flows at the shin and the neck increased significantly (P < 0.05) from standing baseline to 12 deg HUT (252 +/- 55 and 126 +/- 9% (bar-X +/- SE) of baseline, respectively). From 12 deg to -12 deg tilt, flows continued to increase at the shin (509 +/- 71% of baseline) but decreased at the neck to baseline levels (100 +/- 15% of baseline). Cutaneous microvascular flow recovered at both sites during the return to standing posture with significant hysteresis. Flow increases from standing to near-supine posture are attributed at both sites to baroreceptor-mediated vasodilation. The great dissimilarity in flow response magnitudes at the two measurement sites may be indicative of central/local regulatory antagonism above heart level and reinforcement below heart level.

  10. Acute Cutaneous Microvascular Flow Responses to Whole-Body Tilting in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    The transition from upright to head-down tilt (HDT) posture in humans increases blood pressure superior to the heart and decreases pressure inferior to the heart. Consequently, above heart level, myogenic arteriolar tone probably increases with HDT, in opposition to the withdrawal of baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic tone. We hypothesized that due to antagonism between central and local controls, the response of the facial cutaneous microcirculation to acute postural change will be weaker than that in the leg, where these two mechanisms reinforce each other. Cutaneous microvascular flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry simultaneously at the shin and the neck of 7 male and 3 female subjects. Subjects underwent a stepwise tilt protocol from standing control to 54 deg head-up tilt (HUT), 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg (HDT), -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 54 deg, and standing, for 30-sec periods with 10-sec transitions between postures. Flows at the shin and the neck increased significantly (P less than 0.05) from standing baseline to 12 deg HUT (252 +/- 55 and 126 +/- 9% (bar X +/- SE) of baseline, respectively). From 12 deg to -12 deg tilt, flows continued to increase at the shin (509 +/- 71% of baseline) but decreased at the neck to baseline levels (100 +/- 15% of baseline). Cutaneous microvascular flow recovered at both sites during the return to standing posture with significant hysteresis. Flow increases from standing to near-supine posture are attributed at both sites to baroreceptor-mediated vasodilation. The great dissimilarity in flow response magnitudes at the two measurement sites may be indicative of central/local regulatory antagonism above heart level and reinforcement below heart level.

  11. Diagnostic Ultrasound Induced Inertial Cavitation to Non-Invasively Restore Coronary and Microvascular Flow in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Wu, Juefei; Lof, John; Radio, Stanley; Vignon, Francois; Shi, William; Powers, Jeffry; Unger, Evan; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Porter, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound induced cavitation has been explored as a method of dissolving intravascular and microvascular thrombi in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of cavitation required for success, and whether longer pulse duration therapeutic impulses (sustaining the duration of cavitation) could restore both microvascular and epicardial flow with this technique. Accordingly, in 36 hyperlipidemic atherosclerotic pigs, thrombotic occlusions were induced in the mid-left anterior descending artery. Pigs were then randomized to either a) ½ dose tissue plasminogen activator (0.5 mg/kg) alone; or same dose plasminogen activator and an intravenous microbubble infusion with either b) guided high mechanical index short pulse (2.0 MI; 5 usec) therapeutic ultrasound impulses; or c) guided 1.0 mechanical index long pulse (20 usec) impulses. Passive cavitation detectors indicated the high mechanical index impulses (both long and short pulse duration) induced inertial cavitation within the microvasculature. Epicardial recanalization rates following randomized treatments were highest in pigs treated with the long pulse duration therapeutic impulses (83% versus 59% for short pulse, and 49% for tissue plasminogen activator alone; p<0.05). Even without epicardial recanalization, however, early microvascular recovery occurred with both short and long pulse therapeutic impulses (p<0.005 compared to tissue plasminogen activator alone), and wall thickening improved within the risk area only in pigs treated with ultrasound and microbubbles. We conclude that although short pulse duration guided therapeutic impulses from a diagnostic transducer transiently improve microvascular flow, long pulse duration therapeutic impulses produce sustained epicardial and microvascular re-flow in acute myocardial infarction. PMID:23922797

  12. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism.

  13. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism. PMID:27120341

  14. [Nonsuture microvascular anastomosis--experimental arterial end-to-end anastomosis using plastic adhesive and a soluble PVA tube (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, S; Handa, H; Taki, W; Yonekawa, Y; Ikada, Y; Iwata, H

    1979-11-01

    Microvascular anastomosis is now widely applied and many improved methods of the nonsuture anastomosis have been developed instead of the suture anastomosis for the purpose of saving time and making the reconstruction easier. We introduced a new nonsuture method of microvascular anastomosis using plastic adhesive and a soluble tube made of polyvinylalcohol (PVA). PVA, which had been utilized as a plasma expander, is a water-soluble polymer and its solubility is changeable depending on the degree of polimerization and percent saponification. We have made two kinds of soluble PVA tubes, the one has monolayer wall and the other double layered wall. The inner wall of the latter is more soluble than the outer wall. As plastic adhesives, we employed ethyl 2--cyanoacrylate, isopropyl 2--cyanoacrylate, and isobutyl 2--cyanoacrylate which were much superior to methyl 2--cyanoacrylate. Common carotid arteries of rats of 1.0 to 1.3 mm external diameter range were reconstructed and re-exploration was carried out at intervals of more than 7 days after operation. The anastomotic technique was very easy and it took about five minutes to reconstruct. In our last series, approximately 98 percent patency rate was achieved. The advantage of our method is that the blood stream is regained in the small soluble at the anastomotic site immediately after the release of hemostatic clamps.

  15. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  16. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jennifer C; Roseguini, Bruno T; Goerger, Benjamin M; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5-10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  17. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT.

  18. Comparing the effect of clopidogrel versus ticagrelor on coronary microvascular dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome patients (TIME trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although prompt reperfusion treatment restores normal epicardial flow, microvascular dysfunction may persist in some patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Impaired myocardial perfusion is caused by intraluminal platelets, fibrin thrombi and neutrophil plugging; antiplatelet agents play a significant role in terms of protecting against thrombus microembolization. A novel antiplatelet agent, ticagrelor, is a non-thienopyridine, direct P2Y12 blocker that has shown greater, more rapid and more consistent platelet inhibition than clopidogrel. However, the effects of ticagrelor on the prevention of microvascular dysfunction are uncertain. The present study is a comparison between clopidogrel and ticagrelor use for preventing microvascular dysfunction in patients with ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI or NSTEMI, respectively). Methods/design The TIME trial is a single-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-arm study designed to demonstrate the superiority of ticagrelor over clopidogrel. A total of 152 patients with a spectrum of STEMI or NSTEMI will undergo prospective random assignment to clopidogrel or ticagrelor (1:1 ratio). The primary endpoint is an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) measured after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); the secondary endpoint is wall motion score index assessed at 3 months by using echocardiography. Discussion The TIME trial is the first study designed to compare the protective effect of clopidogrel and ticagrelor on coronary microvascular dysfunction in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02026219. Registration date: 24 December 2013. PMID:24885437

  19. Influence of microvascular dysfunction on regional myocardial deformation post-acute myocardial infarction: insights from a novel angiographic index for assessing myocardial tissue-level reperfusion.

    PubMed

    He, Ben; Ding, Song; Qiao, Zhiqing; Gao, Lincheng; Wang, Wei; Ge, Heng; Shen, Xuedong; Pu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the impact of microvascular dysfunction assessed by angiography on myocardial deformation assessed by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). A total of 121 STEMI patients who received primary percutaneous coronary intervention were included. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction, Myocardial Perfusion Frame Count (TMPFC), a novel angiographic method to assess myocardial perfusion, was used to evaluate microvascular dysfunction. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography was performed at 3-7 days after reperfusion. The infarction related regional longitudinal (RLS) strains as well as circumferential (RCS) and radial (RRS) ones, along with global longitudinal, circumferential (GCS), and radial (GRS) strains were measured. Patients with microvascular dysfunction had decreased peak amplitude of RLS (p = 0.012), RCS (p < 0.001), RRS (p = 0.012) at the regional level and decreased peak amplitude of GCS (p = 0.005), GRS (p = 0.012) at the global level. The RCS to RLS and RCS to RRS ratios were significantly different between patients without than with microvascular dysfunction (1.28 ± 0.31 vs. 1.07 ± 0.47, p = 0.027 and 0.69 ± 0.33 vs. 0.56 ± 0.28, p = 0.047). Receiver operator characteristics curves identified a cutoff value of 94 frames for TMPFC to differentiate between normal and abnormal wall motion score index in the sub-acute phase of STEMI (AUC = 0.72; p < 0.001). In the sub-acute phase of STEMI, the presence of microvascular dysfunction in infarcted tissue relates to reduced global and regional myocardial deformation. RCS alterations were more significant than RLS and RRS between patients with than without microvascular dysfunction. TMPFC was useful to predict left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the sub-acute phase of STEMI.

  20. Role of C-reactive protein in determining microvascular function in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Murat; Akdeniz, Cansu; Aslanger, Emre; Kaplan, Abdullah; Yilmaz, Akar; Guz, Goksel; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra; Umman, Sabahattin

    2013-06-15

    The extent of coronary microvascular dysfunction might be related, not only to patient characteristics and procedural factors, but also to the inflammatory status. The aim of the present study was to examine a possible association between inflammation, as reflected by the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and the extent of baseline and post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) coronary microvascular dysfunction in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI. A total of 42 patients undergoing PCI for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome were enrolled. Coronary microvascular resistance (MR) was determined in the territory of culprit artery using a Doppler probe- and a pressure sensor-equipped guidewire both before (taking the collateral blood into account) and after PCI. The periprocedural changes in MR were calculated. The CRP levels at admission were correlated with the pre-PCI MR (r = 0.498, p = 0.001), post-PCI MR (r = 0.429, p = 0.005), and periprocedural changes in MR (r = 0.785, p <0.001). On multivariate regression analysis, the only predictor of the pre-PCI (β = 0.531, p = 0.002) and post-PCI (β = 0.471, p = 0.012) MR was the serum CRP concentration. Likewise, the periprocedural changes in MR was predicted by the serum CRP levels (β = 0.677, p = 0.001) and the presence of angiographic thrombus (β = -0.275, p = 0.02). In conclusion, these results have shown that the CRP level is related to increased coronary MR in the territory of the culprit lesion. This suggests that inflammatory processes might play a role in microvascular impairment in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23558042

  1. Omeprazole does not Potentiate Acute Oxygen Toxicity in Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the pathogenesis of broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is a developmental lung disease of premature infants that is characterized by an interruption of lung alveolar and pulmonary vascular development. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. Earlier we observed that OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury in adult mice and oxygen toxicity in adult human lung cells. However, our later studies in newborn mice demonstrated that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced developmental lung injury. Whether OM exerts a similar toxicity in primary human fetal lung cells is unknown. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that OM potentiates hyperoxia-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation in the human fetal lung derived primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). OM activated AhR as evident by a dose-dependent increase in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 mRNA levels in OM-treated cells. Furthermore, OM at a concentration of 100 μM (OM 100) increased NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression. Surprisingly, hyperoxia decreased rather than increase the NQO1 protein levels in OM 100-treated cells. Exposure to hyperoxia increased cytotoxicity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Interestingly, OM 100-treated cells exposed to air had increased H2O2 levels. However, hyperoxia did not further augment H2O2 levels in OM 100-treated cells. Additionally, hyperoxia-mediated oxygen toxicity was similar in both vehicle- and OM-treated cells. These findings contradict our hypothesis and support the hypothesis that OM does not potentiate acute hyperoxic injury in HPMEC in vitro. PMID:26779382

  2. Radial head dislocation with acute plastic bowing of the ulna.

    PubMed

    Sai, Shigaku; Fujii, Katsuyuki; Chino, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Junichi

    2005-01-01

    Five radial head dislocations with acute plastic bowing of the ulna in patients aged 6-12 years were reviewed. Closed reduction was successful in two, and open reduction was required in three patients in whom treatment was started more than 2 weeks after injury. In one child who presented 2 months after injury, realignment by osteotomy of the ulna as well as open reduction of the radial head was necessary. Follow-up evaluations at 6-24 months revealed good clinical outcomes in all patients. Awareness of this type of radial head dislocation is important to avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:15666132

  3. Role of endothelin in microvascular dysfunction following percutaneous coronary intervention for non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: a single-centre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Guddeti, Raviteja R; Prasad, Abhiram; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Aoki, Tatsuo; Rihal, Charanjit; Holmes, David; Best, Patricia; Lennon, Ryan J; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndromes frequently fails to restore myocardial perfusion despite establishing epicardial vessel patency. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor, and its expression is increased in atherosclerosis and after PCI. In this study, we aim to define the role of endothelin in regulating coronary microvascular blood flow and myocardial perfusion following PCI in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTACS), by assessing whether adjunctive therapy with a selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist acutely improves postprocedural coronary microvascular blood flow. Methods In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 23 NSTACS patients were enrolled to receive an intracoronary infusion of placebo (n=11) or BQ-123 (n=12) immediately before PCI. Post-PCI coronary microvascular blood flow and myocardial perfusion were assessed by measuring Doppler-derived average peak velocity (APV), and cardiac biomarker levels were quantified. Results Compared with the placebo group, APV was significantly higher in the drug group immediately after PCI (30 (20, 37) vs 19 (9, 26) cm/s; p=0.03). Hyperaemic APV, measured post-adenosine administration, was higher in the BQ-123 group, but the difference did not achieve statistical significance (56 (48, 72) vs 46 (34, 64) cm/s; p=0.090). Maximum coronary flow reserve postprocedure was not different between the two groups (2.1 (1.6, 2.3) vs 2.5 (1.8, 3.0)). Per cent change in creatine kinase isoenzyme MB from the time of PCI to 8 and 16 hours post-PCI was significantly lower in the drug group compared with the placebo group (−17 (−26, −10) vs 26 (−15, 134); p=0.02 and −17 (−38, 14) vs 107 (2, 446); p=0.007, respectively). Conclusions Endothelin is a mediator of microvascular dysfunction during PCI in NSTACS, and adjunctive selective ETA antagonist may augment myocardial perfusion during PCI. Trial registration number

  4. Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

  5. Microvascular rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The goals of this presentation are twofold: (1) to briefly sketch the field of vascular rarefaction as a key component of various fibrotic diseases and (2) to illustrate it with four vignettes depicting diverse mechanisms of microvascular rarefaction. Specifically, I shall describe migratory and angiogenic incompetence of endothelial cells under conditions of reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, role of endothelial-to-mesenchymal cell and mesenchymal stem cell-to-endothelial reprogramming, and potential role of antiangiogenic peptides in the development of graft vascular disease as exemplified by chronic allograft nephropathy PMID:20592859

  6. Does Pre-Treatment with High Dose Atorvastatin Prevent Microvascular Dysfunction after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong-Ki; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Chung, Woo-Young; Cho, Byung-Ryul; Fearon, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is controversy surrounding whether or not high dose statin administration before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) decreases peri-procedural microvascular injury. We performed a prospective randomized study to investigate the mechanisms and effects of pre-treatment high dose atorvastatin on myocardial damage in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) undergoing PCI. Subjects and Methods Seventy seven patients with NSTE-ACS were randomly assigned to either the high dose group (atorvastatin 80 mg loading 12 to 24 h before PCI with a further 40 mg loading 2 h before PCI, n=39) or low dose group (atorvastatin 10 mg administration 12 to 24 h before PCI, n=38). Index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) was measured after stent implantation. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured before and after PCI. Results The baseline characteristics were not different between the two patient groups. Compared to the low dose group, the high dose group had lower post PCI IMR (14.1±5.0 vs. 19.2±9.3 U, p=0.003). Post PCI CK-MB was also lower in the high dose group (median: 1.40 ng/mL (interquartile range [IQR: 0.75 to 3.45] vs. 4.00 [IQR: 1.70 to 7.37], p=0.002) as was the post-PCI CRP level (0.09 mg/dL [IQR: 0.04 to 0.16] vs. 0.22 [IQR: 0.08 to 0.60], p=0.001). Conclusion Pre-treatment with high dose atorvastatin reduces peri-PCI microvascular dysfunction verified by post-PCI IMR and exerts an immediate anti-inflammatory effect in patients with NSTE-ACS. PMID:27482255

  7. Acute synthesis of CPEB is required for plasticity of visual avoidance behavior in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wanhua; Liu, Han-Hsuan; Schiapparelli, Lucio; McClatchy, Daniel; He, Hai-yan; Yates, John R.; Cline, Hollis T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural plasticity requires protein synthesis, however the identity of newly synthesized proteins generated in response to plasticity-inducing stimuli remains unclear. We used in vivo bio-orthogonal non-canonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) with the methionine analog, azidohomoalanine (AHA) combined with multidimensional protein identification technique (MudPIT) to identify proteins that are synthesized in tadpole brain over 24 h. We induced conditioning-dependent plasticity of visual avoidance behavior. Induction of behavioral plasticity required NMDA and Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors, αCaMKII and rapid protein synthesis. Combining BONCAT with Western blots revealed that proteins including αCaMKII, MEK1, CPEB, and GAD65 are synthesized during conditioning. Acute synthesis of CPEB during conditioning is required for behavioral plasticity as well as conditioning-induced synaptic and structural plasticity in the tectal circuit. We outline a signaling pathway regulating protein synthesis-dependent behavioral plasticity in intact animals, identify newly synthesized proteins induced by visual experience and demonstrate a requirement for acute synthesis of CPEB in plasticity. PMID:24529705

  8. Acute plastic bowing of the radius with a distal radioulnar joint injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masashi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Acute plastic bowing is an incomplete fracture with a deformation that shows no obvious macroscopic fracture line or cortical discontinuity. Although cases of acute plastic bowing of the ulna with a dislocation of the radial head have been previously reported, we present here a rare case of acute plastic bowing of the radius with a distal radioulnar joint injury in a 16-year-old boy. Internal fixation of the detached fragment to the ulnar styloid and repair of the triangular fibrocartilagenous complex resulted in the disappearance of wrist pain. In cases of distal radioulnar joint injuries in children or adolescents, radiographs of the entire forearm should be taken to evaluate the existence of radial bowing. PMID:21089197

  9. Biliary epithelial senescence and plasticity in acute cellular rejection.

    PubMed

    Brain, J G; Robertson, H; Thompson, E; Humphreys, E H; Gardner, A; Booth, T A; Jones, D E J; Afford, S C; von Zglinicki, T; Burt, A D; Kirby, J A

    2013-07-01

    Biliary epithelial cells (BEC) are important targets in some liver diseases, including acute allograft rejection. Although some injured BEC die, many can survive in function compromised states of senescence or phenotypic de-differentiation. This study was performed to examine changes in the phenotype of BEC during acute liver allograft rejection and the mechanism driving these changes. Liver allograft sections showed a positive correlation (p < 0.0013) between increasing T cell mediated acute rejection and the number of BEC expressing the senescence marker p21(WAF1/Cip) or the mesenchymal marker S100A4. This was modeled in vitro by examination of primary or immortalized BEC after acute oxidative stress. During the first 48 h, the expression of p21(WAF1/Cip) was increased transiently before returning to baseline. After this time BEC showed increased expression of mesenchymal proteins with a decrease in epithelial markers. Analysis of TGF-β expression at mRNA and protein levels also showed a rapid increase in TGF-β2 (p < 0.006) following oxidative stress. The epithelial de-differentiation observed in vitro was abrogated by pharmacological blockade of the ALK-5 component of the TGF-β receptor. These data suggest that stress induced production of TGF-β2 by BEC can modify liver allograft function by enhancing the de-differentiation of local epithelial cells.

  10. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization.

  11. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    PubMed

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, L; Donegá, M; Giusto, E; Mallucci, G; Marchetti, B; Pluchino, S

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. PMID:24785677

  12. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  13. Acute plastic bowing of the forearm in adults: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tada, K; Ikeda, K; Tsubouchi, H; Tomita, K

    2008-08-01

    We report 2 adult cases where the diagnosis of acute plastic bowing of the forearm was either delayed or missed. In a 21-year-old man, ulnar bowing was missed and fixation was not performed because the patient had no limitation to his range of movement or pain. In a 24-year-old woman, the presentation of bowing in both the ulna and radius was delayed and corrective osteotomy was necessary for restoration of full range of movement. Prompt diagnosis enables manual reposition for easy restoration of full range of movement. PMID:18725680

  14. Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn; Flacke, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular angina is common among patients with signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Unfortunately, microvascular is often under-recognized in clinical settings. The diagnosis of microvascular angina relies on assessment of the functional status of the coronary microvasculature. Invasive strategies include acetylcholine provocation, intracoronary Doppler ultrasound, and intracoronary thermodilution; noninvasive strategies include cardiac positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance, and Doppler echocardiography. Once the diagnosis of microvascular angina is established, treatment is focused on improving symptoms and reducing future risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Pharmacologic options and lifestyle modifications for patients with microvascular angina are similar to those for patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:25685641

  15. Acute and chronic effects of ethanol on learning-related synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2014-02-01

    Alcoholism is associated with acute and long-term cognitive dysfunction including memory impairment, resulting in substantial disability and cost to society. Thus, understanding how ethanol impairs cognition is essential for developing treatment strategies to dampen its adverse impact. Memory processing is thought to involve persistent, use-dependent changes in synaptic transmission, and ethanol alters the activity of multiple signaling molecules involved in synaptic processing, including modulation of the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmitter systems that mediate most fast excitatory and inhibitory transmission in the brain. Effects on glutamate and GABA receptors contribute to ethanol-induced changes in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), forms of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie memory acquisition. In this paper, we review the effects of ethanol on learning-related forms of synaptic plasticity with emphasis on changes observed in the hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for encoding contextual and episodic memories. We also include studies in other brain regions as they pertain to altered cognitive and mental function. Comparison of effects in the hippocampus to other brain regions is instructive for understanding the complexities of ethanol's acute and long-term pharmacological consequences.

  16. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  17. Hemorheology and Microvascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    The present review presents basic concepts of blood rheology related to vascular diseases. Blood flow in large arteries is dominated by inertial forces exhibited at high flow velocities, while viscous forces (i.e., blood rheology) play an almost negligible role. When high flow velocity is compromised by sudden deceleration as at a bifurcation, endothelial cell dysfunction can occur along the outer wall of the bifurcation, initiating inflammatory gene expression and, through mechanotransduction, the cascade of events associated with atherosclerosis. In sharp contrast, the flow of blood in microvessels is dominated by viscous shear forces since the inertial forces are negligible due to low flow velocities. Shear stress is a critical parameter in microvascular flow, and a force-balance approach is proposed for determining microvascular shear stress, accounting for the low Reynolds numbers and the dominance of viscous forces over inertial forces. Accordingly, when the attractive forces between erythrocytes (represented by the yield stress of blood) are greater than the shear force produced by microvascular flow, tissue perfusion itself cannot be sustained, leading to capillary loss. The yield stress parameter is presented as a diagnostic candidate for future clinical research, specifically, as a fluid dynamic biomarker for microvascular disorders. The relation between the yield stress and diastolic blood viscosity (DBV) is described using the Casson model for viscosity, from which one may be able determine thresholds of DBV where the risk of microvascular disorders is high. PMID:21779279

  18. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  19. Plasticity of upper thermal limits to acute and chronic temperature variation in Manduca sexta larvae.

    PubMed

    Kingsolver, Joel G; MacLean, Heidi J; Goddin, Silvan B; Augustine, Kate E

    2016-05-01

    In many ectotherms, exposure to high temperatures can improve subsequent tolerance to higher temperatures. However, the differential effects of single, repeated or continuous exposure to high temperatures are less clear. We measured the effects of single heat shocks and of diurnally fluctuating or constant rearing temperatures on the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) for final instar larvae of Manduca sexta Brief (2 h) heat shocks at temperatures of 35°C and above significantly increased CTmax relative to control temperatures (25°C). Increasing mean temperatures (from 25 to 30°C) or greater diurnal fluctuations (from constant to ±10°C) during larval development also significantly increased CTmax Combining these data showed that repeated or continuous temperature exposure during development improved heat tolerance beyond the effects of a single exposure to the same maximum temperature. These results suggest that both acute and chronic temperature exposure can result in adaptive plasticity of upper thermal limits. PMID:26944498

  20. Microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; İdilman, İlkay Sedakat; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular invasion is a crucial histopathologic prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma. We reviewed the literature and aimed to draw attention to clinicopathologic and imaging findings that may predict the presence of microvascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma. Imaging findings suggesting microvascular invasion are disruption of capsule, irregular tumor margin, peritumoral enhancement, multifocal tumor, increased tumor size, and increased glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. In the presence of typical findings, microvascular invasion may be predicted. PMID:26782155

  1. The effect of acute and chronic centrophenoxine treatment on the synaptic plasticity of old rats.

    PubMed

    Bertoni-Freddari, C; Giuli, C; Pieri, C

    1982-12-01

    The cerebellar glomerulus was studied by electron microscopic morphometry in female Wistar rats. Age-dependent alterations have been revealed from 3 to 28 mth of age, and the effect of centrophenoxine (CPH) was analyzed in two different patterns of administration. First, 27-mth-old rats were treated daily for 6 wk (acute treatment), and second, 18-mth-old rats were treated 3 times per week for 5 months (chronic treatment). The dose was 100 mg CPH/kg body weight, injected intraperitoneally. The surface density (SV), the numerical density (NV) and the average length (L) of the synaptic junctions were calculated from data obtained on ethanol-phosphotungstic acid stained ultrathin sections. An age-dependent reduction of SV and NV of the synaptic contact zones was found, and the L increased in the oldest animals. CPH-treatment resulted in a marked increase of SV in both types of application, whereas the other two parameters behaved differently in the two groups. The chronic treatment resulted in a significant slowing down of the decrease of NV, whereas L remained invariate. On the contrary, the acute treatment increased L but did not alter significantly NV. The results and the differences between the treatment types are discussed in terms of synaptic plasticity and are interpreted as different manifestations of the same reactive synaptogenetic process.

  2. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELISA, and Masson staining. In addition, lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA were transfected into CMEC cells using standard procedures for assessing the effect of PTEN and VEGE on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. MiR-21, PTEN, and VEGF expressions were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. The relationship between miR-21 and PTEN was determined by the luciferase activity assay. Results We demonstrated that miR-21 bonded with the 3′-UTR of PTEN and suppressed PTEN expressions. Established models significantly induced cardiac infarct volume and endothelial injury marker expressions as well as miR-21 and PTEN expressions (P<0.05). MiR-21 mimics exhibited significantly protective effects since they down-regulated both infarction size and injury marker expressions by increasing VEGF expression and inhibiting PTEN expression (P<0.05). In addition, results from in vitro research show that lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA can notably antagonize the effect of miR-21 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis (P<0.05). Conclusions MiR-21 exerts protective effects on endothelial injury through the PTEN/VEGF pathway after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27708252

  3. Acute Stress, But not Corticosterone, Disrupts Short- and Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Dorsal Subiculum Via Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J.; Howland, John G.

    2015-01-01

    The subiculum (SUB) serves as the major output structure of the hippocampus; therefore, exploring synaptic plasticity within this region is of great importance for understanding the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and hippocampal–cortical interactions. Previous research has shown exposure to acute stress dramatically alters synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus proper. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague–Dawley rats, we tested the effects of either acute restraint stress (30 min) or corticosterone (CORT) injections (3 mg/kg; s.c.) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in the Cornu Ammonis 1–SUB pathway. Paired-pulse facilitation and two forms of long-term plasticity (long-term potentiation and late-developing potentiation) were significantly reduced after exposure to acute stress but not CORT treatment. Measurements of plasma CORT confirmed similar levels of circulating hormone in animals exposed to either acute stress or CORT treatment. The disruptive effects of acute stress on both short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity are mediated by glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as these disruptions were blocked by pre-treatment with the selective GR antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg; s.c.). The present results highlight the susceptibility of subicular plasticity to acute stress and provide evidence that GR activation is necessary but not sufficient for mediating these alterations. PMID:22918985

  4. Thrombin induces ischemic LTP (iLTP): implications for synaptic plasticity in the acute phase of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Efrat Shavit; Itsekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Aronovich, Anna; Reisner, Yair; Bushi, Doron; Pick, Chaim G.; Tanne, David; Chapman, Joab; Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain ischemia modifies synaptic plasticity by inducing ischemic long-term potentiation (iLTP) of synaptic transmission through the activation of N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). Thrombin, a blood coagulation factor, affects synaptic plasticity in an NMDAR dependent manner. Since its activity and concentration is increased in brain tissue upon acute stroke, we sought to clarify whether thrombin could mediate iLTP through the activation of its receptor Protease-Activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Extracellular recordings were obtained in CA1 region of hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 mice. In vitro ischemia was induced by acute (3 minutes) oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). A specific ex vivo enzymatic assay was employed to assess thrombin activity in hippocampal slices, while OGD-induced changes in prothrombin mRNA levels were assessed by (RT)qPCR. Upon OGD, thrombin activity increased in hippocampal slices. A robust potentiation of excitatory synaptic strength was detected, which occluded the ability to induce further LTP. Inhibition of either thrombin or its receptor PAR1 blocked iLTP and restored the physiological, stimulus induced LTP. Our study provides important insights on the early changes occurring at excitatory synapses after ischemia and indicates the thrombin/PAR1 pathway as a novel target for developing therapeutic strategies to restore synaptic function in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. PMID:25604482

  5. New method of intracoronary adenosine injection to prevent microvascular reperfusion injury in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Grygier, Marek; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander; Lesiak, Maciej; Janus, Magdalena; Kowal, Jadwiga; Skorupski, Wlodzimierz; Pyda, Malgorzata; Mitkowski, Przemyslaw; Grajek, Stefan

    2011-04-15

    The aim of our study was to examine the role of a new, simple protocol of intracoronary adenosine administration performed during primary angioplasty on the immediate angiographic results and clinical course. A prospective, single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 70 consecutive patients (64 ± 14 years, 54 men) with acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was conducted. Patients were randomized to 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 35) received intracoronary adenosine (1 to 2 mg) with a hand injection through the guiding catheter 2 times: immediately after crossing the lesion of the infarct-related artery with guidewire and then after the first balloon inflation. Group 2 (n = 35) received placebo. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the 2 groups were similar. Percutaneous coronary intervention resulted in Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction grade 3 flow after PCI in 32 patients (91.4%) in the adenosine group and 27 patients (77.1%) in the placebo group (p = 0.059). Myocardial blush grade 3 was observed at the end of PCI in 23 patients (65.7%) in the adenosine group and 13 (37.1%) in the placebo group (p < 0.05). Resolution of ST-segment elevation (> 50%) was more frequently observed in the adenosine than in the placebo group: 27 (77%) versus 15 (43%), respectively (p < 0.01). In conclusion, intracoronary adenosine administration improved the angiographic and electrocardiographic results in patients with acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation undergoing PCI. Adenosine administration seemed to be associated with a more favorable clinical course. PMID:21310372

  6. Microvascular decompression for intractable singultus.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Hatayama, Toru; Kon, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Taigen; Sasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    Intractable singultus due to cerebrovascular disease is very rare. We report a case of intractable singultus that improved after microvascular decompression and present a literature review. The patient was a 58-year-old man with a 30-year history of persistent singultus. Its frequency and duration gradually increased and it was resistant to multiple medical treatments. Microvascular decompression to relieve pressure on the anterolateral surface of the lower medulla oblongata from the vertebral artery resulted in the resolution of singultus. Patients with intractable idiopathic singultus who fail to respond to medical therapy need to be considered for the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases and microvascular decompression. PMID:27335312

  7. Safety of guidewire-based measurement of fractional flow reserve and the index of microvascular resistance using intravenous adenosine in patients with acute or recent myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Layland, Jamie; Carrick, David; Petrie, Mark C.; McEntegart, Margaret; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Lindsay, Mitchell; Watkins, Stuart; Davie, Andrew; Mahrous, Ahmed; Carberry, Jaclyn; Teng, Vannesa; McConnachie, Alex; Curzen, Nick; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Berry, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Coronary guidewire-based diagnostic assessments with hyperemia may cause iatrogenic complications. We assessed the safety of guidewire-based measurement of coronary physiology, using intravenous adenosine, in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Methods We prospectively enrolled invasively managed STEMI and NSTEMI patients in two simultaneously conducted studies in 6 centers (NCT01764334; NCT02072850). All of the participants underwent a diagnostic coronary guidewire study using intravenous adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) infusion for 1–2 min. The patients were prospectively assessed for the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and symptoms and invasively measured hemodynamics were also recorded. Results 648 patients (n = 298 STEMI patients in 1 hospital; mean time to reperfusion 253 min; n = 350 NSTEMI in 6 hospitals; median time to angiography from index chest pain episode 3 (2, 5) days) were included between March 2011 and May 2013. Two NSTEMI patients (0.3% overall) experienced a coronary dissection related to the guidewire. No guidewire dissections occurred in the STEMI patients. Chest symptoms were reported in the majority (86%) of patient's symptoms during the adenosine infusion. No serious adverse events occurred during infusion of adenosine and all of the symptoms resolved after the infusion ceased. Conclusions In this multicenter analysis, guidewire-based measurement of FFR and IMR using intravenous adenosine was safe in patients following STEMI or NSTEMI. Self-limiting symptoms were common but not associated with serious adverse events. Finally, coronary dissection in STEMI and NSTEMI patients was noted to be a rare phenomenon. PMID:26418191

  8. Systemic Microvascular Dysfunction and Inflammation after Pulmonary Particulate Matter Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Porter, Dale W.; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K. Murali K.; Marvar, Paul J.; Hubbs, Ann F.; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A.

    2006-01-01

    The epidemiologic association between pulmonary exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular dysfunction is well known, but the systemic mechanisms that drive this effect remain unclear. We have previously shown that acute pulmonary exposure to PM impairs or abolishes endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation in the rat spinotrapezius muscle. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the effect of pulmonary PM exposure on systemic microvascular function and to identify local inflammatory events that may contribute to these effects. Rats were intratracheally instilled with residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or titanium dioxide at 0.1 or 0.25 mg/rat 24 hr before measurement of pulmonary and systemic microvascular responses. In vivo microscopy of the spinotrapezius muscle was used to study systemic arteriolar responses to intraluminal infusion of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 or iontophoretic abluminal application of the adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Leukocyte rolling and adhesion were quantified in venules paired with the studied arterioles. Histologic techniques were used to assess pulmonary inflammation, characterize the adherence of leukocytes to systemic venules, verify the presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the systemic microvascular wall, and quantify systemic microvascular oxidative stress. In the lungs of rats exposed to ROFA or TiO2, changes in some bronchoalveolar lavage markers of inflammation were noted, but an indication of cellular damage was not found. In rats exposed to 0.1 mg ROFA, focal alveolitis was evident, particularly at sites of particle deposition. Exposure to either ROFA or TiO2 caused a dose-dependent impairment of endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. However, exposure to these particles did not affect microvascular constriction in response to PHE. ROFA and TiO2 exposure significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in paired venules, and these cells were positively identified as

  9. Systemic microvascular dysfunction and inflammation after pulmonary particulate matter exposure.

    PubMed

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Porter, Dale W; Barger, Mark; Millecchia, Lyndell; Rao, K Murali K; Marvar, Paul J; Hubbs, Ann F; Castranova, Vincent; Boegehold, Matthew A

    2006-03-01

    The epidemiologic association between pulmonary exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and cardiovascular dysfunction is well known, but the systemic mechanisms that drive this effect remain unclear. We have previously shown that acute pulmonary exposure to PM impairs or abolishes endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation in the rat spinotrapezius muscle. The purpose of this study was to further characterize the effect of pulmonary PM exposure on systemic microvascular function and to identify local inflammatory events that may contribute to these effects. Rats were intratracheally instilled with residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or titanium dioxide at 0.1 or 0.25 mg/rat 24 hr before measurement of pulmonary and systemic microvascular responses. In vivo microscopy of the spinotrapezius muscle was used to study systemic arteriolar responses to intraluminal infusion of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 or iontophoretic abluminal application of the adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Leukocyte rolling and adhesion were quantified in venules paired with the studied arterioles. Histologic techniques were used to assess pulmonary inflammation, characterize the adherence of leukocytes to systemic venules, verify the presence of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the systemic microvascular wall, and quantify systemic microvascular oxidative stress. In the lungs of rats exposed to ROFA or TiO2, changes in some bronchoalveolar lavage markers of inflammation were noted, but an indication of cellular damage was not found. In rats exposed to 0.1 mg ROFA, focal alveolitis was evident, particularly at sites of particle deposition. Exposure to either ROFA or TiO2 caused a dose-dependent impairment of endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. However, exposure to these particles did not affect microvascular constriction in response to PHE. ROFA and TiO2 exposure significantly increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in paired venules, and these cells were positively identified as

  10. Aspects of cerebral plasticity related to clinical features in acute vestibular neuritis: a "starting point" review from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, A; Chiaravalloti, A; Schillaci, O; Ottaviani, F; Alessandrini, M

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of vertigo and is characterised by a sudden unilateral vestibular failure (UVF). Many neuroimaging studies in the last 10 years have focused on brain changes related to sudden vestibular deafferentation as in VN. However, most of these studies, also due to different possibilities across diverse centres, were based on different times of first acquisition from the onset of VN symptoms, neuroimaging techniques, statistical analysis and correlation with otoneurological and psychological findings. In the present review, the authors aim to merge together the similarities and discrepancies across various investigations that have employed neuroimaging techniques and group analysis with the purpose of better understanding about how the brain changes and what characteristic clinical features may relate to each other in the acute phase of VN. Six studies that strictly met inclusion criteria were analysed to assess cortical-subcortical correlates of acute clinical features related to VN. The present review clearly reveals that sudden UVF may induce a wide variety of cortical and subcortical responses - with changes in different sensory modules - as a result of acute plasticity in the central nervous system. PMID:27196070

  11. Regulation of postsynaptic plasticity genes' expression and topography by sustained dopamine perturbation and modulation by acute memantine: relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Iasevoli, Felice; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Sarappa, Chiara; Marmo, Federica; Latte, Gianmarco; Rossi, Rodolfo; Eramo, Anna; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    A relevant role for dopamine-glutamate interaction has been reported in the pathophysiology and treatment of psychoses. Dopamine and glutamate may interact at multiple levels, including the glutamatergic postsynaptic density (PSD), an electron-dense thickening that has gained recent attention as a switchboard of dopamine-glutamate interactions and for its role in synaptic plasticity. Recently, glutamate-based strategies, such as memantine add-on to antipsychotics, have been proposed for refractory symptoms of schizophrenia, e.g. cognitive impairment. Both antipsychotics and memantine regulate PSD transcripts but sparse information is available on memantine's effects under dopamine perturbation. We tested gene expression changes of the Homer1 and PSD-95 PSD proteins in models of sustained dopamine perturbation, i.e. subchronic treatment by: a) GBR-12909, a dopamine receptor indirect agonist; b) haloperidol, a D2R antagonist; c) SCH-23390, a dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) antagonist; and d) SCH-23390+haloperidol. On the last day of treatment, rats were acutely treated with vehicle or memantine. The Homer1a immediate-early gene was significantly induced by haloperidol and by haloperidol+SCH-23390. The gene was not induced by SCH-23390 per se or by GBR-12909. Expression of the constitutive genes Homer1b/c and PSD-95 was less affected by these dopaminergic paradigms. Acute memantine administration significantly increased Homer1a expression by the dopaminergic compounds used herein. Both haloperidol and haloperidol+SCH-23390 shifted Homer1a/Homer1b/c ratio of expression toward Homer1a. This pattern was sharpened by acute memantine. Dopaminergic compounds and acute memantine also differentially affected topographic distribution of gene expression and coordinated expression of Homer1a among cortical-subcortical regions. These results indicate that dopaminergic perturbations may affect glutamatergic signaling in different directions. Memantine may help partially revert dopamine

  12. Plastic Change along the Intact Crossed Pathway in Acute Phase of Cerebral Ischemia Revealed by Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; He, Yongzhi; Lu, Hongyang; Li, Yao; Su, Xin; Jiang, Ying; Tong, Shanbao

    2016-01-01

    The intact crossed pathway via which the contralesional hemisphere responds to the ipsilesional somatosensory input has shown to be affected by unilateral stroke. The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of the intact crossed pathway in response to different intensities of stimulation in a rodent photothrombotic stroke model. Using optical intrinsic signal imaging, an overall increase of the contralesional cortical response was observed in the acute phase (≤48 hours) after stroke. In particular, the contralesional hyperactivation is more prominent under weak stimulations, while a strong stimulation would even elicit a depressed response. The results suggest a distinct stimulation-response pattern along the intact crossed pathway after stroke. We speculate that the contralesional hyperactivation under weak stimulations was due to the reorganization for compensatory response to the weak ipsilateral somatosensory input. PMID:27144032

  13. Diverse impact of acute and long-term extracellular proteolytic activity on plasticity of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Tomasz; Brzdąk, Patrycja; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory require alteration in number and strength of existing synaptic connections. Extracellular proteolysis within the synapses has been shown to play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity by determining synapse structure, function, and number. Although synaptic plasticity of excitatory synapses is generally acknowledged to play a crucial role in formation of memory traces, some components of neural plasticity are reflected by nonsynaptic changes. Since information in neural networks is ultimately conveyed with action potentials, scaling of neuronal excitability could significantly enhance or dampen the outcome of dendritic integration, boost neuronal information storage capacity and ultimately learning. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. With this regard, several lines of evidence and our most recent study support a view that activity of extracellular proteases might affect information processing in neuronal networks by affecting targets beyond synapses. Here, we review the most recent studies addressing the impact of extracellular proteolysis on plasticity of neuronal excitability and discuss how enzymatic activity may alter input-output/transfer function of neurons, supporting cognitive processes. Interestingly, extracellular proteolysis may alter intrinsic neuronal excitability and excitation/inhibition balance both rapidly (time of minutes to hours) and in long-term window. Moreover, it appears that by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, proteases may modulate function of ion channels or alter inhibitory drive and hence facilitate active participation of dendrites and axon initial segments (AISs) in adjusting neuronal input/output function. Altogether, a picture emerges whereby both rapid and long-term extracellular proteolysis may influence some aspects of information processing in neurons, such as initiation of action potential, spike frequency adaptation, properties of action potential and dendritic

  14. Contributions of Bcl-xL to acute and long term changes in bioenergetics during neuronal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria manufacture and release metabolites and manage calcium during neuronal activity and synaptic transmission, but whether long term alterations in mitochondrial function contribute to neuronal plasticity that underlies changes in organism behavior patterns is still poorly understood. Although normal neuronal plasticity may determine learning, in contrast a persistent decline in synaptic strength or neuronal excitability may portend neurite retraction and eventual somatic death. Anti-death proteins such as Bcl-xL provide neuroprotection at the neuronal soma during cell death stimuli, but also appear to enhance neurotransmitter release and synaptic growth and development. It is proposed that Bcl-xL performs these functions through its ability to regulate mitochondrial release of bioenergetic metabolites and calcium, its ability to rapidly alter mitochondrial positioning and morphology as well as its role in interacting with proteins that directly alter synaptic vesicle recycling. Bcl-xL translocates acutely to subcellular membranes during neuronal activity to achieve these changes. After stressful stimuli, pro-apoptotic cleaved delta N Bcl-xL (ΔN Bcl-xL)-induced mitochondrial ion channel activity leads to synaptic depression and this is regulated by caspase activation. During physiological states of decreased synaptic stimulation, loss of mitochondrial Bcl-xL and low level caspase activation occur prior to the onset of long term decline in synaptic efficacy. The degree to which Bcl-xL changes mitochondrial membrane permeability may control the direction of change in synaptic strength. The small molecule Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 has been useful in defining the role of Bcl-xL in synaptic processes. Bcl-xL is crucial to the normal health of neurons and synapses and its malfunction may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24240091

  15. Plasticity of the histamine H3 receptors after acute vestibular lesion in the adult cat

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Mourre, Christiane; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    After unilateral vestibular neurectomy (UVN) many molecular and neurochemical mechanisms underlie the neurophysiological reorganizations occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) complex, as well as the behavioral recovery process. As a key regulator, the histaminergic system appears to be a likely candidate because drugs interfering with histamine (HA) neurotransmission facilitate behavioral recovery after vestibular lesion. This study aimed at analyzing the post-lesion changes of the histaminergic system by quantifying binding to histamine H3 receptors (H3R; mediating namely histamine autoinhibition) using a histamine H3 receptor agonist ([3H]N-α-methylhistamine). Experiments were done in brain sections of control cats (N = 6) and cats submitted to UVN and killed 1 (N = 6) or 3 (N = 6) weeks after the lesion. UVN induced a bilateral decrease in binding density of the agonist [3H]N-α-methylhistamine to H3R in the tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN) at 1 week post-lesion, with a predominant down-regulation in the ipsilateral TMN. The bilateral decrease remained at the 3 weeks survival time and became symmetric. Concerning brainstem structures, binding density in the VN, the prepositus hypoglossi, the subdivisions of the inferior olive decreased unilaterally on the ipsilateral side at 1 week and bilaterally 3 weeks after UVN. Similar changes were observed in the subdivisions of the solitary nucleus only 1 week after the lesion. These findings indicate vestibular lesion induces plasticity of the histamine H3R, which could contribute to vestibular function recovery. PMID:24427120

  16. Development of an Acute Care Plastic Surgery Service in the Saskatoon Health Region: Effects on flexor tendon management

    PubMed Central

    Wilgenbusch, Chelsea S; Dust, Peter W; Sunderland, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute care surgery model has gained favour in general surgery, but has yet to be widely adopted in other specialties. An Acute Care Plastic Surgery (ACS) Service was recently implemented in the Saskatoon Health Region in an effort to improve trauma care. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of ACS on the management of flexor tendon lacerations. The authors hypothesize that ACS has resulted in more timely intervention, improved outcomes and decreased ‘after hours’ surgery. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients treated for flexor tendon lacerations from 2007 to 2013 was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on whether they received treatment before (group A) or after (group B) ACS implementation. Variables included dates and times of patient referral, consultation and tendon repair; postoperative complications; and admissions. A surgeon survey was administered on the perceived impact of ACS. RESULTS: Group A was more likely to have surgery performed after hours (P=0.0019) and be admitted to hospital (P=0.0211) compared with group B. Time from referral to consultation and injury-to-surgery interval were slightly increased post-ACS (Group B). Surgeons were highly satisfied with the new system, citing benefits to patients and surgeons. CONCLUSION: ACS was designed to improve trauma care, while favourably impacting surgeon workload. Surprisingly, the injury-to-surgery interval was slightly increased. However, this was not clinically significant and did not lead to increased postoperative complications. This finding was likely due to a favourable change in practice patterns observed after ACS implementation. ACS has resulted in fewer hospital admissions, decreased after-hours surgeries and improved surgeon satisfaction. PMID:26361628

  17. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M.; Fountaine, Thomas J.; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D.; Seif, Alix E.; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K.; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal L.; Gardner, Rebecca A.; Jensen, Michael C.; Shern, Jack F.; Fry, Terry J.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  18. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M; Fountaine, Thomas J; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D; Seif, Alix E; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W; Mackall, Crystal L; Gardner, Rebecca A; Jensen, Michael C; Shern, Jack F; Fry, Terry J

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  19. Acute and chronic stress-induced disturbances of microglial plasticity, phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Walker, Frederick Rohan; Nilsson, Michael; Jones, Kimberley

    2013-10-01

    Traditionally, microglia have been considered to act as macrophages of the central nervous system. While this concept still remains true it is also becoming increasingly apparent that microglia are involved in a host of nonimmunological activities, such as monitoring synaptic function and maintaining synaptic integrity. It has also become apparent that microglia are exquisitely sensitive to perturbation by environmental challenges. The aim of the current review is to critically examine the now substantial literature that has developed around the ability of acute, sub-chronic and chronic stressors to alter microglial structure and function. The vast majority of studies have demonstrated that stress promotes significant structural remodelling of microglia, and can enhance the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from microglia. Mechanistically, many of these effects appear to be driven by traditional stress-linked signalling molecules, namely corticosterone and norepinephrine. The specific effects of these signalling molecules are, however, complex as they can exert both inhibitory and suppressive effects on microglia depending upon the duration and intensity of exposure. Importantly, research has now shown that these stress-induced microglial alterations, rather than being epiphenomena, have broader behavioural implications, with the available evidence implicating microglia in directly regulating certain aspects of cognitive function and emotional regulation. PMID:24020974

  20. Osmoregulation and branchial plasticity after acute freshwater transfer in red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Watson, Caroline J; Nordi, Wiolene M; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, is an estuarine-dependent fish species commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico and along the coast of the southeastern United States. This economically important species has demonstrated freshwater tolerance; however, the physiological mechanisms and costs related to freshwater exposure remain poorly understood. The current study therefore investigated the physiological response of red drum using an acute freshwater transfer protocol. Plasma osmolality, Cl⁻, Mg²⁺ and Ca²⁺ were all significantly reduced by 24h post-transfer; Cl⁻ and Mg²⁺ recovered to control levels by 7days post-transfer. No effect of transfer was observed on muscle water content; however, muscle Cl⁻ was significantly reduced. Interestingly, plasma and muscle Na⁺ content was unaffected by freshwater transfer. Intestinal fluid was absent by 24h post-transfer indicating cessation of drinking. Branchial gene expression analysis showed that both CFTR and NKCC1 exhibited significant down-regulation at 8 and 24h post-transfer, respectively, although transfer had no impact on NHE2, NHE3 or Na⁺, K⁺ ATPase (NKA) activity. These general findings are supported by immunohistochemical analysis, which revealed no apparent NKCC containing cells in the gills at 7days post transfer while NKA cells localization was unaffected. The results of the current study suggest that red drum can effectively regulate Na⁺ balance upon freshwater exposure using already present Na⁺ uptake pathways while also down-regulating ion excretion mechanisms. PMID:25152533

  1. Integrating metabolic performance, thermal tolerance, and plasticity enables for more accurate predictions on species vulnerability to acute and chronic effects of global warming.

    PubMed

    Magozzi, Sarah; Calosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Predicting species vulnerability to global warming requires a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of sublethal and lethal thermal tolerances. To date, however, most studies investigating species physiological responses to increasing temperature have focused on the underlying physiological traits of either acute or chronic tolerance in isolation. Here we propose an integrative, synthetic approach including the investigation of multiple physiological traits (metabolic performance and thermal tolerance), and their plasticity, to provide more accurate and balanced predictions on species and assemblage vulnerability to both acute and chronic effects of global warming. We applied this approach to more accurately elucidate relative species vulnerability to warming within an assemblage of six caridean prawns occurring in the same geographic, hence macroclimatic, region, but living in different thermal habitats. Prawns were exposed to four incubation temperatures (10, 15, 20 and 25 °C) for 7 days, their metabolic rates and upper thermal limits were measured, and plasticity was calculated according to the concept of Reaction Norms, as well as Q10 for metabolism. Compared to species occupying narrower/more stable thermal niches, species inhabiting broader/more variable thermal environments (including the invasive Palaemon macrodactylus) are likely to be less vulnerable to extreme acute thermal events as a result of their higher upper thermal limits. Nevertheless, they may be at greater risk from chronic exposure to warming due to the greater metabolic costs they incur. Indeed, a trade-off between acute and chronic tolerance was apparent in the assemblage investigated. However, the invasive species P. macrodactylus represents an exception to this pattern, showing elevated thermal limits and plasticity of these limits, as well as a high metabolic control. In general, integrating multiple proxies for species physiological acute and chronic responses to increasing

  2. Microvascular endothelium and pericytes: high yield, low passage cultures.

    PubMed

    Carson, M P; Haudenschild, C C

    1986-06-01

    Cultured microvascular endothelial cells (MEC) have become a valuable model for studies of microvascular physiology and pathology. Most current techniques involve manual removal of undesirable cell types or cloning, require one to several months, and yield high population doubling level cultures derived from a relatively small sample of the original population. We have devised a technique to more rapidly produce larger numbers of MEC. This method provided primary cultures consisting predominantly of MEC within 1 wk. The technique involves selective aspiration of gray matter from the bovine cerebral cortex followed by homogenization, sieving, enzymatic dissociation, and then dense plating (10(4) to 10(5) vessel fragments/cm2) onto gelatin- or fibronectin-coated plastic. Typical yields were 0.1 to 0.5 X 10(6) fragments/g of aspirated gray matter. The optimal culture medium for these cells was 15% equine plasma derived serum, 20% conditioned medium, 2% retinal extract, 60% fresh medium, and 500 micrograms/ml heparin. Cells attached within 24 h, well-spread colonies were present within 1 to 2 d, and cultures approached confluence within 2 to 3 d. Alkaline phosphatase staining confirmed the microvascular origin of the material plated. Morphology, Factor VIII-related antigen staining and 1,1'-dioctacecyl-3,3,3'3,-tetramethyl-indocarbocyanine perchlorate acetylated low density lipoprotein uptake suggested that MEC predominated. Cultures could be passaged and additionally purified by sequential exposure to pancreatin and trypsin-EDTA. Pancreatin selectively removed MEC colonies leaving a relatively homogeneous pericyte population. The relative ease with which such cultures can be produced should facilitate the in vitro study of brain microvascular function and may also provide insights useful for growing MEC from other vascular beds.

  3. Obesity Related Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction: From Basic to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Selthofer-Relatić, K.; Bošnjak, I.; Kibel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity related coronary microvascular disease is a medical entity which is not yet fully elucidated. The pathophysiological basis of coronary microcirculatory dysfunction consists of a heterogeneous group of disorders with individual morphologic/functional/clinical presentation and prognosis. Coronary microcirculatory changes include mechanisms connected with vascular dysfunction, as well as extravascular and vasostructural changes in responses to neural, mechanical, and metabolic factors. Cardiometabolic changes that include obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus type II, and hypertension are associated with atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries and/or microvascular coronary dysfunction, with incompletely understood underlying mechanisms. In obesity, microvascular disease is mediated via adipokines/cytokines causing chronic, subclinical inflammation with (a) reduced NO-mediated dilatation, (b) changed endothelial- and smooth muscle-dependent vasoregulating mechanisms, (c) altered vasomotor control with increased sympathetic activity, and (d) obesity related hypertension with cardiomyocytes hypertrophy and impaired cardiac vascular adaptation to metabolic needs. From a clinical point of view it can present itself in acute or chronic form with different prognosis, as a practice problem for real-life diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27092288

  4. Inflammatory pathways and microvascular responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes constitute an important host defense mechanism, but may at the same time damage functional tissue and propagate acute organ failure. This balance is particularly vulnerable in the lung which provides a large surface area for invading pathogens and microorganisms, and simultaneously harbors a large pool of physiologically marginated neutrophils within its microvascular bed. Pathophysiological stimuli further amplify this accumulation of blood cells and promote the emigration of neutrophils into the pulmonary interstitium and the airspaces by different mechanisms depending on the pathophysiological stimulus, its route of entry into or site of production in the lung, and the time course of its action. Importantly, the pulmonary microvascular endothelium plays a key role in regulating not only sequestration and emigration of neutrophils, but by initiating the inflammatory response to a variety of diverse stimuli many of which do not directly target the circulating neutrophil, but elicit microvascular reactions by primarily acting on the endothelium. This review highlights the inflammatory process in the pulmonary microvasculature with special emphasis on the role of the pulmonary endothelium.

  5. A history of vascular and microvascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Rory F; Hudson, Donald A

    2014-10-01

    The history of microvascular surgery is intimately linked to that of vascular surgery. Microvascular techniques, developed mainly in China, Japan, Australia, and the United States of America, built on the principles of vascular anastomosis established by pioneers in France, Germany, Italy, and the United States of America. We present a history of the technique here.

  6. Using Multiple Whole-Cell Recordings to Study Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Acute Neocortical Slices.

    PubMed

    Lalanne, Txomin; Abrahamsson, Therese; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This protocol provides a method for quadruple whole-cell recording to study synaptic plasticity of neocortical connections, with a special focus on spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). It also describes how to morphologically identify recorded cells from two-photon laser-scanning microscopy (2PLSM) stacks. PMID:27250948

  7. Cardiopulmonary bypass increases pulmonary microvascular permeability through the Src kinase pathway: Involvement of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNWEN; JIANG, ZHAOLEI; BAO, CHUNRONG; MEI, JU; ZHU, JIAQUAN

    2016-01-01

    Changes in pulmonary microvascular permeability following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been established. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB and the underlying mechanism. The pulmonary microvascular permeability was measured using Evans Blue dye (EBD) exclusion, and the neutrophil infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine secretion was investigated. In addition, the activation of Src kinase and the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) was examined. The results revealed that CPB increased pulmonary microvascular leakage, neutrophil count and proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and activated Src kinase. The administration of PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase, decreased the activation of Src kinase and attenuated the increase in pulmonary microvascular permeability observed following CPB. Two important proteins associated with vascular permeability, caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin, were significantly activated at 24 h in the lung tissues following CPB, which correlated with the alterations in pulmonary microvascular permeability and Src kinase. PP2 administration inhibited their activation, suggesting that they are downstream factors of Src kinase activation. The data indicated that the Src kinase pathway increased pulmonary microvascular permeability following CPB, and the activation of caveolin-1 and VE-cadherin may be involved. Inhibition of this pathway may provide a potential therapy for acute lung injury following cardiac surgery. PMID:26847917

  8. Hypercholesterolemia and microvascular dysfunction: interventional strategies.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Phoebe A; Goodwill, Adam G; James, Milinda E; Brock, Robert W; Frisbee, Jefferson C

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is defined as excessively high plasma cholesterol levels, and is a strong risk factor for many negative cardiovascular events. Total cholesterol levels above 200 mg/dl have repeatedly been correlated as an independent risk factor for development of peripheral vascular (PVD) and coronary artery disease (CAD), and considerable attention has been directed toward evaluating mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia may impact vascular outcomes; these include both results of direct cholesterol lowering therapies and alternative interventions for improving vascular function. With specific relevance to the microcirculation, it has been clearly demonstrated that evolution of hypercholesterolemia is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction, a near-complete abrogation in vascular nitric oxide bioavailability, elevated oxidant stress, and the creation of a strongly pro-inflammatory condition; symptoms which can culminate in profound impairments/alterations to vascular reactivity. Effective interventional treatments can be challenging as certain genetic risk factors simply cannot be ignored. However, some hypercholesterolemia treatment options that have become widely used, including pharmaceutical therapies which can decrease circulating cholesterol by preventing either its formation in the liver or its absorption in the intestine, also have pleiotropic effects with can directly improve peripheral vascular outcomes. While physical activity is known to decrease PVD/CAD risk factors, including obesity, psychological stress, impaired glycemic control, and hypertension, this will also increase circulating levels of high density lipoprotein and improving both cardiac and vascular function. This review will provide an overview of the mechanistic consequences of the predominant pharmaceutical interventions and chronic exercise to treat hypercholesterolemia through their impacts on chronic sub-acute inflammation, oxidative stress, and microvascular structure

  9. Modification of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity by memantine in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress: implications for memory and behavior.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Aidi, Ahmed Amro; Ali, Mohamed Mostafa; Attia, Yasser Mahmoud; Rashed, Laila Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Stress is any condition that impairs the balance of the organism physiologically or psychologically. The response to stress involves several neurohormonal consequences. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its release is increased by stress that predisposes to excitotoxicity in the brain. Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate glutamatergic receptors antagonist and has shown beneficial effect on cognitive function especially in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the work was to investigate memantine effect on memory and behavior in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress with the evaluation of serum markers of stress and the expression of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity. Forty-two male rats were divided into seven groups (six rats/group): control, acute restraint stress, acute restraint stress with Memantine, repeated restraint stress, repeated restraint stress with Memantine and Memantine groups (two subgroups as positive control). Spatial working memory and behavior were assessed by performance in Y-maze. We evaluated serum cortisol, tumor necrotic factor, interleukin-6 and hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, synaptophysin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our results revealed that Memantine improved spatial working memory in repeated stress, decreased serum level of stress markers and modified the hippocampal synaptic plasticity markers in both patterns of stress exposure; in ARS, Memantine upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulated the expression of calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and in repeated restraint stress, it upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and downregulated calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression.

  10. Effect of high altitude and exercise on microvascular parameters in acclimatized subjects.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andreas; Demetz, Florian; Bruegger, Dirk; Schmoelz, Martin; Schroepfer, Sebastian; Martignoni, André; Baschnegger, Heiko; Hoelzl, Josef; Thiel, Manfred; Choukér, Alexander; Peter, Klaus; Gamble, John; Christ, Frank

    2006-02-01

    The role of microvascular fluid shifts in the adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia and its contribution to the pathophysiology of AMS (acute mountain sickness) is unresolved. In a systematic prospective study, we investigated the effects of hypobaric hypoxia and physical exercise alone, and in combination, on microvascular fluid exchange and related factors. We used computer-assisted VCP (venous congestion plethysmography) on the calves of ten altitude-acclimatized volunteers. We investigated the effects of: (i) actively climbing to an altitude of 3196 m, (ii) airlifting these subjects to the same altitude, and (iii) exercise at low altitude. CFC (capillary filtration capacity), Pvi (isovolumetric venous pressure) and Qa (calf blood flow) were assessed before and after each procedure and then repeated after an overnight rest. Measurements of CFC showed no evidence of increased microvascular permeability after any of the procedures. Pvi was significantly decreased (P<0.001) from 20.3+/-4.4 to 8.9+/-4.3 mmHg after active ascent, and was still significantly lower (P=0.009) after overnight rest at high altitude (13.6+/-5.9 mmHg). No such changes were observed after the passive ascent (16.7+/-4.0 mmHg at baseline; 17.3+/-4.5 mmHg after passive ascent; and 19.9+/-5.3 mmHg after overnight rest) or after exercise at low altitude. After the active ascent, Qa was significantly increased. We also found a significant correlation between Qa, Pvi and the number of circulating white blood cells. In conclusion, we found evidence to support the hypothesis that increased microvascular permeability associated with AMS does not occur in acclimatized subjects. We also observed that the microvascular equilibrium pressure (Pvi) fell in inverse relation to the increase in Qa, especially in hypoxic exercise. We hypothesize that this inverse relationship reflects the haemodynamic changes at the microvascular interface, possibly attributable to the flow-induced increases in endothelial surface

  11. Protein kinase A mediates glucagon-like peptide 1-induced nitric oxide production and muscle microvascular recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhenhua; Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Cao, Wenhong

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) causes vasodilation and increases muscle glucose uptake independent of insulin. Recently, we have shown that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature and increases muscle glucose use via a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a major signaling intermediate downstream of GLP-1 receptors. To examine whether PKA mediates GLP-1's microvascular action in muscle, GLP-1 was infused to overnight-fasted male rats for 120 min in the presence or absence of H89, a PKA inhibitor. Hindleg muscle microvascular recruitment and glucose use were determined. GLP-1 infusion acutely increased muscle microvascular blood volume within 30 min without altering microvascular blood flow velocity or blood pressure. This effect persisted throughout the 120-min infusion period, leading to a significant increase in muscle microvascular blood flow. These changes were paralleled with an approximately twofold increase in plasma NO levels and hindleg glucose extraction. Systemic infusion of H89 completely blocked GLP-1-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and increases in NO production and muscle glucose extraction. In cultured endothelial cells, GLP-1 acutely increased PKA activity and stimulated endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation at Ser1177 and NO production. PKA inhibition abolished these effects. In ex vivo studies, perfusion of the distal saphenous artery with GLP-1 induced significant vasorelaxation that was also abolished by pretreatment of the vessels with PKA inhibitor H89. We conclude that GLP-1 recruits muscle microvasculature by expanding microvascular volume and increases glucose extraction in muscle via a PKA/NO-dependent pathway in the vascular endothelium. This may contribute to postprandial glycemic control and complication prevention in diabetes. PMID:23193054

  12. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  13. Predicting plasticity: acute context-dependent changes to vocal performance predict long-term age-dependent changes.

    PubMed

    James, Logan S; Sakata, Jon T

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the factors that predict and guide variation in behavioral change can lend insight into mechanisms of motor plasticity and individual differences in behavior. The performance of adult birdsong changes with age in a manner that is similar to rapid context-dependent changes to song. To reveal mechanisms of vocal plasticity, we analyzed the degree to which variation in the direction and magnitude of age-dependent changes to Bengalese finch song could be predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. Using a repeated-measures design, we found that variation in age-dependent changes to the timing, sequencing, and structure of vocal elements ("syllables") was significantly predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. In particular, the degree to which the duration of intersyllable gaps, syllable sequencing at branch points, and fundamental frequency of syllables within spontaneous [undirected (UD)] songs changed over time was correlated with the degree to which these features changed from UD song to female-directed (FD) song in young-adult finches (FDyoung). As such, the structure of some temporal features of UD songs converged over time onto the structure of FDyoung songs. This convergence suggested that the FDyoung song could serve as a stable target for vocal motor plasticity. Consequently, we analyzed the stability of FD song and found that the temporal structure of FD song changed significantly over time in a manner similar to UD song. Because FD song is considered a state of heightened performance, these data suggest that age-dependent changes could reflect practice-related improvements in vocal motor performance. PMID:26311186

  14. Predicting plasticity: acute context-dependent changes to vocal performance predict long-term age-dependent changes

    PubMed Central

    James, Logan S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that predict and guide variation in behavioral change can lend insight into mechanisms of motor plasticity and individual differences in behavior. The performance of adult birdsong changes with age in a manner that is similar to rapid context-dependent changes to song. To reveal mechanisms of vocal plasticity, we analyzed the degree to which variation in the direction and magnitude of age-dependent changes to Bengalese finch song could be predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. Using a repeated-measures design, we found that variation in age-dependent changes to the timing, sequencing, and structure of vocal elements (“syllables”) was significantly predicted by variation in context-dependent changes. In particular, the degree to which the duration of intersyllable gaps, syllable sequencing at branch points, and fundamental frequency of syllables within spontaneous [undirected (UD)] songs changed over time was correlated with the degree to which these features changed from UD song to female-directed (FD) song in young-adult finches (FDyoung). As such, the structure of some temporal features of UD songs converged over time onto the structure of FDyoung songs. This convergence suggested that the FDyoung song could serve as a stable target for vocal motor plasticity. Consequently, we analyzed the stability of FD song and found that the temporal structure of FD song changed significantly over time in a manner similar to UD song. Because FD song is considered a state of heightened performance, these data suggest that age-dependent changes could reflect practice-related improvements in vocal motor performance. PMID:26311186

  15. Roles of LOX-1 in microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2016-05-01

    Studies from human and animal models with metabolic disease and hypertension highlight atrophic remodeling, reduced lumen size and thinner vascular walls of microvessels with profound density reduction. This impaired vascular response limits the perfusion of peripheral tissues inducing organ damage. These conditions are strongly associated with oxidative stress and in particular with the up-regulation of lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1). Several factors such as cytokines, shear stress, and advanced glycation end-products, especially oxLDL, can up-regulate LOX-1. The activation of this receptor induces the production of adhesion molecules, cytokines and the release of reactive oxygen species via NADPH oxidase. LOX-1 is considered a potent mediator of endothelial dysfunction and it is significantly associated with reduced microvascular endothelium NO-dependent vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Microvascular endothelial cells increased the expression of IL-6 in association with the increased concentration of LDL and its degree of oxidation. Moreover, increased IL-6 levels are associated with up-regulation of LOX-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Another consequence of microvascular inflammation is the generation of small amounts of ROS, similar to those induced by low concentration of oxLDL (<5 μg/mL) which induces capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, through LOX-1 up-regulation. In light of its central role, LOX-1 represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human atherosclerotic diseases and microvascular disorders. PMID:26907636

  16. Microvascular dysfunction in the context of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stirban, Alin

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction in diabetes plays a crucial role in the development of diabetic complications. The skin, as one of the most accessible organs, serves as a model for the investigation of microvascular dysfunction. Several non-invasive, mostly laser-Doppler-based methods have been developed lately to assess microvascular function in the skin. Microvascular functional changes occur even in the prediabetic state and become more complex with overt diabetes, being exacerbated by the presence of peripheral and/or autonomic diabetic neuropathy. The present article aims at shedding light on the implication of endothelial and neurovascular dysfunction in microvascular changes in diabetes, highlighting the contribution of different forms of diabetic neuropathy.

  17. Treatment of hemimasticatory spasm with microvascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Nan; Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Jiao, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disorder characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. As the ideology and pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear, there has been no treatment that could give rise to a good outcome so far. Herein, we tried to use surgical management to cure the disease. Six patients with the disease were included in this study. These patients underwent microvascular decompression of the motor fibers of the trigeminal root. After the operation, all faces of the patients felt relaxed at varied degrees, except for 1 patient. Our study showed that microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve could lead to a better outcome. However, a control study with a large sample is needed before this technique is widely used.

  18. Predictors of Microvascular Invasion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yo-Ichi; Shirabe, Ken; Aishima, Shinichi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    This chapter covers a range of important topics in the evaluation of the microvascular invasion (MVI) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before treatment. The malignant potential of HCC is reflected by the types of MVI such as portal venous (vp), hepatic vein (vv) or bile duct (b) infiltration. The identification of the type of MVI in HCC has a key role in decisions regarding the effective treatment of HCC. Here, we describe the possible and important predictors of MVI in HCC. PMID:26398341

  19. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Ortiz, Sebastian F.; Fradkin, Jamie; Eoh, Joon; Trivero, Jacqueline; Davenport, Matthew; Ginn, Brian; Mao, Hai-Quan; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advances in engineering blood vessels over 1 mm in diameter and the existing wealth of knowledge regarding capillary bed formation, studies for the development of microvasculature, the connecting bridge between them, have been extremely limited so far. Here, we evaluate the use of 3-dimensional (3D) microfibers fabricated by hydrogel electrospinning as templates for microvascular structure formation. We hypothesize that 3D microfibers improve extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition from vascular cells, enabling the formation of freestanding luminal multicellular microvasculature. Compared to 2-dimensional cultures, we demonstrate with confocal microscopy and RT-PCR that fibrin microfibers induce an increased ECM protein deposition by vascular cells, specifically endothelial colony-forming cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells. These ECM proteins comprise different layers of the vascular wall including collagen types I, III, and IV, as well as elastin, fibronectin, and laminin. We further demonstrate the achievement of multicellular microvascular structures with an organized endothelium and a robust multicellular perivascular tunica media. This, along with the increased ECM deposition, allowed for the creation of self-supporting multilayered microvasculature with a distinct circular lumen following fibrin microfiber core removal. This approach presents an advancement toward the development of human microvasculature for basic and translational studies.—Barreto-Ortiz, S. F., Fradkin, J., Eoh, J., Trivero, J., Davenport, M., Ginn, B., Mao, H.-Q., Gerecht, S. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures. PMID:25900808

  20. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  1. [Application of intraoperative microvascular dopplerography in surgical treatment of arterial aneurysm of the brain].

    PubMed

    Hloba, M V; Lytvak, S O

    2013-10-01

    The possibilities and results of the intraoperative microvascular dopplerography application in microsurgical exclusion of the brain arterial aneurysm (BAA) were estimated. The investigation was conducted during operative intervention in 30 patients, suffering hemorrhagic type of the brain acute blood flow disorder as a consequence of the BAA rupture. In an acute period (the first-14th day) 23 patients were operated, in the early restoration period (after 30th day)--7. Intraoperative express estimation of the blood flow have permitted to diagnose and to correct timely some typical technical complications, in particular, noncomplete BAA exclusion from the blood flow, the arterial lumen, containing the clipped aneurysm, stenosing; to reveal the arterial segments vasospasm objectively in the patients, operated on in an acute period of hemorrhage, and to diagnose a reactive spasm during manipulations on the arteries. All the patients, operated on in the early restoration period and 82.6% of patients, operated on in an acute period of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, have had reconvalesced. Application of the microvascular dopplerography secures objectivization, simplifies intraoperative estimation of the BAA radicality and the according arterial segments passability in the operative intervention zone, what promotes reduction of the ischemic complications rate and positively impacts the results of treatment.

  2. Skin microvascular endothelial function as a biomarker in cardiovascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Marcin; Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-01

    Skin microvascular endothelial function is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, and could be therefore considered as a representative vascular bed. However, today, available evidence allows considering skin microvascular endothelial function neither as a diagnostic biomarker nor as a prognostic biomarker in cardiovascular diseases. Large follow-up studies using standardized methods should now be conducted to assess the potential predictive value of skin microvascular function in cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  4. [Erythrocytes and microvascular tone during acute traumatic haemorrhagic shock].

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Biais, M; Delaunay, F; Dubuisson, V; Cassone, O; Siméon, F; Morel, O; Janvier, G

    2013-05-01

    Haemorrhagic shock remains a leading cause of death in trauma patients. The concept of haematologic damage control is gradually taking place in the management of traumatic haemorrhagic shock. It is based primarily on the early implementation of a quality blood transfusion involving erythrocytes, plasmas and platelets transfusion. Red blood cell transfusion is mainly supported by the oxygen carrier properties of erythrocytes. However, it appears that erythrocytes ability to modulate the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in capillary opening and perfusion. Erythrocytes are also actively involved in the processes of hemostasis and coagulation. In this context, it seems difficult to define a threshold of hemoglobin concentration to determine the implementation of a blood transfusion in traumatic haemorrhagic shock.

  5. Transcranial diffuse optical monitoring of microvascular cerebral hemodynamics after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, Peyman; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Dinia, Lavinia; Carrera, David; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Durduran, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke is to reestablish the blood flow to the ischemic region of the brain. However, currently, the local cerebral hemodynamics (microvascular) is almost entirely inaccessible for stroke clinicians at the patient bed-side, and the recanalization of the major cerebral arteries (macrovascular) is the only available measure to evaluate the therapy, which does not always reflect the local conditions. Here we report the case of an ischemic stroke patient whose microvascular cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were monitored by a compact hybrid diffuse optical monitor during thrombolytic therapy. This monitor combined diffuse correlation spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy. The reperfusion assessed by hybrid diffuse optics temporally correlated with the recanalization of the middle cerebral artery (assessed by transcranial-Doppler) and was in agreement with the patient outcome. This study suggests that upon further investigation, diffuse optics might have a potential for bed-side acute stroke monitoring and therapy guidance by providing hemodynamics information at the microvascular level.

  6. Direct ink writing of microvascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Willie

    Nature is replete with examples of embedded microvascular systems that enable efficient fluid flow and distribution for autonomic healing, cooling, and energy harvesting. The ability to incorporate microvascular networks in functional materials systems is therefore both scientifically and technologically important. In this PhD thesis, the direct-write assembly of planar and 3D biomimetic microvascular networks within polymer and hydrogel matrices is demonstrated. In addition, the influence of network design of fluid transport efficiency is characterized. Planar microvascular networks composed of periodic lattices of uniformal microchannels and hierarchical, branching architectures are constructed by direct-write assembly of a fugitive organic ink. Several advancements are required to facilitate their patterning, including pressure valving, dual ink printing, and dynamic pressure variation to allow tunable control of ink deposition. The hydraulic conductance is measured using a high pressure flow meter as a function of network design. For a constant vascular volume and areal coverage, 2- and 4-generation branched architectures that obey Murray's Law exhibited the highest hydraulic conductivity. These experimental observations are in good agreement with predictions made by analytic models. 3D microvascular networks are fabricated by omnidirectional printing a fugitive organic ink into a photopolymerizable hydrogel matrix that is capped with fluid filler of nearly identical composition. Using this approach, 3D networks of arbitrary design can be patterned. After ink deposition is complete, the matrix and fluid filler are chemically cross-linked via UV irradiation, and the ink is removed by liquefication. Aqueous solutions composed of a triblock copolymer of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-polypropylene oxide (PPO)-PEO constitute the materials system of choice due to their thermal- and concentration-dependent phase behavior. Specifically, the fugitive ink consists of a 23 w

  7. Antidepressant-like cognitive and behavioral effects of acute ketamine administration associated with plasticity in the ventral hippocampus to medial prefrontal cortex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jett, Julianne D.; Boley, Angela M.; Girotti, Milena; Shah, Amiksha; Lodge, Daniel J.; Morilak, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Acute low-dose administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects in humans and rodents. Recently, we found that the long-lasting effect of ketamine on the forced swim test requires ventral hippocampal (vHipp) activity at the time of drug administration. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a target of the vHipp dysregulated in depression, is important for cognitive flexibility and response strategy selection. Deficits in cognitive flexibility, the ability to modify thoughts and behaviors in response to changes in the environment, are associated with depression. We have shown that chronic stress impairs cognitive flexibility on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), and induces a shift from active to passive response strategies on the shock-probe defensive burying test (SPDB). Objective In this study, we tested the effects of ketamine on chronic stress-induced changes in cognitive flexibility and coping behavior on the AST and SPDB, respectively. Subsequently, we investigated vHipp-mPFC plasticity as a potential mechanism of ketamine’s therapeutic action. Results Ketamine reversed deficits in cognitive flexibility and restored active coping behavior in chronically stressed rats. Further, high frequency stimulation in the vHipp replicated ketamine’s antidepressant-like effects on the forced swim test and AST, but not on the SPDB. Conclusion These results show that ketamine restores cognitive flexibility and coping response strategy compromised by stress. Activity in the vHipp-mPFC pathway may represent a neural substrate for some of the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine, including cognitive flexibility, but other circuits may mediate the effects of ketamine on coping response strategy. PMID:25986748

  8. Listeriolysin O mediates cytotoxicity against human brain microvascular

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penetration of the brain microvascular endothelial layer is one of the routes L. monocytogenes use to breach the blood-brain barrier. Because host factors in the blood severely limit direct invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by L. monocytogenes, alternative mechanisms m...

  9. Rapid homogeneous endothelialization of high aspect ratio microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Naik, Nisarga; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Haller, Carolyn A; Allen, Mark G; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-08-01

    Microvascularization of an engineered tissue construct is necessary to ensure the nourishment and viability of the hosted cells. Microvascular constructs can be created by seeding the luminal surfaces of microfluidic channel arrays with endothelial cells. However, in a conventional flow-based system, the uniformity of endothelialization of such an engineered microvascular network is constrained by mass transfer of the cells through high length-to-diameter (L/D) aspect ratio microchannels. Moreover, given the inherent limitations of the initial seeding process to generate a uniform cell coating, the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of microfluidic systems demands long culture periods for the formation of confluent cellular microconduits. In this report, we describe the design of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) microvascular constructs with reentrant microchannels that facilitates rapid, spatially homogeneous endothelial cell seeding of a high L/D (2 cm/35 μm; > 550:1) aspect ratio microchannels. MEMS technology was employed for the fabrication of a monolithic, elastomeric, reentrant microvascular construct. Isotropic etching and PDMS micromolding yielded a near-cylindrical microvascular channel array. A 'stretch - seed - seal' operation was implemented for uniform incorporation of endothelial cells along the entire microvascular area of the construct yielding endothelialized microvascular networks in less than 24 h. The feasibility of this endothelialization strategy and the uniformity of cellularization were established using confocal microscope imaging. PMID:26227213

  10. Rapid homogeneous endothelialization of high aspect ratio microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Naik, Nisarga; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Haller, Carolyn A; Allen, Mark G; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-08-01

    Microvascularization of an engineered tissue construct is necessary to ensure the nourishment and viability of the hosted cells. Microvascular constructs can be created by seeding the luminal surfaces of microfluidic channel arrays with endothelial cells. However, in a conventional flow-based system, the uniformity of endothelialization of such an engineered microvascular network is constrained by mass transfer of the cells through high length-to-diameter (L/D) aspect ratio microchannels. Moreover, given the inherent limitations of the initial seeding process to generate a uniform cell coating, the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of microfluidic systems demands long culture periods for the formation of confluent cellular microconduits. In this report, we describe the design of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) microvascular constructs with reentrant microchannels that facilitates rapid, spatially homogeneous endothelial cell seeding of a high L/D (2 cm/35 μm; > 550:1) aspect ratio microchannels. MEMS technology was employed for the fabrication of a monolithic, elastomeric, reentrant microvascular construct. Isotropic etching and PDMS micromolding yielded a near-cylindrical microvascular channel array. A 'stretch - seed - seal' operation was implemented for uniform incorporation of endothelial cells along the entire microvascular area of the construct yielding endothelialized microvascular networks in less than 24 h. The feasibility of this endothelialization strategy and the uniformity of cellularization were established using confocal microscope imaging.

  11. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  12. Microvascular Repair: Post-Angiogenesis Vascular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Amanda J.; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Sullivan, Christopher J.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hoying, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular compromise and the accompanying perfusion deficits cause or complicate a large array of disease conditions and treatment failures. This has prompted the exploration of therapeutic strategies to repair or regenerate vasculatures thereby establishing more competent microcirculatory beds. Growing evidence indicates that an increase in vessel numbers within a tissue does not necessarily promote an increase in tissue perfusion. Effective regeneration of a microcirculation entails the integration of new stable microvessel segments into the network via neovascularization. Beginning with angiogenesis, neovascularization entails an integrated series of vascular activities leading to the formation of a new mature microcirculation and includes vascular guidance and inosculation, vessel maturation, pruning, arterio-venous specification, network patterning, structural adaptation, intussusception, and microvascular stabilization. While the generation of new vessel segments is necessary to expand a network, without the concomitant neovessel remodeling and adaptation processes intrinsic to microvascular network formation, these additional vessel segments give rise to a dysfunctional microcirculation. While many of the mechanisms regulating angiogenesis have been detailed, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms driving post-angiogenesis activities specific to neovascularization has yet to be fully realized, but is necessary in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies for repairing compromised microcirculations as a means to treat disease. PMID:22734666

  13. Effects of radiation therapy in microvascular anastomoses

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, M.P.

    1985-07-01

    The otolaryngologist, as a head and neck surgeon, commonly cares for patients with upper aerodigestive tract malignancies. Therapy of these neoplasms often requires wide excision. One standard reconstructive procedure utilizes pedicled regional flaps, both dermal and myodermal which have some disadvantages. The shortcomings of these pedicled regional flaps have led to the use of the vascularized free flap in certain cases. The occasional case may lead to catastrophe if microanastomoses fail when combined with radiation. Notwithstanding, many surgical series have reported success when radiation has been given. The present investigation was undertaken to assess the effects of radiation therapy on microvascular anastomoses when radiation is administered pre- or postoperatively or when nonradiated tissue is transferred to an irradiated recipient site. These effects were observed serially in an experimental rat model using a tubed superficial epigastric flap that adequately reflected tissue viability and vascular patency. The histologic changes were then noted over a three month period after completion of both radiation and surgery. This study adds credence to the observation of the lack of deleterious effects of radiation on experimental microvascular anastomotic patency whether the radiation is given before or after surgery or if radiated tissue is approximated to nonradiated vessels.

  14. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  15. Microvascularization on collared peccary placenta: a microvascular cast study [corrected] in late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tatiana Carlesso; Oliveira, Moacir Franco; Dantzer, Vibeke; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-07-01

    The microvascularization of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) placenta was studied by vascular casts and immunolocalization of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin, to identify the three dimensional organization and vascular flow interrelation in the microvasculature between the maternal and fetal compartments of the placentae. The immunolocalization of vimentin in the vascular endothelium and in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels showed indented capillaries along the uterine epithelium and the trophoblast at the sides of complementary maternal and fetal microfolds, or rugae. This confers the three-dimensional structure observed in vascular casts. On the maternal side, casts demonstrated uterine folds coated by with primary and secondary ridges, and by areolae dispersed between these ridges. The arteriole runs through the center/middle of ridges, branching at the top into a microvascular network wall in a basket-like fashion. At the base of these baskets venules were formed. On the fetal side, arterioles branched centrally in the fetal rugae into a capillary network in a bulbous form, complementary to the opposite maternal depressions forming the baskets. At the base of the bulbous protrusions, the fetal venules arise. The blood vessel orientation in the materno-fetal interface of the placentae of collared peccaries suggests a blood flow pattern of the type countercurrent to cross current. The same pattern has been reported in domestic swine demonstrating that, even after 38 million years, the Tayassuidae and Suidae families exhibit similar placental morphology, which is here characterized at the microvascular level.

  16. Self-healing materials with microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Toohey, Kathleen S; Sottos, Nancy R; Lewis, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey S; White, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Self-healing polymers composed of microencapsulated healing agents exhibit remarkable mechanical performance and regenerative ability, but are limited to autonomic repair of a single damage event in a given location. Self-healing is triggered by crack-induced rupture of the embedded capsules; thus, once a localized region is depleted of healing agent, further repair is precluded. Re-mendable polymers can achieve multiple healing cycles, but require external intervention in the form of heat treatment and applied pressure. Here, we report a self-healing system capable of autonomously repairing repeated damage events. Our bio-inspired coating-substrate design delivers healing agent to cracks in a polymer coating via a three-dimensional microvascular network embedded in the substrate. Crack damage in the epoxy coating is healed repeatedly. This approach opens new avenues for continuous delivery of healing agents for self-repair as well as other active species for additional functionality.

  17. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  18. Phase transition of the microvascular network architecture in human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio; Traversi, Claudio; Cattaneo, Ruggero; De Felice, Claudia; Monaco, Annalisa; Tosi, Gianmarco; Parrini, Stefano; Latini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the microvascular pattern in acquired or genetic diseases in humans. The lower gingival and vestibular oral mucosa, as well as the optic nerve head, was chosen to characterize the vascular pattern complexity due to the simple accessibility and visibility Local fractal dimensions, fractal dimension of the minimum path and Lempel-Ziv complexity have been used as operational numerical tools to characterize the microvascular networks. In the normal healthy subjects microvascular networks show nonlinear values corresponding to the complexity of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, while in several acquired or genetic diseases they are approaching the ones of an invasion percolation model. PMID:23193796

  19. Endotoxin, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor cause neutrophil-dependent microvascular leakage in postcapillary venules.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, E. S.; Ulich, T. R.

    1992-01-01

    Acute inflammation is characterized mainly by the egress of neutrophils from postcapillary venules and by increased vascular permeability leading to the formation of edema. The microvascular site of increased vascular permeability in local acute inflammatory lesions was investigated after the injection of endotoxin (LPS), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) into the dermis overlying the cremasteric and rectus abdominis muscles of rats. LPS caused leakage of colloidal carbon peaking at 3 to 4 hours at the level of the postcapillary venules and capillary leak was variably observed at later time points. IL-1 and TNF also caused postcapillary venular leakage. IL-1 was as potent as LPS and more so than TNF. The microvascular leak caused by LPS, IL-1, and TNF was accompanied by the tissue accumulation of neutrophils, and was neutrophil-dependent because LPS, IL-1, and TNF did not cause vascular labelling in neutropenic rats. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1546745

  20. Differential effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on microvascular recruitment and glucose metabolism in short- and long-term insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A; Rattigan, Stephen; Jeppesen, Jacob F; Lundsgaard, Anne-Marie; Holst, Jens J; Kiens, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has potent effects on blood flow distribution through the microcirculation in healthy humans and rats. A high fat diet induces impairments in insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment (MVR) and muscle glucose uptake, and here we examined whether this could be reversed by GLP-1. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, microvascular recruitment was assessed by continuous real-time imaging of gas-filled microbubbles in the microcirculation after acute (5 days) and prolonged (8 weeks) high fat diet (HF)-induced insulin resistance in rats. A euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (3 mU min−1 kg−1), with or without a co-infusion of GLP-1 (100 pmol l−1), was performed in anaesthetized rats. Consumption of HF attenuated the insulin-mediated MVR in both 5 day and 8 week HF interventions which was associated with a 50% reduction in insulin-mediated glucose uptake compared to controls. Acute administration of GLP-1 restored the normal microvascular response by increasing the MVR after both 5 days and 8 weeks of HF intervention (P < 0.05). This effect of GLP-1 was associated with a restoration of both whole body insulin sensitivity and increased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by 90% (P < 0.05) after 5 days of HF but not after 8 weeks of HF. The present study demonstrates that GLP-1 increases MVR in rat skeletal muscle and can reverse early stages of high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in vivo. Key points Acute glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infusion reversed the high fat diet-induced microvascular insulin resistance that occurred after both 5 days and 8 weeks of a high fat diet intervention. When GLP-1 was co-infused with insulin it had overt effects on whole body insulin sensitivity as well as insulin-mediated skeletal muscle glucose uptake after 5 days of a high fat diet, but not after 8 weeks of high fat diet intervention. Acute GLP-1 infusion did not have an additive

  1. Microvascular temporalis fascia transfer for penile girth enhancement.

    PubMed

    Küçükçelebi, A; Ertaş, N M; Aydin, A; Eroğlu, A; Ozmen, E; Velidedeoğlu, H

    2001-07-01

    The authors report a 44-year-old man with inadequate penile girth that caused psychological problems. Using microvascular temporalis fascia transfer, they achieved satisfactory penile girth enhancement based on reliable vascularity in a single stage. PMID:11756810

  2. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  3. Microvascular complications and diabetic retinopathy: recent advances and future implications.

    PubMed

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-03-01

    Retinal microvascular alterations have been observed during diabetic retinopathy (DR) due to the retinal susceptibility towards subtle pathological alterations. Therefore, retinal microvascular pathology is essential to understand the nature of retinal degenerations during DR. In this review, the role of retinal microvasculature complications during progression of DR, along with recent efforts to normalize such alterations for better therapeutic outcome, will be underlined. In addition, current therapeutics and future directions for advancement of standard treatment for DR patients will be discussed. PMID:23464520

  4. Consumer hazards of plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, G S

    1976-01-01

    The modern consumer is exposed to a wide variety of plastic and rubber products in his day to day life: at home, work, school, shopping, recreation and play, and transport. A large variety of toxic sequellae have resulted from untoward exposures by many different routes: oral, dermal, inhalation, and parenteral. Toxic change may result from the plastic itself, migration of unbound components and additives, chemical decomposition or toxic pyrolysis products. The type of damage may involve acute poisoning, chronic organ damage, reproductive disorders, and carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic episodes. Typical examples for all routes are cited along with the activites of Canadian regulatory agencies to reduce both the incidence and severity of plastic-induced disease. PMID:1026409

  5. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD. PMID:24637920

  6. Neuropathological analysis of lacunes and microvascular lesions in late-onset depression

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Micaela; Gold, Gabriel; Kövari, Enikö; Herrmann, François R.; Hof, Patrick R.; Bouras, Constantin; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2010-01-01

    Aims Previous neuropathological studies documented that small vascular and microvascular pathology is associated with cognitive decline. More recently, we showed that thalamic and basal ganglia lacunes are associated with post-stroke depression and may affect emotional regulation. The present study examines whether this is also the case for late-onset depression. Methods We performed a detailed analysis of small macrovascular and microvascular pathology in the postmortem brains of 38 patients with late-onset major depression (LOD) and 29 healthy elderly controls. A clinical diagnosis of LOD was established while the subjects were alive using the DSM-IV criteria. Additionally, we retrospectively reviewed all charts for the presence of clinical criteria of vascular depression. Neuropathological evaluation included bilateral semiquantitative assessment of lacunes, deep white matter and periventricular demyelination, cortical microinfarcts and both focal and diffuse gliosis. The association between vascular burden and LOD was investigated using Fisher’s exact test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Results Neither the existence of lacunes nor the presence of microvascular ischaemic lesions was related to occurrence of LOD. Similarly, there was no relationship between vascular lesion scores and LOD. This was also the case within the subgroup of LOD patients fulfilling the clinical criteria for vascular depression. Conclusions Our results challenge the vascular depression hypothesis by showing that neither deep white matter nor periventricular demyelination is associated with LOD. In conjunction with our previous observations in stroke patients, they also imply that the impact of lacunes on mood may be significant solely in the presence of acute brain compromise. PMID:20609111

  7. Scalp reconstruction by microvascular free tissue transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Furnas, H.; Lineaweaver, W.C.; Alpert, B.S. )

    1990-05-01

    We report on a series of patients with scalp defects who have been treated with a variety of free flaps, spanning the era of microvascular free tissue transfer from its incipient stages to the present. Between 1971 and 1987, 18 patients underwent scalp reconstruction with 21 free flaps: 11 latissimus dorsi, 3 scalp transfers between identical twins, 3 groin, one combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior, two serratus anterior, and one omentum. These flaps were used to cover scalp defects resulting from burns, trauma, radiation, and tumors in patients ranging from 7 to 79 years of age. Follow-up has ranged from 3 weeks to 7 years. All of our flaps survived and covered complex defects, many of which had failed more conservative attempts at cover. One patient received radiation therapy to his flap without unfavorable sequelae. This experience began with a pioneering omental flap and includes cutaneous and muscle flaps. The latissimus dorsi is our first choice for free flap reconstruction of extensive, complicated scalp wounds because of its large size, predictable blood supply, ease of harvesting, and provision of excellent vascularity to compromised beds.

  8. Influence of silicone sheets on microvascular anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hoang Nguyen, The; Kloeppel, Marcus; Hoehnke, Christoph; Staudenmaier, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    The use of silicone products combined with free flap transfer is well established in reconstructive surgery. We determined the risk of thrombosis as a result of direct contact between the silicone sheet and the point of microanastomosis. We performed microvascular surgery in 24 female Chinchilla Bastard rabbits weighing 3500 to 4000 g using two groups: Group 1 (n = 12), microanastomosis directly in contact with silicone sheets; and Group 2 (n = 12), microanastomosis protected by a 2 x 3 x 1-cm muscle cuff before being placed in contact with the silicone. We assessed flow-through of the microanastomosis by selective microangiography and histology at 1 and 3 weeks. All microanastomoses in Group 1 were occluded by postoperative thromboses, whereas all microanastomoses in Group 2 had adequate flow-through. Histologic analysis revealed thromboses in Group 1 formed from collagenous bundles of fiber securely attached to the intraluminal wall of the vessel. Three weeks after the procedure, these thromboses were canalized by varying small vessels. In Group 2, a slight luminal stenosis with evidence of infiltration of inflammatory cells at the microanastomosis line was observed histologically in all cases. Prefabricated flaps using silicone sheets and muscular cuffs placed around the anastomoses appear to reduce the risk of thrombosis and enhance neovascularization. PMID:18636304

  9. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  11. Joint Effect of Early Microvascular Damage in the Eye & Kidney on Risk of Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Wanfen; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Ong, Peng Guan; Patel, Uptal D; Chow, Khuan Yew; Tai, E Shyong; Ling, Lieng H; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheung, Carol Yim-lui

    2016-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but not all individuals require treatment. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and microalbuminuria reflect early systemic microvascular changes. We examined the joint effect of retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria on CVD risk in an Asian cohort. We conducted a prospective, population-based study. Retinal abnormalities were defined as presence of retinopathy and/or retinal venular widening. Microalbuminuria was defined as urinary albumin: creatinine ratio between 30–300 mg/g. Incident CVD was defined as newly diagnosed clinical stroke, acute myocardial infarction or CVD death. Cox regression models were performed to determine the associations between retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria with risk of CVD, while controlling for established risk factors. 3,496 participants (aged ≥ 40) were free of prevalent CVD. During the follow-up (5.8 years), 126 (3.60%) participants developed CVD. Persons presenting with both retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria were 6.71 times (95% CI, 2.68, 16.79) as likely to have incident CVD compared with those without either abnormalities. There was a significant interaction effect between retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria on incident CVD. Assessment of retinal abnormalities in patients with microalbuminuria may provide additional value in identifying persons at risk of developing CVD. PMID:27273133

  12. Joint Effect of Early Microvascular Damage in the Eye &Kidney on Risk of Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Yip, Wanfen; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Ong, Peng Guan; Patel, Uptal D; Chow, Khuan Yew; Tai, E Shyong; Ling, Lieng H; Wong, Tien Yin; Cheung, Carol Yim-Lui

    2016-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but not all individuals require treatment. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and microalbuminuria reflect early systemic microvascular changes. We examined the joint effect of retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria on CVD risk in an Asian cohort. We conducted a prospective, population-based study. Retinal abnormalities were defined as presence of retinopathy and/or retinal venular widening. Microalbuminuria was defined as urinary albumin: creatinine ratio between 30-300 mg/g. Incident CVD was defined as newly diagnosed clinical stroke, acute myocardial infarction or CVD death. Cox regression models were performed to determine the associations between retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria with risk of CVD, while controlling for established risk factors. 3,496 participants (aged ≥ 40) were free of prevalent CVD. During the follow-up (5.8 years), 126 (3.60%) participants developed CVD. Persons presenting with both retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria were 6.71 times (95% CI, 2.68, 16.79) as likely to have incident CVD compared with those without either abnormalities. There was a significant interaction effect between retinal abnormalities and microalbuminuria on incident CVD. Assessment of retinal abnormalities in patients with microalbuminuria may provide additional value in identifying persons at risk of developing CVD. PMID:27273133

  13. Computational design of microvascular biomimetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Alejandro Marcos

    Biomimetic microvascular materials are increasingly considered for a variety of autonomic healing, cooling and sensing applications. The microvascular material of interest in this work consists of a network of hollow microchannels, with diameters as small as 10 mum, embedded in a polymeric matrix. Recent advances in the manufacturing of this new class of materials have allowed for the creation of very complex 2D and 3D structures. The computational design of such network structures, which is the focus of this work, involves a set of particular challenges, including a large number of design variables (e.g., topology of the network, number of diameters to consider and their sizes) that define the network, and a large number of multidisciplinary objective functions and constraints that drive the optimization process. The computational design tool to be developed must be capable of capturing the trade-off between the different objective and constraint functions, as, for example, networks designed for flow efficiency are likely to have a topology that is very different from those designed for structural integrity or thermal control. In this work, we propose to design these materials using Genetic Algorithms (GAs), the most common methodology within a broader category of Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs). GAs can be combined with a Pareto-selection mechanism to create Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms (MOGAs), which enable the optimization of an arbitrary number of objective functions. As a result, a Pareto-optimal front is obtained, where all candidates are optimal solutions to the optimization problem. Adding a procedure to deal with constraints results in a powerful tool for multi-objective constrained optimization. The method allows the use of discrete variable problems and it does not require any a priori knowledge of the optimal solution. Furthermore, GAs search the entire decision space so the optimal solutions found are likely to be global. The

  14. Bariatric surgery and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sabrina; le Roux, Carel W; Docherty, Neil G

    2014-11-01

    Metabolic dysregulation is the defining characteristic of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and can give rise to microvascular complications, specifically retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Pharmacological targeting of risk factors for microvascular complications can yield therapeutic gains, particularly in relation to retinopathy and nephropathy. Bariatric surgery is superior to intensified pharmacotherapy in relation to glycaemic control and can remediate dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Consequently, evidence of the effect of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications is now emerging in the literature. Examination of the recent published evidence base (covering the period 2011-2014) on the effects of bariatric surgery on microvascular complications reveals further evidence supportive of the efficacy of bariatric surgery in preventing the incidence and progression of albuminuria and arresting renal functional decline. Data on retinopathy are more ambivalent potentially representing the potential in some cases for a degree of surgery associated reactive hypoglycaemia to detract from the benefits of amelioration of hyperglycaemia. A significant gap in the literature remains in relation to the effects of surgery on diabetic neuropathy. Overall, there is a pressing need for prospective randomised controlled trials examining long-term microvascular outcomes following bariatric surgery in patients with T2DM.

  15. Brain microvascular function during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, H.R.; Husum, B.; Waaben, J.; Andersen, K.; Andersen, L.I.; Gefke, K.; Kaarsen, A.L.; Gjedde, A.

    1987-11-01

    Emboli in the brain microvasculature may inhibit brain activity during cardiopulmonary bypass. Such hypothetical blockade, if confirmed, may be responsible for the reduction of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose observed in animals subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass. In previous studies of cerebral blood flow during bypass, brain microcirculation was not evaluated. In the present study in animals (pigs), reduction of the number of perfused capillaries was estimated by measurements of the capillary diffusion capacity for hydrophilic tracers of low permeability. Capillary diffusion capacity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose were measured simultaneously by the integral method, different tracers being used with different circulation times. In eight animals subjected to normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and seven subjected to hypothermic bypass, cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate for glucose, and capillary diffusion capacity decreased significantly: cerebral blood flow from 63 to 43 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 34 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia and cerebral metabolic rate for glucose from 43.0 to 23.0 mumol/100 gm/min in normothermia and to 14.1 mumol/100 gm/min in hypothermia. The capillary diffusion capacity declined markedly from 0.15 to 0.03 ml/100 gm/min in normothermia but only to 0.08 ml/100 gm/min in hypothermia. We conclude that the decrease of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose during normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass is caused by interruption of blood flow through a part of the capillary bed, possibly by microemboli, and that cerebral blood flow is an inadequate indicator of capillary blood flow. Further studies must clarify why normal microvascular function appears to be preserved during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. Fifty Years of Innovation in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Marcus, Hani J; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Hettiaratchy, Shehan

    2016-01-01

    Background Innovation has molded the current landscape of plastic surgery. However, documentation of this process only exists scattered throughout the literature as individual articles. The few attempts made to profile innovation in plastic surgery have been narrative, and therefore qualitative and inherently biased. Through the implementation of a novel innovation metric, this work aims to identify and characterise the most prevalent innovations in plastic surgery over the last 50 years. Methods Patents and publications related to plastic surgery (1960 to 2010) were retrieved from patent and MEDLINE databases, respectively. The most active patent codes were identified and grouped into technology areas, which were subsequently plotted graphically against publication data. Expert-derived technologies outside of the top performing patents areas were additionally explored. Results Between 1960 and 2010, 4,651 patents and 43,118 publications related to plastic surgery were identified. The most active patent codes were grouped under reconstructive prostheses, implants, instruments, non-invasive techniques, and tissue engineering. Of these areas and other expert-derived technologies, those currently undergoing growth include surgical instruments, implants, non-invasive practices, transplantation and breast surgery. Innovations related to microvascular surgery, liposuction, tissue engineering, lasers and prostheses have all plateaued. Conclusions The application of a novel metric for evaluating innovation quantitatively outlines the natural history of technologies fundamental to the evolution of plastic surgery. Analysis of current innovation trends provides some insight into which technology domains are the most active. PMID:27019807

  17. Polysialic Acid Acute Depletion Induces Structural Plasticity in Interneurons and Impairs the Excitation/Inhibition Balance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Pérez-Rando, Marta; Vidueira, Sandra; Nacher, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is affected in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and major depression. Recent studies suggest that imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory activity (E/I) may be responsible for this cortical dysfunction and therefore, may underlie the core symptoms of these diseases. This E/I imbalance seems to be correlated with alterations in the plasticity of interneurons but there is still scarce information on the mechanisms that may link these phenomena. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a good candidate, because it modulates the neuronal plasticity of interneurons and its expression is altered in schizophrenia and major depression. To address this question, we have developed an in vitro model using mPFC organotypic cultures of transgenic mice displaying fluorescent spiny interneurons. After enzymatic depletion of PSA, the spine density of interneurons, the number of synaptic puncta surrounding pyramidal neuron somata and the E/I ratio were strongly affected. These results point to the polysialylation of NCAM as an important factor in the maintenance of E/I balance and the structural plasticity of interneurons. This may be particularly relevant for better understanding the etiology of schizophrenia and major depression. PMID:27445697

  18. Free and microvascular bone grafting in the irradiated dog mandible

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, D.E.; Lorente, C.A.; Handren, J.H. Jr.; Young, J.; Donoff, R.B.; May, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Microvascular and free rib grafts were placed in 4.5 cm defects in an edentate mandibular body defect 18 to 28 days after completion of 50 Gy of irradiation from a /sup 60/Co source. The animals were sacrificed from two to forty weeks postoperatively and evaluated clinically, radiographically, and histologically. There was a marked difference in the alveolar mucosal viability with the two grafts. Mucosal dehiscence was not observed over any of the microvascular grafts, but was present in seven-eighths of the free grafts. Union of the microvascular bone graft to the host bone occurred within six weeks. In contrast, after six weeks the free graft was sequestered in all the animals. An unexpected finding with both types of graft was the marked subperiosteal bone formation. This bone appeared to be derived from the host bed, stabilizing and bridging the defects bilaterally. The results suggest that radiated periosteum may play an important role in osteogenesis.

  19. Regional cutaneous microvascular flow responses during gravitational and LBNP stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Murthy, Gita; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the regional variability of local hydrostatic pressures, microvascular flow responses to gravitational stress probably vary along the length of the body. Although these differences in local autoregulation have been observed previously during whole-body tilting, they have not been investigated during application of artificial gravitational stresses, such as lower body negative pressure or high gravity centrifugation. Although these stresses can create equivalent G-levels at the feet, they result in distinct distributions of vascular transmural pressure along the length of the body, and should consequently elicit different magnitudes and distributions of microvascular response. In the present study, the effects of whole-body tilting and lower body negative pressure on the level and distribution of microvascular flows within skin along the length of the body were compared.

  20. Vascular grafts in microvascular surgery. An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Marrangoni, A.G.; Marcelli, G.; Culig, M.; Simone, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    The patency of microvascular grafts depends on the luminal diameter, which is determined by the amount of fibrin and platelets deposited on the intraluminal surface and the anastomotic site, and the extent of pseudointimal formation. An experimental microvascular model in rats has been developed in our laboratory using Indium-111-labeled platelets to measure the amount of deposition on grafts inserted into the infrarenal aorta. This study was designed to assess the patency rates in these grafts and the pathologic maturation as determined by light and electron microscopy. Our study suggests that substantial patency rates can be achieved in aspirin-treated rats, although there was little influence on the pathologic maturation. Indium-111 oxine-labeled platelets can be used to document platelet aggregation, and the technique can be a valuable adjunct in the study of microvascular grafts.

  1. Citrulline does not enhance blood flow, microvascular circulation, or myofibrillar protein synthesis in elderly men at rest or following exercise.

    PubMed

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Cotie, Lisa M; MacDonald, Maureen J; Mitchell, Cameron J; Prior, Todd; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2014-07-01

    Aging is associated with anabolic resistance, a reduced sensitivity of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) to postprandial hyperaminoacidemia, particularly with low protein doses. Impairments in postprandial skeletal muscle blood flow and/or microvascular perfusion with hyperaminoacidemia and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to anabolic resistance. We examined whether providing citrulline, a precursor for arginine and nitric oxide synthesis, would increase arterial blood flow, skeletal muscle microvascular perfusion, MPS, and signaling through mTORC1. Twenty-one elderly males (65-80 yr) completed acute unilateral resistance exercise prior to being assigned to ingest a high dose (45 g) of whey protein (WHEY) or a low dose (15 g) of whey protein with 10 g of citrulline (WHEY + CIT) or with 10 g of nonessential amino acids (WHEY + NEAA). A primed, continuous infusion of L-[ring-(13)C6] phenylalanine with serial muscle biopsies was used to measure MPS and protein phosphorylation, whereas ultrasound was used to measure microvascular circulation under basal and postprandial conditions in both a rested (FED) and exercised (EX-FED) leg. Argininemia was greater in WHEY + CIT vs. WHEY and WHEY + NEAA from 30 to 300 min postexercise (P < 0.001), but there were no treatment differences in blood flow or microvascular perfusion (all P > 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6K-Thr(389) was greater in WHEY vs. WHEY + NEAA (P = 0.02). Postprandial MPS was greater in WHEY vs. WHEY + CIT and WHEY + NEAA under both FED (WHEY: ~128%; WHEY + CIT: ~56%; WHEY + NEAA: ~38%) and EX-FED (WHEY: ~251%; WHEY + CIT: ~124%; WHEY + NEAA: ~108%) conditions (P = 0.003). Citrulline coingestion with a low quantity of protein was ineffective in augmenting the anabolic properties of protein compared with nonessential amino acids.

  2. Microvascular permeability changes might explain cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-04-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade--alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability--is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions. PMID:24808788

  3. Microvascular Permeability Changes Might Explain Cardiac Tamponade after Alcohol Septal Ablation for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-01-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade—alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability—is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions. PMID:24808788

  4. Thermal provocation to evaluate microvascular reactivity in human skin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With increased interest in predictive medicine, development of a relatively noninvasive technique that can improve prediction of major clinical outcomes has gained considerable attention. Current tests that are the target of critical evaluation, such as flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery and pulse-wave velocity, are specific to the larger conduit vessels. However, evidence is mounting that functional changes in the microcirculation may be an early sign of globalized microvascular dysfunction. Thus development of a test of microvascular reactivity that could be used to evaluate cardiovascular risk or response to treatment is an exciting area of innovation. This mini-review is focused on tests of microvascular reactivity to thermal stimuli in the cutaneous circulation. The skin may prove to be an ideal site for evaluation of microvascular dysfunction due to its ease of access and growing evidence that changes in skin vascular reactivity may precede overt clinical signs of disease. Evaluation of the skin blood flow response to locally applied heat has already demonstrated prognostic utility, and the response to local cooling holds promise in patients in whom cutaneous disorders are present. Whether either of these tests can be used to predict cardiovascular morbidity or mortality in a clinical setting requires further evaluation. PMID:20507974

  5. Xenobiotic Particle Exposure and Microvascular Endpoints: A Call to Arms

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; McCawley, Michael; Knuckles, Travis L.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenobiotic particles can be considered in two genres: air pollution particulate matter and engineered nanoparticles. Particle exposures can occur in the greater environment, the workplace, and our homes. The majority of research in this field has, justifiably, focused on pulmonary reactions and outcomes. More recent investigations indicate that cardiovascular effects are capable of correlating with established mortality and morbidity epidemiological data following particle exposures. While the preliminary and general cardiovascular toxicology has been defined, the mechanisms behind these effects, specifically within the microcirculation, are largely unexplored. Therefore, the purpose of this review is several fold: first, a historical background on toxicological aspects of particle research is presented. Second, essential definitions, terminology, and techniques that may be unfamiliar to the microvascular scientist will be discussed. Third, the most current concepts and hypotheses driving cardiovascular research in this field will be reviewed. Lastly, potential future directions for the microvascular scientist will be suggested. Collectively speaking, microvascular research in the particle exposure field represents far more than a “niche”. The immediate demand for basic, translational, and clinical studies is high and diverse. Microvascular scientists at all career stages are strongly encouraged to expand their research interests to include investigations associated with particle exposures. PMID:21951337

  6. Targeting brain microvascular endothelial cells: a therapeutic approach to neuroprotection against stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qi-jin; Tao, Hong; Wang, Xin; Li, Ming-chang

    2015-01-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells form the interface between nervous tissue and circulating blood, and regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Brain microvascular endothelial cells differ from peripheral endothelial cells with regards expression of specific ion transporters and receptors, and contain fewer fenestrations and pinocytotic vesicles. Brain microvascular endothelial cells also synthesize several factors that influence blood vessel function. This review describes the morphological characteristics and functions of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and summarizes current knowledge regarding changes in brain microvascular endothelial cells during stroke progression and therapies. Future studies should focus on identifying mechanisms underlying such changes and developing possible neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. PMID:26807131

  7. Pericyte abundance affects sucrose permeability in cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Hacking, Cindy

    2005-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and metabolic barrier that restricts diffusion of blood-borne substances into brain. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are used to characterize this structure, examine mechanisms of damage and repair and measure permeability of test substances. The core component of in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier is brain microvascular endothelial cells. We cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMEC) from isolated rat cortex microvessels. After 2-14 days in vitro (DIV), immunohistochemistry of these cells showed strong labeling for zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein expressed in endothelial cells. Pericytes were also present in these cultures, as determined by expression of alpha-actin. The present study was performed to test different cell isolation methods and to compare the resulting cell cultures for abundance of pericytes and for blood-brain barrier function, as assessed by 14C-sucrose flux. Two purification strategies were used. First, microvessels were preabsorbed onto uncoated plastic for 4 h, then unattached microvessels were transferred to coated culture ware. Second, microvessels were incubated with an antibody to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) precoupled to magnetic beads, and a magnetic separation procedure was performed. Our results indicate that immunopurification, but not preadsorption, was an effective method to purify microvessels and reduce pericyte abundance in the resulting cultures. This purification significantly reduced 14C-sucrose fluxes across cell monolayers. These data indicate that pericytes can interfere with the development of blood-brain barrier properties in in vitro models that utilize primary cultures of RBMECs.

  8. Real-time 3D Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography guided microvascular anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, W. P. A.; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis is considered to be the foundation of plastic and reconstructive surgery, hand surgery, transplant surgery, vascular surgery and cardiac surgery. In the last two decades innovative techniques, such as vascular coupling devices, thermo-reversible poloxamers and suture-less cuff have been introduced. Intra-operative surgical guidance using a surgical imaging modality that provides in-depth view and 3D imaging can improve outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work we performed a proof-of-concept evaluation study of OCT as an assisted intraoperative and post-operative imaging modality for microvascular anastomosis of rodent femoral vessels. The OCT imaging modality provided lateral resolution of 12 μm and 3.0 μm axial resolution in air and 0.27 volume/s imaging speed, which could provide the surgeon with clearly visualized vessel lumen wall and suture needle position relative to the vessel during intraoperative imaging. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated phase-resolved Doppler OCT (PRDOCT) imaging of the surgical site was performed as a post-operative evaluation of the anastomosed vessels and to visualize the blood flow and thrombus formation. This information could help surgeons improve surgical precision in this highly challenging anastomosis of rodent vessels with diameter less than 0.5 mm. Our imaging modality could not only detect accidental suture through the back wall of lumen but also promptly diagnose and predict thrombosis immediately after reperfusion. Hence, real-time OCT can assist in decision-making process intra-operatively and avoid post-operative complications.

  9. A Novel Microvascular Flow Technique: Initial Results in Thyroids.

    PubMed

    Machado, Priscilla; Segal, Sharon; Lyshchik, Andrej; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the flow imaging capabilities of a new prototype ultrasound (US) image processing technique (superb micro-vascular imaging [SMI]; Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) for depiction of microvascular flow in normal thyroid tissue and thyroid nodules compared with standard color and power Doppler US imaging.Ten healthy volunteers and 22 patients, with a total of 25 thyroid nodules, scheduled for US-guided fine needle aspiration were enrolled in this prospective study. Subjects underwent US examination consisting of grayscale, color and power Doppler imaging (CDI and PDI) followed by color and monochrome SMI and pulsed Doppler. SMI is a novel, microvascular flow imaging mode implemented on the Aplio 500 US system (Toshiba). SMI uses advanced clutter suppression to extract flow signals from large to small vessels and depicts this information at high frame rates as a color overlay image or as a monochrome map of flow. Two radiologists independently scored still images and digital clips for overall flow detection, vessel branching details and noise on a visual-analog scale of 1 (worst) to 10 (best).For the volunteers SMI visualized microvasculature with significantly lower velocity than CDI and PDI (P < 0.012). In all thyroid nodules, SMI demonstrated microvascular flow with significantly higher image scores and provided better depiction of the vessel branching details compared with CDI and PDI (P < 0.0001). Clutter noise was significantly higher in monochrome SMI mode than in the other modes, including color SMI (P < 0.001).The novel SMI mode consistently improved the depiction of thyroid microvascular flow compared with standard CDI and PDI.

  10. A Novel Microvascular Flow Technique: Initial Results in Thyroids.

    PubMed

    Machado, Priscilla; Segal, Sharon; Lyshchik, Andrej; Forsberg, Flemming

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the flow imaging capabilities of a new prototype ultrasound (US) image processing technique (superb micro-vascular imaging [SMI]; Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) for depiction of microvascular flow in normal thyroid tissue and thyroid nodules compared with standard color and power Doppler US imaging.Ten healthy volunteers and 22 patients, with a total of 25 thyroid nodules, scheduled for US-guided fine needle aspiration were enrolled in this prospective study. Subjects underwent US examination consisting of grayscale, color and power Doppler imaging (CDI and PDI) followed by color and monochrome SMI and pulsed Doppler. SMI is a novel, microvascular flow imaging mode implemented on the Aplio 500 US system (Toshiba). SMI uses advanced clutter suppression to extract flow signals from large to small vessels and depicts this information at high frame rates as a color overlay image or as a monochrome map of flow. Two radiologists independently scored still images and digital clips for overall flow detection, vessel branching details and noise on a visual-analog scale of 1 (worst) to 10 (best).For the volunteers SMI visualized microvasculature with significantly lower velocity than CDI and PDI (P < 0.012). In all thyroid nodules, SMI demonstrated microvascular flow with significantly higher image scores and provided better depiction of the vessel branching details compared with CDI and PDI (P < 0.0001). Clutter noise was significantly higher in monochrome SMI mode than in the other modes, including color SMI (P < 0.001).The novel SMI mode consistently improved the depiction of thyroid microvascular flow compared with standard CDI and PDI. PMID:25900162

  11. Plastic condoms.

    PubMed

    1968-01-01

    Only simple equipment, simple technology and low initial capital investment are needed in their manufacture. The condoms can be made by people who were previously unskilled or only semi-skilled workers. Plastic condoms differ from those made of latex rubber in that the nature of the plastic film allows unlimited shelf-life. Also, the plastic has a higher degree of lubricity than latex rubber; if there is a demand for extra lubrication in a particular market, this can be provided. Because the plastic is inert, these condoms need not be packaged in hermetically sealed containers. All these attributes make it possible to put these condoms on the distributors' shelves in developing countries competitively with rubber condoms. The shape of the plastic condom is based on that of the lamb caecum, which has long been used as luxury-type condom. The plastic condom is made from plastic film (ethylene ethyl acrilate) of 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) thickness. In addition, a rubber ring is provided and sealed into the base of the condom for retention during coitus. The advantage of the plastic condom design and the equipment on which it is made is that production can be carried out either in labour-intensive economy or with varying degrees of mechanization and automation. The uniform, finished condom if made using previously untrained workers. Training of workers can be done in a matter of hours on the two machines which are needed to produce and test the condoms. The plastic film is provided on a double wound roll, and condom blanks are prepared by means of a heat-sealing die on the stamping machine. The rubber rings are united to the condom blanks on an assembly machine, which consists of a mandrel and heat-sealing equipment to seal the rubber ring to the base of the condom. Built into the assembly machine is a simple air-testing apparatus that can detect the smallest pinhole flaw in a condom. The manufacturing process is completed by unravelling the condom from the assembly

  12. Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction and Microvascular Angina: A Systematic Review of Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Marinescu, Mark A; Löffler, Adrián I.; Ouellette, Michelle; Smith, Lavone; Kramer, Christopher M.; Bourque, Jamieson

    2015-01-01

    Angina without coronary artery disease (CAD) has substantial morbidity and is present in 10–30% of patients undergoing angiography. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is present in 50–65% of these patients. The optimal treatment of this cohort is undefined. We performed a systematic review to evaluate treatment strategies for objectively defined CMD in the absence of CAD. We included studies assessing therapy in human subjects with angina and coronary flow reserve (CFR) or myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) <2.5 by positron emission tomography (PET), cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), dilution methods, or intracoronary Doppler in the absence of coronary artery stenosis ≥50% or structural heart disease. Only 8 articles met strict inclusion criteria. The articles were heterogeneous, using different treatments, end-points, and definitions of CMD. Small sample sizes severely limit the power of these studies, with an average of 11 patients per analysis. Studies evaluating, sildenafil, quinapril, estrogen, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) application demonstrated benefits in their respective endpoints. No benefit was found with L-arginine, doxazosin, pravastatin, and diltiazem. Our systematic review highlights that there is little data to support therapies for CMD. We assess the data meeting rigorous inclusion criteria and review the related but excluded literature. We additionally describe the next steps needed to address this research gap, including a standardized definition of CMD, routine assessment of CMD in studies of chest pain without obstructive CAD, and specific therapy assessment in the population with confirmed CMD. PMID:25677893

  13. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  14. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  15. Regional cutaneous microvascular flow responses during gravitational and LBNP stresses.

    PubMed

    Breit, G A; Watenpaugh, D E; Ballard, R E; Murthy, G; Hargens, A R

    1993-01-01

    The most significant cardiovascular event during the transition to microgravity is the redistribution of vascular transmural pressures that results from the loss of hydrostatic gradients along the length of the body. The well-documented effects of this redistribution include facial venous engorgement, headache, and a significant decrease in leg volume. These effects predominantly represent bulk fluid volume shifts, especially in the venous macro- and microcirculation, where volume is a direct function of pressure, related by the mechanical compliance of the vascular compartment. When considering the effect of gravitational pressure alterations on microcirculatory blood flow and volume, however, this direct monotonic relationship no longer applies. Regional microvascular perfusion is largely a function of local arteriolar tone, which is subject to a variety of central and local controls. Lower body venous pooling during application of footward gravitational stress unloads arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, increasing sympathetic arteriolar tone to elicit vasoconstriction and a general decrease in microvascular perfusion. The same stimulus also triggers an increase in the levels of circulating vasoactive hormones, such as norepinephrine and angiotensin II, further augmenting arteriolar tone. Vasomotor tone is also mediated by local mechanisms such as myogenic autoregulation and veno-arteriolar reflexes, which enhance microvascular tone in response to elevated local arteriolar and venular pressure, respectively. Due to the regional variability of local hydrostatic pressures, microvascular flow responses to gravitational stress probably vary along the length of the body. Although these differences in local autoregulation have been observed previously during whole-body tilting, they have not been investigated during application of artificial gravitational stresses, such as lower body negative pressure (LBNP) or +Gz centrifugation. Although these stresses can

  16. Platelets, acting in part via P-selectin, mediate cytomegalovirus-induced microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khoretonenko, Mikhail V; Brunson, Jerry L; Senchenkov, Evgeny; Leskov, Igor L; Marks, Christian R; Stokes, Karen Y

    2014-12-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the population worldwide. It has been implicated in cardiovascular disease, induces microvascular dysfunction, and synergizes with hypercholesterolemia to promote leukocyte and platelet recruitment in venules. Although platelets and platelet-associated P-selectin contribute to cardiovascular disease inflammation, their role in CMV-induced vascular responses is unknown. We assessed the role of platelets in CMV-induced microvascular dysfunction by depleting platelets and developing bone marrow chimeric mice deficient in platelet P-selectin. Wild-type and chimeric mice received mock or murine (m)CMV intraperitoneally. Five weeks later, some mice were switched to a high-cholesterol diet (HC) to investigate the synergism between mCMV and HC. Arteriolar vasodilation and recruitment of leukocytes and donor platelets in venules were measured at 11wk. mCMV with or without HC caused significant endothelial dysfunction in arterioles. Platelet depletion restored normal vasodilation in mCMV-HC but not mCMV-ND mice, whereas protection was seen in both groups for platelet P-selectin chimeras. Only mCMV + HC elevated leukocyte and platelet recruitment in venules. Leukocyte adhesion was reduced to mock levels by acute platelet depletion but was only partially decreased in platelet P-selectin chimeras. Platelets from mCMV-HC mice and, to a lesser extent, mCMV-ND but not mock-HC mice showed significant adhesion in mCMV-HC recipients. Our findings implicate a role for platelets, acting through P-selectin, in CMV-induced arteriolar dysfunction and suggest that the addition of HC leads to a platelet-dependent, inflammatory infiltrate that is only partly platelet P-selectin dependent. CMV appeared to have a stronger activating influence than HC on platelets and may represent an additional therapeutic target in vulnerable patients.

  17. TREATMENT OF MICROVASCULAR MICRO-EMBOLIZATION USING MICROBUBBLES AND LONG-TONE-BURST ULTRASOUND: AN IN VIVO STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, John J.; Brands, Judith; Schnatz, Frederick G.; Black, John J.; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite epicardial coronary artery reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention, distal micro-embolization into the coronary microcirculation limits myocardial salvage during acute myocardial infarction. Thrombolysis using ultrasound and microbubbles (sonothrombolysis) is an approach that induces microbubble oscillations to cause clot disruption and restore perfusion. We sought to determine whether this technique could restore impaired tissue perfusion caused by thrombotic microvascular obstruction. In 16 rats, an imaging transducer was placed on the biceps femoris muscle, perpendicular to a single-element 1-MHz treatment transducer. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was performed at baseline and after micro-embolization. Therapeutic ultrasound (5000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency = 5 0.33 Hz, 1.5 MPa) was delivered to nine rats for two 10-min sessions during intra-arterial infusion of lipid-encapsulated microbubbles; seven control rats received no ultrasound–microbubble therapy. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was repeated after each treatment or control period, and microvascular volume was measured as peak video intensity. There was a 90% decrease in video intensity after micro-embolization (from 8.6 ± 4.8 to 0.7 ± 0.8 dB, p < 0.01). The first and second ultrasound–microbubble sessions were respectively followed by video intensity increases of 5.8 ± 5.1 and 8.7 ± 5.7 dB (p < 0.01, compared with micro-embolization). The first and second control sessions, respectively, resulted in no significant increase in video intensity (2.4 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 4.9) compared with micro-embolization (0.6 ± 0.7 dB). We have developed an in vivo model that simulates the distal thrombotic microvascular obstruction that occurs after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Long-pulse-length ultrasound with microbubbles has a therapeutic effect on microvascular perfusion and may be a valuable adjunct to reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction

  18. Treatment of microvascular micro-embolization using microbubbles and long-tone-burst ultrasound: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pacella, John J; Brands, Judith; Schnatz, Frederick G; Black, John J; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2015-02-01

    Despite epicardial coronary artery reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention, distal micro-embolization into the coronary microcirculation limits myocardial salvage during acute myocardial infarction. Thrombolysis using ultrasound and microbubbles (sonothrombolysis) is an approach that induces microbubble oscillations to cause clot disruption and restore perfusion. We sought to determine whether this technique could restore impaired tissue perfusion caused by thrombotic microvascular obstruction. In 16 rats, an imaging transducer was placed on the biceps femoris muscle, perpendicular to a single-element 1-MHz treatment transducer. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was performed at baseline and after micro-embolization. Therapeutic ultrasound (5000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency = 0.33 Hz, 1.5 MPa) was delivered to nine rats for two 10-min sessions during intra-arterial infusion of lipid-encapsulated microbubbles; seven control rats received no ultrasound-microbubble therapy. Ultrasound contrast perfusion imaging was repeated after each treatment or control period, and microvascular volume was measured as peak video intensity. There was a 90% decrease in video intensity after micro-embolization (from 8.6 ± 4.8 to 0.7 ± 0.8 dB, p < 0.01). The first and second ultrasound-microbubble sessions were respectively followed by video intensity increases of 5.8 ± 5.1 and 8.7 ± 5.7 dB (p < 0.01, compared with micro-embolization). The first and second control sessions, respectively, resulted in no significant increase in video intensity (2.4 ± 2.3 and 3.6 ± 4.9) compared with micro-embolization (0.6 ± 0.7 dB). We have developed an in vivo model that simulates the distal thrombotic microvascular obstruction that occurs after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Long-pulse-length ultrasound with microbubbles has a therapeutic effect on microvascular perfusion and may be a valuable adjunct to reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction. PMID

  19. Photoacoustic microscopy of microvascular responses to cortical electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Hu, Song; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin; Barbour, Dennis L.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-07-01

    Advances in the functional imaging of cortical hemodynamics have greatly facilitated the understanding of neurovascular coupling. In this study, label-free optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) was used to monitor microvascular responses to direct electrical stimulations of the mouse somatosensory cortex through a cranial opening. The responses appeared in two forms: vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. The transition between these two forms of response was observed in single vessels by varying the stimulation intensity. Marked correlation was found between the current-dependent responses of two daughter vessels bifurcating from the same parent vessel. Statistical analysis of twenty-seven vessels from three different animals further characterized the spatial-temporal features and the current dependence of the microvascular response. Our results demonstrate that OR-PAM is a valuable tool to study neurovascular coupling at the microscopic level.

  20. Multiple equilibrium states for blood flow in microvascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock-Muskin, Halley; Diehl, Cecilia; Mohamed, Nora; Karst, Nathan; Geddes, John; Storey, Brian

    2015-11-01

    When blood flows through a vessel bifurcation at the microvascular scale, the hematocrits in the downstream daughter vessels are generally not equal. This phenomenon, known as plasma skimming, can cause heterogeneity in the distribution of red blood cells inside a vessel network. Using established models for plasma skimming, we investigate the equilibrium states in a microvascular network with simple topologies. We find that even simple networks can have multiple equilibrium states for the flow rates and distributions of red blood cells inside the network for fixed inlet conditions. In a ladder network, we find that for certain inlet conditions the network can have 2N observable equilibrium states where N is the number of rungs in the ladder. For ladders with even just a few rungs, the complex equilibrium curves make it seemingly impossible to set the internal state of the network by controlling the inlet flows. Microfluidic experiments are being used to confirm the model predictions.

  1. Treatment of Angina Pectoris Associated with Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ong, Peter; Athanasiadis, Anastasios; Sechtem, Udo

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of angina pectoris associated with coronary microvascular dysfunction is challenging as the underlying mechanisms are often diverse and overlapping. Patients with type 1 coronary microvascular dysfunction (i.e. absence of epicardial coronary artery disease and myocardial disease) should receive strict control of their cardiovascular risk factors and thus receive statins and ACE-inhibitors in most cases. Antianginal medication consists of ß-blockers and/or calcium channel blockers. Second line drugs are ranolazine and nicorandil with limited evidence. Despite individually titrated combinations of these drugs up to 30 % of patients have refractory angina. Rho-kinase inhibitors and endothelin-receptor antagonists represent potential drugs that may prove useful in these patients in the future.

  2. Impact of simulated microgravity on microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chun-Yan; Zou, Lin; Yuan, Ming; Wang, Yang; Li, Tian-Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jun-Feng; Li, Yan; Deng, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning is known to occur in astronauts exposed to microgravity. Endothelial dysfunction at microcirculatory sites might contribute to cardiovascular deconditioning induced by weightlessness. Recent studies have reported changes in the morphology and gene expression of endothelial cells exposed to conditions of simulated microgravity. The present study was aimed at examining the effects of microgravity on the apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cells and the mechanism underlying these effects. We simulated a microgravity environment and found that microgravity induced microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis and that this effect was correlated with the downregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, increased expression of NF-κB, and depolymerization of F-actin. These findings may provide important insights into the origin of the adverse physiological changes occurring due to exposure to microgravity conditions. PMID:21287193

  3. Impact of simulated microgravity on microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chun-Yan; Zou, Lin; Yuan, Ming; Wang, Yang; Li, Tian-Zhi; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jun-Feng; Li, Yan; Deng, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2011-09-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning is known to occur in astronauts exposed to microgravity. Endothelial dysfunction at microcirculatory sites might contribute to cardiovascular deconditioning induced by weightlessness. Recent studies have reported changes in the morphology and gene expression of endothelial cells exposed to conditions of simulated microgravity. The present study was aimed at examining the effects of microgravity on the apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cells and the mechanism underlying these effects. We simulated a microgravity environment and found that microgravity induced microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis and that this effect was correlated with the downregulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, increased expression of NF-κB, and depolymerization of F-actin. These findings may provide important insights into the origin of the adverse physiological changes occurring due to exposure to microgravity conditions.

  4. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c <7.5% across all ages replaces previous guidelines that had called for different targets by age. Evidence shows that prevalence of microvascular complications is greater in patients with age >20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour.

  5. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  6. Patterns and Variations in Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; GOTO, Masanori; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a highly effective surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although there is little prospective clinical evidence, accumulated observational studies have demonstrated the benefits of MVD for refractory TN. In the current surgical practice of MVD for TN, there have been recognized patterns and variations in surgical anatomy and various decompression techniques. Here we provide a stepwise description of surgical procedures and relevant anatomical characteristics, as well as procedural options. PMID:25925756

  7. Endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction in disease: albuminuria and increased microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Satchell, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Appreciation of the glomerular microcirculation as a specialized microcirculatory bed, rather than as an entirely separate entity, affords important insights into both glomerular and systemic microvascular pathophysiology. In this review we compare regulation of permeability in systemic and glomerular microcirculations, focusing particularly on the role of the endothelial glycocalyx, and consider the implications for disease processes. The luminal surface of vascular endothelium throughout the body is covered with endothelial glycocalyx, comprising surface-anchored proteoglycans, supplemented with adsorbed soluble proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and plasma constituents. In both continuous and fenestrated microvessels, this endothelial glycocalyx provides resistance to the transcapillary escape of water and macromolecules, acting as an integral component of the multilayered barrier provided by the walls of these microvessels (ie acting in concert with clefts or fenestrae across endothelial cell layers, basement membranes and pericytes). Dysfunction of any of these capillary wall components, including the endothelial glycocalyx, can disrupt normal microvascular permeability. Because of its ubiquitous nature, damage to the endothelial glycocalyx alters the permeability of multiple capillary beds: in the glomerulus this is clinically apparent as albuminuria. Generalized damage to the endothelial glycocalyx can therefore manifest as both albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability. This triad of altered endothelial glycocalyx, albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability occurs in a number of important diseases, such as diabetes, with accumulating evidence for a similar phenomenon in ischaemia-reperfusion injury and infectious disease. The detection of albuminuria therefore has implications for the function of the microcirculation as a whole. The importance of the endothelial glycocalyx for other aspects of vascular function

  8. Evaluation of intraoperative anticoagulants in microvascular free-flap surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, C. M.; Dennis, R. H.; Massac, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated anticoagulants used during surgery to determine efficacy and associated complications. The patient population was comprised of 15 patients who underwent microvascular free-flap surgery for wound coverage of the lower one third of the leg. Results indicated that the use of heparin in conjunction with other anticoagulants was associated with the development of more hematomas compared with the use of aspirin and dextran, both separately and together. PMID:8918071

  9. Reversibility of retinal microvascular changes in severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Maude, Richard J; Kingston, Hugh W F; Joshi, Sonia; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj K; White, Nicholas J; Dondorp, Arjen M

    2014-09-01

    Malarial retinopathy allows detailed study of central nervous system vascular pathology in living patients with severe malaria. An adult with cerebral malaria is described who had prominent retinal whitening with corresponding retinal microvascular obstruction, vessel dilatation, increased vascular tortuosity, and blood retinal barrier leakage with decreased visual acuity, all of which resolved on recovery. Additional study of these features and their potential role in elucidating the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is warranted.

  10. Plastic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Vinoth, Bharathi; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Sivakumar, Kothandam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics. They are ominous with poor prognosis. Sometimes, infection or airway reactivity may provoke cast bronchitis as a two-step insult on a vulnerable vascular bed. In such instances, aggressive management leads to longer survival. This report of cast bronchitis discusses its current understanding. PMID:26556975

  11. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively.

  12. Microvascular Transport and Tumor Cell Adhesion in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    One critical step in tumor metastasis is tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium forming the microvessel wall. Understanding this step may lead to new therapeutic concepts for tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelium forming the microvessel wall and the glycocalyx layer at its surface are the principal barriers to, and regulators of the material exchange between circulating blood and body tissues. The cleft between adjacent ECs (interendothelial cleft) is the principal pathway for water and solutes transport through the microvessel wall in health. It is also suggested to be the pathway for high molecular weight plasma proteins, leukocytes and tumor cells across microvessel walls in disease. Thus the first part of the review introduced the mathematical models for water and solutes transport through the interendothelial cleft. These models, combined with the experimental results from in vivo animal studies and electron microscopic observations, are used to evaluate the role of the endothelial surface glycocalyx, the junction strand geometry in the interendothelial cleft, and the surrounding extracellular matrix and tissue cells, as the determinants of microvascular transport. The second part of the review demonstrated how the microvascular permeability, hydrodynamic factors, microvascular geometry and cell adhesion molecules affect tumor cell adhesion in the microcirculation. PMID:22476895

  13. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  14. Evaluation of gravimetric techniques to estimate the microvascular filtration coefficient.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2011-06-01

    Microvascular permeability to water is characterized by the microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)). Conventional gravimetric techniques to estimate K(f) rely on data obtained from either transient or steady-state increases in organ weight in response to increases in microvascular pressure. Both techniques result in considerably different estimates and neither account for interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. We therefore developed a theoretical framework to evaluate K(f) estimation techniques by 1) comparing conventional techniques to a novel technique that includes effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return, 2) evaluating the ability of conventional techniques to reproduce K(f) from simulated gravimetric data generated by a realistic interstitial fluid balance model, 3) analyzing new data collected from rat intestine, and 4) analyzing previously reported data. These approaches revealed that the steady-state gravimetric technique yields estimates that are not directly related to K(f) and are in some cases directly proportional to interstitial compliance. However, the transient gravimetric technique yields accurate estimates in some organs, because the typical experimental duration minimizes the effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. Furthermore, our analytical framework reveals that the supposed requirement of tying off all draining lymphatic vessels for the transient technique is unnecessary. Finally, our numerical simulations indicate that our comprehensive technique accurately reproduces the value of K(f) in all organs, is not confounded by interstitial storage and lymphatic return, and provides corroboration of the estimate from the transient technique.

  15. Delayed, bilateral, non-microvascular ear replantation after violent amputation.

    PubMed

    García-Murray, E; Adán-Rivas, O; Salcido-Calzadilla, H

    2009-06-01

    Amputation of any body part is undoubtedly a traumatic experience leaving a terrible deformity, especially when the part or parts involved are visible and constitute an essential component of someone's facial whole. Bilateral ear amputation and successful subsequent replantation has been reported historically, but not in the modern surgical literature. We report the case of a 27-year-old female who was abducted and suffered a bilateral ear amputation at the hands of one of her captors to speed delivery of ransom money; the severed parts were sent to the parents approximately 2 hours after the amputation had taken place, and the girl was released some 48 hours after the ears were delivered. Microvascular replantation was attempted immediately after admission to the hospital some 2 hours after her release, but failed, and so a non-microvascular replantation was performed and was successful, after approximately 54 hours of ischaemia time. We consider this the first report of a complete bilateral, delayed, non-microvascular, successful ear replantation in a human being in the modern literature. PMID:18083644

  16. Microvascular architecture of the filiform papillae in primates and insectivores.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Ohta, Y; Matsukawa, N; Sugioka, S

    1993-03-01

    The microvascular architecture of filiform papillae was investigated under a scanning electron microscope in man, Japanese monkeys, common squirrel monkeys, common marmosets, common tree shrews, large Japanese moles and dwarf shrews utilizing microvascular corrosion casts. Filiform papillae were circularly arranged in primates, and each of them was supplied by a hairpin capillary loop. These papillae sometimes were aggregated. The filiform papillae of Japanese monkeys exhibited markedly locational differences on the lingual dorsum and were supplied by circularly arranged capillary loops or by an intrapapillary capillary network. Small filiform papillae were located on an epithelial eminence in the lingual radix, each of them supplied by a low and simple hairpin capillary loop. The aggregated filiform papillae of common squirrel monkeys were less frequent without any locational differences. Low filiform papillae of common marmosets and tree shrews were simpler in form, being arranged in a circle and supplied by a simple hairpin capillary loop. The filiform papillae of insectivores were not arranged in a circle. The filiform papillae of dwarf shrews were supplied by an incomplete capillary ring without a loop. With respect to species differences, the circularly arranged capillary loops in man were most complicated and highly developed. Microvascular architecture of the filiform papillae of insectivores was much simpler, different from those observed in primates.

  17. Evaluation of gravimetric techniques to estimate the microvascular filtration coefficient.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2011-06-01

    Microvascular permeability to water is characterized by the microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)). Conventional gravimetric techniques to estimate K(f) rely on data obtained from either transient or steady-state increases in organ weight in response to increases in microvascular pressure. Both techniques result in considerably different estimates and neither account for interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. We therefore developed a theoretical framework to evaluate K(f) estimation techniques by 1) comparing conventional techniques to a novel technique that includes effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return, 2) evaluating the ability of conventional techniques to reproduce K(f) from simulated gravimetric data generated by a realistic interstitial fluid balance model, 3) analyzing new data collected from rat intestine, and 4) analyzing previously reported data. These approaches revealed that the steady-state gravimetric technique yields estimates that are not directly related to K(f) and are in some cases directly proportional to interstitial compliance. However, the transient gravimetric technique yields accurate estimates in some organs, because the typical experimental duration minimizes the effects of interstitial fluid storage and lymphatic return. Furthermore, our analytical framework reveals that the supposed requirement of tying off all draining lymphatic vessels for the transient technique is unnecessary. Finally, our numerical simulations indicate that our comprehensive technique accurately reproduces the value of K(f) in all organs, is not confounded by interstitial storage and lymphatic return, and provides corroboration of the estimate from the transient technique. PMID:21346245

  18. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis. PMID:22729782

  19. Microfabrication of cylindrical microfluidic channel networks for microvascular research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhouchun; Li, Xiang; Martins-Green, Manuela; Liu, Yuxin

    2012-10-01

    Current methods for formation of microvascular channel scaffolds are limited with non-circular channel cross-sections, complicated fabrication, and less flexibility in microchannel network design. To address current limitations in the creation of engineered microvascular channels with complex three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in the shape of microvessels, we have developed a reproducible, cost-effective, and flexible micromanufacturing process combined with photolithographic reflowable photoresist and soft lithography techniques to fabricate cylindrical microchannel and networks. A positive reflowable photoresist AZ P4620 was used to fabricate a master microchannel mold with semi-circular cross-sections. By the alignment and bonding of two polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels replicated from the master mold together, a cylindrical microchannel or microchannel network was created. Further examination of the channel dimensions and surface profiles at different branching levels showed that the shape of the microfluidic channel was well approximated by a semi-circular surface, and a multi-level, multi-depth channel network was created. In addition, a computational fluidic dynamics (CFD) model was used to simulate shear flows and corresponding pressure distributions inside of the microchannel and channel network based on the dimensions of the fabricated channels. The fabricated multi-depth cylindrical microchannel network can provide platforms for the investigation of microvascular cells growing inside of cylindrical channels under shear flows and lumen pressures, and work as scaffolds for the investigation of morphogenesis and tubulogenesis.

  20. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Acute and Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease Deploy Normal Phenotype, Differentiation Plasticity, and Immune-Suppressive Activity.

    PubMed

    Copland, Ian B; Qayed, Muna; Garcia, Marco A; Galipeau, Jacques; Waller, Edmund K

    2015-05-01

    The success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is often limited by the development of acute and/or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The lack of effective therapies to treat steroid-refractory GVHD patients has bolstered clinical evaluation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy for GVHD. Currently, testing of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD has exclusively used allogeneic MSCs despite emerging evidence that MSCs lose their immunoprivileged status in vivo. We hypothesized that autologous MSCs could be a viable alternative MSC source for treating active GVHD. MSCs were isolated and successfully expanded from the bone marrow of 12 volunteers (ages 2 to 55 years) who had allo-HSCT transplants and subsequently developed GVHD. MSCs from subjects with GVHD demonstrated an initial lag in growth compared with healthy control subjects; however, this lag disappeared with continued ex vivo expansion. Immunophenotype and mesodermal differentiation capacity of MSCs from GVHD patients were indistinguishable from that of healthy control MSCs. In vitro immunomodulatory functional analyses also demonstrated that GVHD MSCs were equivalent to healthy control MSCs with regards to dose dependently suppressing T cell proliferation and up-regulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression when primed with IFN-γ. Single tandem repeat chimerism analyses further demonstrated that MSCs expanded from GVHD patients were exclusively recipient derived. Based on these data, we conclude that recipient-derived MSCs from patients with GVHD are analogous to MSCs from healthy volunteers and represent a viable option for clinical testing as an immunomodulatory option for symptomatic GVHD.

  1. Plasticity in glutamatergic NTS neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kline, David D

    2008-12-10

    Changes in the physiological state of an animal or human can result in alterations in the cardiovascular and respiratory system in order to maintain homeostasis. Accordingly, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are not static but readily adapt under a variety of circumstances. The same can be said for the brainstem circuits that control these systems. The nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) is the central integration site of baroreceptor and chemoreceptor sensory afferent fibers. This central nucleus, and in particular the synapse between the sensory afferent and second-order NTS cell, possesses a remarkable degree of plasticity in response to a variety of stimuli, both acute and chronic. This brief review is intended to describe the plasticity observed in the NTS as well as the locus and mechanisms as they are currently understood. The functional consequence of NTS plasticity is also discussed.

  2. Microvascular architecture of the near-term uterine caruncles in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Abd-Elnaeim, M M M; Miglino, M A; Leiser, R

    2007-06-01

    The present investigation was carried out on five near-term pregnant water buffaloes for studying the microvascular architecture of the uterine caruncles. The vascular casts were obtained by injection of 4:1 mixture of mercox and methylmethacrylate through the branches of the uterine arteries. After complete polymerization of the plastic, corrosion was conducted in 20% potassium hydroxide, then the vessel casts were immersed in distilled water, cut into small pieces, sputter coated with gold, and examined by using a scanning electron microscope. The buffalo uterine caruncle is highly vascularized through two slightly convoluted arteries and a single less tortuous vein. The arteries branch into several stem arteries at the base of the uterine caruncle, which follow nearly straight course in the primary septa towards the fetal side. During the courses of these stem arteries arterioles of variable diameters arise. The arterioles run in the secondary and tertiary septae and at this location arterioles and venules are connected through a voluminous capillary complex. The latter consists of capillaries of greatly variable diameters with vigorous coiling and sinusoidally dilated zones. From the capillary complexes the blood is driven through postcapillary venules back to the tertiary, secondary and primary septa, respectively, and then converge into stem veins which leave the caruncles through the branches of the uterine vein.

  3. Effect of Qi-regulating,Phlegm-resolving,and Blood-promoting Prescription on Rat Coronary Microvascular Thrombosis and Coronary Microvascular Occlusion.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Objective To explore the effect of qi-regulating,phlegm-resolving,and blood-promoting prescription on coronary microvascular thrombosis and coronary microvascular occlusion in rat models. Methods Totally 125 healthy clean-grade male SD rats weighing (300±25) g were sequentially numbered and then randomly divided into treatment group (n=60),control group (n=60) and blank group (n=5).Rats in the treatment group and control group received apical left ventricular injection of sodium laurate to establish rat models of coronary microvascular thrombosis. Then,rats in the control group were given distilled water by gavage one day before operation and after surgery. In contrast,rats in the treatment group were given qi-regulating,phlegm-resolving,and blood-promoting prescription by gavage one day before operation and after surgery. Five rats from both treatment group and control group were killed at each of six time points (1 hour,24th hour,7th day,14th day,21th day,and 28th day),and the myocardium specimens were harvested. The 5 rats in the blank group did not receive any special treatment and were given normal feeding;in the 28th day,they were sacrificed to obtain the myocardial specimens. Pathological sections of rat myocardial tissues were made to observe and compare the degrees of coronary microvascular thrombosis and coronary microvascular obstruction. Results In the treatment group and the control group,coronary microvascular thrombosis occurred 1 hour after apical sodium laurate injection and reached the peak at the 24th hour. Compared with the blank group,the treatment group and the control group showed different degree of coronary microvascular obstruction. Comparison between the treatment group and the control group at each time point showed that the coronary microvascular thrombosis in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01).The severity of coronary

  4. Dietary nitrite prevents hypercholesterolemic microvascular inflammation and reverses endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Karen Y; Dugas, Tammy R; Tang, Yaoping; Garg, Harsha; Guidry, Eric; Bryan, Nathan S

    2009-05-01

    The nitrite anion is an endogenous product of mammalian nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, a key intermediate in the nitrogen cycle in plants, and a constituent of many foods. Research over the past 6 years has revealed surprising biological and cytoprotective activity of this anion. Hypercholesterolemia causes a proinflammatory phenotype in the microcirculation. This phenotype appears to result from a decline in NO bioavailability that results from a reduction in NO biosynthesis, inactivation of NO by superoxide, or both. Since nitrite has been shown to be potently cytoprotective and restore NO biochemical homeostasis, we investigated if supplemental nitrite could attenuate microvascular inflammation caused by a high cholesterol diet. C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a normal diet or a high cholesterol diet for 3 wk to induce microvascular inflammation. Mice on the high cholesterol diet received either nitrite-free drinking water or supplemental nitrite at 33 or 99 mg/l ad libitum in their drinking water. The results from this investigation reveal that mice fed a cholesterol-enriched diet exhibited significantly elevated leukocyte adhesion to and emigration through the venular endothelium as well as impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in arterioles. Administration of nitrite in the drinking water inhibited the leukocyte adhesion and emigration and prevented the arteriolar dysfunction. This was associated with sparing of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin and decreased levels of C-reactive protein. These data reveal novel anti-inflammatory properties of nitrite and implicate the use of nitrite as a new natural therapy for microvascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction associated with hypercholesterolemia.

  5. Skeletal muscle microvascular function in girls with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    West, Sarah L.; O'Gorman, Clodagh S.; Elzibak, Alyaa H.; Caterini, Jessica; Noseworthy, Michael D.; Rayner, Tammy; Hamilton, Jill; Wells, Greg D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance is prevalent in individuals with Turner Syndrome (TS). We recently demonstrated that girls with TS have normal aerobic but altered skeletal muscle anaerobic metabolism compared to healthy controls (HC). The purpose of this study was to compare peripheral skeletal muscle microvascular function in girls with TS to HC after exercise. We hypothesized that girls with TS would have similar muscle blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal responses during recovery from exercise compared to HC. Methods Thirteen TS participants and 8 HC completed testing. BOLD MRI was used to measure skeletal muscle microvascular response during 60 second recovery, following 60 s of exercise at 65% of maximal workload. Exercise and recovery were repeated four times, and the BOLD signal time course was fit to a four-parameter sigmoid function. Results Participants were 13.7 ± 3.1 years old and weighed 47.9 ± 14.6 kg. The mean change in BOLD signal intensity following exercise at the end of recovery, the mean response time of the function/the washout of deoxyhemoglobin, and the mean half-time of recovery were similar between the TS and HC groups. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that compared to HC, peripheral skeletal muscle microvascular function following exercise in girls with TS is not impaired. General significance This study supports the idea that the aerobic energy pathway is not impaired in children with TS in response to submaximal exercise. Other mechanisms are likely responsible for exercise intolerance in TS; this needs to be further investigated. PMID:26676172

  6. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  7. Quantifying Therapeutic and Diagnostic Efficacy in 2D Microvascular Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    VESGEN is a newly automated, user-interactive program that maps and quantifies the effects of vascular therapeutics and regulators on microvascular form and function. VESGEN analyzes two-dimensional, black and white vascular images by measuring important vessel morphology parameters. This software guides the user through each required step of the analysis process via a concise graphical user interface (GUI). Primary applications of the VESGEN code are 2D vascular images acquired as clinical diagnostic images of the human retina and as experimental studies of the effects of vascular regulators and therapeutics on vessel remodeling.

  8. Alternative venous outflow vessels in microvascular breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mehrara, Babak J; Santoro, Timothy; Smith, Andrew; Arcilla, Eric A; Watson, James P; Shaw, William W; Da Lio, Andrew L

    2003-08-01

    The lack of adequate recipient vessels often complicates microvascular breast reconstruction in patients who have previously undergone mastectomy and irradiation. In addition, significant size mismatch, particularly in the outflow veins, is an important contributor to vessel thrombosis and flap failure. The purpose of this study was to review the authors' experience with alternative venous outflow vessels for microvascular breast reconstruction. In a retrospective analysis of 1278 microvascular breast reconstructions performed over a 10-year period, the authors identified all patients in whom the external jugular or cephalic veins were used as the outflow vessels. Patient demographics, flap choice, the reasons for the use of alternative venous drainage vessels, and the incidence of microsurgical complications were analyzed. The external jugular was used in 23 flaps performed in procedures with 22 patients. The superior gluteal and transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flaps were used in the majority of the cases in which the external jugular vein was used (72 percent gluteal, 20 percent TRAM flap). The need for alternative venous outflow vessels was usually due to a significant vessel size mismatch between the superior gluteal and internal mammary veins (74 percent). For three of the external jugular vein flaps (13 percent), the vein was used for salvage after the primary draining vein thrombosed, and two of three flaps in these cases were eventually salvaged. In three patients, the external jugular vein thrombosed, resulting in two flap losses, while the third was salvaged using the cephalic vein. A total of two flaps were lost in the external jugular vein group. The cephalic vein was used in 11 flaps (TRAM, 64.3 percent; superior gluteal, 35.7 percent) performed in 11 patients. In five patients (54.5 percent), the cephalic vein was used to salvage a flap after the primary draining vein thrombosed; the procedure was successful in four cases. In three

  9. Microvascular alterations and the role of complement in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Lahoria, Rajat; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathological basis of perifascicular muscle fibre atrophy in dermatomyositis. These include ischaemia due to immune-mediated microvascular injury, enhanced expression of type 1 interferon-induced gene transcripts in perifascicular capillaries and muscle fibres, and occlusion of larger perimysial blood vessels. Microvascular complement deposition is a feature of dermatomyositis pathology but the trigger for complement activation, the predominant complement pathway involved, or its role in the pathogenesis of the disease, has not been clearly defined. In the first step of this study we examined the density of capillaries and transverse vessels and searched for occlusion or depletion of larger perimysial blood vessels in 10 patients with dermatomyositis. This revealed an invariable association of perifascicular atrophy with capillary and transverse vessel depletion. The capillary and transverse vessel densities in non-atrophic fibre regions were not significantly different from those in muscle specimens of 10 age-matched controls. Next, in the same 10, as well as in 40 additional dermatomyositis patients, we searched for vascular deposits of IgG, IgM, and the C5b-9 complement membrane attack complex. Thirty-one of 50 dermatomyositis specimens contained C5b-9 reactive endomysial microvessels but none of these or other vessels reacted for IgG. Ten of 50 specimens harboured IgM-positive capillaries but only a few of these reacted for C5b-9. Finally, we analysed and compared different pathways of complement activation in dermatomyositis, lupus nephritis, and necrotic muscle fibres in Duchenne dystrophy. In lupus nephritis, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with IgG, IgM, C1q, and C4d, consistent with immune complex dependent activation of the classical complement pathway. In both dermatomyositis and Duchenne dystrophy, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with C1q and C4d and rarely with IgM indicating activation of the classical

  10. Globular Adiponectin Enhances Muscle Insulin Action via Microvascular Recruitment and Increased Insulin Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Chai, Weidong; Fu, Zhuo; Dong, Zhenhua; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Adiponectin enhances insulin action and induces nitric oxide–dependent vasodilatation. Insulin delivery to muscle microcirculation and transendothelial transport are 2 discrete steps that limit insulin's action. We have shown that expansion of muscle microvascular surface area increases muscle insulin delivery and action. Objective To examine whether adiponectin modulates muscle microvascular recruitment thus insulin delivery and action in vivo. Methods and Results Overnight fasted adult male rats were studied. We determined the effects of adiponectin on muscle microvascular recruitment, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, on insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment and whole-body glucose disposal, using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and insulin clamp, and on muscle insulin clearance and uptake with 125I-insulin. Globular adiponectin potently increased muscle microvascular blood volume without altering microvascular blood flow velocity, leading to a significantly increased microvascular blood flow. This was paralleled by a ≈30% to 40% increase in muscle insulin uptake and clearance, and ≈30% increase in insulin-stimulated whole-body glucose disposal. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase abolished globular adiponectin-mediated muscle microvascular recruitment and insulin uptake. In cultured endothelial cells, globular adiponectin dose-dependently increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation but had no effect on endothelial cell internalization of insulin. Conclusions Globular adiponectin increases muscle insulin uptake by recruiting muscle microvasculature, which contributes to its insulin-sensitizing action. PMID:23459195

  11. Force control of endothelium permeability in mechanically stressed pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Caluch, Adam; Fodil, Redouane; Féréol, Sophie; Zadigue, Patricia; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) as contributing to alveolo-capillary barrier dysfunction. This study aims at elucidating the role of the cytoskeleton (CSK) and cell-matrix adhesion system in the stressed endothelium and more precisely in the loss of integrity of the endothelial barrier. We purposely develop a cellular model made of a monolayer of confluent Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMVECs) whose cytoskeleton (CSK) is directly exposed to sustained cyclic mechanical stress for 1 and 2 h. We used RGD-coated ferromagnetic beads and measured permeability before and after stress application. We find that endothelial permeability increases in the stressed endothelium, hence reflecting a loss of integrity. Structural and mechanical results suggest that this endothelial barrier alteration would be due to physically-founded discrepancies in latero-basal reinforcement of adhesion sites in response to the global increase in CSK stiffness or centripetal intracellular forces. Basal reinforcement of adhesion is presently evidenced by the marked redistribution of αvβ3 integrin with cluster formation in the stressed endothelium. PMID:22766716

  12. Ionizing radiation induces immediate protein acetylation changes in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Kempf, Stefan J.; Sriharshan, Arundhathi; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Atkinson, Michael J.; Tapio, Soile

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a highly regulated post-translational protein modification that is known to regulate several signaling pathways. However, little is known about the radiation-induced changes in the acetylome. In this study, we analyzed the acute post-translational acetylation changes in primary human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells 4 h after a gamma radiation dose of 2 Gy. The acetylated peptides were enriched using anti-acetyl conjugated agarose beads. A total of 54 proteins were found to be altered in their acetylation status, 23 of which were deacetylated and 31 acetylated. Pathway analyses showed three protein categories particularly affected by radiation-induced changes in the acetylation status: the proteins involved in the translation process, the proteins of stress response, and mitochondrial proteins. The activation of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways affecting actin cytoskeleton signaling and cell cycle progression was predicted. The protein expression levels of two nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, sirtuin 1 and sirtuin 3, were significantly but transiently upregulated 4 but not 24 h after irradiation. The status of the p53 protein, a target of sirtuin 1, was found to be rapidly stabilized by acetylation after radiation exposure. These findings indicate that post-translational modification of proteins by acetylation and deacetylation is essentially affecting the radiation response of the endothelium. PMID:25840449

  13. Microvascular Obstruction Evaluation Using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in ST-Elevated Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Kownacki, Łukasz; Kochman, Janusz; Kołodzińska, Agnieszka; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Summary Backround Restoration of blood flow in epicardial coronary artery in patients with acute myocardial infarction can, but does not have to restore efficient blood flow in coronary circulation. The aim of the study was a direct comparison of microvascular obstruction (MVO) detected by rest and stress perfusion imaging and gadolinium enhancement obtained 2 min. (early MVO) and 15 min. (delayed MVO) post contrast. Material/Methods 106 patients with first anterior myocardial infarction were studied. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was performed 5±2 days after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). Stress and rest perfusion imaging was performed as well as early and delayed gadolinium enhancement and systolic function assessment. Scoring of segmental function, perfusion defect, MVO and scar transmurality was performed in 16 segment left ventricular model. Results The prevalence of MVO varies significantly between imaging techniques ranging from 48.8% for delayed MVO to 94% with stress perfusion. Median sum of scores was significantly different for each technique: stress perfusion 13 (7; 18), rest perfusion 3 (0.5; 6), early MVO 3 (0; 8), delayed MVO 0 (0; 4); p<0.05. Infarct size, stress and rest perfusion defects were independent predictors of LV EF at discharge from hospital. Conclusions Imaging protocol has a significant impact on MVO results. The study is the first to describe a stress-induced MVO in STEMI patients. Further research is needed to evaluate its impact on a long term prognosis. PMID:26740825

  14. Microvascular Perfusion and Intramuscular Temperature of the Calf During Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Selkow, Noelle M; Day, Carly; Liu, Zhenqi; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay; Saliba, Susan A

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine how the microvascularity of the gastrocnemius changed after a cryotherapy intervention based on subcutaneous tissue thickness. A secondary purpose was to compare intramuscular temperature change to subcutaneous tissue thickness. Methods This was a single-blinded crossover study; each subject received both conditions (cryotherapy or sham). Subjects had baseline measurements of blood flow, blood volume, and intramuscular temperature recorded at 1cm into the muscle belly of the medial gastrocnemius. The randomized condition was applied for 10, 25, 40, or 60min depending on subcutaneous tissue thickness. Immediate post treatment microvascular measures were taken. After a designated rewarm period, again based on subcutaneous tissue thickness, measurements were retaken. At least 48 hours separated the two conditions. Results There were significant condition by time interactions for blood flow (p=0.01), blood volume (p=0.022), and intramuscular temperature (p<0.001). For blood flow and volume, the cryotherapy condition maintained baseline levels, while the sham condition increased at immediate-post treatment and rewarm. For intramuscular temperature, the cryotherapy condition caused a decrease in intramuscular temperature from baseline compared to no change in the sham condition from baseline. Intramuscular temperature change was significantly correlated to subcutaneous tissue thickness (r=.49; p=0.05). Conclusions Cryotherapy did not decrease blood flow and blood volume from resting levels, even though the intramuscular temperature decreased. An intramuscular change of 7–9°C may not be cold enough to cause local vasoconstriction. PMID:21988932

  15. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-01

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  16. Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J.

    2012-10-03

    To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

  17. Microvascular responsiveness in obesity: implications for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bagi, Zsolt; Feher, Attila; Cassuto, James

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has detrimental effects on the microcirculation. Functional changes in microvascular responsiveness may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in obese patients. Emerging evidence indicates that selective therapeutic targeting of the microvessels may prevent life-threatening obesity-related vascular complications, such as ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and hypertension. It is also plausible that alterations in adipose tissue microcirculation contribute to the development of obesity. Therefore, targeting adipose tissue arterioles could represent a novel approach to reducing obesity. This review aims to examine recent studies that have been focused on vasomotor dysfunction of resistance arteries in obese humans and animal models of obesity. Particularly, findings in coronary resistance arteries are contrasted to those obtained in other vascular beds. We provide examples of therapeutic attempts, such as use of statins, ACE inhibitors and insulin sensitizers to prevent obesity-related microvascular complications. We further identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21797844

  18. Tissue viability imaging for assessment of microvascular events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Doherty, Jim; Nilsson, Gert E.; Henricson, Joakim; Sjoberg, Folke; Leahy, Martin J.

    2005-08-01

    A new technique for the investigation of microvascular tissue blood concentration is presented, based on the method of polarisation spectroscopy of blood in superficial skin tissue. Linearly polarised light incident on the skin is partly reflected by the surface layers, and partly backscattered from the dermal tissue. Use of orthogonal polarisation filters over both a light source and a CCD suppresses the reflections from the surface, and only the depolarised light backscattered from the dermal matrix reaches the CCD array. By separating the colour planes of an image acquired in this manner and applying a dedicated image processing algorithm, spectroscopic information about the amount of red blood cells (RBCs) in the underlying area of tissue can be discovered. The algorithm incorporates theory that utilises the differences in light absorption of RBCs and dermal tissue in the red and green wavelength regions. In vitro fluid models compare well to computer simulations in describing a linear relationship between output signal (called TiViindex) and RBC concentration in the physiological range of 0%-4%. In vivo evaluation of the technique via transepidermal application of acetylcholine by iontophoresis displayed a heterogeneity pattern of vasodilation, which is typical of the vasoactive agent. Extension of the technique to capture and process continuous real-time data creates a new possibility of online real-time image processing. Application of tissue viability (TiVi) imaging include skin care products and drug development, as well as investigations of microvascular angiogenesis.

  19. Effects of hyperoxia on microvascular cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amore, P.A.; Sweet, E.

    1987-02-01

    Microvascular cells are most vulnerable to direct oxygen damage. Using an in vitro model system we have investigated the effect of elevated oxygen on the proliferation, morphology, and integrity of microvascular endothelial cells (EC) and pericytes. Cultivation of these cells at oxygen concentrations of 40% for 1 wk resulted in the inhibition of EC proliferation but had no effect on the growth of the pericytes. Similarly, hyperoxia induced a dramatic change in the shape of the EC, increasing their spread area by close to six-fold. Under the same conditions, the spread area of the pericytes was unaffected. To understand the effect of the hyperoxic treatment on the cells, the integrity of various membrane systems was assessed. /sup 51/Cr release was used to monitor plasma membrane integrity. There was no difference in chromium release by EC and pericytes over the 7 d of growth under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions. Mitochondrial integrity was examined by staining the cells with Rhodamine 123, which is selectively accumulated by the mitochondria. The staining pattern of the mitochondria of both EC and pericytes was altered by growth in the elevated oxygen. Finally, the lysosomes were visualized using acridine orange. The acridine orange staining pattern revealed enlarged and perinuclear lysosomes in the EC but no change in the pericyte lysosomal staining pattern. Thus, the cells of the microvasculature seem to be differentially affected by hyperoxia, a fact that may be significant in the etiology of reperfusion injury, ischemic disease, and pathologies associated with prematurity.

  20. Modulation of cerebral microvascular permeability by endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Brian T; Egleton, Richard D; Davis, Thomas P

    2005-07-01

    Nicotine increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. This implies a possible role for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of cerebral microvascular permeability. Expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in cerebral microvessels was investigated with immunofluorescence microscopy. Positive immunoreactivity was found for receptor subunits alpha3, alpha5, alpha7, and beta2, but not subunits alpha4, beta3, or beta4. Blood-brain barrier permeability was assessed via in situ brain perfusion with [14C]sucrose. Nicotine increased the rate of sucrose entry into the brain from 0.3 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), as previously described. This nicotine-induced increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was significantly attenuated by both the blood-brain barrier-permeant nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine and the blood-brain barrier-impermeant nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium to 0.5 +/- 0.2 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 microl.g(-1).min(-1), respectively. These data suggest that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on the cerebral microvascular endothelium mediate nicotine-induced changes in blood-brain barrier permeability.

  1. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Regine; Putt, Mary E; Carlile, Peter M; Durduran, Turgut; Giammarco, Joseph M; Busch, David R; Jung, Ki Won; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Feldman, Michael D; Mies, Carolyn; Rosen, Mark A; Schnall, Mitchell D; DeMichele, Angela; Yodh, Arjun G

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval) tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63); tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66), and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70). Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography. PMID:24967878

  2. Angina pectoris in women: focus on microvascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchi, Cinzia; Tritto, Isabella; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2013-02-20

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death among women in Western countries, and it is associated with higher morbidity and mortality than in men. Nevertheless, IHD in women remains underdiagnosed and undertreated, and the misperception that females are "protected" against cardiovascular disease leads to underestimation of their cardiovascular risk; instead, women with chest pain have a high risk of cardiovascular events. Women suffering from angina pectoris tend to have different characteristics compared to men, with a high prevalence of non-significant coronary artery disease. Angina in women is more commonly microvascular in origin than in men, and therefore standard diagnostic algorithms may be suboptimal for women. This different pathophysiology impacts clinical management of IHD in women. While response to medical therapy may differ in women, they are scarcely represented in clinical trials. Therefore, solid data in terms of gender efficacy of antianginal drugs are lacking, and particularly when angina is microvascular in origin women often continue to be symptomatic despite maximal therapy with classical antianginal drugs. Recently, new molecules have shown promising results in women. In conclusion, women with angina are a group of patients in whom it seems appropriate to concentrate efforts aimed at reducing morbidity and improving quality of life.

  3. Albumin microvascular leakage in brains with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Ryuji; Chiba, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Nishi, Nozomu; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Ueno, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    Their aim was to examine whether microvascular leakage of endogenous albumin, a representative marker for blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage, was induced in the periventricular area of diabetic db/db mice because periventricular white matter hyperintensity formation in magnetic resonance images was accelerating in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus. Using light and electron microscopes, and semi-quantitative analysis techniques, immunoreactivity of endogenous albumin, indicating vascular permeability, was examined in the periventricular area and spinal cord of db/db mice and db/+m control mice. Greater immunoreactivity of albumin was observed in the vessel wall of the periventricular area of db/db mice than in controls. Additionally, weak immunoreactivity was observed in the spinal cord of both db/db mice and controls. The number of gold particles, indicating immunoreactivity of albumin, in the perivascular area of db/db mice was significantly higher than that of control mice, but there was no significant difference in the number of particles in the spinal cord between db/db mice and controls. These findings suggest that albumin microvascular leakage, or BBB breakdown, is induced in the periventricular area of diabetic mice. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:833-837, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27333535

  4. Differential regulation of TRPV1 channels by H2O2: implications for diabetic microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    DelloStritto, Daniel J; Connell, Patrick J; Dick, Gregory M; Fancher, Ibra S; Klarich, Brittany; Fahmy, Joseph N; Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Damron, Derek S; Thodeti, Charles K; Bratz, Ian N

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated previously that TRPV1-dependent coupling of coronary blood flow (CBF) to metabolism is disrupted in diabetes. A critical amount of H2O2 contributes to CBF regulation; however, excessive H2O2 impairs responses. We sought to determine the extent to which differential regulation of TRPV1 by H2O2 modulates CBF and vascular reactivity in diabetes. We used contrast echocardiography to study TRPV1 knockout (V1KO), db/db diabetic, and wild type C57BKS/J (WT) mice. H2O2 dose-dependently increased CBF in WT mice, a response blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. H2O2-induced vasodilation was significantly inhibited in db/db and V1KO mice. H2O2 caused robust SB366791-sensitive dilation in WT coronary microvessels; however, this response was attenuated in vessels from db/db and V1KO mice, suggesting H2O2-induced vasodilation occurs, in part, via TRPV1. Acute H2O2 exposure potentiated capsaicin-induced CBF responses and capsaicin-mediated vasodilation in WT mice, whereas prolonged luminal H2O2 exposure blunted capsaicin-induced vasodilation. Electrophysiology studies re-confirms acute H2O2 exposure activated TRPV1 in HEK293A and bovine aortic endothelial cells while establishing that H2O2 potentiate capsaicin-activated TRPV1 currents, whereas prolonged H2O2 exposure attenuated TRPV1 currents. Verification of H2O2-mediated activation of intrinsic TRPV1 specific currents were found in isolated mouse coronary endothelial cells from WT mice and decreased in endothelial cells from V1KO mice. These data suggest prolonged H2O2 exposure impairs TRPV1-dependent coronary vascular signaling. This may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue perfusion deficits characteristic of diabetes.

  5. Influenza-Induced Priming and Leak of Human Lung Microvascular Endothelium upon Exposure to Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsen; Armstrong, Susan M; Sugiyama, Michael G; Tabuchi, Arata; Krauszman, Adrienn; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Mullen, Brendan; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Lee, Warren L

    2015-10-01

    A major cause of death after influenza virus infection is lung injury due to a bacterial superinfection, yet the mechanism is unknown. Death has been attributed to virus-induced immunosuppression and bacterial overgrowth, but this hypothesis is based on data from the preantibiotic era and animal models that omit antimicrobial therapy. Because of diagnostic uncertainty, most patients with influenza receive antibiotics, making bacterial overgrowth unlikely. Respiratory failure after superinfection presents as acute respiratory distress syndrome, a disorder characterized by lung microvascular leak and edema. The objective of this study was to determine whether the influenza virus sensitizes the lung endothelium to leak upon exposure to circulating bacterial-derived molecular patterns from Staphylococcus aureus. In vitro as well as in vivo models of influenza followed by S. aureus superinfection were used. Molecular mechanisms were explored using molecular biology, knockout mice, and human autopsy specimens. Influenza virus infection sensitized human lung endothelium to leak when challenged with S. aureus, even at low doses of influenza and even when the pathogens were given days apart. Influenza virus increased endothelial expression of TNFR1 both in vitro and in intact lungs, a finding corroborated by human autopsy specimens of patients with influenza. Leak was recapitulated with protein A, a TNFR1 ligand, and sequential infection caused protein A-dependent loss of IκB, cleavage of caspases 8 and 3, and lung endothelial apoptosis. Mice infected sequentially with influenza virus and S. aureus developed significantly increased lung edema that was protein A and TNFR1 dependent. Influenza virus primes the lung endothelium to leak, predisposing patients to acute respiratory distress syndrome upon exposure to S. aureus.

  6. Directed assembly of three-dimensional microvascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Therriault, Daniel

    Three-dimensional (3-D) microvascular networks with pervasive, interconnected channels less than 300 mum in diameter may find widespread application in microfluidic devices, biotechnology, sensors, and autonomic healing materials. Although microchannel arrays are readily constructed in two-dimensions by photolithographic or soft lithographic techniques, their construction in three-dimensions remains a challenging problem. The development of a microfabrication method to build 3-D microvascular networks based on direct-write assembly is described is this thesis. The method is based on the robotic deposition of a fugitive organic ink to form a free-standing scaffold structure. Secondary infiltration of a structural resin followed by setting of the matrix and removal of the scaffold yields an embedded pervasive network of smooth cylindrical channels (˜10--500 mum) with defined connectivity. Rheological and other material properties studies of fugitive organic ink were performed in order to identify the critical characteristics required for successful deposition of 3-D scaffolds by direct-write assembly. Guided by the results of these studies, several new ink formulations were screened for improved deposition performance. The most successful of these inks (40wt% microcrystalline wax, 60wt% petroleum jelly) showed excellent deposition and had an equilibrium modulus at room temperature (G 'eq ˜ 7.70 kPa 1 Hz) nearly two orders of magnitude higher than the original ink. The optimized ink was used to successfully build thick (i.e., ˜100 layers) scaffold structures at room temperature with negligible time-dependent deformation post-deposition. Secondary infiltration of the resin was accomplished at room temperature while maintaining the scaffold architecture. The optimized ink was also successfully extruded through small micronozzles (1 mum). The construction of 3-D microvascular networks enables microfluidic devices with unparallel geometric complexity. In one example, a

  7. Microvascular Injury in Ketamine-Induced Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Yang, An-Hang; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) remains unclear. In this study, bladder microvascular injury was investigated as a possible contributing mechanism. A total of 36 KC patients with exposure to ketamine for more than 6 months, and 9 control subjects, were prospectively recruited. All participants completed questionnaires, including the O’Leary–Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI) and the interstitial cystitis problem index (ICPI). All KC patients received a urodynamic study and radiological exams. Bladder tissues were obtained from cystoscopic biopsies in the control group and after hydrodistention in the KC group. Double-immunofluorescence staining of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1) and the endothelial marker, cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), was performed to reveal the existence of NMDAR1 on the endothelium. Electron microscopy (EM) was applied to assess the microvascular change in the urinary bladder and to measure the thickening of the basement membrane (BM). A proximity ligation assay (PLA) was used to quantify the co-localization of the endothelial CD31 receptor and the mesenchymal marker [fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1)]. The Mann–Whitney U test and Spearman’s correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. The mean ICSI [14.38 (± 4.16)] and ICPI [12.67 (± 3.54)] scores of the KC group were significantly higher than those (0 and 0, respectively) of the control group (both p < 0.001). The KC patients had decreasing cystometric bladder capacity (CBC) with a mean volume of 65.38 (± 48.67) mL. NMDAR1 was expressed on endothelial cells in both groups under immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, KC patients had significant BM duplication of microvessels in the mucosa of the urinary bladder under EM. The co-expression of the endothelial marker CD31 and mesenchymal marker FSP1 was significantly stained and calculated under PLA. In conclusion, microvascular injury and mesenchymal phenotypic

  8. Intrinsic sex-specific differences in microvascular endothelial cell phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bingaman, Susan; Huxley, Virginia H.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of gonadal hormones in the regulation of vascular function has been documented. An alternate and essential contribution of the sex chromosomes to sex differences in vascular function is poorly understood. We reported previously sex differences in microvessel permeability (Ps) responses to adenosine that were mediated by the cAMP signaling pathway (Wang J, PhD thesis, 2005; Wang J and Huxley V, Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Microcirculation, 2007; Wang J and Huxley VH, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291: H3094–H3105, 2006). The two cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, central to the regulation of vascular barrier integrity, are hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that microvascular endothelial cells (EC) would retain intrinsic and inheritable sexually dimorphic genes with respect to the PDEs modulating EC barrier function. Primary cultured microvascular EC from skeletal muscles isolated from male and female rats, respectively, were used. SRY (a sex-determining region Y gene) mRNA expression was observed exclusively in male, not female, cells. The predominant isoform among PDE1–5, present in both XY and XX EC, was PDE4. Expression mRNA levels of PDE1A (male > female) and PDE3B (male < female) were sex dependent; PDE2A, PDE4D, and PDE5A were sex independent. Barrier function, Ps, was determined from measures of albumin flux across confluent primary cultured microvessel XY and XX EC monolayers. Consistent with intact in situ microvessels, basal monolayer Ps did not differ between XY (1.7 ± 0.2 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 8) and XX (1.8 ± 0.1 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 10) EC. Cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor, reduced (11%, P < 0.05) Ps in XX, not XY, cells. These findings demonstrate the presence and maintenance of intrinsic sex-related differences in gene expression and cellular phenotype by microvascular EC in a gonadal-hormone-free environment. Furthermore, intrinsic cell-sex likely contributes significantly to sexual dimorphism in

  9. Microvascular Injury in Ketamine-Induced Bladder Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Yang, An-Hang; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) remains unclear. In this study, bladder microvascular injury was investigated as a possible contributing mechanism. A total of 36 KC patients with exposure to ketamine for more than 6 months, and 9 control subjects, were prospectively recruited. All participants completed questionnaires, including the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis symptom index (ICSI) and the interstitial cystitis problem index (ICPI). All KC patients received a urodynamic study and radiological exams. Bladder tissues were obtained from cystoscopic biopsies in the control group and after hydrodistention in the KC group. Double-immunofluorescence staining of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1) and the endothelial marker, cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), was performed to reveal the existence of NMDAR1 on the endothelium. Electron microscopy (EM) was applied to assess the microvascular change in the urinary bladder and to measure the thickening of the basement membrane (BM). A proximity ligation assay (PLA) was used to quantify the co-localization of the endothelial CD31 receptor and the mesenchymal marker [fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1)]. The Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. The mean ICSI [14.38 (± 4.16)] and ICPI [12.67 (± 3.54)] scores of the KC group were significantly higher than those (0 and 0, respectively) of the control group (both p < 0.001). The KC patients had decreasing cystometric bladder capacity (CBC) with a mean volume of 65.38 (± 48.67) mL. NMDAR1 was expressed on endothelial cells in both groups under immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, KC patients had significant BM duplication of microvessels in the mucosa of the urinary bladder under EM. The co-expression of the endothelial marker CD31 and mesenchymal marker FSP1 was significantly stained and calculated under PLA. In conclusion, microvascular injury and mesenchymal phenotypic

  10. New technique to quantitate regional pulmonary microvascular transit times from dynamic x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1998-07-01

    Microvascular red blood cell mean transit time is a crucial parameter underlying basic pulmonary physiology. Dynamic x-ray CT imaging during bolus radiopaque tracer injection offers the ability to make functional measurements throughout the lungs, but is not able to resolve individual microvascular beds. We have implemented a model-free Fast Fourier Transform deconvolution algorithm to extract the microvascular transport characteristics from the acquired time-intensity data. The deconvolved feeding arterial bolus input curves and corresponding regional pulmonary parenchymal 'response' functions provide measures of regional pulmonary tracer residence times, allowing calculation of microvascular transit times for different spatial regions of the pulmonary system. The acquired feeding (main) pulmonary artery and regional pulmonary parenchyma time-intensity curves were fit to gamma variate functions which were then sampled with a temporal resolution of 0.1 seconds. Deconvolution of the feeding arterial and regional parenchymal curves consistently results in bimodal regional residue functions. The two modes consist of a relatively large, sharp, narrow peak approximating a delta function followed by a smaller more dispersed curve. The sharp, narrow peak appears to be due to small artery inclusion in the sampled parenchymal region (partial volume effects). The magnitude of the dominant arterial peak decreases as sampling locations are moved from the less expanded dependent to the more expanded non-dependent lung regions of supine dogs. Mathematical separation of the two modes allowed isolation of the arterial and microvascular components. The shape and transit times of the putative microvascular components agree well with results from similar measurements via microfocal angiography and in vivo microscopy. Reconvolving the microvascular component with the input curve results in a corrected parenchymal curve representing the regional microvascular transport characteristics

  11. Retinal fractals and acute lacunar stroke.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ning; Liew, Gerald; Lindley, Richard I; Liu, Erica Y; Wang, Jie Jin; Hand, Peter; Baker, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine whether retinal fractal dimension, a quantitative measure of microvascular branching complexity and density, is associated with lacunar stroke. A total of 392 patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke had retinal fractal dimension measured from digital photographs, and lacunar infarct ascertained from brain imaging. After adjusting for age, gender, and vascular risk factors, higher retinal fractal dimension (highest vs lowest quartile and per standard deviation increase) was independently and positively associated with lacunar stroke (odds ratio [OR], 4.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-12.17 and OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.20-2.84, respectively). Increased retinal microvascular complexity and density is associated with lacunar stroke.

  12. Blood flow in microvascular networks: A study in nonlinear biology

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John B.; Carr, Russell T.; Wu, Fan; Lao, Yingyi; Maher, Meaghan

    2010-01-01

    Plasma skimming and the Fahraeus–Lindqvist effect are well-known phenomena in blood rheology. By combining these peculiarities of blood flow in the microcirculation with simple topological models of microvascular networks, we have uncovered interesting nonlinear behavior regarding blood flow in networks. Nonlinearity manifests itself in the existence of multiple steady states. This is due to the nonlinear dependence of viscosity on blood cell concentration. Nonlinearity also appears in the form of spontaneous oscillations in limit cycles. These limit cycles arise from the fact that the physics of blood flow can be modeled in terms of state dependent delay equations with multiple interacting delay times. In this paper we extend our previous work on blood flow in a simple two node network and begin to explore how topological complexity influences the dynamics of network blood flow. In addition we present initial evidence that the nonlinear phenomena predicted by our model are observed experimentally. PMID:21198135

  13. Diabetic microvascular complications: possible targets for improved macrovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D’Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Roshan, Bijan; Maski, Manish; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2011-01-01

    The results of recent outcome trials challenge hypotheses that tight control of both glycohemoglobin and blood pressure diminishes macrovascular events and survival among type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant questions exist regarding the adequacy of glycohemoglobin alone as a measure of diabetes control. Are we ignoring mechanisms of vasculotoxicity (profibrosis, altered angiogenesis, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and endothelial injury) inherent in current antihyperglycemic medications? Is the polypharmacy for lowering cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and systolic blood pressure producing drug interactions that are too complex to be clinically identified? We review angiotensin–aldosterone mechanisms of tissue injury that magnify microvascular damage caused by hyperglycemia and hypertension. Many studies describe interruption of these mechanisms, without hemodynamic consequence, in the preservation of function in type 1 diabetes. Possible interactions between the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and physiologic glycemic control (through pulsatile insulin release) suggest opportunities for further clinical investigation. PMID:21694944

  14. Diagnosis of coronary microvascular dysfunction – Present status

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Definite clinical diagnosis of microvascular angina is not possible with the existing knowledge. Resting electrocardiogram may be normal, and exercise electrocardiogram may be unremarkable. Echocardiography usually does not show regional wall motion abnormalities. Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography can satisfactorily evaluate only left anterior descending coronary artery and that too in some patients. Radio-isotope imaging can detect only severe localized disease. Noninvasive diagnosis needs high index of suspicion. At present, definite diagnosis is based on documentation of normal epicardial coronaries, coronary flow reserve less than 2.5 on adenosine induced hyperemia, and absence of spasm of epicardial coronaries on acetylcholine provocation. Invasive evaluation is costly, needs sophisticated equipments and expertise. Therapeutic and prognostic implications of various parameters remains to be evaluated. At present invasive evaluation is recommended only for patients with intractable symptoms with unconfirmed diagnosis, requiring repeated hospitalization and evaluation with failure of empirical therapy. PMID:26702685

  15. Surgical variation of microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: A technical note and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Otávio T.; de Almeida, César C.; Iglesio, Ricardo F.; de Navarro, Jessie M.; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Duarte, Kleber P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this article, the authors described their experience in microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The microvascular decompression technique used in the authors’ institution is described in a step by step manner with some illustrative cases as well as a cadaver dissection to highlight the differences with other previously described techniques. Results: Since 2013, 107 patients were operated in the Neurosurgery Division of the University of São Paulo using the described technique, with a shorter operative time and avoiding cerebellar retractor compared with classic techniques. Conclusion: Our modified microvascular decompression technique for trigeminal neuralgia can be used with safety and efficiency for treating trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:27625893

  16. The Utility of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in the Assessment of Suspected Microvascular Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Belardinelli, Romualdo; LaBudde, Brian; Menasco, Nicholas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence demonstrating the potential value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to accurately detect myocardial ischemia secondary to macro-vascular disease is beginning to emerge. Despite distinct mechanisms mediating ischemia in micro-vascular and macrovascular coronary artery disease (CAD), the net physiologic effect of exercise-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is common to both. The abnormal physiologic response to CPET may, therefore, be similar in patients with macro- and micro-vascular ischemia. The following case report describes the CPET abnormalities in a patient with suspected microvascular CAD and the subsequent improvement in LV function following three weeks of medical therapy with the anti-ischemic drug ranolazine. PMID:19233492

  17. Surgical variation of microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: A technical note and anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Otávio T.; de Almeida, César C.; Iglesio, Ricardo F.; de Navarro, Jessie M.; Teixeira, Manoel J.; Duarte, Kleber P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this article, the authors described their experience in microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: The microvascular decompression technique used in the authors’ institution is described in a step by step manner with some illustrative cases as well as a cadaver dissection to highlight the differences with other previously described techniques. Results: Since 2013, 107 patients were operated in the Neurosurgery Division of the University of São Paulo using the described technique, with a shorter operative time and avoiding cerebellar retractor compared with classic techniques. Conclusion: Our modified microvascular decompression technique for trigeminal neuralgia can be used with safety and efficiency for treating trigeminal neuralgia.

  18. Microvascular dysfunction in schizophrenia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Martin W; Martin, Billie-Jean; Fung, Marinda; Pajevic, Milada; Anderson, Todd J; Raedler, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a mental illness associated with cardiovascular disease at a younger age than in the general population. Endothelial dysfunction has predictive value for future cardiovascular events; however, the impact of a diagnosis of schizophrenia on this marker is unknown. Aims: We tested the hypothesis that subjects with schizophrenia have impaired endothelial function. Methods: A total of 102 subjects (34.5±7.5 years) participated in this study. This sample consisted of 51 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 51 healthy subjects, who were matched for age (P=0.442), sex (P>0.999), and smoking status (P=0.842). Peripheral artery microvascular and conduit vessel endothelial function was measured using hyperemic velocity time integral (VTI), pulse arterial tonometry (PAT), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results: Significantly lower values of VTI were noted in subjects with schizophrenia (104.9±33.0 vs. 129.1±33.8 cm, P<0.001), whereas FMD (P=0.933) and PAT (P=0.862) did not differ between the two groups. A multivariable-linear-regression analysis, built on data from univariate and partial correlations, showed that only schizophrenia, sex, lipid-lowering medications, antihypertensive medications, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol were predictive of attenuated VTI, whereas age, ethnicity, family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), antidiabetic medications, antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, and anticholinergic medications did not predict VTI in this model (adjusted R 2=0.248). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a diagnosis of schizophrenia is associated with impaired microvascular function as indicated by lower values of VTI, irrespective of many other clinical characteristics. It might be an early indicator of

  19. Oxidative stress modulates nucleobase transport in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bone, Derek B J; Antic, Milica; Vilas, Gonzalo; Hammond, James R

    2014-09-01

    Purine nucleosides and nucleobases play key roles in the physiological response to vascular ischemia/reperfusion events. The intra- and extracellular concentrations of these compounds are controlled, in part, by equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype 1 (ENT1; SLC29A1) and by equilibrative nucleobase transporter subtype 1 (ENBT1). These transporters are expressed at the membranes of numerous cell types including microvascular endothelial cells. We studied the impact of reactive oxygen species on the function of ENT1 and ENBT1 in primary (CMVEC) and immortalized (HMEC-1) human microvascular endothelial cells. Both cell types displayed similar transporter expression profiles, with the majority (>90%) of 2-chloro[(3)H]adenosine (nucleoside) uptake mediated by ENT1 and [(3)H]hypoxanthine (nucleobase) uptake mediated by ENBT1. An in vitro mineral oil-overlay model of ischemia/reperfusion had no effect on ENT1 function, but significantly reduced ENBT1 Vmax in both cell types. This decrease in transport function was mimicked by the intracellular superoxide generator menadione and could be reversed by the superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTMPyP. In contrast, neither the extracellular peroxide donor TBHP nor the extracellular peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) affected ENBT1-mediated [(3)H]hypoxanthine uptake. SIN-1 did, however, enhance ENT1-mediated 2-chloro[(3)H]adenosine uptake. Our data establish HMEC-1 as an appropriate model for study of purine transport in CMVEC. Additionally, these data suggest that the generation of intracellular superoxide in ischemia/reperfusion leads to the down-regulation of ENBT1 function. Modification of purine transport by oxidant stress may contribute to ischemia/reperfusion induced vascular damage and should be considered in the development of therapeutic strategies.

  20. Alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Domizi, Roberta; Romano, Rocco; Adrario, Erica; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-01

    Glycocalyx degradation may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue hypoperfusion during systemic inflammation and sepsis. In this observational study we evaluated the alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in 16 healthy volunteers and 50 critically ill patients. Sidestream Dark Field images of the sublingual microcirculation were automatically analyzed by dedicated software. The Perfused Boundary Region (PBR) was calculated as the dimensions of the permeable part of the glycocalyx allowing the penetration of circulating red blood cells, providing an index of glycocalyx damage. The PBR was increased in ICU patients compared to healthy controls (2.7 [2.59-2.88] vs. 2.46 [2.37-2.59]μm, p<0.0001) and tended to be higher in the 32 septic patients compared to non-septics (2.77 [2.62-2.93] vs. 2.67 [2.55-2.75]μm, p=0.05), suggesting more severe glycocalyx alterations. A PBR of 2.76 showed the best discriminative ability towards the presence of sepsis (sensitivity: 50%, specificity: 83%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.82, p=0.05). A weak positive correlation was found between PBR and heart rate (r=0.3, p=0.03). In 17 septic patients, a correlation was found between PBR and number of rolling leukocytes in post-capillary venules (RL/venule) (r=0.55, p=0.02), confirming that glycocalyx shedding enhances leukocyte-endothelium interaction.

  1. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  2. Autonomic dysfunction and microvascular damage in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Franco, Manuela; Paradiso, Michele; Riccieri, Valeria; Basili, Stefania; Mammarella, Antonio; Valesini, Guido

    2007-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease characterized by vascular damage and interstizial fibrosis of many organs. Our interest was focused on the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function by measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) and microvascular damage detected by nailfold capillaroscopy (NC) in SSc patients. We examined 25 consecutive outpatients affected by systemic sclerosis and 25 healthy controls. Exclusion criteria were the presence of cardiac disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or neurological diseases. All subjects underwent 24-h ambulatory ECG Holter recording and NC examination. Heart rate variability was evaluated in the time domain, using appropriate software, computing the time series of all normal-to-normal (NN) QRS intervals throughout the 24-h recording period. A semiquantitative rating scale was adopted to score the NC abnormalities, as well as a rating system for avascular areas and morphological NC patterns. In SSc patients, HRV analysis showed significantly lower values of SDNN (standard deviation of all NN intervals) (p=0.009), SDANN (standard deviation of the averages of NN intervals in all 5-min segments of the entire recording) (p=0.01), and pNN50 (the percentage of adjacent NN intervals that differed by more than 50 ms) (p=0.02), compared to the control group. These parameters in SSc patients significantly decreased with the worsening of semiquantitative capillaroscopy score. In conclusion, an abnormal autonomic nervous control of the heart might contribute to identify subclinical cardiac involvement in SSc patients. The coexistence of autonomic dysfunction with a more severe microvascular damage could be considered a potential prognostic tool in the identification of those patients particularly at risk for cardiac mortality.

  3. Long noncoding RNA-MEG3 is involved in diabetes mellitus-related microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gui-Zhen; Tian, Wei; Fu, Hai-Tao; Li, Chao-Peng; Liu, Ban

    2016-02-26

    Microvascular dysfunction is an important characteristic of diabetic retinopathy. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we investigated the role of lncRNA-MEG3 in diabetes-related microvascular dysfunction. We show that MEG3 expression level is significantly down-regulated in the retinas of STZ-induced diabetic mice, and endothelial cells upon high glucose and oxidative stress. MEG3 knockdown aggravates retinal vessel dysfunction in vivo, as shown by serious capillary degeneration, and increased microvascular leakage and inflammation. MEG3 knockdown also regulates retinal endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro. The role of MEG3 in endothelial cell function is mainly mediated by the activation of PI3k/Akt signaling. MEG3 up-regulation may serve as a therapeutic strategy for treating diabetes-related microvascular complications. PMID:26845358

  4. SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICROVASCULAR THROMBOSIS IN RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICROVASCULAR THROMBOSIS IN RESPONSE TO PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE.
    PS Gilmour, MC Schladweiler, AD Ledbetter, and UP Kodavanti. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PTB, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Environmental particles (PM...

  5. Genetic Studies on Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Focusing on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Soo Heon

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 8.3% and is the leading cause of visual loss, end-stage renal disease and amputation. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified genetic risk factors for diabetic microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. We summarized the recent findings of GWASs on diabetic microvascular complications and highlighted the challenges and our opinion on future directives. Five GWASs were conducted on diabetic retinopathy, nine on nephropathy, and one on neuropathic pain. The majority of recent GWASs were underpowered and heterogeneous in terms of study design, inclusion criteria and phenotype definition. Therefore, few reached the genome-wide significance threshold and the findings were inconsistent across the studies. Recent GWASs provided novel information on genetic risk factors and the possible pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular complications. However, further collaborative efforts to standardize phenotype definition and increase sample size are necessary for successful genetic studies on diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:26194074

  6. Interactions of the Gasotransmitters Contribute to Microvascular Tone (Dys)regulation in the Preterm Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Rebecca M.; Palliser, Hannah K.; Latter, Joanna L.; Kelly, Megan A.; Chwatko, Grazyna; Glowacki, Rafal; Wright, Ian M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), nitric oxide (NO), and carbon monoxide (CO) are involved in transitional microvascular tone dysregulation in the preterm infant; however there is conflicting evidence on the interaction of these gasotransmitters, and their overall contribution to the microcirculation in newborns is not known. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of all 3 gasotransmitters, characterise their interrelationships and elucidate their combined effects on microvascular blood flow. Methods 90 preterm neonates were studied at 24h postnatal age. Microvascular studies were performed by laser Doppler. Arterial COHb levels (a measure of CO) were determined through co-oximetry. NO was measured as nitrate and nitrite in urine. H2S was measured as thiosulphate by liquid chromatography. Relationships between levels of the gasotransmitters and microvascular blood flow were assessed through partial correlation controlling for the influence of gestational age. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow and derive a theoretical model of their interactions. Results No relationship was observed between NO and CO (p = 0.18, r = 0.18). A positive relationship between NO and H2S (p = 0.008, r = 0.28) and an inverse relationship between CO and H2S (p = 0.01, r = -0.33) exists. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the combination of these effects on microvascular blood flow. The model with the best fit is presented. Conclusions The relationships between NO and H2S, and CO and H2S may be of importance in the preterm newborn, particularly as NO levels in males are associated with higher H2S levels and higher microvascular blood flow and CO in females appears to convey protection against vascular dysregulation. Here we present a theoretical model of these interactions and their overall effects on microvascular flow in the preterm newborn, upon which future mechanistic studies may

  7. Visualization of microvascularity in glioblastoma multiforme with 8-T high-spatial-resolution MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Christoforidis, Gregory A; Grecula, John C; Newton, Herbert B; Kangarlu, Allahyar; Abduljalil, Amir M; Schmalbrock, Petra; Chakeres, Donald W

    2002-10-01

    We used 8-T high-spatial-resolution gradient-echo MR imaging to directly visualize microvascularity in pathologically proved glioblastoma multiforme. Images were compared with 1.5-T high-spatial-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted images and digital subtraction angiograms. Preliminary data indicate that 8-T high-spatial-resolution MR imaging may enable the identification of areas of abnormal microvascularity in glioblastoma multiforme that are not visible with other routine clinical techniques.

  8. [THE AGING OF MICROVASCULAR NETWORK FORMED IN CORTEX FOLLOWING INTRACEREBRAL TRANSPLANTATION OF MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, I B; Anisimov, S V; Puzanov, M V; Sergeev, I V; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2015-01-01

    Using a TV device to study microcirculation in brain we found that intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to 12-months old rats led to a significant increase (circa 1,5-fold times) of microvascular density in pia tissue and to increased constriction reactions of pia arterioles in response to noradrenalin application on a brain surface. Both microvascular density and pia arterioles reactivity was completely preserved in aging until 22-24 months. PMID:26390610

  9. Microvascular patterns in the blubber of shallow and deep diving odontocetes.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Sara J; Gay, Mark; Pabst, D Ann; Dillaman, Richard; Westgate, Andrew J; Koopman, Heather N

    2012-08-01

    Blubber, a specialized form of subdermal adipose tissue, surrounds marine mammal bodies. Typically, adipose tissue is perfused by capillaries but information on blubber vascularization is lacking. This study's goals were to: 1) describe and compare the microvasculature (capillaries, microarterioles, and microvenules) of blubber across odontocete species; 2) compare microvasculature of blubber to adipose tissue; and 3) examine relationships between blubber's lipid composition and its microvasculature. Percent microvascularity, distribution, branching pattern, and diameter of microvessels were determined from images of histochemically stained blubber sections from shallow-diving bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), deeper-diving pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps), deep-diving beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris; Ziphius cavirostris), and the subdermal adipose tissue of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). Tursiops blubber showed significant stratification in percent microvascularity among the superficial, middle, and deep layers and had a significantly higher percent microvascularity than all other animals analyzed, in which the microvasculature was more uniformly distributed. The percent microvasculature of Kogia blubber was lower than that of Tursiops but higher than that of beaked whales and the subdermal adipose tissue of domestic pigs. Tursiops had the most microvascular branching. Microvessel diameter was relatively uniform in all species. There were no clear patterns associating microvascular and lipid characteristics. The microvascular characteristics of the superficial layer of blubber resembled the adipose tissue of terrestrial mammals, suggesting some conservation of microvascular patterns in mammalian adipose tissue. The middle and deep layers of blubber, particularly in Tursiops, showed the greatest departure from typical mammalian microvascular arrangement. Factors such as metabolics or thermoregulation may be influencing the microvasculature in these

  10. Prostaglandin E2 enhances interleukin-8 production via EP4 receptor in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aso, Hiromichi; Ito, Satoru; Mori, Akemi; Morioka, Masataka; Suganuma, Nobukazu; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2012-01-15

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a bioactive prostanoid implicated in the inflammatory processes of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. This study investigated whether PGE(2) can induce production of interleukin (IL)-8, the major chemokine for neutrophil activation, from human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVECs). PGE(2) significantly enhanced IL-8 protein production with increases in IL-8 mRNA expression and intracellular cAMP levels. HPMVECs expressed only EP4 receptor mRNA. The PGE(2) effects were mimicked by a selective EP4 receptor agonist, ONO-AE1-329, and inhibited by a selective EP4 receptor antagonist, ONO-AE3-208, or a protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate triethylamine salt. The specific agonist for EP1, EP2, or EP3 receptor did not induce IL-8 production. PGE(2)-induced IL-8 production was accompanied by p38 phosphorylation and was significantly inhibited by a p38 inhibitor, SB-203580, but not by an ERK1/2 inhibitor, U-0126, or a JNK inhibitor, SP-600125. Additionally, PGE(2) increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression with no change in constitutive cyclooxygenase-1 expression, suggesting possible involvement of an autocrine or paracrine manner. In conclusion, PGE(2) enhances IL-8 production via EP4 receptor coupled to G(s) protein in HPMVECs. Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway, followed by p38 activation, is essential for these mechanisms. Because neutrophils play a critical role in the inflammation of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome, IL-8 released from the pulmonary microvasculature in response to PGE(2) may contribute to pathophysiology of this disease.

  11. Deeper Penetration of Erythrocytes into the Endothelial Glycocalyx Is Associated with Impaired Microvascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Boels, Margien G. S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43–2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: −0.034; 95% confidence interval: −0.037 to −0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick (“healthy”) glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin (“risk”) glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion. PMID:24816787

  12. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI. PMID:27165871

  13. Deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the endothelial glycocalyx is associated with impaired microvascular perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; van den Berg, Bernard M; Boels, Margien G S; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43-2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: -0.034; 95% confidence interval: -0.037 to -0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick ("healthy") glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin ("risk") glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion.

  14. Drag-Reducing Polymer Enhances Microvascular Perfusion in the Traumatized Brain with Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bragin, Denis E; Thomson, Susan; Bragina, Olga; Statom, Gloria; Kameneva, Marina V; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not focused on improving microvascular perfusion. Drag-reducing polymers (DRP), linear, long-chain, blood-soluble, nontoxic macromolecules, may offer a new approach to improving cerebral perfusion by primary alteration of the fluid dynamic properties of blood. Nanomolar concentrations of DRP have been shown to improve hemodynamics in animal models of ischemic myocardium and ischemic limb, but have not yet been studied in the brain. We recently demonstrated that DRP improved microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a normal rat brain. We hypothesized that DRP could restore microvascular perfusion in hypertensive brain after TBI. Using in vivo two-photon laser scanning microscopy we examined the effect of DRP on microvascular blood flow and tissue oxygenation in hypertensive rat brains with and without TBI. DRP enhanced and restored capillary flow, decreased microvascular shunt flow, and, as a result, reduced tissue hypoxia in both nontraumatized and traumatized rat brains at high intracranial pressure. Our study suggests that DRP could constitute an effective treatment for improving microvascular flow in brain ischemia caused by high intracranial pressure after TBI.

  15. Thiel embalming technique: a valuable method for microvascular exercise and teaching of flap raising.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Klaus-D; Kesting, Marco; Mücke, Thomas; Rau, Andrea; Hölzle, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Because of its high requirements on dexterity and microsurgical skills and the need of complete understanding of flap anatomy, microvascular free flap transfer belongs to the most demanding surgical procedures. Therefore, courses for flap raising and microvascular exercise are considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practise. To achieve teaching conditions as realistic as possible we used a novel cadaver embalming method enabling tissue dissection comparable to the living body. Thirty cadavers which were offered to us by the Institute of Anatomy for the purpose of running flap raising courses were embalmed in the technique described by Thiel. On each cadaver, nine free flaps were dissected according to a structured protocol by each course participant and afterwards used for microvascular exercise. The conservation of fine vascular structures and the suitability of the embalmed tissue for microvascular suturing were observed and photographically documented. The Thiel embalming technique provided flap raising procedures to be performed under realistic conditions similar to the living body. Vessels and nerves could be exposed and dissected up to a diameter of 1 mm and allowed for microvascular suturing even after weeks like fresh specimens. The Thiel embalming method is a unique technique and ideally suited to teach flap raising and microvascular suturing on human material.

  16. Added Qualifications in Microsurgery: Consideration for Subspecialty Certification in Microvascular Surgery in Europe.

    PubMed

    Heidekrueger, Paul I; Tanna, Neil; Weichman, Katie E; Szpalski, Caroline; Tos, Pierluigi; Ninkovic, Milomir; Broer, P Niclas

    2016-07-01

    Background While implementation of subspecializations may increase expertise in a certain area of treatment, there also exist downsides. Aim of this study was, across several disciplines, to find out if the technique of microsurgery warrants the introduction of a "Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQ) in microsurgery." Methods An anonymous, web-based survey was administered to directors of microsurgical departments in Europe (n = 205). Respondents were asked, among other questions, whether they had completed a 12-month microvascular surgery fellowship and whether they believed a CAQ in microvascular surgery should be instituted. Results The response rate was 57%, and 33% of the respondents had completed a 12-month microvascular surgery fellowship.A total of 61% of all surgeons supported a CAQ in microsurgery. Answers ranged from 47% of support to 100% of support, depending on the countries surveyed. Discussion This is one of the few reports to evaluate the potential role of subspecialty certification of microvascular surgery across several European countries. The data demonstrate that the majority of directors of microsurgical departments support such a certificate. There was significantly greater support for a CAQ in microsurgery among those who have completed a formal microvascular surgery fellowship themselves. Conclusion This study supports the notion that further discussion and consideration of subspecialty certification in microvascular surgery appears necessary. There are multiple concerns surrounding this issue. Similar to the evolution of hand surgery certification, an exploratory committee of executive members of the respective medical boards and official societies may be warranted.

  17. Action of Shiga Toxin Type-2 and Subtilase Cytotoxin on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, María M.; Sacerdoti, Flavia; Jancic, Carolina; Repetto, Horacio A.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Ibarra, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) associated with diarrhea is a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and responsible for acute and chronic renal failure in children younger than 5 years old. The human kidney is the most affected organ due to the presence of very Stx-sensitive cells, such as microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) was proposed as a new toxin that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis, although its action on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC) has not been described yet. In this study, we compared the effects of SubAB with those caused by Stx2 on primary cultures of HGEC isolated from fragments of human pediatric renal cortex. HGEC were characterized as endothelial since they expressed von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1). HGEC also expressed the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor for Stx2. Both, Stx2 and SubAB induced swelling and detachment of HGEC and the consequent decrease in cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Preincubation of HGEC with C-9 −a competitive inhibitor of Gb3 synthesis-protected HGEC from Stx2 but not from SubAB cytotoxic effects. Stx2 increased apoptosis in a time-dependent manner while SubAB increased apoptosis at 4 and 6 h but decreased at 24 h. The apoptosis induced by SubAB relative to Stx2 was higher at 4 and 6 h, but lower at 24 h. Furthermore, necrosis caused by Stx2 was significantly higher than that induced by SubAB at all the time points evaluated. Our data provide evidence for the first time how SubAB could cooperate with the development of endothelial damage characteristic of HUS pathogenesis. PMID:23936204

  18. IL-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M; Amezquita, Robert A; Pierce, Richard W; Jane-Wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C; Gonzalez, Anjelica L; Pober, Jordan S

    2016-09-15

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multistep process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with IL-1- or TNF-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a proinflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, although neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA sequencing analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and they also stimulate neutrophil production of proinflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and caspase-9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by conditioned media from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  19. Periodontal Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  20. Plasticity and Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hai-Sui

    Plasticity and Geotechnics is the first attempt to summarize and present, in one volume, the major developments achieved to date in the field of plasticity theory for geotechnical materials and its applications to geotechnical analysis and design.

  1. Plastic Surgery for Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or severe acne and scarring. Teens frequently gain self-esteem and confidence when their physical problems are corrected. ... art as a helpful index of anxiety and self-esteem with plastic surgery. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery 2002. ...

  2. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  3. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  4. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  5. Atorvastatin reduces endotoxin-induced microvascular inflammation via NOSII.

    PubMed

    McGown, Caroline C; Brookes, Zoë L S; Hellewell, Paul G; Ross, Jonathan J; Brown, Nicola J

    2015-05-01

    In a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced rat model of sepsis (endotoxaemia), we previously demonstrated that pravastatin reduced microvascular inflammation via increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase III (NOSIII). This study aimed to determine whether atorvastatin, the most commonly used statin for lowering cholesterol, exerted beneficial pleiotropic effects via a similar mechanism. The mesenteric microcirculation of anaesthetised male Wistar rats (308 ± 63 g, n = 54) was prepared for fluorescent intravital microscopy. Over 4 h, animals received intravenous (i.v.) administration of either saline, LPS (150 μg kg(-1) h(-1)) or LPS + atorvastatin (200 μg kg(-1) s.c., 18 and 3 h before LPS), with/without the non-specific NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (10 μg kg(-1) h(-1)) or NOSII-specific inhibitor 1400 W (20 μg kg(-1) min(-1)). LPS decreased mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (4 h, control 113 ± 20 mmHg; LPS 70 ± 23 mmHg), being reversed by atorvastatin (105 ± 3 mmHg) (p < 0.05). LPS also increased macromolecular leak measured after 100 mg kg(-1) of i.v FITC-BSA (arbitrary grey level adjacent to venules), which again was attenuated by atorvastatin (control 1.9 ± 4.0; LPS 12.0 ± 2.4; LPS + atorvastatin 4.5 ± 2.2) (p < 0.05). Furthermore, immunohistochemistry identified that atorvastatin decreased LPS-induced upregulation of endothelial cell NOSII expression, but NOSIII was unchanged in all groups. Atorvastatin improved MAP and reduced microvascular inflammation during endotoxaemia, associated with a reduction of pro-inflammatory NOSII. This differs from previous studies, whereby pravastatin increased expression of NOSIII. Thus preoperative statins have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects during endotoxaemia, but careful consideration must be given to the specific statin being used. PMID:25678054

  6. Evaluation of coronary microvascular function in patients with vasospastic angina

    PubMed Central

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Mitsuba, Naoya; Ishibashi, Ken; Nishioka, Kenji; Kurisu, Satoshi; Kihara, Yasuki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate endothelium-dependent and -independent coronary microvascular functions in patients with vasospastic angina (VSA). METHODS: Thirty-six patients with VSA (30 men and 6 women; mean age, 58 years) were enrolled in this study. VSA was defined as ≥ 90% narrowing of the epicardial coronary arteries on angiography performed during a spasm provocation test, presence of chest pain, and/or ST-segment deviation on an electrocardiogram (ECG). Patients (n = 36) with negative spasm provocation test results and those matched for age and sex were enrolled as a control group (nonVSA group). Low-dose acetylcholine (ACh; 3 μg/min) was infused into the left coronary ostium for 2 min during the spasm provocation test. Following the spasm provocation test, nitroglycerin (0.2 mg) was administered intracoronally. Coronary blood flow (was calculated from quantitative angiography and Doppler flow velocity measurements, and the coronary flow reserve was calculated as the ratio of coronary flow velocity after injection of adenosine triphosphate (20 μg) to the baseline value. Changes in the coronary artery diameter in response to ACh and nitroglycerin infusion were expressed as percentage changes from baseline measurements. RESULTS: Body mass index was significantly lower in the VSA group than in the nonVSA group. The frequency of conventional coronary risk factors and the rate of statin use were similar between the 2 groups. The left ventricular ejection fraction as evaluated by echocardiography was similar between the 2 groups. The duration of angina was 9 ± 2 mo. The results of blood chemistry analysis were similar between the 2 groups. Low-dose ACh did not cause coronary spasms. The change in coronary artery diameter in response to ACh was lower in the VSA group (-1.4% ± 9.3%) than in the nonVSA group (3.1% ± 6.5%, P < 0.05), whereas nitroglycerin-induced coronary artery dilatation and coronary blood flow increase in response to ACh or coronary flow reserve did

  7. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  8. Tomorrow's Plastic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Averil

    2005-01-01

    Far from being just cheap packaging materials, plastics may be the materials of tomorrow. Plastic can conduct electricity, and this opens up a host of high-tech possibilities in the home and in energy generation. These possibilities are discussed here along with how plastic can be recycled and perhaps even grown.

  9. Processing of plastics

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Albert

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the processing of plastic materials from the handling of polymers in the pellet and powder form to manufacturing of a plastic fabricated product. Various types of equipment used and melt processing ranges of various polymer formulations to make the myriad of plastic products that are commercially available are discussed. PMID:1175556

  10. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  11. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  12. Isolation and characterization of equine microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bochsler, P N; Slauson, D O; Chandler, S K; Suyemoto, M M

    1989-10-01

    The use of cultured tissue has not yet become widespread in research involving equine disease, and this may be attributable in part to the scarcity of published reports concerning tissue culture methods for this species. We report here the isolation of equine microvascular endothelium (EMVE) from fresh omental tissue of horses and ponies. Fresh donor tissue was minced, subjected to collagenase digestion, and filtered. Cells were layered on 5% bovine serum albumin for gravity sedimentation, the bottom layer was collected, and the cells were plated onto fibronectin-coated flasks. Medium consisted of Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with 10% whole fetal bovine serum (wFBS) and 20 micrograms of endothelial cell growth supplement/ml. The EMVE grew readily in culture, had the cobblestone morphologic feature at confluence, stained positively for factor VIII-related antigen, and metabolized acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Fibroblast and smooth muscle cell contamination was minimal in primary cell cultures, which were successfully passed and maintained in culture for 3 to 5 serial passages, using various media and substrates. Preliminary studies were undertaken to determine optimal growth conditions with a range of variables: serum concentration, extracellular matrix components, and growth factors, Optimal conditions were achieved with a minimum of 10% wFBS, and with either fibronectin or laminin as extracellular matrix substrates. The EMVE grew adequately in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium plus 10% wFBS, and the added growth factors or serum supplements did not appear necessary for growth of EMVE.

  13. Macro- and microvascular effects of nitrous oxide in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, J. L.; Westphal, K. A.; Richardson, D. R.; Roth, G. I.

    1991-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to determine the macro- and microvascular actions of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the rat, and (2) to determine whether the vascular actions of N2O involved specific interaction with alpha-adrenergic receptors or opioid receptors. Systolic blood pressure, heart rat, total tail blood flow, blood cell velocity in subepidermal capillaries of the tail, and percentage of capillaries exhibiting flow were monitored in conscious rats during the administration of N2O before and after administration of clonidine (an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist), prazosin (an alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist) or naloxone (an opioid antagonist). Total tail blood flow increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner with N2O at 20% and 40% with oxygen. This action of N2O was not blocked by clonidine, prazosin, or naloxone. Capillary flow velocity increased during 20% and 40% N2O compared to 100% O2, but the changes were not statistically significant nor did they correlate with the changes in tail blood flow. These data suggest that the peripheral vascular action of N2O does not involve specific actions at alpha-adrenergic receptors or opioid receptors and may be the result of direct actions on the peripheral vasculature. PMID:1667350

  14. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores.

  15. Syndecan-2 downregulation impairs angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noguer, Oriol Villena, Joan; Lorita, Jordi; Vilaro, Senen; Reina, Manuel

    2009-03-10

    The formation of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is a necessary process during development but also for tumour growth and other pathologies. It is promoted by different growth factors that stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, and generate new tubular structures. Syndecans, transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, bind such growth factors through their glycosaminoglycan chains and could transduce the signal to the cytoskeleton, thus regulating cell behaviour. We demonstrated that syndecan-2, the major syndecan expressed by human microvascular endothelial cells, is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins, in both bidimensional and tridimensional culture conditions. The role of syndecan-2 in 'in vitro' tumour angiogenesis was also examined by inhibiting its core protein expression with antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Downregulation of syndecan-2 reduces spreading and adhesion of endothelial cells, enhances their migration, but also impairs the formation of capillary-like structures. These results suggest that syndecan-2 has an important function in some of the necessary steps that make up the angiogenic process. We therefore propose a pivotal role of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan in the formation of new blood vessels.

  16. Review: Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William R.; Thore, Clara R.

    2010-01-01

    This review of age-related brain microvascular pathologies focuses on topics studied by this laboratory, including anatomy of the blood supply, tortuous vessels, venous collagenosis, capillary remnants, vascular density, and microembolic brain injury. Our studies feature thick sections, large blocks embedded in celloidin, and vascular staining by alkaline phosphatase (AP). This permits study of the vascular network in three dimensions, and the differentiation of afferent from efferent vessels. Current evidence suggests that there is decreased vascular density in aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and leukoaraiosis (LA), and cerebrovascular dysfunction precedes and accompanies cognitive dysfunction and neurodegeneration. A decline in cerebrovascular angiogenesis may inhibit recovery from hypoxia-induced capillary loss. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is inhibited by tortuous arterioles and deposition of excessive collagen in veins and venules. Misery perfusion due to capillary loss appears to occur before cell loss in LA, and CBF is also reduced in the normal-appearing white matter. Hypoperfusion occurs early in AD, inducing white matter lesions and correlating with dementia. In vascular dementia, cholinergic reductions are correlated with cognitive impairment, and cholinesterase inhibitors have some benefit. Most lipid microemboli from cardiac surgery pass through the brain in a few days, but some remain for weeks. They can cause what appears to be a type of vascular dementia years after surgery. Donepezil has shown some benefit. Emboli, such as clots, cholesterol crystals, and microspheres can be extruded through the walls of cerebral vessels, but there is no evidence yet that lipid emboli undergo such extravasation. PMID:20946471

  17. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  18. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of microvascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Magnain, C; Castel, A; Boucneau, T; Simonutti, M; Ferezou, I; Rancillac, A; Vitalis, T; Sahel, J A; Paques, M; Atlan, M

    2014-12-01

    We report on local superficial blood flow monitoring in biological tissue from laser Doppler holographic imaging. In time-averaging recording conditions, holography acts as a narrowband bandpass filter, which, combined with a frequency-shifted reference beam, permits frequency-selective imaging in the radio frequency range. These Doppler images are acquired with an off-axis Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Microvascular hemodynamic components mapping is performed in the cerebral cortex of the mouse and the eye fundus of the rat with near-infrared laser light without any exogenous marker. These measures are made from a basic inverse-method analysis of local first-order optical fluctuation spectra at low radio frequencies, from 0 Hz to 100 kHz. Local quadratic velocity is derived from Doppler broadenings induced by fluid flows, with elementary diffusing wave spectroscopy formalism in backscattering configuration. We demonstrate quadratic mean velocity assessment in the 0.1-10 mm/s range in vitro and imaging of superficial blood perfusion with a spatial resolution of about 10 micrometers in rodent models of cortical and retinal blood flow.

  19. Normal Muscle Oxygen Consumption and Fatigability in Sickle Cell Patients Despite Reduced Microvascular Oxygenation and Hemorheological Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Xavier; Pichon, Aurélien; Lemonne, Nathalie; Mougenel, Danièle; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Lamarre, Yann; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Although it has been hypothesized that muscle metabolism and fatigability could be impaired in sickle cell patients, no study has addressed this issue. Methods We compared muscle metabolism and function (muscle microvascular oxygenation, microvascular blood flow, muscle oxygen consumption and muscle microvascular oxygenation variability, which reflects vasomotion activity, maximal muscle force and local muscle fatigability) and the hemorheological profile at rest between 16 healthy subjects (AA), 20 sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SC) patients and 16 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients. Results Muscle microvascular oxygenation was reduced in SS patients compared to the SC and AA groups and this reduction was not related to hemorhelogical abnormalities. No difference was observed between the three groups for oxygen consumption and vasomotion activity. Muscle microvascular blood flow was higher in SS patients compared to the AA group, and tended to be higher compared to the SC group. Multivariate analysis revealed that muscle oxygen consumption was independently associated with muscle microvascular blood flow in the two sickle cell groups (SC and SS). Finally, despite reduced muscle force in sickle cell patients, their local muscle fatigability was similar to that of the healthy subjects. Conclusions Sickle cell patients have normal resting muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability despite hemorheological alterations and, for SS patients only, reduced muscle microvascular oxygenation and increased microvascular blood flow. Two alternative mechanisms can be proposed for SS patients: 1) the increased muscle microvascular blood flow is a way to compensate for the lower muscle microvascular oxygenation to maintain muscle oxygen consumption to normal values or 2) the reduced microvascular oxygenation coupled with a normal resting muscle oxygen consumption could indicate that there is slight hypoxia within the muscle which is not sufficient to limit

  20. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  1. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  2. Early microvascular changes in the preterm neonate: a comparative study of the human and guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Rebecca M.; Palliser, Hannah K.; Lakkundi, Anil; de Waal, Koert; Latter, Joanna L.; Clifton, Vicki L.; Wright, Ian M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dysfunction of the transition from fetal to neonatal circulatory systems may be a major contributor to poor outcome following preterm birth. Evidence exists in the human for both a period of low flow between 5 and 11 h and a later period of increased flow, suggesting a hypoperfusion–reperfusion cycle over the first 24 h following birth. Little is known about the regulation of peripheral blood flow during this time. The aim of this study was to conduct a comparative study between the human and guinea pig to characterize peripheral microvascular behavior during circulatory transition. Very preterm (≤28 weeks GA), preterm (29–36 weeks GA), and term (≥37 weeks GA) human neonates underwent laser Doppler analysis of skin microvascular blood flow at 6 and 24 h from birth. Guinea pig neonates were delivered prematurely (62 day GA) or at term (68–71 day GA) and laser Doppler analysis of skin microvascular blood flow was assessed every 2 h from birth. In human preterm neonates, there is a period of high microvascular flow at 24 h after birth. No period of low flow was observed at 6 h. In preterm animals, microvascular flow increased after birth, reaching a peak at 10 h postnatal age. Blood flow then steadily decreased, returning to delivery levels by 24 h. Preterm birth was associated with higher baseline microvascular flow throughout the study period in both human and guinea pig neonates. The findings do not support a hypoperfusion–reperfusion cycle in the microcirculation during circulatory transition. The guinea pig model of preterm birth will allow further investigation of the mechanisms underlying microvascular function and dysfunction during the initial extrauterine period. PMID:25350751

  3. Endurance, interval sprint, and resistance exercise training: impact on microvascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olver, T Dylan; Laughlin, M Harold

    2016-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) alters capillary hemodynamics, causes capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle, and alters endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype, resulting in impaired vasodilatory responses. These changes contribute to altered blood flow responses to physiological stimuli, such as exercise and insulin secretion. T2D-induced microvascular dysfunction impairs glucose and insulin delivery to skeletal muscle (and other tissues such as skin and nervous), thereby reducing glucose uptake and perpetuating hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In patients with T2D, exercise training (EX) improves microvascular vasodilator and insulin signaling and attenuates capillary rarefaction in skeletal muscle. EX-induced changes subsequently augment glucose and insulin delivery as well as glucose uptake. If these adaptions occur in a sufficient amount of tissue, and skeletal muscle in particular, chronic exposure to hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and the risk of microvascular complications in all vascular beds will decrease. We postulate that EX programs that engage as much skeletal muscle mass as possible and recruit as many muscle fibers within each muscle as possible will generate the greatest improvements in microvascular function, providing that the duration of the stimulus is sufficient. Primary improvements in microvascular function occur in tissues (skeletal muscle primarily) engaged during exercise, and secondary improvements in microvascular function throughout the body may result from improved blood glucose control. We propose that the added benefit of combined resistance and aerobic EX programs and of vigorous intensity EX programs is not simply "more is better." Rather, we believe the additional benefit is the result of EX-induced adaptations in and around more muscle fibers, resulting in more muscle mass and the associated microvasculature being changed. Thus, to acquire primary and secondary improvements in microvascular function and improved

  4. Studies of pathological dynamics after microvascular injury using nonlinear optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosidi, Nathanael L.

    Microvascular lesions are a common feature in the aging brain and clinical evidence has correlated microvascular pathology with the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Traditional animal models that replicate hemorrhagic and ischemic lesions in the brain typically affect large regions in the cortex and do not reproduce the small-scale lesions linked to neurodegeneration that likely stem from injuries to single microvessels. Due in part to this lack of small-scale injury animal models, there remains an incomplete understanding of the cellular and pathophysiological dynamics following small-scale vascular lesions, making progress on therapeutic strategies difficult. We used tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses to injure single penetrating arterioles (PA) (i.e., arterioles that plunge into the brain) in the cortex of live anesthetized rodents and used two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) imaging to quantify blood flow changes and to determine the time course of pathological consequences in the brain after injury. We find that after ischemic occlusion of a PA, nearby pial and penetrating arterioles do not actively compensate for the reduction of blood flow observed near the occluded blood vessel. We find that capillaries connected downstream to the clotted vessel dilate but other capillaries in the vicinity do not, suggesting that any compensatory signal that results in a physiological response travels vascularly. We ruptured individual PAs to induce microhemorrhages that resulted in extravasation of blood into the parenchyma. We find that tissue compression due to the hematoma does not collapse capillaries and cause acute ischemia. 2PEF imaging of mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in a subset of cortical neurons revealed no dendrite degeneration out to seven days after microhemorrhage. However, we did observe an inflammatory response by microglia/macrophages as quickly as 1.5-hrs after

  5. Waste plastics liquefaction technology

    SciTech Connect

    Machidori, Hideki; Ikawa, Hironori

    1996-12-31

    Plastics are now indispensable not only in industries but for daily life because of their excellent convenience. Only in Japan, about 12.25 million tons of plastics were produced in 1993. On the other hand, the production of waste plastics in the form of industrial and municipal wastes reached 7.56 million tons in the same year. A greater part of the produced waste plastics are now disposed of by incineration and landfill. The incineration would however generate detrimental substances from burned-up plastics and emit them into the exhaust gas, while the landfill would reduce rapidly the residual capacity of the final repositories. Under the circumstances, the Law for the Promotion of Sorted Collection and Recommercialization of Plastics Containers and Packages is to be enforced in 2000 in Japan. Waste plastics liquefaction technology has become high-lighted and is presupposed to employ for the treatment of waste plastics other than PET bottles in the law for the reason that relatively wide variety of waste plastics can be processed in quantity by this technology. The Kubota Corporation has made R and D efforts relating to the plastics liquefaction technology for more than 4 years, and it is now entering the stage of its commercialization.

  6. How Plastics Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Louis

    2013-03-01

    We encounter plastics every day, but despite their widespread use, amazing range of properties, and basic scientific underpinnings, most physicists--like most people--know relatively little about plastics. In contrast to hard crystalline and amorphous solids (e.g., metals, salts, ceramics, and glasses), we take plastics for granted, select them carelessly, and examine them more closely only on a need-to-know basis. By ignoring plastics until we need them, however, we risk not knowing what we don't know and using the wrong ones. To repurpose a familiar advertisement, ``there's a plastic for that.'' This talk will review some of the basic physics and science of plastics. It will examine the roles of temperature, order, intermolecular forces, entanglements, and linkages in plastics, and how those issues affect the properties of a given plastic. We'll stop along the way to recognize a few of the more familiar plastics, natural and synthetic, and explain some of their mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. The talk will conclude by explaining the remarkable properties of a plastic that has been largely misunderstood since its discovery 70 years ago: Silly Putty.

  7. Methylene blue solder re-absorption in microvascular anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Jeremy F.; Hepplewhite, J.; Frier, Malcolm; Bell, Peter R. F.

    2003-06-01

    Soldered vascular anastomoses have been reported using several chromophores but little is known of the optimal conditions for microvascular anastomosis. There are some indications of the optimal protein contents of a solder, and the effects of methylene blue on anastomotic strength. The effects of varying laser power density in vivo have also been described, showing a high rate of thrombosis with laser power over 22.9Wcm-2. However no evidence exists to describe how long the solder remains at the site of the anastomosis. Oz et al reported that the fibrin used in their study had been almost completely removed by 90 days but without objective evidence of solder removal. In order to address the issue of solder re-absorption from the site of an anastomosis we used radio-labelled albumin (I-125) incorporated into methylene blue based solder. This was investigated in both the situation of the patent and thrombosed anastomosis with anastomoses formed at high and low power. Iodine-125 (half life: 60.2 days) was covalently bonded to porcine albumin and mixed with the solder solution. Radio-iodine has been used over many years to determine protein turnover using either I-125 or I-131. Iodine-125 labelled human albumin is regularly used as a radiopharmaceutical tool for the determination of plasma volume. Radio-iodine has the advantages of not affecting protein metabolism and the label is rapidly excreted after metabolic breakdown. Labelling with chromium (Cr-51) causes protein denaturation and is lost from the protein with time. Labelled albumin has been reported in human studies over a 21-day period, with similar results reported by Matthews. Most significantly McFarlane reported a different rate of catabolism of I-131 and I-125 over a 22-day period. The conclusion from this is that the rate of iodine clearance is a good indicator of protein catabolism. In parallel with the surgery a series of blank standards were prepared with a known mass of solder to correct for isotope

  8. Mst1 inhibits CMECs autophagy and participates in the development of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Mingming; Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Yu; Man, Wanrong; Wu, Bin; Feng, Jiaxu; Sun, Lei; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications account for a substantial proportion of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Abnormalities of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) lead to impaired cardiac microvascular vessel integrity and subsequent cardiac dysfunction, underlining the importance of coronary microvascular dysfunction. In this study, experimental diabetes models were constructed using Mst1 transgenic, Mst1 knockout and sirt1 knockout mice. Diabetic Mst1 transgenic mice exhibited impaired cardiac microvessel integrity and decreased cardiac function. Mst1 overexpression deceased CMECs autophagy as evidenced by decreased LC3 expression and enhanced protein aggregation when subjected to high glucose culture. Mst1 knockout improved cardiac microvessel integrity and enhanced cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 knockdown up-regulated autophagy as indicated by more typical autophagosomes and increased LC3 expression in CMECs subjected to high glucose cultures. Mst1 knockdown also promoted autophagic flux in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Mst1 overexpression increased CMECs apoptosis, whereas Mst1 knockout decreased CMECs apoptosis. Sirt1 knockout abolished the effects of Mst1 overexpression in cardiac microvascular injury and cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, Mst1 knockout preserved cardiac microvessel integrity and improved cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 decreased sirt1 activity, inhibited autophagy and enhanced apoptosis in CMECs, thus participating in the pathogenesis of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27680548

  9. Conditioned Media from Microvascular Endothelial Cells Cultured in Simulated Microgravity Inhibit Osteoblast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Castiglioni, Sara; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gravity contributes to the maintenance of bone integrity. Accordingly, weightlessness conditions during space flight accelerate bone loss and experimental models in real and simulated microgravity show decreased osteoblastic and increased osteoclastic activities. It is well known that the endothelium and bone cells cross-talk and this intercellular communication is vital to regulate bone homeostasis. Because microgravity promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction, we anticipated that the molecular cross-talk between endothelial cells exposed to simulated microgravity and osteoblasts might be altered. Results. We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel device developed by NASA. Endothelial cells in microgravity show growth inhibition and release higher amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6 than controls. Conditioned media collected from microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity were used to culture human osteoblasts and were shown to retard osteoblast proliferation and inhibit their activity. Discussion. Microvascular endothelial cells in microgravity are growth retarded and release high amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6, which might play a role in retarding the growth of osteoblasts and impairing their osteogenic activity. Conclusions. We demonstrate that since simulated microgravity modulates microvascular endothelial cell function, it indirectly impairs osteoblastic function. PMID:25210716

  10. [Coronary microvascular dysfunction : Clinical aspects, diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Ong, P; Sechtem, U

    2016-06-01

    Just as in epicardial coronary stenosis, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) also leads to an imbalance of myocardial oxygen supply and demand. The dysfunction is located at the level of the coronary microcirculation with vessel diameters < 500 µm and structural as well as functional alterations have been described. The underlying mechanisms are diverse, frequently overlap and are still incompletely understood. Among others, conditions such as chronic inflammation, estrogen deficiency and a genetic familial predisposition have been reported. A common and often underdiagnosed clinical manifestation of CMD is found in patients who have symptoms of angina pectoris but no obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease or myocardial disease. The CMD can be diagnosed using non-invasive procedures, such as the combination of coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography and cardiac stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or coronary CT and positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, invasive coronary vasomotor assessment is also suitable. Very little evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment of CMD. The current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease from 2013 recommend using acetylsalicylic acid (ASS) and a statin as well as beta blockers and/or calcium channel blockers. Patients with CMD have an elevated risk for coronary events and death of approximately 1.7 % per year. Moreover, there is an increased morbidity with frequent presentations in practices and emergency admissions. Clinical research efforts should aim at a better characterization of the underlying mechanisms of CMD in order to develop targeted treatment approaches. PMID:27255117

  11. Novel Biomarkers of Arterial and Venous Ischemia in Microvascular Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Gerard K.; Monahan, John F. W.; Davis, Gabrielle B.; Lee, Yong Suk; Ragina, Neli P.; Wang, Charles; Zhou, Zhao Y.; Hong, Young Kwon; Spivak, Ryan M.; Wong, Alex K.

    2013-01-01

    both diagnose and successfully treat microvascular complications before irreversible tissue damage and flap loss occurs. PMID:23977093

  12. Our plastic age.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation.

  13. Our plastic age

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Richard C.; Swan, Shanna H.; Moore, Charles J.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  14. Our plastic age.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation. PMID:19528049

  15. Plasticized phenolphthalein polycarbonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    Phenolphthalein polycarbonate was successfully plasticized with polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Aroclor 1231) or tricresyl phosphate and cast from tetrahydrofuran to give clear films without loss of fire resistance. At loadings of 20 to 30 percent plasticizer the Tg was lowered to approximately 100 C which would render phenolphthalein polycarbonate easily moldable. Although these materials had some mechanical integrity as shown by their film forming ability, the room temperature toughness of the plasticized polymer was not significantly improved over unmodified polymer.

  16. Plasticity and Geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. O.; Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2002-11-01

    Plasticity and Geomechanics is a concise introduction to the general subject of plasticity with a particular emphasis on applications in geomechanics. Derived from the authors' lecture notes, this book is written with students firmly in mind. Excessive use of mathematical methods is avoided and, where possible, physical interpretations are given for important concepts. The authors present a clear introduction to the complex ideas and concepts of plasticity and demonstrate how this developing subject is of critical importance to geomechanics and geotechnical engineering.

  17. Plasticity and Geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. O.; Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2005-08-01

    Plasticity and Geomechanics is a concise introduction to the general subject of plasticity with a particular emphasis on applications in geomechanics. Derived from the authors' lecture notes, this book is written with students firmly in mind. Excessive use of mathematical methods is avoided and, where possible, physical interpretations are given for important concepts. The authors present a clear introduction to the complex ideas and concepts of plasticity and demonstrate how this developing subject is of critical importance to geomechanics and geotechnical engineering.

  18. Plastics and health risks.

    PubMed

    Halden, Rolf U

    2010-01-01

    By 2010, the worldwide annual production of plastics will surpass 300 million tons. Plastics are indispensable materials in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health (e.g., disposable syringes, intravenous bags). However, plastics also pose health risks. Of principal concern are endocrine-disrupting properties, as triggered for example by bisphenol A and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Opinions on the safety of plastics vary widely, and despite more than five decades of research, scientific consensus on product safety is still elusive. This literature review summarizes information from more than 120 peer-reviewed publications on health effects of plastics and plasticizers in lab animals and humans. It examines problematic exposures of susceptible populations and also briefly summarizes adverse environmental impacts from plastic pollution. Ongoing efforts to steer human society toward resource conservation and sustainable consumption are discussed, including the concept of the 5 Rs--i.e., reduce, reuse, recycle, rethink, restrain--for minimizing pre- and postnatal exposures to potentially harmful components of plastics.

  19. The plastics waste problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rowatt, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Post-consumer plastic is a symptom of the municipal solid waste (MSW) problem, not the cause. Yet the U.S. public sees plastic as a major contributor to the waste stream. Two-thirds say the environmental risks of using plastics outweigh the benefits and that they favor mandatory recycling programs in their community; more than four-fifths think recycling can substantially reduce the amount of solid waste and decry the presence of nonbiodegradable plastics in landfills. Given this perception, the author reviews solid waste management issues and examines the contributions that resin producers can make.

  20. Coatings For Plastic Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Robert W.

    1983-11-01

    Over the past decade there has been a tremendous surge of interest in the use of plastic optical elements to supplement or replace glass optics. While the technology of molding and polishing plastic optics has been the chief interest, there has been increasing need for precision coatings for these elements. In some instances these coatings are as critical as the elements themselves. In this paper we will describe the difficulties incurred in coating plastic and some of the many coatings presently available today despite the difficulties encountered. We will then cover the durability aspects of these coatings and lastly, point out some areas to consider when evaluating using plastic instead of glass.

  1. Microvascular coronary dysfunction and ischemic heart disease: where are we in 2014?

    PubMed

    Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Many patients with angina and signs of myocardial ischemia on stress testing have no significant obstructive epicardial coronary disease. There are many potential coronary and non-coronary mechanisms for ischemia without obstructive epicardial coronary disease, and prominent among these is coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction. Patients with coronary microvascular and/or endothelial dysfunction are often at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, including ischemic events and heart failure despite preserved ventricular systolic function. In this article, we will review the diagnosis and treatment of coronary microvascular and endothelial dysfunction, discuss their potential contribution to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and highlight recent advances in the evaluation of atherosclerotic morphology in these patients, many of whom have non-obstructive epicardial disease.

  2. Monitoring the healing process of laser-induced microvascular lesions using optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) possesses optical resolution and reveals endogenous optical absorption contrast, promising to be a valuable tool for in vivo microvascular imaging. In laser dermatology, OR-PAM can provide fruitful structural and functional information about the targeted microvascular lesions, such as their threedimensional (3D) morphology, precise location inside the tissue, and blood oxygenation within single vessels, which will facilitate accurate diagnosis and proper treatment. More importantly, the advantages of noninvasiveness and measurement consistency also permit OR-PAM to monitor the healing process of the laser-surgical wound noninvasively. In this work, we employed OR-PAM to monitor the healing process of microvascular lesions induced by nanosecond-pulsed laser. Our results indicate that OR-PAM could be a very useful tool in laser dermatology and laser microsurgery.

  3. The prevention of diabetic microvascular complications of diabetes: is there a role for lipid lowering?

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A

    2005-06-01

    The role of hyperglycemia in the development of microvascular complications of diabetes, such as nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy, has been well documented. Evidence is accumulating to support the concept that dyslipidemia can also contribute to the development of these complications. Lipid-lowering agents, such as statins, have been shown to prevent cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes. However, in addition to preventing macrovascular diseases, statins may also be able to retard the progression of microvascular complications of diabetes. Indeed, in addition to reducing lipid levels, these agents can improve endothelial function and reduce oxidative stress, which can improve microvascular function. These findings would provide further support for the use of lipid-lowering agents in patients with diabetes.

  4. Microvascular Branching as a Determinant of Blood Flow by Intravital Particle Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Wernet, Mark P.; Myers, Jerry G.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2007-01-01

    The effects of microvascular branching on blood flow were investigated in vivo by microscopic particle imaging velocimetry (micro-PIV). We use micro-PIV to measure blood flow by tracking red blood cells (RBC) as the moving particles. Velocity flow fields, including flow pulsatility, were analyzed for the first four branching orders of capillaries, postcapillary venules and small veins of the microvascular network within the developing avian yolksac at embryonic day 5 (E5). Increasing volumetric flowrates were obtained from parabolic laminar flow profiles as a function of increasing vessel diameter and branching order. Maximum flow velocities increased approximately twenty-fold as the function of increasing vessel diameter and branching order compared to flow velocities of 100 - 150 micron/sec in the capillaries. Results from our study will be useful for the increased understanding of blood flow within anastomotic, heterogeneous microvascular networks.

  5. Applications of computational models to better understand microvascular remodelling: a focus on biomechanical integration across scales

    PubMed Central

    Murfee, Walter L.; Sweat, Richard S.; Tsubota, Ken-ichi; Gabhann, Feilim Mac; Khismatullin, Damir; Peirce, Shayn M.

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular network remodelling is a common denominator for multiple pathologies and involves both angiogenesis, defined as the sprouting of new capillaries, and network patterning associated with the organization and connectivity of existing vessels. Much of what we know about microvascular remodelling at the network, cellular and molecular scales has been derived from reductionist biological experiments, yet what happens when the experiments provide incomplete (or only qualitative) information? This review will emphasize the value of applying computational approaches to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and effects of microvascular remodelling. Examples of individual computational models applied to each of the scales will highlight the potential of answering specific questions that cannot be answered using typical biological experimentation alone. Looking into the future, we will also identify the needs and challenges associated with integrating computational models across scales. PMID:25844149

  6. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness. There are two main types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when ...

  7. Segmental resection of the anterior mandibular arch with fibular microvascular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dierks, E J; Karakourtis, M H

    1997-09-01

    Segmental mandibular resection should be undertaken if there is a demonstrable invasion by cancer or if such invasion is suspected. Before the advent of microvascular free flaps, immediate osseous reconstruction of the anterior mandible was technically demanding and unreliable. Mandibular reconstruction with microvascular free flaps is no longer a novelty, nor is it reserved for unusually large resections. It has become the method of choice for the immediate reconstruction of defects resulting from mandibular cancer. This technique is particularly well-suited for defects of the anterior mandibular arch.

  8. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  9. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability, impaired microvascular function, and increased tissue oxygen consumption in children with falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J Brice; Granger, Donald L; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2014-11-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  10. [MIP-1α promotes the migration ability of Jurkat cell through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yi-Yang; Song, Qian; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia resulting from brain metastasis of human acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) cells and the role of MIP-1α in migration of Jurkat cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The real-time PCR, siRNA test, transendothelial migration test, endothelial permeability assay and cell adhesion assay were used to detect MIP-1α expression, penetration and migration ability as well as adhesion capability respectively. The results showed that the MIP-1α expression in Jurkat cells was higher than that in normal T cells and CCRF-HSB2, CCRF-CEM , SUP-T1 cells. The MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells enhanced the ability of Jurkat cells to penetrate through HBMEC, the ability of Jurkat cells treated by MIP-1α siRNA to adhere to HBMEC and to migrate trans endothelial cells decreased. It is concluded that the MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells participates in process of penetrating the Jurkat cells through HBMEC monolayer.

  11. In vivo micro-vascular imaging and flow cytometry in zebrafish using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Jiang, Jun; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y

    2014-03-01

    Zebrafish has rapidly evolved as a powerful vertebrate model organism for studying human diseases. Here we first demonstrate a new label-free approach for in vivo imaging of microvasculature, based on the recent discovery and detailed characterization of the two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence in the blood plasma of zebrafish. In particular, three-dimensional reconstruction of the microvascular networks was achieved with the depth-resolved two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) imaging. Secondly, the blood flow images, obtained by perpendicularly scanning the focal point across the blood vessel, provided accurate information for characterizing the hemodynamics of the circulatory system. The endogenous fluorescent signals of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) enabled visualization of the circulating granulocytes (neutrophils) in the blood vessel. The development of acute sterile inflammation could be detected by the quantitative counting of circulating neutrophils. Finally, we found that by utilizing a short wavelength excitation at 650 nm, the commonly used fluorescent proteins, such as GFP and DsRed, could be efficiently excited together with the endogenous fluorophores to achieve four-color TPEF imaging of the vascular structures and blood cells. The results demonstrated that the multi-color imaging could potentially yield multiple view angles of important processes in living biological systems.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of indirubin derivatives on influenza A virus-infected human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Fok, Siu-Ping; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Mak, Nai-Ki; Chan, Michael Chi-Wai; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) poses global threats to human health. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction are major complications in patients with severe influenza infection. This may be explained by the recent studies which highlighted the role of the pulmonary endothelium as the center of innate immune cells recruitment and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In this report, we examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of two indirubin derivatives, indirubin-3'-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) and indirubin-3'-oxime (E231), on IAV (H9N2) infected-human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Infection of H9N2 on HPMECs induced a high level of chemokines and cytokines production including IP-10, RANTES, IL-6, IFN-β and IFN-γ1. Post-treatment of E804 or E231 could significantly suppress the production of these cytokines. H9N2 infection rapidly triggered the activation of innate immunity through phosphorylation of signaling molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Using specific inhibitors or small-interfering RNA, we confirmed that indirubin derivatives can suppress H9N2-induced cytokines production through MAPKs and STAT3 signaling pathways. These results underscore the immunomodulatory effects of indirubin derivatives on pulmonary endothelium and its therapeutic potential on IAV-infection. PMID:26732368

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects of indirubin derivatives on influenza A virus-infected human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Fok, Siu-Ping; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Mak, Nai-Ki; Chan, Michael Chi-Wai; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) poses global threats to human health. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction are major complications in patients with severe influenza infection. This may be explained by the recent studies which highlighted the role of the pulmonary endothelium as the center of innate immune cells recruitment and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In this report, we examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of two indirubin derivatives, indirubin-3′-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) and indirubin-3′-oxime (E231), on IAV (H9N2) infected-human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Infection of H9N2 on HPMECs induced a high level of chemokines and cytokines production including IP-10, RANTES, IL-6, IFN-β and IFN-γ1. Post-treatment of E804 or E231 could significantly suppress the production of these cytokines. H9N2 infection rapidly triggered the activation of innate immunity through phosphorylation of signaling molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Using specific inhibitors or small-interfering RNA, we confirmed that indirubin derivatives can suppress H9N2-induced cytokines production through MAPKs and STAT3 signaling pathways. These results underscore the immunomodulatory effects of indirubin derivatives on pulmonary endothelium and its therapeutic potential on IAV-infection. PMID:26732368

  14. Network-timing-dependent plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Vincent; Keller, Daniel; Perich, Matthew; Markram, Henry; Muller, Eilif B.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of activity in networks of neurons are thought to convey salient information and drive synaptic plasticity. Here we report that network bursts also exert a profound effect on Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In acute slices of juvenile rat somatosensory cortex we paired a network burst, which alone induced long-term depression (LTD), with STDP-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD. We observed that STDP-induced LTP was either unaffected, blocked or flipped into LTD by the network burst, and that STDP-induced LTD was either saturated or flipped into LTP, depending on the relative timing of the network burst with respect to spike coincidences of the STDP event. We hypothesized that network bursts flip STDP-induced LTP to LTD by depleting resources needed for LTP and therefore developed a resource-dependent STDP learning rule. In a model neural network under the influence of the proposed resource-dependent STDP rule, we found that excitatory synaptic coupling was homeostatically regulated to produce power law distributed burst amplitudes reflecting self-organized criticality, a state that ensures optimal information coding. PMID:26106298

  15. Intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography in cerebral aneurysm surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stendel, R.; Pietila, T.; Al, H; Schilling, A.; Brock, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Outcome of surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms may be severely compromised by local cerebral ischaemia or infarction resulting from the inadvertent occlusion of an adjacent vessel by the aneurysm clip, or by incomplete aneurysm closure. It is therefore mandatory to optimise clip placement in situ to reduce the complication rate. The present study was performed to investigate the reliability of intraoperative microvascular Doppler ultrasonography (MDU) in cerebral aneurysm surgery, and to assess the impact of this method on the surgical procedure itself.
METHODS—Seventy five patients (19 men, 56 women, mean age 54.8 years, range 22-84 years) with 90 saccular cerebral aneurysms were evaluated. Blood flow velocities in the aneurysmal sac and in the adjacent vessels were determined by MDU before and after aneurysm clipping. The findings of MDU were analysed and compared with those of visual inspection of the surgical site and of postoperative angiography. Analysis was also made of the cases in which the clip was repositioned due to MDU findings.
RESULTS—A relevant stenosis of an adjacent vessel induced by clip positioning that had escaped detection by visual inspection was identified by Doppler ultrasonography in 17 out of 90 (18.9%) aneurysms. In addition, Doppler ultrasound demonstrated a primarily unoccluded aneurysm in 11 out of 90 (12.2%) patients. The aneurysm clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU findings in 26 out of 90 (28.8%) cases. In middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, the MDU results were relevant to the surgical procedure in 17out of 44 (38.6%) cases. Whereas with aneurysms of the anterior cerebral artery significant findings occurred in only five of 32cases (15.6%; p<0.05). The clip was repositioned on the basis of the MDU results in 18 out of 50 (36%) aneurysms in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) grade I-V compared with only eight out of 40 (20%) aneurysms in patients without SAH (p<0.05).

  16. Spinal Plasticity following Intermittent Hypoxia: Implications for Spinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dale-Nagle, Erica A.; Hoffman, Michael S.; MacFarlane, Peter M.; Satriotomo, Irawan; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Vinit, Stéphane; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity is a fundamental property of the neural system controlling breathing. One frequently studied model of respiratory plasticity is long-term facilitation of phrenic motor output (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH). pLTF arises from spinal plasticity, increasing respiratory motor output through a mechanism that requires new synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), activation of its high affinity receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and extracellular-related kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in or near phrenic motor neurons. Since intermittent hypoxia induces spinal plasticity, we are exploring the potential to harness repetitive AIH as a means of inducing functional recovery in conditions causing respiratory insufficiency, such as cervical spinal injury. Since repetitive AIH induces phenotypic plasticity in respiratory and motor neurons, it may restore respiratory motor function in patients with incomplete spinal injury. PMID:20536940

  17. Ventricular longitudinal function is associated with microvascular obstruction and intramyocardial haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Foley, James R J; Musa, Tarique Al; Ripley, David P; Swoboda, Peter P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Background Microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) are associated with adverse prognosis, independently of infarct size after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) is a well-established parameter of longitudinal function on echocardiography. Objective We aimed to investigate how acute MAPSE, assessed by a four-chamber cine-cardiovascular MR (CMR), is associated with MVO, IMH and convalescent left ventricular (LV) remodelling. Methods 54 consecutive patients underwent CMR at 3T (Intera CV, Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) within 3 days of reperfused STEMI. Cine, T2-weighted, T2* and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging were performed. Infarct and MVO extent were measured from LGE images. The presence of IMH was investigated by combined analysis of T2w and T2* images. Averaged-MAPSE (medial-MAPSE+lateral-MAPSE/2) was calculated from 4-chamber cine imaging. Results 44 patients completed the baseline scan and 38 patients completed 3-month scans. 26 (59%) patients had MVO and 25 (57%) patients had IMH. Presence of MVO and IMH were associated with lower averaged-MAPSE (11.7±0.4 mm vs 9.3±0.3 mm; p<0.001 and 11.8±0.4 mm vs 9.2±0.3 mm; p<0.001, respectively). IMH (β=−0.655, p<0.001) and MVO (β=−0.567, p<0.001) demonstrated a stronger correlation to MAPSE than other demographic and infarct characteristics. MAPSE ≤10.6 mm demonstrated 89% sensitivity and 72% specificity for the detection of MVO and 92% sensitivity and 74% specificity for IMH. LV remodelling in convalescence was not associated with MAPSE (AUC 0.62, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.77, p=0.22). Conclusions Postreperfused STEMI, LV longitudinal function assessed by MAPSE can independently predict the presence of MVO and IMH. PMID:27175286

  18. Microvascular oxygen partial pressure during hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Kohei; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-12-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is a major therapeutic treatment for ischemic ulcerations that perforate skin and underlying muscle in diabetic patients. These lesions do not heal effectively, in part, because of the hypoxic microvascular O2 partial pressures (PmvO2 ) resulting from diabetes-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, which alters the dynamic balance between O2 delivery (Q̇o2) and utilization (V̇o2) rates. We tested the hypothesis that HBO in diabetic muscle would exacerbate the hyperoxic PmvO2 dynamics due, in part, to a reduction or slowing of the cardiovascular, sympathetic nervous, and respiratory system responses to acute HBO exposure. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into diabetic (DIA: streptozotocin ip) and healthy (control) groups. A small animal hyperbaric chamber was pressurized with oxygen (100% O2) to 3.0 atmospheres absolute (ATA) at 0.2 ATA/min. Phosphorescence quenching techniques were used to measure PmvO2 in tibialis anterior muscle of anesthetized rats during HBO. Lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were measured electrophysiologically. During the normobaric hyperoxia and HBO, DIA tibialis anterior PmvO2 increased faster (mean response time, CONT 78 ± 8, DIA 55 ± 8 s, P < 0.05) than CONT. Subsequently, PmvO2 remained elevated at similar levels in CONT and DIA muscles until normobaric normoxic recovery where the DIA PmvO2 retained its hyperoxic level longer than CONT. Sympathetic nervous system and cardiac and respiratory responses to HBO were slower in DIA vs. CONT. Specifically the mean response times for RR (CONT: 6 ± 1 s, DIA: 29 ± 4 s, P < 0.05), HR (CONT: 16 ± 1 s, DIA: 45 ± 5 s, P < 0.05), and LSNA (CONT: 140 ± 16 s, DIA: 247 ± 34 s, P < 0.05) were greater following HBO onset in DIA than CONT. HBO treatment increases tibialis anterior muscle PmvO2 more rapidly and for a longer duration in DIA than CONT, but not to a greater level. Whereas respiratory, cardiovascular

  19. Reinforced plastics durability

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, G.

    1999-01-01

    Written especially for first-time users of reinforced plastics. The book offers substantial introductory information with key concepts. Chapters examine the long-term threats to the integrity of reinforced plastics: outdoor weathering, solvent/water attack, high temperatures, and repetitive stress.

  20. Coatings for plastic glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This article describes how, as a replacement for glass, coated thermoplastic polymers can reduce cost and weight and increase occupant retention and design flexibility. Advances in transparent protective coatings have increased the potential for successful use of plastics in automotive applications. Originally, plastic materials were considered replacements for metals but, with proven performance, the utility of plastics is expanding beyond metal displacement. Now, transparent plastics are being considered as a potential replacement for glass. Driving this approach are many of the same reasons that plastics were first considered as alternatives to metals--cost, weight, design flexibility, and CAFE requirements. Glass has good optical properties, abrasion and chemical resistance, and outdoor durability, but it is also heavy, breakable, and expensive to form into intricate shapes. Although most clear plastics offer good optical properties, moldability, toughness, and cost benefits, their primary limitation is poor surface resistance to abrasion, scratching, chemicals, and the outdoor environment. In many cases, clear protective coatings can minimize these limitations. The potential advantages and disadvantages of plastic vs glass in automotive applications are given. Transparent plastic materials available for consideration as replacements for automotive glazing are listed.

  1. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  2. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  3. 77 FR 54930 - Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A Subsidiary of Plastics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A... determination was published in the Federal Register on Monday, July 23, 2012 (77 FR 43123). ] At the request of... plastic parts. New information shows that Fortis Plastics is now called Carlyle Plastics and Resins....

  4. Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Briefing Papers > Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients Briefing Paper: Plastic Surgery for Ethnic Patients More than 3. ... 2067-2071. Share Related Links Plastic Surgery Briefing Papers Menu Cosmetic Reconstructive Patient Safety Before & After Find ...

  5. Sonothrombolysis with BR38 Microbubbles Improves Microvascular Patency in a Rat Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kampschulte, Marian; Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Botteron, Catherine; Juenemann, Martin; Yeniguen, Mesut; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Kaps, Manfred; Spratt, Neil J.; Gerriets, Tibo; Nedelmann, Max

    2016-01-01

    Background Early recanalization of large cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is associated with improved clinical outcome, however persisting hypoperfusion leads to poor clinical recovery despite large vessel recanalization. Limited experimental sonothrombolysis studies have shown that addition of microbubbles during treatment can improve microvascular patency. We aimed to determine the effect of two different microbubble formulations on microvascular patency in a rat stroke model. Methods We tested BR38 and SonoVue® microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis in Wistar rats submitted to 90-minute filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Rats were randomized to treatment (n = 6/group): control, rt-PA, or rt-PA+3-MHz ultrasound insonation with BR38 or SonoVue® at full or 1/3 dose. Treatment duration was 60 minutes, beginning after withdrawal of the filament, and sacrifice was immediately after treatment. Vascular volumes were evaluated with microcomputed tomography. Results Total vascular volume of the ipsilateral hemisphere was reduced in control and rt-PA groups (p<0.05), but was not significantly different from the contralateral hemisphere in all microbubble-treated groups (p>0.1). Conclusions Microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis improves microvascular patency. This effect is not dose- or microbubble formulation-dependent suggesting a class effect of microbubbles promoting microvascular reopening. This study demonstrates that microbubble-enhanced sonothrombolysis may be a therapeutic strategy for patients with persistent hypoperfusion of the ischemic territory. PMID:27077372

  6. Circulation, bone scans, and tetracycline labeling in microvascularized and vascular bundle implanted rib grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Lalonde, D.H.; Williams, H.B.; Rosenthall, L.; Viloria, J.B.

    1984-11-01

    The circulation in microvascularized rib grafts has been compared with that in conventional rib grafts and in those augmented by a direct vascular bundle implantation into the bone grafts. A new experimental model has been designed to correlate vascular perfusion, bone scan patterns, tetracycline labeling, and histological findings in these bone grafts. Posterior microvascularized rib grafts were found to have a circulatory pattern identical to that of the normal rib. Failed microvascularized rib grafts were revascularized more slowly than conventional rib grafts. Vascular bundles implanted into rib grafts remained patent and increased the rate of revascularization. The stripping or preservation of periosteum had no observable effects on the rate or pattern of conventional rib graft revascularization. The circulation in rib grafts was accurately reflected in technetium 99 bone scans, as was the patency of the anastomoses of microvascularized rib grafts and of implanted vascular bundles. In contrast, tetracycline labeling was repeatedly observed in avascular areas of bone grafts and, therefore, is not a reliable indicator of bone graft circulation.

  7. High fat diet induces central obesity, insulin resistance and microvascular dysfunction in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rute R S; Villela, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Souza, Maria das Graças C; Boa, Beatriz C S; Cyrino, Fátima Z G A; Silva, Simone V; Lisboa, Patricia C; Moura, Egberto G; Barja-Fidalgo, Thereza Christina; Bouskela, Eliete

    2011-11-01

    Microvascular dysfunction is an early finding in obesity possibly related to co-morbidities like diabetes and hypertension. Therefore we have investigated changes on microvascular function, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance tests (GTT and ITT) on male hamsters fed either with high fat (HFD, n=20) or standard (Control, n=21) diet during 16 weeks. Total body fat and protein content were determined by carcass analysis, aorta eNOS and iNOS expression by immunoblotting assay and mean blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) by an arterial catheter. Microvascular reactivity in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, functional capillary density (FCD), capillary recruitment induced by a hyperinsulinemic status and macromolecular permeability after 30 min ischemia was assessed on either cheek pouch or cremaster muscle preparations. Compared to Control, HFD animals have shown increased visceral fat (6.0 ± 0.8 vs. 13.8 ± 0.6g/100g BW), impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation, decreased FCD (11.3 ± 1.3 vs. 6.8 ± 1.2/field) and capillary recruitment during hyperinsulinemia and increased macromolecular permeability after ischemia/reperfusion (86.4 ± 5.2 vs.105.2 ± 5.1 leaks/cm(2)), iNOS expression and insulin resistance. MAP, HR, endothelial independent vasodilatation and eNOS expression were not different between groups. Our results have shown that HFD elicits an increase on visceral fat deposition, microvascular dysfunction and insulin resistance in hamsters.

  8. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications.

  9. Usefulness of Microvascular Ultrasonography in Differentiating Metastatic Lymphadenopathy from Tuberculous Lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Ryoo, Inseon; Suh, Sangil; You, Sung-Hye; Seol, Hae Young

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of vascular pattern analysis on microvascular ultrasonography in distinguishing metastatic lymphadenopathy from tuberculous lymphadenitis, compared with conventional power Doppler ultrasonography, and to evaluate inter-observer agreement for microvascular ultrasonography. Thirty-four patients with metastatic lymphadenopathy and 27 patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis were included. The level of inter-observer agreement was excellent or good for all aspects of vascular pattern analysis on both ultrasonographic examinations. Vascular distribution, internal vascularity and internal vascular features of lymph nodes on microvascular ultrasonography differed significantly different (p ≤ 0.002) between metastatic lymphadenopathy and tuberculous lymphadenitis. A central vascular pattern with displacement was prevalent in metastasis, and an avascular pattern was more frequent in tuberculosis. Internal vascularity of metastasis was higher than that of tuberculosis. Vascular patterns on power Doppler ultrasonography did not differ significantly. Vascular pattern analysis using microvascular ultrasonography can be helpful in differentiating metastatic lymphadenopathy from tuberculous lymphadenitis with good inter-observer agreement.

  10. Integration of Self-Assembled Microvascular Networks with Microfabricated PEG-Based Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Cuchiara, Michael P.; Gould, Daniel J.; McHale, Melissa K.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite tremendous efforts, tissue engineered constructs are restricted to thin, simple tissues sustained only by diffusion. The most significant barrier in tissue engineering is insufficient vascularization to deliver nutrients and metabolites during development in vitro and to facilitate rapid vascular integration in vivo. Tissue engineered constructs can be greatly improved by developing perfusable microvascular networks in vitro in order to provide transport that mimics native vascular organization and function. Here a microfluidic hydrogel is integrated with a self-assembling pro-vasculogenic co-culture in a strategy to perfuse microvascular networks in vitro. This approach allows for control over microvascular network self-assembly and employs an anastomotic interface for integration of self-assembled micro-vascular networks with fabricated microchannels. As a result, transport within the system shifts from simple diffusion to vessel supported convective transport and extra-vessel diffusion, thus improving overall mass transport properties. This work impacts the development of perfusable prevascularized tissues in vitro and ultimately tissue engineering applications in vivo. PMID:23536744

  11. Angiotensin AT1 and AT2 Receptors Regulate Basal Skeletal Muscle Microvascular Volume and Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Weidong; Wang, Wenhui; Liu, Jia; Barrett, Eugene J.; Carey, Robert M.; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II causes vasoconstriction via the type 1 receptor (AT1R) and vasodilatation through the type 2 receptor (AT2R). Both are expressed in muscle microvasculature where substrate exchanges occur. Whether they modulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion and substrate metabolism is not known. We measured microvascular blood volume (MBV), a measure of microvascular surface area and perfusion, in rats during systemic infusion of angiotensin II at either 1 or 100 ng/kg/min. Each caused a significant increase in muscle MBV. Likewise, administration of AT1R blocker losartan increased muscle MBV by >3-fold (p<0.001). Hindleg glucose extraction and muscle interstitial oxygen saturation simultaneously increased by 2–3-fold. By contrast, infusing AT2R antagonist PD123319 significantly decreased muscle MBV by up to 80% (p<0.001). This was associated with a significant decrease in hindleg glucose extraction and muscle oxygen saturation. AT2R antagonism and inhibition of nitric oxide synthase each blocked the losartan-induced increase in muscle MBV and glucose uptake. In conclusion, angiotensin II acts on both AT1R and AT2R to regulate basal muscle microvascular perfusion. Basal AT1R tone restricts muscle MBV and glucose extraction while basal AT2R activity increases muscle MBV and glucose uptake. Pharmacologic manipulation of the balance of AT1R and AT2R activity affords the potential to improve glucose metabolism. PMID:19996061

  12. Early Systemic Microvascular Damage in Pigs with Atherogenic Diabetes Mellitus Coincides with Renal Angiopoietin Dysbalance

    PubMed Central

    Khairoun, Meriem; van den Heuvel, Mieke; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Sorop, Oana; de Boer, Rients; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.; Baelde, Hans J.; Zandbergen, Malu; Duncker, Dirk J.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Reinders, Marlies E. J.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a range of microvascular complications including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Microvascular abnormalities in the kidneys are common histopathologic findings in DN, which represent one manifestation of ongoing systemic microvascular damage. Recently, sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging has emerged as a noninvasive tool that enables one to visualize the microcirculation. In this study, we investigated whether changes in the systemic microvasculature induced by DM and an atherogenic diet correlated spatiotemporally with renal damage. Methods Atherosclerotic lesion development was triggered in streptozotocin-induced DM pigs (140 mg/kg body weight) by administering an atherogenic diet for approximately 11 months. Fifteen months following induction of DM, microvascular morphology was visualized in control pigs (n = 7), non-diabetic pigs fed an atherogenic diet (ATH, n = 5), and DM pigs fed an atherogenic diet (DM+ATH, n = 5) using SDF imaging of oral mucosal tissue. Subsequently, kidneys were harvested from anethesized pigs and the expression levels of well-established markers for microvascular integrity, such as Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) and Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) were determined immunohistochemically, while endothelial cell (EC) abundance was determined by immunostaining for von Willebrand factor (vWF). Results Our study revealed an increase in the capillary tortuosity index in DM+ATH pigs (2.31±0.17) as compared to the control groups (Controls 0.89±0.08 and ATH 1.55±0.11; p<0.05). Kidney biopsies showed marked glomerular lesions consisting of mesangial expansion and podocyte lesions. Furthermore, we observed a disturbed Angpt2/ Angpt1balance in the cortex of the kidney, as evidenced by increased expression of Angpt2 in DM+ATH pigs as compared to Control pigs (p<0.05). Conclusion In the setting of DM, atherogenesis leads to the augmentation of mucosal capillary tortuosity, indicative of systemic microvascular damage

  13. Two cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Arifumi; Tsukada, Yasuhiko; Abe, Yoshinobu; Shimada, Jiro; Tase, Choichiro

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a life-threatening complication in trauma patients. Not only regional neuromuscular disability, but also systemic organ disorders can result from prolonged tissue ischemia. In this report, we describe 2 cases of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome complicated with severe heat stroke. In both cases, emergency fasciotomy was rapidly performed after recognition of the syndrome, but serious regional neuromuscular disabilities remained. Microvascular endothelial injury is an important mechanism of acute atraumatic compartment syndrome. Thrombi diffusely formed in the compartmental space hinder establishment of reperfusion even after fasciotomy. Furthermore, disruption of fibrinolysis due to heat stroke could enhance this damage.

  14. Sleep and protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity: impacts of sleep loss and stress

    PubMed Central

    Grønli, Janne; Soulé, Jonathan; Bramham, Clive R.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep has been ascribed a critical role in cognitive functioning. Several lines of evidence implicate sleep in the consolidation of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Stress disrupts sleep while impairing synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. Here, we discuss evidence linking sleep to mechanisms of protein synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity and synaptic scaling. We then consider how disruption of sleep by acute and chronic stress may impair these mechanisms and degrade sleep function. PMID:24478645

  15. Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor Increases Intestinal Microvascular Blood Flow in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoyi; Radulescu, Andrei; Zorko, Nicholas; Besner, Gail E.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. Although the exact etiology remains unknown, decreased intestinal blood flow is thought to play a critical role. We have shown that heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) protects the intestines from injury in a rodent model of NEC. Our current goal was to assess the effect of HB-EGF on intestinal microvascular blood flow and intestinal injury in rat pups subjected to experimental NEC. Methods Newborn rat pups were subjected to stress by exposure to hypoxia, hypothermia, hypertonic feedings and lipopolysaccharide, with some pups receiving HB-EGF (800 μg/kg/dose) added to the feeds. Control animals received breast milk. Intestinal injury was graded using a standard histologic injury scoring system. Microvascular blood flow was assessed by FITC-dextran angiography with fluorescent images subjected to quantification, and by scanning electron microscopy. Results Intestinal microvascular blood flow (defined as the extent of vascular filling with FITC-dextran) was significantly decreased in pups subjected to stress compared to breast fed pups. Stressed pups treated with HB-EGF had significantly increased microvascular blood flow. The changes in villous microvasculature correlated with histologic injury scores, with stressed pups treated with HB-EGF showing decreased histologic injury. Conclusions HB-EGF significantly preserved intestinal microvascular blood flow in pups subjected to experimental NEC, indicating that HB-EGF may play a critical role in the therapy of various diseases manifested by decreased intestinal blood flow, including NEC. PMID:19361505

  16. The mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury: focus on microvascular endothelium as a key target.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A S; Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews and updates current views on gastric mucosal injury with a focus on the microvascular endothelium as the key target and the role of the anti-apoptosis protein survivin. Under normal conditions, mucosal integrity is maintained by well structured and mutually amplifying defense mechanisms, which include pre-epithelial "barrier"--the first line of defense; and, an epithelial "barrier". Other important defense mechanisms of gastric mucosa include: continuous epithelial cell renewal, blood flow through mucosal microvessels (providing oxygen and nutrients), an endothelial microvascular "barrier," sensory innervation, and generation of PGs, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide. The microvascular endothelium lining gastric mucosal blood microvessels severs not only as a barrier but is a biologically active tissue involved in many synthetic and metabolic functions. It allows transport of oxygen and nutrients, and produces prostaglandins and leukotriens, procoagulant factors, nitric oxide, endothelin, ghrelin, HSP, growth factors such VEGF, bFGF, angiopoietin 2 and others, specific types of collagen, plasminogen activator, and can also actively contract. Accumulating evidence indicates that the gastric microvascular endothelium is a critical target for injury by ethanol, NSAIDs, free radicals, ischemia-reperfusion and other damaging factors. The injury--microvessel rupture, plasma and erythrocyte extravasation, platelet aggregation and fibrin deposition caused by these damaging factors--occurs early (1-5 min), precedes glandular epithelial cell injury and results in cessation of blood flow, ischemia, hypoxia and impaired oxygen and nutrient transport. As a consequence, mucosal necrosis develops. One of the main reasons for the increased susceptibility of gastric microvascular endothelial (vs. epithelial) cells to injury is reduced expression levels of survivin, an anti-apoptosis protein, which is a regulator of both proliferation and cell survival. PMID

  17. Muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in adulthood due to early postnatal overnutrition.

    PubMed

    Leite, Richard Diego; Kraemer-Aguiar, Luiz Guilherme; Boa, Beatriz Costa da Silva; Cyrino, Fatima Z G A; Nivoit, Pierre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2012-07-01

    The aims of our study were to investigate effects of postnatal overnutrition, obtained by restricting the number of pups per litter, on microcirculatory reactivity, fat depots, its total percentage and lipid profile. Microvascular reactivity was evaluated in the cremaster muscle of 24 hamsters divided into four groups, with 6 animals in each one: normal (NL) and restricted (RL) litter groups, both at 6th and 21st weeks of age. The NL group had 8-9 pups and the RL 3 pups per litter and to avoid the litter effect, only one animal was used per litter. The results have shown that the RL group had higher velocity of weight, body mass and fat gain compared to the NL one at weeks 6 and 21. Significant differences were also observed on urogenital fat depot, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein between groups. At the lowest concentration of Ach, the RL group showed smaller arteriolar dilatation at the 21st than at the 6th week [5(3-13) vs 19(8-40)%, p<0.01] while the NL one did not show any difference within the group. The highest concentration of Ach at the 21th week pointed to endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction in RL compared to NL [3(8-26) vs. 13(8-26)%, p<0.05]. Endothelial-independent microvascular reactivity was similar between groups. Our data suggest that postnatal overnutrition is associated to muscle endothelial-dependent microvascular dysfunction, greater body mass and total percentage of fat and impaired the lipid profile. In conclusion, the imprinting promoted by this experimental model of obesity was able to influence microvascular reactivity later in life.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species and Respiratory Plasticity Following Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Wilkerson, J.E.R.; Lovett-Barr, M.R.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network controlling breathing exhibits plasticity in response to environmental or physiological challenges. For example, while hypoxia initiates rapid and robust increases in respiratory motor output to defend against hypoxemia, it also triggers persistent changes, or plasticity, in chemosensory neurons and integrative pathways that transmit brainstem respiratory activity to respiratory motor neurons. Frequently studied models of hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity include: 1) carotid chemosensory plasticity and metaplasticity induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), and 2) acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) in naïve and CIH preconditioned rats. These forms of plasticity share some mechanistic elements, although they differ in anatomical location and the requirement for CIH preconditioning. Both forms of plasticity require serotonin receptor activation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the cellular sources and targets of ROS are not well known, recent evidence suggests that ROS modify the balance of protein phosphatase and kinase activities, shifting the balance towards net phosphorylation and favoring cellular reactions that induce and/or maintain plasticity. Here, we review possible sources of ROS, and the impact of ROS on phosphorylation events relevant to respiratory plasticity. PMID:18692605

  19. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  20. A Plastic Menagerie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Bobble heads had become quite popular, depicting all sorts of sports figures, animals, and even presidents. In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made bobble head sculptures out of empty plastic drink bottles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  1. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  2. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  3. Dreaming in plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhov, Marianna; Andelman, David; Shikler, Rafi

    2008-07-01

    Plastic is one of the most versatile materials available. It is cheap, flexible and easy to process, and as a result it is all around us - from our computer keyboards to the soles of our shoes. One of its most common applications is as an insulating coating for electric wires; indeed, plastic is well known for its insulating characteristics. It came as something of a surprise, therefore, when in the late 1970s a new generation of plastics was discovered that displayed exactly the opposite behaviour - the ability to conduct electricity. In fact, plastics can be made with a whole range of conductivities - there are polymer materials that behave like semiconductors and there are those that can conduct as well as metals. This discovery sparked a revolution in the electronics community, and three decades of research effort is now yielding a range of stunning new applications for this ubiquitous material.

  4. Cortical plasticity and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Raluca; Kilgard, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    The brain is constantly adapting to environmental and endogenous changes (including injury) that occur at every stage of life. The mechanisms that regulate neural plasticity have been refined over millions of years. Motivation and sensory experience directly shape the rewiring that makes learning and neurological recovery possible. Guiding neural reorganization in a manner that facilitates recovery of function is a primary goal of neurological rehabilitation. As the rules that govern neural plasticity become better understood, it will be possible to manipulate the sensory and motor experience of patients to induce specific forms of plasticity. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding factors that regulate cortical plasticity, illustrates specific forms of reorganization induced by control of each factor, and suggests how to exploit these factors for clinical benefit.

  5. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  6. The Need for Plastics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Plastics Engineers, Inc., Stamford, CT.

    In view of a lack of trained personnel in the industry, the Plastics Education Foundation proposes that educators (1) add more plastics programs, (2) establish plastics engineering degrees at appropriate 4-year institutions, (3) add plastics processing technology to current engineering curricula, and (4) interest younger students in courses and/or…

  7. Microvascular dysfunction in the course of metabolic syndrome induced by high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). One important feature underlying the pathophysiology of many types of CVD is microvascular dysfunction. Although components of MetS are themselves CVD risk factors, the risk is increased when the syndrome is considered as one entity. We aimed to characterize microvascular function and some of its influencing factors in the course of MetS development. Methods Development of MetS in C57BL/6 mice on a high-fat diet (HFD, 51% of energy from fat) was studied. The initial phase of MetS (I-MetS) was defined as the first 2 weeks of HFD feeding, with the fully developed phase occurring after 8 weeks of HFD. We characterized these phases by assessing changes in adiposity, blood pressure, and microvascular function. All data are presented as mean ± standard error (SEM). Differences between cumulative dose–response curves of myograph experiments were calculated using non-linear regression analysis. In other experiments, comparisons between two groups were made with Student’s t-test. Comparisons between more than two groups were made using one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. A probability value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results I-MetS mice presented with weight gain, blood pressure elevation, and microvascular dysfunction characterized by augmented vasoconstriction. This finding, contrary to those in mice with fully developed MetS, was not associated with endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, or systemic inflammation. In the initial phase, perivascular adipose tissue showed no sign of inflammation and had no influence on the pattern of vasoconstriction. These findings suggest that the onset of hypertension in MetS is strongly influenced by vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction and independent of important factors known to influence microvascular function and consequently blood pressure levels. Conclusion We identified in I

  8. Analysis of microvascular density in early gastric carcinoma using magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Masashi; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Rie; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakai, Yoshitaka; Nagasaki, Futoshi; Nomura, Eiki; Suzuki, Noriaki; Saito, Eri

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Intramucosal vascular density differs between differentiated and undifferentiated type gastric carcinomas. This study aimed to evaluate the microvascular density characteristics of these two types of carcinoma using magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI). Patients and methods: In total, 42 differentiated and 10 undifferentiated types were evaluated. The microvessels observed using ME-NBI were extracted from stored still images and the microvascular density in the two carcinoma types was analyzed. Histological vascular density in resected specimens was also evaluated using CD34 immunostaining. Results: There were significant differences between the microvascular density in the differentiated and undifferentiated types of carcinoma (10.02 ± 4.72 % vs 4.02 ± 0.40 %; P < 0.001) using ME-NBI. Vascular density assessed histologically also differed significantly between differentiated and undifferentiated types in both the whole mucosal (5.81 ± 3.17 % vs 3.25 ± 1.21 %) and the superficial mucosal layers (0 – 100 μm) (6.38 ± 3.73 % vs 3.66 ± 1.46 %). However, the vascular density in the surrounding non-carcinomatous mucosa assessed using ME-NBI and histologically, was significantly lower in the differentiated than in the undifferentiated types (P < 0.001). There was good agreement between ME-NBI and histologically assessed microvascular density in both the whole (r = 0.740; P < 0.001) and superficial mucosal layers (r = 0.764; P < 0.001). White opaque substance (WOS) was seen in eight patients who had the differentiated type carcinoma. In almost all cases with WOS, the appearance of the carcinoma was discolored. Conclusions: There was a close relationship between ME-NBI assessed microvascular density and histologically assessed vascular density in the mucosal layer. Microvascular density differed significantly between the differentiated and undifferentiated

  9. Impact of the arterial input function on microvascularization parameter measurements using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marianne; Pitre-Champagnat, Stéphanie; Tabarout, Farid; Leguerney, Ingrid; Polrot, Mélanie; Lassau, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the sources of variation influencing the microvascularization parameters measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US). METHODS: Firstly, we evaluated, in vitro, the impact of the manual repositioning of the ultrasound probe and the variations in flow rates. Experiments were conducted using a custom-made phantom setup simulating a tumor and its associated arterial input. Secondly, we evaluated, in vivo, the impact of multiple contrast agent injections and of examination day, as well as the influence of the size of region of interest (ROI) associated with the arterial input function (AIF). Experiments were conducted on xenografted B16F10 female nude mice. For all of the experiments, an ultrasound scanner along with a linear transducer was used to perform pulse inversion imaging based on linear raw data throughout the experiments. Semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses were performed using two signal-processing methods. RESULTS: In vitro, no microvascularization parameters, whether semi-quantitative or quantitative, were significantly correlated (P values from 0.059 to 0.860) with the repositioning of the probe. In addition, all semi-quantitative microvascularization parameters were correlated with the flow variation while only one quantitative parameter, the tumor blood flow, exhibited P value lower than 0.05 (P = 0.004). In vivo, multiple contrast agent injections had no significant impact (P values from 0.060 to 0.885) on microvascularization parameters. In addition, it was demonstrated that semi-quantitative microvascularization parameters were correlated with the tumor growth while among the quantitative parameters, only the tissue blood flow exhibited P value lower than 0.05 (P = 0.015). Based on these results, it was demonstrated that the ROI size of the AIF had significant influence on microvascularization parameters: in the context of larger arterial ROI (from 1.17 ± 0.6 mm3 to 3.65 ± 0.3 mm3), tumor blood flow and

  10. Parasite biomass-related inflammation, endothelial activation, microvascular dysfunction and disease severity in vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Barber, Bridget E; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A; Price, Ric N; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  11. The development of a dynamic model for microvascular research and practice using human placenta: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, N; Moss, A L; Townsend, P L

    1985-07-01

    Human placenta has been investigated in an attempt to develop a non-animal model for microvascular research and practice, with a dynamic artificial circulation. Initial work has been encouraging and further development is in progress.

  12. The plasticity of clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Group, F.F.

    1905-01-01

    (1) Sand injures plasticity little at first because the grains are suspended in a plastic mass. It is only when grains are abundant enough to come in contact with their neighbors, that the effect becomes serious, and then both strength and amount of possible flow are injured. (2) Certain rare organic colloids increase the plasticity by rendering the water viscous. (3) Fineness also tends to increase plasticity. (4) Plane surfaces (plates) increase the amount of possible flow. They also give a chance for lubrication by thinner films, thus increasing the friction of film, and the strength of the whole mass. The action of plates is thus twofold ; but fineness may be carried to such an extent as to break up plate-like grains into angular fragments. The beneficial effects of plates are also decreased by the fact that each is so closely surrounded by others in the mass. (5) Molecular attraction is twofold in increasing plasticity. As the attraction increases, the coherence and strength of the mass increase, and the amount of possible deformation before crumbling also increases. Fineness increases this action by requiring more water. Colloids and crystalloids in solution may also increase the attraction. It is thus seen to be more active than any other single factor.

  13. Multi-physics optimization of three-dimensional microvascular polymeric components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, Alejandro M.; Saksena, Rajat; Kozola, Brian D.; Geubelle, Philippe H.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; White, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    This work discusses the computational design of microvascular polymeric materials, which aim at mimicking the behavior found in some living organisms that contain a vascular system. The optimization of the topology of the embedded three-dimensional microvascular network is carried out by coupling a multi-objective constrained genetic algorithm with a finite-element based physics solver, the latter validated through experiments. The optimization is carried out on multiple conflicting objective functions, namely the void volume fraction left by the network, the energy required to drive the fluid through the network and the maximum temperature when the material is subjected to thermal loads. The methodology presented in this work results in a viable alternative for the multi-physics optimization of these materials for active-cooling applications.

  14. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Tiago M.; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A.; Pula, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs. PMID:27141997

  15. Capsule independent uptake of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans into brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease with a high rate of mortality among HIV/AIDS patients across the world. The ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is central to the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, but the way in which this occurs remains unclear. Here we use both mouse and human brain derived endothelial cells (bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3) to accurately quantify fungal uptake and survival within brain endothelial cells. Our data indicate that the adherence and internalisation of cryptococci by brain microvascular endothelial cells is an infrequent event involving small numbers of cryptococcal yeast cells. Interestingly, this process requires neither active signalling from the fungus nor the presence of the fungal capsule. Thus entry into brain microvascular endothelial cells is most likely a passive event that occurs following 'trapping' within capillary beds of the BBB.

  16. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A; Pula, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs. PMID:27141997

  17. Compliance of laser-assisted microvascular anastomosis: a comparative study with manual anastomosis (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaria, Roland G.; Lhote, Francois-Marie; Dauzat, Michel; Juan, Jean-Marie; Oliva-Lauraire, Marie-Claire; Durrleman, Nicolas; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Albat, Bernard; Frapier, Jean-Marc; Chaptal, Paul-Andre; Godlewski, Guilhem

    1999-01-01

    The compliance of microvascular anastomosis is an important predictive factor for long term patency of graft or vascular reconstruction. This experimental study compare the compliance of manual suture and laser assisted end to end microvascular anastomosis. In nine New-Zealand white rabbits we performed manual end-to-end suture anastomosis on the left femoral artery and laser assisted anastomosis on the right femoral artery, with a diode laser (wavelength 988 nm, power output 500 mW). Compliance was obtained by echotracking (CBI 8000 sonomicrometry system with 20 MHz implantable microprobe from Crystal-Biotech, USA) on the anastomosis site as well as upstream, and downstream from the anastomosis. Vessel compliance was lower on the manual suture side compared to the laser assisted anastomosis side, especially downstream from the anastomosis.

  18. Speckle-correlation monitoring of the internal micro-vascular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Khmara, M. B.; Vilensky, M. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Gorfinkel, I. V.; Zdrajevsky, R. A.

    2009-10-01

    The results of experimental study of possibility to monitor the micro-vascular blood flow in superficial tissues of various organs with the use of endoscope-based full-field speckle correlometer are presented. The blood microcirculation monitoring was carried out in the course of the laparotomy of abdominal cavity of laboratory animals (rats). Transfer of laser light to the area of interest and scattered radiation from the probed zone to the detector (CMOS camera) was carried out via fiber-optic bundles of endoscopic system. Microscopic hemodynamics was analyzed for small intestine, liver, spleen, kidney, and pancreas under different conditions (normal state, provocated peritonitis and ischemia, administration of vasodilative agents such as papaverine, lidocaine). The prospects and problems of internal monitoring of microvascular flow in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  19. Capsule independent uptake of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans into brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease with a high rate of mortality among HIV/AIDS patients across the world. The ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is central to the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, but the way in which this occurs remains unclear. Here we use both mouse and human brain derived endothelial cells (bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3) to accurately quantify fungal uptake and survival within brain endothelial cells. Our data indicate that the adherence and internalisation of cryptococci by brain microvascular endothelial cells is an infrequent event involving small numbers of cryptococcal yeast cells. Interestingly, this process requires neither active signalling from the fungus nor the presence of the fungal capsule. Thus entry into brain microvascular endothelial cells is most likely a passive event that occurs following 'trapping' within capillary beds of the BBB. PMID:22530025

  20. Interactions between microvascular and macrovascular disease in diabetes: pathophysiology and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Andrew J; Clough, Geraldine; Byrne, Christopher D

    2007-11-01

    Convention partitions the complications of diabetes into two main subtypes. First are the diabetes-specific microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy; second are the atherothrombotic macrovascular complications that account for the majority of premature deaths. Pathological interactions between microvascular and macrovascular complications, for example, nephropathy and macrovascular disease, are common. Similar mechanisms and shared risk factors drive the development and progression of both small and large vessel disease. This concept has therapeutic implications. Mounting evidence points to the need for multifactorial strategies to prevent vascular complications in subjects with diabetes and/or the metabolic syndrome. We advocate a combined therapeutic approach that addresses small and large vessel disease. Preferential use should be made of drug regimens that (i) maximize vascular protection, (ii) reduce the risk of iatrogenic vascular damage and (iii) minimize the increasing problem of polypharmacy. PMID:17924862

  1. Heat stress prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells by blocking calpain/p38 MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-feng; Zheng, Dong; Fan, Guo-chang; Peng, Tianqing; Su, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMECs) injury including apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury during sepsis. Our recent study has demonstrated that calpain activation contributes to apoptosis in PMECs under septic conditions. This study investigated how calpain activation mediated apoptosis and whether heat stress regulated calpain activation in lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated PMECs. In cultured mouse primary PMECs, incubation with LPS (1 µg/ml, 24 h) increased active caspase-3 fragments and DNA fragmentation, indicative of apoptosis. These effects of LPS were abrogated by pre-treatment with heat stress (43 °C for 2 h). LPS also induced calpain activation and increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of calpain and p38 MAPK prevented apoptosis induced by LPS. Furthermore, inhibition of calpain blocked p38 MAPK phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated PMECs. Notably, heat stress decreased the protein levels of calpain-1/2 and calpain activities, and blocked p38 MAPK phosphorylation in response to LPS. Additionally, forced up-regulation of calpain-1 or calpain-2 sufficiently induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation and apoptosis in PMECs, both of which were inhibited by heat stress. In conclusion, heat stress prevents LPS-induced apoptosis in PMECs. This effect of heat stress is associated with down-regulation of calpain expression and activation, and subsequent blockage of p38 MAPK activation in response to LPS. Thus, blocking calpain/p38 MAPK pathway may be a novel mechanism underlying heat stress-mediated inhibition of apoptosis in LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. PMID:27325431

  2. Plastic condom developed.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    A prototype plastic condom that is expected to be at least as strong as latex, less likely to fail, and more comfortable to use has been designed by researchers at North Carolina-based Family Health International (FHI). The National Institutes of Health has granted the nonprofit medical research organization $1.3 million to conduct tests that will include clinical trials involving volunteer couples to examine the condom/s safety, efficacy in preventing pregnancy, and acceptability among users. Researchers hope the tests, expected to take about 4 years, will show that the plastic condom can be stored for years without weakening, whereas latex loses strength with time. In addition, FHI claims the plastic condom can be used with any kind of lubricant, while Latex is limited to water-based or silicone lubricants. Latex condoms lose up to 90% of their strength when used with oil-based lubricants such as hand lotion, according to studies.

  3. Adaptation without Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Del Mar Quiroga, Maria; Morris, Adam P; Krekelberg, Bart

    2016-09-27

    Sensory adaptation is a phenomenon in which neurons are affected not only by their immediate input but also by the sequence of preceding inputs. In visual cortex, for example, neurons shift their preferred orientation after exposure to an oriented stimulus. This adaptation is traditionally attributed to plasticity. We show that a recurrent network generates tuning curve shifts observed in cat and macaque visual cortex, even when all synaptic weights and intrinsic properties in the model are fixed. This demonstrates that, in a recurrent network, adaptation on timescales of hundreds of milliseconds does not require plasticity. Given the ubiquity of recurrent connections, this phenomenon likely contributes to responses observed across cortex and shows that plasticity cannot be inferred solely from changes in tuning on these timescales. More broadly, our findings show that recurrent connections can endow a network with a powerful mechanism to store and integrate recent contextual information. PMID:27681421

  4. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts. PMID:26851257

  5. Metabolic Actions of Angiotensin II and Insulin: A Microvascular Endothelial Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Yavuz, Shazene

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic actions of insulin to promote glucose disposal are augmented by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increases in microvascular blood flow to skeletal muscle. The balance between NO-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. Angiotensin II acting on AT2 receptor increases capillary blood flow to increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal. In contrast, AT1 receptor activation leads to reduced NO bioavailability, impaired insulin signaling, vasoconstriction, and insulin resistance. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by dysregulated local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Under insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1, leading to decreased blood flow, which worsens insulin resistance. Similarly, excess AT1 receptor activity in the microvasculature may selectively impair vasodilation while simultaneously potentiating the vasoconstrictor actions of insulin. Therapeutic interventions that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling and the imbalance in AT1 and AT2 receptor signaling in microvascular endothelium may simultaneously ameliorate endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. In the present review, we discuss molecular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying microvascular and metabolic actions of insulin and Angiotensin II, the mechanistic basis for microvascular endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in RAAS dysregulated clinical states, and the rationale for therapeutic strategies that restore the balance in vasodilator and constrictor actions of insulin and Angiotensin II in the microvasculature. PMID:22684034

  6. [Postoperative monitoring of microvascular flap repair with pulse oximetry--initial experience].

    PubMed

    Strauss, J M; Neukam, F W; Krohn, S; Schmelzeisen, R; Borchard, F

    1994-03-01

    The surgical success of microvascular free flaps or pedicled flaps depends on the function of the nutritive vessels. Complications such as thrombosis or vessel kinking, are dangerous and may result in flap loss. During the last decade, different methods were tested for their capability of monitoring flap perfusion. We report our preliminary experience with the continuous and non-invasive pulse oximetry by using a special reflection sensor positioned on the surface of the flap. PMID:8020852

  7. Withdrawing intra-aortic balloon pump support paradoxically improves microvascular flow

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) is frequently used to mechanically support the heart. There is evidence that IABP improves microvascular flow during cardiogenic shock but its influence on the human microcirculation in patients deemed ready for discontinuing IABP support has not yet been studied. Therefore we used sidestream dark field imaging (SDF) to test our hypothesis that human microcirculation remains unaltered with or without IABP support in patients clinically ready for discontinuation of mechanical support. Methods We studied 15 ICU patients on IABP therapy. Measurements were performed after the clinical decision was made to remove the balloon catheter. We recorded global hemodynamic parameters and performed venous oximetry during maximal IABP support (1:1) and 10 minutes after temporarily stopping the IABP therapy. At both time points, we also recorded video clips of the sublingual microcirculation. From these we determined indices of microvascular perfusion including perfused vessel density (PVD) and microvascular flow index (MFI). Results Ceasing IABP support lowered mean arterial pressure (74 ± 8 to 71 ± 10 mmHg; P = 0.048) and increased diastolic pressure (43 ± 10 to 53 ± 9 mmHg; P = 0.0002). However, at the level of the microcirculation we found an increase of PVD of small vessels <20 μm (5.47 ± 1.76 to 6.63 ± 1.90; P = 0.0039). PVD for vessels >20 μm and MFI for both small and large vessels were unaltered. During the procedure global oxygenation parameters (ScvO2/SvO2) remained unchanged. Conclusions In patients deemed ready for discontinuing IABP support according to current practice, SDF imaging showed an increase of microcirculatory flow of small vessels after ceasing IABP therapy. This observation may indicate that IABP impairs microvascular perfusion in recovered patients, although this warrants confirmation. PMID:20738876

  8. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization. PMID:24400144

  9. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is a well-recognized phenomenon consisting of bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during ocular surgery or other manipulations in and around the orbit. Thus far, it could bee shown that central stimulation of the trigeminal nerve during transsphenoidal surgery and surgery for tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can lead to TCR. In cases of microvascular trigeminal decompression for trigeminal neuralgia, no data of the possible occurrence of TCR are available. TCR was defined as a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the heart rate (HR) of more than 20% to the baseline values before the stimulus and coinciding with the manipulation of the trigeminal nerve. Electronic anesthetic recorded perioperative HR and MABP values were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients who received microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and were divided into two subgroups on the basis of occurrence of TCR during surgery. Of the 28 patients, 5 (18%) showed evidence of TCR during manipulation at the trigeminal radix by separation from microvascular structures. Their HR fell 46% and their MABP 57% during operative procedures near the trigeminal nerve as compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. After cessation of manipulation, HR and MABP returned (spontaneously) to levels before the stimulus. Risk factors of TCR were compared with results from the literature. In conclusion, the present results give evidence of TCR during manipulation of the central part of the trigeminal nerve during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia under a standardized anesthetic protocol.

  10. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    PubMed

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (p<0.05) in the old vs. young rats. Calcified and ossified vessel volumes per tissue volume and calcified vessel volume per patent vessel volume were augmented (p<0.05) 262%, 375% and 263%, respectively, in the old vs. young rats. Ossified and patent vessel number was higher (171%) and lower (40%), respectively, in the old vs. young rats. Finally, adipocyte volume per patent vessel volume was higher (86%) with age. This study is the first to report ossification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the

  11. Myosin light chain kinase-dependent microvascular hyperpermeability in thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaobing; Xu, Wenjuan; Ustinova, Elena; Wu, Mack; Childs, Ed; Hunter, Felicia; Yuan, Sarah

    2003-10-01

    Although the critical role of systemic inflammatory edema in the development of multiple organ failure in patients with massive burns has been fully recognized, the precise mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of blood fluid and proteins in tissues remote from the burn wound are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that circulating factors released during thermal injury cause microvascular leakage by triggering endothelial cell contraction and barrier dysfunction. A third-degree scald burn was induced in rats on the dorsal skin covering 25% total body surface area. The microcirculation and transvascular flux of albumin were observed in the rat mesentery using intravital fluorescence microscopy. The direct effect of circulating factors on microvascular barrier function was assessed by measuring the apparent permeability coefficient of albumin in isolated rat mesenteric venules during perfusion of plasma freshly withdrawn from burned rats. The in vivo study showed that the transvenular flux of albumin was significantly increased over a 6-h period with a maximal response seen at 3 h postburn. Importantly, perfusion of noninjured venules with burn plasma induced a time-dependent increase in albumin permeability. Pharmacological inhibition of protein kinase C, Src tyrosine kinases, or mast cell activation did not significantly affect the hyperpermeability response; however, blockage of myosin light chain phosphorylation with the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 greatly attenuated the burn-induced increase in venular permeability in a dose-related pattern. The results support a role for endogenous circulating factors in microvascular leakage during burns. Myosin light chain phosphorylation-dependent endothelial contractile response may serve as an end-point effector leading to microvascular barrier dysfunction. PMID:14501951

  12. Intravenous and Gastric Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticle Exposure Disrupts Microvascular Smooth Muscle Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Minarchick, Valerie C.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Fix, Natalie R.; Leonard, Stephen S.; Sabolsky, Edward M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) hold great therapeutic potential, but the in vivo effects of non-pulmonary exposure routes are unclear. The first aim was to determine whether microvascular function is impaired after intravenous and gastric CeO2 NP exposure. The second aim was to investigate the mechanism(s) of action underlying microvascular dysfunction following CeO2 NP exposure. Rats were exposed to CeO2 NP (primary diameter: 4 ± 1 nm, surface area: 81.36 m2/g) by intratracheal instillation, intravenous injection, or gastric gavage. Mesenteric arterioles were harvested 24 h post-exposure and vascular function was assessed using an isolated arteriole preparation. Endothelium-dependent and independent function and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) signaling (soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] and cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]) were assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and nitric oxide (NO) production were analyzed. Compared with controls, endothelium-dependent and independent dilation were impaired following intravenous injection (by 61% and 45%) and gastric gavage (by 63% and 49%). However, intravenous injection resulted in greater microvascular impairment (16% and 35%) compared with gastric gavage at an identical dose (100 µg). Furthermore, sGC activation and cGMP responsiveness were impaired following pulmonary, intravenous, and gastric CeO2 NP treatment. Finally, nanoparticle exposure resulted in route-dependent, increased ROS generation and decreased NO production. These results indicate that CeO2 NP exposure route differentially impairs microvascular function, which may be mechanistically linked to decreased NO production and subsequent VSM signaling. Fully understanding the mechanisms behind CeO2 NP in vivo effects is a critical step in the continued therapeutic development of this nanoparticle. PMID:25481005

  13. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization.

  14. Roles of limbal microvascular net and limbal stroma in regulating maintenance of limbal epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minghai; Wang, Bowen; Wan, Pengxia; Liang, Xuanwei; Wang, Xiaoran; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the microenvironment (niche) of stem cells is helpful for stem-cell-based regenerative medicine. In the eye, limbal epithelial stem cells (corneal epithelial stem cells) provide the self-renewal capacity of the corneal epithelium and are essential for maintaining corneal transparency and vision. Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency results in significant visual deterioration. Successful treatment of this type of blinding disease requires studies of the limbal epithelial stem cells and their microenvironment. We investigate the function of the limbal microvascular net and the limbal stroma in the maintenace of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche in vivo and examine the regulation of limbal epithelial stem cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in vivo. We assess the temporal and spatial changes in the expression patterns of the following markers during a six-month follow-up of various rabbit limbal autograft transplantation models: vascular endothelial cell marker CD31, corneal epithelium differentiation marker K3, limbal epithelial stem-cell-associated markers P63 and ABCG2 and proliferating cell nuclear marker Ki67. Our results suggest that limbal epithelial stem cells cannot maintain their stemness or proliferation without the support of the limbal microvascular net microenvironment. Thus, both the limbal microvascular net and the limbal stroma play important roles as components of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche maintaining limbal epithelial stem cell survival and proliferation and the avoidance of differentiation. The limbal stroma constitutes the structural basis of the limbal epithelial stem cell niche and the limbal microvascular net is a requirement for this niche. These new insights should aid the eventual construction of tissue-engineered cornea for corneal blind patients in the future.

  15. Prevalence of Microvascular Complications in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Iqbal, Farrukh; Taj, Azeem; Iqbal, Zafar; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Qasim Zafar

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: Microvascular complications are the major outcome of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus progression, which reduce the quality of life, incur heavy economic burdens to the health care system and increase diabetic mortality. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of microvascular complications among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients and to analyze the association between these complications and poor glycemic control. Methods: This cross sectional hospital based study was carried out in Diabetic Clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore Pakistan. The study was conducted from November 2011 to November 2012 among newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. Relevant information of all patients was recorded with the help of a proforma. They were investigated for retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Results: We have divided the patients into two groups: Group I with good glycemic control (HbA1c <6.5) and group II with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >6.5). In group II microvascular complications were 89.8%. Neuropathy, nephropathy and retinopathy were present in 68.5%, 56.2% and 31.4% respectively. These similar percentages in Group I were 50%, 0% and 31% respectively and are significantly lower. Conclusion: The study showed that even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients who had poor glycemic control, frequency of microvascular complications is much higher as compared to those who had average glycemic control. Thus tight glycemic control does count even in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics to prevent and minimize the occurrence of complications. PMID:24353655

  16. A Micro-delivery Approach for Studying Microvascular Responses to Localized Oxygen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ghonaim, Nour W.; Lau, Leo W. M.; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G.; Yang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    In vivo video microscopy has been used to study blood flow regulation as a function of varying oxygen concentration in microcirculatory networks. However, previous studies have measured the collective response of stimulating large areas of the microvascular network at the tissue surface. Objective We aim to limit the area being stimulated by controlling oxygen availability to highly localized regions of the microvascular bed within intact muscle. Design and Method Gas of varying O2 levels was delivered to specific locations on the surface of the Extensor Digitorum Longus muscle of rat through a set of micro-outlets (100 μm diameter) patterned in ultrathin glass using state-of-the-art microfabrication techniques. O2 levels were oscillated and digitized video sequences were processed for changes in capillary hemodynamics and erythrocyte O2 saturation. Results and Conclusions Oxygen saturations in capillaries positioned directly above the micro-outlets were closely associated with the controlled local O2 oscillations. Radial diffusion from the micro-outlet is limited to ~75 μm from the center as predicted by computational modelling and as measured in vivo. These results delineate a key step in the design of a novel micro-delivery device for controlled oxygen delivery to the microvasculature to understand fundamental mechanisms of microvascular regulation of O2 supply. PMID:21914035

  17. Noninvasive measurement of microvascular leakage in patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Bethell, D B; Gamble, J; Pham, P L; Nguyen, M D; Tran, T H; Ha, T H; Tran, T N; Dong, T H; Gartside, I B; White, N J; Day, N P

    2001-01-15

    Dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is a potentially lethal complication of dengue virus infection associated with hypotension and leakage of plasma water into the extravascular space. To determine whether the underlying pathophysiology of DSS is distinct from that in milder forms of the disease, we assessed microvascular permeability, by use of strain gauge plethysmography, in Vietnamese children with DSS (n=19), or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) without shock (n=16), and in healthy control children (n=15). At admission and after fluid resuscitation, the mean coefficient of microvascular permeability (K(f)) for the patients with dengue was approximately 50% higher than that for the control patients (P=.02). There was no significant difference in K(f) between the 2 groups of patients with dengue; this suggests the same underlying pathophysiology. We hypothesize that in patients with DSS, the fluctuations in K(f) are larger than those in patients with DHF, which leads to short-lived peaks of markedly increased microvascular permeability and consequent hemodynamic shock.

  18. Comparison of Different Methods for the Calculation of the Microvascular Flow Index

    PubMed Central

    Pozo, Mario O.; Kanoore Edul, Vanina S.; Ince, Can; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The microvascular flow index (MFI) is commonly used to semiquantitatively characterize the velocity of microcirculatory perfusion as absent (0), intermittent (1), sluggish (2), or normal (3). There are three approaches to compute MFI: (1) the average of the predominant flow in each of the four quadrants (MFIby quadrants), (2) the direct assessment during the bedside video acquisition (MFIpoint of care), and (3) the mean value of the MFIs determined in each individual vessel (MFIvessel by vessel). We hypothesized that the agreement between the MFIs is poor and that the MFIvessel by vessel better reflects the microvascular perfusion. For this purpose, we analyzed 100 videos from septic patients. In 25 of them, red blood cell (RBC) velocity was also measured. There were wide 95% limits of agreement between MFIby quadrants and MFIpoint of care (1.46), between MFIby quadrants and MFIvessel by vessel (2.85), and between MFIby point of care and MFIvessel by vessel (2.56). The MFIs significantly correlated with the RBC velocity and with the fraction of perfused small vessels, but MFIvessel by vessel showed the best R2. Although the different methods for the calculation of MFI reflect microvascular perfusion, they are not interchangeable and MFIvessel by vessel might be better. PMID:22593824

  19. [Free microvascular transfer of segmental corticocancellous femur for treatment of avascular scaphoid necrosis].

    PubMed

    Bürger, K H; Gaggl, A J; Kukutschki, W; Mueller, E

    2009-02-01

    Successful treatment of scaphoid non-union with avascular necrosis of the proximal poles and humpback deformity with carpal collapse is one of the main problems in reconstructive hand surgery. Vascularised bone transfer is one of the most successful techniques for treating these problems. 15 patients with avascular necrosis and non-union of the scaphoid were treated by a microvascular reanastomosed corticocancellous transplant from the distal medial femur. In all patients the success of the microvascular bone transfer was examined by MRI and conventional radiographs immediately, 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The transplant vitality, signs of reunion and carpal configuration were registered. Furthermore, the Mayo wrist score was employed for clinical evaluation. All transplants remained vital during the follow-up period of one year. Pseudoarthrosis was treated successfully in every case. In 14 cases there was a significant increase of the Mayo wrist score and in one case there was no difference before and after surgery. The microvascular transfer of corticocancellous femur resulted in a high rate of complete healing of scaphoid pseudoarthrosis and correction of the carpal relation.

  20. Effect of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee on microvascular function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Hamadate, Naobumi; Uchida, Taro; Kina-Tanada, Mika; Kubota, Haruaki; Nakasone, Junko; Sakanashi, Matao; Ueda, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke; Tsutsui, Masato

    2015-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that coffee drinking is associated with reduced mortality of cardiovascular disease. However, its precise mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we examined whether single ingestion of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee improves microvascular function in healthy subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in 27 healthy volunteers. A cup of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was drunk by the subjects, and reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. In an interval of more than 2 days, the same experimental protocol was repeated with another coffee in a crossover manner. Caffeinated coffee intake slightly but significantly elevated blood pressure and decreased finger blood flow as compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. There was no significant difference in heart rate between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake. Importantly, caffeinated coffee intake significantly enhanced post-occlusive reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow, an index of microvascular endothelial function, compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. These results provide the first evidence that caffeine contained in a cup of coffee enhances microvascular function in healthy individuals.

  1. Air Pollution Particulate Matter Collected from an Appalachian Mountaintop Mining Site Induces Microvascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    KNUCKLES, TRAVIS L.; STAPLETON, PHOEBE A.; MINARCHICK, VALERIE C.; ESCH, LAURA; MCCAWLEY, MICHAEL; HENDRYX, MICHAEL; NURKIEWICZ, TIMOTHY R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Air pollution PM is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In Appalachia, PM from mining may represent a health burden to this sensitive population that leads the nation in cardiovascular disease, among others. Cardiovascular consequences following inhalation of PMMTM are unclear, but must be identified to establish causal effects. Methods PM was collected within 1 mile of an active MTM site in southern WV. The PM was extracted and was primarily <10μm in diameter (PM10), consisting largely of sulfur (38%) and silica (24%). Adult male rats were IT with 300 μg PMMTM. Twenty-four hours following exposure, rats were prepared for intravital microscopy, or isolated arteriole experiments. Results PMMTM exposure blunted endothelium-dependent dilation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles by 26%, and 25%, respectively, as well as endothelium-independent dilation. In vivo, PMMTM exposure inhibited endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation (60% reduction). α-adrenergic receptor blockade inhibited PVNS-induced vasoconstriction in exposed animals compared with sham. Conclusions These data suggest that PMMTM exposure impairs microvascular function in disparate microvascular beds, through alterations in NO-mediated dilation and sympathetic nerve influences. Microvascular dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular disease in regions with MTM sites. PMID:22963349

  2. Microvascular Reconstruction of Free Jejunal Graft in Larynx-preserving Esophagectomy for Cervical Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Natori, Yuhei; Komoto, Masakazu; Matsumura, Takashi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Tsurumaru, Masahioko; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Losing the ability to speak severely affects the quality of life, and patients who have undergone laryngectomy tend to become depressed, which may lead to social withdrawal. Recently, with advancements in chemoradiotherapy and with alternative perspectives on postoperative quality of life, larynx preservation has been pursued; however, the selection of candidates and the optimal reconstructive procedure remain controversial. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed our experience with free jejunal graft for larynx-preserving cervical esophagectomy (LPCE), focusing on microvascular reconstruction. Methods: Seven patients underwent LPCE for cervical esophageal carcinoma, and defects were reconstructed by free jejunal transfer subsequently. We collected preoperative and postoperative data of the patients and assessed the importance of the procedure. Results: We mostly used the transverse cervical artery as the recipient, and a longer operative time was required, particularly for the regrowth cases. The operative field for microvascular anastomosis was more limited and deeper than those in the laryngectomy cases. Two graft necrosis cases were confirmed at postoperative day 9 or 15, and vessels contralateral from the graft were chosen as recipients in both patients. Conclusions: Microvascular reconstruction for free jejunal graft in LPCE differed in several ways from the procedure combined with laryngectomy. Compression from the tracheal cartilage to the pedicle was suspected as the reason of the necrosis clinically and pathologically. Therefore, we should select recipient vessels from the ipsilateral side of the graft, and careful and extended monitoring of the flap should be considered to make this procedure successful. PMID:27257562

  3. Microvascular anastomosis using fibrin glue and venous cuff in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Sacak, Bulent; Tosun, Ugur; Egemen, Onur; Sakiz, Damlanur; Ugurlu, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Conventional anastomosis with interrupted sutures can be time-consuming, can cause vessel narrowing, and can lead to thrombosis at the site of repair. The amount of suture material inside the lumen can impair the endothelium of the vessel, triggering thrombosis. In microsurgery, fibrin sealants have the potential beneficial effects of reducing anastomosis time and promoting accurate haemostasis at the anastomotic site. However, there has been a general reluctance to use fibrin glue for microvascular anastomoses because the fibrin polymer is highly thrombogenic and may not provide adequate strength. To overcome these problems, a novel technique was defined for microvascular anastomosis with fibrin glue and a venous cuff. Sixty-four rats in two groups are included in the study. In the experimental group (n = 32), end-to-end arterial anastomosis was performed with two stay sutures, fibrin glue, and a venous cuff. In the control group (n = 32), conventional end-to-end arterial anastomosis was performed. Fibrin glue assisted anastomosis with a venous cuff took less time, caused less bleeding at the anastomotic site, and achieved a patency rate comparable to that provided by the conventional technique. Fibrin sealant assisted microvascular anastomosis with venous cuff is a rapid, easy, and reliable technique compared to the end-to-end arterial anastomosis.

  4. Skeletal muscle capillary density and microvascular function are compromised with aging and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Groen, Bart B L; Hamer, Henrike M; Snijders, Tim; van Kranenburg, Janneau; Frijns, Dionne; Vink, Hans; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-04-15

    Adequate muscle perfusion is required for the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. Impairments in microvascular structure and/or function with aging and type 2 diabetes have been associated with the progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. Our objective was to compare muscle fiber type specific capillary density and endothelial function between healthy young men, healthy older men, and age-matched type 2 diabetes patients. Fifteen healthy young men (24 ± 1 yr), 15 healthy older men (70 ± 2 yr), and 15 age-matched type 2 diabetes patients (70 ± 1 yr) were selected to participate in the present study. Whole body insulin sensitivity, muscle fiber type specific capillary density, sublingual microvascular density, and dimension of the erythrocyte-perfused boundary region were assessed to evaluate the impact of aging and/or type 2 diabetes on microvascular structure and function. Whole body insulin sensitivity was significantly lower at a more advanced age, with lowest values reported in the type 2 diabetic patients. In line, skeletal muscle capillary contacts were much lower in the older and older type 2 diabetic patients when compared with the young. Sidestream darkfield imaging showed a significantly greater thickness of the erythrocyte perfused boundary region in the type 2 diabetic patients compared with the young. Skeletal muscle capillary density is reduced with aging and type 2 diabetes and accompanied by impairments in endothelial glycocalyx function, which is indicative of compromised vascular function. PMID:24577061

  5. Mapping genetic determinants of coronary microvascular remodeling in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Massimiliano; Petretto, Enrico; Kleinert, Christina; Scavone, Angela; De, Tisham; Cook, Stuart; Silhavy, Jan; Zidek, Vaclav; Pravenec, Michal; d'Amati, Giulia; Camici, Paolo G

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying coronary microvascular remodeling and dysfunction, which are critical determinants of abnormal myocardial blood flow regulation in human hypertension, are poorly understood. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) exhibits many features of human hypertensive cardiomyopathy. We demonstrate that remodeling of intramural coronary arterioles is apparent in the SHR already at 4 weeks of age, i.e. before the onset of systemic hypertension. To uncover possible genetic determinants of coronary microvascular remodeling, we carried out detailed histological and histomorphometric analysis of the heart and coronary vasculature in 30 weeks old SHR, age-matched Brown Norway (BN-Lx) parentals and BXH/HXB recombinant inbred (RI) strains. Using previously mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), we carried out a genome-wide association analysis between genetic determinants of cardiac gene expression and histomorphometric traits. This identified 36 robustly mapped eQTLs in the heart which were associated with medial area of intramural coronary arterioles [false discovery rate (FDR) ~5%]. Transcripts, which were both under cis-acting genetic regulation and significantly correlated with medial area (FDR <5%), but not with blood pressure indices, were prioritized and four candidate genes were identified (Rtel1, Pla2g5, Dnaja4 and Rcn2) according to their expression levels and biological functions. Our results demonstrate that genetic factors play a role in the development of coronary microvascular remodeling and suggest blood pressure independent candidate genes for further functional experiments.

  6. Effect of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee on microvascular function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Hamadate, Naobumi; Uchida, Taro; Kina-Tanada, Mika; Kubota, Haruaki; Nakasone, Junko; Sakanashi, Matao; Ueda, Shinichiro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke; Tsutsui, Masato

    2015-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that coffee drinking is associated with reduced mortality of cardiovascular disease. However, its precise mechanisms remain to be clarified. In this study, we examined whether single ingestion of caffeine contained in a cup of coffee improves microvascular function in healthy subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed in 27 healthy volunteers. A cup of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee was drunk by the subjects, and reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. In an interval of more than 2 days, the same experimental protocol was repeated with another coffee in a crossover manner. Caffeinated coffee intake slightly but significantly elevated blood pressure and decreased finger blood flow as compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. There was no significant difference in heart rate between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake. Importantly, caffeinated coffee intake significantly enhanced post-occlusive reactive hyperemia of finger blood flow, an index of microvascular endothelial function, compared with decaffeinated coffee intake. These results provide the first evidence that caffeine contained in a cup of coffee enhances microvascular function in healthy individuals. PMID:25727960

  7. Inhibition of autophagy ameliorates pulmonary microvascular dilation and PMVECs excessive proliferation in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Duo; Chen, Bing; Gu, Jianteng; Chen, Lin; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Yi, Bin; Lu, Kaizhi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a defective liver-induced pulmonary vascular disorder with massive pulmonary microvascular dilation and excessive proliferation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Growing evidence suggests that autophagy is involved in pulmonary diseases, protectively or detrimentally. Thus, it is interesting and important to explore whether autophagy might be involved in and critical in HPS. In the present study, we report that autophagy was activated in common bile duct ligation (CBDL) rats and cultured pulmonary PMVECs induced by CBDL rat serum, two accepted in vivo and in vitro experimental models of HPS. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly alleviated pathological alterations and typical symptom of HPS in CBDL rats in vivo, and consistently 3-MA significantly attenuated the CBDL rat serum-induced excessive proliferation of PMVECs in vitro. All these changes mediated by 3-MA might explain the observed prominent improvement of pulmonary appearance, edema, microvascular dilatation and arterial oxygenation in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that autophagy activation may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HPS, and autophagy inhibition may have a therapeutic potential for this disease. PMID:27480323

  8. Effects of S-nitrosation on hemoglobin-induced microvascular damage.

    PubMed

    Burke, Tara K; Teng, Xinjun; Patel, Rakesh P; Baldwin, Ann L

    2006-01-01

    Blood substitutes, such as diaspirin cross-linked hemoglobin (Hb), cause microvascular leakiness to macromolecules. Because of the potentially stabilizing effects of nitric acid (NO) on endothelium, experiments were performed to determine whether S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb), a potential NO-donor Hb-based blood substitute, would not cause microvascular damage. Release of NO, or its metabolites, from the SNO-Hb was facilitated by addition of glutathione, which aids in the decomposition of S-nitrosothiols. In anesthetized rats, the mesenteric microvasculature was perfused with SNO-Hb with glutathione (six rats), SNO-Hb alone (six rats), or saline (eight rats) for 10 min, followed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-albumin for 1 min, and finally fixed for epifluorescence microscopic examination. When comparing the SNO-Hb group with saline, both the numbers and areas of leaks were significantly increased [0.019 +/- 0.003 (SEM) microm vs. 0.0030 +/- 0.0004 and 7.36 +/- 1.50 vs. 0.156 +/- 0.035 (p < 0.005)]. With the addition of glutathione, leakage was still high (0.005 +/- 0.00005 microm and 5.086 +/- 0.064 microm) but decreased compared with SNO-Hb alone (p < 0.005). In conclusion, NO, or a related vasodilator, when released from SNO-Hb, significantly reduces but does not eliminate microvascular damage. Further improvements may result by S-nitrosating a more stable form of modified hemoglobin. PMID:16910757

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  10. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature. PMID:27430896

  11. Transmural variation and anisotropy of microvascular flow conductivity in the rat myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy F.; Shipley, Rebecca J.; Lee, Jack; Sands, Gregory B.; LeGrice, Ian J.; Smith, Nicolas P.

    2015-01-01

    Transmural variations in the relationship between structural and fluid transport properties of myocardial capillary networks are determined via continuum modelling approaches using recent three-dimensional (3D) data on the microvascular structure. Specifically, the permeability tensor, which quantifies the inverse of the blood flow resistivity of the capillary network, is computed by volume-averaging flow solutions in synthetic networks with geometrical and topological properties derived from an anatomically-detailed microvascular data set extracted from the rat myocardium. Results show that the permeability is approximately ten times higher in the principal direction of capillary alignment (the ‘longitudinal’ direction) than perpendicular to this direction, reflecting the strong anisotropy of the microvascular network. Additionally, a 30% increase in capillary diameter from subepicardium to subendocardium is shown to translate to a 130% transmural rise in permeability in the longitudinal capillary direction. This result supports the hypothesis that perfusion is preferentially facilitated during diastole in the subendocardial microvasculature to compensate for the severely-reduced systolic perfusion in the subendocardium. PMID:24866569

  12. Determination of Optical and Microvascular Parameters of Port Wine Stains Using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihai; Yao, Guangping; Chen, Defu; Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying; Li, Buhong

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing port wine stains (PWS) with its optical parameters [i.e. absorption coefficient (μ a) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ s')] and microvascular parameters [i.e. blood volume fraction (BVF), mean vessel diameter (MVD), and oxygen saturation (StO2)] is extremely important for elucidating the mechanisms for its light-based treatments, such as pulsed dye laser and photodynamic therapy. In this study, a customized diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) probe with an appropriate source-detector distance was used to measure the diffuse reflectance spectra of PWS lesions in clinical practice. The results demonstrate that optical parameters of different types of PWS lesions can be accurately extracted by fitting the DRS with diffusion equation. Since the sampling depth of the probe coincides with the depth distribution of abnormal vasculature in PWS, the obtained microvascular parameters of PWS lesions that changed from pink to purple are in agreement with the corresponding physiological conditions. This study suggests that DRS can be utilized to quantitatively determine the optical and microvascular parameters of PWS lesions, which have the potential for planning the protocol and predicting the efficiency for light-based PWS treatments. PMID:27526164

  13. Plastics in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergandine, David R.; Holm, D. Andrew

    The materials in this curriculum supplement, developed for middle school or high school science classes, present solid waste problems related to plastics. The set of curriculum materials is divided into two units to be used together or independently. Unit I begins by comparing patterns in solid waste from 1960 to 1990 and introducing methods for…

  14. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  15. Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticle Exposure Improves Microvascular Dysfunction and Reduces Oxidative Stress in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Minarchick, Valerie C.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Sabolsky, Edward M.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    The elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vascular wall is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. This increase in oxidative stress contributes to various mechanisms of vascular dysfunction, such as decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. Therefore, anti-oxidants are being researched to decrease the high levels of ROS, which could improve the microvascular dysfunction associated with various cardiovascular diseases. From a therapeutic perspective, cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) hold great anti-oxidant potential, but their in vivo activity is unclear. Due to this potential anti-oxidant action, we hypothesize that injected CeO2 NP would decrease microvascular dysfunction and oxidative stress associated with hypertension. In order to simulate a therapeutic application, spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were intravenously injected with either saline or CeO2 NP (100 μg suspended in saline). Twenty-four hours post-exposure mesenteric arteriolar reactivity was assessed via intravital microscopy. Endothelium-dependent and –independent function was assessed via acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside. Microvascular oxidative stress was analyzed using fluorescent staining in isolated mesenteric arterioles. Finally, systemic inflammation was examined using a multiplex analysis and venular leukocyte flux was counted. Endothelium-dependent dilation was significantly decreased in the SH rats (29.68 ± 3.28%, maximal response) and this microvascular dysfunction was significantly improved following CeO2 NP exposure (43.76 ± 4.33%, maximal response). There was also an increase in oxidative stress in the SH rats, which was abolished following CeO2 NP treatment. These results provided evidence that CeO2 NP act as an anti-oxidant in vivo. There were also changes in the inflammatory profile in the WKY and SH rats. In WKY rats, IL-10 and TNF-α were increased following CeO2 NP treatment. Finally, leukocyte

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitor Protects Against Microvascular Hyperpermeability Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Devendra A.; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A.; Childs, Ed W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic shock (HS)-induce microvascular hyperpermeability involves disruption of endothelial cell adherens junctions leading to increase in paracellular permeability. β-Catenin, an integral component of the adherens junctional complex and Wnt pathway, and caspase-3 via its apoptotic signaling regulate endothelial cell barrier integrity. We have hypothesized that inhibiting phosphorylation of β-catenin and caspase-3 activity using glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) specific inhibitor SB216763, would attenuate microvascular hyperpermeability following HS. Methods In Sprague-Dawley rats, HS was induced by withdrawing blood to reduce mean arterial pressure to 40 mmHg for 60 minutes followed by resuscitation. Rats were given SB216763 (600 μg/kg) intravenously 10 minutes prior to shock. To study microvascular permeability, the rats were injected intravenously with FITC-albumin (50 mg/kg) and its flux across the mesenteric post-capillary venules was determined using intravital microscopy. In cell-culture studies, rat lung microvascular endothelial cell (RLMEC) monolayers grown on Transwell plates were pre-treated with SB216763 (5 μM) followed by BAK (5 μg/mL) and caspase-3 (5 μg/mL) protein transfection. FITC-albumin (5 mg/mL) flux across cell monolayers indicates change in monolayer permeability. Activity of canonical Wnt pathway was determined by luciferase assay. Caspase-3 enzyme activity was assayed fluorometrically. Results The HS group showed significant increase in FITC-albumin extravasation (p<0.05) compared with sham. SB216763 significantly decrease HS-induced FITC-albumin extravasation (p<0.05). Pre-treatment with SB216763, protected against a BAK-induced increase in RLMEC monolayer permeability and caspase-3 activity, but failed to show similar results with a caspase-3-induced increase in monolayer permeability. Wnt3a treatment showed an increase in β-catenin dependent TCF-mediated transcription. Conclusion Inhibiting phosphorylation of

  17. In Vitro Investigation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    A classical in vitro model for investigation of information storage in the brain is based on the acute hippocampal slice. Here, repeated high-frequency stimulation of excitatory Schaeffer collaterals making synapses onto pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region leads to strengthening of evoked field-recording responses-long-term potentiation (LTP)-in keeping with Hebb's postulate. This model remains tremendously influential for its reliability, specificity, and relative ease of use. More recent plasticity studies have explored various other brain regions including the neocortex, which often requires more laborious whole-cell recordings of synaptically connected pairs of neurons, to ensure that the identities of recorded cells are known. In addition, with this experimental approach, the spiking activity can be controlled with millisecond precision, which is necessary for the study of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Here, we provide protocols for in vitro study of hippocampal CA1 LTP using field recordings, and of STDP in synaptically connected pairs of layer-5 pyramidal cells in acute slices of rodent neocortex. PMID:27250951

  18. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering. PMID:25828916

  19. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering.

  20. Adult cortical plasticity following injury: Recapitulation of critical period mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Nahmani, Marc; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2014-01-01

    A primary goal of research on developmental critical periods is the recapitulation of a juvenile-like state of malleability in the adult brain that might enable recovery from injury. These ambitions are often framed in terms of the simple reinstatement of enhanced plasticity in the growth-restricted milieu of an injured adult brain. Here, we provide an analysis of the similarities and differences between deprivation-induced and injury-induced cortical plasticity, to provide for a nuanced comparison of these remarkably similar processes. As a first step, we review the factors that drive ocular dominance plasticity in the primary visual cortex of the uninjured brain during the critical period (CP) and in adults, to highlight processes that might confer adaptive advantage. In addition, we directly compare deprivation-induced cortical plasticity during the CP and plasticity following acute injury or ischemia in mature brain. We find that these two processes display a biphasic response profile following deprivation or injury: an initial decrease in GABAergic inhibition and synapse loss transitions into a period of neurite expansion and synaptic gain. This biphasic response profile emphasizes the transition from a period of cortical healing to one of reconnection and recovery of function. Yet while injury-induced plasticity in adult shares several salient characteristics with deprivation-induced plasticity during the CP, the degree to which the adult injured brain is able to functionally rewire, and the time required to do so, present major limitations for recovery. Attempts to recapitulate a measure of CP plasticity in an adult injury context will need to carefully dissect the circuit alterations and plasticity mechanisms involved while measuring functional behavioral output to assess their ultimate success. PMID:24791715

  1. Plastics for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Jack

    1977-01-01

    Describes three plastics projects (which involve making a styrene fishing bobber, an acrylic salad fork and spoon set, and acetate shrink art) designed to provide elementary level students an opportunity to work with plastics and to learn about careers in plastics production and distribution. (TA)

  2. Seabirds and floating plastic debris.

    PubMed

    Cadée, Gerhard C

    2002-11-01

    80% of floating plastic debris freshly washed ashore on a Dutch coast showed peckmarks made by birds at sea. They either mistake these debris for cuttlebones or simply test all floating objects. Ingestion of plastic is deleterious for marine organisms. It is urgent to set measures to plastic litter production.

  3. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  4. Breathing: Rhythmicity, Plasticity, Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2010-01-01

    Breathing is a vital behavior that is particularly amenable to experimental investigation. We review recent progress on three problems of broad interest. (i) Where and how is respiratory rhythm generated? The preBötzinger Complex is a critical site, whereas pacemaker neurons may not be essential. The possibility that coupled oscillators are involved is considered. (ii) What are the mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing? Serotonin-dependent long-term facilitation following intermittent hypoxia is an important example of such plasticity, and a model that can account for this adaptive behavior is discussed. (iii) Where and how are the regulated variables CO2 and pH sensed? These sensors are essential if breathing is to be appropriate for metabolism. Neurons with appropriate chemosensitivity are spread throughout the brainstem; their individual properties and collective role are just beginning to be understood. PMID:12598679

  5. Stress-gradient plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Srinath S.; Curtin, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    A new model, stress-gradient plasticity, is presented that provides unique mechanistic insight into size-dependent phenomena in plasticity. This dislocation-based model predicts strengthening of materials when a gradient in stress acts over dislocation source–obstacle configurations. The model has a physical length scale, the spacing of dislocation obstacles, and is validated by several levels of discrete-dislocation simulations. When incorporated into a continuum viscoplastic model, predictions for bending and torsion in polycrystalline metals show excellent agreement with experiments in the initial strengthening and subsequent hardening as a function of both sample-size dependence and grain size, when the operative obstacle spacing is proportional to the grain size. PMID:21911403

  6. Compensatory plasticity: time matters.

    PubMed

    Lazzouni, Latifa; Lepore, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioral outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioral enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short-term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. The development of specialized higher order visual pathways independently from early sensory experience is likely to preserve their function and switch to the intact modalities. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with

  7. Frozen cultural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Petr; Novakova, Julie

    2016-01-01

    We discuss cultural group selection under the view of the frozen plasticity theory and the different explanatory power and predictions of this framework. We present evidence that cultural adaptations and their influence on the degree of cooperation may be more complex than presented by Richerson et al., and conclude with the gene-environment-culture relationship and its impacts on cultural group selection. PMID:27561647

  8. Plasticity of amyloid fibrils†

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Ronald; Shivaprasad, Shankaramma; Williams, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    In experiments designed to characterize the basis of amyloid fibril stability through mutational analysis of the Aβ(1-40) molecule, fibrils exhibit consistent, significant structural malleability. In these results, and in other properties, amyloid fibrils appear to more resemble plastic materials generated from synthetic polymers than they do globular proteins. Thus, like synthetic polymers and plastics, amyloid fibrils exhibit both polymorphism, the ability of one polypeptide to form aggregates of different morphologies, and isomorphism, the ability of different polypeptides to grow into a fibrillar amyloid morphology. This view links amyloid with the prehistorical and 20th Century use of proteins as starting materials to make films, fibers, and plastics, and with the classic protein fiber stretching experiments of the Astbury group. Viewing amyloid from the point of view of the polymer chemist may shed new light on issues such as the role of protofibrils in the mechanism of amyloid formation, the biological potency of fibrils, and the prospects for discovering inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:17198370

  9. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties. PMID:2319903

  10. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  11. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  12. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution.

  13. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  14. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  15. Computer-based analysis of microvascular alterations in a mouse model for Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzer, Stefan; Müller, Ralph; Stampanoni, Marco; Abela, Rafael; Meyer, Eric P.; Ulmann-Schuler, Alexandra; Krucker, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Vascular factors associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have recently gained increased attention. To investigate changes in vascular, particularly microvascular architecture, we developed a hierarchical imaging framework to obtain large-volume, high-resolution 3D images from brains of transgenic mice modeling AD. In this paper, we present imaging and data analysis methods which allow compiling unique characteristics from several hundred gigabytes of image data. Image acquisition is based on desktop micro-computed tomography (µCT) and local synchrotron-radiation µCT (SRµCT) scanning with a nominal voxel size of 16 µm and 1.4 µm, respectively. Two visualization approaches were implemented: stacks of Z-buffer projections for fast data browsing, and progressive-mesh based surface rendering for detailed 3D visualization of the large datasets. In a first step, image data was assessed visually via a Java client connected to a central database. Identified characteristics of interest were subsequently quantified using global morphometry software. To obtain even deeper insight into microvascular alterations, tree analysis software was developed providing local morphometric parameters such as number of vessel segments or vessel tortuosity. In the context of ever increasing image resolution and large datasets, computer-aided analysis has proven both powerful and indispensable. The hierarchical approach maintains the context of local phenomena, while proper visualization and morphometry provide the basis for detailed analysis of the pathology related to structure. Beyond analysis of microvascular changes in AD this framework will have significant impact considering that vascular changes are involved in other neurodegenerative diseases as well as in cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and arthritis.

  16. The study of synchronization of rhythms of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation during adaptive changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaev, Andrey V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Palmer, Scott G.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Stewart, Neil A.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-02-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems, such as "LAKK-M", allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including blood microcirculatory index (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). Such systems may provide significant information relevant to physiology and clinical medicine. The aim of this research was to use such a system to study the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted with 8 healthy volunteers - 3 females and 5 males of 21-49 years. Each volunteer was subjected to basic 3 minute tests. The volunteers were observed for between 1-4 months each, totalling 422 basic tests. Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the forearm medial surface. Wavelet analysis was used to study rhythmic oscillations in LDF- and TRO-data. Tissue oxygen consumption (from arterial and venal blood oxygen saturation and nutritive flux volume) was calculated for all volunteers during "adaptive changes" as (617+/-123 AU) and (102+/-38 AU) with and without arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) respectively. This demonstrates increased consumption compared to normal (495+/-170 AU) and (69+/-40 AU) with and without AVAs respectively. Data analysis demonstrated the emergence of resonance and synchronization of rhythms of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and potentially from psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes suggest increased oxygen consumption resulting from increased microvascular blood flow velocity.

  17. Effect of medication on microvascular vasodilatation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Christine; Andersson, Sven E; Edvinsson, Lars; Edvinsson, Marie-Louise; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Nived, Ola

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microvascular responses in the skin, to local heat, iontophoretically administered acetylcholine and to sodium nitroprusside in relation to cardiovascular damage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and matched controls. We also wanted to examine if the ongoing medication in SLE patients influenced this vascular response. We investigated 30 women with SLE and compared them with 20 age and sex-matched controls. The cutaneous blood flow response to local heat (+44°C), iontophoretically administered endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine), as well as independent (sodium nitroprusside) vasodilatation, was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Clinical data and medication were retrieved from the clinical database and patient records. The cutaneous microvascular reactivity did not differ between SLE patients and a group of matched controls nor did it correlate with cardiovascular damage [assessed by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR-DI)]. However, patients on antimalarial drugs (hydroxychloroquine n = 8 and chloroquine diphosphate n = 3) responded more strongly to sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent vasodilatation) compared with those without antimalarial drugs (p < 0.01). The response to acetylcholine was higher among patients on warfarin compared with those without (p < 0.05), whereas glucocorticoid use (≥5 mg daily) was associated with reduced response to acetylcholine (p < 0.05). Smokers in general tended to have a lower response to acetylcholine (p = 0.064). Smoking SLE patients versus non-smoking SLE patients had a significantly lower response to acetylcholine (p = 0.01). Medication with antimalarial drugs-enhanced endothelium-independent vasodilatation, while glucocorticoid use was associated with reduction and warfarin-treatment with enhancement of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Therefore, despite there is no

  18. The relationship between red blood cell deformability metrics and perfusion of an artificial microvascular network

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Jose M.; Nielsen, Nathan D.; Vignes, Seth M.; Chen, Tanya G.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of red blood cells (RBC) to undergo a wide range of deformations while traversing the microvasculature is crucial for adequate perfusion. Interpretation of RBC deformability measurements performed in vitro in the context of microvascular perfusion has been notoriously difficult. This study compares the measurements of RBC deformability performed using micropore filtration and ektacytometry with the RBC ability to perfuse an artificial microvascular network (AMVN). Human RBCs were collected from healthy consenting volunteers, leukoreduced, washed and exposed to graded concentrations (0% – 0.08%) of glutaraldehyde (a non-specific protein cross-linker) and diamide (a spectrin-specific protein cross-linker) to impair the deformability of RBCs. Samples comprising cells with two different levels of deformability were created by adding non-deformable RBCs (hardened by exposure to 0.08% glutaraldehyde) to the sample of normal healthy RBCs. Ektacytometry indicated a nearly linear decline in RBC deformability with increasing glutaraldehyde concentration. Micropore filtration showed a significant reduction only for concentrations of glutaraldehyde higher than 0.04%. Neither micropore filtration nor ektacytometry measurements could accurately predict the AMVN perfusion. Treatment with diamide reduced RBC deformability as indicated by ektacytometry, but had no significant effect on either micropore filtration or the AMVN perfusion. Both micropore filtration and ektacytometry showed a linear decline in effective RBC deformability with increasing fraction of non-deformable RBCs in the sample. The corresponding decline in the AMVN perfusion plateaued above 50%, reflecting the innate ability of blood flow in the microvasculature to bypass occluded capillaries. Our results suggest that in vitro measurements of RBC deformability performed using either micropore filtration or ektacytometry may not represent the ability of same RBCs to perfuse microvascular networks

  19. Brain angioarchitecture and intussusceptive microvascular growth in a murine model of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Arianna; Ackermann, Maximilian; Belleri, Mirella; Coltrini, Daniela; Nico, Beatrice; Ribatti, Domenico; Konerding, Moritz A; Presta, Marco; Righi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Defects of the angiogenic process occur in the brain of twitcher mouse, an authentic model of human Krabbe disease caused by genetic deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosylceramidase (GALC), leading to lethal neurological dysfunctions and accumulation of neurotoxic psychosine in the central nervous system. Here, quantitative computational analysis was used to explore the alterations of brain angioarchitecture in twitcher mice. To this aim, customized ImageJ routines were used to assess calibers, amounts, lengths and spatial dispersion of CD31(+) vessels in 3D volumes from the postnatal frontal cortex of twitcher animals. The results showed a decrease in CD31 immunoreactivity in twitcher brain with a marked reduction in total vessel lengths coupled with increased vessel fragmentation. No significant changes were instead observed for the spatial dispersion of brain vessels throughout volumes or in vascular calibers. Notably, no CD31(+) vessel changes were detected in twitcher kidneys in which psychosine accumulates at very low levels, thus confirming the specificity of the effect. Microvascular corrosion casting followed by scanning electron microscopy morphometry confirmed the presence of significant alterations of the functional angioarchitecture of the brain cortex of twitcher mice with reduction in microvascular density, vascular branch remodeling and intussusceptive angiogenesis. Intussusceptive microvascular growth, confirmed by histological analysis, was paralleled by alterations of the expression of intussusception-related genes in twitcher brain. Our data support the hypothesis that a marked decrease in vascular development concurs to the onset of neuropathological lesions in twitcher brain and suggest that neuroinflammation-driven intussusceptive responses may represent an attempt to compensate impaired sprouting angiogenesis.

  20. AST-120 Improves Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung-Hwa; Yu, Mina; Lee, Sihna; Ryu, Dong-Ryeol; Kim, Seung-Jung; Kang, Duk-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is a pivotal phenomenon in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a known uremic toxin that induces ED in patients with chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AST-120, an absorbent of IS, improves microvascular or macrovascular ED in HD patients. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective, case-controlled trial. Fourteen patients each were enrolled in respective AST-120 and control groups. The subjects in the AST-120 group were treated with AST-120 (6 g/day) for 6 months. Microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry using iontophoresis of acetylcholine (Ach) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at baseline and again at 3 and 6 months. Carotid arterial intima-media thickness (cIMT) and flow-mediated vasodilation were measured at baseline and 6 months. The Wilcoxon rank test was used to compare values before and after AST-120 treatment. Results Ach-induced iontophoresis (endothelium-dependent response) was dramatically ameliorated at 3 months and 6 months in the AST-120 group. SNP-induced response showed delayed improvement only at 6 months in the AST-120 group. The IS level was decreased at 3 months in the AST-120 group, but remained stable thereafter. cIMT was significantly reduced after AST-120 treatment. No significant complications in patients taking AST-120 were reported. Conclusion AST-120 ameliorated microvascular ED and cIMT in HD patients. A randomized study including a larger population will be required to establish a definitive role of AST-120 as a preventive medication for CVD in HD patients. PMID:27189289

  1. A comparison of heparinised saline irrigation solutions in a model of microvascular thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cox, G W; Runnels, S; Hsu, H S; Das, S K

    1992-07-01

    The use of heparinised irrigation solutions has become common in microvascular surgery, but the concentration of heparin has been determined empirically. A laboratory model of microvascular thrombosis, employing a crush injury, intimal abrasion, and stasis to the rat superficial femoral artery was used to compare heparinised saline irrigation solutions of various concentrations. The solutions included normal saline (Group I, controls) and heparinised normal saline in concentrations of 10 U/ml (Group III), 250 U/ml (Group IV), and 500 U/ml (Group V). Group I animals had a patency rate of 25% at 20 min and 0% at 24 h. Group II showed a patency rate of 75% at 20 min but fell to 37.5% at 24 h. Patency in Group III was 87.5% at 20 min and at 24 h. Group IV had a 100% patency rate at 20 min and at 24 h. Group V animals were 100% patent at 20 min and 87.5% patent at 24 h. The activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged in animals exposed to 250 U/ml and 500 U/ml of heparinised saline. Patency was significantly improved in animals exposed to 100 U/ml, 250 U/ml and 500 U/ml when compared to the control group (p less than 0.001). These results suggest that topical heparinised saline administration is of benefit in the prevention of microvascular thrombosis. Higher concentrations tested in this study resulted in a significant increase in patency, but also prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time. 100 U/ml is the ideal concentration of heparinised saline irrigation because it significantly improved patency but did not produce detectable systemic effects in this model.

  2. In vivo microvascular mosaics show air embolism reduction after perfluorocarbon emulsion treatment.

    PubMed

    Torres Filho, Ivo P; Torres, Luciana N; Spiess, Bruce D

    2012-11-01

    Massive arteriolar gas embolism (AGE) has never been evaluated in vivo using intravital microscopy and previous perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions were only effective in AGE when administered before AGE. We implemented a new system for quantitative studies of massive AGE using brightfield microscopy and tested a treatment with a third-generation PFC emulsion after massive AGE. We studied bubble dynamics in cremaster muscles from anesthetized rats after AGE was induced by direct air injection into the femoral artery ipsilateral to the studied muscle. Using a motorized microscope stage and a color camera, in vivo microvascular mosaics were produced on-line from over 2000 digital images to evaluate multiple networks in order to investigate the distribution, lodging, breaking, reduction and moving of 105 air bubbles in microvessels. Thirty minutes after PFC treatment, there was a reduction of 80% in bubble volume while untreated and saline-treated rats showed significantly smaller decreases of 33% and 40%, respectively (p<0.05). Air bubbles also dissolved into a larger number of smaller bubbles after PFC treatment. The proposed methodology may prove useful for rapid in vivo data acquisition from large networks. Since large air bubbles broke-up, decreased in length and volume, and moved toward smaller microvessels, the study provides quantitative data to support a mechanism by which PFC may improve tissue blood flow following massive AGE. The findings suggest that this new generation of PFC emulsions administered after severe AGE may reach compromised microvascular networks and provide help to alleviate microvascular obstruction by increasing air bubble reabsorption.

  3. Effect of Irradiation on Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Parotid Glands in the Miniature Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junji; Yan Xing; Gao Runtao; Mao Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng Changyu; Zhang Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials: A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg{sup 2+}-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results: Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions: Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage.

  4. Zingiber officinale attenuates retinal microvascular changes in diabetic rats via anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dongare, Shirish; Mathur, Rajani; Saxena, Rohit; Mathur, Sandeep; Agarwal, Renu; Nag, Tapas C.; Srivastava, Sushma; Kumar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is a common microvascular complication of long-standing diabetes. Several complex interconnecting biochemical pathways are activated in response to hyperglycemia. These pathways culminate into proinflammatory and angiogenic effects that bring about structural and functional damage to the retinal vasculature. Since Zingiber officinale (ginger) is known for its anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties, we investigated the effects of its extract standardized to 5% 6-gingerol, the major active constituent of ginger, in attenuating retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Methods Diabetic rats were treated orally with the vehicle or the ginger extract (75 mg/kg/day) over a period of 24 weeks along with regular monitoring of bodyweight and blood glucose and weekly fundus photography. At the end of the 24-week treatment, the retinas were isolated for histopathological examination under a light microscope, transmission electron microscopy, and determination of the retinal tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Results Oral administration of the ginger extract resulted in significant reduction of hyperglycemia, the diameter of the retinal vessels, and vascular basement membrane thickness. Improvement in the architecture of the retinal vasculature was associated with significantly reduced expression of NF-κB and reduced activity of TNF-α and VEGF in the retinal tissue in the ginger extract–treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusions The current study showed that ginger extract containing 5% of 6-gingerol attenuates the retinal microvascular changes in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes through anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic actions. Although precise molecular targets remain to be determined, 6-gingerol seems to be a potential candidate for further investigation. PMID:27293376

  5. Numerical simulation of red blood cell distributions in three-dimensional microvascular bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Hyakutake, Toru; Nagai, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    We constructed three-dimensional microvascular bifurcation models using a parent vessel of diameter 10μm and investigated the flow behavior of the red blood cells (RBCs) through bifurcations. We considered symmetric and asymmetric model types. Two cases of equal daughter vessel diameter were employed for the asymmetric models, where the first was 10μm, which is the same as the parent vessel and the second was 7.94μm, which satisfies Murray's law. Simulated blood flow was computed using the lattice Boltzmann method in conjunction with the immersed boundary method for incorporating fluid-membrane interactions between the flow field and deformable RBCs. First, we investigated the flow behavior of a single RBC through microvascular bifurcations. In the case of the symmetric bifurcation, the turning point of the fractional plasma flow wherein the RBC flow changed from one daughter vessel to the other was 0.50. This turning point was however different for asymmetric bifurcations. Additionally, we varied the initial offset of RBCs from the centerline of the parent vessel. The simulation results indicated that the RBCs preferentially flow through the branch of a larger flow ratio. Next, we investigated the distribution characteristics of multiple RBCs. Simulations indicated that the results of the symmetric model were similar to those predicted by a previously published empirical model. On the other hand, results of asymmetric models deviated from those of the symmetric and empirical models. These results suggest that the distribution of RBCs varies according to the bifurcation angle and daughter vessel diameter in a microvascular bifurcation of the size considered.

  6. Glaucocalyxin A Ameliorates Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Mice by Suppression of Microvascular Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui; Xu, Dongzhou; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Ting; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jian; You, Tao; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardio-protective roles of glaucocalyxin A (GLA) in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and to explore the underlying mechanism. Material/Methods Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in wild-type C57BL/6J mice was induced by transient ligation of the left anterior descending artery. GLA or vehicle (solvent) was administrated intraperitoneally to the mice before reperfusion started. After 24 h of myocardial reperfusion, ischemic size was revealed by Evans blue/TTC staining. Cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography and microvascular thrombosis was assessed by immunofluorescence staining of affected heart tissue. We also measured the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK, P-GSK-3β, and cleaved caspase 3 in the myocardium. Results Compared to the solvent-treated control group, GLA administration significantly reduced infarct size (GLA 13.85±2.08% vs. Control 18.95±0.97%, p<0.05) and improved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (GLA 53.13±1.11% vs. Control 49.99±1.25%, p<0.05) and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) (28.34±0.71% vs. Control 25.11±0.74%, p<0.05) in mice subjected to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. GLA also attenuated microvascular thrombosis (P<0.05) and increased the phosphorylation of pro-survival kinase AKT (P<0.05) and GSK-3β (P<0.05) in the myocardium upon reperfusion injury. Conclusions Administration of GLA before reperfusion ameliorates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice. The cardio-protective roles of GLA may be mediated through the attenuation of microvascular thrombosis. PMID:27716735

  7. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  8. Cathepsin S Cleavage of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 on Endothelial Cells Promotes Microvascular Diabetes Complications.

    PubMed

    Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Steiger, Stefanie; Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Tato, Maia; Kukarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Thomasova, Dana; Popper, Bastian; Demleitner, Jana; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph; Cohen, Clemens D; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Liapis, Helen; Moll, Solange; Reid, Emma; Stitt, Alan W; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Martin; Hartmann, Guido; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a central pathomechanism in diabetes-associated complications. We hypothesized a pathogenic role in this dysfunction of cathepsin S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that degrades elastic fibers and activates the protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on endothelial cells. We found that injection of mice with recombinant Cat-S induced albuminuria and glomerular endothelial cell injury in a PAR2-dependent manner. In vivo microscopy confirmed a role for intrinsic Cat-S/PAR2 in ischemia-induced microvascular permeability. In vitro transcriptome analysis and experiments using siRNA or specific Cat-S and PAR2 antagonists revealed that Cat-S specifically impaired the integrity and barrier function of glomerular endothelial cells selectively through PAR2. In human and mouse type 2 diabetic nephropathy, only CD68(+) intrarenal monocytes expressed Cat-S mRNA, whereas Cat-S protein was present along endothelial cells and inside proximal tubular epithelial cells also. In contrast, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C was expressed only in tubules. Delayed treatment of type 2 diabetic db/db mice with Cat-S or PAR2 inhibitors attenuated albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis (indicators of diabetic nephropathy) and attenuated albumin leakage into the retina and other structural markers of diabetic retinopathy. These data identify Cat-S as a monocyte/macrophage-derived circulating PAR2 agonist and mediator of endothelial dysfunction-related microvascular diabetes complications. Thus, Cat-S or PAR2 inhibition might be a novel strategy to prevent microvascular disease in diabetes and other diseases.

  9. Printing Cancer Cells into Intact Microvascular Networks: A Model for Investigating Cancer Cell Dynamics during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Phamduy, Theresa B.; Sweat, Richard S.; Azimi, Mohammad S.; Burow, Matthew E.; Murfee, Walter L.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    While cancer cell invasion and metastasis is dependent on cancer cell-stroma, cancer cell-blood vessel, and cancer cell-lymphatic vessel interactions, our understanding of these interactions remain largely unknown. A need exists for physiologically-relevant models that more closely mimic the complexity of cancer cell dynamics in a real tissue environment. The objective of this study was to combine laser-based cell printing and tissue culture methods to create a novel ex vivo model in which cancer cell dynamics can be tracked during angiogenesis in an intact microvascular network. Laser direct-write (LDW) was utilized to reproducibly deposit breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and fibroblasts into spatially-defined patterns on cultured rat mesenteric tissues. In addition, heterogeneous patterns containing co-printed MDA-MB-231/fibroblasts or MDA-MB-231/MCF-7 cells were generated for fibroblast-directed and collective cell invasion models. Printed cells remained viable and the cells retained the ability to proliferate in serum-rich media conditions. Over a culture period of five days, time-lapse imaging confirmed fibroblast and MDA-MB-231 cell migration within the microvascular networks. Confocal microscopy indicated that printed MDA-MB-231 cells infiltrated the tissue thickness and were capable of interacting with endothelial cells. Angiogenic network growth in tissue areas containing printed cancer cells was characterized by significantly increased capillary sprouting compared to control tissue areas containing no printed cells. Our results establish an innovative ex vivo experimental platform that enables time-lapse evaluation of cancer cell dynamics during angiogenesis within a real microvascular network scenario. PMID:26190039

  10. Diet Induced Obesity in Sprague Dawley Rats Causes Microvascular and Neural Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric P.; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Oltman, Christine L.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective was to determine the effect of diet induced obesity (DIO) on microvascular and neural function. Methods Rats were fed a standard or high fat diet for up to 32 weeks. Measurements were performed of vasodilation in epineurial arterioles by videomicroscopy, endoneurial blood flow by hydrogen clearance, nerve conduction velocity by electrical stimulation, size-frequency distribution of myelinated fibers of the sciatic nerve, intraepidermal nerve fiber density using confocal microscopy and thermal nociception using the Hargreaves method. Results Rats fed a high fat diet for 32 weeks developed sensory neuropathy as indicated by slowing of sensory nerve conduction velocity and thermal hypoalgesia. Motor nerve conduction velocity and endoneurial blood flow were not impaired. Mean axonal diameter of myelinated fibers of the sciatic nerve was unchanged in high fat fed rats compared to control. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density was significantly reduced in high fat fed rats. Vascular relaxation to acetylcholine and calcitonin gene-related peptide was decreased and expression of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) increased in epineurial arterioles of rats fed a high fat diet. In contrast, insulin-mediated vascular relaxation was increased in epineurial arterioles. NEP activity was significantly increased in the skin of the hindpaw. Markers of oxidative stress were increased in the aorta and serum of high fat fed rats but not in epineurial arterioles. Conclusion Chronic obesity causes microvascular and neural dysfunction. This is associated with increased expression of NEP but not oxidative stress in epineurial arterioles. NEP degrades vasoactive peptides which may explain the decrease in microvascular function. PMID:20503263

  11. Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities and Risk of Renal Failure in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yip, WanFen; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Teo, Boon Wee; Tay, Wan Ting; Ikram, M. Kamran; Tai, E. Shyong; Chow, Khuan Yew; Wong, Tien Y.; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Retinal microvascular signs may provide insights into the structure and function of small vessels that are associated with renal disease. We examined the relationship of retinal microvascular signs with both prevalent and incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Methods A total of 5763 subjects (aged ≥40 years) from two prospective population-based studies (the Singapore Malay Eye Study and the Singapore Prospective Study) were included for the current analysis. Retinopathy was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Retinal vascular parameters were measured using computer-assisted programs to quantify the retinal vessel widths (arteriolar and venular caliber) and retinal vascular network (fractal dimension). Data on ESRD was obtained by record linkage with the ESRD cases registered by National Registry of Diseases Office, Singapore. Multi-variable adjusted regression analyses were performed to assess the associations of baseline retinal vascular parameters and prevalent and incident ESRD. Results At baseline, 21(0.36%) persons had prevalent ESRD. During a median follow-up of 4.3 years, 33 (0.57%) subjects developed ESRD. In our analyses, retinopathy was associated with prevalent ESRD (multi-variable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–8.05) and incident ESRD (multi-variable adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.51, 95%CI: 1.14–5.54). This association was largely seen in person with diabetes (HR, 2.60, 95%CI: 1.01–6.66) and not present in persons without diabetes (HR, 1.65, 95%CI: 0.14–18.98). Retinal arteriolar caliber, retinal venular caliber and retinal vascular fractal dimension were not associated with ESRD. Conclusion Retinopathy signs in persons with diabetes are related to an increased risk of ESRD; however, other microvascular changes in the retina are not associated with ESRD. PMID:25658337

  12. Optical measurements of microvascular circulatory function in the foot for detection of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, G.; Chekh, V.; Burge, M.; Barriga, E. S.; Luan, S.; Heintz, P.; Edwards, A.; McGrew, E.; Soliz, P.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to quantify functional signals in the microvascular circulation of the plantar. Our device is based on thermal and spectral technologies that can be easily adopted in clinical and tele-screening settings. Eightytwo thousand amputations are performed annually on diabetics in the US. The cost of foot disorder diagnosis and management are estimated at $10.9 billion dollars annually. Our experiments on normal controls and diabetics assess the temperature recovery time characteristics due to cold provocation to the bottom of the foot (plantar). A difference in the nature of the recovery time between normal controls and diabetics was observed.

  13. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry-1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Niharikaa; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Maheshwari, Vitthal D.; Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES), as a marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes. Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214) presenting to our centre were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216); Group 2 (microvascular disease (peripheral, ocular or renal) in 20.7%. Microvascular disease was significantly greater in illiterate (25.9%) and low (23.6%) compared to middle (15.0%) and high (14.7%) ES groups (P < 0.05). Age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that in illiterate and low ES groups respectively, prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (odds ratio 3.84, confidence intervals 2.09–7.05 and 2.15, 1.36–3.41); low fruit/vegetable (2.51, 1.53–4.14 and 1.99, 1.30–3.04) and low fibre intake (4.02, 2.50–6.45 and 1.78, 1.23–2.59) was greater compared to high ES. Poor diabetes control (HbA1c >8.0%) was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%), low (46.0%) and middle (41.0%) compared to high (31.5%) ES subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet and sub-optimal diabetes control. PMID:26425480

  14. Association of low educational status with microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes: Jaipur diabetes registry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Niharikaa; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Maheshwari, Vitthal D.; Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Gupta, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of educational status (ES), as marker of socioeconomic status, with the prevalence of microvascular complications in diabetes. Methods: Successive patients (n = 1214) presenting to our center were evaluated for sociodemographic, anthropometric, clinical, and therapeutic variables. Subjects were classified according to ES into Group 1 (illiterate, 216); Group 2 (≤ primary, 537), Group 3 (≤ higher secondary, 312), and Group 4 (any college, 149). Descriptive statistics is reported. Results: Mean age of patients was 52 ± 10 years, duration of diabetes 7 ± 7 years and 55% were men. Prevalence of various risk factors was smoking/tobacco 25.5%, obesity body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 64.0%, abdominal obesity 63.4%, hypertension 67.5%, high fat diet 14.5%, low fruits/vegetables 31.8%, low fiber intake 60.0%, high salt diet 16.9%, physical inactivity 27.5%, coronary or cerebrovascular disease 3.0%, and microvascular disease (peripheral, ocular or renal) in 20.7%. Microvascular disease was significantly greater in illiterate (25.9%) and low (23.6%) compared to middle (15.0%) and high (14.7%) ES groups (P < 0.05). Age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that in illiterate and low ES groups respectively, prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (odds ratio 3.84, confidence interval: 09–7.05 and 2.15, 1.36–3.41); low fruit/vegetable (2.51, 1.53–4.14 and 1.99, 1.30–3.04) and low fiber intake (4.02, 2.50–6.45 and 1.78, 1.23–2.59) was greater compared to high ES. Poor diabetes control (HbA1c >.0%) was significantly greater in illiterate (38.0%), low (46.0%), and middle (41.0%) compared to high (31.5%) ES subjects (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a greater prevalence of the microvascular disease in illiterate and low ES diabetes patients in India. This is associated with the higher prevalence of smoking/tobacco use, poor quality diet, and sub-optimal diabetes control. PMID:26693427

  15. [Reconstruction of oral mucosa with a micro-vascularized fascia-cutaneous flap from the forearm].

    PubMed

    Burgueño García, Miguel; Cebrián Carretero, José Luis; Muñoz Caro, Jesús Manuel; Arias Gallo, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Epidermoid carcinoma of jugal mucosa is an aggressive tumor. Its treatment is based on broad excision and reconstruction in order to avoid fibrosis and restriction of mouth opening. Neck dissection and radiotherapy are indicated in selected cases. We display our experience with microvascularized flaps with the aim of preventing the flaws. We reconsider 8 patients (representing 10 flaps) handle in our Department. Besides we discuss other therapeutic alternatives after the growth's removal. The conclusion reached is that the mucovascularized forearm flaps give a great quantity of thin tissue and therefore so results to be the best option for the reconstruction of the jugal mucosa.

  16. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Tanja C; Maisner, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  17. Non-Invasive Measurement of Skin Microvascular Response during Pharmacological and Physiological Provocations

    PubMed Central

    Iredahl, Fredrik; Löfberg, Andreas; Sjöberg, Folke; Farnebo, Simon; Tesselaar, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular changes in the skin due to pharmacological and physiological provocations can be used as a marker for vascular function. While laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used extensively for measurement of skin microvascular responses, Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) and Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) are novel imaging techniques. TiVi measures red blood cell concentration, while LDF and LSCI measure perfusion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare responses to provocations in the skin using these different techniques. Method Changes in skin microcirculation were measured in healthy subjects during (1) iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and noradrenaline (NA), (2) local heating and (3) post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) using LDF, LSCI and TiVi. Results Iontophoresis of SNP increased perfusion (LSCI: baseline 40.9±6.2 PU; 10-min 100±25 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 119±18; 10-min 150±41 AU; p = 0.011). No change in perfusion (LSCI) was observed after iontophoresis of NA (baseline 38.0±4.4 PU; 10-min 38.9±5.0 PU; p = 0.64), while RBC concentration decreased (TiVi: baseline 59.6±11.8 AU; 10-min 54.4±13.3 AU; p = 0.021). Local heating increased perfusion (LDF: baseline 8.8±3.6 PU; max 112±55 PU; p<0.001, LSCI: baseline 50.8±8.0 PU; max 151±22 PU; p<0.001) and RBC concentration (TiVi: baseline 49.2±32.9 AU; max 99.3±28.3 AU; p<0.001). After 5 minutes of forearm occlusion with prior exsanguination, a decrease was seen in perfusion (LDF: p = 0.027; LSCI: p<0.001) and in RBC concentration (p = 0.045). Only LSCI showed a significant decrease in perfusion after 5 minutes of occlusion without prior exsanguination (p<0.001). Coefficients of variation were lower for LSCI and TiVi compared to LDF for most responses. Conclusion LSCI is more sensitive than TiVi for measuring microvascular changes during SNP-induced vasodilatation and forearm occlusion. TiVi is more sensitive to noradrenaline

  18. Influence of non-Newtonian viscosity of blood on microvascular impairment.

    PubMed

    Moh, Jeong-Hah; Cho, Young I; Cho, Daniel J; Kim, Doosang; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2014-01-01

    The present research investigated the role of blood viscosity on flow within a microvascular network to identify the conditions of blood flow stagnation. When the yield stress of blood was less than 0.005 Pa, there were no stagnant regions in the microvasculature. However, when the yield stress increased to 0.05 Pa, stagnant or reduced flow areas began to appear, which grew and expanded rapidly with further increase in the yield stress. Thus, the yield stress determined from blood viscosity profile of a patient can be utilized to evaluate the risk of circulatory impairment. PMID:24584322

  19. Influence of non-Newtonian viscosity of blood on microvascular impairment.

    PubMed

    Moh, Jeong-Hah; Cho, Young I; Cho, Daniel J; Kim, Doosang; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2014-01-01

    The present research investigated the role of blood viscosity on flow within a microvascular network to identify the conditions of blood flow stagnation. When the yield stress of blood was less than 0.005 Pa, there were no stagnant regions in the microvasculature. However, when the yield stress increased to 0.05 Pa, stagnant or reduced flow areas began to appear, which grew and expanded rapidly with further increase in the yield stress. Thus, the yield stress determined from blood viscosity profile of a patient can be utilized to evaluate the risk of circulatory impairment.

  20. Multiple microvascular and astroglial 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes in human brain: molecular and pharmacologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bouchelet, I; Olivier, A; Villemure, J G; Ball, R; Stanimirovic, D B; Hamel, E

    1999-08-01

    Physiologic and anatomic evidence suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurons regulate local cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier permeability. To evaluate the possibility that some of these effects occur directly on the blood vessels, molecular and/or pharmacologic approaches were used to assess the presence of 5-HT receptors in human brain microvascular fractions, endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures, as well as in astroglial cells which intimately associate with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Isolated microvessels and capillaries consistently expressed messages for the h5-HT1B, h5-HT1D, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A but not 5-HT7 receptors. When their distribution within the vessel wall was studied in more detail, it was found that capillary endothelial cells exhibited mRNA for the h5-HT1D and for the 5-HT7 receptors whereas microvascular smooth muscle cells, in addition to h5-HT1D and 5-HT7, also showed polymerase chain reaction products for h5-HT1B receptors. Expression of 5-HT1F and 5-HT2A receptor mRNAs was never detected in any of the microvascular cell cultures. In contrast, messages for all 5-HT receptors tested were detected in human brain astrocytes with a predominance of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 subtypes. In all cultures, sumatriptan inhibited (35-58%, P < .05) the forskolin-stimulated production of cyclic AMP, an effect blocked by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonists GR127935 and GR55562. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine induced strong increases (> or = 400%, P < .005) in basal cyclic AMP levels that were abolished by mesulergine, a nonselective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. Only astroglial cells showed a ketanserin-sensitive increase (177%, P < .05) in IP3 formation when exposed to 5-HT. These results show that specific populations of functional 5-HT receptors are differentially distributed within the various cellular compartments of the human cortical microvascular bed, and that human brain astroglial cells are endowed with multiple 5-HT receptors

  1. Calcineurin mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating retinoic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Kristin L.; Zhang, Zhenjie; Ganesan, Subhashree; Hintze, Maik; Shin, Maggie M.; Tang, Yitai; Cho, Ahryon; Graef, Isabella A.; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a form of non-Hebbian plasticity that maintains stability of the network and fidelity for information processing in response to prolonged perturbation of network and synaptic activity. Prolonged blockade of synaptic activity decreases resting Ca2+ levels in neurons, thereby inducing retinoic acid (RA) synthesis and RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity; however, the signal transduction pathway that links reduced Ca2+-levels to RA synthesis remains unknown. Here we identify the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) as a key regulator for RA synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Prolonged inhibition of CaN activity promotes RA synthesis in neurons, and leads to increased excitatory and decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission. These effects of CaN inhibitors on synaptic transmission are blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis or acute genetic deletion of the RA receptor RARα. Thus, CaN, acting upstream of RA, plays a critical role in gating RA signaling pathway in response to synaptic activity. Moreover, activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity is absent in CaN knockout neurons, demonstrating the essential role of CaN in RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, in GluA1 S831A and S845A knockin mice, CaN inhibitor- and RA-induced regulation of synaptic transmission is intact, suggesting that phosphorylation of GluA1 C-terminal serine residues S831 and S845 is not required for CaN inhibitor- or RA-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, our study uncovers an unforeseen role of CaN in postsynaptic signaling, and defines CaN as the Ca2+-sensing signaling molecule that mediates RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26443861

  2. Plasticity of Th17 Cells in Autoimmune Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christian F; Turner, Jan-Eric; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Kapffer, Sonja; Koyro, Tobias; Krohn, Sonja; Ufer, Friederike; Friese, Manuel A; Flavell, Richard A; Stockinger, Brigitta; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Stahl, Rolf A K; Huber, Samuel; Panzer, Ulf

    2016-07-15

    The ability of CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pathogenic Th1 and Th17 or protective T regulatory cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Recent data suggest that CD4(+) T cell subsets display a considerable plasticity. This plasticity seems to be a critical factor for their pathogenicity, but also for the potential transition of pathogenic effector T cells toward a more tolerogenic phenotype. The aim of the current study was to analyze the plasticity of Th17 cells in a mouse model of acute crescentic glomerulonephritis and in a mouse chronic model of lupus nephritis. By transferring in vitro generated, highly purified Th17 cells and by using IL-17A fate reporter mice, we demonstrate that Th17 cells fail to acquire substantial expression of the Th1 and Th2 signature cytokines IFN-γ and IL-13, respectively, or the T regulatory transcription factor Foxp3 throughout the course of renal inflammation. In an attempt to therapeutically break the stability of the Th17 phenotype in acute glomerulonephritis, we subjected nephritic mice to CD3-specific Ab treatment. Indeed, this treatment induced an immunoregulatory phenotype in Th17 cells, which was marked by high expression of IL-10 and attenuated renal tissue damage in acute glomerulonephritis. In summary, we show that Th17 cells display a minimum of plasticity in acute and chronic experimental glomerulonephritis and introduce anti-CD3 treatment as a tool to induce a regulatory phenotype in Th17 cells in the kidney that may be therapeutically exploited.

  3. In vivo microvascular network imaging of the human retina combined with an automatic three-dimensional segmentation method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shenghai; Piao, Zhonglie; Zhu, Jiang; Lu, Fan; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Microvascular network of the retina plays an important role in diagnosis and monitoring of various retinal diseases. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) segmentation method with intensity-based Doppler variance (IBDV) based on swept-source optical coherence tomography. The automatic 3-D segmentation method is used to obtain seven surfaces of intraretinal layers. The microvascular network of the retina, which is acquired by the IBDV method, can be divided into six layers. The microvascular network of the six individual layers is visualized, and the morphology and contrast images can be improved by using the segmentation method. This method has potential for earlier diagnosis and precise monitoring in retinal vascular diseases. PMID:26169790

  4. Use of recycled plastics in wood plastic composites - a review.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Najafi, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    The use of recycled and waste thermoplastics has been recently considered for producing wood plastic composites (WPCs). They have great potential for WPCs manufacturing according to results of some limited researches. This paper presents a detailed review about some essential properties of waste and recycled plastics, important for WPCs production, and of research published on the effect of recycled plastics on the physical and mechanical properties of WPCs.

  5. Use of recycled plastics in wood plastic composites - a review.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Najafi, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    The use of recycled and waste thermoplastics has been recently considered for producing wood plastic composites (WPCs). They have great potential for WPCs manufacturing according to results of some limited researches. This paper presents a detailed review about some essential properties of waste and recycled plastics, important for WPCs production, and of research published on the effect of recycled plastics on the physical and mechanical properties of WPCs. PMID:23777666

  6. Soluble CD40L in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: relation to microvascular complications and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Mohamed A; Adly, Amira Am; Ismail, Eman A

    2012-12-01

    CD40-soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) interactions might constitute an important mediator for vascular inflammation that initiates diabetic microangiopathy. Little is known about the relation between sCD40L and glycemic control. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate sCD40L levels in patients with type 1 diabetes and its relation to microvascular complications and metabolic control. Sixty patients with type 1 diabetes were compared with 30 healthy control subjects. Detailed medical history, thorough clinical examination, and laboratory assessment of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glycemic control, and the presence of microvascular complications were performed. Measurement of serum sCD40L levels was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of microvascular complications. Serum sCD40L levels were significantly elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes in both groups compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001). Patients with microvascular complications had higher serum sCD40L concentrations than non-complicated cases (median, 13 000 vs. 450 pg/mL; p < 0.001). Serum sCD40L cutoff value of 530 pg/mL was able to differentiate complicated from non-complicated cases (p < 0.001). Patients with microalbuminuria or peripheral neuropathy showed higher levels of sCD40L when compared with patients without these complications (p < 0.05). Serum sCD40L levels were positively correlated with hemoglobin A1c and urinary albumin excretion (p < 0.001). We suggest that serum sCD40L levels are elevated in type 1 diabetes, particularly in patients with microvascular complications and a significant correlation with glycemic control exists. Therefore, measurement of serum sCD40L levels in poorly controlled patients would help to identify those at high risk of developing microvascular complications.

  7. Acute gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Graves, Nancy S

    2013-09-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common infectious disease syndrome, causing a combination of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. There are more than 350 million cases of acute gastroenteritis in the United States annually and 48 million of these cases are caused by foodborne bacteria. Traveler's diarrhea affects more than half of people traveling from developed countries to developing countries. In adult and pediatric patients, the prevalence of Clostridium difficile is increasing. Contact precautions, public health education, and prudent use of antibiotics are necessary goals in decreasing the prevalence of Clostridium difficle. Preventing dehydration or providing appropriate rehydration is the primary supportive treatment of acute gastroenteritis.

  8. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  9. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  10. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients. PMID:27622096

  11. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients. PMID:27622096

  12. Case Series of Pulmonary Tumor Embolism and Intravascular Lymphoma: Evaluation of the Usefulness of Pulmonary Microvascular Cytology.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Baba, Yuri; Kagiyama, Naho; Miyamoto, Takashi; Mutoh, Makoto; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Sugita, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor embolism (PTE) and intravascular lymphoma cause rapidly progressive deterioration and an antemortem diagnosis is difficult. The usefulness of pulmonary microvascular cytology (PMC) in the diagnosis of these disorders has been reported in sporadic case reports. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 7 patients with tumor cells in the pulmonary microvasculature (4 with PTE and 3 with malignant lymphoma) who underwent pulmonary microvascular cytology. Two of the 4 patients with PTE and 2 of the 3 patients with malignant lymphoma (all 3 had intravascular metastasis) had positive PMC results. These findings suggested that PMC may be useful in the diagnosis of these disorders. PMID:27629967

  13. The vascular pattern and viability of microvascularized rib grafts based on periosteal circulation--an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Papanastasiou, V.W.; Lalonde, D.H.; Williams, H.B.

    1984-11-01

    Previous reports have stressed the importance of the nutrient blood supply in rib grafts transferred by microvascular anastomoses. In the present experimental study, we have demonstrated that a rib graft transferred by microvascular anastomoses based on periosteal vessels can survive; vascular clearing studies demonstrated that the vascularity of these grafts extends not only into the cortex but the medulla as well. The relative facility of harvesting these grafts (compared with those based on nutrient vessels) should make them the favored choice. Technetium bone scintigraphy proved accurate in the assessment of both vascular pattern and microanastomotic patency. Tetracycline labeling did not correlate well with the patency of a rib graft's pedicle blood supply.

  14. Processing plastics in Packerland

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, H.

    1998-04-01

    Located in Green Bay, Wisconsin, Catenation, Inc. is a privately held recycling company dedicated to the recovery of post-consumer plastic containers. What makes the company stand out is its ability to separate and sort material from a commingled bale. Catenation uses custom-made, high-speed, computer-driven vision equipment to scan and sort every bottle by category. The computer even can be programmed to distinguish soiled jugs from clean containers. This is a selling point for buyers of resin who are insistent on receiving high-grade material.

  15. Fabrication of plastic biochips

    SciTech Connect

    Saaem, Ishtiaq; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Alam, S. Munir; Tian Jingdong

    2010-07-15

    A versatile surface functionalization procedure based on rf magnetron sputtering of silica was performed on poly(methylmethacrylate), polycarbonate, polypropylene, and cyclic olefin copolymers (Topas 6015). The hybrid thermoplastic surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis and contact angle measurements. The authors then used these hybrid materials to perform a sandwich assay targeting an HIV-1 antibody using fluorescent detection and biotinylated peptides immobilized using the bioaffinity of biotin-neutravidin. They found a limit of detection similar to arrays on glass surfaces and believed that this plastic biochip platform may be used for the development of disposable immunosensing and diagnostic applications.

  16. History of reinforced plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J.V.; Rosato, D.V.

    1981-01-01

    This history of reinforced plastics is told by combining the individual histories of each reinforcement and the way in which they added to and changed the direction and rate of growth of the industry. The early history is based on all resins, fillers, and fibers found in nature. Then came the Baekeland revolution with the first synthetic resin which lasted about 25 years, at which time synthetic fiber glass and polyester resin dramatically changed the industry. Now, for the 1980s, the high modulus fibers developed 10 to 20 years ago are reshaping the industry. 32 figures.

  17. Psychotherapy and brain plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Collerton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I will review why psychotherapy is relevant to the question of how consciousness relates to brain plasticity. A great deal of the research and theorizing on consciousness and the brain, including my own on hallucinations for example (Collerton and Perry, 2011) has focused upon specific changes in conscious content which can be related to temporal changes in restricted brain systems. I will argue that psychotherapy, in contrast, allows only a focus on holistic aspects of consciousness; an emphasis which may usefully complement what can be learnt from more specific methodologies. PMID:24046752

  18. Advances in engineering plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, L.

    1997-12-01

    New polymers are being commercialized in record numbers, offering the product designer a new realm of possibilities, and promising tough competition to the traditional engineering resins. Most of the growth is in single-site catalyzed resins. Metallocene (and non-metallocene) single-site catalysts enhance polymer architecture to generate highly uniform molecules, and even permit tailoring new categories of polymers. These new materials include the truly unique aliphatic polyketone, syndiotactic polystyrene (SPS); polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) resins; and novel variations of established polymers. This article provides a closer look at these newcomers to the plastics marketplace, with an emphasis on their properties and potential applications.

  19. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  20. Acute Bronchitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bronchitis? Acute bronchitis is almost always caused by viruses that attack the lining of the bronchial tree ... infection. As your body fights back against these viruses, more swelling occurs and more mucus is produced. ...

  1. Acute Pericarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... large pericardial effusions). Acute pericarditis usually responds to colchicine or NSAIDs (such as aspirin and ibuprofen ) taken ... reduce pain but relieves it by reducing inflammation. Colchicine also decreases the chance of pericarditis returning later. ...

  2. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  3. The commercialization of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Eric

    2013-09-01

    The last decade has brought a major challenge to the traditional practice of plastic surgery from corporations that treat plastic surgery as a commercial product and market directly to the public. This corporate medicine model may include promotion of a trademarked procedure or device, national advertising that promises stunning results, sales consultants, and claims of innovation, superiority, and improved safety. This article explores the ethics of this business practice and whether corporate medicine is a desirable model for patients and plastic surgeons.

  4. Microvascular destruction identifies murine allografts that cannot be rescued from airway fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ashok N.; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Thurman, Joshua M.; Miller, Edmund J.; Henson, Peter M.; Zamora, Martin R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    Small airway fibrosis (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome) is the primary obstacle to long-term survival following lung transplantation. Here, we show the importance of functional microvasculature in the prevention of epithelial loss and fibrosis due to rejection and for the first time, relate allograft microvascular injury and loss of tissue perfusion to immunotherapy-resistant rejection. To explore the role of alloimmune rejection and airway ischemia in the development of fibroproliferation, we used a murine orthotopic tracheal transplant model. We determined that transplants were reperfused by connection of recipient vessels to donor vessels at the surgical anastomosis site. Microcirculation through the newly formed vascular anastomoses appeared partially dependent on VEGFR2 and CXCR2 pathways. In the absence of immunosuppression, the microvasculature in rejecting allografts exhibited vascular complement deposition, diminished endothelial CD31 expression, and absent perfusion prior to the onset of fibroproliferation. Rejecting grafts with extensive endothelial cell injury were refractory to immunotherapy. After early microvascular loss, neovascularization was eventually observed in the membranous trachea, indicating a reestablishment of graft perfusion in established fibrosis. One implication of this study is that bronchial artery revascularization at the time of lung transplantation may decrease the risk of subsequent airway fibrosis. PMID:18060031

  5. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  6. Epidermal devices for noninvasive, precise, and continuous mapping of macrovascular and microvascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Webb, R Chad; Ma, Yinji; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Yoon, Stephen; Guo, Xiaogang; Feng, Xue; Shi, Yan; Seidel, Miles; Cho, Nam Heon; Kurniawan, Jonas; Ahad, James; Sheth, Niral; Kim, Joseph; Taylor, James G; Darlington, Tom; Chang, Ken; Huang, Weizhong; Ayers, Joshua; Gruebele, Alexander; Pielak, Rafal M; Slepian, Marvin J; Huang, Yonggang; Gorbach, Alexander M; Rogers, John A

    2015-10-01

    Continuous monitoring of variations in blood flow is vital in assessing the status of microvascular and macrovascular beds for a wide range of clinical and research scenarios. Although a variety of techniques exist, most require complete immobilization of the subject, thereby limiting their utility to hospital or clinical settings. Those that can be rendered in wearable formats suffer from limited accuracy, motion artifacts, and other shortcomings that follow from an inability to achieve intimate, noninvasive mechanical linkage of sensors with the surface of the skin. We introduce an ultrathin, soft, skin-conforming sensor technology that offers advanced capabilities in continuous and precise blood flow mapping. Systematic work establishes a set of experimental procedures and theoretical models for quantitative measurements and guidelines in design and operation. Experimental studies on human subjects, including validation with measurements performed using state-of-the-art clinical techniques, demonstrate sensitive and accurate assessment of both macrovascular and microvascular flow under a range of physiological conditions. Refined operational modes eliminate long-term drifts and reduce power consumption, thereby providing steps toward the use of this technology for continuous monitoring during daily activities. PMID:26601309

  7. Gestational Diabetes Reduces Adenosine Transport in Human Placental Microvascular Endothelium, an Effect Reversed by Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Salomón, Carlos; Westermeier, Francisco; Puebla, Carlos; Arroyo, Pablo; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) courses with increased fetal plasma adenosine concentration and reduced adenosine transport in placental macrovascular endothelium. Since insulin modulates human equilibrative nucleoside transporters (hENTs) expression/activity, we hypothesize that GDM will alter hENT2-mediated transport in human placental microvascular endothelium (hPMEC), and that insulin will restore GDM to a normal phenotype involving insulin receptors A (IR-A) and B (IR-B). GDM effect on hENTs expression and transport activity, and IR-A/IR-B expression and associated cell signalling cascades (p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk) and Akt) role in hPMEC primary cultures was assayed. GDM associates with elevated umbilical whole and vein, but not arteries blood adenosine, and reduced hENTs adenosine transport and expression. IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios (‘metabolic phenotype’) were lower in GDM. Insulin reversed GDM-reduced hENT2 expression/activity, IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios to normal pregnancies (‘mitogenic phenotype’). It is suggested that insulin effects required IR-A and IR-B expression leading to differential modulation of signalling pathways restoring GDM-metabolic to a normal-mitogenic like phenotype. Insulin could be acting as protecting factor for placental microvascular endothelial dysfunction in GDM. PMID:22808198

  8. Hearing outcomes after loss of brainstem auditory evoked potentials during microvascular decompression.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Krishnaiah, Balaji; Habeych, Miguel E; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Crammond, Donald J

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to study the pre-operative characteristics, intra-operative changes and post-operative hearing outcomes in patients after complete loss of wave V of the brainstem auditory evoked potential. We retrospectively analyzed the brainstem auditory evoked potential data of 94 patients who underwent microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm at our institute. Patients were divided into two groups - those with and those without loss of wave V. The differences between the two groups and outcomes were assessed using t-test and chi-squared tests. In our study 23 (24%) patients out of 94 had a complete loss of wave V, with 11 (48%) patients experiencing transient loss and 12 (52%) patients experiencing permanent loss. The incidence of hearing loss in patients with no loss of wave V was 5.7% and 26% in patients who did experience wave V loss. The incidence of hearing change in patients with no loss of wave V was 12.6% and 30.43% in patients who did experience wave V loss. Loss of wave V during the procedure or at the end of procedure significantly increases the odds of hearing loss. Hearing change is a significant under-reported clinical condition after microvascular decompression in patients who have loss of wave V.

  9. Quality improvement of microsurgery through telecommunication--the postoperative care after microvascular transfer of intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Kuo, Hsin-Chih; Chung, Kuo-Piao; Chen, Shih-Heng; Tang, Yueh-Bih; Su, Syi

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the use of telecommunication to improve the quality of postoperative care following microsurgery, especially following microvascular transfer of intestinal transfer for which shortening of ischemia time is of utmost importance to achieve high success rate. From 2003 to 2009 microvascular transfer of intestinal flaps had been performed in 112 patients. After surgery the patients were put in intensive care unit and the flaps were checked every 1 hour. The image for circulatory status of the flaps was sent directly to the attending surgeon for judgment. The information was sent through intranet and the surgeon can get access to the intranet through internet if necessary. Among the 112 cases, there were 9 cases of reexploration. The average duration between the time of problem detection and the time of starting reexploration was 54 min in 7 cases, and other 2 cases were delayed to enter the operating room which had been occupied by other cases of major trauma. Only two flaps were lost completely, two patients developed narrowing at the junction of cervical esophagus and thoracic esophagus. The rate of salvage for intestinal flap is apparently higher than those reported in the literature. In the postoperative management of microsurgery in ICU, telecommunication can help to reduce the ischemia time after vascular compromise in the transfer of free intestinal flap. Telecommunication is really an easy and effective tool in improving the outcome of reconstructive surgery.

  10. Association of Microvascular Function and Endothelial Biomarkers With Clinical Outcome in Dengue: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Sophie; Lam, Phung Khanh; Vu, Le Hoang Mai; Le, Thi Lien; Ha, Ngo Thanh; Toan, Tran Thi; Van, Nguyen Thu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Le Duyen, Huynh Thi; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Fox, Annette; Mongkolspaya, Juthathip; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron Paul; Screaton, Gavin Robert; Wertheim, Heiman; Wills, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background. The hallmark of severe dengue is increased microvascular permeability, but alterations in the microcirculation and their evolution over the course of dengue are unknown. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the sublingual microcirculation using side-stream dark-field imaging in patients presenting early (<72 hours after fever onset) and patients hospitalized with warning signs or severe dengue in Vietnam. Clinical findings, microvascular function, global hemodynamics assessed with echocardiography, and serological markers of endothelial activation were determined at 4 time points. Results. A total of 165 patients were enrolled. No difference was found between the microcirculatory parameters comparing dengue with other febrile illnesses. The proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) and the mean flow index (MFI) were lower in patients with dengue with plasma than those without leakage (PPV, 88.1% vs 90.6% [P = .01]; MFI, 2.1 vs 2.4 [P = .007]), most markedly during the critical phase. PPV and MFI were correlated with the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (P < .001 for both) and angiopoietin 2 (P < .001 for both), negatively correlated. Conclusions. Modest microcirculatory alterations occur in dengue, are associated with plasma leakage, and are correlate with molecules of endothelial activation, angiopoietin 2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. PMID:27230099

  11. Microvascular function in younger adults with obesity and metabolic syndrome: role of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Proctor, Lester T.; Sebranek, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults with cardiovascular disease exhibit microvascular dysfunction and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that microvascular impairments begin early in the disease process and can be improved by scavenging ROS. Forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) was measured in 45 young (32 ± 2 yr old) adults (n = 15/group) classified as lean, obese, and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Vasodilation in response to endothelial (ACh) and vascular smooth muscle [nitroprusside (NTP) and epoprostenol (Epo)] agonists was tested before and after intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid to scavenge ROS. Vasodilation was assessed as a rise in relative vascular conductance (ml·min−1·dl−1·100 mmHg−1). ACh and NTP responses were preserved (P = 0.825 and P = 0.924, respectively), whereas Epo responses were lower in obese and MetSyn adults (P < 0.05) than in lean controls. Scavenging of ROS via infusion of ascorbic acid resulted in an increase in ACh-mediated (P < 0.001) and NTP-mediated (P < 0.001) relative vascular conductance across all groups, suggesting that oxidative stress influences vascular responsiveness in adults with and without overt cardiovascular disease risk. Ascorbic acid had no effect on Epo-mediated vasodilation (P = 0.267). These results suggest that obese and MetSyn adults exhibit preserved endothelium-dependent vasodilation with reduced dependence on prostacyclin and are consistent with an upregulation of compensatory vascular control mechanisms. PMID:23934859

  12. Dammarenediol-II Prevents VEGF-Mediated Microvascular Permeability in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Hyeon; Jung, Se-Hui; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Han, Jung Yeon; Choi, Yong-Eui; Hong, Hae-Deun; Jeon, Hye-Yoon; Hwang, JongYun; Na, SungHun; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a major diabetic complication predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability in the retina; however, treatments targeting glycemic control have not been successful. Here, we investigated the protective effect of dammarenediol-II, a precursor of triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis, on VEGF-induced vascular leakage using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and diabetic mice. We overproduced the compound in transgenic tobacco expressing Panax ginseng dammarenediol-II synthase gene and purified using column chromatography. Analysis of the purified compound using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system revealed identical retention time and fragmentation pattern to those of authentic standard dammarenediol-II. Dammarenediol-II inhibited VEGF-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, but it had no effect on the levels of intracellular Ca(2+) in HUVECs. We also found that dammarenediol-II inhibited VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial-cadherin disruption, both of which play critical roles in modulating endothelial permeability. Notably, microvascular leakage in the retina of diabetic mice was successfully inhibited by intravitreal dammarenediol-II injection. Our results suggest that the natural drug dammarenediol-II may have the ability to prevent diabetic microvascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26400610

  13. 3D functional and perfusable microvascular networks for organotypic microfluidic models.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-05-01

    The metastatic dissemination of cancer cells from primary tumors to secondary loci is a complex and multistep process including local invasion, intravasation, survival in the blood stream and extravasation towards the metastatic site. It is well known cancer metastases follow organ-specific pathways with selected primary tumors mainly metastasizing towards a specific panel of secondary organs (Steven Paget's theory 1889). However, circulatory patterns and microarchitecture of capillary networks play a key role in the metastatic spread as well (James Ewing's theory 1929). Taking into account both these factors would be critical to develop more complex and physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models. This review presents recent advances in the generation of microvascularized systems through microfluidic approaches and discusses promising results achieved by organ-on-a-chip platforms mimicking the pathophysiology of the functional units of specific organs. The combination of physiologically-like microvascular networks and organotypic microenvironments would foster a new generation of in vitro cancer models to more effectively screen new therapeutics, design personalized medicine treatments and investigate molecular pathways involved in cancer metastases. PMID:25893395

  14. Microvascular anastomosis in rodent model evaluated by Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Tong, Dedi; Zhu, Shan; Wu, Lehao; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, WP Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis are critical components of reconstructive microsurgery, vascular surgery and transplant surgery. Imaging modality that provides immediate, real-time in-depth view and 3D structure and flow information of the surgical site can be a great valuable tool for the surgeon to evaluate surgical outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques, thus potentially increase the surgical success rate. Microvascular anastomosis for vessels with outer diameter smaller than 1.0 mm is extremely challenging and effective evaluation of the outcome is very difficult if not impossible using computed tomography (CT) angiograms, magnetic resonance (MR) angiograms and ultrasound Doppler. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. Phaseresolved Doppler OCT that explores the phase information of OCT signals has been shown to be capable of characterizing dynamic blood flow clinically. In this work, we explore the capability of Fourier domain Doppler OCT as an evaluation tool to detect commonly encountered post-operative complications that will cause surgical failure and to confirm positive result with surgeon's observation. Both suture and cuff based techniques were evaluated on the femoral artery and vein in the rodent model.

  15. Quantitative Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonic Imaging Reflects Microvascularization in Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Prognosis after Resection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ru-Hai; Lin, Qing-Guang; Huang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Ling; Cao, Yun; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Li, An-Hua; Beretta, Laura; Qian, Chao-Nan

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the correlation between tumor vasculature detected by pre-surgical contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and the post-surgical prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. One hundred ninety-five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who had undergone curative resection and pre-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were enrolled. Intra-tumoral microvessels were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining for anti-CD31 and anti-CD34. On the basis of the immunohistochemical staining and morphology patterns, tumors were divided into capillary-like and sinusoid-like microvessel subtypes. The rise time of tumors was shorter in the capillary-like microvessel subtype than in the sinusoid-like microvasculature subtype (p = 0.026). Intra-tumor microvascular density (p < 0.001, hazard ratio = 0.137) and rise time (p = 0.006, hazard ratio = 2.475) were independent factors corresponding to different microvasculature types. Microvascular density, vascular invasion and wash-in perfusion index were determined to be independent factors in recurrence-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography may serve as a means of non-invasive assessment of tumor angiogenesis and may be associated with the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after resection. PMID:26210785

  16. Human growth hormone stimulates proliferation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rymaszewski, Z.; Cohen, R.M.; Chomczynski, P. )

    1991-01-15

    Growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors sought to determine whether this could be mediated by an effect of GH on proliferation of endothelial cells, and, for this purpose, established long-term cultures of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) from normal postmortem human eyes. High-purity hREC preparations were selected for experiments, based on immunogluorescence with acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-factor VIII-related antigen. Growth requirements for these cells were complex, including serum for maintenance at slow growth rates and additional mitogens for more rapid proliferation. Exposure of hREC to physiologic doses of human GH (hGH) resulted in 100% greater cell number vs. control but could be elicited only in the presence of serum. When differing serum conditions were compared, hGH stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation up to 1.6- to 2.2-fold under each condition and increased DNA content significantly in the presence of human, horse, and fetal calf serum. In summary, hREC respond to physiologic concentrations of hGH in vitro with enhanced proliferation. This specific effect of GH on retinal microvascular endothelial cells supports the hypothesis of role for GH in endothelial cell biology.

  17. Overweight status is associated with extensive signs of microvascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sunni R.; Bellary, Srikanth; Karimzad, Said; Gherghel, Doina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate if overweight individuals exhibit signs of vascular dysfunction associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One hundred lean and 100 overweight participants were recruited for the present study. Retinal microvascular function was assessed using the Dynamic Retinal Vessel Analyser (DVA), and systemic macrovascular function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Investigations also included body composition, carotid intimal-media thickness (c-IMT), ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (BP), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides (TG), cholesterol levels (HDL-C and LDL-C), and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overweight individuals presented with higher right and left c-IMT (p = 0.005 and p = 0.002, respectively), average 24-h BP values (all p < 0.001), plasma glucose (p = 0.008), TG (p = 0.003), TG: HDL-C ratio (p = 0.010), and vWF levels (p = 0.004). Moreover, overweight individuals showed lower retinal arterial microvascular dilation (p = 0.039) and baseline-corrected flicker (bFR) responses (p = 0.022), as well as, prolonged dilation reaction time (RT, p = 0.047). These observations emphasise the importance of vascular screening and consideration of preventive interventions to decrease vascular risk in all individuals with adiposity above normal range. PMID:27578554

  18. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  19. [Microvascular and macrovascular complications in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke E; Borkenstein, Martin H

    2010-08-01

    Diabetes-related microvascular and macrovascular complications, as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy are life-threatening complications in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Risk factors for the development of complications are longer duration of diabetes, older age and puberty. Further risk factors include smoking, hypertension, higher body mass index and dyslipoproteinaemia. Therefore prevention and screening for complications is an important part in the care of children and adolescents with T1DM. Target levels to reduce the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications in children and adolescents with T1DM are the following: HbA1c<7.5%, lipids in normal range, blood pressure<90th percentile by age, sex and height, BMI<95th percentile, no smoking and physical activity. Screening for retinopathy and microalbuminuria should start from 11 years with two years diabetes duration and from 9 years with 5 years duration and after 2 years diabetes duration in an adolescent. Thereafter screening should be performed annually. Blood pressure should be measured at least annually. Screening for fasting blood lipids should be performed soon after diagnosis in all children with T1DM aged over 12 years. If normal results are obtained, this should be repeated every 5 years.

  20. Epidermal devices for noninvasive, precise, and continuous mapping of macrovascular and microvascular blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R. Chad; Ma, Yinji; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Yoon, Stephen; Guo, Xiaogang; Feng, Xue; Shi, Yan; Seidel, Miles; Cho, Nam Heon; Kurniawan, Jonas; Ahad, James; Sheth, Niral; Kim, Joseph; Taylor VI, James G.; Darlington, Tom; Chang, Ken; Huang, Weizhong; Ayers, Joshua; Gruebele, Alexander; Pielak, Rafal M.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Gorbach, Alexander M.; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of variations in blood flow is vital in assessing the status of microvascular and macrovascular beds for a wide range of clinical and research scenarios. Although a variety of techniques exist, most require complete immobilization of the subject, thereby limiting their utility to hospital or clinical settings. Those that can be rendered in wearable formats suffer from limited accuracy, motion artifacts, and other shortcomings that follow from an inability to achieve intimate, noninvasive mechanical linkage of sensors with the surface of the skin. We introduce an ultrathin, soft, skin-conforming sensor technology that offers advanced capabilities in continuous and precise blood flow mapping. Systematic work establishes a set of experimental procedures and theoretical models for quantitative measurements and guidelines in design and operation. Experimental studies on human subjects, including validation with measurements performed using state-of-the-art clinical techniques, demonstrate sensitive and accurate assessment of both macrovascular and microvascular flow under a range of physiological conditions. Refined operational modes eliminate long-term drifts and reduce power consumption, thereby providing steps toward the use of this technology for continuous monitoring during daily activities. PMID:26601309

  1. Early postoperative bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of microvascular bone grafts in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schuepbach, Jonas; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Demard, Francois

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone scintigraphy was performed to monitor anastomotic patency and bone viability. Methods In this retrospective study, bone scans were carried out during the first three postoperative days in a series of 60 patients who underwent microvascular bone grafting for reconstruction of the mandible or maxilla. Results In our series, early bone scans detected a compromised vascular supply to the bone with high accuracy (p < 10-6) and a sensitivity that was superior to the sensitivity of clinical monitoring (92% and 75% respectively). Conclusion When performing bone scintigraphy during the first three postoperative days, it not only helps to detect complications with high accuracy, as described in earlier studies, but it is also an additional reliable monitoring tool to decide whether or not microvascular revision surgery should be performed. Bone scans were especially useful in buried free flaps where early postoperative monitoring depended exclusively on scans. According to our experience, we recommend bone scans as soon as possible after surgery and immediately in cases suspicious of vascularized bone graft failure. PMID:17448223

  2. Overweight status is associated with extensive signs of microvascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunni R; Bellary, Srikanth; Karimzad, Said; Gherghel, Doina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate if overweight individuals exhibit signs of vascular dysfunction associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One hundred lean and 100 overweight participants were recruited for the present study. Retinal microvascular function was assessed using the Dynamic Retinal Vessel Analyser (DVA), and systemic macrovascular function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Investigations also included body composition, carotid intimal-media thickness (c-IMT), ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (BP), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides (TG), cholesterol levels (HDL-C and LDL-C), and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overweight individuals presented with higher right and left c-IMT (p = 0.005 and p = 0.002, respectively), average 24-h BP values (all p < 0.001), plasma glucose (p = 0.008), TG (p = 0.003), TG: HDL-C ratio (p = 0.010), and vWF levels (p = 0.004). Moreover, overweight individuals showed lower retinal arterial microvascular dilation (p = 0.039) and baseline-corrected flicker (bFR) responses (p = 0.022), as well as, prolonged dilation reaction time (RT, p = 0.047). These observations emphasise the importance of vascular screening and consideration of preventive interventions to decrease vascular risk in all individuals with adiposity above normal range. PMID:27578554

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and microvascular density in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Faur, Alexandra Corina; Lazar, Elena; Cornianu, Marioara

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates whether salivary tumours with different morphology and evolution also differ in terms of neovascularization and VEGF expression and the prognostic value of the results. Surgical specimens from 45 patients - 8 pleomorphic adenomas (PA), 7 Warthin tumours (WT), 5 basal cell adenomas (BA), 6 carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CEPA), 6 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC), 5 acinic cell carcinomas (AC), 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) and 4 adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified (ADK NOS) - were immunostained. In malignant salivary tumours, the following mean microvascular density (MVD) values were recorded (± SD = Standard Deviation): 27.61 (SD ± 2.27) in cases with CEPA, 27.08 (DS ± 7.81) in AC and 32.93 (SD ± 7.76) in ADK NOS, with lower values for MEC 24.31(SD ± 2.88) and for ACC 22.13 (SD ± 5.44). For benign tumours, an MVD of 35.71 (SD ± 2.09) was recorded in WT and lower average values in PA (MVD = 14.84; SD ± 4.86) and in BA (MVD = 23.96; SD ± 9.13). MVD did not correlate with the investigated clinicopathological parameters. The VEGF expression is significantly more important (p = 0.001) in malignant salivary tumours as compared with benign ones. The VEGF expression and the microvascularization in salivary gland tumours are important elements to be considered when formulating a diagnosis and assessing case evolutions in patients with such tumours.

  4. Microvascular responses to body tilt in cutaneous maximus muscle of conscious rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Rohit K.; Segal, Steven S.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated microvascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) and head-down tilt (HDT) in striated muscle of conscious male rats. To observe the microcirculation in the cutaneous maximus muscle, a transparent polycarbonate chamber was implanted aseptically into a skin fold created between the shoulders. Rats were trained to sit quietly during HUT and HDT while positioned on a horizontal microscope that rotated in the sagittal plane. At 4-5 days after surgery, arteriole and venule diameters were recorded using videomicroscopy while the rat experienced 10 min each (in random order) of HUT or HDT at 20 deg or 40 deg separated by 2-h rest periods. HUT had no affect on microvessel diameter; 20 deg HDT had little affect. In response to 40 deg HDT, 'large' arterioles constricted by 18 +/- 2% and 'small' arterioles dilated by 21 +/- 3%; this difference suggested variation in mechanisms controlling arteriolar responses. Venules exhibited a larger fluctuation in diameter during 40 deg HDT compared with other body positions, suggesting that venomotor activity may be induced with sufficient fluid shift or change in central venous pressure. These observations illustrate a viable model for studying microvascular responses to gravitational stress in conscious rats.

  5. Optogenetics and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-feng; Jackson, Michael F; Macdonald, John F

    2013-11-01

    The intricate and complex interaction between different populations of neurons in the brain has imposed limits on our ability to gain detailed understanding of synaptic transmission and its integration when employing classical electrophysiological approaches. Indeed, electrical field stimulation delivered via traditional microelectrodes does not permit the targeted, precise and selective control of neuronal activity amongst a varied population of neurons and their inputs (eg, cholinergic, dopaminergic or glutamatergic neurons). Recently established optogenetic techniques overcome these limitations allowing precise control of the target neuron populations, which is essential for the elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors. Indeed, by introducing light-activated channels (ie, microbial opsin genes) into specific neuronal populations, optogenetics enables non-invasive optical control of specific neurons with milliseconds precision. These approaches can readily be applied to freely behaving live animals. Recently there is increased interests in utilizing optogenetics tools to understand synaptic plasticity and learning/memory. Here, we summarize recent progress in applying optogenetics in in the study of synaptic plasticity.

  6. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels.

    PubMed

    Legarda, F; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Abelairas, A

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of (241)Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of (241)Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of (241)Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification. PMID:20042341

  7. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels.

    PubMed

    Legarda, F; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Abelairas, A

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of (241)Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of (241)Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of (241)Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  8. Basal cold but not heat tolerance constrains plasticity among Drosophila species (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Nyamukondiwa, C; Terblanche, J S; Marshall, K E; Sinclair, B J

    2011-09-01

    Thermal tolerance and its plasticity are important for understanding ectotherm responses to climate change. However, it is unclear whether plasticity is traded-off at the expense of basal thermal tolerance and whether plasticity is subject to phylogenetic constraints. Here, we investigated associations between basal thermal tolerance and acute plasticity thereof in laboratory-reared adult males of eighteen Drosophila species at low and high temperatures. We determined the high and low temperatures where 90% of flies are killed (ULT(90) and LLT(90) , respectively) and also the magnitude of plasticity of acute thermal pretreatments (i.e. rapid cold- and heat-hardening) using a standardized, species-specific approach for the induction of hardening responses. Regression analyses of survival variation were conducted in ordinary and phylogenetically informed approaches. Low-temperature pretreatments significantly improved LLT(90) in all species tested except for D. pseudoobscura, D. mojavensis and D. borealis. High-temperature pretreatment only significantly increased ULT(90) in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. pseudoobscura and D. persimilis. LLT(90) was negatively correlated with low-temperature plasticity even after phylogeny was accounted for. No correlations were found between ULT(90) and LLT(90) or between ULT(90) and rapid heat-hardening (RHH) in ordinary regression approaches. However, after phylogenetic adjustment, there was a positive correlation between ULT(90) and RHH. These results suggest a trade-off between basal low-temperature tolerance and acute low-temperature plasticity, but at high temperatures, increased basal tolerance was accompanied by increased plasticity. Furthermore, high- and low-temperature tolerances and their plasticity are clearly decoupled. These results are of broad significance to understanding how organisms respond to changes in habitat temperature and the degree to which they can adjust thermal sensitivity. PMID:21658189

  9. Evaluation of microvascular structure in humans: a 'state-of-the-art' document of the Working Group on Macrovascular and Microvascular Alterations of the Italian Society of Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Virdis, Agostino; Savoia, Carmine; Grassi, Guido; Lembo, Giuseppe; Vecchione, Carmine; Seravalle, Gino; Taddei, Stefano; Volpe, Massimo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of microvascular structure is, in general, not an easy task. Among the methods that may be applied to humans, plethysmographic evaluation of small arteries and wire or pressure micromyography were extensively used in the last decades. The media-to-lumen ratio of small arteries evaluated by micromyography was demonstrated to possess a strong prognostic significance; however, its extensive evaluation is limited by the local invasiveness of the assessment. Noninvasive approaches were then proposed, including capillaroscopy, which provides information about microvascular rarefaction. Recently, the interest of investigators was focused on the retinal microvascular bed. In particular, a noninvasive measurement of the wall-to-lumen ratio of retinal arterioles using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry has been introduced.Recent data suggest a rather good agreement between this approach and micromyographic measurements, generally considered the gold standard approach. Therefore, the evaluation of microvascular structure is progressively moving from bench to bedside, and it could represent, in the immediate future, an evaluation to be performed in all hypertensive patients, in order to obtain a better stratification of cardiovascular risk.

  10. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Giselle; Sibille, Jérémie; Zapata, Jonathan; Rouach, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis. PMID:26346563

  11. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  12. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  13. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  14. Flash Cracking Reactor for Waste Plastic Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timko, Michael T.; Wong, Hsi-Wu; Gonzalez, Lino A.; Broadbelt, Linda; Raviknishan, Vinu

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of waste plastic to energy is a growing problem that is especially acute in space exploration applications. Moreover, utilization of heavy hydrocarbon resources (wastes, waxes, etc.) as fuels and chemicals will be a growing need in the future. Existing technologies require a trade-off between product selectivity and feedstock conversion. The objective of this work was to maintain high plastic-to-fuel conversion without sacrificing the liquid yield. The developed technology accomplishes this goal with a combined understanding of thermodynamics, reaction rates, and mass transport to achieve high feed conversion without sacrificing product selectivity. The innovation requires a reaction vessel, hydrocarbon feed, gas feed, and pressure and temperature control equipment. Depending on the feedstock and desired product distribution, catalyst can be added. The reactor is heated to the desired tempera ture, pressurized to the desired pressure, and subject to a sweep flow at the optimized superficial velocity. Software developed under this project can be used to determine optimal values for these parameters. Product is vaporized, transferred to a receiver, and cooled to a liquid - a form suitable for long-term storage as a fuel or chemical. An important NASA application is the use of solar energy to convert waste plastic into a form that can be utilized during periods of low solar energy flux. Unlike previous work in this field, this innovation uses thermodynamic, mass transport, and reaction parameters to tune product distribution of pyrolysis cracking. Previous work in this field has used some of these variables, but never all in conjunction for process optimization. This method is useful for municipal waste incinerator operators and gas-to-liquids companies.

  15. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  16. Recycle your plastic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlke, W.C. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper discusses how source reduction and recycling are alternatives to managing waste. This includes the recycling of material before it leaves the manufacturer or reducing the size of the product being made. In-plant reprocessing of plastic materials is one method of source reduction. Included are such applications as where an injection molder collects the spur, regrinds it, and feeds it back to make an injection molded part. When a polystyrene sheet is thermoformed to make cups, after cutting, the remaining sheet is recycled, chopped up and reextruded to make a sheet to again be fed to the thermoformer. The alternative would be to sell the waste or send it to the city dump.

  17. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  18. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy associated with urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder: antemortem diagnosis by pulmonary microvascular cytology.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamada, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Katagi, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Jun; Kosuga, Tsuneharu; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-09-01

    PTTM (Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy) is very difficult to diagnose before death. We report a case of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder associated with PTTM in which an antemortem diagnosis by PMC (pulmonary microvascular cytology). PMC may represent the only chance for diagnosis and achievement of remission in PTTM. PMID:26401277

  19. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans. PMID:27630556

  20. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F; Boas, David A; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These "bottom-up" models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans. PMID:27630556

  1. Plastics to fuel: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews recent developments in catalytic and non-catalytic degradation of waste plastics into fuels. Thermal degradation decomposes plastic into three fractions: gas, crude oil, and solid residue. Crude oil from non-catalytic pyrolysis is usually composed of higher boiling point hydrocarb...

  2. Plastics & Composites Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed plastics and composites technology program for design engineers. General information was obtained through a literature search, from the Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., the Michigan Employment Security Commission, and interviews with…

  3. Computational strain gradient crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niordson, Christian F.; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical method for viscous strain gradient crystal plasticity theory is presented, which incorporates both energetic and dissipative gradient effects. The underlying minimum principles are discussed as well as convergence properties of the proposed finite element procedure. Three problems of plane crystal plasticity are studied: pure shear of a single crystal between rigid platens as well as plastic deformation around cylindrical voids in hexagonal close packed and face centered cubic crystals. Effective in-plane constitutive slip parameters for plane strain deformation of specifically oriented face centered cubic crystals are developed in terms of the crystallographic slip parameters. The effect on geometrically necessary dislocation structures introduced by plastic deformation is investigated as a function of the ratio of void radius to plasticity length scale.

  4. Microvascular perfusion during focal vasogenic brain edema: a scanning laser fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lindsberg, P J; Sirén, A L; Hallenbeck, J M

    1997-01-01

    Controversy exists about the effect of tissue edema on cerebral microcirculation. High spatial resolution is required for observation of extravasation and microcirculation during focal vasogenic edema formation. To study the relationship between tissue edema and perfusion, we developed a technique for simultaneous visualization of extravasation and microvessel perfusion in rats. Focal intracortical microvascular injury was generated with a 1-sec Nd-YAG laser pulse. Evans blue albumin (EBA) was infused 30 min before decapitation to study extravasation and FITC-dextran was injected 30 sec prior to decapitation to examine microvessel perfusion. Computerized scanning laser-excited fluorescence microscopy followed by high resolution image analysis permitted quantitative assessment of both parameters on single fresh-frozen brain sections. Studied at 30 min (3.66 +/- 0.15 mm), 2 hr (4.14 +/- 0.08 mm, P < .05), and 8 hr (4.69 +/- 0.18 mm, P < .01) after injury, the diameter of the circular, sharply demarcated zone of EBA-extravasation increased progressively. At 30 min, microvessels at a zone surrounding the area of EBA-extravasation contained 69 +/- 14% (P < .05) more fluorescent FITC-filling than in the control hemisphere, but the density of perfused microvessels was unchanged. At 2 hr, secondary tissue changes had already occurred in a zone surrounding the initial laser lesion. While severe reduction in the density (-76 +/- 13%, P < .05) of perfused microvessels was observed within 400 to 240 microm inside the border of EBA extravasation, perfusion indexes were normal despite the presence of extravasated plasma constituents within 0-80 microm from the border. In a narrow zone (80 microm) outside the border of extravasation, individual microvessels contained 34 +/- 9% (P < .01) less FITC-fluorescence than those in a homologous area of the uninjured contralateral hemisphere. This report demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous measurement and high-resolution mapping

  5. Skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation dynamics in heart failure: exercise training and nitric oxide-mediated function.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Ferguson, Scott K; McCullough, Danielle J; Behnke, Bradley J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle O2 delivery-utilization matching such that microvascular oxygenation falls faster (i.e., speeds PO2mv kinetics) during increases in metabolic demand. Conversely, exercise training improves (slows) muscle PO2mv kinetics following contractions onset in healthy young individuals via NO-dependent mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would improve contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in CHF rats partly via improved NO-mediated function. CHF rats (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure = 17 ± 2 mmHg) were assigned to sedentary (n = 11) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 11; 5 days/wk, 6-8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min; -14% grade downhill running) groups. PO2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; NO donor; 300 μM), and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained CHF rats had greater peak oxygen uptake and spinotrapezius muscle citrate synthase activity than their sedentary counterparts (p < 0.05 for both). The overall speed of the PO2mv fall during contractions (mean response time; MRT) was slowed markedly in trained compared with sedentary CHF rats (sedentary: 20.8 ± 1.4, trained: 32.3 ± 3.0 s; p < 0.05), and the effect was not abolished by L-NAME (sedentary: 16.8 ± 1.5, trained: 31.0 ± 3.4 s; p > 0.05). Relative to control, SNP increased MRT in both groups such that trained CHF rats had slower kinetics (sedentary: 43.0 ± 6.8, trained: 55.5 ± 7.8 s; p < 0.05). Improved NO-mediated function is not obligatory for training-induced improvements in skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation (slowed PO2mv kinetics) following contractions onset in rats with CHF.

  6. (-)-Epicatechin administration and exercising skeletal muscle vascular control and microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; White, Michael J; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2013-01-15

    Consumption of the dietary flavanol (-)-epicatechin (EPI) is associated with enhanced endothelial function and augmented skeletal muscle capillarity and mitochondrial volume density. The potential for EPI to improve peripheral vascular function and muscle oxygenation during exercise is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that EPI administration in healthy rats would improve treadmill exercise performance secondary to elevated skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance [VC, blood flow/mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and improved skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation. Rats received water (control, n = 12) or 4 mg/kg EPI (n = 12) via oral gavage daily for 24 days. Exercise endurance capacity and peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2) peak) were measured via treadmill runs to exhaustion. MAP (arterial catheter) and blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured and VC was calculated during submaximal treadmill exercise (25 m/min, 5% grade). Spinotrapezius muscle microvascular O(2) pressure (Po(2mv)) was measured (phosphorescence quenching) during electrically induced twitch (1 Hz) contractions. In conscious rats, EPI administration resulted in lower (↓~5%) resting (P = 0.03) and exercising (P = 0.04) MAP. There were no differences in exercise endurance capacity, Vo(2) peak, total exercising hindlimb blood flow (control, 154 ± 13; and EPI, 159 ± 8 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P = 0.68), or VC (control, 1.13 ± 0.10; and EPI, 1.24 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.21) between groups. Following anesthesia, EPI resulted in lower MAP (↓~16%) but did not impact resting Po(2mv) or any kinetics parameters (P > 0.05 for all) during muscle contractions compared with control. EPI administration (4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) improved modestly cardiovascular function (i.e., ↓MAP) with no impact on exercise performance, total exercising skeletal muscle blood flow and VC, or contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

  7. Androgens influence microvascular dilation in PCOS through ET-A and ET-B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Megan M; Taylor, Hugh S; Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2013-10-01

    Hyperandrogenism and vascular dysfunction often coexist in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We hypothesized that testosterone compromises cutaneous microvascular dilation in women with PCOS via the endothelin-1 ET-B subtype receptor. To control and isolate testosterone's effects on microvascular dilation, we administered a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRHant) for 11 days in obese, otherwise healthy women [controls, 22.0 (4) yr, 36.0 (3.2) kg/m(2)] or women with PCOS [23 (4) yr, 35.4 (1.3) kg/m(2)], adding testosterone (T; 2.5 mg/day) on days 8-11. Using laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous microdialysis, we measured changes in skin microcirculatory responsiveness (ΔCVC) to local heating while perfusing ET-A (BQ-123) and ET-B (BQ-788) receptor antagonists under three experimental conditions: baseline (BL; prehormone intervention), GnRHant (day 4 of administration), and T administration. At BL, ET-A receptor inhibition enhanced heat-induced vasodilation in both groups [ΔCVC control 2.03 (0.65), PCOS 2.10 (0.25), AU/mmHg, P < 0.05]; ET-B receptor inhibition reduced vasodilation in controls only [ΔCVC 0.98 (0.39), 1.41 (0.45) AU/mmHg for controls, PCOS] compared with saline [ΔCVC controls 1.27 (0.48), PCOS 1.31 (0.13) AU/mmHg]. GnRHant enhanced vasodilation in PCOS [saline ΔCVC 1.69 (0.23) AU/mmHg vs. BL, P < 0.05] and abolished the ET-A effect in both groups, a response reasserted with T in controls. ET-B receptor inhibition reduced heat-induced vasodilation in both groups during GnRHant and T [ΔCVC, controls: 0.95 (0.21) vs. 0.51 (13); PCOS: 1.27 (0.23) vs. 0.84 (0.27); for GnRHant vs. T, P < 0.05]. These data demonstrate that androgen suppression improves microvascular dilation in PCOS via ET-A and ET-B receptors.

  8. Biodegradability of degradable plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Agamuthu, P; Faizura, Putri Nadzrul

    2005-04-01

    Plastic waste constitutes the third largest waste volume in Malaysian municipal solid waste (MSW), next to putrescible waste and paper. The plastic component in MSW from Kuala Lumpur averages 24% (by weight), whereas the national mean is about 15%. The 144 waste dumps in the country receive about 95% of the MSW, including plastic waste. The useful life of the landfills is fast diminishing as the plastic waste stays un-degraded for more than 50 years. In this study the compostability of polyethylene and pro-oxidant additive-based environmentally degradable plastics (EDP) was investigated. Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples exposed hydrolytically or oxidatively at 60 degrees C showed that the abiotic degradation path was oxidative rather than hydrolytic. There was a weight loss of 8% and the plastic has been oxidized as shown by the additional carbonyl group exhibited in the Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) Spectrum. Oxidation rate seemed to be influenced by the amount of pro-oxidant additive, the chemical structure and morphology of the plastic samples, and the surface area. Composting studies during a 45-day experiment showed that the percentage elongation (reduction) was 20% for McD samples [high-density polyethylene, (HDPE) with 3% additive] and LL samples (LLDPE with 7% additive) and 18% reduction for totally degradable plastic (TDP) samples (HDPE with 3% additive). Lastly, microbial experiments using Pseudomonas aeroginosa on carbon-free media with degradable plastic samples as the sole carbon source, showed confirmatory results. A positive bacterial growth and a weight loss of 2.2% for degraded polyethylene samples were evident to show that the degradable plastic is biodegradable.

  9. Role of genetic polymorphisms of ion channels in the pathophysiology of coronary microvascular dysfunction and ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Mancone, Massimo; Chilian, William M; Severino, Paolo; Canali, Emanuele; Logan, Suzanna; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Volterrani, Maurizio; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2013-11-01

    Conventionally, ischemic heart disease (IHD) is equated with large vessel coronary disease. However, recent evidence has suggested a role of compromised microvascular regulation in the etiology of IHD. Because regulation of coronary blood flow likely involves activity of specific ion channels, and key factors involved in endothelium-dependent dilation, we proposed that genetic anomalies of ion channels or specific endothelial regulators may underlie coronary microvascular disease. We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding for ion channels expressed in the coronary vasculature and the possible correlation with IHD resulting from microvascular dysfunction. 242 consecutive patients who were candidates for coronary angiography were enrolled. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted, analyzing genetic polymorphisms relative to (1) NOS3 encoding for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS); (2) ATP2A2 encoding for the Ca²⁺/H⁺-ATPase pump (SERCA); (3) SCN5A encoding for the voltage-dependent Na⁺ channel (Nav1.5); (4) KCNJ8 and KCNJ11 encoding for the Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 subunits of K-ATP channels, respectively; and (5) KCN5A encoding for the voltage-gated K⁺ channel (Kv1.5). No significant associations between clinical IHD manifestations and polymorphisms for SERCA, Kir6.1, and Kv1.5 were observed (p > 0.05), whereas specific polymorphisms detected in eNOS, as well as in Kir6.2 and Nav1.5 were found to be correlated with IHD and microvascular dysfunction. Interestingly, genetic polymorphisms for ion channels seem to have an important clinical impact influencing the susceptibility for microvascular dysfunction and IHD, independent of the presence of classic cardiovascular risk factors.

  10. The association between microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One of the earliest manifestations of CVD is endothelial dysfunction (ED). ED can occur in both the microcirculation and the macrocirculation, and these manifestations might be relatively independent of each other. Little is known about the association between endothelial function in the microcirculation and the macrocirculation in RA. The objectives of the present study were to examine the relationship between microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function in patients with RA. Methods Ninety-nine RA patients (72 females, mean age (± SD) 56 ± 12 years), underwent assessments of endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelial-independent (sodium nitroprusside) microvascular vasodilatory function (laser Doppler imaging with iontophoresis), as well as endothelial-dependent (flow-mediated dilation) and endothelial-independent (glyceryl trinitrate-mediated dilation) macrovascular vasodilatory function. Vasodilatory function was calculated as the percentage increase after each stimulus was applied relative to baseline values. Results Pearson correlations showed that microvascular endothelial-dependent function was not associated with macrovascular endothelial-dependent function (r (90 patients) = 0.10, P = 0.34). Similarly, microvascular endothelial-independent function was not related to macrovascular endothelial-independent function (r (89 patients) = 0.00, P = 0.99). Conclusions Microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function were independent of each other in patients with RA, suggesting differential regulation of endothelial function in these two vascular beds. Assessments of both vascular beds may provide more meaningful clinical information on vascular risk in RA, but this hypothesis needs to be confirmed in long-term prospective studies. PMID:21693023

  11. An observational cohort study of the kynurenine to tryptophan ratio in sepsis: association with impaired immune and microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Christabelle J; Davis, Joshua S; Woodberry, Tonia; McNeil, Yvette R; Stephens, Dianne P; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2011-01-01

    Both endothelial and immune dysfunction contribute to the high mortality rate in human sepsis, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In response to infection, interferon-γ activates indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) which metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan to the toxic metabolite kynurenine. IDO can be expressed in endothelial cells, hepatocytes and mononuclear leukocytes, all of which contribute to sepsis pathophysiology. Increased IDO activity (measured by the kynurenine to tryptophan [KT] ratio in plasma) causes T-cell apoptosis, vasodilation and nitric oxide synthase inhibition. We hypothesized that IDO activity in sepsis would be related to plasma interferon-γ, interleukin-10, T cell lymphopenia and impairment of microvascular reactivity, a measure of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability. In an observational cohort study of 80 sepsis patients (50 severe and 30 non-severe) and 40 hospital controls, we determined the relationship between IDO activity (plasma KT ratio) and selected plasma cytokines, sepsis severity, nitric oxide-dependent microvascular reactivity and lymphocyte subsets in sepsis. Plasma amino acids were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and microvascular reactivity by peripheral arterial tonometry. The plasma KT ratio was increased in sepsis (median 141 [IQR 64-235]) compared to controls (36 [28-52]); p<0.0001), and correlated with plasma interferon-γ and interleukin-10, and inversely with total lymphocyte count, CD8+ and CD4+ T-lymphocytes, systolic blood pressure and microvascular reactivity. In response to treatment of severe sepsis, the median KT ratio decreased from 162 [IQR 100-286] on day 0 to 89 [65-139] by day 7; p = 0.0006) and this decrease in KT ratio correlated with a decrease in the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (p<0.0001). IDO-mediated tryptophan catabolism is associated with dysregulated immune responses and impaired microvascular reactivity in sepsis and may link these two

  12. Patient Safety: Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Information > Patient Safety Guide to Safe Plastic Surgery Patient Safety More Resources Choose a surgeon ... Important facts about the safety and risks of plastic surgery Questions to ask my plastic surgeon Choose ...

  13. Microvascular dysfunction and efficacy of PDE5 inhibitors in BPH-LUTS.

    PubMed

    Cellek, Selim; Cameron, Norman E; Cotter, Mary A; Fry, Christopher H; Ilo, Dapo

    2014-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction commonly coexist, and both respond to phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibitors, suggesting a shared pathophysiological mechanism. We propose that both BPH-LUTS and erectile dysfunction are caused by microvascular dysfunction within the pelvic organs, and we present an overview of preclinical and clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that, within both the penis and the lower urinary tract, a combination of endothelial and neural dysfunction leads to a vicious cycle of hypoxia, vasoconstriction, altered smooth muscle contractility, and degeneration of autonomic neurons and ganglia. This hypothesis explains much of the preclinical and clinical research relating to these two conditions, and provides a rationale for further investigation into the effects of PDE5 inhibitors on the pathophysiology and symptoms of BPH-LUTS.

  14. [Effective Microvascular Decompression of the Trigeminal Nerve in a Patient with SUNCT].

    PubMed

    Kikui, Shoji; Miyahara, Jun-Ichi; Sugiyama, Hanako; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; Takeshima, Takao

    2016-08-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with severe, saw-tooth pattern pain around the right eye that started with conjunctival injection, lacrimation and nasal discharge, lasting for about 1 hour, 4 months after the initial onset of lancinating pain in the same area. The patient was diagnosed with SUNCT (short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing) according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3rd edition (beta version). The symptoms improved in 2 months but recurred 6 months later. He developed a toxic eruption after receiving a variety of antiepileptic agents including lamotrigine, which suggested refractory SUNCT. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed neurovascular compression (NVC) involving the right trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) was performed, and the pain was relieved postoperatively. MVD should be considered when treating refractory SUNCT because NVC may be involved in some cases. (Received February 29, 2016; Accepted April 4, 2016; Published August 1, 2016). PMID:27503824

  15. Quantitative changes in mast cells and microvascular pattern associated with dietary gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, A P; Tovey, F I; Riley, P A; Clark, C G

    1985-01-01

    The regional distribution of mast cells and the microvascular pattern in the stomach of Wistar rats fed on an ulcerogenic diet were compared with those of control animals. Mounts of the distended stomach were made and stained for blood vessels and mast cells in the subserosal layer. Measurements made under dark ground illumination in 12 operationally defined regions of the serosa demonstrated that the stomach wall in the region around the oesophagus is more richly vascularised and possesses a greater number of mast cells (60 cells per mm2) than other regions. Changes in the mast cells and microvasculature were observed in rats fed an ulcerogenic diet, notably in the zone around the oesophagus, where more than 30% mast cells were degranulated and the mean vascular diameter increased by 26%. The severity of the vascular changes correlated with the location of the ulcers of which 50% were in the zone surrounding the oesophagus.

  16. Microvascular decompression of trigeminal nerve root for treatment of a patient with hemimasticatory spasm.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ning-Ning; Zhong, Jun; Zhou, Qiu-Meng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yong-Nan; Li, Shi-Ting

    2014-05-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a rare disease; with little knowledge of the pathogenesis, it has still been intractable today. We presented a 56-year-old woman with involuntary painful spasm in her left masseter muscle for 11 years. The patient was successfully treated with microvascular decompression surgery. An offending superior cerebellar artery was found to contact with the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve root, which was then removed away and pieces of soft wadding were interposed between the nerve and the vessel to assure the separation. Postoperatively, the symptom totally disappeared and no recurrence was observed during the 7 months' follow-up. The treatment as well as the pathogenesis of the disease was reviewed, and we put forward a new hypothesis.

  17. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  18. The Brain Microvascular Endothelium Supports T Cell Proliferation and Has Potential for Alloantigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wheway, Julie; Obeid, Stephanie; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges E. R.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form the inner lining of blood vessels and are positioned between circulating lymphocytes and tissues. Hypotheses have formed that EC may act as antigen presenting cells based on the intimate interactions with T cells, which are seen in diseases like multiple sclerosis, cerebral malaria (CM) and viral neuropathologies. Here, we investigated how human brain microvascular EC (HBEC) interact with and support the proliferation of T cells. We found HBEC to express MHC II, CD40 and ICOSL, key molecules for antigen presentation and co-stimulation and to take up fluorescently labeled antigens via macropinocytosis. In co-cultures, we showed that HBEC support and promote the proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which both are key in CM pathogenesis, particularly following T cell receptor activation and co-stimulation. Our findings provide novel evidence that HBEC can trigger T cell activation, thereby providing a novel mechanism for neuroimmunological complications of infectious diseases. PMID:23320074

  19. Micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators with complex geometries obtained by laser stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Chacón Tanarro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    In our work we present the complete development process of geometrically complex micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators. The complex geometries and three-dimensional networks are designed by means of computer aided design resources. Manufacture is accomplished, in a single step, by means of laser stereolithography, directly from the computer-aided design files with the three dimensional geometries of the different actuators under development. To our knowledge, laser stereolithography is applied here for the first time to the development of shape memory polymer devices with complex geometries and inner micro-vasculatures for their activation using a thermal fluid. Final testing of the developed actuators helps to validate the approach and to put forward some present challenges.

  20. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood–brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood–brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  1. ROLE OF ATP IN REGULATING RENAL MICROVASCULAR FUNCTION AND IN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhengrong; Inscho, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an essential energy substrate for cellular metabolism but it can also influence many biological processes when released into the extracellular milieu. Research has established that extracellular ATP acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor that regulates many physiological functions. Alternatively, excessive extracellular ATP levels contribute to pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and atherosclerosis. Renal P2 receptors are widely distributed throughout glomeruli, vasculature and tubular segments, and participate in controlling renal vascular resistance, mediating renal autoregulation, and regulating tubular transport function. This review will focus on the role of ATP-P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal microvascular function and autoregulation, recent advances on the role of ATP-P2 signaling in hypertension-associated renal vascular injury, and emerging new directions. PMID:21768526

  2. Class IIA ring avulsion injuries: an absolute indication for microvascular repair.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M

    1984-11-01

    The class II ring avulsion category, includes those patients in whom only digital arteries are damaged but all other structures are intact and functional (here labeled class IIA). Current literature suggests this is a rare lesion. Seven patients with this specific injury in whom the affected digits were nonviable are reported. Four of the seven were misdiagnosed on initial emergency room evaluation. Two did not seek additional medical attention and the condition progressed to necrosis and amputation. The other two, who sought additional treatment because of progressive ischemia, and three additional patients who were correctly diagnosed on initial examination underwent simple digital arterial repair. All digits operated on survived and demonstrated near normal function. Since failure to operate results in digital loss, this is an absolute indication for microvascular repair.

  3. Coronary Microvascular Function and Beyond: The Crosstalk between Hormones, Cytokines, and Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Dal Lin, Carlo; Tona, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Beyond its hemodynamic function, the heart also acts as a neuroendocrine and immunoregulatory organ. A dynamic communication between the heart and other organs takes place constantly to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis. The current understanding highlights the importance of the endocrine, immune, and nervous factors to fine-tune the crosstalk of the cardiovascular system with the entire body. Once disrupted, this complex interorgan communication may promote the onset and the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, expanding our knowledge on how these factors influence the cardiovascular system can lead to novel therapeutic strategies to improve patient care. In the present paper, we review novel concepts on the role of endocrine, immune, and nervous factors in the modulation of microvascular coronary function. PMID:26124827

  4. Microvascular Staged Phalloplasty Preserving Original Glans in a Severe Hypospadias: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Pedro C.; Rubi, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Penile reconstruction is usually performed in patients with gender dysphoria; with penile loss because of trauma, infection, and tumors; and with congenital deformities like severe hypospadias, in which standard techniques do not achieve a good result. Hypospadias are one of the most common inherent genital anomalies in boys. Many surgical procedures have been published for total phallic reconstruction aiming at a functionally and aesthetically pleasing. We present a case of reconstruction of the penis in a severe hypospadias in a 40-year-old man by transferring the original glans to the forearm flap and a stiffening procedure with an osteocutaneous fibular flap 3 months after first surgery. Three months postoperatively, the final result was an acceptable sexual intercourse, normal voiding, and quite normal appearance. Microvascular staged phalloplasty preserving original glans in a severe hypospadia could be considered a surgical option for micropenis. Technical difficulties and microsurgical advanced skills are the main drawback of this approach. PMID:26894013

  5. Coronary Microvascular Function and Beyond: The Crosstalk between Hormones, Cytokines, and Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Dal Lin, Carlo; Tona, Francesco; Osto, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Beyond its hemodynamic function, the heart also acts as a neuroendocrine and immunoregulatory organ. A dynamic communication between the heart and other organs takes place constantly to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis. The current understanding highlights the importance of the endocrine, immune, and nervous factors to fine-tune the crosstalk of the cardiovascular system with the entire body. Once disrupted, this complex interorgan communication may promote the onset and the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Thus, expanding our knowledge on how these factors influence the cardiovascular system can lead to novel therapeutic strategies to improve patient care. In the present paper, we review novel concepts on the role of endocrine, immune, and nervous factors in the modulation of microvascular coronary function.

  6. Microvascular dysfunction and efficacy of PDE5 inhibitors in BPH-LUTS.

    PubMed

    Cellek, Selim; Cameron, Norman E; Cotter, Mary A; Fry, Christopher H; Ilo, Dapo

    2014-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction commonly coexist, and both respond to phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibitors, suggesting a shared pathophysiological mechanism. We propose that both BPH-LUTS and erectile dysfunction are caused by microvascular dysfunction within the pelvic organs, and we present an overview of preclinical and clinical studies supporting the hypothesis that, within both the penis and the lower urinary tract, a combination of endothelial and neural dysfunction leads to a vicious cycle of hypoxia, vasoconstriction, altered smooth muscle contractility, and degeneration of autonomic neurons and ganglia. This hypothesis explains much of the preclinical and clinical research relating to these two conditions, and provides a rationale for further investigation into the effects of PDE5 inhibitors on the pathophysiology and symptoms of BPH-LUTS. PMID:24619381

  7. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, C; Slabu, I; Wiekhorst, F; Bergemann, C; von Eggeling, F; Hochhaus, A; Trahms, L; Clement, J H

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles' shape, material, size, and coating. PMID:27163489

  8. Repeated self-healing of microvascular carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Wass, D. F.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-11-01

    A self-healing, high performance, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is demonstrated by embedding a Lewis-acid catalytic curing agent within a laminate, manufactured using out of autoclave (OOA) composite manufacturing methods. Two configurations of healing agent delivery, pre-mixed and autonomous mixing, are investigated via injection of a healing agent through bio-inspired microvascular channels exposed on Mode I fractured crack planes. Healing is effected when an epoxy resin-solvent healing agent mixture reaches the boundary of embedded solid-state scandium(III) triflate (Sc(OTf)3) catalyst, located on the crack plane, to initiate the ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of epoxides. Tailored self-healing agents confer high healing efficiency values after multiple healing cycles (69-108%) to successfully mitigate against crack propagation within the composite microstructure.

  9. Ranolazine: Drug overview and possible role in primary microvascular angina management.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Mattia; Porretta, Alessandra Pia; Gallino, Augusto

    2015-02-15

    Ranolazine is a novel well-tolerated anti-ischemic drug, which selectively inhibits late sodium current and exerts metabolic properties without any hemodynamic effect. Ranolazine has been approved as a second-line medical treatment for symptomatic stable coronary artery disease. Primary microvascular angina (MVA) is suspected when angina symptoms occur in patients with demonstrated myocardial ischemia, absence of myocardial disease and normal coronary artery angiography. Recent clinical data suggest that MVA represents a complex entity, which has been increasingly recognized as a significant cause of morbidity. High variability and low response to traditional anti-anginal treatment characterize primary MVA. Despite the fact that clinical and preclinical evidence provides information regarding ranolazine usefulness in primary MVA management, only three recent small randomized trials have investigated this issue. By selecting peer-reviewed literature in Pubmed and Cochrane Library, this review provides an overview on ranolazine pharmacology and efficacy, focusing on recent evidence suggesting its usefulness in management of primary MVA.

  10. Impact of long-term exposure to cigarette smoking on skin microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Pistelli, F; Pesce, M; Aquilini, F; Franzoni, F; Santoro, G; Carrozzi, L

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of cigarettes smoking and smokers' clinical characteristics on skin microvascular function, we measured the skin forearm blood flux, basally and during post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia, in 100 current smokers (mean age 51±11 years; range: 18 to 86 years) and in 66 healthy never-smokers matched for age and sex, by using laser Doppler fluximetry (LDF). Basal and post-ischemic LDF tracings were analyzed in the frequency domain within 0.009-0.02 Hz, 0.021-0.06 Hz and 0.061-0.2 Hz ranges, related to endothelial-dependent, sympathetic-dependent and myogenic-dependent vasomotion, respectively, using an adapted version of the Fourier analysis. The post-ischemic percentage change from baseline of the area under the LDF curve (AUC%) was significantly lower in smokers than in never-smokers [162.5% (139.3-183.0) vs 190.1% (156.3-216.8); p=0.00016]. Compared to controls, smokers also showed a reduced basal power spectral density (PSD) in the myogenic-dependent vasomotion (p=0.0034) and a reduced post-ischemic percentage increase in PSD of the endothelial-dependent vasomotion (p=0.0010) and sympathetic-dependent vasomotion (p=0.0016). An inverse relationship was observed in smokers between AUC% and smoking exposure duration (r=0.23, p=0.018), pack-years (r=0.33, p=0.0007), age (r=0.26, p=0.008) and body mass index (r=0.21, p=0.037). In the multiple linear regression model, pack-years was the only variable independently associated with AUC% (r=0.21, p=0.03). This study confirms that smoking is associated with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction and shows that the severity of this impairment is independently related to the duration and intensity of the exposure to smoking.

  11. GLP-1 increases microvascular recruitment but not glucose uptake in human and rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sjøberg, Kim A.; Holst, Jens J.; Rattigan, Stephen; Richter, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The insulinotropic gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has been proposed to have effects on vascular function and glucose disposal. However, whether GLP-1 is able to increase microvascular recruitment (MVR) in humans has not been investigated. GLP-1 was infused in the femoral artery in overnight-fasted, healthy young men. Microvascular recruitment was measured with real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound and leg glucose uptake by the leg balance technique with and without inhibition of the insulinotropic response of GLP-1 by coinfusion of octreotide. As a positive control, MVR and leg glucose uptake were measured during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Infusion of GLP-1 caused a rapid increase (P < 0.05) of 20 ± 12% (mean ± SE) in MVR in the vastus lateralis muscle of the infused leg after 5 min, and MVR further increased to 60 ± 8% above preinfusion levels by 60 min infusion. The effect was slightly slower but similar in magnitude in the noninfused contralateral leg, in which GLP-1 concentration was within the physiological range. Octreotide infusion did not prevent the GLP-1-induced increase in MVR. GLP-1 infusion did not increase leg glucose uptake with or without octreotide coinfusion. GLP-1 infusion in rats increased MVR by 28% (P < 0.05) but did not increase muscle glucose uptake. During the hyperinsulinemic clamp, MVR increased ∼40%, and leg glucose uptake increased 35-fold. It is concluded that GLP-1 in physiological concentrations causes a rapid insulin-independent increase in muscle MVR but does not affect muscle glucose uptake. PMID:24302010

  12. Preparation of a designed poly(trimethylene carbonate) microvascular network by stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Schüller-Ravoo, Sigrid; Zant, Erwin; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2014-12-01

    Designed flexible and elastic network structures are prepared by stereolithography using a photo-crosslinkable resin based on a poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) macromer with a molecular weight of 3150 g/mol. Physical properties and the compatibility with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are evaluated. The hydrophobic networks are found to be flexible and elastic, with an E modulus of 7.9 ± 0.1 MPa, a tensile strength of 3.5 ± 0.1 MPa and an elongation at break of 76.7 ± 0.7%. HUVECs attach and proliferate well on the surfaces of the built structures. A three-dimensional microvascular network is designed to serve as a perfusable scaffold for tissue engineering. In the design, 5 generations of open channels each branch into 4 smaller channels yielding a microvascular region with a high density of capillaries. The overall cross-sectional area through which medium or blood can be perfused remains constant. These structures would ensure efficient nourishment of cells in a large volume of tissue. Built by stereolithography using the PTMC resin, the smallest channels of these structures have square cross-sectional areas, with inner widths of approximately 224 μm and wall thicknesses of approximately 152 μm. The channels are open, allowing water to perfuse the scaffold at 0.279 ± 0.006 mL/s at 80 mmHg and 0.335 ± 0.009 mL/s at 120 mmHg.

  13. Diminished Alveolar Microvascular Reserves in Type 2 Diabetes Reflect Systemic Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chance, William W.; Rhee, Chanhaeng; Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Dane, D. Merrill; Pruneda, M. Lourdes; Raskin, Philip; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Alveolar microvascular function is moderately impaired in type 1 diabetes, as manifested by restriction of lung volume and diffusing capacity (DLCO). We examined whether similar impairment develops in type 2 diabetes and defined the physiologic sources of impairment as well as the relationships to glycemia and systemic microangiopathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A cross-sectional study was conducted at a university-affiliated diabetes treatment center and outpatient diabetes clinic, involving 69 nonsmoking type 2 diabetic patients without overt cardiopulmonary disease. Lung volume, pulmonary blood flow (Q̇), DLCO, membrane diffusing capacity (measured from nitric oxide uptake [DLNO]), and pulmonary capillary blood volume (VC) were determined at rest and exercise for comparison with those in 45 healthy nonsmokers as well as with normal reference values. RESULTS—In type 2 diabetic patients, peak levels of oxygen uptake, Q̇ and DLCO, DLNO, and VC at exercise were 10–25% lower compared with those in control subjects. In nonobese patients (BMI <30 kg/m2), reductions in DLCO, DLNO, and VC were fully explained by the lower lung volume and peak Q̇, but these factors did not fully explain the impairment in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m2). The slope of the increase in VC with respect to Q̇ was reduced ∼20% in patients regardless of BMI, consistent with impaired alveolar-capillary recruitment. Functional impairment was directly related to A1C level, retinopathy, neuropathy, and microalbuminuria in a sex-specific manner. CONCLUSIONS—Alveolar microvascular reserves are reduced in type 2 diabetes, reflecting restriction of lung volume, alveolar perfusion, and capillary recruitment. This reduction correlates with glycemic control and extrapulmonary microangiopathy and is aggravated by obesity. PMID:18492945

  14. Microvascular pathology and morphometrics of sporadic and hereditary small vessel diseases of the brain.

    PubMed

    Craggs, Lucinda J L; Yamamoto, Yumi; Deramecourt, Vincent; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Small vessel diseases (SVDs) of the brain are likely to become increasingly common in tandem with the rise in the aging population. In recent years, neuroimaging and pathological studies have informed on the pathogenesis of sporadic SVD and several single gene (monogenic) disorders predisposing to subcortical strokes and diffuse white matter disease. However, one of the limitations toward studying SVD lies in the lack of consistent assessment criteria and lesion burden for both clinical and pathological measures. Arteriolosclerosis and diffuse white matter changes are the hallmark features of both sporadic and hereditary SVDs. The pathogenesis of the arteriopathy is the key to understanding the differential progression of disease in various SVDs. Remarkably, quantification of microvascular abnormalities in sporadic and hereditary SVDs has shown that qualitatively the processes involved in arteriolar degeneration are largely similar in sporadic SVD compared with hereditary disorders such as cerebral autosomal arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Important significant regional differences in lesion location within the brain may enable one to distinguish SVDs, where frontal lobe involvement appears consistently with almost every SVD, but others bear specific pathologies in other lobes, such as the temporal pole in CADASIL and the pons in pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy or PADMAL. Additionally, degenerative changes in the vascular smooth muscle cells, the cerebral endothelium and the basal lamina are often rapid and more aggressive in genetic disorders. Further quantification of other microvascular elements and even neuronal cells is needed to fully characterize SVD pathogenesis and to differentiate the usefulness of vascular interventions and treatments on the resulting pathology.

  15. Microvascular reactivity in normotensive subjects with a familial predisposition to hypertension.

    PubMed

    Maver, J; Strucl, M

    2000-11-01

    Using the laser-Doppler method we measured blood flow on the nailfold skin to compare the reactivity of cutaneous microcirculation in three groups of normotensive subjects: 11 subjects with a familial predisposition to hypertension without a previous record of high blood pressure, 6 predisposed subjects with a previous record of high blood pressure, and 13 subjects with no predisposition to hypertension. The flow was measured after direct and indirect skin cooling and heating and during postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PRH) after a 10-min occlusion of digital arteries. The frequency of flow oscillations in the second part of the PRH was established. Heart rate spectral analysis was performed based on the monitoring of the peripheral pulse frequency by means of the finapres device. In comparison to the other two groups of subjects, the group with a predisposition and a previous record of high blood pressure displayed a larger surface area in the low frequency band (0.05 to 0.15 Hz) of the heart rate variability power spectrum (the Bonferroni test, P < 0.05). As compared to subjects without predisposition, both groups of predisposed subjects exhibited higher frequency of flow oscillations in the second part of the PRH (the Bonferroni test, P < 0.05). Our results indicate that there could be a change in cutaneous microvascular reactivity of local (most probably myogenic) origin even in normotensive subjects with a predisposition to hypertension, whereas in normotensives with a predisposition and a previous record of high blood pressure there could be also a different cutaneous microvascular reactivity of central (nonvascular) origin. PMID:11078640

  16. Phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1) modulates MT1-MMP activity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wieghaus, Kristen A; Gianchandani, Erwin P; Neal, Rebekah A; Paige, Mikell A; Brown, Milton L; Papin, Jason A; Botchwey, Edward A

    2009-07-01

    We are creating synthetic pharmaceuticals with angiogenic activity and potential to promote vascular invasion. We previously demonstrated that one of these molecules, phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1), significantly expands microvascular networks in vivo following sustained release from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) films. In addition, to probe PNF1 mode of action, we recently applied a novel pathway-based compendium analysis to a multi-timepoint, controlled microarray data set of PNF1-treated (vs. control) human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs), and we identified induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and, subsequently, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling networks by PNF1. Here we validate this microarray data set with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Subsequently, we probe this data set and identify three specific TGF-beta-induced genes with regulation by PNF1 conserved over multiple timep