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Sample records for acute migraine therapy

  1. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  2. Acute Migraine Therapy: New Drugs and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Monteith, Teshamae S.

    2010-01-01

    Opinion Statement The conceptual shift of our understanding of migraine from a vascular disorder to a brain disorder has dramatically altered the approach to the development of new medicines in the field. Current pharmacologic treatments of acute migraine consist of nonspecific and relatively specific agents. Migraine-specific drugs comprise two classes, the ergot alkaloid derivatives and the triptans, serotonin 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists. The ergots, consisting of ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (DHE), are the oldest specific antimigraine drugs available and are considered relatively safe and effective. Ergotamine has been used less extensively because of its adverse effects; DHE is better tolerated. The triptan era, beginning in the 1990s, was a period of considerable change, although these medicines retained vasoconstrictor actions. New methods of delivering older drugs include orally inhaled DHE and the transdermal formulation of sumatriptan, both currently under study. Novel medicines being developed are targeted at neural sites of action. Serotonin 5-HT1F receptor agonists have proven effective in phase II studies and have no vascular actions. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists are another promising nonvasoconstrictor approach to treating acute migraine. Olcegepant (BIBN4096BS) and telcagepant (MK-0974) have been shown to be safe and effective in phase I, II, and (for telcagepant) phase III clinical trials. Other targets under investigation include glutamate (AMPA/kainate), TRPV1, prostanoid EP4, and nitric oxide synthase. With new neural targets and the potential for therapeutic advances, the next era of antimigraine medications is near. PMID:21110235

  3. Acute Migraine Treatment in Adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2015-06-01

    There are many options for acute migraine attack treatment, but none is ideal for all patients. This study aims to review current medical office-based acute migraine therapy in adults and provides readers with an organized approach to this important facet of migraine treatment. A general literature review includes a review of several recent published guidelines. Acetaminophen, 4 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (ibuprofen, acetylsalicylic acid [ASA], naproxen sodium, and diclofenac potassium), and 7 triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have good evidence for efficacy and form the core of acute migraine treatment. NSAID-triptan combinations, dihydroergotamine, non-opioid combination analgesics (acetaminophen, ASA, and caffeine), and several anti-emetics (metoclopramide, domperidone, and prochlorperazine) are additional evidence-based options. Opioid containing combination analgesics may be helpful in specific patients, but should not be used routinely. Clinical features to be considered when choosing an acute migraine medication include usual headache intensity, usual rapidity of pain intensity increase, nausea, vomiting, degree of disability, patient response to previously used medications, history of headache recurrence with previous attacks, and the presence of contraindications to specific acute medications. Available acute medications can be organized into 4 treatment strategies, including a strategy for attacks of mild to moderate severity (strategy one: acetaminophen and/or NSAIDs), a triptan strategy for patients with severe attacks and for attacks not responding to strategy one, a refractory attack strategy, and a strategy for patients with contraindications to vasoconstricting drugs. Acute treatment of migraine attacks during pregnancy, lactation, and for patients with chronic migraine is also discussed. In chronic migraine, it is particularly important that medication

  4. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  5. Recent advances in migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Ghiotto, Natascia; Wu, Shizheng; Pucci, Ennio; Costa, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common and highly disabling neurological disorder associated with a high socioeconomic burden. Effective migraine management depends on adequate patient education: to avoid unrealistic expectations, the condition must be carefully explained to the patient soon as it is diagnosed. The range of available acute treatments has increased over time. At present, abortive migraine therapy can be classed as specific (ergot derivatives and triptans) or non-specific (analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Even though acute symptomatic therapy can be optimised, migraine continues to be a chronic and potentially progressive condition. In addition to the drugs officially approved for migraine prevention by international governmental regulatory agencies, numerous different agents are commonly used for this indication, showing various levels of evidence of efficacy and tolerability. Guidelines published in recent years, based on evidence-based medicine data on migraine prophylaxis, are a useful source of guidance, especially for primary care physicians and neurologists without specific expertise in headache medicine. Although the field of pharmacological migraine prevention has seen few advances in recent years, potential novel approaches are now being developed. This review looks at emerging pharmacological strategies for acute and preventive migraine treatment that are nearing or have already entered the clinical trial phase. Specifically, it discusses preclinical and clinical data on compounds acting on calcitonin gene-related peptide or its receptor, the serotonin 5-HT1F receptor, nitric oxide synthase, and acid-sensing ion channel blockers. PMID:27330903

  6. Current and emerging second-generation triptans in acute migraine therapy: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Deleu, D; Hanssens, Y

    2000-07-01

    Sterile neurogenic inflammation within cephalic tissue, involving vasodilation and plasma protein extravasation, has been proposed as a pathophysiological mechanism in acute migraine. The action of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1B/1D) agonists--so-called triptans--on receptors located in meningeal arteries (5-HT1B) and trigeminovascular fiber endings (5-HT1D) has an inhibitory effect on this neurogenic inflammation. Recently, a series of second-generation 5-HT1B/1D agonists (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan) have been developed and are reviewed in this article. Their in vitro pharmacological properties, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, drug interactions, and adverse effects are evaluated and compared to the golden standard in the treatment of acute migraine, sumatriptan. PMID:10883409

  7. Acute Migraine Management in Children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Alfonzo, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Migraines are common, incapacitating, and often stress inducing for pediatric patients and parents alike. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, more than 1 million Americans seek emergency care every year due to migraines, with increasing frequency among adolescents. The disease can vary in severity and character, often mimicking life-threatening conditions, requiring prompt nuanced recognition by emergency personnel and implementation of an effective treatment strategy. Development of emergency department guidelines for the management of pediatric migraines should be based on up-to-date evidence supporting safe, appropriate therapies for children.

  8. Behavioral therapy for chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, Francesca; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling condition which affects a considerable proportion of patients. Several risk factors and lifestyle habits contribute to the transformation of migraine into a chronic form. Behavioral treatments, including relaxation, biofeedback, and cognitive behavioral therapy reduce the risk of episodic into chronic migraine transformation, thus restraining the headache-related disability. The rationale of behavioral therapies is that a medical problem should be recognized and thoroughly examined by the patient to be successfully managed. Being aware of factors which precipitate or aggravate migraine allows patients to progressively modulate the frequency and duration of their attacks. Similarly, the acquisition of healthy habits improves the quality of life and the subjective well-being of patients and contributes to breaking the vicious cycle that leads to migraine chronification. The highest level of care is achieved when behavioral therapies are integrated with other treatments, including physical and pharmacological interventions.

  9. Ryodoraku therapy for migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, K; Sadove, M S; Kim, S I; Lee, M H; Cheng, D

    1975-01-01

    The authors discuss Ryodoraku electric acupuncture therapy in detail in Part I. The results of the treatment of migraine headache (20 cases) by Ryodoraku therapy were investigated in part II. In the present study 15 out of 20 patients achieved good to excellent responses to this type of therapy. PMID:1119438

  10. Migraine headache confounding the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Karle, Francis J; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with a history of migraine headache attempted to hike from Lukla, Nepal, to Mount Everest Base Camp. On the sixth day of hiking, he had a migraine headache. After achieving resolution with typical therapies and rest, he ascended higher. Another headache developed that was interpreted to be a migraine. The headache was treated, and he ascended higher, after which severe symptoms of acute mountain sickness developed, necessitating his evacuation by helicopter. Persons with headaches in daily life may present challenges to diagnosis when traveling to high altitude. Careful evaluation and decision making are needed to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:24462763

  11. The acute treatment of migraine in adults: the american headache society evidence assessment of migraine pharmacotherapies.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Silberstein, Stephen D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to provide an updated assessment of the evidence for individual pharmacological therapies for acute migraine treatment. Pharmacological therapy is frequently required for acutely treating migraine attacks. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines published in 2000 summarized the available evidence relating to the efficacy of acute migraine medications. This review, conducted by the members of the Guidelines Section of the American Headache Society, is an updated assessment of evidence for the migraine acute medications. A standardized literature search was performed to identify articles related to acute migraine treatment that were published between 1998 and 2013. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines Development procedures were followed. Two authors reviewed each abstract resulting from the search and determined whether the full manuscript qualified for review. Two reviewers studied each qualifying full manuscript for its level of evidence. Level A evidence requires at least 2 Class I studies, and Level B evidence requires 1 Class I or 2 Class II studies. The specific medications - triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan [oral, nasal spray, injectable, transcutaneous patch], zolmitriptan [oral and nasal spray]) and dihydroergotamine (nasal spray, inhaler) are effective (Level A). Ergotamine and other forms of dihydroergotamine are probably effective (Level B). Effective nonspecific medications include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen), opioids (butorphanol nasal spray), sumatriptan/naproxen, and the combination of acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeine (Level A). Ketoprofen, intravenous and intramuscular ketorolac, flurbiprofen, intravenous magnesium (in migraine with aura), and the combination of isometheptene compounds, codeine/acetaminophen and tramadol/acetaminophen are probably effective (Level B). The antiemetics prochlorperazine

  12. CGRP receptor antagonism and migraine therapy.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Warfvinge, Karin

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is the most prevalent of the neurological disorders and can affect the patient throughout the lifetime. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide that is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is now 2 decades since it was proposed to be involved in migraine pathophysiology. The cranial sensory system contains C-fibers storing CGRP and trigeminal nerve activation and acute migraine attacks result in release of CGRP. The CGRP receptor consists of a complex of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) and receptor component protein (RCP). At the central synapses in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis, CGRP acts postjunctionally on second-order neurons to transmit pain signals centrally via brainstem and midbrain to thalamus and higher cortical pain regions. CLR and RAMPs are widely expressed throughout the brain, in the trigeminal ganglion and in intracranial arteries. CGRP does not induce neurogenic inflammation or sensitization at peripheral meningeal sites but relays nociceptive information from trigeminal primary afferent neurons to the second-order neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus neurons. CGRP receptor antagonists have been developed as novel antimigraine drugs and found to be effective in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Other ways to stop CGRP activity has been introduced recently through antibodies against CGRP and the CGRP receptor. While the CGRP receptors are expressed both in the CNS and at various places related to the trigeminal system the exact site of action for their therapy effect is still unresolved but the new approaches may resolve this. PMID:23745702

  13. Migraine.

    PubMed

    Peck, K R; Johnson, Y L; Smitherman, T A

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of migraine epidemiology and mechanisms. Migraine is a common and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by episodic attacks of severe head pain and other symptoms, including interference with activity, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound. A number of risk factors for migraine onset and progression have been identified, including the presence of comorbid disorders and overuse of acute headache medications. Though the pathophysiology of migraine is complex and incompletely understood, advances in genetics research and clinical trials methodology offer promise for better understanding the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. These advances presently center on genomewide studies, development of antibodies targeting calcitonin gene-related peptide, and understanding the psychologic mechanisms that underlie the efficacy of some interventions. Studies of both pharmacologic and behavioral interventions for migraine and its common comorbidities also offer promise for understanding the neuroepidemiologic mechanisms of migraine. Clinical trials relevant to these mechanisms are reviewed, and methodologic considerations for future trials are discussed. PMID:27637964

  14. Family Therapy Approach to Incapacitating Migraine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstock, Harvey A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The case of a nine-year-old boy suffering from psycosomatic migraine headaches is discussed. The main article presents the case study and discusses the family systems approach which was successfully used in therapy. The following discussion deals with the psychosomatic personality. (HMV)

  15. [Faster, higher, further. Current thinking on acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Limmroth, V; Hubrecht, L; Diener, H C

    2004-10-01

    In the past months significant new data have been published in the field of headache and migraine. With the publication of the second and revised version of the classification of headache disorders, new entities such as chronic migraine have been introduced. Moreover, the repertoire of drugs available for the treatment of migraine has changed as well. Whereas ergot derivatives have been almost completely taken off the market, seven triptans in 23 different preparations are now available and allow the physician to customize the treatment of acute attacks. CGRP antagonists, a completely new generation of anti-migraine compounds for the treatment of acute attacks, have now been tested successfully in clinical trials. For the prophylaxis of migraine, several agents that had been well established for decades have recently been taken off the market too, but new agents such as topiramate, which possesses different modes of action, have been tested successfully and are now available for the prophylaxis of migraine. The following review will summarize the newest developments in acute therapy and prophylactic treatment of migraine.

  16. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  17. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Migraine Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... and Information Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Migraine? The pain of a migraine headache is often ...

  18. Pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in adolescents and children.

    PubMed

    Wöber-Bingöl, Çiçek

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disease in children and adolescents. The incidence of migraine has increased alarmingly in the general population during recent decades. Migraine causes considerable individual suffering and impaired quality of life. Therefore, appropriate management is essential. In this article, the treatment of acute migraine in children and adolescents will be reviewed. Only a few randomized controlled studies have been published and high placebo rates are a major problem for proving superiority of active drugs. Generally, acetaminophen (paracetamol) and ibuprofen are accepted as drugs of first choice, even though the evidence is poor for the former and limited for latter. Among 14 studies on triptans in adolescents, 9 showed some superiority over placebo with respect to pain relief and pain freedom, and among 6 studies in children, 5 suggest some superiority over placebo. Sumatriptan nasal spray and zolmitriptan nasal spray have been approved for adolescents in Europe; almotriptan has been approved for adolescents in the USA, as has rizatriptan for patients aged 6-17 years. A recent study demonstrated the efficacy of a fixed combination of sumatriptan and naproxen in adolescents with migraine. In conclusion, evidence for the pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in children is very poor and evidence for adolescents is better but still limited. PMID:23575981

  19. The triggers or precipitants of the acute migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Kelman, L

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and define the triggers of the acute migraine attack. Patients rated triggers on a 0-3 scale for the average headache. Demographics, prodrome, aura, headache characteristics, postdrome, medication responsiveness, acute and chronic disability, sleep characteristics and social and personal characteristics were also recorded. One thousand two hundred and seven International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 (1.1-1.2, and 1.5.1) patients were evaluated, of whom 75.9% reported triggers (40.4% infrequently, 26.7% frequently and 8.8% very frequently). The trigger frequencies were stress (79.7%), hormones in women (65.1%), not eating (57.3%), weather (53.2%), sleep disturbance (49.8%), perfume or odour (43.7%), neck pain (38.4%), light(s) (38.1%), alcohol (37.8%), smoke (35.7%), sleeping late (32.0%), heat (30.3%), food (26.9%), exercise (22.1%) and sexual activity (5.2%). Triggers were more likely to be associated with a more florid acute migraine attack. Differences were seen between women and men, aura and no aura, episodic and chronic migraine, and between migraine and probable migraine.

  20. [Psychofonia--a neurophysiologic music therapy in migraine].

    PubMed

    Meister, M; Einsle, R; Brunner, J; Rhyner, K

    1999-05-20

    Migraine and other functional disorders are common and often difficult to treat. Alternative treatment modalities are clearly warranted and gain more widespread acceptance. Psychofonia is a new form of music therapy for treating migraine patients. For each patient an individualized sound pattern is created based on his individual EEG by using computer technology. In a cohort study we investigated prospectively 55 migraine patients treated with this EEG-based music therapy. 56% of the patients showed an improvement of at least 50% of their symptoms after a twelve months treatment period. Our results suggest that this form of music therapy is effective in treating migraine patients and should be studied in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial.

  1. Complicated Migraines.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Alyssa E; Victorio, M Cristina; Berenson, Frank R

    2016-02-01

    Migraines are a common paroxysmal disorder that may present with a multitude of neurologic symptoms. Migraines have been re-categorized in the most recent edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. In this article, we review the literature on hemiplegic migraines, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, migraine with brainstem aura, retinal migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, Alice in Wonderland syndrome, and acute confusional migraine. We also discuss the principal clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and treatment options for these disorders. PMID:27017017

  2. Acute treatment of migraine and the role of triptans.

    PubMed

    Freitag, F G

    2001-03-01

    The use of triptans has improved the ability to treat migraine successfully compared with older treatments. Speed of relief, consistency of effect, and good tolerability have been the hallmarks of these agents. All of the currently available triptans have comparable efficacy and tolerability. Variables between the agents may lead to one agent or dose form being preferred over another in various clinical scenarios. The triptans that are forthcoming may improve on these options through enhanced efficacy rates, tolerability, and headache recurrence rates. There exist increasing options for migraine treatment that may further improve the clinical effects of the older and newer triptans through early treatment of migraine at the stages of mild migraine pain, or even during the prodromal phase of the attack. Additionally, recent work suggests that mini-prophylaxis of migraine at the menses is a highly successful treatment option with the triptans. In this age of managed care, providing cost-effective treatment of headache will take on increasing importance. Techniques such as stratification of acute treatments may enhance cost-effective care, whereas ready availability of the triptans may lead to significant improvements in utilization of parameters such as office visits, emergency room treatment, and even hospitalization. PMID:11898508

  3. How to Apply the AHS Evidence Assessment of the Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults to your Patient with Migraine.

    PubMed

    Pringsheim, Tamara; Davenport, William Jeptha; Marmura, Michael J; Schwedt, Todd J; Silberstein, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The "Acute Treatment of Migraine in Adults: The American Headache Society Evidence Assessment of Migraine Pharmacotherapies" provides levels of evidence for medication efficacy for acute treatment of migraine. The goal of this companion paper is to provide guidance on how to choose between evidence-based treatment options, and, based on the clinical characteristics of the patient and their migraine attacks, to provide guidance on designing an individualized strategy for managing migraine attacks. The acute pharmacological treatments described in the American Headache Society evidence assessment can be divided into those initially taken by the patient during the headache phase of the migraine attack, those taken by the patient later in the attack when initial treatments fail, and those administered intravenously or intramuscularly in urgent care settings. Medications taken initially by patients in the headache phase include nonspecific analgesics such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), triptans, and dihydroergotamine (DHE). A stratified approach to treatment is advised, with the choice of medication based on the patient's treatment needs, taking into consideration the attack severity, presence of associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, and the degree of migraine-related disability. Individuals with migraine may find reassurance in having a "back-up plan" in the event of an initial acute treatment failure. For those individuals who had a partial response to the initial acute treatment, a second dose might be indicated. When the initial treatment does not provide meaningful and sustained benefits, a treatment from a different medication class is typically chosen. Depending upon the initial treatment used, this might include NSAIDs, triptans, or DHE. Opioids or acetaminophen in combination with codeine or tramadol can be considered as part of the "back-up plan," provided they are used infrequently. When all patient administered

  4. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of some brain cells. Medicines can help prevent migraine attacks or help relieve symptoms of attacks when they happen. For many people, treatments to relieve stress can also help. NIH: National ...

  5. Migraines

    MedlinePlus

    ... except small amounts for flavoring Papaya Passion fruit Pea pods Pickled, preserved or marinated foods, such as ... foods Raisins Red plums Sauerkraut Seasoned salt Snow peas Soy sauce Diagnosis & Tests How is migraine diagnosed? ...

  6. Alcohol and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Alcohol and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their ... to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and Depression Caffeine and Migraine ...

  7. Magnetic resonance angiography evidence of vasospasm in children with suspected acute hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Safier, Robert; Cleves-Bayon, Catalina; Vaisleib, Inna; Siddiqui, Ali; Zuccoli, Giulio

    2014-06-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare subtype of migraine that is differentiated by motor weakness in the aura phase. The purpose of this case series was to examine the magnetic resonance angiogram findings of patients suffering from suspected acute hemiplegic migraine. This was a retrospective institutional board review protocol study of 8 patients. All patients received full brain magnetic resonance imaging under a 1.5-T magnet. The scans were subsequently evaluated by a neuroradiologist and 2 neurologists who were blinded to the study. The magnetic resonance angiogram findings of this study showed the presence of vasospasm within the intracranial vasculature during suspected acute hemiplegic migraine. This case series suggests that routine use of magnetic resonance angiography might be beneficial in both managing patients with acute hemiplegic migraine and helping to further understand the pathophysiology of this complicated disease process.

  8. Aberrant Neuromagnetic Activation in the Motor Cortex in Children with Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinyao; Xiang, Jing; Wang, Yingying; O’Brien, Hope; Kabbouche, Marielle; Horn, Paul; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF) during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65–150 Hz) oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems. PMID:23185541

  9. Aberrant neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex in children with acute migraine: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinyao; Xiang, Jing; Wang, Yingying; O'Brien, Hope; Kabbouche, Marielle; Horn, Paul; Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF) during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65-150 Hz) oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems.

  10. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 10 March 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using aspirin to treat a discrete migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Thirteen studies (4222 participants) compared aspirin 900 mg or 1000 mg, alone or in combination with metoclopramide 10 mg, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes, all active treatments were superior to placebo, with NNTs of 8.1, 4.9 and 6.6 for 2-hour pain-free, 2-hour headache relief, and 24-hour headache relief with aspirin alone versus placebo, and 8.8, 3.3 and 6.2 with aspirin plus metoclopramide versus placebo. Sumatriptan 50 mg did not differ from aspirin alone for 2-hour pain-free and headache relief, while sumatriptan 100 mg was better than the combination of aspirin plus metoclopramide for 2-hour pain-free, but not headache relief; there were no data for 24-hour headache relief. Associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting

  11. Innovative delivery systems for migraine: the clinical utility of a transdermal patch for the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alan M; Freitag, Fred; Pearlman, Starr H

    2010-11-01

    Migraine is a disabling, painful primary headache disorder that is associated with various combinations of neurological, gastrointestinal, autonomic and pain symptoms. Gastrointestinal disturbances associated with migraine, including nausea and vomiting, affect a majority of migraineurs and often result in a delay in taking or avoidance of pharmacological intervention. Gastric stasis and vomiting may lead to delayed or inconsistent absorption of orally administered medications. Many migraineurs awake early in the morning with their attack progressing and already associated with nausea and vomiting. As a result, there is a need for a novel, non-invasive, non-oral delivery system for fast and effective acute treatment of migraine. There are two non-oral delivery systems currently available in the US for the acute treatment of migraine: three nasal sprays and two injectable formulations. Although nasal sprays depend partially on nasal mucosal absorption, a significant amount of drug is swallowed, transits the stomach and is absorbed in the small intestine, which is not as rapid or effective a route of delivery for those migraineurs with gastric stasis. Sumatriptan is rapidly absorbed by subcutaneous injection with or without a needle, but the invasiveness and discomfort of the delivery, the high incidence of adverse events and the high recurrence rate all limit its use for many patients. Iontophoretic delivery of medication is a non-invasive transdermal approach that uses small amounts of electrical current to promote rapid movement of the ionized drug through the skin and into the systemic circulation. This delivery bypasses hepatic first-pass metabolism and also avoids gastric transit delay and slowing of small intestinal absorption associated with gastrointestinal stasis in migraineurs. Two pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that iontophoretic transdermal delivery of sumatriptan results in rapid and consistent achievement of therapeutic plasma concentrations

  12. NSAIDs in the Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Pardutz, Arpad; Schoenen, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurological disorder with a serious socio-economical burden. By blocking cyclooxygenase nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decrease the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are involved in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches. Despite the introduction more than a decade ago of a new class of migraine-specific drugs with superior efficacy, the triptans, NSAIDs remain the most commonly used therapies for the migraine attack. This is in part due to their wide availability as over-the-counter drugs and their pharmaco-economic advantages, but also to a favorable efficacy/side effect profile at least in attacks of mild and moderate intensity. We summarize here both the experimental data showing that NSAIDs are able to influence several pathophysiological facets of the migraine headache and the clinical studies providing evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of various subclasses of NSAIDs in migraine therapy. Taken together these data indicate that there are several targets for NSAIDs in migraine pathophysiology and that on the spectrum of clinical potency acetaminophen is at the lower end while ibuprofen is among the most effective drugs. Acetaminophen and aspirin excluded, comparative trials between the other NSAIDs are missing. Since evidence-based criteria are scarce, the selection of an NSAID should take into account proof and degree of efficacy, rapid GI absorption, gastric ulcer risk and previous experience of each individual patient. If selected and prescribed wisely, NSAIDs are precious, safe and cost-efficient drugs for the treatment of migraine attacks.

  13. Chronic migraine: a therapeutic challenge for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Pablo; Carmona-Abellán, Mar; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Chronic migraine is a common disabling condition. Severe migraine attacks should be treated with triptans, but these agents are contraindicated in patients with vascular problems and may not be effective or tolerated in around one third of the patients. New acute migraine therapies without vasoconstrictive activity and triptan-specific side effects are emerging. For the prophylaxis of chronic migraine, only topiramate and OnabotulinumtoxinA have been shown to be effective in placebo-controlled randomized trials, so novel therapeutic strategies are needed. The growing understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic migraine will contribute to the identification of new treatment targets.

  14. The pharmacological profile and clinical prospects of the oral 5-HT1F receptor agonist lasmiditan in the acute treatment of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Heike; Neeb, Lars

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 years have passed without the launch of a new substance class for acute migraine therapy. Triptans were the latest class of substances which successfully passed all developmental stages with a significant antimigraine efficacy and a sufficient safety profile. New drugs with a better adverse event profile and at least similar efficacy are needed for migraine subjects who cannot tolerate triptans for attack treatment. Lasmiditan is a novel highly specific 5-HT1F receptor agonist currently in clinical trials for acute migraine therapy and devoid of vasoconstriction in coronary arteries as determined in a surrogate assay. In both phase II randomized, placebo-controlled trials in acute migraine the primary endpoint was met. For the intravenous formulation a clear dose-dependent effect on headaches could be determined. Lasmiditan tablets in doses of 50–400 mg show significant headache relief after 2 hours compared with placebo and improved accompanying symptoms. This substance is chemically clearly different from other antimigraine drugs, which is also reflected by its dose-dependent adverse event profile chiefly including dizziness, vertigo, paresthesia and fatigue. Adverse events are usually linked to the central nervous system. Future phase III clinical trials with an active triptan comparator or in a preferential trial design will allow a better comparison of lasmiditan and triptans. They will also determine whether lasmiditan will become available to the migraine patient. PMID:25584073

  15. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  16. Migraine in the era of precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lv-Ming; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder in the neurologic clinics whose mechanisms have been explored for several years. The aura has been considered to be attributed to cortical spreading depression (CSD) and dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system is the key factor that has been considered in the pathogenesis of migraine pain. Moreover, three genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A) have come from studies performed in individuals with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic form of migraine with aura. Therapies targeting on the neuropeptids and genes may be helpful in the precision medicine of migraineurs. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated efficacy in the acute specific treatment of migraine attacks. Therefore, ongoing and future efforts to find new vulnerabilities of migraine, unravel the complexity of drug therapy, and perform biomarker-driven clinical trials are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with migraine. PMID:27127758

  17. Early treatment of acute migraine: new evidence of benefits.

    PubMed

    Valade, D

    2009-12-01

    The current management approach to migraine headaches advocates use of triptan medications early in the course of an attack while pain is still mild, rather than waiting to treat the pain when it has progressed to moderate-severe. Recently, strong new evidence for the benefits of early intervention has become available. The AEGIS, AIMS and AwM studies of almotriptan in patients with migraine indicate that earlier treatment initiation and lower pain intensity at the time of treatment are important predictors of enhanced therapeutic outcomes. The opportunity to treat early exists for about 50% of all migraine attacks, which offers considerable scope for improving migraine management. Importantly, treating pain early and before it has progressed beyond 'mild' meets many of the expectations patients have of their migraine treatment. It is believed that consistent, positive outcomes may assist in overcoming the various physician- and patient-perceived barriers to adoption of this beneficial treatment strategy. PMID:20017750

  18. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of paracetamol (acetaminophen), alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 4 October 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered paracetamol to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Ten studies (2769 participants, 4062 attacks) compared paracetamol 1000 mg, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes paracetamol was superior to placebo, with NNTs of 12, 5.2 and 5.0 for 2-hour pain-free and 1- and 2-hour headache relief, respectively, when medication was taken for moderate to severe pain. Nausea, photophobia and phonophobia were reduced more with paracetamol than with placebo at 2 hours (NNTs of 7 to 11); more individuals were free of any functional disability at 2 hours with paracetamol (NNT 10); and fewer participants needed rescue medication over 6 hours (NNT 6). Paracetamol 1000 mg plus metoclopramide 10 mg was not significantly different from oral sumatriptan

  19. [New physiopathological knowledge applied to migraine therapy and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Visens, Laura S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a very common condition that has a significant socioeconomic impact. Based on the most recent reports from the World Health Organization, its diagnosis and treatment are far from being optimal. Specialists have made great efforts to classify headaches, including migraines, in order to have a useful diagnostic tool and to guide treatment. On the other hand, advances made in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of migraines, new treatment options were developed. These new options include onabotulinum toxin A and topiramate. The prompt detection of migraine disorders and an appropriate treatment, both symptomatic and preventive, are key to relieve the personal, familiar, and social burden with special focus on chronic migraine.

  20. Symptomatic or prophylactic treatment of weekend migraine: an open-label, nonrandomized, comparison study of frovatriptan versus naproxen sodium versus no therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, Mario; Barrilà, Caterina; Leva, Serena; De Piazza, Claudio; Omboni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background Migraine often occurs during weekends. The efficacy of frovatriptan, naproxen sodium, or no therapy for the acute or prophylactic treatment of weekend migraineurs was tested in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Methods Twenty-eight subjects (mean age 36 ± 12 years, including 18 females) suffering from migraine without aura were followed up for six consecutive weekends. No treatment was administered during the first two weekends. On the third and fourth weekends, patients were given frovatriptan 2.5 mg and on the fifth and sixth weekends naproxen sodium 500 mg. Treatment was taken on Saturday and Sunday morning, regardless of the occurrence of migraine. Efficacy was evaluated through a diary, where patients reported the severity of migraine on a scale from 0 (no migraine) to 10 (severe migraine) and use of rescue medication. Results The migraine severity score was significantly lower with frovatriptan (4.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8–5.9]) than with naproxen sodium (5.7 [CI 5.1–6.4], P< 0.05 versus frovatriptan) or no therapy (6.6 [6.2–7.0], P< 0.01 versus frovatriptan). The difference in favor of frovatriptan was more striking in patients not taking rescue medication (frovatriptan, 1.9 [1.5–2.3]) versus naproxen sodium 3.6 [3.0–4.2], P< 0.001) and versus no therapy (5.1 [4.4–5.8], P< 0.001) and on the second day of treatment. The rate of use of rescue medication was significantly (P< 0.05) lower on frovatriptan (12.5%) than on naproxen sodium (31.3%) or no therapy (56.3%). Conclusion This pilot study provides the first evidence of the efficacy of a second-generation triptan as symptomatic or prophylactic treatment for weekend migraine. PMID:23355779

  1. Intravenous migraine therapy in children with posttraumatic headache in the ED☆,☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Steven; Kurowski, Brad; Byczkowski, Terri; Timm, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 3.8 million children sustain traumatic brain injuries annually. Treatment of posttraumatic headache (PTH) in the emergency department (ED) is variable, and benefits are unclear. Objective The objective of the study is to determine if intravenous migraine therapy reduces pain scores in children with PTH and factors associated with improved response. Methods This was a retrospective study of children, 8 to 21 years old, presenting to a tertiary pediatric ED with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and PTH from November 2009 to June 2013. Inclusion criteria were mTBI (defined by diagnosis codes) within 14 days of ED visit, headache, and administration of one or more intravenous medications: ketorolac, prochlorperazine, metoclopramide, chlorpromazine, and ondansetron. Primary outcome was treatment success defined by greater than or equal to 50% pain score reduction during ED visit. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine predictors of treatment success: age, sex, migraine or mTBI history, time since injury, ED head computed tomographic (CT) imaging, and pretreatment with oral analgesics. Results A total of 254 patients were included. Mean age was 13.8 years, 51% were female, 80% were white, mean time since injury was 2 days, and 114 patients had negative head CTs. Eighty-six percent of patients had treatment success with 52% experiencing complete resolution of headache. Bivariate analysis showed that patients who had a head CT were less likely to respond (80% vs 91%; P = .008). Conclusions Intravenous migraine therapy reduces PTH pain scores for children presenting within 14 days after mTBI. Further prospective work is needed to determine long-term benefits of acute PTH treatment in the ED. PMID:25676851

  2. Diagnosis and management of migraines and migraine variants.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tomia Palmer

    2015-06-01

    Migraine headache is a neurologic disorder that occurs in 18% of women and 6% of men. Adults and children with mild to moderate migraine headaches seeking acute therapy should be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the efficacy, cost, and decreased side effects. Some children and adults require preventive therapy (those with headaches lasting >12 h, those patients with >4 headaches in 1 month, those with headaches that affect their ability to function). Studies have shown that early treatment with large doses of medication work well for the treatment of moderate to severe migraine headache.

  3. Rofecoxib versus ibuprofen for acute treatment of migraine: a randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Misra, U; Jose, M; Kalita, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Rofecoxib is a potent cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor with a long duration of action. Its role in migraine has not been systematically evaluated. Aim: To study the efficacy of rofecoxib in migraine. Method: In a randomised placebo controlled trial rofecoxib 25 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, and placebo were compared regarding their efficacy in relieving acute migraine attack. Migraine patients with 2–6 attacks per month were recruited. Headache severity, functional disability, and severity of associated symptoms were graded on a 0–3 scale. The primary endpoint was pain relief at two hours. Relief of associated symptoms and sustained pain relief for 24 hours were also noted. Result: One hundred and twenty four patients were randomised into rofecoxib (42), ibuprofen (40), and placebo (42) groups. One hundred and one patients were followed up: 33 on rofecoxib, 35 ibuprofen, and 33 placebo. Patients' ages ranged from 16–62 (mean 31.4) years, and 83 were females. Pain relief at two hours was noted in 45.5% on rofecoxib, 55.6% on ibuprofen, and 9.1% in the placebo group. The associated symptoms at two hours were reduced in 39.4% on rofecoxib, 50% on ibuprofen, and 9.1% in the placebo group. Sustained 24 hour pain relief was noted in 36.4% on rofecoxib, 41% on ibuprofen, and 6.1% in the placebo group. In the ibuprofen group, five patients had abdominal pain but there were no side effects in those on rofecoxib or in the control group. Both rofecoxib and ibuprofen were significantly effective in relieving pain, associated symptoms at two hours, and in sustained pain relief. There was no significant difference between rofecoxib and ibuprofen in aborting acute migraine attacks. Conclusions: Both ibuprofen and rofecoxib were superior to placebo in aborting an acute migraine attack, and there was no significant difference in their efficacy in an acute migraine attack. PMID:15579612

  4. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  5. [Migraine variants and unusual types of migraine in childhood].

    PubMed

    Gaul, C; Kraya, T; Holle, D; Benkel-Herrenbrück, I; Schara, U; Ebinger, F

    2011-04-01

    Migraine is a frequent primary headache disorder in children and adolescents. Most of the young sufferers of migraine describe typical migraine symptoms but sometimes rare forms of migraine variants and unusual types of migraine occur in children and adolescents. These childhood periodic syndromes are common precursors of migraine. Phenotypes are alternating hemiplegia of childhood, benign paroxysmal torticollis, benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood, alternating hemiplegia in childhood, Alice in Wonderland syndrome, cyclic vomiting syndrome, acute confusional migraine and abdominal migraine. PMID:21431964

  6. Female-targeted drug therapies may propel migraine DM efforts.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    Julius Caesar, Thomas Jefferson, and even Sigmund Freud had this ailment, and Alice is thought to have described it in Wonderland. But make no mistake, migraine headaches are not the stuff of fairy tales for the 45 million migraine sufferers of the disabling and costly disorder. Here are the disease management guidelines you need to reduce migraine-related expense and minimize your patient's pain.

  7. Female-targeted drug therapies may propel migraine DM efforts.

    PubMed

    1998-02-01

    Julius Caesar, Thomas Jefferson, and even Sigmund Freud had this ailment, and Alice is thought to have described it in Wonderland. But make no mistake, migraine headaches are not the stuff of fairy tales for the 45 million migraine sufferers of the disabling and costly disorder. Here are the disease management guidelines you need to reduce migraine-related expense and minimize your patient's pain. PMID:10178017

  8. Ibuprofen with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rabbie, Roy; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers do not seek professional help, relying instead on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce symptoms commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine efficacy and tolerability of ibuprofen, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 22 April 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered ibuprofen to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and number needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Nine studies (4373 participants, 5223 attacks) compared ibuprofen with placebo or other active comparators; none combined ibuprofen with a self-administered antiemetic. All studies treated attacks with single doses of medication. For ibuprofen 400 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (26% versus 12% with placebo), 2-hour headache relief (57% versus 25%) and 24-hour sustained headache relief (45% versus 19%) were 7.2, 3.2 and 4.0, respectively. For ibuprofen 200 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (20% versus 10%) and 2-hour headache relief (52% versus 37%) were 9.7 and 6.3, respectively. The higher dose was significantly better for 2-hour headache relief than the lower dose. Soluble formulations of ibuprofen 400 mg were better than standard tablets for 1-hour, but not 2-hour headache relief

  9. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Domenico; Tepper, Stewart J

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence. PMID:19337456

  10. High Frequency Migraine Is Associated with Lower Acute Pain Sensitivity and Abnormal Insula Activity Related to Migraine Pain Intensity, Attack Frequency, and Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Moayedi, Massieh; Keaser, Michael L.; Khan, Shariq A.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a pain disorder associated with abnormal brain structure and function, yet the effect of migraine on acute pain processing remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether altered pain-related brain responses and related structural changes are associated with clinical migraine characteristics. Using fMRI and three levels of thermal stimuli (non-painful, mildly painful, and moderately painful), we compared whole-brain activity between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched controls. Although, there were no significant differences in pain thresholds nor in pre-scan pain ratings to mildly painful thermal stimuli, patients did have aberrant suprathreshold nociceptive processing. Brain imaging showed that, compared to controls, patients had reduced activity in pain modulatory regions including left dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and middle temporal cortices and, at a lower-threshold, greater activation in the right mid-insula to moderate pain vs. mild pain. We also found that pain-related activity in the insula was associated with clinical variables in patients, including associations between: bilateral anterior insula and pain catastrophizing (PCS); bilateral anterior insula and contralateral posterior insula and migraine pain intensity; and bilateral posterior insula and migraine frequency at a lower-threshold. PCS and migraine pain intensity were also negatively associated with activity in midline regions including posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed a negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity; FA) and migraine duration in the right mid-insula and a positive correlation between left mid-insula FA and PCS. In sum, while patients showed lower sensitivity to acute noxious stimuli, the neuroimaging findings suggest enhanced nociceptive processing and significantly disrupted modulatory networks, particularly involving the insula, associated with indices

  11. Concordant Occipital and Supraorbital Neurostimulation Therapy for Hemiplegic Migraine; Initial Experience; A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Will, Kelly R.; Conidi, Frank; Bulger, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hemiplegic migraine is a particularly severe form of the disease that often evolves to a debilitating chronic illness that is resistant to commonly available therapies. Peripheral neurostimulation has been found to be a beneficial therapy for some patients among several diagnostic classes of migraine, but its potential has not been specifically evaluated for hemiplegic migraine. Materials and Methods Four patients with hemiplegic migraine were treated with concordant, combined occipital and supraorbital neurostimulation over periods ranging 6–92 months. The clinical indicators followed included assessments of headache frequency and severity, frequency of hemiplegic episodes, functional impairment, medication usage, and patient satisfaction. Results All reported a positive therapeutic response, as their average headache frequency decreased by 92% (30 to 2.5 headache days/month); Visual Analog Score by 44% (9.5 to 5.3); frequency of hemiplegic episodes by 96% (7.5 to 0.25 hemiplegic episodes/month); headache medication usage by 96% (6 to 0.25 daily medications); and Migraine Disability Assessment score by 98% (249 to 6). All were satisfied and would recommend the therapy, and all preferred combined occipital–supraorbital neurostimulation to occipital neurostimulation alone. Conclusions Concordant combined occipital and supraorbital neurostimulation may provide effective therapy for both the pain and motor aura in some patients with hemiplegic migraine. PMID:25688595

  12. Efficacy of parecoxib, sumatriptan, and rizatriptan in the treatment of acute migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Lohse, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    Triptans and analgetic nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs reduce acute pain syndromes in migraine. A further treatment option for an acute headache attack in patients with migraine may be the application of cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitors, as they have anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an oral fast-dissolving tablet of 10 mg of rizatriptan, an intravenous infusion of 40 mg of parecoxib, and a subcutaneous pen injection of sumatriptan (6 mg/0.5 mL) on pain relief in 3 cohorts of patients with episodic migraine. They were treated owing to the acute onset of a pain attack as a case of emergency. They were randomized to treatment with sumatriptan, rizatriptan, or parecoxib. The participants completed a visual analog scale for pain intensity at baseline before the drug administration and then after intervals of 20, 30, 60, and 120 minutes. Rizatriptan, parecoxib, and sumatriptan reduced pain symptoms. Twenty and 30 minutes after drug intake, rizatriptan was more efficacious than parecoxib and sumatriptan, and parecoxib was more effective than sumatriptan. Only a significant difference between rizatriptan and sumatriptan was found after 60 and 120 minutes. This trial demonstrates the effectiveness of a parecoxib infusion in the treatment of acute migraine and that the circumvention of the first pass effect of the liver by rizatriptan may be beneficial for fast pain relief. PMID:21996647

  13. Chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for migraine: a study protocol of a single-blinded placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Tuchin, Peter J; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Migraine affects 15% of the population, and has substantial health and socioeconomic costs. Pharmacological management is first-line treatment. However, acute and/or prophylactic medicine might not be tolerated due to side effects or contraindications. Thus, we aim to assess the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (CSMT) for migraineurs in a single-blinded placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial (RCT). Method and analysis According to the power calculations, 90 participants are needed in the RCT. Participants will be randomised into one of three groups: CSMT, placebo (sham manipulation) and control (usual non-manual management). The RCT consists of three stages: 1 month run-in, 3 months intervention and follow-up analyses at the end of the intervention and 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary end point is migraine frequency, while migraine duration, migraine intensity, headache index (frequency x duration x intensity) and medicine consumption are secondary end points. Primary analysis will assess a change in migraine frequency from baseline to the end of the intervention and follow-up, where the groups CSMT and placebo and CSMT and control will be compared. Owing to two group comparisons, p values below 0.025 will be considered statistically significant. For all secondary end points and analyses, a p value below 0.05 will be used. The results will be presented with the corresponding p values and 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The RCT will follow the clinical trial guidelines from the International Headache Society. The Norwegian Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services have approved the project. Procedure will be conducted according to the declaration of Helsinki. The results will be published at scientific meetings and in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT01741714. PMID:26586317

  14. Management of migraine in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kabbouche, Marielle A; Gilman, Deborah K

    2008-01-01

    Headaches in children and adolescents are still under-diagnosed. 75% of children are affected by primary headache by the age of 15 with 28% fitting the ICHD2 criteria of migraine. Migraine is considered a chronic disorder that can severely impact a child’s daily activities, including schooling and socializing. Early recognition and aggressive therapy, with acute and prophylactic treatments, as well as intensive biobehavioral interventions, are essential to control the migraine attacks and reverse the progression into intractable disabling headache. PMID:18830400

  15. Anthroposophic Therapy for Migraine: A Two-Year Prospective Cohort Study in Routine Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Kienle, Gunver S; Glockmann, Anja; Ziegler, Renatus; Rivoir, Andreas; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Background and Methods: Anthroposophic treatment for migraine is provided by physicians and includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 45 consecutive adult outpatients (89% women) starting anthroposophic treatment for migraine under routine conditions. Main outcomes were Average Migraine Severity (physician and patient ratings 0-10, primary outcome), Symptom Score (patient rating, 0-10), and quality of life (SF-36); main follow-up time point was after six months. Results: The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (67% of patients), eurythmy therapy (38%), art therapy (18%), and rhythmical massage therapy (13%). Median therapy duration was 105 days. In months 0-6, conventional prophylactic antimigraine medications were used by 14% (n=5/36) of evaluable patients. From baseline to six-month follow-up, physician-rated Average Migraine Severity improved by 3.14 points (95% confidence interval 2.40-3.87, p<0.001); patient-rated Average Migraine Severity improved by 2.82 points (2.05-3.64, p<0.001); and Symptom Score improved by 2.32 points (1.68-2.95, p<0.001). In addition, three SF-36 scales (Social Functioning, Bodily Pain, Vitality), the SF-36 Physical Component summary measure, and the SF-36 Health Change item improved significantly. All improvements were maintained at last follow-up after 24 months. Patients not using conventional prophylactic antimigraine medications had improvements similar to the whole cohort. Conclusions: Patients with migraine under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of symptoms and quality of life. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that anthroposophic therapies may be useful in the long-term care of patients with migraine. PMID:21673981

  16. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    PubMed Central

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care. PMID:25709653

  17. Cost-benefit analysis of sumatriptan tablets versus usual therapy for treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Biddle, A K; Shih, Y C; Kwong, W J

    2000-11-01

    We performed a systematic assessment of the costs and benefits of sumatriptan and usual therapy for migraine from society's perspective. A decision tree was constructed with probability estimates based on data from an open-label clinical trial assessing the economic and human impacts of sumatriptan and usual therapy on nursing personnel. Direct medical care costs including costs for drug, physician, and emergency room visits were considered. Benefits were estimated using the human capital approach based on the national average of weekly earnings and productivity loss estimated from a migraine clinical trial. The net benefits of sumatriptan and usual therapy for the treatment of a single migraine attack were estimated to be $50 and $20, respectively. The annual incremental net benefit of sumatriptan over usual therapy was estimated to be $114-540/patient. The price difference was offset by benefits of sumatriptan in reducing use of health care resources and productivity loss. PMID:11079284

  18. [Stress and migraine].

    PubMed

    Radat, F

    2013-05-01

    The link between stress and migraine is complex. In its recent conception, stress is viewed as a transactional process between an individual and his-her environment in which the individual makes a response to an internal or external constraint. This paper reviews the evidence in favor of a relationship between stress and migraine. Many studies show that 50 to 80% of patients report stress as a precipitating factor for their migraine headaches. Many authors have suggested that acute stress can provoke biological modifications lowering the threshold of the individual's susceptibility to a migraine attack. It has also been shown that the incidence of migraine is higher when stress scores are higher in the previous year. This suggests that as well as being a precipitating factor of crisis, stress could also be a precipitating factor of illness in susceptible individuals. Moreover, stress can trigger migraine chronification. This has been shown in many retrospective studies and in one prospective study. Hyperalgesia and central sensitivity to pain induced by chronic stress can partly explain this phenomenon. Many retrospective studies also show that adverse events during childhood, like sexual and physical abuse, are more frequent in migraineurs than non-migraineurs. Nevertheless, there is no prospective study allowing considering a causal link between childhood abuse and migraine in adulthood. Another point that will be tackled is the comorbidity between stress related psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, and migraine. Here again, many studies conducted in huge samples from the general population are convincing. All that leads to propose stress management therapies to migraineurs. Randomized control trials and meta-analyses have shown that relaxation therapies, biofeedback and stress management cognitive behavioral therapies are effective in migraine prophylaxis, above all in children. The use of these therapies is of particular interest in

  19. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination for acute treatment of migraine: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Chaouki K; Couch, James R

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including naproxen and naproxen sodium, are effective yet nonspecific analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, which work for a variety of pain and inflammatory syndromes, including migraine. In migraine, their analgesic effect helps relieve the headache, while their anti-inflammatory effect decreases the neurogenic inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion. This is the hypothesized mechanism by which they prevent the development of central sensitization. Triptans, including sumatriptan, work early in the migraine process at the trigeminovascular unit as agonists of the serotonin receptors (5-HT receptors) 1B and 1D. They block vasoconstriction and block transmission of signals to the trigeminal nucleus and thus prevent peripheral sensitization. Therefore, combining these two drugs is an attractive modality for the abortive treatment of migraine. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination tablet (Treximet® [sumatriptan–naproxen]) proves to be an effective and well tolerated drug that combines these two mechanisms; yet is far from being the ultimate in migraine abortive therapy, and further research remains essential. PMID:20368903

  20. Intranasal Delivery of Chitosan Nanoparticles for Migraine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Neha; Nagaich, Upendra; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of the research was to formulate and evaluate sumatriptan succinate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles for migraine therapy in order to improve its therapeutic effect and reduce dosing frequency. Material and Methods The Taguchi method design of experiments (L9 orthogonal array) was applied to obtain the optimized formulation. The sumatriptan succinate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) were prepared by ionic gelation of chitosan with tripolyphosphate anions (TPP) and Tween 80 as surfactant. Results The CNPs had a mean size of 306.8 ± 3.9 nm, a zeta potential of +28.79 mV, and entrapment efficiency of 75.4 ± 1.1%. The in vitro drug release of chitosan nanoparticles was evaluated in phosphate buffer saline pH 5.5 using goat nasal mucosa and found to be 76.7 ± 1.3% within 28 hours. Discussion The release of the drug from the nanoparticles was anomalous, showing non-Fickian diffusion indicating that drug release is controlled by more than one process i.e. the superposition of both phenomena, a diffusion-controlled as well as a swelling-controlled release. This is clearly due to the characteristics of chitosan which easily dissolves at low pH, thus a nasal pH range of 5.5 ± 0.5 supports it very well. The mechanism of pH-sensitive swelling involves protonation of the amine groups of chitosan at low pH. This protonation leads to chain repulsion, diffusion of protons and counter ions together with water inside the gel, and the dissociation of secondary interactions. Conclusion The results suggest that sumatriptan succinate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles are the most suitable mode of drug delivery for promising therapeutic action. PMID:24106677

  1. Resting-state fMRI study of acute migraine treatment with kinetic oscillation stimulation in nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie-Qiang; Wang, Yanlu; Hallin, Rolf; Juto, Jan-Erik

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic oscillatory stimulation (KOS) in the nasal cavity is a non-invasive cranial nerve stimulation method with promising efficacy for acute migraine and other inflammatory disorders. For a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of KOS treatment, we conducted a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 10 acute migraine patients and 10 normal control subjects during KOS treatment in a 3 T clinical MRI scanner. The fMRI data were first processed using a group independent component analysis (ICA) method and then further analyzed with a voxel-wise 3-way ANOVA modeling and region of interest (ROI) of functional connectivity metrics. All migraine participants were relieved from their acute migraine symptoms after 10-20 min KOS treatment and remained migraine free for 3-6 months. The resting-state fMRI result indicates that migraine patients have altered intrinsic functional activity in the anterior cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and middle/superior temporal gyrus. KOS treatment gave rise to up-regulated intrinsic functional activity for migraine patients in a number of brain regions involving the limbic and primary sensory systems, while down regulating temporally the activity for normal controls in a few brain areas, such as the right dorsal posterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus. The result of this study confirms the efficacy of KOS treatment for relieving acute migraine symptoms and reducing attack frequency. Resting-state fMRI measurements demonstrate that migraine is associated with aberrant intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory systems. KOS in the nasal cavity gives rise to the adjustment of the intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory networks and restores the physiological homeostasis in the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27622142

  2. Management considerations in the treatment of migraine in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matarese, Christine A; Mack, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is common in adolescents. It can significantly reduce quality of life, may contribute to significant school absences, and disrupt social activities. This article will address the clinical presentation, natural history, types, evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis of migraine. Common adolescent lifestyle factors such as stress, irregular mealtimes, and sleep deprivation may exacerbate migraines. Management options are discussed including lifestyle modifications, acute and preventative therapies. Features of chronic daily headache including comorbid conditions, management, and outcome are also addressed. PMID:24600258

  3. Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Subcutaneous administration may be preferable to oral for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using subcutaneous sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Thirty-five studies (9365 participants) compared subcutaneous sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 6 mg dose. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 6 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 2.9, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.1 for pain-free at one and two hours, and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively, and 6.1 for sustained pain-free at 24 hours. Results for the 4 mg and 8 mg doses were similar to the 6 mg dose, with 6 mg significantly better than 4 mg only for pain-free at one hour, and 8 mg significantly better than 6 mg only for headache relief at one hour. There was no evidence of increased migraine relief if a second dose of sumatriptan 6

  4. Rizatriptan wafer--sublingual vs. placebo at the onset of acute migraine.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J A; O'Connor, S

    2000-07-01

    Rizatriptan wafer is a 5HT1B/1D agonist for use in the acute treatment of migraine. It is a freeze-fried formulation, approved for oral administration, which dissolves on the tongue and is swallowed with saliva. In this study the efficacy of sublingually administered rizatriptan 10-mg wafer was evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, out-patient study involving 39 migraineurs. Patients were instructed to treat a migraine at the onset of pain in order to evaluate time of onset of pain relief and pain relief at 1 h. The average time to onset of relief was 25 min for patients treated with rizatriptan wafer and 27 min for patients treated with placebo. At 1 h, 50% of the patients receiving rizatriptan wafer and 50% of the patients receiving placebo experienced significant relief. Implications and potential reasons for a high placebo response are discussed.

  5. Association of cinnarizine and betahistine in prophylactic therapy for Ménière's disease with and without migraine.

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Gatti, O; Sykopetrites, V; Quaglieri, S; Benazzo, M; Bussi, M

    2014-10-01

    Prophylactic therapy of Ménière's disease (MD) includes betahistine and calcium-blockers (the latter also useful for migraine prevention). The aim of our work was to assess the efficacy of combined therapy with cinnarizine and betahistine in MD subjects both with and without migraine and poorly responsive to betahistine alone. Fifty-two MD subjects were included who were poorly responsive to betahistine during 6 months of follow-up; 29 were migraineurs. Combined therapy was administered with betahistine 48 mg/day and cinnarizine 20 mg BID for 1 month, 20 mg/day for 2 weeks and 20 mg every 2 days for 2 more weeks, and then repeated. Results were collected over 6 months of follow-up. MD subjects with and without migraine demonstrated a decrease in both vertigo spells and migrainous attacks during combined therapy (from 9.4 to 3.8 and from 6.8 to 5.9 in 6 months, respectively, for vertigo spells, while migraine decreased from 3.8 to 1 in 6 months, respectively). A correlation was seen between decrease of vertigo spells and headaches in the sample of MD subjects with migraine. Our data support a proactive role for cinnarizine in preventing vertigo spells, especially in MD patients with migraine. PMID:25709150

  6. Association of cinnarizine and betahistine in prophylactic therapy for Ménière's disease with and without migraine.

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Gatti, O; Sykopetrites, V; Quaglieri, S; Benazzo, M; Bussi, M

    2014-10-01

    Prophylactic therapy of Ménière's disease (MD) includes betahistine and calcium-blockers (the latter also useful for migraine prevention). The aim of our work was to assess the efficacy of combined therapy with cinnarizine and betahistine in MD subjects both with and without migraine and poorly responsive to betahistine alone. Fifty-two MD subjects were included who were poorly responsive to betahistine during 6 months of follow-up; 29 were migraineurs. Combined therapy was administered with betahistine 48 mg/day and cinnarizine 20 mg BID for 1 month, 20 mg/day for 2 weeks and 20 mg every 2 days for 2 more weeks, and then repeated. Results were collected over 6 months of follow-up. MD subjects with and without migraine demonstrated a decrease in both vertigo spells and migrainous attacks during combined therapy (from 9.4 to 3.8 and from 6.8 to 5.9 in 6 months, respectively, for vertigo spells, while migraine decreased from 3.8 to 1 in 6 months, respectively). A correlation was seen between decrease of vertigo spells and headaches in the sample of MD subjects with migraine. Our data support a proactive role for cinnarizine in preventing vertigo spells, especially in MD patients with migraine.

  7. SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) in adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Amy E; Gillan, Eileen; DiMario, Francis Joseph

    2014-03-01

    SMART syndrome (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic findings in patients following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. Little is known about the mechanisms behind the disorder, making successful treatment challenging. We report 2 new cases of SMART syndrome in pediatric patients as well as review all documented cases of the syndrome. Each of our 2 pediatric patients suffered multiple episodes. Attacks were characterized by severe headache, visual disturbance, aphasia, and weakness. Recovery occurred over several days to weeks. The data from all documented reports of SMART syndrome indicate a greater prevalence for male gender. An age-dependent pattern of onset was also observed, with a greater variability of syndrome onset in patients who received cranial irradiation at a younger age. SMART appears to be a reversible, recurrent long-term complication of radiation therapy with possible age- and gender-related influences.

  8. A review of the pharmacoeconomics of eletriptan for the acute treatment of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Bhambri, Rahul; Mardekian, Jack; Liu, Larry Z; Schweizer, Edward; Ramos, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a commonly occurring, chronic disorder that can cause significant disability. Eletriptan, a selective serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 1 receptor subtype B/D (5-HT1B/1D) agonist, is a clinically effective treatment for moderate to severe migraine. The objective of this literature review was to summarize the available data on the pharmacoeconomics of eletriptan relative to other triptans. Articles meeting the following three criteria were included in the review: 1) contained pharmacoeconomic data on a marketed dose of eletriptan; 2) included data on at least one other comparator triptan; and 3) was in English. A MEDLINE® search yielded a total of eight studies (from the European Union [n=5] and from the USA [n=3]) across multiple regions. Seven of the studies examined the pharmacoeconomics of eletriptan relative to other triptans, and a further study examined the health care costs of eletriptan 40 mg versus sumatriptan 100 mg. Eletriptan 40 mg was among a group of triptans, including rizatriptan 10 mg and almotriptan 12.5 mg, demonstrating the greatest cost-effectiveness. This result held across different definitions of efficacy (2 hours pain-free, sustained pain-free, and sustained pain-free with no adverse events) and also held when cost-effectiveness models accounted for second doses and use of rescue medication, management of adverse events, and productivity loss, in addition to drug acquisition costs. Only limited head-to-head comparator data were available. The majority of pharmacoeconomic studies utilized the same set of efficacy and/or tolerability data, and indirect costs were rarely included despite the fact that the majority of per capita migraine costs are attributable to indirect costs. In summary, although the market is now dominated by generics, eletriptan 40 mg is among the most clinically and cost-effective oral triptans available for the management of acute migraine. Increased effectiveness/efficacy of eletriptan may necessitate a lesser

  9. Eletriptan: a review of its use in the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L; Keating, Gillian M

    2006-01-01

    Eletriptan (Relpax) is an orally administered, lipophilic, highly selective serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist ('triptan') that is effective in the acute treatment of moderate to severe migraine attacks in adults. It has a rapid onset of action and demonstrates superiority over placebo as early as 30 minutes after the administration of a single 40 or 80 mg oral dose. The efficacy of eletriptan 20 mg was similar to that of sumatriptan 100 mg, while eletriptan 40 and 80 mg displayed greater efficacy than sumatriptan 50 or 100 mg for most endpoints. Eletriptan 40 mg was generally superior to naratriptan 2.5 mg and equivalent to almotriptan 12.5 mg, rizatriptan 10 mg and zolmitriptan 2.5 mg, while eletriptan 80 mg was superior to zolmitriptan 2.5 mg for most efficacy parameters. Eletriptan 40 and 80 mg were consistently superior to ergotamine/caffeine. Eletriptan is generally well tolerated, reduces time lost from normal activities, improves patients' health-related quality of life and appears to be at least as, if not more, cost effective than sumatriptan. Eletriptan is therefore a useful addition to the triptan family and a first-line treatment option in the acute management of migraine attacks. PMID:16789799

  10. Response to Ayurvedic therapy in the treatment of migraine without aura.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Prakash Balendu; Vaidya, Babu S R; Vaidya, Sureshkumar K

    2010-01-01

    Migraine patients who do not respond to conventional therapy, develop unacceptable side-effects, or are reluctant to take medicines resort to complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). Globally, patients have been seeking various non-conventional modes of therapy for the management of their headaches. An Ayurvedic Treatment Protocol (AyTP) comprising five Ayurvedic medicines, namely Narikel Lavan, Sootshekhar Rasa, Sitopaladi Churna, Rason Vati and Godanti Mishran along with regulated diet and lifestyle modifications such as minimum 8 h sleep, 30-60 min morning or evening walk and abstention from smoking/drinking, was tried for migraine treatment. The duration of the therapy was 90 days. Out of 406 migraine patients who were offered this AyTP, 204 patients completed 90 days of treatment. Complete disappearance of headache and associated symptoms at completion of AyTP was observed in 72 (35.2%); mild episode of headache without need of any conventional medicines in 72 (35.2%); low intensity of pain along with conventional medicines in 50 (24.5%); no improvement in seven (3.4%) and worst pain was noted in three (1.4%) patients, respectively. In 144 (70.5%) of patients marked reduction of migraine frequency and pain intensity observed may be because of the AyTP. Though the uncontrolled open-label design of this study does not allow us to draw a definite conclusion, from this observational study we can make a preliminary assessment regarding the effectiveness of this ayurvedic treatment protocol. PMID:20532095

  11. Response to Ayurvedic therapy in the treatment of migraine without aura

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Prakash Balendu; Vaidya, Babu S. R.; Vaidya, Sureshkumar K.

    2010-01-01

    Migraine patients who do not respond to conventional therapy, develop unacceptable side-effects, or are reluctant to take medicines resort to complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). Globally, patients have been seeking various non-conventional modes of therapy for the management of their headaches. An Ayurvedic Treatment Protocol (AyTP) comprising five Ayurvedic medicines, namely Narikel Lavan, Sootshekhar Rasa, Sitopaladi Churna, Rason Vati and Godanti Mishran along with regulated diet and lifestyle modifications such as minimum 8 h sleep, 30-60 min morning or evening walk and abstention from smoking/drinking, was tried for migraine treatment. The duration of the therapy was 90 days. Out of 406 migraine patients who were offered this AyTP, 204 patients completed 90 days of treatment. Complete disappearance of headache and associated symptoms at completion of AyTP was observed in 72 (35.2%); mild episode of headache without need of any conventional medicines in 72 (35.2%); low intensity of pain along with conventional medicines in 50 (24.5%); no improvement in seven (3.4%) and worst pain was noted in three (1.4%) patients, respectively. In 144 (70.5%) of patients marked reduction of migraine frequency and pain intensity observed may be because of the AyTP. Though the uncontrolled open-label design of this study does not allow us to draw a definite conclusion, from this observational study we can make a preliminary assessment regarding the effectiveness of this ayurvedic treatment protocol. PMID:20532095

  12. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    von Brevern, M; Lempert, T

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades a new vestibular syndrome has emerged that is now termed vestibular migraine (VM). The main body of evidence for VM is provided by epidemiologic data demonstrating a strong association between migraine and vestibular symptoms. Today, VM is recognized as one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. The clinical presentation of VM is heterogeneous in terms of vestibular symptoms, duration of episodes, and association with migrainous accompaniments. Similar to migraine, there is no clinical or laboratory confirmation for VM and the diagnosis relies on the history and the exclusion of other disorders. Recently, diagnostic criteria for VM have been elaborated jointly by the International Headache Society and the Bárány Society. Clinical examination of patients with acute VM has clarified that the vast majority of patients with VM suffer from central vestibular dysfunction. Findings in the interval may yield mild signs of damage to both the central vestibular and ocular motor system and to the inner ear. These interictal clinical signs are not specific to VM but can be also observed in migraineurs without a history of vestibular symptoms. How migraine affects the vestibular system is still a matter of speculation. In the absence of high-quality therapeutic trials, treatment is targeted at the underlying migraine. PMID:27638080

  13. Frovatriptan: a review of its use in the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Frovatriptan (Migard®; Frova®) is an orally administered triptan approved for the acute treatment of adults with migraine, with or without aura. This article reviews the pharmacology of frovatriptan, focusing on its efficacy and tolerability. The precise mechanism of action of frovatriptan is unknown, but is thought to stem from agonism at serotonin 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, resulting in inhibition of intracranial and extracerebral artery vasodilation, along with possible anti-inflammatory and pain inhibiting effects. Frovatriptan appears to be functionally selective for 5-HT receptors in human basilar arteries over coronary arteries, which could translate into a low cardiovascular risk. In contrast to other triptans, frovatriptan has a long terminal elimination half-life in blood of ≈26 hours, which can be expected to be associated with a sustained treatment effect. Oral frovatriptan 2.5 mg was efficacious in patients with moderate to severe migraine attacks; in randomized, double-blind trials the proportion of patients with headache response at 2 hours (primary endpoint) was consistently significantly higher in frovatriptan than placebo groups. Frovatriptan was generally well tolerated in short-term clinical trials and when used over the longer term. The most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events occurring at a frequency ≥1% higher in frovatriptan than placebo recipients were dizziness, fatigue, headache, paraesthesia, flushing, skeletal pain, hot or cold sensation, dry mouth, chest pain and dyspepsia. In a study in patients with coronary artery disease, or who were at high risk of coronary artery disease, there was no increase over placebo in the occurrence of clinically significant ECG changes or in cardiac rhythm disturbances. In a further trial, frovatriptan administered early in a migraine attack was more efficacious than placebo followed by later administration of frovatriptan as pain progressed. Three crossover trials compared early

  14. Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Seng, Elizabeth K; Rains, Jeanetta A; Nicholson, Robert A; Lipton, Richard B

    2015-06-01

    Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

  15. [Psychosomatic approach for chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    From psychosomatic view point, the psychological or social stresses and depressive or anxiety disorders are very important factors in the course and the maintenance for migraine patients. These factors are very complex, and often lead the migraine becoming chronic. In the psychosomatic approach, not only the physical assessment for chronic migraine but also the assessments for stress and mental states are done. As the psychosomatic therapies for chronic migraine, autogenic training, biofeedback therapy and cognitive therapy are effective. PMID:22277516

  16. Evaluation of Ocular Side Effects in the Patients on Topiramate Therapy for Control of Migrainous Headache

    PubMed Central

    Hesami, Omid; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Moghaddam, Nahid Beladi; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Mokhtari, Sara; Fakhraee, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Topiramate, a sulfa-derivative monosaccharide, is an antiepileptic drug which is administered in the control of migraine. It is reported to cause various ocular side effects such as visual field defect and myopic shift. To investigate the alterations in refractive error, properties of the cornea and changes in the anterior chamber in patients that receive Topiramate for migraine control. Materials and Methods This is a hospital-based, non-interventional, observational study that is conducted at Imam Hossein Hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Neurology, in collaboration with the department of Ophthalmology. Thirty three consecutive patients with the diagnosis of migraine that were candidate for Topiramate therapy were recruited. Patients with history of ocular trauma or surgery, keratoconus, glaucoma, congenital ocular malformations and any history of unexplained visual loss were excluded. After thorough ophthalmic examination, all the patients underwent central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement, and Pentacam imaging (Scheimpflug camera) at the baseline. Various parameters were extracted and used for analysis. Anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and anterior chamber angle (ACA) measurement was performed. These measurements were repeated on day 30th and 90th after the initiation of Topiramate therapy. According to the normality tests, parameters with normal distribution were analysed using the repeated measures test and the remaining parameters (with non-normal distribution) were analysed using the non-parametric k-sample test. A p-value< 0.05 was considered statistically significant, according to Bonferroni post hoc correction. Results There were 66 eyes of 33 patients under the diagnosis of migrainous headache, that Topiramate was initiated for headache control, included in the study. The mean value of refractive error had a statistically significant myopic change, from −0

  17. Bilateral occipital lobe infarction in acute migraine: clinical, neurophysiological, and neuroradiological study.

    PubMed

    Ganji, S; Williams, W; Furlow, J

    1992-07-01

    A woman having common migraine attacks coincident with an asymmetrical bilateral occipital lobe infarction that spared the brainstem and cerebellum underwent these studies: serial electroencephalography, brainstem auditory, visual and somatosensory evoked potentials, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebral arteriography. The patient's vision improved greatly during a one-year follow-up. The absence of risk factors for stroke suggested that migraine caused the infarction in the posterior circulation network. The pathophysiological mechanisms of stroke in migraine remains speculative.

  18. Fixed combination of cinnarizine and dimenhydrinate in the prophylactic therapy of vestibular migraine: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Colombo, B; Gatti, O; Comi, G; Bussi, M

    2015-10-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most frequent causes of episodic vertigo, with a lifetime prevalence of 0.98%. Prophylactic therapy includes calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants. We studied the association of cinnarizine 20 mg and dimenhydrinate 40 mg (Arlevertan) in a group of 22 patients affected by definite VM. Proposed therapy included one tablet twice a day for 1 month, which was repeated three times with 1 month of interval between drug intake; results were compared with those of a control group of 11 VM patients who asked to observe only lifestyle measures for migraine. The main outcome was the number of vertigo and headache crises in the 6 months before therapy and in the 6 months of follow-up. Subjects performing Arlevertan presented during the 6 months of therapy a decrease of vertigo attacks from 5.3 to 2.1 and of headaches from 4.3 to 1.7 (p < 0.0001); 68% of these subjects reported a decrease of at least 50% of vertigo attacks, while 63% of headaches. Conversely, vertigo attacks decreased from 3.5 to 2.2 and headaches from 2.6 to 2 in patients observing only lifestyle; 18% of these subjects reported a decrease of at least 50% of vertigo crises and 27% of headaches. Our data do not differ from those of previous works assessing efficacy of different prophylactic therapies for VM and reporting consistent reduction of vertigo spells in a rate of patients ranging from 60 and 80%. PMID:26037548

  19. How transparent are migraine clinical trials?

    PubMed Central

    Dufka, Faustine L.; Dworkin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Transparency in research requires public access to unbiased information prior to trial initiation and openly available results upon study completion. The Repository of Registered Migraine Trials is a global snapshot of registered migraine clinical trials and scorecard of results availability via the peer-reviewed literature, registry databases, and gray literature. The 295 unique clinical trials identified employed 447 investigational agents, with 30% of 154 acute migraine trials and 11% of 141 migraine prophylaxis trials testing combinations of agents. The most frequently studied categories in acute migraine trials were triptans, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiemetics, calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists, and acetaminophen. Migraine prophylaxis trials frequently studied anticonvulsants, β-blockers, complementary/alternative therapies, antidepressants, and botulinum toxin. Overall, 237 trials were eligible for a results search. Of 163 trials completed at least 12 months earlier, 57% had peer-reviewed literature results, and registries/gray literature added another 13%. Using logistic regression analysis, studies with a sample size below the median of 141 subjects were significantly less likely to have results, but the dominant factor associated with availability of results was time since study completion. In unadjusted models, trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov and trials with industry primary sponsorship were significantly more likely to have results. Recently completed trials rarely have publicly available results; 2 years after completion, the peer-reviewed literature contains results for fewer than 60% of completed migraine trials. To avoid bias, evidence-based therapy algorithms should consider factors affecting results availability. As negative trials are less likely to be published, special caution should be exercised before recommending a therapy with a high proportion of missing trial results. PMID:25194013

  20. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  1. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  2. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  3. Caffeine and Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Google+ Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Caffeine and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their Relationship to Migraine Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache ...

  4. Refractory chronic migraine: is drug withdrawal necessary before starting a therapy with onabotulinum toxin type A?

    PubMed

    Butera, Calogera; Colombo, Bruno; Bianchi, Francesca; Cursi, Marco; Messina, Roberta; Amadio, Stefano; Guerriero, Roberta; Comi, Giancarlo; Del Carro, Ubaldo

    2016-10-01

    Onabotulinum toxin A (BT-A) is now one of the authorized prophylaxis treatments for chronic migraine (CM) thanks to previous clinical trials, which usually required a pharmacologic washout as a precondition for demonstrating its efficacy. Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy in daily clinical practice of BT-A injections in refractory CM patients, regardless of medication overuse without any standardized withdrawal protocol and without stopping the ongoing prophylaxis treatment as well. We treated 44 refractory CM patients (37 females and 7 males) trimonthly without any modification in symptomatic, or prophylactic drug therapy. Main efficacy variables included number of headache, or migraine days and episodes, total cumulative headache hours, MIDAS and HIT-6 scores; all items were assessed at baseline and at the 12-, 24-, and 36-week follow-up. All variables showed a statistically significant improvement at week 36. In general, more than 50 % of patients had a good clinical outcome (including all improved patients, either partial or full responder) and that the percentage of drug abuser patients significantly decreased from 75 to 50 %, thanks to a spontaneous reduction of the symptomatic drug intake. Adverse events were uncommon and did not require treatment discontinuation. Onabotulinum toxin A treatment in refractory CM patients with unsatisfactory prophylactic drug treatments and pharmacological abuse is effective in improving clinical outcome and quality of life. This result may be achieved through a flexible pharmacologic approach tailored to each patient's needs; moreover, the patient himself can be often expected to reduce drug consumption spontaneously.

  5. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  6. Acute oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Fazal; Campbell, Ian Allen

    2004-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is a central part of our clinical practice and is widely used in many pulmonary and non-pulmonary conditions worldwide but it is sometimes used unnecessarily and can be harmful. Optimum use is not only important for patient care but is also sound fiscally because of the expense of oxygen and the cost of devices utilised. This article is aimed both at reviewing available research and guidelines for the use of oxygen and providing knowledge of different administering and monitoring devices and equipment. Various hospital based audits have shown oxygen as being poorly prescribed and inappropriately administered and it is important for everyone involved in patient care to understand the basics of oxygen therapy before optimum practice can be implemented and followed. PMID:15225466

  7. Migraine madness: recurrent psychosis after migraine.

    PubMed

    Fuller, G N; Marshall, A; Flint, J; Lewis, S; Wise, R J

    1993-04-01

    A 69 year old man with longstanding migraine with aura had four episodes of psychosis lasting 7-28 days during a 17 year period. During attacks he had formed visual hallucination and delusions, including reduplicative paramnesia. His mother was similarly affected. His EEG showed symmetrical frontal delta waves. The time course and EEG changes are similar to acute confusional migraine. The reduplicative paramnesia suggests a focal non-dominant hemisphere dysfunction.

  8. Migraine madness: recurrent psychosis after migraine.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, G N; Marshall, A; Flint, J; Lewis, S; Wise, R J

    1993-01-01

    A 69 year old man with longstanding migraine with aura had four episodes of psychosis lasting 7-28 days during a 17 year period. During attacks he had formed visual hallucination and delusions, including reduplicative paramnesia. His mother was similarly affected. His EEG showed symmetrical frontal delta waves. The time course and EEG changes are similar to acute confusional migraine. The reduplicative paramnesia suggests a focal non-dominant hemisphere dysfunction. PMID:8482964

  9. Migraine in Children: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Tabassum, S; Rahman, S M; Akhter, S; Rahman, M M; Bayes, F; Roy, S

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent headache is common in children. Among them migraine is the most common disabling cause of primary headache. It causes serious disability in child's life and family. It causes negative impact on their quality of life. Clinical characteristic of migraine in children differ from adult. It may be shorter in duration and bifrontal or bitemporal in location in contrast to adult which is longer in duration and usually unilateral. It is less common before 3 years of age. Males are more affected before puberty. But after puberty females are predominantly affected. Intensity of pain is moderate to severe. There are some triggering factors. Positive family history usually present. Disability can be assessed by PedMIDAS scale in children and adolescents which is modified version of MIDAS scale for adult. Diagnosis of migraine usually clinical but evaluation should be done to exclude severe underlying secondary cause. Management consists of pharmacological and non pharmacological approach. Parental education, life style modification is the mainstay of management. Acute treatment consists of Acetaminophen, NSAIDs and Triptans. Among Triptans, Sumatriptan nasal spray is only found effective for children. Preventive therapy aims to decrease frequency and severity of headache. Flunarizine, Propranolol, Amitryptylline, Levetiracetam, Valproate, Topiramate are found effective in pediatric age group. Pediatrician should evaluate the child to exclude secondary cause of headache when indicated. They should have also proper knowledge and skills to manage a child having migraine to improve their quality of life and academic achievement. PMID:27612914

  10. Eletriptan in the management of acute migraine: an update on the evidence for efficacy, safety, and consistent response

    PubMed Central

    Capi, Matilde; Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; de Andrés, Fernando; Gentile, Giovanna; Negro, Andrea; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a multifactorial, neurological and disabling disorder, also characterized by several autonomic symptoms. Triptans, selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonists, are the first-line treatment option for moderate-to-severe headache attacks. In this paper, we review the recent data on eletriptan clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and potential clinically relevant interactions with other drugs. Among triptans, eletriptan shows a consistent and significant clinical efficacy and a good tolerability profile in the treatment of migraine, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors without coronary artery disease. It shows the most favorable clinical response, together with sumatriptan injections, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan. Additionally, eletriptan shows the most complex pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile compared with the other triptans. It is metabolized primarily by the CYP3A4 hepatic enzyme and therefore the concomitant administration of CYP3A4-potent inhibitors should be carefully evaluated. A relatively low risk of serotonin syndrome is given by the co-administration with serotoninergic drugs. No clinically relevant interaction has been found with drugs used for migraine prophylactic treatment or other acute drugs, with the exception of ergot derivatives that should not be co-administered with eletriptan. PMID:27582896

  11. Eletriptan in the management of acute migraine: an update on the evidence for efficacy, safety, and consistent response.

    PubMed

    Capi, Matilde; Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; de Andrés, Fernando; Gentile, Giovanna; Negro, Andrea; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Migraine is a multifactorial, neurological and disabling disorder, also characterized by several autonomic symptoms. Triptans, selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonists, are the first-line treatment option for moderate-to-severe headache attacks. In this paper, we review the recent data on eletriptan clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and potential clinically relevant interactions with other drugs. Among triptans, eletriptan shows a consistent and significant clinical efficacy and a good tolerability profile in the treatment of migraine, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors without coronary artery disease. It shows the most favorable clinical response, together with sumatriptan injections, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan. Additionally, eletriptan shows the most complex pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile compared with the other triptans. It is metabolized primarily by the CYP3A4 hepatic enzyme and therefore the concomitant administration of CYP3A4-potent inhibitors should be carefully evaluated. A relatively low risk of serotonin syndrome is given by the co-administration with serotoninergic drugs. No clinically relevant interaction has been found with drugs used for migraine prophylactic treatment or other acute drugs, with the exception of ergot derivatives that should not be co-administered with eletriptan. PMID:27582896

  12. Chronic migraine: risk factors, mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    May, Arne; Schulte, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic migraine has a great detrimental influence on a patient's life, with a severe impact on socioeconomic functioning and quality of life. Chronic migraine affects 1-2% of the general population, and about 8% of patients with migraine; it usually develops from episodic migraine at an annual conversion rate of about 3%. The chronification is reversible: about 26% of patients with chronic migraine go into remission within 2 years of chronification. The most important modifiable risk factors for chronic migraine include overuse of acute migraine medication, ineffective acute treatment, obesity, depression and stressful life events. Moreover, age, female sex and low educational status increase the risk of chronic migraine. The pathophysiology of migraine chronification can be understood as a threshold problem: certain predisposing factors, combined with frequent headache pain, lower the threshold of migraine attacks, thereby increasing the risk of chronic migraine. Treatment options include oral medications, nerve blockade with local anaesthetics or corticoids, and neuromodulation. Well-defined diagnostic criteria are crucial for the identification of chronic migraine. The International Headache Society classification of chronic migraine was recently updated, and now allows co-diagnosis of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache. This Review provides an up-to-date overview of the classification of chronic migraine, basic mechanisms and risk factors of migraine chronification, and the currently established treatment options. PMID:27389092

  13. Migraine - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation -- www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation -- www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  14. Refractory chronic migraine: is drug withdrawal necessary before starting a therapy with onabotulinum toxin type A?

    PubMed

    Butera, Calogera; Colombo, Bruno; Bianchi, Francesca; Cursi, Marco; Messina, Roberta; Amadio, Stefano; Guerriero, Roberta; Comi, Giancarlo; Del Carro, Ubaldo

    2016-10-01

    Onabotulinum toxin A (BT-A) is now one of the authorized prophylaxis treatments for chronic migraine (CM) thanks to previous clinical trials, which usually required a pharmacologic washout as a precondition for demonstrating its efficacy. Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy in daily clinical practice of BT-A injections in refractory CM patients, regardless of medication overuse without any standardized withdrawal protocol and without stopping the ongoing prophylaxis treatment as well. We treated 44 refractory CM patients (37 females and 7 males) trimonthly without any modification in symptomatic, or prophylactic drug therapy. Main efficacy variables included number of headache, or migraine days and episodes, total cumulative headache hours, MIDAS and HIT-6 scores; all items were assessed at baseline and at the 12-, 24-, and 36-week follow-up. All variables showed a statistically significant improvement at week 36. In general, more than 50 % of patients had a good clinical outcome (including all improved patients, either partial or full responder) and that the percentage of drug abuser patients significantly decreased from 75 to 50 %, thanks to a spontaneous reduction of the symptomatic drug intake. Adverse events were uncommon and did not require treatment discontinuation. Onabotulinum toxin A treatment in refractory CM patients with unsatisfactory prophylactic drug treatments and pharmacological abuse is effective in improving clinical outcome and quality of life. This result may be achieved through a flexible pharmacologic approach tailored to each patient's needs; moreover, the patient himself can be often expected to reduce drug consumption spontaneously. PMID:27395386

  15. Profiles of 5-HT 1B/1D agonists in acute migraine with special reference to second generation agents.

    PubMed

    Deleu, D; Hanssens, Y

    1999-06-01

    The efficacy of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D (5-HT 1B/1D) agonists is related to their inhibitory effects on neurogenic inflammation, mediated through serotoninergic control mechanisms. Recently, a series of oral second generation 5-HT 1B/1D agonists (eletriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan and zolmitriptan) have been developed and are reviewed in this paper. Their in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties, clinical efficacy, drug interactions, and adverse effects are evaluated and compared to the gold standard in the treatment of acute migraine, sumatriptan. PMID:10427351

  16. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated.

  17. Guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Pryse-Phillips, W E; Dodick, D W; Edmeads, J G; Gawel, M J; Nelson, R F; Purdy, R A; Robinson, G; Stirling, D; Worthington, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide physicians and allied health care professionals with guidelines for the nonpharmacologic management of migraine in clinical practice. OPTIONS: The full range and quality of nonpharmacologic therapies available for the management of migraine. OUTCOMES: Improvement in the nonpharmacologic management of migraine. EVIDENCE AND VALUES: The creation of the guidelines followed a needs assessment by members of the Canadian Headache Society and included a statement of objectives; development of guidelines by multidisciplinary working groups using information from literature reviews and other resources; comparison of alternative clinical pathways and description of how published data were analysed; definition of the level of evidence for data in each case; evaluation and revision of the guidelines at a consensus conference held in Ottawa on Oct. 27-29, 1995; redrafting and insertion of tables showing key variables and data from various studies and tables of data with recommendations; and reassessment by all conference participants. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Augmentation of the use of nonpharmacologic therapies for the acute and prophylactic management of migraine is likely to lead to substantial benefits in both human and economic terms. RECOMMENDATIONS: Both the avoidance of migraine trigger factors and the use of nonpharmacologic therapies have a part to play in overall migraine management. VALIDATION: The guidelines are based on consensus of Canadian experts in neurology, emergency medicine, psychiatry, psychology and family medicine, and consumers. Previous guidelines did not exist. Field testing of the guidelines is in progress. PMID:9679487

  18. Advances in migraine management: implications for managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Dodick, David W; Lipsy, Robert J

    2004-05-01

    Migraine headache is a disabling disease that poses a significant societal burden. Stratified care and early intervention are current strategies for migraine management. It has been shown that early treatment with triptans in select patients can improve treatment outcomes. Triptans are selective 5-HT receptor agonists that are specific and effective treatments in the management of migraine, and they meet the acute treatment goal of rapid relief with minimal side effects. Triptans are associated with improved quality of life. Factors such as speed of onset, need for a second triptan dose, and patient satisfaction should be considered in the selection of a specific triptan treatment. Appropriate treatment can decrease costs. The patient's migraine history and response to prior therapy should be considered when selecting acute treatment. Cost-effectiveness models can be used to understand the effect of treatment choices on health care budgets. The direct cost per migraine episode, driven primarily by the need for rescue medications, is important to include in economic models. All aspects of effectiveness (efficacy, tolerability, and cost) should be considered to reduce overall managed care expenditures for migraine treatment. The improved clinical profiles of the triptans provide substantial value to managed care organizations.

  19. Altered cognition-related brain activity and interactions with acute pain in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Khan, Shariq A.; Keaser, Michael L.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of migraine on neural cognitive networks. However, cognitive dysfunction is increasingly being recognized as a comorbidity of chronic pain. Pain appears to affect cognitive ability and the function of cognitive networks over time, and decrements in cognitive function can exacerbate affective and sensory components of pain. We investigated differences in cognitive processing and pain–cognition interactions between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched healthy controls using an fMRI block-design with two levels of task difficulty and concurrent heat (painful and not painful) stimuli. Across groups, cognitive networks were recruited in response to a difficult cognitive task, and a pain–task interaction was found in the right (contralateral to pain stimulus) posterior insula (pINS), such that activity was modulated by decreasing the thermal pain stimulus or by engaging the difficult cognitive task. Migraine patients had less task-related deactivation within the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) compared to controls. These regions have been reported to have decreased cortical thickness and cognitive-related deactivation within other pain populations, and are also associated with pain regulation, suggesting that the current findings may reflect altered cognitive function and top-down regulation of pain. During pain conditions, patients had decreased task-related activity, but more widespread task-related reductions in pain-related activity, compared to controls, suggesting cognitive resources may be diverted from task-related to pain-reduction-related processes in migraine. Overall, these findings suggest that migraine is associated with altered cognitive-related neural activity, which may reflect altered pain regulatory processes as well as broader functional restructuring. PMID:25610798

  20. Recent advances in the acute management of migraine and cluster headaches.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K L

    1994-06-01

    I have discussed the pharmacokinetics, efficacies, and side effects of the various nonnarcotic drugs available for the treatment of patients who have headache. Sumatriptan, the newest one, is expensive but may be cost-effective for those who have failed traditional migraine treatment, who visit the ER frequently, who have potential for drug abuse, or who have to miss time from school or work due to the headache. Studies are in progress to compare sumatriptan with other available drugs such as DHE-45 and to determine its possible role in the prophylaxis of migraine. A new 5-HT1D receptor agonist with more efficacy and fewer side effects may be developed in the future. When sumatriptan and DHE-45 are contraindicated due to hypertension or coronary artery disease, other drugs such as metoclopramide, ketorolac, and butorphanol can be used as alternatives.

  1. Primary Headache Disorders: Focus on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling headache disorder. Most patients with disabling tension-type headache are likely to have migraine and accordingly respond to treatments efficacious in migraine. Individuals are genetically predisposed to experiencing recurrent migraine. Evidence supports migraine to be a primarily neural and not vascular mediated disorder. 1–2% of the population have chronic daily headache associated with acute-relief medication overuse; the majority are migraineurs. The presence of acute-relief medication overuse renders preventative medication less adequately efficacious. PMID:26525886

  2. Abnormal movements in children with migraine.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Paul E; Mack, Kenneth J

    2015-03-01

    The cause and treatment of functional movement disorders and nonepileptic spells in children is poorly understood, and an association with migraine has not previously been reported. We retrospectively reviewed children diagnosed with chronic or episodic migraine at our institution from 2006 to 2013 to determine the proportion with nonorganic movement disorders, their phenomenology, provoking factors, and natural history. Thirty-two patients were identified, representing 4.3% of patients with chronic migraine and 0.9% of patients with episodic migraine. Twenty-four of the 32 (75%) had chronic migraine, whereas 8 (25%) had episodic migraine. Nonepileptic spells was the most common phenomenon in both cohorts, followed by tremor and functional gait disorders. Severe migraine attacks preceded these movements in the majority of patients. With appropriate migraine therapy, significant reduction or resolution of these movements was reported. We conclude that nonorganic movement disorders are observed in pediatric migraine, are more prevalent among chronic migraineurs, and can resolve with improved pain control.

  3. Therapy of acute gastroenteritis: role of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zollner-Schwetz, I; Krause, R

    2015-08-01

    Acute infectious diarrhoea remains a very common health problem, even in the industrialized world. One of the dilemmas in assessing patients with acute diarrhoea is deciding when to test for aetiological agents and when to initiate antimicrobial therapy. The management and therapy of acute gastroenteritis is discussed in two epidemiological settings: community-acquired diarrhoea and travellers' diarrhoea. Antibiotic therapy is not required in most patients with acute gastroenteritis, because the illness is usually self-limiting. Antimicrobial therapy can also lead to adverse events, and unnecessary treatments add to resistance development. Nevertheless, empirical antimicrobial therapy can be necessary in certain situations, such as patients with febrile diarrhoeal illness, with fever and bloody diarrhoea, symptoms persisting for >1 week, or immunocompromised status.

  4. Migraine mimics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2015-02-01

    The symptoms of migraine are non-specific and can be present in many other primary and secondary headache disorders, which are reviewed. Even experienced headache specialists may be challenged at times when diagnosing what appears to be first or worst, new type, migraine status, and chronic migraine.

  5. [Endoscopic therapy of acute and chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Veltzke-Schlieker, W; Adler, A; Abou-Rebyeh, H; Wiedenmann, B; Rösch, T

    2005-02-01

    Endoscopic therapy is valuable for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Early endoscopic papillotomy appears, in the case of a severe course of acute biliary pancreatitis, to be advantageous. Endoscopic drainage can be considered in cases of acute fluid retention and necrosis as well as subacute, non-healing pancreatitis or cyst development. By acute chronic pancreatitis with strictures or bile duct stones, papillotomy, dilation and stent insertion can lead to an improvement in pain symptoms. An improvement in endo- or exocrine function, however, is not expected. Studies on the endoscopic therapy of pancreatitis are still very limited, and recommendations can usually only be made based on retrospective case series. PMID:15657718

  6. Butterbur extract: prophylactic treatment for childhood migraines.

    PubMed

    Utterback, Gretchann; Zacharias, Rayna; Timraz, Shahrazad; Mershman, Denay

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of migraine headaches in childhood is increasing. Migraines are often difficult to diagnose in pediatrics and even more difficult to treat and prevent. In order to decrease the impact of the condition on the child and the family, prophylactic treatment is recommended if the child is experiencing disabling migraines. The medications currently prescribed for the prevention of pediatric migraines often have significant side effects and are of questionable therapeutic value. For those patients and parents who are interested in alternative therapies and natural remedies for preventive treatment of pediatric migraines, butterbur extract derived from the butterbur plant, Petasites hybridus, has emerged as a promising treatment. This paper discusses the impact of migraines among pediatric patients, the rationale for the preventative treatment of pediatric migraines, the current therapies and the relevance of butterbur extract as a prophylactic treatment for migraines in this patient population.

  7. [Vestibular migraine].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars Juul; Kirchmann, Malene; Friis, Morten

    2015-12-14

    Dizziness caused by migraine, vestibular migraine (VM), has been highly debated over the last three decades. The co-morbidity of migraine and dizziness is higher than a random concurrence. One third of the patients with migraine and dizziness have VM. Recently, The International Headache Society approved VM as a diagnostic entity and the diagnostic criteria for VM appear in the appendix for The International Classification of Headache Disorders. VM is common but often underdiagnosed. Treatment follows migraine management guidelines although evidence is sparse.

  8. Combination of acupuncture and spinal manipulative therapy: management of a 32-year-old patient with chronic tension-type headache and migraine

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsen, Bahia A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment using acupuncture and spinal manipulation for a patient with a chronic tension-type headache and episodic migraines. Clinical Features A 32-year-old woman presented with headaches of 5 months' duration. She had a history of episodic migraine that began in her teens and had been controlled with medication. She had stopped taking the prescription medications because of gastrointestinal symptoms. A neurologist diagnosed her with mixed headaches, some migrainous and some tension type. Her headaches were chronic, were daily, and fit the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria of a chronic tension-type headache superimposed with migraine. Intervention and Outcome After 5 treatments over a 2-week period (the first using acupuncture only, the next 3 using acupuncture and chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy), her headaches resolved. The patient had no recurrences of headaches in her 1-year follow-up. Conclusion The combination of acupuncture with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy was a reasonable alternative in treating this patient's chronic tension-type headaches superimposed with migraine. PMID:23449932

  9. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zhou, Jiying; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein, we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments because of hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.

  10. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-03-24

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed.

  11. Evaluation Efficacy of Ferrous Sulfate Therapy on Headaches of 5-15 Years Old Iron Deficient Children with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, R; Zare Bidoki, S; Ordooei, M

    2016-01-01

    Background Some researches have shown the association between iron deficiency and migraine headache in adults. The aim of present study was to evaluate efficacy of ferrous sulfate treatment on migraine headaches of 5-15 years old migraineur children with iron deficiency. Materials and Methods In a quasi- experimental study, monthly frequency, severity, duration and disability of headaches of 5-15 years old migraineur children that prophylactic therapy was indicated in them and had iron deficiency who were referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran between 2013 and 2015 and were treated with 2mg/kg/day topiramate plus 4mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate for three consecutive months, were evaluated and headache characteristics before and after treatment were compared. Results In this study, 98 children with mean age of 9.72±3.19 were evaluated that 31children (31.6%) had iron deficiency. Monthly frequency (22.89±7.18 vs.14.5±4.56, P= 0.02), severity score (8.12± 1.76 vs. 5.03±1.15, P= 0.02) and disability score of headache (38.23±10.7vs. 30.12±7.46, P= 0.03) were more in children with iron deficiency. Iron therapy was effective in decreasing of monthlyfrequency 22.89± 7.18 vs. 10.13±4.51, P = 0.001), severity score (8.12±1.76 vs. 5.11±1.62, P =0.001), duration (2.14±1.23 vs.1.14±1.01, P= 0.001) and disability score of headache (38.23±10.7 vs. 22.87±8.65, P= 0.01). Conclusion In children, iron deficiency increased monthly frequency, severity and disability of migraine headache and ferrous sulfate can be used as a safe and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. PMID:27222700

  12. Emerging drugs for migraine prophylaxis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bigal, Marcelo E; Krymchantowski, Abouch V

    2006-05-04

    Migraine is a chronic neurologic disorder with heterogeneous characteristics resulting in a range of symptom profiles, burden, and disability. Migraine affects nearly 12% of the adult population in occidental countries, imposing considerable economic and social losses. The pharmacologic treatment of migraine includes preventive and acute strategies. A better understanding of the migraine pathophysiology along with the discovery of novel molecular targets has lead to a growing number of upcoming therapeutic proposals. This review focuses on new and emerging agents for the treatment of migraine.

  13. Neurofeedback therapy in patients with acute and chronic pain syndromes--literature review and own experience.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Alicja; Biedroń, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Pain management is based mainly on pharmacotherapy which has many limitations. Non-pharmacological techniques, like neurofeedback (EEG-biofeedback) are alternative methods of pain treatment. Data from literature confirm high efficacy of neurofeedback in pain syndromes treatment, chronic and acute as well. Neurofeedback plays an important role in management of post stroke, post traumatic headaches and in primary headaches like tension type headaches or migraine. Literature review and own experience indicate importance of number and frequency of performed neurofeedback trainings on treatment effectiveness. Satisfactory results have already been observed after 30 trainings however usually 40-60 training have to be performed. Effectiveness of such therapy in pain syndromes is usually good or less often acceptable (50% reduction of headaches). Children with tension type headaches (differently than adults) need reminder therapy every 6-12 months, otherwise recurrence of headaches is observed. Based on our own experience neurofeedback therapy seems to play role in neuropathic pain and cancer pain management.

  14. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  15. Oculomotor ophthalmoplegic migraine: is it really migraine?

    PubMed

    Carlow, Thomas J

    2002-09-01

    Oculomotor ophthalmoplegic migraine is a rare episodic childhood condition in which a unilateral oculomotor palsy is preceded by headache. I describe six new cases that had magnetic resonance imaging signal abnormalities during the acute phase, consisting of a thickened and enhancing ipsilateral oculomotor nerve at its exit from the midbrain. During the quiescent phase, when the headache had resolved, the signal abnormalities were still present but less dramatic. Seventeen similar cases have been previously reported. The pathophysiology may be a trigeminovascular migraine epiphenomenon that is dependent on the unique oculomotor nerve anatomy and porous blood-nerve barrier at the emergence of the oculomotor nerve from the brainstem and the sequelae of demyelination. Early high-dose corticosteroid treatment is recommended to rapidly resolve an acute episode and to potentially prevent permanent abnormal oculomotor nerve signs.

  16. Vitamin supplementation as possible prophylactic treatment against migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common form of headache disorder globally. The etiology of migraine is multifactorial, with genetic components and environmental interactions considered to be the main causal factors. Some researchers postulate that deficits in mitochondrial energy reserves can cause migraine or an increase in homocysteine levels can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, vitamins could play a vital role in migraine prevention. For instance, riboflavin influences mitochondrial dysfunction and prevents migraine. Genes such as flavoenzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), especially the C677T variant, have been associated with elevated plasma levels of homocysteine and migraine with aura. Homocysteine catalyzation requires the presence of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, which can decrease the severity of migraine with aura, making these vitamins potentially useful prophylactic agents for treating migraine with aura. Menstrual migraine, on the other hand, is associated with increased prostaglandin (PG) levels in the endometrium, indicating a role for vitamin E, which is an anti-PG. Vitamin C can also be used as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species for treating neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients. This paper reviews possible therapies based on vitamin supplementation for migraine prophylaxis, focusing on migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of a novel gastrodin derivative as a potential anti-migraine agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Han; Zhao, Li-Xue; Wan, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Xiao-Na; Long, Fang-Yi; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Chu; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder in the brain. An optimal therapy for migraine has not yet been developed. Gastrodin (Gas), the main effective constitute from Gastrodiae Rhizoma (Tianma in Chinese), has been indicated for migraine treatment and prophylaxis more than 30 years, with demonstrated safety. However, Gas is a phenolic glycoside, with relatively low concentrations and weak efficacy in the central nervous system. To develop more effective anti-migraine agents, we synthesized a novel Gas derivative (Gas-D). In the present study, comparative pharmacodynamic evaluations of Gas and Gas-D were performed in a model of nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine in rats and the hot-plate test in mice. Following behavioral testing in this migraine model, external jugular vein blood and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) were collected to analyze plasma nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and c-Fos expression in the TNC. The acute oral toxicity of Gas and Gas-D was also examined. We found that Gas-D had potent anti-migraine effects, likely attributable to inhibition of both trigeminal nerve activation at central sites and the peripheral release of CGRP following NO scavenging. Additionally, Gas-D exerted significant anti-nociceptive effect in response to thermal pain compared with Gas. Furthermore, a single dose of 2.048 g/kg Gas or Gas-D presented no acute oral toxicity in mice. Altogether, the potent anti-migraine and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Gas-D suggest that it might be a potentially novel drug candidate for migraine treatment or prophylaxis. PMID:26704993

  18. Pharmacological characterization of a novel gastrodin derivative as a potential anti-migraine agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Han; Zhao, Li-Xue; Wan, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Xiao-Na; Long, Fang-Yi; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Chu; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder in the brain. An optimal therapy for migraine has not yet been developed. Gastrodin (Gas), the main effective constitute from Gastrodiae Rhizoma (Tianma in Chinese), has been indicated for migraine treatment and prophylaxis more than 30 years, with demonstrated safety. However, Gas is a phenolic glycoside, with relatively low concentrations and weak efficacy in the central nervous system. To develop more effective anti-migraine agents, we synthesized a novel Gas derivative (Gas-D). In the present study, comparative pharmacodynamic evaluations of Gas and Gas-D were performed in a model of nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine in rats and the hot-plate test in mice. Following behavioral testing in this migraine model, external jugular vein blood and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) were collected to analyze plasma nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and c-Fos expression in the TNC. The acute oral toxicity of Gas and Gas-D was also examined. We found that Gas-D had potent anti-migraine effects, likely attributable to inhibition of both trigeminal nerve activation at central sites and the peripheral release of CGRP following NO scavenging. Additionally, Gas-D exerted significant anti-nociceptive effect in response to thermal pain compared with Gas. Furthermore, a single dose of 2.048 g/kg Gas or Gas-D presented no acute oral toxicity in mice. Altogether, the potent anti-migraine and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Gas-D suggest that it might be a potentially novel drug candidate for migraine treatment or prophylaxis.

  19. Rizatriptan in migraine.

    PubMed

    Krymchantowski, Abouch Valenty; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo

    2005-09-01

    The prevalence of migraine is high, affecting a significant proportion of the adult population during their most productive years of life and promoting impairment of their normal daily activities. Although guidelines for the acute treatment of migraine are available, outcome parameters are sometimes still below the expectations of both patients and physicians. Triptans represented an advance in clinical practice and have become the most well-studied class of medication for migraine. These agents present class I evidence for efficacy. However, they differ with regard to several of their clinical parameters, including onset of relief and consistency of response. Rizatriptan is a selective agonist of the 5-hydroxytryptophan(1B/1D )receptors, with proven superiority over placebo, ergotamine and selected oral triptans, demonstrating a good profile of safety and tolerability. PMID:16162083

  20. Migraine and neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Tajti, János; Szok, Délia; Majláth, Zsófia; Tuka, Bernadett; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurovascular primary headache disorder. The pathomechanism is not clear, but extensive preclinical and clinical studies are ongoing. The structural basis of the leading hypothesis is the trigeminovascular system, which includes the trigeminal ganglion, the meningeal vasculature, and the distinct nuclei of the brainstem, the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex. This review covers the effects of sensory (calcitonin gene-related peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and substance P), sympathetic (neuropeptide Y) and parasympathetic (vasoactive intestinal peptide) migraine-related neuropeptides and the functions of somatostatin, nociceptin and the orexins in the trigeminovascular system. These neuropeptides may take part in neurogenic inflammation (plasma protein extravasation and vasodilatation) of the intracranial vasculature and peripheral and central sensitization of the trigeminal system. The results of human clinical studies are discussed with regard to the alterations in these neuropeptides in the plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid during or between migraine attacks, and the therapeutic possibilities involving migraine-related neuropeptides in the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine headache are surveyed.

  1. The diagnosis and treatment of chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling brain disorder. Chronic migraine, a condition characterized by the experience of migrainous headache on at least 15 days per month, is highly disabling. Patients with chronic migraine present to primary care, are often referred for management to secondary care, and make up a large proportion of patients in specialist headache clinics. Many patients with chronic migraine also have medication overuse, defined as using a compound analgesic, opioid, triptan or ergot derivative on at least 10 days per month. All doctors will encounter patients with chronic headaches. A basic working knowledge of the common primary headaches, and a rational manner of approaching the patient with these conditions, allows a specific diagnosis of chronic migraine to be made quickly and safely, and by making this diagnosis one opens up a substantial number of acute and preventive treatment options. This article discusses the current state of management of chronic migraine. PMID:25954496

  2. Lifestyle Factors and Migraine in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Trojsi, Francesca; Tessitore, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common pain symptoms in children. Indeed, a high percentage of adult migraine patients report to have suffered from recurrent headache during the childhood. In particular, children could experience the so-called childhood periodic syndromes (such as cyclic vomiting, abdominal migraine, and benign paroxysmal vertigo) that have been usually considered precursors of migraine or they could develop overt migraine headaches. However, typical cohort of migraine symptoms could be absent and children could not achieve all clinical features necessary for a migraine attack diagnosis according to classification criteria. Nevertheless, migraine is characterized also in childhood by a significant negative impact on the quality of life and a high risk of developing chronic and persistent headache in adulthood. Several studies have emphasized the role of different risk factors for migraine in children. Among these, obesity and overweight, particular food or the regular consumption of alcohol or caffeine, dysfunctional family situation, low level of physical activity, physical or emotional abuse, bullying by peers, unfair treatment in school, and insufficient leisure time seem to be strictly related to migraine onset or progression. Consequently, both identification and avoidance of triggers seem to be mandatory in children with migraine and could represent an alternative approach to the treatment of migraine abstaining from pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26757711

  3. Lifestyle Factors and Migraine in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Trojsi, Francesca; Tessitore, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common pain symptoms in children. Indeed, a high percentage of adult migraine patients report to have suffered from recurrent headache during the childhood. In particular, children could experience the so-called childhood periodic syndromes (such as cyclic vomiting, abdominal migraine, and benign paroxysmal vertigo) that have been usually considered precursors of migraine or they could develop overt migraine headaches. However, typical cohort of migraine symptoms could be absent and children could not achieve all clinical features necessary for a migraine attack diagnosis according to classification criteria. Nevertheless, migraine is characterized also in childhood by a significant negative impact on the quality of life and a high risk of developing chronic and persistent headache in adulthood. Several studies have emphasized the role of different risk factors for migraine in children. Among these, obesity and overweight, particular food or the regular consumption of alcohol or caffeine, dysfunctional family situation, low level of physical activity, physical or emotional abuse, bullying by peers, unfair treatment in school, and insufficient leisure time seem to be strictly related to migraine onset or progression. Consequently, both identification and avoidance of triggers seem to be mandatory in children with migraine and could represent an alternative approach to the treatment of migraine abstaining from pharmacologic therapies.

  4. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Sun-Edelstein, Christina; Rapoport, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is a common and disabling disorder that remains underdiagnosed and poorly treated. Significant unmet therapeutic needs add to the burden of this disorder; even when CM is recognized, effective treatment options are limited and randomized controlled trials supporting the use of various preventive medications are sparse. In this review, we discuss the available options for CM treatment. Currently the only FDA-approved treatment for CM prevention is onabotulinumtoxinA. Two double-blind studies have demonstrated the efficacy of topiramate for CM prevention, but it is not FDA-approved for this indication. Treatments in development for migraine will also be reviewed. Advancements in the understanding of migraine pathogenesis have identified new targets for both acute and preventive treatment and have engendered the development of targeted and mechanism-based therapies. The need for more effective treatment for CM patients, which has long since been identified, is now being addressed. Several of the emerging treatments for migraine prevention are under investigation specifically for CM or high-frequency episodic migraine.

  5. Comparison of the effects of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zencirci, Beyazit

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is defined as a disorder characterized by intermittent headache episodes, accompanied with nausea, photophobia and/or phonophobia. Pharmacological therapy is in accordance with the severity of pain and may include acute, prophylactic and most commonly both approaches. The aim of the acute therapy is stopping or alleviating the attack or progression of the pain and, in case of a migraine attack that has started, lessening the pain. Preventive therapy aims to reduce attack frequency and severity. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of dietary factors in the management and prophylaxis of migraine in cases diagnosed as having migraine disorder according to the 2003-IHS criteria. Fifty consecutive Turkish patients (13 men, 37 women) with diagnosis of migraine were randomly divided into two groups for treatment protocols with the written approval of the ethics committee. The cases in the first group (K) were treated with metoprolol, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), and naproxen sodium just at the aura or at the beginning of the attacks. The cases in the second group (D) were also supplied with a comprehensive dietary list arranged by our algology clinic in addition to the same medication protocol. There were no demographic differences between the cases (P > 0.05). VAS scores were lower in group D than group K (P < 0.01), and also the migraine attack frequencies and monthly amounts of analgesic consumed amounts were also statistically significantly less. It was concluded that beta-blocker and riboflavin therapy supplemented with a convenient diet with appropriate alternatives in patients with migraine disorder was associated with statistically significant decreases in headache frequency, intensity, duration and medication intake. PMID:21197315

  6. Is migraine a neuropathic pain syndrome?

    PubMed

    Biondi, David M

    2006-06-01

    The understanding of migraine pathophysiology has evolved from the belief that migraine is a vascular disorder, to evidence that better defines migraine as a neurogenic disorder associated with secondary changes in brain perfusion. There is evidence to suggest that the early phase of migraine pain results from neurogenic inflammation affecting cranial blood vessels and dura. Allodynia, hyperalgesia, and expansion of nociceptive fields occur during most well-established migraine attacks. These clinical features of migraine are evocative of those traditionally associated with neuropathic pain. A hypothesis that defines migraine pain as a unique neuropathic pain disorder can imply the potential for neural plasticity and may provide insight into the mechanisms that underlie the transformation of episodic to chronic forms of migraine. The neuropathic pain model of migraine pathophysiology not only paves the way for mechanism-based treatment strategies that can improve the acute and preventive management of migraine attacks, but also opens the door for the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. It also lends momentum to an understanding of clinically intriguing topics such as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and medication-overuse headache (rebound headache), opioid resistance in the treatment of chronic headache, and disease modification in defending against the potential for migraine transformation.

  7. Rizatriptan vs. rizatriptan plus trimebutine for the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Krymchantowski, A V; Filho, P F M; Bigal, M E

    2006-07-01

    Gastroparesis frequently happens during migraine attacks, postponing the onset of action of orally administered drugs. Furthermore, triptans seem to work better in the earlier phases of the migraine attacks. Therefore, associating a gastrokinetic drug with a triptan may translate into better efficacy and higher consistency of response. Trimebutine is an opioid derivative with exclusive action on receptors of the Meissner and Auerbach plexus throughout the digestive tube. It has no absorption or central penetration. Herein we contrast the combination of rizatriptan plus trimebutine with rizatriptan alone in the acute treatment of migraine. Forty patients with migraine consecutively seen in our clinic were randomized to treat two consecutive moderate or severe attacks with one tablet of 10 mg rizatriptan plus one capsule of 200 mg trimebutine and two attacks with the same triptan and placebo, in counterbalanced order. We collected information on the severity of the attack, as well as presence of nausea and photophobia at the time of drug intake, and after 1, 2 and 4 h. Recurrence and adverse events were also contrasted. Sixty-four attacks were treated with each drug regimen. At 1 h postdose, 30 (46.8%) of 64 attacks treated with the combination resolved completely, vs. eight (12.5%) of the rizatriptan-treated attacks, a difference of 34% (P < 0.01). At 2 h postdose, 47 (73.4%) attacks treated with the combination vs. 20 (31.2%) of those treated with rizatriptan alone resolved completely, a difference of 42% (95% confidence interval 26, 58, P < 0.001). Regarding nausea and photophobia, the combination was also associated with significantly better response. Recurrence was similar among the two drug regimens, as well as adverse events. The combination rizatriptan and trimebutine is more effective than rizatriptan alone. The combination does not increase adverse events or recurrence of pain. PMID:16776704

  8. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Migraine 101 Quiz Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... the facts when it comes to headaches and migraines? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz. True/ ...

  9. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  10. A review of the use of frovatriptan in the treatment of menstrually related migraine

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is a highly prevalent condition associated with considerable disability. Migraine attacks occur exclusively around the menstrual period in approximately 10% of women with migraine, that is, pure menstrual migraine, while at least 50% of them also experience migraine at other times of the month, that is, menstrually related migraine (MRM). The therapeutic approach to patients with MRM is based on treatment of the attack, or prophylactic strategies. Triptans are recommended as first-line treatments for moderate to severe migraine attacks, including MM. Frovatriptan is one of the newest triptans. Its high affinity for 5-HT1B/1D receptors and long half-life contribute to its distinctive clinical effect, characterized by a more sustained and prolonged effect than other triptans. Indeed, frovatriptan proved to be effective in treating the acute attack, but was particularly effective in the short-term preventive therapy of MM. In addition, frovatriptan is one of the safest triptans, with the lowest risk of treatment-emergent adverse events. Following extensive evidence from randomized pharmacological trials, frovatriptan has now gained a grade A recommendation from the guidelines for short-term prophylaxis of MM. Recent post-hoc analyses of direct comparative trials also suggest that frovatriptan might have an important role in the acute treatment of MRM. In these studies, frovatriptan showed pain relief and pain-free rates similar to those of zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, and almotriptan, but with significantly lower recurrence rates. More well-designed, randomized, prospective studies, specifically enrolling women with MM, will be needed in the near future to confirm the efficacy of frovatriptan in this migraine subtype. PMID:23483096

  11. Acute Coronary Syndrome: Focus on Antiplatelet Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Rodel V

    2016-02-01

    The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology in 2014 published a focused update of the 2007 and 2012 guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). The management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is described in a separate guideline published in 2013. The focused updates to the guidelines contain updated recommendations for dual antiplatelet therapy, including use of the P2Y12 inhibitor ticagrelor, which was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Nurses caring for patients with acute coronary syndrome must have a good understanding of the current treatment guidelines for such patients, to help ensure delivery of evidence-based care. This review article uses a case study-based approach to describe how the new guidelines affect clinical decision making when choosing appropriate antiplatelet therapy for patients with NSTE-ACS or STEMI, depending on the patient's clinical history and presenting characteristics. PMID:26830177

  12. The migraine postdrome

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Nicola J.; Lipton, Richard B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Olesen, Jes

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report migraine postdrome symptoms in patients who report nonheadache symptoms as part of their attacks. Methods: A prospective daily electronic diary study was conducted over 3 months in 120 patients with migraine. Nonheadache symptoms before, during, and after headache were collected on a daily basis. Visual analogue scales were used to capture the overall level of functioning and the severity of the headache. The postdrome was defined as the time from resolution of troublesome headache to return to normal. Results: Of 120 evaluable patients, 97 (81%) reported at least one nonheadache symptom in the postdrome. Postdrome symptoms, in order of frequency, included feeling tired/weary and having difficulty concentrating and stiff neck. Many patients also reported a mild residual head discomfort. In most attacks (93%), there was return to normal within 24 hours after spontaneous pain resolved. There was no relationship between medication taken for the headache and the duration of the postdrome. The severity of the migraine was not associated with the duration of the postdrome. Overall state of health scores remained low during the postdrome. Conclusion: Nonheadache symptoms in the postdrome were common and may contribute to the distress and disability in the patients studied. Postdrome symptoms merit larger observational studies and careful recording in clinical trials of acute and preventive migraine treatments. PMID:27335112

  13. A data-driven acute inflammation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute inflammation is a severe medical condition defined as an inflammatory response of the body to an infection. Its rapid progression requires quick and accurate decisions from clinicians. Inadequate and delayed decisions makes acute inflammation the 10th leading cause of death overall in United States with the estimated cost of treatment about $17 billion annually. However, despite the need, there are limited number of methods that could assist clinicians to determine optimal therapies for acute inflammation. We developed a data-driven method for suggesting optimal therapy by using machine learning model that is learned on historical patients' behaviors. To reduce both the risk of failure and the expense for clinical trials, our method is evaluated on a virtual patients generated by a mathematical model that emulates inflammatory response. In conducted experiments, acute inflammation was handled with two complimentary pro- and anti-inflammatory medications which adequate timing and doses are crucial for the successful outcome. Our experiments show that the dosage regimen assigned with our data-driven method significantly improves the percentage of healthy patients when compared to results by other methods used in clinical practice and found in literature. Our method saved 88% of patients that would otherwise die within a week, while the best method found in literature saved only 73% of patients. At the same time, our method used lower doses of medications than alternatives. In addition, our method achieved better results than alternatives when only incomplete or noisy measurements were available over time as well as it was less affected by therapy delay. The presented results provide strong evidence that models from the artificial intelligence community have a potential for development of personalized treatment strategies for acute inflammation. PMID:24565439

  14. [Acute tonsillopharyngitis: the effectiveness of topical therapy].

    PubMed

    Nosulya, E V; Kim, I A; Chernykh, N M; Karnoukhova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a furasol sore throat gargle solution for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis. Forty patients presenting with acute tonsillopharyngitis were allocated to two groups, 20 subjects in each, by means of independent sequential randomization. Prior to the onset of the treatment, all the patients were examined for determining the species composition of pharyngeal microflora with the use of an «AutoScan4 System» analyzer («Siemens», USA) and estimating the resistance to antibacterial preparations (by the disk diffusion method). All the participants of the study were prescribed antibacterial therapy. In the patients of group 1 (study group), the antibacterial treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis was supplemented by a furasol sore throat gargle solution whereas those of group 2 (controls) were treated without topical therapy. The quantitative evaluation of the severity of manifestations of the disease before and after the treatment was based on a 5-point visual-analog scale. It was shown that systemic antibacterial therapy resulted in the consistent decrease of the frequency of occurrence of pathogenic and potentially pathogenic microflora in the patients comprising both groups. Treatment with a furasol sore throat gargle solution did not lead to the appearance of bacterial species alien to the oropharynx, nor was it accompanied by the impairment of resistance of its mucous membrane to the colonization by microorganisms. The results of the study give evidence of the well apparent regression of the subjective signs of tonsillopharyngitis and the inflammatory changes in the mucous membrane of the pharynx in the patients given the topical treatment in the form of a furasol sore throat gargle solution in addition to antibacterial therapy. It is concluded that a furasol sore throat gargle solution can be recommended for the introduction into the combined treatment of the patients

  15. A review of rizatriptan, a quick and consistent 5-HT1B/1D agonist for the acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2004-03-01

    Rizatriptan is a second-generation triptan marketed as 5 and 10 mg tablets and rapidly disintegrating wafer formulations. In > 5000 acute migraine patients enrolled in short-term trials and almost 1800 patients in long-term, open-label trials treating approximately 47000 attacks, rizatriptan was effective and well-tolerated. Controlled head-to-head data and a meta-analysis of 53 randomised, placebo-controlled trials of oral triptans in > 24000 patients have shown that rizatriptan 10 mg offers efficacy advantages over oral sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg and other oral triptans, both in terms of speed of onset of action and consistency. These advantages may reflect its improved pharmacological profile over sumatriptan in terms of higher oral bioavailability and a shorter time to maximum concentration. The wafer formulation offers the convenience of being administered without water. As a result of its superior efficacy profile and generally good tolerability, rizatriptan can be considered as a first-line treatment for acute migraine. PMID:15013934

  16. Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.

    PubMed

    Maghbooli, Mehdi; Golipour, Farhad; Moghimi Esfandabadi, Alireza; Yousefi, Mehran

    2014-03-01

    Frequency and torment caused by migraines direct patients toward a variety of remedies. Few studies to date have proposed ginger derivates for migraine relief. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of ginger in the ablation of common migraine attack in comparison to sumatriptan therapy. In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder or sumatriptan. Time of headache onset, its severity, time interval from headache beginning to taking drug and patient self-estimation about response for five subsequent migraine attacks were recorded by patients. Patients(,) satisfaction from treatment efficacy and their willingness to continue it was also evaluated after 1 month following intervention. Two hours after using either drug, mean headaches severity decreased significantly. Efficacy of ginger powder and sumatriptan was similar. Clinical adverse effects of ginger powder were less than sumatriptan. Patients' satisfaction and willingness to continue did not differ. The effectiveness of ginger powder in the treatment of common migraine attacks is statistically comparable to sumatriptan. Ginger also poses a better side effect profile than sumatriptan.

  17. Insights into the mechanism of onabotulinumtoxinA in chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L; Cady, Roger

    2011-01-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA has recently been approved by regulatory agencies in the UK and United States for treatment of chronic migraine based on data generated from the PREEMPT studies. As such, onabotulinumtoxinA is the only prophylactic therapy specifically approved for chronic migraine. Most headache clinicians would agree that acute episodic migraine and chronic migraine differ in their pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and response to pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological therapies. Of the 7 botulinum neurotoxin serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin type A (onabotulinumtoxinA) has been the most thoroughly investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. Based on preclinical studies, onabotulinumtoxinA is known to inhibit the release of excitatory neurotransmitters from both motor and sensory neurons by preventing vesicle fusion to the cell membrane. In addition to the well-documented myorelaxant effects of this neurotoxin, onabotulinumtoxinA can exert a direct analgesic effect that likely involves inhibition of primary and secondary nociceptive neurons. The inhibitory effects of onabotulinumtoxinA are also likely to involve suppressing the activity of myogenic trigger points and decreasing the persistent nociceptive barrage that promotes and maintains central sensitization. This article describes possible mechanisms to explain how onabotulinumtoxinA functions as a therapy for chronic migraine and considers why treatment with the neurotoxin is not effective in some chronic migraineurs.

  18. Insights Into the Mechanism of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Chronic Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.; Cady, Roger

    2012-01-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA has recently been approved by regulatory agencies in the UK and United States for treatment of chronic migraine based on data generated from the PREEMPT studies. As such, onabotulinumtoxinA is the only prophylactic therapy specifically approved for chronic migraine. Most headache clinicians would agree that acute episodic migraine and chronic migraine differ in their pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, and response to pharmacological as well as nonpharmacological therapies. Of the 7 botulinum neurotoxin serotypes, botulinum neurotoxin type A (onabotulinumtoxinA) has been the most thoroughly investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. Based on preclinical studies, onabotulinumtoxinA is known to inhibit the release of excitatory neurotransmitters from both motor and sensory neurons by preventing vesicle fusion to the cell membrane. In addition to the well-documented myorelaxant effects of this neurotoxin, onabotulinumtoxinA can exert a direct analgesic effect that likely involves inhibition of primary and secondary nociceptive neurons. The inhibitory effects of onabotulinumtoxinA are also likely to involve suppressing the activity of myogenic trigger points and decreasing the persistent nociceptive barrage that promotes and maintains central sensitization. This article describes possible mechanisms to explain how onabotulinumtoxinA functions as a therapy for chronic migraine and considers why treatment with the neurotoxin is not effective in some chronic migraineurs. PMID:22082429

  19. [A clinical challenge. Pragmatic treatment of migraine and concomitant depression].

    PubMed

    Jürgens, T P; Leinisch, E; Koch, H J

    2008-02-01

    The association of migraine and depression has been confirmed in numerous studies and it has been suggested that both diseases influence each other in a bidirectional way. As the conventional antidepressants mostly aggravate a pre-existing depression, treatment of both is a demanding task and should be planned in an interdisciplinary setting with neurologists and psychiatrists experienced in pain management. The pharmacological therapy is mainly based on a modulation of the serotonergic and noradrenergic systems and non-pharmacological treatment is also incorporated. The number of drugs should be kept to a minimum but drugs effective in the treatment of both migraine and depression should be used. Current data favours the use of amitriptylin, although newer studies justify the use of venlafaxin and fluoxetin as second choice drugs.A combination of several antidepressants with acute acting antimigraine drugs can provoke potentially threatening side effects, however, these possible side effects should not lead to suboptimal treatment of patients with depression and concomitant migraine. The current data on the antimigraine effects of common antidepressants are reviewed and advice for the preventive treatment of migraine with concomitant depression is given. Additionally, hazardous interactions and preferable drug combinations are listed.

  20. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Laursen, L C; Lervang, H H; Stjernebjerg, T; Weeke, B

    1987-02-01

    In a group comparative double blind pilot study six asthmatic patients with an acute exacerbation of their disease were randomly treated with either methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) (1000 mg daily for 3 days) (n = 2) followed by placebo tablets, or standard doses of methylprednisolone (MP) (50 mg daily gradually decreased to zero over 3 weeks) (n = 4). The results showed that the effect of MPPT did not differ from that of standard doses of MP. MPPT has, however, the potential of being preferable to standard treatment with MP, because of easy administration and optimal patient compliance. PMID:3296841

  1. Consistency of response to sumatriptan/naproxen sodium in a randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over study for the acute treatment of migraine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Winner, Paul; Linder, Steven; Hershey, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    A multi-centered, randomized, placebo-controlled, early intervention, cross-over study was conducted to evaluate the consistency of response of sumatriptan/naproxen sodium 85/500 mg (S/NS) over 4 attacks in the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents. Inclusion of subjects was dependent on their age of 12-17 years, frequency, and history of migraine headaches (1-8 per month) over the previous 6 months prior to screening and generally healthy males and females of non-childbearing potential that were not on excluded medications. Subjects were instructed to treat within 1 hour of pain onset, including when the pain was still mild. Subjects were randomized in a double-blind fashion using a computer-generated randomization list in which the study drug was prepared prior to study start, and subjects were allocated to a number in sequential order for each site. Each site was allocated number blocks in sets of 10 depending of the rate of enrollment. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of S/NS vs placebo in the primary end-points of pain-free response at 2 hours (2hPF), 24-hour sustained pain-free response (24hPF), and pain-free response at 2 hours with early intervention (2hPFE) calculated as percentage out of all attacks. In the study, 94 subjects treated 347 attacks in total: treating 277 with S/NS and 70 with placebo. Compared with placebo, S/NS produced higher 2hPF rates (S/NS 37%, placebo 18%; P < .004), and 2hPFE with rates (S/NS 32%, 18% placebo; P < .03). Compared with placebo, 24hPF rates were S/NS 86%, placebo 78%, P < .17, which were higher than placebo but not clinically significant. 2hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraines treated with S/NS in 40.4% of subjects. 24hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraine treated with S/NS in 86.2% subjects. Adverse reactions were generally low and comparable between S/NS and placebo.

  2. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Migraines: What a Pain! KidsHealth > For Kids > Migraines: What ... coming and how to avoid them. What's a Migraine? Almost everyone gets headaches . You might have one ...

  3. Newer formulations of the triptans: advances in migraine management.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, Jonathan Paul; Gawel, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Migraine is a common, frequently incapacitating, headache disorder that imposes a substantial burden on both the individual patient and society. The last two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine, and in our development of an efficacious and diverse therapeutic armamentarium. There are several routes of drug administration available to patients with migraine. All the serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists (triptans) are available as oral tablets (sumatriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan, frovatriptan and eletriptan). Only sumatriptan is available as a subcutaneous injection. Some triptans are also available via newer routes of administration, including orally disintegrating tablets (rizatriptan and zolmitriptan), rectal suppositories (sumatriptan) and intranasal sprays (sumatriptan and zolmitriptan). Oral disintegrating tablets and other non-oral triptan routes (subcutaneous, intranasal, rectal) are a useful alternative to conventional oral tablets for patients who have difficulty swallowing pills or prefer not to do so, and for patients whose nausea and/or vomiting precludes swallowing tablets and/or makes the likelihood of complete absorption unpredictable. This is important because epidemiological studies in migraine reveal that the vast majority of patients (>90%) have experienced nausea during a migraine attack and more than 50% have nausea with the majority of attacks. Similarly, most (almost 70%) have vomited at some time during an attack and of these patients, almost one-third vomit in the majority of attacks. The newer formulations, rapidly dissolving tablets and intranasal sprays, afford patients the opportunity to use abortive therapy without the need for liquids, at anytime and anywhere, at the onset of a migraine attack. Furthermore, the intranasal sprays are absorbed rapidly and have a prompt onset of action allowing for significant pain free rates versus placebo as early

  4. Newer formulations of the triptans: advances in migraine management.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, Jonathan Paul; Gawel, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Migraine is a common, frequently incapacitating, headache disorder that imposes a substantial burden on both the individual patient and society. The last two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine, and in our development of an efficacious and diverse therapeutic armamentarium. There are several routes of drug administration available to patients with migraine. All the serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists (triptans) are available as oral tablets (sumatriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan, frovatriptan and eletriptan). Only sumatriptan is available as a subcutaneous injection. Some triptans are also available via newer routes of administration, including orally disintegrating tablets (rizatriptan and zolmitriptan), rectal suppositories (sumatriptan) and intranasal sprays (sumatriptan and zolmitriptan). Oral disintegrating tablets and other non-oral triptan routes (subcutaneous, intranasal, rectal) are a useful alternative to conventional oral tablets for patients who have difficulty swallowing pills or prefer not to do so, and for patients whose nausea and/or vomiting precludes swallowing tablets and/or makes the likelihood of complete absorption unpredictable. This is important because epidemiological studies in migraine reveal that the vast majority of patients (>90%) have experienced nausea during a migraine attack and more than 50% have nausea with the majority of attacks. Similarly, most (almost 70%) have vomited at some time during an attack and of these patients, almost one-third vomit in the majority of attacks. The newer formulations, rapidly dissolving tablets and intranasal sprays, afford patients the opportunity to use abortive therapy without the need for liquids, at anytime and anywhere, at the onset of a migraine attack. Furthermore, the intranasal sprays are absorbed rapidly and have a prompt onset of action allowing for significant pain free rates versus placebo as early

  5. [Diuretic therapy in acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Trullàs, Joan Carles; Morales-Rull, José Luis; Formiga, Francesc

    2014-03-01

    Diuretics are widely recommended in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Unfortunately, despite their widespread use, limited data are available from randomized clinical trials to guide clinicians on the appropriate management of diuretic therapy. Loop diuretics are considered the first-line diuretic therapy, especially intravenous furosemide, but the best mode of administration (high-dose versus low-dose and continuous infusion versus bolus) is unclear. When diuretic resistance develops, different therapeutic strategies can be adopted, including combined diuretic therapy with thiazide diuretics and/or aldosterone antagonists. Low or "non-diuretic" doses (25-50mg QD) of aldosterone antagonists have been demonstrated to confer a survival benefit in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and consequently should be prescribed in all such patients, unless contraindicated by potassium and/or renal function values. There is less evidence on the use of aldosterone antagonists at higher or "diuretic" doses (≥ 100mg QD) but these drugs could be useful in relieving congestive symptoms in combination with furosemide. Thiazide diuretics can also be helpful as they have synergic effects with loop diuretics by inhibiting sodium reabsorption in distal parts of the nephron. The effect of diuretic therapy in AHF should be monitored with careful observation of clinical signs and symptoms of congestion. Serum electrolytes and kidney function should also be monitored during the use of intravenous diuretics.

  6. Treatment of menstrual migraine: utility of control of related mood disturbances.

    PubMed

    Negro, Andrea; Napoletano, Flavia; Lionetto, Luana; Marsibilio, Francesco; Sani, Gabriele; Girardi, Paolo; Martelletti, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) has a prevalence in the general population of approximately 7%, although it seems to be much higher within the population of females with migraine. Episodes of MM have been reported to be longer, more intense, more disabling, less responsive to acute therapy and more prone to recurrence than those of other types of migraine. MM is demonstrated to have a bi-directional link to affective illnesses such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder and depression. There is clinical and pathophysiological evidence suggesting that the relationship between MM and affective disorders could be linked to ovarian hormones. The aim of this review is to analyze treatment strategies in patients with co-existent MM and affective disorders.

  7. Epigone migraine vertigo (EMV): a late migraine equivalent.

    PubMed

    Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P; Giannoni, B; Pecci, R

    2014-02-01

    and intensity of both headache and vertigo while taking prophylactic therapy. Control visits were programmed after 4, 12 and 24 months of therapy. All patients considerably improved symptoms with therapy: 19 subjects (68%) reported complete disappearance of vestibular symptoms, while 9 (32%) considered symptoms very improved. The subjective judgement was corroborated by data from patients diaries. We conclude that EMV is a clinical variant of typical migraine-related vertigo: a migraineassociated vertigo, headache spell independent, following a headache period, during the lifetime of a patient.

  8. Tackling chronic migraine: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, several diagnostic criteria and definitions have been proposed for chronic migraine (CM). The third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders–3 beta, published in 2013, has revised CM diagnostic criteria. CM is defined as “headache occurring on 15 or more days per month for more than 3 months, which has the features of migraine headache on at least 8 days per month.” Patients who meet the criteria for CM and for medication-overuse headache should be given both diagnoses. Worldwide, CM prevalence ranges 1%–3%, and its incidence has been estimated to be 2.5% per year. CM is associated with disability and poor quality of life. Modifiable risk factors include (among others): migraine progression (defined as an increase in frequency and severity of migraine attacks); medication and caffeine overuse; obesity; stressful life events; and snoring. CM patients have a significantly higher frequency of some comorbid conditions, including chronic pain, psychiatric disorders, respiratory illness, and some vascular risk factors. Management includes identification and control of comorbidities and risk factors that predispose to CM; treatment and prevention for medication overuse; early treatment for migraine attacks; and an adequate preventive therapy for CM. Several randomized controlled clinical trials have shown the efficacy of topiramate, amitriptyline, onabotulinumtoxinA, and cognitive-behavioral therapy in CM. PMID:24748814

  9. Newly Approved Agents for the Treatment and Prevention of Pediatric Migraine.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of pediatric migraine remains an unmet medical need. There continues to be a paucity of pediatric randomized controlled trials for the treatment of migraine, both in the acute and preventive settings. Pediatric studies are often complicated by high placebo-response rates and much of our current practice is based on adult trials. This lack of significant pediatric studies results in a wide variation in migraine management both amongst clinicians and between institutions, and evidence-based treatments are not always administered. In this article, we aim to briefly review newly approved abortive and preventive agents for migraine in the pediatric age group. Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medications, including ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, aspirin, and acetaminophen are reasonable first-line options for abortive therapy. In addition, studies have shown triptans, or migraine-specific agents, to be safe and effective in children and adolescents and several formulations have been approved for the pediatric population, including rizatriptan, almotriptan, zolmitriptan nasal spray, and naproxen sodium/sumatriptan in combination. PMID:27503180

  10. Chemical Mediators of Migraine: Preclinical and Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Nahas, Stephanie J.; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder, and although the pathophysiology of migraine has not been fully delineated, much has been learned in the past 50 years. This knowledge has been accompanied by significant advancements in the way migraine is viewed as a disease process and in the development therapeutic options. In this review, we will focus on 4 mediators (nitric oxide, histamine, serotonin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide) which have significantly advanced our understanding of migraine as a disease entity. For each mediator we begin by reviewing the preclinical data linking it to migraine pathophysiology, first focusing on the vascular mechanisms, then the neuronal mechanisms. The preclinical data are then followed by a review of the clinical data which support each mediator’s role in migraine and highlights the pharmacological agents which target these mediators for migraine therapy. PMID:21631491

  11. Managing migraine by patient profile: role of frovatriptan

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger K; Farmer, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    For the last quarter of a century, triptans have been available for acute treatment of migraine but with little guidance on which of the different triptan products to use for which patient or which attack of migraine. In this article, we propose a structured approach to analysis of individual migraine attacks and patient characteristics as a means of defining and optimizing acute intervention. Assessment of patient and attack profiles includes the “5-Ps”: pattern, phenotype, patient, pharmacology, and precipitants. Attending to these five components of information can assist in developing an individualized behavioral, pharmacological, and nonpharmacological comprehensive treatment plan for most migraine patients. This clinical approach is then focused on frovatriptan because of its unique molecular signature and potential novel clinical applications. Frovatriptan like all triptans is indicated for acute treatment of migraine but its role has been explored in management of several unique migraine phenotypes. Frovatriptan has the longest half-life of any triptan and consequently is often promoted for acute treatment of migraine of longer duration. It has also been studied as a short-term preventive treatment in women with menstrual-related migraine. Given that 60% of female migraineurs suffer from menstrual-related migraine, this population is the obvious group for continued study. Small studies have also explored frovatriptan’s use in treating migraine predicted by premonitory symptoms as a preventive for the headache phase of migraine. By identifying patient and attack profiles, clinicians may effectively determine the viability of frovatriptan as an effective pharmacological intervention for migraine. PMID:27103792

  12. Cognitive behavior therapy for comorbid migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder: An exploratory randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Aiello, Rachele; Gilson, Kathryn; Meadows, Graham; Milgrom, Jeannette; Reece, John

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated comorbidity between migraine and tension-type headache on the one hand, and depression on the other. Presence of depression is a negative prognostic indicator for behavioral treatment of headaches. Despite the recognised comorbidity, there is a limited research literature evaluating interventions designed for comorbid headaches and depression. Sixty six participants (49 female, 17 male) suffering from migraine and/or tension-type headache and major depressive disorder were randomly allocated to a Routine Primary Care control group or a Cognitive Behavior Therapy group that also received routine primary care. The treatment program involved 12 weekly 50-min sessions administered by clinical psychologists. Participants in the treatment group improved significantly more than participants in the control group from pre-to post-treatment on measures of headaches, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Improvements achieved with treatment were maintained at four month follow-up. Comorbid anxiety disorders were not a predictor of response to treatment, and the only significant predictor was gender (men improved more than women). The new integrated treatment program appears promising and worthy of further investigation.

  13. Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    cessation of treatment. Fourteen trials compared a ’true’ acupuncture intervention with a variety of sham interventions. Pooled analyses did not show a statistically significant superiority for true acupuncture for any outcome in any of the time windows, but the results of single trials varied considerably. Four trials compared acupuncture to proven prophylactic drug treatment. Overall in these trials acupuncture was associated with slightly better outcomes and fewer adverse effects than prophylactic drug treatment. Two small low-quality trials comparing acupuncture with relaxation (alone or in combination with massage) could not be interpreted reliably. Authors’ conclusions In the previous version of this review, evidence in support of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis was considered promising but insufficient. Now, with 12 additional trials, there is consistent evidence that acupuncture provides additional benefit to treatment of acute migraine attacks only or to routine care. There is no evidence for an effect of ’true’ acupuncture over sham interventions, though this is difficult to interpret, as exact point location could be of limited importance. Available studies suggest that acupuncture is at least as effective as, or possibly more effective than, prophylactic drug treatment, and has fewer adverse effects. Acupuncture should be considered a treatment option for patients willing to undergo this treatment. PMID:19160193

  14. AVP-825 Breath-Powered Intranasal Delivery System Containing 22 mg Sumatriptan Powder vs 100 mg Oral Sumatriptan in the Acute Treatment of Migraines (The COMPASS Study): A Comparative Randomized Clinical Trial Across Multiple Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Stewart J; Cady, Roger K; Silberstein, Stephen; Messina, John; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Djupesland, Per G; Shin, Paul; Siffert, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of AVP-825, an investigational bi-directional breath-powered intranasal delivery system containing low-dose (22 mg) sumatriptan powder, vs 100 mg oral sumatriptan for acute treatment of migraine in a double-dummy, randomized comparative efficacy clinical trial allowing treatment across multiple migraine attacks. Background In phases 2 and 3, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, AVP-825 provided early and sustained relief of moderate or severe migraine headache in adults, with a low incidence of triptan-related adverse effects. Methods This was a randomized, active-comparator, double-dummy, cross-over, multi-attack study (COMPASS; NCT01667679) with two ≤12-week double-blind periods. Subjects experiencing 2-8 migraines/month in the past year were randomized 1:1 using computer-generated sequences to AVP-825 plus oral placebo tablet or an identical placebo delivery system plus 100 mg oral sumatriptan tablet for the first period; patients switched treatment for the second period in this controlled comparative design. Subjects treated ≤5 qualifying migraines per period within 1 hour of onset, even if pain was mild. The primary end-point was the mean value of the summed pain intensity differences through 30 minutes post-dose (SPID-30) using Headache Severity scores. Secondary outcomes included pain relief, pain freedom, pain reduction, consistency of response across multiple migraines, migraine-associated symptoms, and atypical sensations. Safety was also assessed. Results A total of 275 adults were randomized, 174 (63.3%) completed the study (ie, completed the second treatment period), and 185 (67.3%) treated at least one migraine in both periods (1531 migraines assessed). There was significantly greater reduction in migraine pain intensity with AVP-825 vs oral sumatriptan in the first 30 minutes post-dose (least squares mean SPID-30 = 10.80 vs 7.41, adjusted mean

  15. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sara M; Gottschalk, Christopher H; Jabbari, Bahman

    2015-07-14

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  16. Acute parotitis and hyperamylasemia following whole-brain radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cairncross, J.G.; Salmon, J.; Kim, J.H.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Parotitis, an infrequent, previously unreported complication of whole-brain radiation therapy, was observed in 4 patients. The acute symptoms, which include fever, dry mouth, pain, swelling, and tenderness, are accompanied by hyperamylasemia. Among 10 patients receiving whole-brain irradiation, 8 had serum amylase elevations without symptoms. Both acute parotitis and asymptomatic hyperamylasemia result from irradiation of the parotid glands.

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus botulinum toxin injection in chronic migraine prophylaxis: a pilot randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Hatem S; Esmail, Eman H; Abdelalim, Ahmad; El-Jaafary, Shaimaa; Elmazny, Alaa; Sabbah, Asmaa; Shalaby, Nevin M

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a prevalent disabling disease, with major health-related burden and poor quality of life. Long-term use of preventive medications carries risk of side effects. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injection as preventive therapies for chronic migraine. Methods A pilot, randomized study was conducted on a small-scale sample of 29 Egyptian patients with chronic migraine, recruited from Kasr Al-Aini teaching hospital outpatient clinic and diagnosed according to ICHD-III (beta version). Patients were randomly assigned into two groups; 15 patients received BTX-A injection following the Phase III Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy injection paradigm and 14 patients were subjected to 12 rTMS sessions delivered at high frequency (10 Hz) over the left motor cortex (MC, M1). All the patients were requested to have their 1-month headache calendar, and they were subjected to a baseline 25-item (beta version) Henry Ford Hospital Headache Disability Inventory (HDI), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and visual analogue scale assessment of headache intensity. The primary efficacy measures were headache frequency and severity; secondary measures were 25-item HDI, HIT-6, and number of acute medications. Follow-up visits were scheduled at weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after baseline visit. Results A reduction in all outcome measures was achieved in both the groups. However, this improvement was more sustained in the BTX-A group, and both the therapies were well tolerated. Conclusion BTX-A injection and rTMS have favorable efficacy and safety profiles in chronic migraineurs. rTMS is of comparable efficacy to BTX-A injection in chronic migraine therapy, but with less sustained effect. PMID:27785091

  18. Cyclical migraine.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Diamond, S

    1981-06-01

    We have observed 27 migraineurs whose headaches occurred in groups separated by headache-free periods. Twenty-one of the patients were women. The headaches occurred on either side in most patients. The headaches were severe lasting for an average of 25.5 hours, often preceded by scintillating scotomas, and often associated with nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. The attacks occurred in cycles that lasted an average of six weeks. The cycles recurred an average of five times per year; during the cycles, severe migraine occurred several times per week. In many patients, the cycles were often accompanied by a constant, low-grade headaches and depression. Twenty-two patients were treated with lithium carbonate. Complete or partial control of the headaches was achieved in 19 patients. PMID:6786269

  19. The 'Act when Mild' (AwM) study: a step forward in our understanding of early treatment in acute migraine.

    PubMed

    Goadsby, P J

    2008-09-01

    An important issue in the management of migraine is the advice given to patients as to when to take their treatment in the course of the attack. While it seems common sense almost to take treatment early in the attack, the evidence base for that advice is not as robust as could be expected. The 'Act when Mild' (AwM) Study was a randomized, four-arm, multicentre, multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of almotriptan (12.5 mg) to compare outcomes after administration of treatment when pain intensity was mild and within 1 h of headache onset (mild/early) with outcomes when pain had become moderate or severe. Of 491 migraineurs enrolled, 403 were evaluable with an intention-to-treat population (ITT) of 404. At the primary end-point, 2 h pain free, on the ITT analysis 49% of patients in the almotriptan 12.5 mg treat early/mild group and 40% in the treat moderate/severe group had responded (P = 0.21). Of these patients, 43 did not take medication according to their randomly allocated baseline pain intensity (mild or moderate/severe) and were subsequently reassigned, prior to study unblinding, to the appropriate group (AwM population) for re-analysis of the primary outcome measure: 2-h pain-free rates. In the almotriptan arms, 53% of the mild/early group and 37.5% of the moderate/severe group were pain free at 2 h (P = 0.02; AwM population). The corresponding proportions in the placebo groups were 24.7% and 17.5% (significantly lower than the respective almotriptan arms; P migraine pain is

  20. Treatment of pediatric migraine in the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Amy A; Goadsby, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Migraine constitutes a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared with adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. We review current knowledge about pediatric migraineurs presenting at the emergency room and their management, and summarize the best evidence available to guide clinical decision-making.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  2. Acute Therapy: Why Not Over-The-Counter or Other Nonspecific Options?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  3. Familial hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jakob Møller

    2010-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with aura, where hemiplegia occurs during the aura phase. Mutation screening of families with FHM has revealed a range of different mutations. The mutated FHM genes code for ion transport proteins. Animal and cellular studies have associated the mutated FHM genes with disturbed ion homeostasis, altered cellular excitability and altered neurotransmitter release. Abnormal cortical excitability due to dysfunctional ion-channels might facilitate cortical spreading depression (CSD) and thereby migraine aura and migraine headache. Genotyped FHM patients offer us the chance to study the interplay between genotype and phenotype and may be regarded as a genetic migraine model. FHM studies might open for a better understanding of the molecular migraine pathology, and potentially help to unravel the pathogenesis of the more common migraine forms. We have therefore studied genotyped FHM patients to understand the effect of genotype on the response to migraine provoking substances. We show here that two known migraine triggers failed to induce more migraine aura or migraine headache in FHM-patients than in healthy controls, thus indicating that the FHM genotype does not confer hypersensitivity to these migraine triggers. This has implications for our understanding of the headache mechanisms and raises the question whether FHM share neurobiological background with the common types of migraine. The aims of the present thesis were to test the hypothesis that FHM mutations might be associated with hypersensitivity to known migraine triggers and, thereby, share pathophysiological pathways with the common types of migraine, but our results disprove this hypothesis. Thus, FHM seems very different from MO and MA, both genetically and pathophysiologically. The fact that FHM genes regulate ion homeostasis cannot be extrapolated to the common types of migraine.

  4. Therapy of Acute Hypertension in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment target, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and propose treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios. PMID:24522943

  5. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  6. Episodic and chronic migraine headache: breaking down barriers to optimal treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-03-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder that affects an estimated 36 million Americans. Migraine headaches often occur over many years or over an individual's lifetime. By definition, episodic migraine is characterized by headaches that occur on fewer than 15 days per month. According to the recent International Classification of Headache Disorders (third revision) beta diagnostic criteria, chronic migraine is defined as "headaches on at least 15 days per month for at least 3 months, with the features of migraine on at least 8 days per month." However, diagnostic criteria distinguishing episodic from chronic migraine continue to evolve. Persons with episodic migraine can remit, not change, or progress to high-frequency episodic or chronic migraine over time. Chronic migraine is associated with a substantially greater personal and societal burden, more frequent comorbidities, and possibly with persistent and progressive brain abnormalities. Many patients are poorly responsive to, or noncompliant with, conventional preventive therapies. The primary goals of migraine treatment include relieving pain, restoring function, and reducing headache frequency; an additional goal may be preventing progression to chronic migraine. Although all migraineurs require abortive treatment, and all patients with chronic migraine require preventive treatment, there are no definitive guidelines delineating which persons with episodic migraine would benefit from preventive therapy. Five US Food and Drug Association strategies are approved for preventing episodic migraine, but only injections with onabotulinumtoxinA are approved for preventing chronic migraine. Identifying persons who require migraine prophylaxis and selecting and initiating the most appropriate treatment strategy may prevent progression from episodic to chronic migraine and alleviate the pain and suffering associated with frequent migraine.

  7. Optimizing asparaginase therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rizzari, Carmelo; Conter, Valentino; Starý, Jan; Colombini, Antonella; Moericke, Anja; Schrappe, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Asparaginases are important agents used in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three types of asparaginase are currently available: two are derived from Escherichia coli [native asparaginase and pegylated asparaginase (PEG-asparaginase)] and one from Erwinia chrysanthemi (crisantaspase). All three products share the same mechanism of action but have different pharmacokinetic properties, which do not make them easily interchangeable. Among the known toxicities and side-effects, allergic reactions and silent inactivation represent the most important limitations to the prolonged use of any asparaginase product, with associated reduced therapeutic effects and poorer outcomes. Routine real time monitoring can help to identify patients with silent inactivation and facilitate a switch to a different product to ensure continued depletion of asparagine, completion of the treatment schedule and maintenance of outcomes. However, the most appropriate second-line treatment is still a matter of debate. PEG-asparaginase has lower immunogenicity and a longer half-life than native Escherichia coli (E. coli) asparaginase, which makes it useful for both first-line and second-line use with a reduced number of doses. However, PEG-asparaginase displays cross-reactivity with native E. coli asparaginase that may harm its therapeutic effects. Crisantaspase does not display cross-reactivity to either of the E. coli-derived products, which has made crisantaspase the second-line treatment option in a number of recent protocols. As crisantaspase has a much shorter biological half-life than the E. coli-derived products, the appropriate dosage and administration schedule are of paramount importance in delivering treatment with this product. In the ongoing trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica - Berlin-Franklin-Munster), in which PEG-asparaginase is used first-line, one dose of PEG-asparaginase is substituted by seven doses

  8. Cinnarizine in migraine prophylaxis: efficacy, tolerability and predictive factors for therapeutic responsiveness. An open-label pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Paolo; Fiermonte, Giancarlo; Pierelli, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of cinnarizine (75 mg, at bedtime) in migraine prophylaxis and the presence of possible predictive factors for therapeutic responsiveness were evaluated in an open-label pilot trial. Eighty consecutive outpatients suffering from migraine with or without aura participated in the study. After 12 weeks of therapy, 55 patients experienced a greater than 66% reduction in headache frequency and were considered responders. A significant reduction in the number of migraine days (mean reduction 58 +/- 8%) and in intake of medication to treat acute attacks (mean reduction 55 +/- 11%) was also observed. Cinnarizine was well tolerated, as documented by the low number of adverse effects. Failure to respond to previous prophylactic treatments was a negative predictive factor correlated with a poor prognosis. This study, even bearing in mind its limitations as an open-label trial, suggests that cinnarizine might be an effective prophylactic anti-migraine agent. The clinical characteristics of migraine patients do not help to predict response to treatment. PMID:14703897

  9. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Repetitive Transnasal Sphenopalatine Ganglion Blockade With Tx360® as Acute Treatment for Chronic Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger; Saper, Joel; Dexter, Kent; Manley, Heather R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if repetitive sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) blocks with 0.5% bupivacaine delivered through the Tx360® are superior in reducing pain associated with chronic migraine (CM) compared with saline. Background The SPG is a small concentrated structure of neuronal tissue that resides within the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) in close proximity to the sphenopalatine foramen and is innervated by the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. From an anatomical and physiological perspective, SPG blockade may be an effective acute and preventative treatment for CM. Method This was a double-blind, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot study using a novel intervention for acute treatment in CM. Up to 41 subjects could be enrolled at 2 headache specialty clinics in the US. Eligible subjects were between 18 and 80 years of age and had a history of CM defined by the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders appendix definition. They were allowed a stable dose of migraine preventive medications that was maintained throughout the study. Following a 28-day baseline period, subjects were randomized by computer-generated lists of 2:1 to receive 0.5% bupivacaine or saline, respectively. The primary end-point was to compare numeric rating scale scores at pretreatment baseline vs 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 24 hours postprocedure for all 12 treatments. SPG blockade was accomplished with the Tx360®, which allows a small flexible soft plastic tube that is advanced below the middle turbinate just past the pterygopalatine fossa into the intranasal space. A 0.3 cc of anesthetic or saline was injected into the mucosa covering the SPG. The procedure is performed similarly in each nostril. The active phase of the study consisted of a series of 12 SPG blocks with 0.3 cc of 0.5% bupivacaine or saline provided 2 times per week for 6 weeks. Subjects were re-evaluated at 1 and 6 months postfinal procedure. Results The final dataset

  10. Current Therapy in Acute Mouth Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, George; Burnstein, Irwin L.

    1970-01-01

    Until a dental department is added to a college health service, a physician or nurse can give treatment for acute oral infections. Treatment excludes the use of caustic, escharotic chemicals in favor of more benign agents. (Author)

  11. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide.

  12. Acupoint Injection of Onabotulinumtoxin A for Migraines

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Min; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Zhang, Yi; Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Ren, Wen-Ting; Cui, Guang-Fu; Xin, Le; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Onabotulinumtoxin A (BoNTA) has been reported to be effective in the therapy for migraines. Acupuncture has been used worldwide for the treatment of migraine attacks. Injection of a small amount of drug at acupuncture points is an innovation as compared to traditional acupuncture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of fixed (muscle)-site and acupoint-site injections of BoNTA for migraine therapy in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial extending over four months. Subjects with both episodic and chronic migraines respectively received a placebo (n = 19) or BoNTA (2.5 U each site, 25 U per subject) injection at fixed-sites (n = 41) including occipitofrontalis, corrugator supercilii, temporalis and trapeziue, or at acupoint-sites (n = 42) including Yintang (EX-HN3), Taiyang (EX-HN5), Baihui (GV20), Shuaigu (GB8), Fengchi (GB20) and Tianzhu (BL10). The variations between baseline and BoNTA post-injection for four months were calculated monthly as outcome measures. BoNTA injections at fixed-sites and acupoint-sites significantly reduced the migraine attack frequency, intensity, duration and associated symptoms for four months compared with placebo (p < 0.01). The efficacy of BoNTA for migraines in the acupoint-site group (93% improvement) was more significant than that in the fixed-site group (85% improvement) (p < 0.01). BoNTA administration for migraines is effective, and at acupoint-sites shows more efficacy than at fixed-sites. Further blinded studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of a low dose toxin (25 U) introduced with this methodology in chronic and episodic migraines. PMID:26529014

  13. Acupoint injection of onabotulinumtoxin A for migraines.

    PubMed

    Hou, Min; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Zhang, Yi; Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Ren, Wen-Ting; Cui, Guang-Fu; Xin, Le; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Onabotulinumtoxin A (BoNTA) has been reported to be effective in the therapy for migraines. Acupuncture has been used worldwide for the treatment of migraine attacks. Injection of a small amount of drug at acupuncture points is an innovation as compared to traditional acupuncture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of fixed (muscle)-site and acupoint-site injections of BoNTA for migraine therapy in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial extending over four months. Subjects with both episodic and chronic migraines respectively received a placebo (n = 19) or BoNTA (2.5 U each site, 25 U per subject) injection at fixed-sites (n = 41) including occipitofrontalis, corrugator supercilii, temporalis and trapeziue, or at acupoint-sites (n = 42) including Yintang (EX-HN3), Taiyang (EX-HN5), Baihui (GV20), Shuaigu (GB8), Fengchi (GB20) and Tianzhu (BL10). The variations between baseline and BoNTA post-injection for four months were calculated monthly as outcome measures. BoNTA injections at fixed-sites and acupoint-sites significantly reduced the migraine attack frequency, intensity, duration and associated symptoms for four months compared with placebo (p < 0.01). The efficacy of BoNTA for migraines in the acupoint-site group (93% improvement) was more significant than that in the fixed-site group (85% improvement) (p < 0.01). BoNTA administration for migraines is effective, and at acupoint-sites shows more efficacy than at fixed-sites. Further blinded studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of a low dose toxin (25 U) introduced with this methodology in chronic and episodic migraines.

  14. Acute pancreatitis: etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Mitchell S

    2008-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a relatively common disease that affects about 300,000 patients per annum in America with a mortality of about 7%. About 75% of pancreatitis is caused by gallstones or alcohol. Other important causes include hypertriglyceridemia, medication toxicity, trauma from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, hypercalcemia, abdominal trauma, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown after thorough investigation. This article discusses the causes, diagnosis, imaging findings, therapy, and complications of acute pancreatitis.

  15. [Lymphotropic therapy for acute purulent odontogenic jaw periostitis].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Lĭubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R; Sheplev, B V

    2003-01-01

    The structure of the gingival mucosa was studied by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent odontogenic maxillary periostitis treated traditionally and receiving lymphotropic therapy. Lymphotropic administration of the antibiotic during 2 days resulted in less pronounced dilatation of the interstitial spaces and lymph vessels adjacent to the molars and higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages. This indicated high efficiency of lymphotropic therapy of acute purulent maxillary periostitis for molars. Microcirculation parameters and tissue leukocyte cytogram in gingival mucosal tissue adjacent to the canines and premolars differed negligibly in patients treated by different methods.

  16. The Cerebellum and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Maurice; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and pathophysiological evidences connect migraine and the cerebellum. Literature on documented cerebellar abnormalities in migraine, however, is relatively sparse. Cerebellar involvement may be observed in 4 types of migraines: in the widespread migraine with aura (MWA) and migraine without aura (MWoA) forms; in particular subtypes of migraine such as basilar-type migraine (BTM); and in the genetically driven autosomal dominant familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) forms. Cerebellar dysfunction in migraineurs varies largely in severity, and may be subclinical. Purkinje cells express calcium channels that are related to the pathophysiology of both inherited forms of migraine and primary ataxias, mostly spinal cerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA-6) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2). Genetically driven ion channels dysfunction leads to hyperexcitability in the brain and cerebellum, possibly facilitating spreading depression waves in both locations. This review focuses on the cerebellar involvement in migraine, the relevant ataxias and their association with this primary headache, and discusses some of the pathophysiological processes putatively underlying these diseases. PMID:17578530

  17. Diagnosis and management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth C

    2004-11-01

    Migraine headaches afflict approximately 6% of men and 18% of women in the United States, and cost billions of dollars each year in lost productivity, absenteeism, and direct medical expendi tures. Despite its prevalence and the availability of therapeutic op tions, many patients do not seek treatment, and among those who do, a significant portion are misdiagnosed. Correct diagnosis can be made by identifying the historic and physical examination finding that distinguish primary headache disorders from secondary head ache disorders, as well as the key clinical features that distinguis migraine headaches from other types. Once diagnosis is made, im proper or inadequate management of headache pain, related symp toms such as nausea, and the possible aggravating side-effects of pharmacologic therapies represent further obstacles to effective ther apy. Dissatisfaction with migraine therapy on the basis of these factors is common. Among abortive therapy options there are de livery methods available which may avoid aggravating symptom such as nausea. Recommended pharmacologic agents include non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intranasal butorphanol, ergota mine and its derivatives, and the triptans. Indications for prophylac tic in addition to abortive therapy include the occurrence o headaches that require abortive therapy more than twice a week, tha do not respond well to abortive therapy, and which are particularly severe. Research is ongoing in the pathophysiology of migraines evaluation of nonpharmacologic treatment modalities, assessment of new drug therapies, and validation of headache guidelines. PMID:15586597

  18. Rizatriptan in the treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Dahlof, C G; Rapoport, A M; Sheftell, F D; Lines, C R

    1999-11-01

    Rizatriptan is a selective 5-hydroxytriptamine1B/1D receptor agonist that was launched in 1998 for the acute treatment of migraine in adults. Based on data from 6 large clinical trials in patients > or =18 years of age in whom migraine was diagnosed according to International Headache Society criteria, the marketed 10-mg and 5-mg oral doses of rizatriptan are effective in relieving headache pain and associated migraine symptoms. The 10-mg dose is more effective than the 5-mg dose. At 2 hours after dosing, up to 77% of patients taking rizatriptan 10 mg had pain relief compared with 37% of those taking placebo, up to 44% were completely pain free compared with 7% of those taking placebo, and up to 77% were free of nausea compared with 58% of those taking placebo (P < 0.05 for all 3 comparisons). Both doses of rizatriptan are generally well tolerated. In placebo-controlled studies involving treatment of a single migraine attack, the most common side effects (incidence > or =2%) occurred in <10% of patients, typically were transitory (2 to 3 hours), and were mild or moderate. Rizatriptan is an effective and well-tolerated acute treatment for migraine. PMID:10890255

  19. Thrombolytic Therapy in the Acute Management of Frostbite Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christopher; Pannucci, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Frostbite injuries frequently result in devastating ischemic damage to the distal extremities. This ischemia and resultant necrosis have historically been managed expectantly, with amputation of devitalized tissue commonly being the end result after severe injury. Advances in nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, and thrombolytic therapy have contributed to the development of a therapy proving successful in reversing these acute ischemic effects and ameliorating the morbidity of these rare limb-threatening injuries. PMID:21211711

  20. Spectrum of migraine variants and beyond: The individual syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Borad, Nirali

    2016-01-01

    "Migraine-related conditions" are probably the second most common condition after seizure encountered in pediatric neurology requiring frequent Emergency Department visits. Among migraines, migraine-related condition presents with an acute onset sign or symptom other than headache or visual aura of unknown etiology. A delay in diagnosis is a common occurrence. Previously, the authors proposed a common clinical profile and suggested that the future review should seek the applicability of the common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis of migraine-related individual syndromes. Authors describe the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the spectrum of migraine variants and beyond in children.

  1. Migraine and the menopausal transition.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vincent T

    2014-05-01

    The menopausal transition or "perimenopause" represents a time period of turbulent changes in ovarian hormones as middle-aged women progress into menopause. The purpose of this article is to review the literature to determine the effect of the menopausal transition on migraine headaches and to develop a rational treatment approach to these patients. The menopausal transition is divided into early and stages based upon patterns of menstruation and specific reproductive hormones. Studies would suggest that the prevalence of migraine and other climacteric symptoms tend to peak during the late menopausal transition particularly in those with a past history of premenstrual stress disorder. Treatment approaches vary by stage of the menopausal transition and include conventional daily preventatives, mini-prophylaxis and hormonal therapies.

  2. Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia following multimodality therapy for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Ortega, J.A.; Ying, K.L.

    1985-02-01

    The genetic form of retinoblastoma carries a high risk of secondary malignant neoplasm, apparently not related to the use of chemotherapy. A child with unilateral non-genetic retinoblastoma who had received chemotherapy and radiation therapy and developed acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) is reported. The occurrence of ANLL and retinoblastoma has not been previously reported.

  3. Laser therapy of acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Chikina, Elena E.; Meglinski, Igor V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Knyazev, Anatoly B.; Mareev, Oleg V.

    2006-06-01

    The clinical results of photodynamic therapy of maxillary sinusitis have been presented. 0.1%-Methylene Blue aqueous solution in combination with He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm) has been used for treatment of patients with acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis. Efficacy of the photodynamic therapy was estimated with the use of the following criteria: the state of respiration, olfaction, duration of purulent discharge, reconstruction of transport function of ciliary epithelium, etc. The obtained results have shown that the photodynamic therapy is effective in comparison with conservative methods of treatment of the diseases.

  4. Spectrum of complicated migraine in children: A common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Fields, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Complicated migraine encompasses several individual clinical syndromes of migraine. Such a syndrome in children frequently presents with various neurological symptoms in the Emergency Department. An acute presentation in the absence of headache presents a diagnostic challenge. A delay in diagnosis and treatment may have medicolegal implication. To date, there are no reports of a common clinical profile proposed in making a clinical diagnosis for the complicated migraine. In this clinical review, we propose and describe: (1) A common clinical profile in aid to clinical diagnosis for spectrum of complicated migraine; (2) How it can be used in differentiating complicated migraine from migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and seizure; (3) We discuss the status of complicated migraine in the International Headache Society classification 2013; and (4) In addition, a common treatment strategy for the spectrum of migraine has been described. To diagnose complicated migraine clinically, it is imperative to adhere with the proposed profile. This will optimize the use of investigation and will also avoid a legal implication of delay in their management. The proposed common clinical profile is incongruent with the International Headache Society 2013. Future classification should minimize the dissociation from clinically encountered syndromes and coin a single word to address collectively this subtype of migraine with an acute presentation of a common clinical profile. PMID:25664241

  5. Disentangling the intricacies of migraine: a review.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Priti; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Saini, Deepika

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of migraine, a neurological disorder, has still not been clearly established, although it may be categorized as a headache disorder with specific characteristics such as focal neurological symptoms preceding or accompanying the headache. Many researchers have suggested genetic predisposition as one of the underlying causes of migraine. An insight into the various pathophysiological mechanisms such as the role of cortical spreading depression, abnormal brain stem activity, trigeminal nerves, calcitonin gene related peptide, nitric oxide and serotonin receptors in the development of migraine, has been conferred in the present article. The accurate diagnosis of migraine and identification of its type is a prerequisite for appropriate therapy. Ample opportunity still exists for the improvement in the safety, efficacy and tolerance capacity of the currently available antimigraine medications, through the design and development of targeted drug delivery system. In the present review, an attempt has been made to highlight all the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine, its diagnosis, treatment and therapeutic area to be explored including mitigation of biochemical pathways and gene therapy.

  6. [Migraine - established concepts and new developments].

    PubMed

    Speck, V; Maihöfner, C

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a very common primary headache disorder associated with intermittent attacks and great suffering. Despite extensive research efforts in the recent years, many pathophysiological aspects remain unclear. An altered cortical adaptability and the brainstem as a migraine generator are probably involved in the initiation of a (silent) cortical spreading depression and other processes that lead to neurogenic inflammation of the meninges causing the headache. Numerous studies in the last years have examined somatic, especially cerebrovascular and also psychological comorbidities. For attack therapy, CGRP antagonists have emerged as promising non-vasoconstrictive acting alternatives for triptans. However, they were so far not approved due to liver enzyme elevations in safety studies. Another new approach without vasoconstrictive action are the selective 5-HT1F agonists (especially Lasmiditan). Large placebo-controlled and triptan-controlled trials need to be awaited. For migraine prophylaxis, a comparable effect of sports and pharmacological prophylaxis using topiramate could be found. Particularly the combination of drug and non-drug therapies (such as the combination of stress management training with a beta-blocker treatment) achieves high efficacy. Also interdisciplinary, multimodal treatment approaches are important options. Two large multicentre studies have demonstrated the efficacy of botulinum toxin A as a prophylactic treatment for chronic migraine. Neuromodulative and neurostimulative procedures are promising but still experimental treatment options for patients with refractory migraine.

  7. [Management of intractable migraine in adults].

    PubMed

    Pradalier, André; Baudesson, Gilles; Delage, Alain

    2003-01-01

    The management of intractable migraine is not yet standardised. The first point in the emergency department is to eliminate severe cephalalgic non-migrainous disease, then to confirm the diagnosis of migraine. The second point is to determine trigger factors responsible for the refractory migraine--principally inadequate therapy, such as too low a dosage, inadequate treatment compared with intensity, and delayed treatment. Examples of inadequate classical treatments are presented for the following four main oral therapies: a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), analgesics, ergot derivatives, and triptans. When these drugs are ineffective, the following are used via injections: propacetamol, aspirin (lysine acetylsalicylate), injectable NSAIDs, and nefopam. These products differ from country-to-country. For example, morphinomimetics, phenothiazines and corticosteroids are widely prescribed in the US, while metamizole (dipyrone) is preferred in developing countries. The authors describe the different models of administration and the adverse effects of the substances. Finally, they describe the treatment of status migrainosus. Globally, triptans are underused in emergency departments. This review confirms the need for controlled trials of treatments for migraine in emergency departments in order to develop an international therapeutic consensus. PMID:14679670

  8. Migraine: pathophysiology, pharmacology, treatment and future trends.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; Centurión, David; Valdivia, Luis Felipe; de Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    2003-03-01

    Migraine treatment has evolved into the scientific arena, but it seems still controversial whether migraine is primarily a vascular or a neurological dysfunction. Irrespective of this controversy, the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), a vasoconstrictor and a central neurotransmitter, seem to decrease during migraine (with associated carotid vasodilatation) whereas an i.v. infusion of 5-HT can abort migraine. In fact, 5-HT as well as ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and other antimigraine agents invariably produce vasoconstriction in the external carotid circulation. The last decade has witnessed the advent of sumatriptan and second generation triptans (e.g. zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan), which belong to a new class of drugs, the 5-HT1B/1D/1F receptor agonists. Compared to sumatriptan, the second-generation triptans have a higher oral bioavailability and longer plasma half-life. In line with the vascular and neurogenic theories of migraine, all triptans produce selective carotid vasoconstriction (via 5-HT1B receptors) and presynaptic inhibition of the trigeminovascular inflammatory responses implicated in migraine (via 5-HT1D/5-ht1F receptors). Moreover, selective agonists at 5-HT1D (PNU-142633) and 5-ht1F (LY344864) receptors inhibit the trigeminovascular system without producing vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, PNU-142633 proved to be ineffective in the acute treatment of migraine, whilst LY344864 did show some efficacy when used in doses which interact with 5-HT1B receptors. Finally, although the triptans are effective antimigraine agents producing selective cranial vasoconstriction, efforts are being made to develop other effective antimigraine alternatives acting via the direct blockade of vasodilator mechanisms (e.g. antagonists at CGRP receptors, antagonists at 5-HT7 receptors, inhibitors of nitric oxide biosynthesis, etc). These alternatives will hopefully lead to fewer side effects. PMID:15320857

  9. An overview of novel therapies for acute hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Rafael; Frank, Michael M

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Attacks are characterized by nonpitting edema of external or mucosal body surfaces. Patients often present with swelling of the extremities, abdominal pain, and swelling of the mouth and throat, which can at times lead to asphyxiation. The disease is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the complement C1-inhibitor protein, which leads to unregulated production of bradykinin. Long-term therapy has depended on the use of attenuated androgens or plasmin inhibitors but in the US there was, until recently, no specific therapy for acute attacks. As well, many patients with hereditary angioedema in the US were either not adequately controlled on previously available therapies or required doses of medications that exposed them to the risk of serious adverse effects. Five companies have completed or are currently conducting phase III clinical trials in the development of specific therapies to terminate acute attacks or to be used as prophylaxis. These products are based on either replacement therapy with purified plasma-derived or recombinant C1-inhibitor, or inhibition of the kinin-generating pathways with a recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor or bradykinin type 2 receptor antagonist. Published studies thus far suggest that all of these products are likely to be effective. These new therapies will likely lead to a totally new approach in treating hereditary angioedema. PMID:20866113

  10. Genetics Home Reference: sporadic hemiplegic migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of sporadic hemiplegic migraine: Genetic Testing Registry: Migraine, sporadic hemiplegic Journal of the American Medical Association Patient Page: Migraine ...

  11. [Exercise test after acute myocardial infarction: without therapy?].

    PubMed

    Gregorio, G

    2001-12-01

    In this article we analyze the role of ECG exercise test in the clinical evaluation and prognostic stratification of patients after acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, we analyze if test results may be influenced by drugs. In clinical practice, most of the cardiologists working in hospital perform pre-discharge tests while patients are on medical therapy; after the acute event, exercise test is performed after pharmacological wash-out. In the thrombolytic age exercise test has a well-defined role in the evaluation and prognostic stratification of postinfarction patients, but some aspects regarding the way of performance and the opportunity of a pharmacological wash-out need further investigation.

  12. Taking the headache out of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dodick, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Migraine is a disease that contributes to major disability. Perhaps because migraine attacks are not immediately life-threatening per se and individuals return to a “normal” state between attacks, it is not taken seriously. However, migraine is associated with a number of comorbidities, including psychiatric disease, stroke, and other chronic pain disorders. Current acute treatments for episodic migraine are relatively effective, but preventive treatments for episodic and chronic migraine are far less so. Recent functional imaging studies have shown that the disease affects brain function and structure (either as a result of its genetic predisposition or as a result of repeated attacks). The current evidence in the pain field is that changes observed in brain function and structure may be reversible, adding credence to the notion that treating the disease aggressively and early may be beneficial to patients. Here we suggest a change in our approach to a disease that is currently not treated with the urgency that it deserves given its global prevalence, disease burden, and effects on brain function. PMID:26335578

  13. Topiramate in the prevention and treatment of migraine: efficacy, safety and patient preference

    PubMed Central

    Naegel, Steffen; Obermann, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a very common disorder characterized by the combination of typical headache with associated autonomic symptoms and/or the presence of aura. Considerable advances have been made in recent years to understand the pathophysiology of migraine, which has led to improved treatment options for the acute migraine attack as well as migraine prophylaxis. Unfortunately, preventive treatment is often insufficient to decrease migraine frequency substantially or is not well tolerated. Topiramate is an antipileptic drug with a complex mode of action which has proven its efficacy and safety in the prophylactic treatment of episodic migraine in a number of randomized controlled clinical trials. Topiramate is also effective in treating patients with chronic migraine. It has little pharmacological interaction with other drugs and is generally well tolerated by patients. PMID:20169042

  14. [Migraine and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic disorders that share many clinical features and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. However, the temporal association between migraine and epilepsy is a controversial issue, since these two conditions may occur in numerous ways. Four types of association between headache and epileptic seizure are recognized: pre-ictal headache, headache as the expression of an epileptic manifestation, post-ictal headache, and inter-ictal headache. The classification of epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy did not refer to the epileptic headache. On the other hand, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-3) defines three entities: migraine aura-triggered seizure which sometimes referred to as migralepsy, hemicrania epileptica, and post-ictal headache. However, ICHD-3 mentions that there is a complex and bidirectional association between migraine and epilepsy. Most of the previous reports of migralepsy corresponded to occipital seizures that mimic migraine with aura. The term migralepsy has recently been criticized. Migraine and epilepsy share several pathophysiological mechanisms which involve neurotransmitters and iron channel dysfunctions. There is the hypothesis of a shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and epilepsy. Strong support of a shared genetic basis comes from familial hemiplegic migraine.

  15. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Breath Powered Nasal Delivery of Sumatriptan Powder (AVP-825) in the Treatment of Acute Migraine (The TARGET Study)

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Roger K; McAllister, Peter J; Spierings, Egilius LH; Messina, John; Carothers, Jennifer; Djupesland, Per G; Mahmoud, Ramy A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of AVP-825, a drug–device combination of low-dose sumatriptan powder (22 mg loaded dose) delivered intranasally through a targeted Breath Powered device vs an identical device containing lactose powder (placebo device) in the treatment of migraine headache. Background Early treatment of migraine headaches is associated with improved outcome, but medication absorption after oral delivery may be delayed in migraineurs because of reduced gastric motility. Sumatriptan powder administered with an innovative, closed-palate, Bi-Directional, Breath Powered intranasal delivery mechanism is efficiently absorbed across the nasal mucosa and produces fast absorption into the circulation. Results from a previously conducted placebo-controlled study of AVP-825 showed a high degree of headache relief with an early onset of action (eg, 74% AVP-825 vs 38% placebo device at 1 hour, P < .01). Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in adults with a history of migraine with or without aura, participants were randomized via computer-generated lists to AVP-825 or placebo device to treat a single migraine headache of moderate or severe intensity. The primary endpoint was headache relief (defined as reduction of headache pain intensity from severe or moderate migraine headache to mild or none) at 2 hours post-dose. Results Two hundred and thirty patients (116 AVP-825 and 114 placebo device) were randomized, of whom 223 (112 and 111, respectively) experienced a qualifying migraine headache (their next migraine headache that reached moderate or severe intensity). A significantly greater proportion of AVP-825 patients reported headache relief at 2 hours post-dose compared with those using the placebo device (68% vs 45%, P = .002, odds ratio 2.53, 95% confidence interval [1.45, 4.42]). Between-group differences in headache relief were evident as early as 15 minutes, reached statistical significance at 30

  16. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogenesis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise. PMID:23181051

  17. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies.

  18. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies. PMID:27269777

  19. Migraine headache. Working for the best outcome.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G; Solomon, G D; Millstein, E

    1987-06-01

    Migraine is a common hereditary disorder manifested by episodic headache, irritability, and gastrointestinal upset. The condition may be triggered by dietary, environmental, psychological, or pharmacologic factors. With proper diagnosis and judicious use of abortive and prophylactic therapy, patients often obtain excellent results. PMID:3588460

  20. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Mehmet, Baykara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL) usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs). These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia. PMID:27433037

  1. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p > 0.0014) and indirect (p = 0.001) occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p = 0.001). Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p > 0.000) and indirect (p > 0.000) physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p > 0.000). Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient's first therapy session. PMID:27752389

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Flores-Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Flores-Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification. PMID:24716037

  4. [Adsorption therapy for acute suppurative periostitis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Liubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R

    2002-01-01

    Capillaries and tissue leukocyte cytograms in soft gingival tissues were examined by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent periostitis of the jaws treated by different methods. Disorders in the lymph outflow from gingival tissues were detected, which were due to dilatation of the lymph vessels and interstitial spaces in the mucosal lamina propria and stasis with leukocyte aggregation and purulent clots in the lumina of many lymph vessels. Less pronounced dilatation of interstitial spaces and lymph vessels, higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages in the tissues of the gingival mucosa lamina propria, observed 2 days after the beginning of adsorption therapy of the subperiosteal abscess cavity, indicate that this therapy is more effective in acute purulent periostitis than traditional treatment.

  5. [Therapy of acute and subacute epiphysiolysis of the femur head].

    PubMed

    Kujat, R; Rogge, D; Tscherne, H

    1984-04-01

    Therapy and prognosis of the slipped capital femoral epiphysis are discussed in connection with the results obtained in the authors' own patients. Reduction of a dislocated femoral head is always desirable. If closed reduction fails, it will be necessary to reduce in full view. In smaller children, fixation is effected by means of several Kirschner wires, in older ones via screw osteosynthesis. Bone pegging or osteotomy are not suited for treatment of an acute or subacute slipped capital epiphysis.

  6. Contemporary therapy: aromatherapy in the management of acute pain?

    PubMed

    Ching, M

    1999-12-01

    Recent surveys indicate that people are increasingly using complementary therapies as an adjunct or alternative to conventional treatment options as well as for general health and well being. Whilst complementary therapies such as aromatherapy have been utilised in clinical settings as diverse as long term care facilities and palliative care, its application to the acute care setting has not been explored in depth. The changes in contemporary health care practices such as post-operative pain management and length of hospital admissions have provided nurses with the challenge of examining the range of therapeutic interventions that can be applied to their practice. The purpose of this paper is to examine critically the potential uses of aromatherapy in the management of acute post-operative pain. The concept of aromatherapy will be explored in relation to its effects on the pain pathways, methods of administration and therapeutic effects. Specific reference will be made to Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and its use in aromatherapy. A review of the literature points to gaps in the knowledge related to the clinical application of aromatherapy in relation to issues of dosage, methods of administration and therapeutic effects. The relatively small number of studies that have looked at aromatherapy in the acute care setting supports the literature reviewed. Issues such as small sample sizes and the difficulty in replicating these studies make it difficult to generalize the findings. In order to achieve best practice, further research is necessary to explore the use of aromatherapy in the management of acute post-operative pain.

  7. Thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction complicating diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Sim, Ming-Ming; Smith, Eric E

    2006-10-01

    Diagnostic and interventional percutaneous coronary catheterization is associated with stroke. Many of such strokes are asymptomatic, but some are devastating. Once the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction is confirmed, thrombolytic therapy should be administrated within the time window of 3 hours. We report a 61-year-old woman who suffered from an acute cerebral infarction during diagnostic cardiac catheterization for unstable angina, which manifested as sudden onset of global aphasia, right hemiplegia and gaze preponderance to the left side. Computed tomography of the head performed immediately after recognition of the symptoms showed a hyperdense middle cerebral artery (MCA) sign. Following prompt recognition and diagnosis, intravenous thrombolytic therapy was administered 2 hours after symptom onset. The patient had a favorable outcome. Initially, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 21, and 24 hours later it improved to 9. The hyperdense MCA lesion had resolved on the 24-hour follow-up scan. This case illustrates the clinical benefit of thrombolytic therapy in the setting of acute stroke associated with cardiac catheterization.

  8. Migraine headache: epidemiologic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Linet, M S; Stewart, W F

    1984-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that a number of factors are associated with the risk of migraine and precipitation of an attack. However, the degree to which causal associations can be inferred from reported studies is very limited and is a result of the methodological problems discussed throughout this review. The study of migraine in many ways parallels the pattern seen in early investigations of other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, because a number of methodological problems had to be resolved in the study of these conditions before significant progress could be made. To achieve significant advances in the improvement of our understanding of the causes of migraine, a number of related issues must be addressed and resolved in future studies. Most noteworthy among these are Recognition of the probable heterogeneity of migraine, not merely in the manifestation of symptoms but, more importantly, in the existence of distinct etiologic subtypes. A number of findings suggest that some migraine subtypes are sensitive to certain precipitants, some appear to be a part of a more generalized constitutional disorder, and some are accompanied by a higher prevalence of migraine among family members. Efforts should be made in understanding the relationship between specific biochemical markers and traits (such as monoamine oxidase deficiency and tyramine sensitivity); precipitants related to the migraine attack; and epidemiologic characteristics such as age at onset and sex. Creation of a more precise, reliable, and practically useful definition of migraine. Without such a definition, it is difficult, if not impossible, to compare results between studies, to understand the relationship between risk factors and migraine subtypes, to understand properly associations identified in selected clinic populations, and, in general, to understand the epidemiology of migraine. More accurate characterization of the case group under

  9. Migraine MLT-down: an unusual presentation of migraine in patients with aspartame-triggered headaches.

    PubMed

    Newman, L C; Lipton, R B

    2001-10-01

    Aspartame, an artificial sweetener added to many foods and beverages, may trigger headaches in susceptible individuals. We report two patients with aspartame-triggered attacks in whom the use of an aspartame-containing acute medication (Maxalt-MLT) worsened an ongoing attack of migraine.

  10. Pilot study of MK-462 in migraine.

    PubMed

    Cutler, N R; Claghorn, J; Sramek, J J; Block, G; Panebianco, D; Cheng, H; Olah, T V; Reines, S A

    1996-04-01

    MK-462 is a potent, selective 5HT1D receptor agonist which may be useful in treating acute migraine. We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled inpatient study to assess the preliminary efficacy and safety of oral doses of MK-462 20 mg (n = 8) and 40 mg (n = 36) vs placebo (n = 21), administered to 65 male and post-menopausal female migraine patients aged 22-51 with moderate or severe migraine headache. Headache severity and functional disability were measured at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 h post-dose. The 20 mg dose was well tolerated and 4/8 patients obtained relief in headache severity at the 2 h time point. The 40 mg dose was well tolerated and was significantly (p < 0.05) superior to placebo at the 1.5 and 2 h time points (with 27/36 or 75% obtaining relief at 2 h compared to 7/21 or 33% for placebo). Adverse events occurred in 50% of patients on 20 mg MK-462, 72% of those on 40 mg MK-462, and in 52% of placebo-treated subjects. The most common adverse events associated with MK-462 were drowsiness (20 mg 12%; 40 mg 44%; placebo 24%), dry mouth (40 mg 36%; placebo 19%), and lightheadedness/dizziness (40 mg 17%; placebo 10%). Based on these preliminary results, MK-462 appears worthy of continued study for the treatment of acute migraine. PMID:8665577

  11. Therapy Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(8;16) Mimicking Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chharchhodawala, Taher; Gajendra, Smeeta; Tiwari, Priya; Gogia, Ajay; Gupta, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;16)(p11;q13) is a distinct clinical and morphological entity with poor prognosis, which is characterized by a high frequency of extramedullary involvement, most commonly leukemia cutis; association with therapy related AML; frequent coagulopathy and morphologic features overlapping acute promyelocytic leukemia(APL). Herein, we present a case of 47 year-old post-menopausal woman developing secondary AML with t(8;16)(p11;q13) after 1 year of completion of therapy for breast carcinoma. Blasts were granulated with few showing clefted nucleus resembling promyelocytes and immnuophenotyping showed high side scatter with MPO positivity and CD 34 and HLA-DR negativity. In view of promyelocyte like morphology and immunophenotyping of blasts, possibility of APL was considered but, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for PML-RARα fusion transcript came out to be negative. Conventional cytogenetics showed t(8;16)(p11;q13). So, we should keep possibility of t(8;16) (p11;q13) in therapy related acute myeloid leukemia in patient showing clinical and morphological features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:27408347

  12. Spotlight on eletriptan in migraine.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L; Keating, Gillian M

    2006-01-01

    Eletriptan (Relpax) is an orally administered, lipophilic, highly selective serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist ('triptan') that is effective in the acute treatment of moderate to severe migraine attacks in adults. It has a rapid onset of action and demonstrates superiority over placebo as early as 30 minutes after the administration of a single 40 or 80 mg oral dose. The efficacy of eletriptan 20 mg was similar to that of sumatriptan 100 mg, while eletriptan 40 and 80 mg displayed greater efficacy than sumatriptan 50 or 100 mg for most endpoints. Eletriptan 40 mg was generally superior to naratriptan 2.5 mg and equivalent to almotriptan 12.5 mg, rizatriptan 10 mg and zolmitriptan 2.5 mg, while eletriptan 80 mg was superior to zolmitriptan 2.5 mg for most efficacy parameters. Eletriptan 40 and 80 mg were consistently superior to ergotamine/caffeine. Eletriptan is generally well tolerated, reduces time lost from normal activities, improves patients' health-related quality of life and appears to be at least as, if not more, cost effective than sumatriptan. Eletriptan is therefore a useful addition to the triptan family and a first-line treatment option in the acute management of migraine attacks. PMID:17044732

  13. Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Depression and Anxiety in Migraine Patients Todd A. Smitherman, PhD and ... if you experience these symptoms. Migraine, Depression, and Anxiety Many migraine patients suffer from symptoms of depression ...

  14. Trigeminal nociceptive transmission in migraineurs predicts migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Stankewitz, Anne; Aderjan, David; Eippert, Falk; May, Arne

    2011-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a major role of the trigeminovascular system in the pathogenesis of migraine. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we compared brain responses during trigeminal pain processing in migraine patients with those of healthy control subjects. The main finding is that the activity of the spinal trigeminal nuclei in response to nociceptive stimulation showed a cycling behavior over the migraine interval. Although interictal (i.e., outside of attack) migraine patients revealed lower activations in the spinal trigeminal nuclei compared with controls, preictal (i.e., shortly before attack) patients showed activity similar to controls, which demonstrates that the trigeminal activation level increases over the pain-free migraine interval. Remarkably, the distance to the next headache attack was predictable by the height of the signal intensities in the spinal nuclei. Migraine patients scanned during the acute spontaneous migraine attack showed significantly lower signal intensities in the trigeminal nuclei compared with controls, demonstrating activity levels similar to interictal patients. Additionally we found-for the first time using fMRI-that migraineurs showed a significant increase in activation of dorsal parts of the pons, previously coined "migraine generator." Unlike the dorsal pons activation usually linked to migraine attacks, the gradient-like activity following nociceptive stimulation in the spinal trigeminal neurons likely reflects a raise in susceptibility of the brain to generate the next attack, as these areas increase their activity long before headache starts. This oscillating behavior may be a key player in the generation of migraine headache, whereas attack-specific pons activations are most likely a secondary event.

  15. A PEPTIDE UNCOUPLING CRMP-2 FROM THE PRESYNAPTIC Ca(2+) CHANNEL COMPLEX DEMONSTRATES EFFICACY IN ANIMAL MODELS OF MIGRAINE AND AIDS THERAPY-INDUCED NEUROPATHY.

    PubMed

    Ripsch, Matthew S; Ballard, Carrie J; Khanna, May; Hurley, Joyce H; White, Fletcher A; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-03-01

    Biological, genetic, and clinical data provide compelling proof for N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) as therapeutic targets for chronic pain. While decreasing channel function is ultimately anti-nociceptive, directly targeting the channel can lead to multiple adverse effects. Targeting regulators of channel activity may facilitate improved analgesic properties associated with channel block and afford a broader therapeutic window. Towards this end, we recently identified a short peptide, designated CBD3, derived from collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) that suppressed inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity by inhibiting CRMP-2 binding to CaV2.2 [Brittain et al., Nature Medicine 17:822-829 (2011)]. Rodents administered CBD3 intraperitoneally, fused to the HIV TAT protein cell penetrating domain, exhibited antinociception lasting ~4 hours highlighting potential instability, limited oral bioavailability, and/or rapid elimination of peptide. This report focuses on improving upon the parental CBD3 peptide. Using SPOTScan analysis of synthetic versions of the parental CBD3 peptide, we identified peptides harboring single amino acid mutations that bound with greater affinity to CaV2.2. One such peptide, harboring a phenylalanine instead of glycine (G14F), was tested in rodent models of migraine and neuropathic pain. In vivo laser Doppler blood flowmetry measure of capsaicin-induced meningeal vascular responses related to headache pain was almost completely suppressed by dural application of the G14F peptide. The G14F mutant peptide, administered intraperitoneally, also exhibited greater antinociception in Stavudine (2'-3'-didehydro-2'-3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T)/Zerit®) model of AIDS therapy-induced peripheral neuropathy compared to the parent CBD3 peptide. These results demonstrate the patent translational value of small biologic drugs targeting CaV2.2 for management of clinical pain. PMID:22662308

  16. A PEPTIDE UNCOUPLING CRMP-2 FROM THE PRESYNAPTIC Ca2+ CHANNEL COMPLEX DEMONSTRATES EFFICACY IN ANIMAL MODELS OF MIGRAINE AND AIDS THERAPY-INDUCED NEUROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ripsch, Matthew S.; Ballard, Carrie J.; Khanna, May; Hurley, Joyce H.; White, Fletcher A.; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Biological, genetic, and clinical data provide compelling proof for N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) as therapeutic targets for chronic pain. While decreasing channel function is ultimately anti-nociceptive, directly targeting the channel can lead to multiple adverse effects. Targeting regulators of channel activity may facilitate improved analgesic properties associated with channel block and afford a broader therapeutic window. Towards this end, we recently identified a short peptide, designated CBD3, derived from collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) that suppressed inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity by inhibiting CRMP-2 binding to CaV2.2 [Brittain et al., Nature Medicine 17:822–829 (2011)]. Rodents administered CBD3 intraperitoneally, fused to the HIV TAT protein cell penetrating domain, exhibited antinociception lasting ~4 hours highlighting potential instability, limited oral bioavailability, and/or rapid elimination of peptide. This report focuses on improving upon the parental CBD3 peptide. Using SPOTScan analysis of synthetic versions of the parental CBD3 peptide, we identified peptides harboring single amino acid mutations that bound with greater affinity to CaV2.2. One such peptide, harboring a phenylalanine instead of glycine (G14F), was tested in rodent models of migraine and neuropathic pain. In vivo laser Doppler blood flowmetry measure of capsaicin-induced meningeal vascular responses related to headache pain was almost completely suppressed by dural application of the G14F peptide. The G14F mutant peptide, administered intraperitoneally, also exhibited greater antinociception in Stavudine (2'-3'-didehydro-2'-3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T)/Zerit®) model of AIDS therapy-induced peripheral neuropathy compared to the parent CBD3 peptide. These results demonstrate the patent translational value of small biologic drugs targeting CaV2.2 for management of clinical pain. PMID:22662308

  17. [Chronic migraine: treatment].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2012-04-10

    We define chronic migraine as that clinical situation in which migraine attacks appear 15 or more days per month. Until recently, and in spite of its negative impact, patients with chronic migraine were excluded of the clinical trials. This manuscript revises the current treatment of chronic migraine. The first step should include the avoidance of potential precipitating/aggravating factors for chronic migraine, mainly analgesic overuse and the treatment of comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The symptomatic treatment should be based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and triptans (in this case < 10 days per month). It is necessary to avoid the use of combined analgesics, opioids and ergotamine-containing medications. Preventive treatment includes a 'transitional' treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids, while preventive treatment exerts its actions. Even though those medications efficacious in episodic migraine prevention are used, the only drugs with demonstrated efficacy in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine are topiramate and pericranial infiltrations of Onabotulinumtoxin A.

  18. [Diet and migraine].

    PubMed

    Leira, R; Rodríguez, R

    1996-05-01

    Some foods in our diet can spark off migraine attacks in susceptible individuals. Some foods can bring an attack on through an allergic reaction. A certain number such as citrus fruits, tea, coffee, pork, chocolate, milk, nuts, vegetables and cola drinks have been cited as possible allergens associated with migraine. This mechanism has however been criticized: an improvement in symptoms by eliminating some food(s) from our diet does not necessarily mean an immunologically based allergic reaction. The high IgE incidence rate is not greater in such patients than in the population at large. Other allergic reactions unrelated to diet may also be associated with migraine attacks. On the other hand substances in food may be the cause of modifications in vascular tone and bring migraine on in those so prone. Among such substances are tyramine, phenylalanine, phenolic flavonoids, alcohol, food additives (sodium nitrate, monosodium glutamate, aspartame) and caffeine. Another recognized trigger for migraine is hypoglycemia. Such foods as chocolate, cheese, citrus fruits, bananas, nuts, 'cured' meats, dairy products, cereals, beans, hot dogs, pizza, food additives (sodium nitrate, monosodium glutamate in Chinese restaurant food, aspartame as a sweetener), coffee, tea, cola drinks, alcoholic drinks such as red wine, beer or whisky distilled in copper stills, all may bring on a migraine attack. For every patient we have to assess which foodstuffs are involved in the attack (not necessarily produced by consuming the product concerned) in order to try to avoid their consumptions as a means of prophylaxis for migraine.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in migraine.

    PubMed

    Yorns, William R; Hardison, H Huntley

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is the most frequent type of headache in children. In the 1980s, scientists first hypothesized a connection between migraine and mitochondrial (mt) disorders. More recent studies have suggested that at least some subtypes of migraine may be related to a mt defect. Different types of evidence support a relationship between mitochondria (mt) and migraine: (1) Biochemical evidence: Abnormal mt function translates into high intracellular penetration of Ca(2+), excessive production of free radicals, and deficient oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately causes energy failure in neurons and astrocytes, thus triggering migraine mechanisms, including spreading depression. The mt markers of these events are low activity of superoxide dismutase, activation of cytochrome-c oxidase and nitric oxide, high levels of lactate and pyruvate, and low ratios of phosphocreatine-inorganic phosphate and N-acetylaspartate-choline. (2) Morphologic evidence: mt abnormalities have been shown in migraine sufferers, the most characteristic ones being direct observation in muscle biopsy of ragged red and cytochrome-c oxidase-negative fibers, accumulation of subsarcolemmal mt, and demonstration of giant mt with paracrystalline inclusions. (3) Genetic evidence: Recent studies have identified specific mutations responsible for migraine susceptibility. However, the investigation of the mtDNA mutations found in classic mt disorders (mt encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy) has not demonstrated any association. Recently, 2 common mtDNA polymorphisms (16519C→T and 3010G→A) have been associated with pediatric cyclic vomiting syndrome and migraine. Also, POLG mutations (eg, p.T851 A, p.N468D, p.Y831C, p.G517V, and p.P163S) can cause disease through impaired replication of mtDNA, including migraine. Further studies to investigate the relationship between mt

  20. Opioid Treatment of Migraine: Risk Factors and Behavioral Issues.

    PubMed

    Stone, Melissa T; Weed, Valerie; Kulich, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Migraine can impact every aspect of a person's functioning. Psychological comorbidities, cognitive constructs, and behavioral responses to pain greatly impact the perception of migraine pain, treatment efficacy and outcome, and overall quality of life and functioning. Current considerations for migraine treatment emphasize the utility of the biopsychosocial model in understanding and treating migraine, noting both the importance of addressing psychological factors such as cognitive beliefs as well as psychiatric comorbidities. The guidelines for migraine treatment implicate opioid therapy as a second or third tier treatment. Guidelines and recommendations for the safe use of opioid medications among patients with chronic pain emphasize the importance of screening prior to prescribing opioid medications. Chronic opioid therapy has been shown to further levels of disability, decrease quality of life, and correlate to psychiatric comorbidities, concerns that are already present in migraine patients. While opioid treatment provides an alternative for persons with contraindications for alternative migraine treatments, it is critical that opioids be used sparingly and exclusively in conjunction with comprehensive assessment and integration of psychological treatment. PMID:27474093

  1. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  2. Migraine diagnosis and clinical symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S

    1994-09-01

    Migraine is a very common phenomenon. Eighteen percent of women in this country and 6% of men have migraine. The old classification for headaches and diagnostic criteria were published in 1962, more than a quarter of a century ago. In 1988, the International Headache Society published a new classification and diagnostic criteria for all headache disorders, cranial neuralgias, and facial pain. The International Headache Society classification divides migraine, as it had been divided in the past, into two major categories: migraine without aura (formerly called common migraine) and migraine with aura (formerly called classical migraine). These criteria are rather complex and simpler criteria are proposed for clinical practice. The typical patient with migraine is a woman whose headaches began in adolescence or young adult life. There usually is a family history of migraine. Migraine is almost always more than just a headache. Virtually anything in the external environment and many things in the internal milieu may provoke migraine in a susceptible individual. There are many potential manifestations of the aura of migraine, but 90% are visual phenomena. Migraine in children is a little different than in adults. When the onset is below the age of puberty, the ratio of females to males is equal, but after puberty there is a striking predominance of women over men in a ratio of 3:1. Whenever the history of migraine is not typical or if something unexpected is found on examination, imaging studies are warranted. PMID:7960727

  3. Optimization of combinations of ginsenoside-Rg1, ginsenoside-Rb1, evodiamine and rutaecarpine for effective therapy of mouse migraine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanchuan; Pan, Xueqiang; Xu, Yongsong; Lu, Xuran; He, Shida; He, Rui; Gong, Muxin

    2016-04-01

    Wuzhuyu decoction (WZYD) is a classic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula. It has been extensively used for treating migraine for thousands of years in TCM. Four potential active ingredients from WZYD, ginsenoside-Rg1 (Rg1), ginsenoside-Rb1 (Rb1), evodiamine (Ev) and rutaecarpine (Ru), were found to have positive correlations with pharmacodynamic indicators involving mouse migraine in our previous study. To find a better therapeutic effect on migraine, this research was carried out to optimize the combinations of Rg1, Rb1, Ev and Ru using the uniform design method. The results showed that Rb1 and Ev played key roles in improving the therapeutic effect on mouse migraine by strongly ameliorating pharmacodynamic indicators associated with migraine. They significantly increased the contents of 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline and dopamine in brain tissues, and reduced the content of nitric oxide in brain tissues and the activities of nitric oxide synthase in both brain tissues and blood serum. The optimal concentrations of Rb1 and Ev were 1057.4 mg/L and 312.5 mg/L, respectively. Rg1 and Ru contributed less to the overall desirability, suggesting that they had reverse effects on some pharmacodynamic indicators of this type of migraine. The verification test demonstrated by the immunohistochemical method that the optimal combination inhibited the expression of c-fos and c-jun in periaqueductal gray of mice, and strongly ameliorated pharmacodynamic indicators. These results suggested that the therapeutic effect of the optimal combination of the four ingredients was strong, and the optimal results were proven to be reliable and accurate.

  4. [Antibacterial therapy in surgery of patients with acute destructive appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Bezrodnyĭ, B H; Kolosovych, I V; Iovitsa, A V; Martynovych, L D; Sydorenko, R A; Sysak, O M

    2012-01-01

    Character of microflora of exsudate of abdominals and mucosis microflora of vermicular appendix is studied for patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis with the purpose of development of variants of antibacterial therapy at surgical treatment of patients with acute appendicitis. The patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis, which were on treatment in a municipal clinical hospital N 4 Kyiv for period 2004-2010. An Inflammatory-destructive process in an appendix is conditioned by both aerobic (Escherichia coli - 46,6 %, Enterobacter - 4,2 %, Citrobacter - 4,2 %, Klebsiella - 3,3 %, Pseudomonas aeruginosa - 5,8 %, Staphylococcus - 4,2 %) and anaerobic microorganisms (Bacteroides - 100 %) and increase Candida - 17,5 %. Antibacterial therapy is effective at 46,7 % patients with acute appendicitis. At 49,6 % patients acute appendicitis develops on a background dysbiotic intestinal disturbances. Clinically the effective charts of empiric antibacterial monotherapy 6 days it is been: Moxifloxacini intravenously 400 mgs one time in twenty-four hours during, Ertapenemi for a 1 g one time in twenty-four hours intravenously and combined - Aztreonami for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular during; Cefepimumi for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular.

  5. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group). All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society); 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician). Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine. PMID:22405186

  6. Commonly Used Acute Migraine Treatments

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Migraine and neurogenetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Swati

    2013-09-01

    In the current classification of headache disorders, headache attributable to genetic disorders is not classified separately, rather as headache attributed to cranial or cervical vascular disorder. The classification thus implies that a vascular pathology causes headache in these genetic disorders. Unquestionably, migraine is one of the prominent presenting features of several genetic cerebral small vessel diseases such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy, retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and hereditary infantile hemiparessis, retinal arteriolar tortuosity and leukoencephalopahty. Shared genetic features, increased susceptibility, and/or vascular endothelial dysfunction may play a role in pathogenesis of migraine. Common or overlapping pathways involving the responsible genes may provide insight regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms that can explain their comorbidity with migraine. This review focuses on clinical features of genetic vasculopathies. An independent category-migraine related to genetic disorders-should be considered to classify these disorders.

  8. Evolving Therapies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Progress at Last?

    PubMed

    DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stein, Eytan M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an acquired disease characterized by chromosomal translocations and somatic mutations that lead to leukemogenesis. Systemic combination chemotherapy with an anthracycline and cytarabine remains the standard induction regimen for "fit" adults. Patients who achieve complete remission generally receive postinduction therapy with cytarabine-based chemotherapy or an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Those unfit for induction chemotherapy are treated with hypomethylating agents (HMAs), low-dose cytarabine, or they are offered supportive care alone with transfusions and prophylactic antimicrobials. The revolution in understanding the genetics of AML, facilitated by next-generation sequencing, has led to many new drugs against driver mutations. Better methods of identification of leukemic blasts have provided us with better means to detect the disease left behind after cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. This measurable residual disease has been correlated with poorer relapse-free survival, demonstrating the need for novel strategies to eradicate it to improve the outcome of patients with acute leukemias. In this article, we discuss adapting and improving AML therapy by age and comorbidities, emerging targeted therapies in AML, and minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment in AML. PMID:27249736

  9. Effectiveness of chelation therapy with time after acute uranium intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, J.L.; Ortega, A.; Llobet, J.M.; Corbella, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of increasing the time interval between acute uranium exposure and chelation therapy was studied in male Swiss mice. Gallic acid, 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3- benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-AS) were administered ip at 0, 0.25, 1, 4, and 24 hr after sc injection of 10 mg/kg of uranyl acetate dihydrate. Chelating agents were given at doses equal to one-fourth of their respective LD50 values. Daily elimination of uranium into urine and feces was determined for 4 days after which time the mice were killed, and the concentration of uranium was measured in kidney, spleen, and bone. The excretion of uranium was especially rapid in the first 24 hr. Treatment with Tiron or gallic acid at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly increased the total excretion of the metal. In kidney and bone, only administration of Tiron at 0, 0.25, or 1 hr after uranium injection, or gallic acid at 1 hr after uranium exposure significantly reduced tissue uranium concentrations. Treatment at later times (4 to 24 hr) did not increase the total excretion of the metal and did not decrease the tissue uranium concentrations 4 days after uranyl acetate administration. The results show that the length of time before initiating chelation therapy for acute uranium intoxication greatly influences the effectiveness of this therapy.

  10. Pharmacological synergy: the next frontier on therapeutic advancement for migraine.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Andrew; Gennings, Chris; Cady, Roger

    2012-04-01

    The burden of migraine significantly impacts the individual sufferer, their families, the workplace, and society. The World Health Organization has identified migraine as an urgent public health priority and has initiated a global initiative to reduce the burden of migraine. Underlying the World Health Organization initiative is the need to discover means of optimizing migraine treatments and make them accessible to the broader portion of the world population. Development of acute migraine medications over the past several decades has largely centered on engineering highly specific receptor molecules that alter migraine pathophysiological mechanisms to abort or reverse the acute attack of migraine. The first product of this line of discovery was sumatriptan and heralded as a landmark therapeutic breakthrough. Sumatriptan is a 5-HT-1B/D receptor agonist considered to activate receptors involved in the pathophysiology specific to migraine. Large-scale regulatory/clinical studies demonstrated statistical superiority for sumatriptan over placebo in reduction or elimination of headache, nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia. Since the introduction of sumatriptan, 6 other triptan products have been released in the United States as acute treatments for migraine, all having the same mechanism of action and similar efficacy. Despite their utility as migraine abortive medications, the triptans do not successfully treat all attacks of migraine or necessarily treat all migraine associated symptoms. In fact, in less than 25% of attacks do subjects obtain and maintain a migraine-free response to treatment for at least beyond 24 hours. A wide range of non-triptan medications also have demonstrated efficacy in acute migraine. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, phenothiazines, and valproic acid to name a few. Given the distinctly different mechanisms of actions of these various medications, it is likely that several unique pathophysiological

  11. [Acute extremity compartment syndrome: current concepts in diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Sellei, R M; Hildebrand, F; Pape, H-C

    2014-07-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the upper and lower limbs is observed following trauma, reperfusion or as an intraoperative complication caused by positioning. The pathophysiology of the disorder has been extensively described and is well known as a loss of perfusion due to rising compartmental pressures. It is a serious and potentially limb- and life-threatening complication. Early diagnosis is made primarily based on clinical findings. Early and focused therapy is crucial to prevent the devastating complications of this acute condition. However, diagnosis can be difficult, particularly in unconscious patients. Thus, in uncertain cases, pressure measurements are essential. Dermato-fasciotomy is the routine method to decompress the compartmental space. This review article examines the clinical findings, diagnostic techniques, and management options for the patient with musculoskeletal injuries.

  12. Prophylaxis of migraine in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    While it has been established that headaches in the pediatric age group are relatively common, the characterization of headache disorders and their treatment in this group has historically been limited. Due to the paucity of controlled studies on prophylaxis of the primary headache disorders in children, the diagnosis of migraine often rests on criteria similar to those used in adults. Data from adult studies are often extrapolated and applied to the pediatric patient. Although it appears that many prophylactic agents are safe, well tolerated and efficacious in children, currently only topiramate is FDA-approved for use in patients 12 years and over. As a result, despite often experiencing significant disability, many children who present to their physician with migraines do not receive preventive therapy. One-third of adolescents meet the criteria for warranting prophylactic therapy, yet few are offered a preventative medication. Moreover, controlled clinical trials investigating the use of both abortive and prophylactic medications in children have suffered from high placebo response rates. A diverse group of medications are used to prevent migraine attacks, including antidepressants, antiepileptics, antihistamines and antihypertensive agents, yet there still remains a serious lack of controlled studies on the pharmacological treatment of pediatric migraine.

  13. Building better therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William L; Raetz, Elizabeth A

    2005-04-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is one of the most curable of all human cancers, but new approaches are urgently needed for children who relapse and to avoid severe side effects of curative therapy. Work from the laboratories of Rob Pieters and William Evans, including a paper in this issue of Cancer Cell, has led to the identification of genes whose expression correlates with drug crossresistance and long term outcome. The goal is now to integrate these and other findings using gene expression technology into the care of children with the most common pediatric malignancy. PMID:15837616

  14. Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Karen J; Lewis, James F

    2007-09-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a life-threatening form of respiratory failure that affects a heterogeneous population of critically ill patients. Although overall mortality appears to be decreasing in recent years due to improvements in supportive care, there are presently no proven, effective pharmacological therapies to treat ARDS and prevent its associated complications. The most common cause of death in ARDS is not hypoxemia or pulmonary failure, but rather multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), suggesting that improving survival in patients with ARDS may be linked to decreasing the incidence or severity of MODS. The key to developing novel treatments depends, in part, on identifying and understanding the mechanisms by which ARDS leads to MODS, although the heterogeneity and complexity of this disorder certainly poses a challenge to investigators. Novel therapies in development for treatment of ALI/ARDS include exogenous surfactant, therapies aimed at modulating neutrophil activity, such as prostaglandin and complement inhibitors, and treatments targeting earlier resolution of ARDS, such as beta-agonists and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. From a clinical perspective, identifying subpopulations of patients most likely to benefit from a particular therapy and recognising the appropriate stage of illness in which to initiate treatment could potentially lead to better outcomes in the short term.

  15. Evidence-Based Treatments for Adults with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Nimeri, Randa; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Migraine, a significantly disabling condition, is treated with acute and preventive medications. However, some individuals are refractory to standard treatments. Although there is a host of alternative management options available, these are not always backed by strong evidence. In fact, most of the drugs used in migraine were initially designed for other purposes. Whilst effective, the benefits from these medications are modest, reflecting the need for newer and migraine-specific therapeutic agents. In recent years, we have witnessed the emergence of novel treatments, of which noninvasive neuromodulation appears to be the most attractive given its ease of use and excellent tolerability profile. This paper reviews the evidence behind the available treatments for migraine. PMID:26839703

  16. The use of triptans for pediatric migraines.

    PubMed

    Eiland, Lea S; Hunt, Melissa O

    2010-12-01

    Migraine headaches frequently occur in the pediatric population, with a prevalence of 3% in children 2-7 years of age, 4-11% in children 7-11 years of age, and 8-23% in children 11 years of age and older. Migraine without aura is more than twice as common as migraine with aura in children. Headaches are the third leading cause of emergency room referrals and rank in the top five health problems of children. The 2004 American Academy of Neurology's treatment parameter for migraine in children and adolescents recommended that nasal sumatriptan be considered for acute treatment; however, data were lacking to make a decision regarding the available oral triptans at that time. The more recently released European guidelines discuss three different triptans for use in children but no specific triptan was recommended. Currently, six of the seven available triptans have been studied for efficacy and safety in the pediatric population; however, only a few well controlled clinical studies have been conducted. Sumatriptan has the most available data on outcomes in general, with nasal sumatriptan showing the most positive results. Nasal sumatriptan is approved in children older than 12 years of age in Europe. Oral sumatriptan does not show any clinical benefit versus placebo in children. Rizatriptan and zolmitriptan have conflicting efficacy and safety data, with most studies favoring the use of oral rizatriptan and nasal zolmitriptan. Almotriptan is the first triptan to obtain a US FDA indication in adolescents with migraines lasting 4 or more hours. This approval was based upon two studies, one large clinical trial and one very small, open-label, pilot study. At this time, there are insufficient data to recommend naratriptan and eletriptan for first- or second-line use in pediatric patients with migraines. There are currently no efficacy data for frovatriptan in pediatric patients, which limits its use in this population. Adverse effects of triptans and pharmacokinetic data

  17. Red Ear and More: Facial and Extrafacial Erythema Accompanying Migraine Attacks.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Elena Martínez; Mesonero, Luis López; Hueso, María Isabel Pedraza; Piñero, Marina Ruiz; de Lera Alfonso, Mercedes; Peral, Ángel Luis Guerrero

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of migraine are infrequent and their spectrum is reduced to the red ear syndrome (RES) and eyelid disorders. We report a case of a 26-year-old woman with migraine accompanied by extensive erythema, which involved right ear and cheek and left hemithorax. She fulfilled proposed criteria of RES. We started preventive therapy with a significant response. This is the first description in the literature of an erythema accompanying migraine attacks broadly exceeding the ear. PMID:26474080

  18. Source localization of intermittent rhythmic delta activity in a patient with acute confusional migraine: cross-spectral analysis using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Eun; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Eom, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, Jung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acute confusional migraine (ACM) shows typical electroencephalography (EEG) patterns of diffuse delta slowing and frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA). The pathophysiology of ACM is still unclear but these patterns suggest neuronal dysfunction in specific brain areas. We performed source localization analysis of IRDA (in the frequency band of 1-3.5 Hz) to better understand the ACM mechanism. Typical IRDA EEG patterns were recorded in a patient with ACM during the acute stage. A second EEG was obtained after recovery from ACM. To identify source localization of IRDA, statistical non-parametric mapping using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography was performed for the delta frequency band comparisons between ACM attack and non-attack periods. A difference in the current density maximum was found in the dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (ACC). The significant differences were widely distributed over the frontal, parietal, temporal and limbic lobe, paracentral lobule and insula and were predominant in the left hemisphere. Dorsal ACC dysfunction was demonstrated for the first time in a patient with ACM in this source localization analysis of IRDA. The ACC plays an important role in the frontal attentional control system and acute confusion. This dysfunction of the dorsal ACC might represent an important ACM pathophysiology.

  19. Providing Care for Patients with Chronic Migraine: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Carrie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic migraine, a subtype of migraine defined as ≥ 15 headache days per month for ≥ 3 months, in which ≥ 8 days per month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to migraine-specific treatment, is a disabling, underdiagnosed, and undertreated disorder associated with significant disability, poor health-related quality of life, and high economic burden. The keys to caring for chronic migraine patients include: (1) making a proper diagnosis; (2) identifying and eliminating exacerbating factors; (3) assessing for medication overuse (patients with chronic headache often overuse acute medications); and (4) continued management. Communication between patient and physician about treatment goals is important. The patient management guidelines presented in this article should help physicians improve treatment success and proactively address common comorbidities among their patients with chronic migraine.

  20. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes

    PubMed Central

    Irby, Megan B.; Bond, Dale S.; Lipton, Richard B.; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T.; Penzien, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Overview Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Conclusion Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the

  1. Failure of antibiotic therapy in acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Lemarchand, Vincent; Moreau, Sylvain; Goullet de Rugy, Marc; Valdazo, André; Bequignon, Arnaud

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the possible causes of failure of antibiotic therapy in children with acute otitis media (AOM). Thirty-nine samples of middle-ear fluid were obtained by myringotomy from 31 children suffering from AOM, unrelieved by antibiotic therapy administered for over 48 hours. The samples were analysed by the usual microbiological techniques, including cultures, tests for beta-lactamase producing strains and the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration of penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In 14 samples, no bacterial strains were detected in the cultures of middle-ear fluid; and in two samples the cultures revealed two strains of bacteria. The bacteria most frequently identified were Haemophilus influenzae, found in 11 samples, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, found in seven samples, of which four produced strains with reduced susceptibility to penicillin. The failure of antibiotic therapy in AOM appears to be related to the increased resistance of Haemophilus influenzae and to the reduced susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin. Other factors contributing to the failure of antibiotic therapy in AOM may be the viruses or the bacteria that produce multiple pathogens in the middle ear.

  2. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  3. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a.Migraine Associated Vertigo or [MAV])

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a Top Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Vestibular Migraine (a.k.a. Migraine Associated Vertigo or ... Wackym on his You Tube Channel. Migraine and vestibular dysfunction Approximately 40% of migraine patients have some ...

  4. Two Mechanisms Involved in Trigeminal CGRP Release: Implications for Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.; Masterson, Caleb G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to better understand the cellular mechanisms involved in proton stimulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) secretion from cultured trigeminal neurons by investigating the effects of two anti-migraine therapies, onabotulinumtoxin A and rizatriptan. Background Stimulated CGRP release from peripheral and central terminating processes of trigeminal ganglia neurons is implicated in migraine pathology by promoting inflammation and nociception. Based on models of migraine pathology, several inflammatory molecules including protons are thought to facilitate sensitization and activation of trigeminal nociceptive neurons and stimulate CGRP secretion. Despite the reported efficacy of triptans and onabotulinumtoxinA to treat acute and chronic migraine, respectively, a substantial number of migraneurs do not get adequate relief with these therapies. A possible explanation is that triptans and onabutulinumtoxinA are not able to block proton mediated CGRP secretion. Methods CGRP secretion from cultured primary trigeminal ganglia neurons was quantitated by radioimmunoassay while intracellular calcium and sodium levels were measured in neurons via live cell imaging using Fura2-AM and SBFI-AM, respectively. The expression of ASIC3 was determined by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, the involvement of ASICs in mediating proton stimulation of CGRP was investigated using the potent and selective ASIC3 inhibitor APETx2. Results While KCl caused a significant increase in CGRP secretion that was significantly repressed by treatment with EGTA, onabotulinumtoxinA, and rizatriptan, the stimulatory effect of protons (pH 5.5) was not suppressed by EGTA, onabotulinumtoxinA, or rizatriptan. In addition, while KCl caused a transient increase in intracellular calcium levels that was blocked by EGTA, no appreciable change in calcium levels was observed with proton treatment. However, protons did significantly increase the

  5. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  6. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with OnabotulinumtoxinA: Mode of Action, Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Szok, Délia; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László; Tajti, János

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic migraine is a common, highly disabling, underdiagnosed and undertreated entity of migraine. It affects 0.9%–2.2% of the general adult population. The present paper overviews the preclinical and clinical data regarding the therapeutic effect of onabotulinumtoxinA in chronic migraineurs. Methods: A literature search was conducted in the database of PubMed up to 20 May 2015 for articles related to the pathomechanism of chronic migraine, the mode of action, and the efficacy, safety and tolerability of onabotulinumtoxinA for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. Results: The pathomechanism of chronic migraine has not been fully elucidated. The mode of action of onabotulinumtoxinA in the treatment of chronic migraine is suggested to be related to the inhibition of the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in the trigeminovascular system. Randomized clinical trials demonstrated that long-term onabotulinumtoxinA fixed-site and fixed-dose (155–195 U) intramuscular injection therapy was effective and well tolerated for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. Conclusions: Chronic migraine is a highly devastating entity of migraine. Its exact pathomechanism is unrevealed. Two-third of chronic migraineurs do not receive proper preventive medication. Recent clinical studies revealed that onabotulinumtoxinA was an efficacious and safe treatment for chronic migraine. PMID:26193319

  7. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter AB; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. PMID:27307722

  8. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter A B; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care.

  9. Nutrition disorders during acute renal failure and renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiesen, Patricia; Van Overmeire, Lionel; Delanaye, Pierre; Dubois, Bernard; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2011-03-01

    The physiological and biological modifications related to acute renal failure in critically ill patients, including the current use of continuous renal replacement therapies, have dramatically changed the type and importance of the metabolic and nutrition disturbances observed during treatment of renal failure. This review summarizes the current knowledge and makes recommendations for the daily nutrition management of these patients. The filtration of water-soluble substances of low molecular weight by continuous hemodiafiltration results in significant losses of glucose, amino acids, low-molecular-weight proteins, trace elements, and water-soluble vitamins. The losses of these macronutrients and micronutrients should be compensated for. During continuous renal replacement therapy, the daily recommended energy allowance is between 25 and 35 kcal/kg, with a ratio of 60%-70% carbohydrates to 30%-40% lipids, and between 1.5 and 1.8 g/kg protein. Providing energy 25-35 kcal/kg/d with a carbohydrate/lipid ratio of 60-70/30-40 and protein 1.5-1.8 g/kg/d is recommended during continuous renal replacement therapy. Supplemental vitamin B(1) (100 mg/d), vitamin C (250 mg/d), and selenium (100 mcg/d) are also recommended.

  10. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter A B; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. PMID:27307722

  11. Migraine and metaphor.

    PubMed

    Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    The metaphors of migraine make it a challenging source of inspiration for writers of fiction. The visual aura is a hallucination, the outside world - the so-called 'reality' - is distorted. The excruciating pain can stand for horror, punishment, and fate. Photophobia, phonophobia, and osmophobia underline visual, acoustic, and olfactoric stimuli. The protagonist sees, hears, and smells more, but not always better. Paradoxically, this increased awareness of 'reality' results in a need to seek isolation. Often, the end of a migraine attack is like a rescue. Immediately after an attack the fear of the next one begins. As migraine is hereditary, there are also aspects of solidarity, but shame and blame are nearby. PMID:23485897

  12. Animal models of monogenic migraine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Tolner, Else A; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder with a strong genetic component. Rare monogenic forms of migraine, or syndromes in which migraine frequently occurs, help scientists to unravel pathogenetic mechanisms of migraine and its comorbidities. Transgenic mouse models for rare monogenic mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), have been created. Here, we review the current state of research using these mutant mice. We also discuss how currently available experimental approaches, including epigenetic studies, biomolecular analysis and optogenetic technologies, can be used for characterization of migraine genes to further unravel the functional and molecular pathways involved in migraine. PMID:27154999

  13. The TRPA1 channel in migraine mechanism and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Benemei, S; Fusi, C; Trevisan, Gabriela; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2014-01-01

    Migraine remains an elusive and poorly understood disease. The uncertainty is reflected by the currently unsatisfactory acute and prophylactic treatments for this disease. Genetic and pharmacological information points to the involvement of some transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in pain mechanisms. In particular, the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels seem to play a major role in different models of pain diseases. Recent findings have underscored the possibility that TRP channels expressed in the nerve terminals of peptidergic nociceptors contribute to the migraine mechanism. Among this channel subset, TRPA1, a sensor of oxidative, nitrative and electrophilic stress, is activated by an unprecedented series of irritant and pain-provoking exogenous and endogenous agents, which release the pro-migraine peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, through this neuronal pathway. Some of the recently identified TRPA1 activators have long been known as migraine triggers. Furthermore, specific analgesic and antimigraine medicines have been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPA1 channels. Thus, TRPA1 is emerging as a major contributing pathway in migraine and as a novel target for the development of drugs for pain and migraine treatment. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24206166

  14. The TRPA1 channel in migraine mechanism and treatment.

    PubMed

    Benemei, S; Fusi, C; Trevisan, Gabriela; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2014-05-01

    Migraine remains an elusive and poorly understood disease. The uncertainty is reflected by the currently unsatisfactory acute and prophylactic treatments for this disease. Genetic and pharmacological information points to the involvement of some transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in pain mechanisms. In particular, the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels seem to play a major role in different models of pain diseases. Recent findings have underscored the possibility that TRP channels expressed in the nerve terminals of peptidergic nociceptors contribute to the migraine mechanism. Among this channel subset, TRPA1, a sensor of oxidative, nitrative and electrophilic stress, is activated by an unprecedented series of irritant and pain-provoking exogenous and endogenous agents, which release the pro-migraine peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, through this neuronal pathway. Some of the recently identified TRPA1 activators have long been known as migraine triggers. Furthermore, specific analgesic and antimigraine medicines have been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPA1 channels. Thus, TRPA1 is emerging as a major contributing pathway in migraine and as a novel target for the development of drugs for pain and migraine treatment.

  15. Acute pancreatitis induced by paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy in an ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Shintani, D; Yoshida, H; Imai, Y; Fujiwara, K

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was treated with a regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC therapy) as adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage IC ovarian adenocarcinoma. There was no severe toxicity except for grade 3 neutropenia during the first four cycles of TC therapy. However, she developed acute pancreatitis at 14 days after fifth cycle. TC therapy is commonly associated with adverse effects such as myelosuppression, hypersensitivity, alopecia, and peripheral neuropathy, but acute pancreatitis has rarely been reported. Ovarian cancer patients often present with nausea and abdominal pain, which are the same symptoms of pancreatitis. It is very important to keep in mind that acute pancreatitis may be concealed in these common symptoms of ovarian cancer during and after TC therapy. Because acute pancreatitis is fatal complication and quitting the drug usually leads to complete cure. The authors report an uncommon case in which TC therapy may have caused acute pancreatitis. PMID:27172765

  16. Acute pancreatitis induced by paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy in an ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Shintani, D; Yoshida, H; Imai, Y; Fujiwara, K

    2016-01-01

    A 46-year-old female was treated with a regimen of paclitaxel and carboplatin (TC therapy) as adjuvant chemotherapy for Stage IC ovarian adenocarcinoma. There was no severe toxicity except for grade 3 neutropenia during the first four cycles of TC therapy. However, she developed acute pancreatitis at 14 days after fifth cycle. TC therapy is commonly associated with adverse effects such as myelosuppression, hypersensitivity, alopecia, and peripheral neuropathy, but acute pancreatitis has rarely been reported. Ovarian cancer patients often present with nausea and abdominal pain, which are the same symptoms of pancreatitis. It is very important to keep in mind that acute pancreatitis may be concealed in these common symptoms of ovarian cancer during and after TC therapy. Because acute pancreatitis is fatal complication and quitting the drug usually leads to complete cure. The authors report an uncommon case in which TC therapy may have caused acute pancreatitis.

  17. [Current therapy of the acute coronary syndrome - 2016].

    PubMed

    Becker, Dávid; Merkely, Béla

    2016-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is a life threatening disease with high mortality rate without optimal therapy. Due to the continuous development in the treatment of the disease, the prognosis has dramatically improved over the last 30 years. Apart from the improvement of the medication, the most important factor is the availability of an immediate coronary intervention for everyone, at any time. Currently, nineteen interventional centers provide this care in Hungary, 24 hours a day. Thanks to the European guidelines, the care system is now more efficient in determining who and when needs the treatment. This article summarises the principles of the treatment currently in use. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1500-1506. PMID:27640615

  18. Dietary and Lifestyle Changes in the Treatment of a 23-Year-Old Female Patient With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brett R.; Seaman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with atypical migraine headache. Clinical Features A 23-year-old woman experienced migraines for 3 months. She had no previous history of migraines and was unresponsive to pharmaceutical and musculoskeletal therapies. The migraine headaches could not be classified according to the common categories associated with migraines. She had a change in diet due to severe gastroesophageal reflux causing her to reduce or avoid consuming foods. She also had a history of smoking and alcohol consumption. Intervention and Outcome Dietary and lifestyle changes were recommended in conjunction with the administration of a multivitamin, magnesium oxide, and Ulmus rubra. Her migraine headaches improved with the resolution of her gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Conclusion This patient with atypical migraines and a history of poor dietary and lifestyle choices improved using nutritional changes and supplementing with a multivitamin and magnesium oxide. PMID:26778934

  19. [Characteristics of therapy of acute myocardial infarction in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Motz, W; Kerner, W

    2012-05-01

    Therapy of acute myocardial infarction (STEMI and NSTEMI) in diabetics does not principally differ from that of non-diabetic patients. Due to the higher mortality in diabetics reperfusion measures, such as direct percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), should be rapidly performed. An intensive drug treatment with thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-receptor blocking agents must be carried out according to the current guidelines. An important factor is the high risk of renal failure due to the contrast dye administered during PCI in the presence of pre-existing diabetic kidney damage which should be limited to 100 ml if possible. Direct PCI should be limited to the infarcted vessel. After stabilization a comprehensive strategy to cure coronary artery disease, whether with PCI or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) should be finalized. If severe coronary 3-vessel disease is present, CABG should be favored in diabetic patients. After surviving an acute myocardial infarction differentiated metabolic monitoring is mandatory.

  20. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Early vs. non-early intervention in acute migraine-'Act when Mild (AwM)'. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of almotriptan.

    PubMed

    Goadsby, P J; Zanchin, G; Geraud, G; de Klippel, N; Diaz-Insa, S; Gobel, H; Cunha, L; Ivanoff, N; Falques, M; Fortea, J

    2008-04-01

    The study was designed to compare the response to almotriptan in migraine patients who take medication early in the course of the attack with that when medication is taken after pain has become moderate or severe. A randomized, four-arm, multicentre, multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of almotriptan (12.5 mg) comparing treatment administration when pain intensity was mild and within 1 h of headache onset vs. pain that had become moderate or severe was conducted. Of 491 migraineurs enrolled, 403 were evaluable [intention-to-treat population (ITT)]. Their mean age was 38 years, 84% were female and they had a mean of 3.7 attacks/month. Of these patients, 10% did not take medication according to their randomly allocated basal pain intensity (mild or moderate/severe) and were subsequently reassigned to that group for this analysis-'Act when Mild (AwM)' group. In the almotriptan arms, 53% of mild basal pain and 38% of moderate/severe basal pain patients were pain free at 2 h (P = 0.03; primary end-point). Corresponding proportions in the placebo groups were 25% and 17% (statistically significant vs. respective almotriptan arms). Secondary end-points (ITT) were also significantly in favour of early intervention with almotriptan, both between and across treatment groups, such as sustained pain free: 45.6% vs. 30.5% (P = 0.02). Adverse events were reported in < 5% of treated patients in all groups (NS), with no serious events. Treatment with almotriptan while migraine pain is still mild provides statistically significant and clinically relevant enhancements in efficacy compared with treatment when pain has reached higher severity levels. PMID:18294251

  2. Application of acute stroke imaging: selecting patients for revascularization therapy.

    PubMed

    Shang, Tiesong; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2012-09-25

    Due to the dynamic and versatile characteristics of ischemic penumbra, selecting the right acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients for revascularization therapy (RT) based on initial available imaging can be challenging. The main patient selection criterion for RT is the size of the mismatch between the potentially salvageable tissue (penumbra) and the irreversibly damaged tissue (core). The goal of revascularization RT is to "freeze" the core and prevent it from extending to the penumbral tissue. Penumbral imaging selection of AIS patients for RT, using magnetic resonance or CT-based studies, may provide more clinical benefit to the appropriate patients, although direct evidence is pending. Not all penumbra-core mismatches beyond 3 hours are equal and need treatment, and defining which mismatches to target for RT is the current goal of ongoing clinical trials. In addition to "penumbral"-based imaging, large vessel occlusion and clot length estimation based on CT angiography and noncontrasted ultrathin CT scan has been used to identify patients who are refractory to systemic thrombolysis and may be eligible for endovascular therapy. The application of various imaging modalities in selecting and triaging AIS patients for RT is discussed in this review. Larger prospective randomized trials are needed to better understand the role of various imaging modalities in selecting AIS patients for RT and to understand its influence on clinical outcome.

  3. A better model of acute pancreatitis for evaluating therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Rattner, D W; Lewandrowski, K; Compton, C C; Mandavilli, U; Knoefel, W T; Warshaw, A L

    1992-01-01

    Existing models of acute pancreatitis have limitations to studying novel therapy. Whereas some produce mild self-limited pancreatitis, others result in sudden necrotizing injury. The authors developed an improved model providing homogeneous moderately severe injury by superimposing secretory hyperstimulation on minimal intraductal bile acid exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 231) received low-pressure intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (GDOC) at very low (5 or 10 mmol/L) concentrations followed by intravenous cerulein. Cerulein or GDOC alone caused only very mild inflammation. However, GDOC combined with cerulein was uniformly associated with more edema (p less than 0.0005), acinar necrosis (p less than 0.01), inflammation (p less than 0.006), and hemorrhage (p less than 0.01). Pancreatic injury was further increased and death was potentiated by increasing volume and duration of intraductal low-dose GDOC infusion. There was significant morphologic progression between 6 and 24 hours. The authors conclude that (1) combining minimal intraductal bile acid exposure with intravenous hyperstimulation produces homogeneous pancreatitis of intermediate severity that can be modulated at will; (2) the injury is progressive over at least 24 hours with finite mortality rate; (3) the model provides superior opportunity to study innovative therapy. Images FIG. 3. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. PMID:1731649

  4. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  5. [Is the management of migraine and tension headache in Croatia satisfactory?].

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Vlasta Vuković

    2013-12-01

    According to the epidemiological study conducted in Croatia, 15% of the population suffer from migraine, 20.6% from tension-type headache and 2.4% from chronic headache. Although migraine is a frequent primary headache and poses a major problem to both the affected individuals and the society, it is considered that migraine is underdiagnosed. The study revealed half of patients with headache and even 36.3% of respondents with migraine to have never visited a doctor. Migraine and tension-type headache are not satisfactorily treated; in the study, one-quarter of the respondents were fully satisfied with the treatment of their headaches, approximately half were partially satisfied, one-fifth were mostly unsatisfied, and 10% were completely unsatisfied. It should be noted that specific therapy for migraine attacks, i.e. triptans, are available on the market and can be administered for moderate and severe headache attacks. Triptans are prescribed rarely, not only in Croatia but also in the world, although studies have shown that the use of triptans increases productivity at work and improves the quality of life in migraineurs. Prophylaxis may significantly improve the quality of life; the Croatian epidemiological study showed only 14% of respondents with migraine to have ever used prophylactic therapy. Considering that migraine is an 'expensive disorder', appropriate treatment of patients with migraine will decrease the costs that include visits to general practitioners, emergency departments and cost of hospitalization. Even indirect costs will decrease as well, including the costs caused by absenteeism from work and costs caused by reduced efficiency at work. It is necessary to educate the population about migraine and therapeutic options. Lack of time, unrecognized patients and insufficient knowledge about current treatment of migraine and other primary headaches are probably the reasons why patients do not receive appropriate therapy. Continuous campaigns, which

  6. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  7. Migraine misdiagnosis as a sinusitis, a delay that can last for many years

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sinusitis is the most frequent misdiagnosis given to patients with migraine. Therefore we decided to estimate the frequency of misdiagnosis of sinusitis among migraine patients. Methods The study included migraine patients with a past history of sinusitis. All included cases fulfilled the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-III- beta) criteria. We excluded patients with evidence of sinusitis within the past 6 months of evaluation. Demographic data, headache history, medical consultation, and medication intake for headache and effectiveness of therapy before and after diagnosis were collected. Results A total of 130 migraine patients were recruited. Of these patients 106 (81.5%) were misdiagnosed as sinusitis. The mean time delay of migraine diagnosis was (7.75 ± 6.29, range 1 to 38 years). Chronic migraine was significantly higher (p < 0.02) in misdiagnosed patients than in patients with proper diagnosis. Medication overuse headache (MOH) was reported only in patients misdiagnosed as sinusitis. The misdiagnosed patients were treated either medically 87.7%, or surgically12.3% without relieve of their symptoms in 84.9% and 76.9% respectively. However, migraine headache improved in 68.9% after proper diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions Many migraine patients were misdiagnosed as sinusitis. Strict adherence to the diagnostic criteria will prevent the delay in migraine diagnosis and help to prevent chronification of the headache and possible MOH. PMID:24330723

  8. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Engmann, Birk

    2012-01-01

    This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet. PMID:22649454

  9. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  10. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  11. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of the visual cortex: a proof-of-concept study based on interictal electrophysiological abnormalities in migraine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Preventive pharmacotherapy for migraine is not satisfactory because of the low efficacy/tolerability ratio of many available drugs. Novel and more efficient preventive strategies are therefore warranted. Abnormal excitability of cortical areas appears to play a pivotal role in migraine pathophysiology. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive and safe technique that is able to durably modulate the activity of the underlying cerebral cortex, and is being tested in various medical indications. The results of small open studies using tDCS in migraine prophylaxis are conflicting, possibly because the optimal stimulation settings and the brain targets were not well chosen. We have previously shown that the cerebral cortex, especially the visual cortex, is hyperresponsive in migraine patients between attacks and provided evidence from evoked potential studies that this is due to a decreased cortical preactivation level. If one accepts this concept, anodal tDCS over the visual cortex may have therapeutic potentials in migraine prevention, as it is able to increase neuronal firing. Objective To study the effects of anodal tDCS on visual cortex activity in healthy volunteers (HV) and episodic migraine without aura patients (MoA), and its potentials for migraine prevention. Methods We recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEP) before and after a 15-min session of anodal tDCS over the visual cortex in 11 HV and 13 MoA interictally. Then 10 MoA patients reporting at least 4 attacks/month subsequently participated in a therapeutic study, and received 2 similar sessions of tDCS per week for 8 weeks as migraine preventive therapy. Results In HV as well as in MoA, anodal tDCS transiently increased habituation of the VEP N1P1 component. VEP amplitudes were not modified by tDCS. Preventive treatment with anodal tDCS turned out to be beneficial in MoA: migraine attack frequency, migraine days, attack duration and acute medication

  12. Migraine and sleep: new connections.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Andrew H; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    "Attack" is often a word associated with migraine, and for good reason. If you suffer from migraine headaches or know someone who does, you are well aware of its crippling nature. This story focuses on new research that has uncovered an important link between migraine and sleep patterns. A better understanding of the relationships among the body's circadian rhythms, the brain's hypothalamus, and a mutated gene holds enormous promise of improved care for the more than 36 million Americans who experience migraine (three times more common in women) and the number of people suffering from familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASP). PMID:24765233

  13. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  14. Advances in the Genetics and Therapy of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Gianfelici, Valentina; O'Brien, Susan M; Mullighan, Charles G

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains an important cause of morbidity in children and adults. In this article, we highlight advances in the genetics and therapy of three key subtypes of ALL: T-cell ALL, BCR-ABL1 (Philadelphia [Ph] chromosone-positive), and Ph-like ALL. T-ALL is an aggressive disease that accounts for about 15% and 25% of ALL among pediatric and adult cohorts, respectively, and exhibits a multistep nature of cancer initiation and progression. The integration of cytogenetics, molecular biology, and immunophenotype analyses has led to the identification of defined T-ALL subgroups, such as early T-cell precursor ALL and novel lesions with a prognostic role, for which specific inhibitors are being developed. Ph-positive ALL was historically regarded as a subtype of ALL with a poor prognosis, and allogeneic stem cell transplant was recommended for all patients who could undergo this procedure. The deep complete responses seen with combination tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and chemotherapy in Ph-positive ALL, and the reports of long-term survival among some patients not undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant, has raised the question of whether there is a subset of patients who could be cured without this intervention. Ph-like ALL is a subtype of B-progenitor ALL common among older children and adults and associated with a diverse range of genetic alterations that activate kinase signaling. Ph-like ALL is also associated with poor outcome, for which precision medicine trials identifying kinase alterations and testing TKI therapy are being developed. PMID:27249738

  15. QEEG-guided neurofeedback for recurrent migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    Seventy-one patients with recurrent migraine headaches, aged 17-62, from one neurological practice, completed a quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) procedure. All QEEG results indicated an excess of high-frequency beta activity (21-30 Hz) in 1-4 cortical areas. Forty-six of the 71 patients selected neurofeedback training while the remaining 25 chose to continue on drug therapy. Neurofeedback protocols consisted of reducing 21-30 Hz activity and increasing 10 Hz activity (5 sessions for each affected site). All the patients were classified as migraine without aura. For the neurofeedback group the majority (54%) experienced complete cessation of their migraines, and many others (39%) experienced a reduction in migraine frequency of greater than 50%. Four percent experienced a decrease in headache frequency of < 50%. Only one patient did not experience a reduction in headache frequency. The control group of subjects who chose to continue drug therapy as opposed to neurofeedback experienced no change in headache frequency (68%), a reduction of less than 50% (20%), or a reduction greater than 50% (8%). QEEG-guided neurofeedback appears to be dramatically effective in abolishing or significantly reducing headache frequency in patients with recurrent migraine.

  16. The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon; Yee, Michelle M

    2003-01-01

    Diet can play an important role in the precipitation of headaches in children and adolescents with migraine. The diet factor in pediatric migraine is frequently neglected in favor of preventive drug therapy. The list of foods, beverages, and additives that trigger migraine includes cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits, hot dogs, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, fatty foods, ice cream, caffeine withdrawal, and alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and beer. Underage drinking is a significant potential cause of recurrent headache in today's adolescent patients. Tyramine, phenylethylamine, histamine, nitrites, and sulfites are involved in the mechanism of food intolerance headache. Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy is an infrequent cause. Dietary triggers affect phases of the migraine process by influencing release of serotonin and norepinephrine, causing vasoconstriction or vasodilatation, or by direct stimulation of trigeminal ganglia, brainstem, and cortical neuronal pathways. Treatment begins with a headache and diet diary and the selective avoidance of foods presumed to trigger attacks. A universal migraine diet with simultaneous elimination of all potential food triggers is generally not advised in practice. A well-balanced diet is encouraged, with avoidance of fasting or skipped meals. Long-term prophylactic drug therapy is appropriate only after exclusion of headache-precipitating trigger factors, including dietary factors.

  17. Food allergies and migraine.

    PubMed

    Grant, E C

    1979-05-01

    60 migraine patients completed elimination diets after a 5-day period of withdrawal from their normal diet. 52 (87%) of these patients had been using oral contraceptive steroids, tobacco, and/or ergotamine for an average of 3 years, 22 years, and 7.4 years respectively. The commonest foods causing reactions were wheat (78%), orange (65%), eggs (45%), tea and coffee (40% each), chocolate and milk (37%) each), beef (35%), and corn, cane sugar, and yeast (33% each). When an average of ten common foods were avoided there was a dramatic fall in the number of headaches per month, 85% of patients becoming headache-free. The 25% of patients with hypertension became normotensive. Chemicals in the home environment can make this testing difficult for outpatients. Both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms may play a part in the pathogenesis of migraine caused by food intolerance.

  18. Dual antiplatelet therapy dilemmas: duration and choice of antiplatelets in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tomey, Matthew; Mehran, Roxana

    2013-10-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is a key component of therapy for acute coronary syndromes managed with and without percutaneous coronary intervention. Recent advances have given patients a wider variety of therapeutic options including the use of combinations of agents, dosing strategies, and durations of therapy. The optimal regimen minimizes thrombotic risk without increasing the risk of bleeding. Choosing the best therapy for each patient is an individualized dilemma that requires new, evidence-based tools to support regimen decision-making.

  19. Acute myelogenous leukemia following radiation therapy and chemotherapy for osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.D.; Gale, R.P.

    1984-06-01

    Patients receiving ionizing radiation therapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy are at increased risk of developing acute myelogenous leukemia. Ten cases of therapy-linked myelogenous leukemia have been reported in patients with sarcoma, and the authors report here the first case in a patient who received combined-modality therapy for treatment of an osteogenic sarcoma. As treatment for this disease becomes more intensive and survival improves, the incidence of leukemia following therapy for osteogenic sarcoma may increase.

  20. Effect of Yoga on migraine: A comprehensive study using clinical profile and cardiac autonomic functions

    PubMed Central

    Kisan, Ravikiran; Sujan, MU; Adoor, Meghana; Rao, Raghavendra; Nalini, A; Kutty, Bindu M; Chindanda Murthy, BT; Raju, TR; Sathyaprabha, TN

    2014-01-01

    Context and Aims: Migraine is an episodic disabling headache requiring long-term management. Migraine management through Yoga therapy would reduce the medication cost with positive health benefits. Yoga has shown to improve the quality of life, reduce the episode of headache and medication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Yoga as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients by assessing clinical outcome and autonomic functions tests. Subjects and Methods: Migraine patients were randomly given either conventional care (n = 30) or Yoga with conventional care (n = 30). Yoga group received Yoga practice session for 5 days a week for 6 weeks along with conventional care. Clinical assessment (frequency, intensity of headache and headache impact) and autonomic function test were done at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Results: Yoga with conventional care and convention care groups showed significant improvement in clinical variables, but it was better with Yoga therapy. Improvement in the vagal tone along with reduced sympathetic activity was observed in patients with migraine receiving Yoga as adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: Intervention showed significant clinical improvement in both groups. Headache frequency and intensity were reduced more in Yoga with conventional care than the conventional care group alone. Furthermore, Yoga therapy enhanced the vagal tone and decreased the sympathetic drive, hence improving the cardiac autonomic balance. Thus, Yoga therapy can be effectively incorporated as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients. PMID:25035622

  1. Common hippocampal structural and functional changes in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Becerra, Lino; Brawn, Jennifer; McEwen, Bruce; Burstein, Rami; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is classically involved in memory consolidation, spatial navigation and is involved in the stress response. Migraine is an episodic disorder characterized by intermittent attacks with a number of physiological and emotional stressors associated with or provoking each attack. Given that migraine attacks can be viewed as repeated stressors, alterations in hippocampal function and structure may play an important role in migraine pathophysiology. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, hippocampal morphometric and functional differences (in response to noxious heat stimulation) were compared in age and gender-matched acute episodic migraineurs with high (HF) versus low (LF) frequency of migraine attacks. Morphometric results were compared with age and gender-matched healthy control (HC) cohort. Significant larger bilateral hippocampal volume was found in LF group relative to the HF and HC groups suggestive of an initial adaptive plasticity that may then become dysfunctional with increased frequency. Functional correlates of greater deactivation (LF > HF) in the same hippocampal regions in response to noxious stimulation was also accompanied by overall reduction in functional connectivity of the hippocampus with other brain regions involved in pain processing in the HF group. The results implicate involvement of hippocampus in the pathophysiology of the migraine. PMID:22760159

  2. New onset migraine with aura after treatment initiation with ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Migraine with aura is a complex neurological disorder modeled in animals by cortical spreading depression. It is less usual to find complete animal models for the disease so any opportunity to test a human effect back at the bench is welcome. Findings We report the case of a 24 year old woman who developed new onset episodic migraine with visual aura shortly after treatment initiation with the If ion channel blocker ivabradine for frequency control in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We studied whether ivabradine could alter cortical spreading depression in a suitable animal model. Sixteen rats received either ivabradine or saline, and the number of depolarization shifts and blood flow changes induced by cortical spreading depression were measured in both groups. No significant differences between the ivabradine and saline group were detected. Conclusions Ivabradine is an interesting substance since it is known to produce migraine-like phosphenes frequently and the patient we report developed de novo migraine with aura. However, we were unable to demonstrate that the drug influences the susceptibility of the brain to cortical spreading depression with acute administration. The combined data show the relationship of migraine aura to cortical spreading depression may have some nuances yet to be identified. PMID:23718730

  3. Topiramate-induced paresthesia is more frequently reported by migraine than epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Shafiei, Kaveh; Azizpour, Iman

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate is an approved and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. Paresthesia is the most commonly reported side effect. The primary objective of this study was to compare the frequency of topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine headache to epileptic patients. Patients with migraine without aura and epilepsy were enrolled in this observational study. All cases were interviewed by telephone about their history of paresthesia. Confounding factors were controlled through logistic regression. The odds ratio of developing topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine compared to epilepsy patients was 3.4. Three factors were independent contributors to developing topiramate-induced paresthesia: female sex (odds ratio 2.1), topiramate dosage (odds ratio 0.3) and duration of therapy. Our findings indicate an independent association between migraine and development of paresthesia. Migraineurs were more likely than epileptic patients to report paresthesia as topiramate adverse effects. Female sex, treatment duration and topiramate dosage contribute significantly to subsequent development of paresthesia.

  4. The association of migraine with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Tobias

    2010-03-01

    Migraine is a common, chronic-intermittent primary headache disorder affecting mostly women. The migraine pathophysiology involves both the neuronal and vascular systems, and in some patients, transient neurologic symptoms occur, which are known as migraine aura. A large body of literature supports an association between migraine and ischemic stroke, which is apparent mostly in young women with migraine with aura. Further increased risks have been observed particularly in smokers and women who use oral contraceptives. The vast majority of individual studies, as well as a recent meta-analysis, did not find an association between migraine without aura and ischemic stroke. Although there are several hypotheses about potential biological mechanisms linking migraine with aura to ischemic stroke, the precise causes remain unclear. Because the absolute risk of stroke is considerably low in patients with migraine, the vast majority of migraine patients will not experience a stroke event because of the migraine.

  5. Options in topical therapies in the management of patients with acute pain.

    PubMed

    McCarberg, Bill; D'Arcy, Yvonne

    2013-07-01

    The traditional cornerstones of analgesic therapy for patients with acute pain have been oral therapies; however, all oral agents exhibit a variety of potentially dose-limiting or intolerable adverse effects in patients. Elderly patients and those with concomitant conditions already being managed with multiple systemic drugs may be particularly susceptible to systemic toxicities with oral analgesic therapies. Topical agents offer an alternative to oral modalities and can effectively treat patients with acute pain while offering lower systemic absorption and conferring little risk of systemic toxicity. The objective of this article is to review the therapeutic usefulness of available topical therapies in their most thoroughly investigated applications, the treatment of patients with acute musculoskeletal and herpetic pain. For example, although heating pads/wraps and cold packs are widely used to alleviate pain associated with sprains, strains, and contusions, evidence of the effectiveness of these methods is lacking. However, there are sufficient data supporting the use of various topical formulations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for these indications (ketoprofen gel or patch, ibuprofen gel or cream, and diclofenac gel or patch), and demonstrating markedly less patient risk of systemic toxicity than is associated with oral NSAID therapy. A ketoprofen patch was shown to be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of patients with tendinopathies. In the treatment of acute neck or low back pain, cold and heat therapies have demonstrated limited effectiveness for patients, and the efficacy of topical NSAIDs has not been established. Use of topical NSAID therapy has been useful in reducing acute-phase herpes zoster pain, and the lidocaine 5% patch has been shown to reduce acute herpetic pain intensity once lesions have healed (the patch cannot be applied to open skin lesions). Topical analgesics represent an alternative treatment modality for

  6. New players in the preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-11-10

    Migraine is a common, chronic disorder of the brain causing much disability, as well as personal, familial and societal impact. Several oral preventive agents are available in different countries for the prevention of migraine, but none have performed better than 50% improvement in 50% of patients in a clinical trial. Additionally, each has various possible adverse events making their tolerability less than optimal. Recently, three monoclonal antibodies targeting the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) ligand (LY2951742, ALD403 and TEV-48125) and one targeting the CGRP receptor (AMG 334) have completed phase 2 trials, and the results have been reported. These early results show them all to be somewhat more effective than placebo, with no serious adverse events. Three have been studied for episodic migraine, and only TEV-48125 has been studied for both high frequency episodic and chronic migraine. Moreover, preliminary data suggests that neurostimulation is effective in migraine treatment, including stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion, transcutaneous supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve, and transcutaneous vagus nerve. In this article, these innovative therapies will be reviewed.

  7. The therapeutic armamentarium in migraine is quite elderly.

    PubMed

    Martelletti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Global Burden of Disease 2010 study considers migraine as one of the most important noncommunicable diseases in the world, classifying it third in terms of global prevalence (14.70%): it sums up the 54.19% of all the years of life lived with disabilities caused by the rest of all neurological disorders. This Editorial provides an historical excursus of old and new-entry molecules in migraine therapeutic area. Drugs for acute treatment such as triptans date back to the early 1990s with the appearance of sumatriptan and the following six triptans in the years immediately after (zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, naratriptan, eletriptan, almotriptan, frovatriptan). Prophylaxis drugs, dedicated to patients with medium/high frequency of crises, show as last entries topiramate and botulinum toxin type A. The use of this preventative group, with its intrinsic limits, is mandatory to reduce the risk of migraine chronification, a highly harmful clinical phenomenon that produces as its natural consequence the medication overuse headache. The development of new acute and preventative compounds, such as 5HT (serotonin) 1F receptor (5-HT1F) agonist lasmiditan, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) peptide receptor antagonists, anti-CGRP monoclonal antibodies (LY2951742, ALD403, LBR101) and anti-CGRP-r monoclonal antibody (AMG334), is warranted and might be soon completed in order to offer new opportunities to migraine patients.

  8. From migraine genes to mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tolner, Else A; Houben, Thijs; Terwindt, Gisela M; de Vries, Boukje; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-04-01

    Migraine is a common multifactorial episodic brain disorder with strong genetic basis. Monogenic subtypes include rare familial hemiplegic migraine, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), and retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy. Functional studies of disease-causing mutations in cellular and/or transgenic models revealed enhanced (glutamatergic) neurotransmission and abnormal vascular function as key migraine mechanisms. Common forms of migraine (both with and without an aura), instead, are thought to have a polygenic makeup. Genome-wide association studies have already identified over a dozen genes involved in neuronal and vascular mechanisms. Here, we review the current state of molecular genetic research in migraine, also with respect to functional and pathway analyses. We will also discuss how novel experimental approaches for the identification and functional characterization of migraine genes, such as next-generation sequencing, induced pluripotent stem cell, and optogenetic technologies will further our understanding of the molecular pathways involved in migraine pathogenesis. PMID:25789438

  9. Acute prooxidant effects of vitamin C in EDTA chelation therapy and long-term antioxidant benefits of therapy.

    PubMed

    Hininger, Isabelle; Waters, Robert; Osman, Mireille; Garrel, Catherine; Fernholz, Karen; Roussel, Anne Marie; Anderson, Richard A

    2005-06-15

    Chelation therapy is thought to not only remove contaminating metals but also to decrease free radical production. EDTA chelation therapy, containing high doses of vitamin C as an antioxidant, is often used in the treatment of diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases but the effectiveness of this treatment may be variable and its efficacy has not been demonstrated conclusively. The objective of this work was to determine if the vitamin C added to standard chelation therapy cocktails was prooxidant. We administered a standard EDTA cocktail solution with or without 5 g of sodium ascorbate. One hour following the standard chelation therapy, there were highly significant prooxidant effects on lipids, proteins, and DNA associated with decreased activities of RBC glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase while in the absence of sodium ascorbate, there were no acute signs of oxidative damage. After 16 sessions of standard chelation therapy, the acute prooxidant effects of vitamin C remained, but, even in the absence of nutrient supplements, there were beneficial long-term antioxidant effects of chelation therapy and plasma peroxide levels decreased. In conclusion, multiple sessions of EDTA chelation therapy protect lipids against oxidative damage. However, standard high amounts of vitamin C added to EDTA chelation solutions also display short term prooxidant effects. The added benefits of lower levels of vitamin C in chelation therapy need to be documented.

  10. Functional outcome in acute stroke patients with oropharyngeal Dysphagia after swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun-Ling; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Chi; Leong, Chau-Peng; Lin, Wei-Che; Pong, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia after stroke is associated with mortality and increased pulmonary complications. Swallowing therapies may decrease pulmonary complications and improve patients' quality of life after stroke. This study used clinical swallowing assessments and videofluoroscopy (VFS) to assess the functional recovery of acute stroke patients with dysphagia after different swallowing therapies. We enrolled 29 acute stroke patients with dysphagia and randomly divided them into 3 therapy groups: traditional swallowing (TS), oropharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), and combined NMES/TS. All patients were assessed using the clinical functional oral intake scale (FOIS), 8-point penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), and functional dysphagia scale (FDS) of VFS before and after treatment. There were no differences in the clinical parameters and swallowing results of the FOIS and VFS before swallowing treatment among the 3 groups (P > .05). TS therapy and combined therapy both had significant swallowing improvement after therapy according to the FOIS and 8-point PAS (P < .05). When comparing the results of the VFS among the 3 groups, we found significant improvements in patients eating cookies and thick liquid after combined NMES/TS therapy (P < .05). In acute stroke patients with dysphagia, combined NMES/TS therapy is the most effective swallowing therapy in taking solid diets and thick liquids.

  11. The pipeline in headache therapy.

    PubMed

    Vollbracht, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, neurovascular disorder characterized by episodic attacks of head pain and associated disability plus systemic autonomic and neurologic symptoms. The advent of the triptan class of medication in the 1990s revolutionized the acute treatment of migraine, but many migraineurs do not respond optimally or at all to triptans, have intolerable adverse effects, or have contraindications to their use. Preventive pharmacotherapy has advanced mostly through serendipity, with new drugs being found effective while being used for other indications. There remains a significant need for new medications and devices that can provide effective, rapid, and sustained pain relief without adverse effects or recurrence. Several new acute and preventive therapies for the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches have shown promise and are currently under investigation. This article covers innovative delivery mechanisms, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor modulators, orexin receptor antagonists, glial cell modulators, and neurostimulation. PMID:23839594

  12. Headaches and Migraines: Understanding Headaches, From Mild to Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... through them was to lie down in a dark room and just suffer through it." "For us, ... and Migraine pages on MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov) The Web site for the National Institute for Neurological Disorders: ...

  13. Defining response in migraine: which endpoints are important?

    PubMed

    Edmeads, John

    2005-01-01

    The primary endpoint traditionally measured in clinical trials of triptans for acute migraine therapy has been 2-hour pain relief, a decrease in pain intensity from moderate/severe to mild/none. Although harder to achieve, endpoints such as 2-hour pain free and the composite measure sustained pain free are now preferred as they better reflect what patients desire from medication, namely rapid onset of action, and complete and lasting relief of pain. A comprehensive meta-analysis has shown that oral triptans differ in their ability to achieve these endpoints, with almotriptan 12.5 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg providing the highest likelihood of success. Although all triptans have simple and consistent pharmacokinetic features, they also have specific differences that may play a part in their differing clinical attributes. Incorporating tolerability to generate a more stringent endpoint, sustained pain free with no adverse events (SNAE), may provide an even better representation of patients' expectations. Comparison of SNAE rates using data from the meta-analysis of oral triptans indicates that almotriptan 12.5 mg has the best balance of high efficacy and good tolerability. PMID:15920334

  14. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Occipital seizures imitating migraine aura.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C P; Sharoqi, I A; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    Three cases are reported in which symptoms of occipital seizures resembled the visual aura of migraine. Careful recording of the characteristics and timing of such visual effects will often resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:9204019

  16. [Neurologic and mental disorders in patients with migraine and in their children].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, E I; Kalashnikova, L A; Asanova, L M

    1990-01-01

    To specify indications for differentiated therapy, a study was made of the characteristic features of the psychopathological picture of the interictal period of migraine in 50 women aged 28 to 60 years suffering from different forms of migrainous attacks. Besides, the neuropsychic disorders were also examined in those patients' children. The first group was made up of migraine patients in whom paroxysmal psychic disorders resembling convulsion-free epileptic attacks ranked first in the clinical structure of the interictal period. In the second group patients, of paramount importance was the hysterical symptomatology. The third group patients suffered from somatized depressions. The differentiated therapy of psychic disorders of the interictal period favoured the deceleration of migrainous attacks in all the three groups patients. PMID:2175132

  17. Migraine with persistent aura in a Mexican patient: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    San-Juan, O D; Zermeño, P F

    2007-05-01

    Persistent aura symptoms in patients with migraine are rare but well documented. The International Headache Society defines persistent aura without infarction as when the aura symptoms persist for > 1 week without radiographic evidence of infarction. The visual aura of migraine attacks has been explained by cortical spreading depression. We describe a case of a 28-year-old Mexican woman, who presented with persistent aura symptoms, and a literature review. The patient had a 24-year history of migraine headache. In November 2005 the patient had an attack which started with scintillating scotomas bilaterally associated with photopsias and amaurosis followed by migraine headache. All imaging studies were negative. The episode lasted 35 days and probably resolved with nimodipine therapy. Persistent aura symptoms are rare entities. This is the first case documented of a Mexican patient with persistent aura without infarction and probably resolved with nimodipine therapy.

  18. Immunoadsorption therapy for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders long after the acute phase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masatake; Nanri, Kazunori; Taguchi, Takeshi; Ishiko, Tomoko; Yoshida, Masaharu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Sugisaki, Kentaro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a severe inflammatory demyelinating disease with exacerbations involving recurrent or bilateral optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Pulse steroid therapy is recommended as the initial, acute-phase treatment for NMO. If ineffective, treatment with plasma exchange (PE) should commence. However, no evidence exists to support the effectiveness of PE long after the acute phase. Immunoadsorption therapy (IA) eliminates pathogenic antibodies while sparing other plasma proteins. With IA, side effects of PE resulting from protein substitution can be avoided. However, whether IA is effective for NMO remains unclear. We describe a patient with anti-aquaporin-4-positive myelitis who responded to IA using a tryptophan polyvinyl alcohol gel column that was begun 52 days after disease onset following the acute phase. Even long after the acute phase when symptoms appear to be stable, IA may be effective and should not be excluded as a treatment choice.

  19. [Mnemonic complaints and chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Morandeira-Rivas, C; Lopez Del Val, L J; Bellosta-Diago, E; Velazquez-Benito, A

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Patients with chronic migraine often report lower cognitive performance, which affects their quality of life. AIMS. To analyse whether the mnemonic capacity of patients with chronic migraine is altered or not. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with chronic migraine evaluated consecutively in our unit, and paired by age (18-60 years) and gender with a control group consisting of cognitively healthy volunteers. The following cognitive instruments were administered: Folstein Minimental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Alteration Test (M@T), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and working memory. RESULTS. A total of 30 patients with chronic migraine were included (mean age: 49.33 ± 10.05 years) paired with a control group of 30 healthy volunteers (mean age: 44.83 ± 10.91 years). The mean elapsed time since onset of the patients with chronic migraine was 4.47 ± 2.74 years. On performing a comparative analysis between the two groups, significant differences were found with overall lower scores in the group of patients with chronic migraine in the MoCA (24.16 versus 29), M@T (43.76 versus 48.8) and working memory tests (17.5 versus 24.26). Performance in the MMSE was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with chronic migraine can have lower cognitive performance regardless of distracting elements, such as pharmacological factors or psychiatric comorbidity, since chronic migraine can be understood as yet another element within the spectrum of chronic pain.

  20. [Migraine – Principles and Treatment of a Widespread Disease].

    PubMed

    Huggenberger, Kai; Raudyte, Egle; Sándor, Peter S; Gantenbein, Andreas R

    2016-02-17

    Headaches are amongst the most common reasons for visiting a general practitioner in Switzerland. The key features in differentiating migraine from other types of headache are the pulsating pain, interfering with daily activities, and the hypersensitivity to stimuli such as light or sound. Around 15 % of the patients report a preceeding aura, consisting of transient neurological symptoms. An effective migraine management is based on non-pharmacological treatment as well as acute and preventive medication. Non-pharmacological options include the management of the trigger factors stress, sleep deprivation, musculoskeletal tension. Acute treatment should be stratified and include non-opioid analgesics for milder attacks, triptans or combinations for more severe attacks. The spectrum of preventive medication is broad. Therefore it is essential to find a suitable and well tolerable drug for the individual patient.

  1. New Strategies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Redefining prognostic markers to guide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Irum; Altman, Jessica K.; Licht, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    While the standard therapy of AML has been relatively constant over the past two decades, this may be changing with enhanced technologies allowing for the classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) into molecularly distinct subsets. Some specific subsets of AML have an excellent prognosis in response to standard therapy while the poor prognosis of AML associated with specific sets of mutations or chromosomal anomalies require the development of new therapies. Elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of AML has led to the development and of therapies that affect signaling, apoptosis, protein and intermediate metabolism, the surface of the leukemia cell, leukemia cell/stromal interaction and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:22893630

  2. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  3. Use of Scrambler Therapy in Acute Paediatric Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Congedi, Sabrina; Spadini, Silvia; Di Pede, Chiara; Ometto, Martina; Franceschi, Tatiana; De Tommasi, Valentina; Agosto, Caterina; Lazzarin, Pierina; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We report our clinical experience on the effect of Scrambler Therapy (ST) for a child with acute mixed pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. ST, recently proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, is a noninvasive approach to relieve pain, by changing pain perception at brain level. It is safe and has no side effects. Further research is needed to assess its efficacy for acute pain and for paediatric population.

  4. Use of Scrambler Therapy in Acute Paediatric Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spadini, Silvia; De Tommasi, Valentina; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We report our clinical experience on the effect of Scrambler Therapy (ST) for a child with acute mixed pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. ST, recently proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, is a noninvasive approach to relieve pain, by changing pain perception at brain level. It is safe and has no side effects. Further research is needed to assess its efficacy for acute pain and for paediatric population. PMID:26977329

  5. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  6. ONCE-DAILY VERSUS DIVIDED DOSAGE LITHIUM THERAPY IN ACUTE MANIA

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, K.P.; Prasad, K.M.R.; Mohan, Rajesh; Andrade, Chittaranjan; Ashok, M.V.; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Sreenivas, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare once-daily with divided dosage lithium treatment in acute mania. In 79 retrospectively studied subjects who met the DSMIII-R criteria for mania, 26 independent and dependent variables were analyzed. The two groups of patients (categorized according to dosage schedule) were broadly comparable with respect to demographic and clinical characteristics. The two groups also did not differ on the outcome measures of lithium efficacy and lithium adverse effects. It is concluded that single dose lithium therapy is clinically comparable with divided dose lithium therapy in acute mania. Possible advantages of switching over to once-daily lithium regimes are discussed. PMID:21743707

  7. Cell therapy, advanced materials, and new approaches to acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S; Humes, H David

    2009-12-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common clinical syndrome characterized by an abrupt deterioration in kidney function, resulting in abnormalities in volume-regulatory, metabolic-regulatory, excretory, and endocrine functions. Despite decades of improvements in the provision of intensive care, and specifically in the provision of renal replacement therapy, the morbidity and mortality associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) remain extremely high. This article highlights novel cell therapies, advanced materials, and approaches to AKI with the aim of illuminating a potential path for future basic, translational, and clinical research using these novel modalities.

  8. Aspects on antidote therapy in acute poisoning affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Persson, H

    1984-01-01

    The number of toxic substances affecting the nervous system through acute or chronic exposure is overwhelming. This survey will elucidate the possibilities of antidote therapy in some acute cases of poisoning, caused by nervous system toxicants. Antidotes exert their therapeutic effects through a variety of mechanisms: Adsorption, formation of inert complexes, inhibited conversion to toxic metabolites, enhancement of endogenous detoxification, interference at receptor sites, and physiological antagonism. The application of these principles in treating some poisonings caused by important nervous system toxicants will be considered. This survey is by no means comprehensive, but rather gives some relevant examples and deals only with acute poisoning.

  9. Efficacy and Tolerability of STOPAIN for a Migraine Attack

    PubMed Central

    St. Cyr, Andrea; Chen, Ashley; Bradley, Kathleen C.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Young, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether topical menthol 6% gel will relieve a migraine attack. Materials and Methods: A single-center, open-label pilot trial of 25 patients with at least 1 year of diagnosed episodic migraine and <15 headache days per month. Patients treated one migraine attack with STOPAIN topical menthol 6% gel to skull base within 2 h of headache onset. Headache pain severity was assessed prior to and after gel application. Results: Thirty-two patients enrolled and 25 completed the study. Prior to treatment, 7 patients had mild pain, 13 moderate pain, and 5 severe pain. Two hours following gel application, 7 (28%) patients had no pain, 7 (28%) mild pain, 6 (25%) moderate pain, and 5 (20%) severe pain. The majority of patients had similar pain intensity (8; 32%) or improvement (13; 52%). At 24-h, only two non-rescued patients still had mild headache. Of the 25 completers, 2 patients took rescue medication prior to the 2-h period, and an additional 10 patients rescued between 2 and 24 h. Conclusion: Study results showed a significant improvement in headache intensity by 2 h after gel application. This pilot study shows STOPAIN gel may be effective in treating an acute migraine attack. PMID:25699012

  10. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Allais, Gianni; Benedetto, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours). Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (<1 hour after symptom onset) or late (>1 hour after onset). Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost-effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. PMID:27757013

  11. Impact of Migraine on School Performance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The impact of migraine on school performance Daniel Kantor, MD e168 WHAT ... this study tackle an often overlooked problem: how migraine headache affects the school performance of children. 1 ...

  12. Assessment of arterial collateralization and its relevance to intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, Siva Seeta; Mitchell, Peter; Dowling, Richard; Yan, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    Evidence from recent randomized controlled studies comparing intra-arterial (IA) therapy with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator highlighted the mismatch between recanalization success and clinical outcomes in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. There is emerging interest in the impact of arterial collateralization, as determined by leptomeningeal anastomoses (LMAs), on the treatment outcomes of IA therapy. The system of LMA constitutes the secondary network of cerebral collateral circulation apart from the Circle of Willis. Both anatomic and angiographic studies confirmed significant interindividual variability in LMA. This review aims to outline the current understanding of arterial collateralization and its impact on outcomes after IA therapy for acute ischemic stroke, underpinning the possible role of arterial collateralization assessment as a selection tool for patients most likely to benefit from IA therapy.

  13. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  14. Measuring biomarkers of acute kidney injury during renal replacement therapy: wisdom or folly?

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Marlies; Forni, Lui G

    2014-06-19

    Early data are now appearing relating to the measurement of biomarkers of acute kidney injury during renal replacement therapy. These data go some way in describing the clearance of these molecules during renal support. Understanding the potential clearance, or otherwise, of these proteins may lead to directing our therapies in the future particularly with regard to cessation of renal support. We describe a recent study which has provided data that may aid in addressing this issue.

  15. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  16. Managing Migraine Headaches in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Green, Antoinette; Kabbouche, Marielle; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew; O'Brien, Hope

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of migraine headaches can be challenging in children and adolescents. The description of migraine in this population may include symptoms that are not typically described in adults. Treatment options for pediatric migraine is increasing, however remain limited. This article will go through the key components to diagnosing migraine in pediatric patients as well as give options for short and long-term management.

  17. [The effect of endovascular helium-neon laser therapy on the immune status of patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis].

    PubMed

    Siniukhin, V N; Ianenko, E K; Safanov, R M; Khamaganova, E G; Borisik, V I

    1996-01-01

    Cellular immunity was assessed in 48 patients with acute calculous pyelonephritis exposed to intravenous He-Ne laser therapy. It was found that endovascular He-Ne laser therapy in the study regimens corrects immunological abnormalities arising in acute calculous pyelonephritis. PMID:9036617

  18. Picasso's migraine: Illusory cubist splitting or illusion?

    PubMed

    Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D

    2011-07-01

    It is widely believed that Pablo Picasso suffered from migraine. The main cause for this is our suggestion made 10 years ago that some of Picasso's paintings resemble migraine auras. Here we critically look back at our own hypothesis. We conclude that, although the idea is still fascinating, there is no proof of Picasso suffering from migraine with aura.

  19. Reperfusion Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Dorado, Laura; Millán, Mònica; Dávalos, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 4.5 hours of symptoms onset significantly improves clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This narrow window for treatment leads to a small proportion of eligible patients to be treated. Intravenous or intra-arterial trials, combined intravenous/intra-arterial trials, and newer devices to mechanically remove the clot from intracranial arteries have been investigated or are currently being explored to increase patient eligibility and to improve arterial recanalization and clinical outcome. New retrievable stent-based devices offer higher revascularization rates with shorter time to recanalization and are now generally preferred to first generation thrombectomy devices such as Merci Retriever or Penumbra System. These devices have been shown to be effective for opening up occluded vessels in the brain but its efficacy for improving outcomes in patients with acute stroke has not yet been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. We summarize the results of the major systemic thrombolytic trials and the latest trials employing different endovascular approaches to ischemic stroke. PMID:24646159

  20. Update: Acute coronary syndromes (V). Personalized antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Rafeedheen, Rahil; Tantry, Udaya S

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that high on-treatment platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate during clopidogrel therapy is an independent risk factor for ischemic event occurrences in a postpercutaneous coronary intervention patients. However, the precise role of platelet function testing remains debated. Platelet function testing to ensure optimal platelet inhibition has been recommended by some authorities to improve outcomes in patients treated with clopidogrel. Recent prospective, randomized trials of personalized antiplatelet therapy have failed to demonstrate a benefit of platelet function testing in improving outcomes. In this review article, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for clopidogrel nonreponsiveness, recent trials of platelet function testing, and other new developments in the field of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  1. The impact of migraine and the effect of migraine treatment on workplace productivity in the United States and suggestions for future research.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Landy, Stephen H; Downs, Kristen E; Runken, M Chris

    2009-05-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine is associated with decreased productivity. This article describes the results of a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed publications that measured the impact of migraine on workplace productivity in the United States and provides recommendations for future research. A MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1, 1990 to July 31, 2008. Articles were included if the results were from a prospective or retrospective study that reported work-specific productivity outcomes in adults with migraine in the United States. Twenty-six studies were included. Nine studies found that diagnosed and/or undiagnosed migraine had a negative impact on worker productivity. Although one migraine prophylactic study found a statistically significant improvement in worker productivity for topiramate-treated patients, another found an insignificant difference in lisinopril-treated patients. Fifteen studies compared the impact of triptan therapy with a control group. The control groups in these studies differed with regard to recall periods, time to follow-up, and types of questionnaires used. Almost all studies found that triptan therapy was associated with a statistically significant improvement in loss in worker productivity vs the control group. Health care professionals can reduce the impact of migraine on worker productivity with appropriate therapy. Researchers should collect presenteeism and absenteeism data, report results in units of time, use a validated instrument, carefully consider recall periods, and report worker productivity separately. In addition, patients with undiagnosed migraine should be included in disease burden studies. When evaluating effects of treatment on productivity, researchers should target well-controlled, double-blind studies and conduct productivity research for new treatments.

  2. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  3. Cognitive Processing Therapy for Acute Stress Disorder Resulting from an Anti-Gay Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaysen, Debra; Lostutter, Ty W.; Goines, Marie A.

    2005-01-01

    This case study describes Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) with a 30-year-old gay man with symptoms of acute stress disorder (ASD) following a recent homophobic assault. Treatment addressed assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms. Also addressed were low self-esteem, helplessness, and high degrees of…

  4. The Additive Benefit of Hypnosis and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Treating Acute Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Richard A.; Moulds, Michelle L.; Guthrie, Rachel M.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2005-01-01

    This research represents the first controlled treatment study of hypnosis and cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT) of acute stress disorder (ASD). Civilian trauma survivors (N = 87) who met criteria for ASD were randomly allocated to 6 sessions of CBT, CBT combined with hypnosis (CBT-hypnosis), or supportive counseling (SC). CBT comprised exposure,…

  5. Warfarin therapy in a dog with acute arterial thrombosis and pyometra.

    PubMed

    Arai, Shiori; Callan, Mary Beth

    2014-11-01

    This report describes the presentation of acute arterial thrombosis causing triparesis in a 6-year-old female Chihuahua with pyometra and its successful management in combination with warfarin therapy. This is the first case report of a dog with arterial thrombosis associated with pyometra. PMID:25392549

  6. Drug-induced acute autoimmune hepatitis during combination therapy with atorvastatin and ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    van Heyningen, Charles

    2005-09-01

    A case is presented of a patient who developed acute hepatitis during cholesterol-lowering treatment with atorvastatin and ezetimibe. Further investigations reveal a probable drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis, and ezetimibe is considered to be the most likely causal agent. This case is the first report of an autoimmune hepatitis associated with ezetimibe therapy.

  7. Warfarin therapy in a dog with acute arterial thrombosis and pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Shiori; Callan, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the presentation of acute arterial thrombosis causing triparesis in a 6-year-old female Chihuahua with pyometra and its successful management in combination with warfarin therapy. This is the first case report of a dog with arterial thrombosis associated with pyometra. PMID:25392549

  8. Fifty years of migraine research.

    PubMed

    Lance, J W

    1988-05-01

    The prevalence of ice-pick pains and ice-cream headache in migrainous patients and their localisation to the habitual site of migraine headache, suggest that segments of the central pain pathways remain hyperexcitable between spontaneous attacks. Excessive afferent stimulation (flashing lights, noise, strong perfumes) or hypothalamic changes resulting from emotion, stress or the operation of some internal clock may set in motion brainstem mechanisms, including spontaneous unilateral or bilateral discharge of pain pathways. Studies in the experimental animal have shown that certain monoaminergic brainstem nuclei can influence the cerebral circulation unilaterally and that they and the trigeminal system can induce a reflex dilatation of the external carotid circulation. Descending pathways from the same brainstem nuclei cause the adrenal gland to secrete noradrenaline, which in turn can release serotonin from blood platelets. Free serotonin may become adsorbed to the arterial wall, thus increasing sensitivity to pain, augmenting afferent input and adding a pulsating quality to migrainous pain. Both neural and vascular components of migraine implicate monoamines, specifically noradrenaline and serotonin, as neurotransmitters and humoral agents. The recent pharmacological classification of serotonin (5HT) receptors indicates that agonists of a subset of the 5HT1 receptor and antagonists of 5HT2 receptors are most likely to be helpful in the treatment of migraine. PMID:3056372

  9. Epigenetics and migraine; complex mitochondrial interactions contributing to disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Roos-Araujo, Deidré; Stuart, Shani; Lea, Rod A; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-06-10

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder classified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as one of the top twenty most debilitating diseases in the developed world. Current therapies are only effective for a proportion of sufferers and new therapeutic targets are desperately needed to alleviate this burden. Recently the role of epigenetics in the development of many complex diseases including migraine has become an emerging topic. By understanding the importance of acetylation, methylation and other epigenetic modifications, it then follows that this modification process is a potential target to manipulate epigenetic status with the goal of treating disease. Bisulphite sequencing and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation have been used to demonstrate the presence of methylated cytosines in the human D-loop of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), proving that the mitochondrial genome is methylated. For the first time, it has been shown that there is a difference in mtDNA epigenetic status between healthy controls and those with disease, especially for neurodegenerative and age related conditions. Given co-morbidities with migraine and the suggestive link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the lowered threshold for triggering a migraine attack, mitochondrial methylation may be a new avenue to pursue. Creative thinking and new approaches are needed to solve complex problems and a systems biology approach, where multiple layers of information are integrated is becoming more important in complex disease modelling.

  10. Acute Onset Sensory Polyneuropathy Due to Metronidazole Therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jitendra; Atam, Virendra; Dinkar, Anju

    2015-09-01

    Metronidazole is associated with numerous neurologic complications, including peripheral neuropathy particularly in patients; those are on high doses of metronidazole for prolonged period. We hereby report a case of liver abscess that developed sensory polyneuropathy following 11 days of metronidazole therapy at low cumulative dose. PMID:27608880

  11. Role of adenosine as adjunctive therapy in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Forman, Mervyn B; Stone, Gregg W; Jackson, Edwin K

    2006-01-01

    Although early reperfusion and maintained patency is the mainstay therapy for ST elevation myocardial infarction, experimental studies demonstrate that reperfusion per se induces deleterious effects on viable ischemic cells. Thus "myocardial reperfusion injury" may compromise the full potential of reperfusion therapy and may account for unfavorable outcomes in high-risk patients. Although the mechanisms of reperfusion injury are complex and multifactorial, neutrophil-mediated microvascular injury resulting in a progressive decrease in blood flow ("no-reflow" phenomenon) likely plays an important role. Adenosine is an endogenous nucleoside found in large quantities in myocardial and endothelial cells. It activates four well-characterized receptors producing various physiological effects that attenuate many of the proposed mechanisms of reperfusion injury. The cardio-protective effects of adenosine are supported by its role as a mediator of pre- and post-conditioning. In experimental models, administration of adenosine in the peri-reperfusion period results in a marked reduction in infarct size and improvement in ventricular function. The cardioprotective effects in the canine model have a narrow time window with the drug losing its effect following three hours of ischemia. Several small clinical studies have demonstrated that administration of adenosine with reperfusion therapy reduces infarct size and improves ventricular function. In the larger AMISTAD and AMISTAD II trials a 3-h infusion of adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion resulted in a striking reduction in infarct size (55-65%). Post hoc analysis of AMISTAD II showed that this was associated with significantly improved early and late mortality in patients treated within 3.17 h of symptoms. An intravenous infusion of adenosine for 3 h should be considered as adjunctive therapy in high risk-patients undergoing reperfusion therapy. PMID:16961725

  12. Atypical nummular headache or circumscribed migraine: The utility of pressure algometry

    PubMed Central

    Barón, Johanna; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ruiz, Marina; Pedraza, María Isabel; Guerrero, Ángel Luis; Madeleine, Pascal; Cuadrado, María Luz; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    A peripheral mechanism has been proposed for nummular headache; however, there have been descriptions of atypical features resembling migraine. The authors describe a case in which algometry assessment facilitated the discrimination between atypical nummular headache and circumscribed migraine. A 21-year-old woman presented with a history of focal episodic pain in a circumscribed area on the left frontal region. The algometry study showed a unilateral and diffuse decrease of the pain pressure thresholds with frontal predominance, as has been proposed for migraine patients. This result led the authors to introduce a more specific preventive therapy with topiramate, with significant relief. In conclusion, cartographic investigation of pressure pain sensitivity is a simple tool that can help to differentiate between nummular headache and migraine. Further confirmatory investigations are needed. PMID:25647287

  13. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Noninvasive ventilatory correction as an adjunct to an experimental systemic reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barlinn, Kristian; Balucani, Clotilde; Palazzo, Paola; Zhao, Limin; Sisson, April; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2010-01-01

    Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies. PMID:21052540

  15. Clinical review: Acute respiratory distress syndrome - clinical ventilator management and adjunct therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury with a high short-term mortality rate and significant long-term consequences among survivors. Supportive care, principally with mechanical ventilation, remains the cornerstone of therapy - although the goals of this support have changed in recent years - from maintaining normal physiological parameters to avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury while providing adequate gas exchange. In this article we discuss the current evidence base for ventilatory support and adjunctive therapies in patients with ARDS. Key components of such a strategy include avoiding lung overdistension by limiting tidal volumes and airway pressures, and the use of positive end-expiratory pressure with or without lung recruitment manoeuvres in patients with severe ARDS. Adjunctive therapies discussed include pharmacologic techniques (for example, vasodilators, diuretics, neuromuscular blockade) and nonpharmacologic techniques (for example, prone position, alternative modes of ventilation). PMID:23672857

  16. Meta-Analysis of Local Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean A; Baerlocher, Mark O; Baerlocher, Felix; Socko, Daniel; Sacks, David; Nikolic, Boris; Wojak, Joan C; Haskal, Ziv J

    2016-03-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess randomized controlled trials comparing local endovascular therapy (with and without intravenous thrombolysis) versus standard care (intravenous thrombolysis alone when appropriate) for acute ischemic stroke. Local endovascular therapy showed a significant improvement in functional independence versus standard care (odds ratio, 1.779; 95% confidence interval, 1.262-2.507; P < .001). This benefit strengthened further on subgroup analyses of trials in which a majority of cases used stent retrievers, trials with intravenous thrombolysis use in both arms when appropriate, and trials that required preprocedural imaging of all patients. There were no significant differences between arms in terms of mortality, hemicraniectomy, intracranial hemorrhage, and cerebral edema rates (P > .05). In conclusion, in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, local endovascular therapy leads to improved functional independence compared with standard care. PMID:26803573

  17. [Oxygen therapy in acute and chronic conditions: Indications, oxygen systems, assessement and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Luna Paredes, M C; Asensio de la Cruz, Oscar; Cortell Aznar, Isidoro; Martínez Carrasco, M C; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Pérez Ruiz, E; Pérez Frías, J

    2009-08-01

    Oxygen therapy has become a major tool for infants with acute and chronic respiratory failure. Appropriate goals when prescribing supplemental oxygen are reduction and prevention of hypoxemia, prevention and treatment of pulmonary hypertension and decrease in respiratory and cardiac overload. This is commonplace in the acute setting and is also becoming widespread in chronic pathologies. However, there is a lack of consensus on many fundamental issues, such as appropriate indications, desirable targets and outcome measures amongst centres, reflecting a variety of clinical practices. The Techniques Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pneumology undertook to design recommendations for a rational approach to oxygen therapy, reviewing the existing literature in order to establish its indications, benefits and potential risks as well as its cost-effectivenes. General aspects of oxygen treatment are reviewed including physiological mechanisms, indications, delivery systems and assessment methods. Management of patients on home oxygen therapy is also addressed with discussion of benefits and potential risks of supplemental oxygen use.

  18. Migration without migraines

    SciTech Connect

    Lines, L.; Burton, A.; Lu, H.X.

    1994-12-31

    Accurate velocity models are a necessity for reliable migration results. Velocity analysis generally involves the use of methods such as normal moveout analysis (NMO), seismic traveltime tomography, or iterative prestack migration. These techniques can be effective, and each has its own advantage or disadvantage. Conventional NMO methods are relatively inexpensive but basically require simplifying assumptions about geology. Tomography is a more general method but requires traveltime interpretation of prestack data. Iterative prestack depth migration is very general but is computationally expensive. In some cases, there is the opportunity to estimate vertical velocities by use of well information. The well information can be used to optimize poststack migrations, thereby eliminating some of the time and expense of iterative prestack migration. The optimized poststack migration procedure defined here computes the velocity model which minimizes the depth differences between seismic images and formation depths at the well by using a least squares inversion method. The optimization methods described in this paper will hopefully produce ``migrations without migraines.``

  19. Spontaneous hemarthrosis following fibrinolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mahmoud M; Khan, Iqbal S; Mahdi, Ousama

    2014-11-23

    Background Despite the widespread use of fibrinolytic therapy and the numerous reports on its bleeding complications, spontaneous hemarthrosis following fibrinolytic therapy is quite rare. Case Report We describe in this report a patient with no previous history of articular disease who developed a spontaneous right knee bloody effusion following fibrinolytic therapy using rt-PA for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Furthermore, we provide a review of all cases of spontaneous hemarthrosis documented so far in the literature. Conclusions Several pre-existing joint diseases may predispose to hemarthrosis following fibrinolytic therapy, even in patients who deny previous or current articular disorders. Therefore, hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mono-arthritis following fibrinolytic therapy for STEMI.

  20. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning: Emergency management and hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Severance, H.W.; Kolb, J.C.; Carlton, F.B.; Jorden, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    An ice storm in February 1989 resulted in numerous incidences of carbon monoxide poisoning in central Mississippi secondary to exposure to open fires in unventilated living spaces. Sixteen cases were treated during this period at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and 6 received Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy. These 6 cases and the mechanisms of CO poisoning are discussed and recommendations for emergency management are reviewed.10 references.

  1. Psychiatric comorbidities of episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Buse, Dawn C; Silberstein, Stephen D; Manack, Aubrey N; Papapetropoulos, Spyros; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is a prevalent disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Population- and clinic-based studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities, particularly mood and anxiety disorders, are more common among persons with chronic migraine than among those with episodic migraine. Additional studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities may be a risk factor for migraine chronification (i.e., progression from episodic to chronic migraine). It is important to identify and appropriately treat comorbid psychiatric conditions in persons with migraine, as these conditions may contribute to increased migraine-related disability and impact, diminished health-related quality of life, and poor treatment outcomes. Here, we review the current literature on the rates of several psychiatric comorbidities, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder, among persons with migraine in clinic- and population-based studies. We also review the link between physical, emotional, and substance abuse, psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Finally, we review the data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification and explore theories and evidence underlying the comorbidity between migraine and these psychiatric disorders. PMID:23132299

  2. Genetic insights into migraine and glutamate: a protagonist driving the headache.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Claudia F; Smith, Robert A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2016-08-15

    Migraine is a complex polygenic disorder that continues to be a great source of morbidity in the developed world with a prevalence of 12% in the Caucasian population. Genetic and pharmacological studies have implicated the glutamate pathway in migraine pathophysiology. Glutamate profoundly impacts brain circuits that regulate core symptom domains in a range of neuropsychiatric conditions and thus remains a "hot" target for drug discovery. Glutamate has been implicated in cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon responsible for migraine with aura and in animal models carrying FHM mutations. Genotyping case-control studies have shown an association between glutamate receptor genes, namely, GRIA1 and GRIA3 with migraine with indirect supporting evidence from GWAS. New evidence localizes PRRT2 at glutamatergic synapses and shows it affects glutamate signalling and glutamate receptor activity via interactions with GRIA1. Glutamate-system defects have also been recently implicated in a novel FHM2 ATP1A2 disease-mutation mouse model. Adding to the growing evidence neurophysiological findings support a role for glutamate in cortical excitability. In addition to the existence of multiple genes to choreograph the functions of fast-signalling glutamatergic neurons, glutamate receptor diversity and regulation is further increased by the post-translational mechanisms of RNA editing and miRNAs. Ongoing genetic studies, GWAS and meta-analysis implicate neurogenic mechanisms in migraine pathology and the first genome-wide associated locus for migraine on chromosome X. Finally, in addition to glutamate modulating therapies, the kynurenine pathway has emerged as a candidate for involvement in migraine pathophysiology. In this review we discuss recent genetic evidence and glutamate modulating therapies that bear on the hypothesis that a glutamatergic mechanism may be involved in migraine susceptibility. PMID:27423601

  3. Managing Migraine During Pregnancy and Lactation.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Turner, Dana P; Lee, Michelle; Bishop, Laura; Strauss, Lauren

    2016-04-01

    While over half of women with migraine report improvement during pregnancy, having a history of migraine may increase the chance of negative health outcomes. The state of pregnancy increases the risk of several dangerous secondary headache disorders, especially those associated with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and providers need to know the red flags to diagnose and treat emergently. Non-pharmacological migraine treatments can be instituted in advance of pregnancy as many are considered the safest options during pregnancy, but understanding the safety of medications and dietary supplements ensures appropriate care for the refractory migraine patient. New controversy exists over the safety of several historically routine and safe migraine treatment options in pregnancy, such as magnesium, acetaminophen, ondansetron, and butalbital. While it is not clear if breastfeeding decreases the postpartum recurrence of migraine, understanding safe treatment options during lactation can allow women to continue breastfeeding while achieving migraine relief.

  4. Chronic Migraine – New Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    ROCEANU, Adina; ANTOCHI, Florina; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is defined as headache occurring more than fifteen days/month for at least three consecutive months, with headache having the clinical features of migraine without aura for at least eight days per month. Recently, new treatment options became available in chronic migraine patients. Topiramate is effective in chronic migraine, in the presence or absence of medication overuse, and/or other migraine prophylaxis. Efficacy of onabotulinumtoxin A as a preventive treatment of chronic migraine has been shown in the PREEMPT studies. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is an invasive treatment for refractory chronic headaches. ONS has encouraging results in refractory chronic migraine patients in commercially funded, multi-centre randomized trials. PMID:25705314

  5. Sex and the Migraine Brain

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, D; Erpelding, N; Lebel, A; Linnman, C; Veggeberg, R; Grant, PE; Buettner, C; Becerra, L; Burstein, R

    2014-01-01

    The brain responds differently to environmental and internal signals that relates to the stage of development of neural systems. While genetic and epigenetic factors contribute to a premorbid state, hormonal fluctuations in women may alter the set point of migraine. The cyclic surges of gonadal hormones may directly alter neuronal, glial and astrocyte function throughout the brain. Estrogen is mainly excitatory and progesterone inhibitory on brain neuronal systems. These changes contribute to the allostatic load of the migraine condition that most notably starts at puberty in girls. PMID:24662368

  6. The use of medical orders in acute care oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming; Elliott, Malcolm

    The life of every living organism is sustained by the presence of oxygen and the acute deprivation of oxygen will, therefore, result in hypoxia and ultimately death. Although oxygen is normally present in the air, higher concentrations are required to treat many disease processes. Oxygen is therefore considered to be a drug requiring a medical prescription and is subject to any law that covers its use and prescription. Administration is typically authorized by a physician following legal written instructions to a qualified nurse. This standard procedure helps prevent incidence of misuse or oxygen deprivation which could worsen the patients hypoxia and ultimate outcome. Delaying the administration of oxygen until a written medical prescription is obtained could also have the same effect. Clearly, defined protocols should exist to allow for the legal administration of oxygen by nurses without a physicians order because any delay in administering oxygen to patients can very well lead to their death. PMID:19377391

  7. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Integrating Genomics into Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy of childhood, is a genetically complex entity that remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. Major advances in genomic and epigenomic profiling during the past decade have appreciably enhanced knowledge of the biology of de novo and relapsed ALL and have facilitated more precise risk stratification of patients. These achievements have also provided critical insights regarding potentially targetable lesions for development of new therapeutic approaches in the era of precision medicine. This review delineates the current genetic landscape of childhood ALL with emphasis upon patient outcomes with contemporary treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic implications of newly identified genomic alterations in specific subsets of ALL. PMID:26194091

  8. Acute reperfusion therapy and stroke care in Asia after successful endovascular trials.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Koga, Masatoshi; Hayakawa, Mikito; Yamagami, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The current status of and prospects for acute stroke care in Asia in the situation where both intravenous thrombolysis and endovascular therapies have been recognized as established strategies for acute stroke are reviewed. Of 15 million people annually having stroke worldwide, ≈9 million are Asians. The burdens of both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are severe in Asia. The unique features of stroke in Asia include susceptibility to intracranial atherosclerosis, high prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage, effects of dietary and lifestyle habits, and several disorders with genetic causes. These features affect acute stroke care, such as the dosage of alteplase for thrombolysis and consideration of bleeding complications during antithrombotic therapy. Acute endovascular thrombectomy, as well as intravenous thrombolysis, is relatively prevalent in East Asia, but most of the other Asian countries need to develop their human resources and fundamental medical infrastructure for stroke care. A limitation of endovascular therapy in East Asia is the high prevalence of intracranial atherosclerosis that can cause recanalization failure and require additional angioplasty or permanent stent insertion although intracranial stenting is not an established strategy. Multinational collaboration on stroke research among Asian countries is infrequent. Asians should collaborate to perform their own thrombolytic and endovascular trials and seek the optimal strategy for stroke care specific to Asia.

  9. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  10. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations. PMID:26429697

  11. Patterns and Predictors of Intensive Statin Therapy among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Mouin S.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Tang, Fengming; Karrowni, Wassef Y.; Maddox, Thomas M.; McGuire, Darren K.; Spertus, John A.; Arnold, Suzanne V.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive statin therapy is a central component of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), particularly among high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the frequency and predictors of intensive statin therapy use after AMI among patients with DM have not been described. We examined patterns of intensive statin therapy use (defined as a statin with expected LDL-C lowering of >50%) at discharge among AMI patients with known DM enrolled in a 24-site US registry. Predictors of intensive statin therapy use were evaluated using multivariable hierarchical Poisson regression models. Among 1300 patients with DM after AMI, 22% were prescribed intensive statin therapy at hospital discharge. In multivariable models, ST-elevation AMI (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.29–1.70), insurance for medications (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.00–1.63) and higher LDL-C levels (RR 1.05 per 1 mg/dL, 95% CI 1.02–1.07) were independent predictors of intensive statin therapy whereas higher GRACE scores were associated with lower rates of intensive statin therapy (RR 0.94 per 10 points; 95% CI 0.91–0.98). In conclusion, only 1 in 5 patients with DM were prescribed intensive statin therapy at discharge after an AMI. Predictors of intensive statin therapy use suggest important opportunities to improve quality of care in this patient population. PMID:24560324

  12. Novel Therapeutics for Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia: 2014.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    Effective treatment options for adults with therapy-related AML continues to be an area of unmet need. Genetic and molecular changes within these leukemias confer resistance to standard chemotherapy regimens. Emerging developmental therapeutics in this area has focused on several approaches. These include; novel delivery of chemotherapy as well as newer DNA-damaging agents delivered through antibody-drug conjugates, increased use of hypomethylating agents, and molecularly-directed small molecules against specific mutations commonly occurring in secondary AML. Results of this efforts are encouraging, but to date, no clear improvements have been demonstrated in this most difficult to treat population.

  13. Pharmacotherapy of acute mania: monotherapy or combination therapy with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics?

    PubMed

    Grande, Iria; Vieta, Eduard

    2015-03-01

    The use of combination therapy with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics in acute mania in bipolar disorder (BD) is widespread, although most treatment guidelines recommend monotherapy as the first option, and reserve combination therapy, which is associated with more frequent and more severe side effects, for when patients do not respond to the former treatment option. Reasons to prescribe combination therapy include the lack of efficacy of the current treatment (either real or due to undisclosed poor adherence), psychiatric comorbidities, severe previous course of illness, slow cross-tapering during treatment switching, and potential benefits from particular combinations. The decision to start with monotherapy or combination therapy may depend on the patient characteristics, and is still under debate. Clinical trials designed to ascertain whether combination therapy or monotherapy is more advantageous for patients in acute mania and beyond, according to illness severity, are urgently needed. Adding a third monotherapy arm to the conventional two-arm, adjunctive-design trials or initiating combination therapy from the beginning may help to shed some light on the issue.

  14. Effect of biofeedback treatment on sympathetic function in common migraine and tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Grazzi, L; Bussone, G

    1993-06-01

    Behavioral therapies such as biofeedback are commonly used to treat migraine and tension headache. Controlling sympathetic activity is effective for controlling the pain in both disturbances. A group of 26 common migraine patients and a group of 14 tension headache patients were treated by electromyographic biofeedback (EMG-BFB); blood samples were collected during the treatment (1st session; pre and post 10th session) and plasma catecholamines and cortisol measured to determine basal levels and changes induced by the behavioral therapy. The clinical efficacy of BFB treatment for tension headache and common migraine was confirmed. The basal values of the plasma stress indices were significantly different between the two groups, but did not change during treatment. The lack of correlation between the clinical improvement and the biological indices monitored indicates the need for further studies with standardized protocols in order to probe the mechanism of action of these effective behavioral therapies.

  15. Encephalopathy in Acute Leukaemia Associated with Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, H. E. M.; Knapton, P. J.; O'Sullivan, J. P.; Wells, D. G.; Harris, Ruth F.; Innes, Elizabeth M.; Stuart, J.; Schwartz, F. C. M.; Thompson, Eileen N.

    1972-01-01

    Seven patients are described in whom dementia developed during treatment with methotrexate for meningeal leukaemia. The patients presented with confusion, tremor, ataxia, irritability, and somnolence. There were major epileptic fits in two cases and in one case there was progression to coma and death. Necropsy findings in the latter showed infarcted areas in the temporal and parietal lobes, with no evidence of active leukaemic disease or of viral encephalitis. The condition has not responded to radiotherapy and no positive evidence of viral encephalitis has been obtained. On the other hand, when treated with folinic and folic acid the deterioration has been arrested and there has been some improvement; thus the condition appears to be due to methotrexate. The occurrence of so many cases within the past year of a condition not previously described is probably attributable to the introduction of intensive cytotoxic therapy directed against meningeal leukaemia. ImagesFIG. 2.FIG. 3.FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4504035

  16. Migraine Headache Treatment & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... The molecular basis for migraine headaches and the aura associated with certain migraines is uncertain. One multi-faceted research study is examining how migraine with aura may affect metabolism and neurophysiological function. Investigators are ...

  17. What is Migraine? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... I get an aura prior to my migraine" Comfort measures help Pamela Duvick manage migraines Since she ... can 'work through.'" Duvick manages her migraines with comfort measures and over-the-counter pain relievers, such ...

  18. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring ... of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and Other Vascular Headaches—Symptoms and Diagnosis Migraine: ...

  19. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  20. Targeted Therapies in Hematology and Their Impact on Patient Care: Chronic and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Elias Jabbour Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the genetic and molecular characterizations of leukemias have enhanced our capabilities to develop targeted therapies. The most dramatic examples of targeted therapy in cancer to date are the use of targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) which has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target, transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disease with outcomes that vary widely according to subtype of the disease. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors are promising strategies to help improve the cure rates in AML. In this review, we will highlight the results of recent clinical trials in which outcomes of CML and AML have been influenced significantly. Also, novel approaches to sequencing and combining available therapies will be covered. PMID:24246694

  1. Proton Therapy for Spinal Ependymomas: Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Amsbaugh, Mark J.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Zhu, Ron; Wages, Cody; Crawford, Cody N.; Palmer, Matthew; De Gracia, Beth; Woo Shiao; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report acute toxicities and preliminary outcomes for pediatric patients with ependymomas of the spine treated with proton beam therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Eight pediatric patients received proton beam irradiation between October 2006 and September 2010 for spinal ependymomas. Toxicity data were collected weekly during radiation therapy and all follow-up visits. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: All patients had surgical resection of the tumor before irradiation (7 subtotal resection and 1 gross total resection). Six patients had World Health Organization Grade I ependymomas, and two had World Health Organization Grade II ependymomas. Patients had up to 3 surgical interventions before radiation therapy (range, 1-3; median, 1). Three patients received proton therapy after recurrence and five as part of their primary management. The entire vertebral body was treated in all but 2 patients. The mean radiation dose was 51.1 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45 to 54 cobalt gray equivalents). With a mean follow-up of 26 months from the radiation therapy start date (range, 7-51 months), local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were all 100%. The most common toxicities during treatment were Grade 1 or 2 erythema (75%) and Grade 1 fatigue (38%). No patients had a Grade 3 or higher adverse event. Proton therapy dramatically reduced dose to all normal tissues anterior to the vertebral bodies in comparison to photon therapy. Conclusion: Preliminary outcomes show the expected control rates with favorable acute toxicity profiles. Proton beam therapy offers a powerful treatment option in the pediatric population, where adverse events related to radiation exposure are of concern. Extended follow-up will be required to assess for late recurrences and long-term adverse effects.

  2. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset.

  3. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset. PMID:15482352

  4. [Prognosis improvements in children with acute myelocytic leucemia after more intensive induction therapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Scheer, U; Schellong, G; Riehm, H

    1979-03-01

    Between October 1974 and October 1978 23 children with acute myelocytic leucemia (AML) received intensive therapy in the Univ.-Kinderklinik Münster: 4 children were treated according to the ALGB-protocol consisting of 5-7 day courses of ARA-C-infusion and 3 DNR-injections. 19 patients received the West-Berlin-protocol: The first 7 the original ALL protocol, 11 the modified form of AML, which will be presented here as AML-therapy-study BFM 78. 4 of the 23 patients died with early acute cerebral bleeding. 2 patients were nonresponders. 17 children went into remission. One girl died in remission of septicemic aspergillosis. 4 children had a relapse. In November 1978 there were still 12 patients in continuous complete remission, 3 of them already without therapy. 13 of the 19 patients, who were treated with the West-Berlin-protocol went into remission. 1 had a relapse. At present there are 11 patients in continuous complete remission. The above results and those found in the literature could signify that the long term prognosis of children with AML will be improved. To coordinate efforts toward this goal a cooperative AML-therapy-study in the "Deutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Leukämieforschung" (BFM-group) using the here presented therapy protocol was formed in November 1978.

  5. Migraine: multiple processes, complex pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Rami; Noseda, Rodrigo; Borsook, David

    2015-04-29

    Migraine is a common, multifactorial, disabling, recurrent, hereditary neurovascular headache disorder. It usually strikes sufferers a few times per year in childhood and then progresses to a few times per week in adulthood, particularly in females. Attacks often begin with warning signs (prodromes) and aura (transient focal neurological symptoms) whose origin is thought to involve the hypothalamus, brainstem, and cortex. Once the headache develops, it typically throbs, intensifies with an increase in intracranial pressure, and presents itself in association with nausea, vomiting, and abnormal sensitivity to light, noise, and smell. It can also be accompanied by abnormal skin sensitivity (allodynia) and muscle tenderness. Collectively, the symptoms that accompany migraine from the prodromal stage through the headache phase suggest that multiple neuronal systems function abnormally. As a consequence of the disease itself or its genetic underpinnings, the migraine brain is altered structurally and functionally. These molecular, anatomical, and functional abnormalities provide a neuronal substrate for an extreme sensitivity to fluctuations in homeostasis, a decreased ability to adapt, and the recurrence of headache. Advances in understanding the genetic predisposition to migraine, and the discovery of multiple susceptible gene variants (many of which encode proteins that participate in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission and proper formation of synaptic plasticity) define the most compelling hypothesis for the generalized neuronal hyperexcitability and the anatomical alterations seen in the migraine brain. Regarding the headache pain itself, attempts to understand its unique qualities point to activation of the trigeminovascular pathway as a prerequisite for explaining why the pain is restricted to the head, often affecting the periorbital area and the eye, and intensifies when intracranial pressure increases.

  6. Migraine: Multiple Processes, Complex Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Rodrigo; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common, multifactorial, disabling, recurrent, hereditary neurovascular headache disorder. It usually strikes sufferers a few times per year in childhood and then progresses to a few times per week in adulthood, particularly in females. Attacks often begin with warning signs (prodromes) and aura (transient focal neurological symptoms) whose origin is thought to involve the hypothalamus, brainstem, and cortex. Once the headache develops, it typically throbs, intensifies with an increase in intracranial pressure, and presents itself in association with nausea, vomiting, and abnormal sensitivity to light, noise, and smell. It can also be accompanied by abnormal skin sensitivity (allodynia) and muscle tenderness. Collectively, the symptoms that accompany migraine from the prodromal stage through the headache phase suggest that multiple neuronal systems function abnormally. As a consequence of the disease itself or its genetic underpinnings, the migraine brain is altered structurally and functionally. These molecular, anatomical, and functional abnormalities provide a neuronal substrate for an extreme sensitivity to fluctuations in homeostasis, a decreased ability to adapt, and the recurrence of headache. Advances in understanding the genetic predisposition to migraine, and the discovery of multiple susceptible gene variants (many of which encode proteins that participate in the regulation of glutamate neurotransmission and proper formation of synaptic plasticity) define the most compelling hypothesis for the generalized neuronal hyperexcitability and the anatomical alterations seen in the migraine brain. Regarding the headache pain itself, attempts to understand its unique qualities point to activation of the trigeminovascular pathway as a prerequisite for explaining why the pain is restricted to the head, often affecting the periorbital area and the eye, and intensifies when intracranial pressure increases. PMID:25926442

  7. [Various aspects of the pathogenesis, clinical picture and treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Veĭn, A M; Vlasov, N A; Golubeva, V V

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 108 patients with migraine the authors studied the characteristics of the emotional-personality sphere and autonomic nervous system, as well as the status of the brain nonspecific systems. The findings of nocturnal electropolygraphy were also used in the study. The efficacy of drugs with antiserotonin action versus multiple modality therapy was compared. The observed disorders in the psychic, autonomic and endocrine systems are interpreted as a consequence of dysfunction of the central integrative cerebral apparatuses. The most effective approaches toward the multiple modality therapy of migraine patients have been developed. PMID:3630504

  8. Survey of Migraine Sufferers with Dogs to Evaluate for Canine Migraine-Alerting Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Amrita

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Anecdotal reports suggest that changes in dog behavior might be used to predict impending migraine episodes. This survey was designed to investigate how companion dogs react to migraines that occur in their owners. Design Online survey was available from January 4–31, 2012. Settings/location Survey was conducted through SurveyMonkey, with links to the survey posted at Migraine.com and promoted through social media. Subjects Adults ≥18 years old who experience migraine episodes and live with a dog were eligible to participate. Interventions and outcome measures Participants completed an 18-question online survey that asked about participant demographics, migraines, and their dog's behavior before or during migraine episodes. Results The survey was completed by 1029 adult migraineurs (94.9% women), with migraines typically occurring ≤8 days per month in 63.4% of participants. A recognized change in the dog's behavior prior to or during the initial phase of migraine was endorsed by 552 participants (53.7%), most commonly unusual attentiveness to the owner (39.9%). Among the 466 participants providing details about their dog's behavior with their migraines, 57.3% were able to identify dog alerting behavior before symptoms of a migraine attack would typically begin, with changes usually noticed within 2 hours before the onset of initial migraine symptoms. The dog's behavior was considered to be often or usually linked with the development of a migraine for 59.2% of migraineurs, and 35.8% of migraineurs endorsed beginning migraine treatments after the dog's behavior was recognized and before migraine symptoms had started. Participant demographics, migraine frequency, and breed of dog in the home were similar between the 470 participants with no alerting behavior endorsed and the 466 participants providing detailed alerting information. Conclusions About one in four migraineurs living with a companion dog endorsed recognizing a change in their

  9. Migraine-like episodic pain behavior in a dog: can dogs suffer from migraines?

    PubMed

    Plessas, I N; Volk, H A; Kenny, P J

    2013-01-01

    Migraines and other primary headache disorders commonly affect people. There is evidence to suggest that migraines can occur in dogs. In this review, we present a dog with paroxysmal episodes that have a striking resemblance to human migraine, and we give an overview of migraine in people. The current classification, clinical signs, and diagnosis in people are discussed, as well as the anatomy of head pain, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment options.

  10. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  11. Management Patterns in Acute Low Back Pain: the Role of Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gellhorn, Alfred Campbell; Chan, Leighton; Martin, Brook; Friedly, Janna

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To evaluate the relationship between early physical therapy (PT) for acute low back pain and subsequent use of lumbosacral injections, lumbar surgery, and frequent physician office visits for low back pain. Summary of Background Data Wide practice variations exist in the treatment of acute low back pain. Physical Therapy (PT) has been advocated as an effective treatment in this setting though disagreement exists regarding its purported benefits. Methods A national 20% sample of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services physician outpatient billing claims was analyzed. Patients were selected who received treatment for low back pain between 2003 and 2004 (n=439,195). To exclude chronic low back conditions, patients were excluded if they had a prior visit for back pain, lumbosacral injection, or lumbar surgery within the previous year. Main outcome measures were rates of lumbar surgery, lumbosacral injections, and frequent physician office visits for low back pain over the following year. Results Based on logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for undergoing surgery in the group of enrollees that received PT in the acute phase (<4 weeks) compared to those receiving PT in the chronic phase (>3 months) was 0.38 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.41), adjusting for age, gender, diagnosis, treating physician specialty, and comorbidity. The adjusted OR for receiving a lumbosacral injection in the group receiving PT in the acute phase was 0.46 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.49), and the adjusted OR for frequent physician office usage in the group receiving PT in the acute phase was 0.47 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.50). Conclusions There was a lower risk of subsequent medical service usage among patients who received PT early after an episode of acute low back pain relative to those who received PT at later times. Medical specialty variations exist regarding early use of PT, with potential underutilization among generalist specialties. PMID

  12. [Organ-protection therapy. A new therapeutic approach for acute heart failure?].

    PubMed

    Chivite, David; Formiga, Francesc; Corbella, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Unlike the prolonged benefit produced by the treatment of chronic heart failure, newer drugs tested for the treatment of acute heart failure in the last decade have failed to provide evidence of clinical benefit beyond some improvement in symptom relief. In particular, no drug has shown the ability to reduce the higher medium- and long-term risk of morbidity and mortality in these patients after an episode of decompensation. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of acute heart failure and its consequences has led to the hypothesis that, beyond symptom control, effective therapies for this syndrome should target not only the hemodynamic changes of the initial phase of the syndrome but should also "protect" the organism from the activation of neurohumoral and inflammatory pathways triggered by the decompensation episode, which persist in time and confer a risk of deleterious effects in several organs and tissues. Serelaxin, a new drug related to the peptidic endogenous hormones of the relaxin family, has recently been shown to provide multiple beneficial effects in terms of "organ protection" - not only in the cardiovascular and renal systems - from these acute heart failure-related deleterious changes. This drug has already been tested in acute heart failure patients with encouraging results in terms of medium-term clinical benefit, rendering serelaxin as a serious candidate for first-line, prognosis-modifying therapy in this syndrome.

  13. [New therapy schemes for acute, subacute and chronic variants of extrinsic allergic alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Makar'iants, N N; Shmelev, E I

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve treatment of patients with exogenous allergic alveolitis morphologically different variants of the disease, i.e. acute, subacute and chronic were identified and confirmed. For each variant of exogenous allergic alveolitis new therapy schemes were proposed. The study included 74 patients who were divided into 5 groups. In the first group with acute exogenous allergic alveolitis inhalation glycocorticosteroids in high doses in combination with plasmapheresis were prescribed, in the second group standard therapy with systemic glycocorticosteroids was prescribed. The third and the fourth group consisted of patients with subacute exogenous allergic alveolitis. The protracted ambroxol inhalation using nebulizers and the reduced dose of systemic glycocorticosteroids were used in the third group; and the standard dose of systemic glycocorticosteroids was used in the fourth. The fifth group consisted of patients with chronic exogenous allergic alveolitis, who received the standard dose of glycocorticosteroids and cytostatic drugs. After one month of therapy, it was ascertained that the use of high doses of inhalation glycocorticosteroids in combination with plasmapheresis in patients with acute exogenous allergic alveolitis led to significant improvements in clinical and CT presentation, physical activity tolerance, as well as the use of systemic glycocorticosteroids. The use of ambroxol inhalation in patients with subacute exogenous allergic alveolitis led to a significant improvement in clinical symptomatology, functional parameters and CT presentation, thus enabling to reduce the dose of glycocorticosteroids used and to avoid unwanted side effects.

  14. [New therapy schemes for acute, subacute and chronic variants of extrinsic allergic alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Makar'iants, N N; Shmelev, E I

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve treatment of patients with exogenous allergic alveolitis morphologically different variants of the disease, i.e. acute, subacute and chronic were identified and confirmed. For each variant of exogenous allergic alveolitis new therapy schemes were proposed. The study included 74 patients who were divided into 5 groups. In the first group with acute exogenous allergic alveolitis inhalation glycocorticosteroids in high doses in combination with plasmapheresis were prescribed, in the second group standard therapy with systemic glycocorticosteroids was prescribed. The third and the fourth group consisted of patients with subacute exogenous allergic alveolitis. The protracted ambroxol inhalation using nebulizers and the reduced dose of systemic glycocorticosteroids were used in the third group; and the standard dose of systemic glycocorticosteroids was used in the fourth. The fifth group consisted of patients with chronic exogenous allergic alveolitis, who received the standard dose of glycocorticosteroids and cytostatic drugs. After one month of therapy, it was ascertained that the use of high doses of inhalation glycocorticosteroids in combination with plasmapheresis in patients with acute exogenous allergic alveolitis led to significant improvements in clinical and CT presentation, physical activity tolerance, as well as the use of systemic glycocorticosteroids. The use of ambroxol inhalation in patients with subacute exogenous allergic alveolitis led to a significant improvement in clinical symptomatology, functional parameters and CT presentation, thus enabling to reduce the dose of glycocorticosteroids used and to avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:23457980

  15. [Positron emission tomographic studies of migraine].

    PubMed

    Géraud, G; Denuelle, M; Fabre, N; Payoux, P; Chollet, F

    2005-07-01

    Due to technical constraints and randomness of migraine attacks, studies using PET are scarce. Nevertheless, these studies have given new insights into migraine pathogenesis. One of the main facts revealed by PET studies is that posterior cerebral hypoperfusion accompanying migraine auras could also be present in migraine attacks without aura. This hypoperfusion is probably due to an increase of intrinsic vasoconstrictive tone in the cerebral circulation. Using PET within 6 hours after the onset of a spontaneous migraine attack, significant activations of brainstem (midbrain and pons) and of hypothalamus, persisting after headache relief by sumatriptan have been shown. These structures could play the role of migraine attack generators, modulating intrinsic vascular tone and central pain transmission. PMID:16141953

  16. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  17. [INCIDENCE OF ACUTE URINARY RETENTION IN PATIENTS WITH PROSTATIC ADENOMA AND 8-YEAR LONG TAMSULOSIN THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Davidov, M I; Lokshin, K L; Gorbunova, I S

    2015-01-01

    This report introduces results of an 8-year study estimating the risk of acute urinary retention in patients with stage I prostatic adenoma. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group consisted of 331 men was regularly taking Omnic (tamsulosin) 0.4 mg 1 time daily for 8 years as a means of medical therapy. The second group consisted of 334 patients treated with herbal preparations (Gentos, Tadenan or Speman). In the case of acute urinary retention patients were taken to the urological department to release urine from the urinary bladder by catheterization or by the surgical procedure. The incidence of acute urinary retention in group 1 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2% per year and, for a total of 8 years of follow-up was 6.45%. In the second group, it ranged from 1.8 to 7.3% per year, making a total of 36.2%. Therefore, the risk of acute urinary retention in patients receiving Omnic (tamsulosin) was reduced by 5.6 times in comparison with the group of patients treated with herbal medications. Thus, the need for surgery decreased from 27.8 to 6.3%. According to the results of an 8-year long tamsulosin was found as a safe and highly effective means to reduce the risk of acute urinary retention.

  18. A new model to predict acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Neesh; Graham, Michelle; Klarenbach, Scott; Meyer, Steven; Kieser, Teresa; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Ye, Feng; James, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery is associated with adverse in-hospital and long-term outcomes. Novel risk factors for acute kidney injury have been identified, but it is unknown whether their incorporation into risk models substantially improves prediction of postoperative acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. Methods: We developed and validated a risk prediction model for acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy within 14 days after cardiac surgery. We used demographic, and preoperative clinical and laboratory data from 2 independent cohorts of adults who underwent cardiac surgery (excluding transplantation) between Jan. 1, 2004, and Mar. 31, 2009. We developed the risk prediction model using multivariable logistic regression and compared it with existing models based on the C statistic, Hosmer–Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and Net Reclassification Improvement index. Results: We identified 8 independent predictors of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy in the derivation model (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval [CI]): congestive heart failure (3.03, 2.00–4.58), Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class III or higher (1.66, 1.15–2.40), diabetes mellitus (1.61, 1.12–2.31), baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (0.96, 0.95–0.97), increasing hemoglobin concentration (0.85, 0.77–0.93), proteinuria (1.65, 1.07–2.54), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) plus valve surgery (v. CABG only, 1.25, 0.64–2.43), other cardiac procedure (v. CABG only, 3.11, 2.12–4.58) and emergent status for surgery booking (4.63, 2.61–8.21). The 8-variable risk prediction model had excellent performance characteristics in the validation cohort (C statistic 0.83, 95% CI 0.79–0.86). The net reclassification improvement with the prediction model was 13.9% (p < 0.001) compared with the best existing risk prediction model (Cleveland Clinic Score). Interpretation: We have developed

  19. Adipokines and Migraine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, B. Lee; Sacco, Simona; Bernecker, Claudia; Scher, Ann I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is comorbid with obesity. Recent research suggests an association between migraine and adipocytokines, proteins that are predominantly secreted from adipose tissue and which participate in energy homeostasis and inflammatory processes. Objectives In this review, we first briefly discuss the association between migraine and obesity and the importance of adipose tissue as a neuroendocrine organ. We then present a systematic review of the extant literature evaluating circulating levels of adiponectin and leptin in those with migraine. Methods A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the keywords “migraine,” “adiponectin,” and “leptin.” In addition reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed for possible inclusion. English language studies published between 2005 and 2015 evaluating circulating blood concentration of adiponectin or leptin in those with migraine were included. Conclusions While the existing data are suggestive that adipokines may be associated with migraine, substantial study design differences and conflicting results limit definitive conclusions. Future research utilizing carefully considered designs and methodology is warranted. In particular careful and systematic characterization of pain states at the time of samples, as well as systematic consideration of demographic (eg, age, sex) and other vital covariates (eg, obesity status, lipids) are needed to determine if adipokines play a role in migraine pathophysiology and if any adipokine represents a viable, novel migraine biomarker, or drug target. PMID:27012149

  20. Chronic Migraine in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Özge, Aynur; Yalin, Osman Özgür

    2016-02-01

    Chronic migraine is defined as having more than 15 headache days in a month, half of these showing migraine features, for at least 3 months. It is a chronic painful syndrome with aspects such as psychiatric comorbid, decreased quality of life, and environmental and intrinsic psychological factors that make face-to-face treatment difficult. Children and adolescent migraine differ from adults as a result of growing brain and evolving disorder. In this paper, we will emphasize the definition, diagnosis, epidemiology, burden of life, and management of chronic migraine in children and adolescent.

  1. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  2. A Practical Approach to Migraine Management

    PubMed Central

    Edmeads, John

    1983-01-01

    Migraine is a benign constitutional disorder of neurovascular function characterized by recurrent headaches and autonomic and/or CNS symptoms. The diagnosis is made entirely on clinical grounds, and should not be difficult. The sequence of treatment is removal of migraine trigger factors, analgesic compounds, ergotamine, and migraine prophylactic agents. Providing that their specific contraindications are observed, and their side-effects mitigated by commonsense measures, these agents are safe and effective. A correct combination should result in improvement for most patients with migraine. Imagesp125-a PMID:21286588

  3. Evaluation of occupational therapy interventions for elderly patients in Swedish acute care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wressle, Ewa; Filipsson, Viveka; Andersson, Lena; Jacobsson, Beatrice; Martinsson, Karin; Engel, Kristina

    2006-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether occupational therapy interventions in acute care could improve the elderly patient's perception of ability to manage at home after discharge. A pilot study was performed, including 22 patients in the experimental group and 19 in the control group. Occupational therapy interventions were conducted in the experimental group concerning personal care, information, prescription of assistive devices, planning of discharge, and reporting to primary care or community care. The control group was given no occupational therapy interventions. Structured interviews were performed on discharge and at a follow-up in about 14 weeks after discharge. The two groups were comparable concerning gender, age, days of care, and diagnoses. Patients in the experimental group scored lower on mental health and were more anxious on discharge. However, there was no difference between the groups in managing at home after discharge. Patients in the control group had greater need of further contacts with healthcare after discharge. Due to the small sample interpretations must be made with caution. The findings indicate that occupational therapy interventions in acute care might have a positive effect from the perspective of the elderly patient. These results need to be confirmed in a larger study.

  4. Evaluation of occupational therapy interventions for elderly patients in Swedish acute care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wressle, Ewa; Filipsson, Viveka; Andersson, Lena; Jacobsson, Beatrice; Martinsson, Karin; Engel, Kristina

    2006-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether occupational therapy interventions in acute care could improve the elderly patient's perception of ability to manage at home after discharge. A pilot study was performed, including 22 patients in the experimental group and 19 in the control group. Occupational therapy interventions were conducted in the experimental group concerning personal care, information, prescription of assistive devices, planning of discharge, and reporting to primary care or community care. The control group was given no occupational therapy interventions. Structured interviews were performed on discharge and at a follow-up in about 14 weeks after discharge. The two groups were comparable concerning gender, age, days of care, and diagnoses. Patients in the experimental group scored lower on mental health and were more anxious on discharge. However, there was no difference between the groups in managing at home after discharge. Patients in the control group had greater need of further contacts with healthcare after discharge. Due to the small sample interpretations must be made with caution. The findings indicate that occupational therapy interventions in acute care might have a positive effect from the perspective of the elderly patient. These results need to be confirmed in a larger study. PMID:17203670

  5. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Medjo, Biljana; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina; Nikolic, Dimitrije; Cuturilo, Goran; Djukic, Slobodanka

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy on oxygenation and mortality in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Thirty-three children with ARDS and an arterial SatO2 <88% despite mechanical ventilation were analyzed. Patients in the iNO group were prospectively enrolled and treated with conventional therapy plus iNO. The control group consisted of retrospectively analyzed patients treated only with conventional therapy. A significant increase in PaO2/FiO2 ratio (25.6%) and decrease in oxygenation index (19.5%) was observed after 4 h of iNO treatment, when compared to baseline values. A positive response to iNO was detected in 69% of patients, and there was no difference between pulmonary and extrapulmonary ARDS. There was no difference in mortality and duration of mechanical ventilation between iNO and control group. PMID:22885439

  7. [Stroke from the Perspective of Neurologists (Part 2): Update in the Acute Therapy].

    PubMed

    Schur, Patrick; Luft, Andreas

    2016-05-11

    In the last praxis edition (9/2016) the article with the title “Neues in der Akutdiagnostik” reported about the relevant factors for the extension of thrombolytic procedures despite the usual inclusion criteria of thrombolysis. The rapid clinical and imaging identification of patients who benefit from endovascular therapy based on the “target mismatch” is an other key factor in the race against time. In addition the advantages of new mechanical devices allow to remove a thrombus quickly, completely and especially with better outcome. The recently published randomized controlled studies MR-CLEAN, EXTEND-IA, ESCAPE, SWIFT-PRIME and REVASCAT showed significant benefits of intra-arterial thrombolysis in patients with large artery occlusions. The following article discusses the state-of-the-art of the basic therapy and the major pathways of acute therapy. PMID:27167477

  8. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P < .015; 95% confidence intervals 0.25-0.77). There was also an increase in the HOMA-IR index; on visit 1, the median HOMA-IR (interquartile range) was 5.2 (3.9) versus 6.9 (6.8) on visit 3 (P < .015). Other indices of glucose metabolism did not change. These observations document that GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans.

  9. Modeling neural immune signaling of episodic and chronic migraine using spreading depression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Aya D; Grinberg, Yelena Y; Mitchell, Heidi M; Kraig, Richard P

    2011-06-13

    Migraine and its transformation to chronic migraine are healthcare burdens in need of improved treatment options. We seek to define how neural immune signaling modulates the susceptibility to migraine, modeled in vitro using spreading depression (SD), as a means to develop novel therapeutic targets for episodic and chronic migraine. SD is the likely cause of migraine aura and migraine pain. It is a paroxysmal loss of neuronal function triggered by initially increased neuronal activity, which slowly propagates within susceptible brain regions. Normal brain function is exquisitely sensitive to, and relies on, coincident low-level immune signaling. Thus, neural immune signaling likely affects electrical activity of SD, and therefore migraine. Pain perception studies of SD in whole animals are fraught with difficulties, but whole animals are well suited to examine systems biology aspects of migraine since SD activates trigeminal nociceptive pathways. However, whole animal studies alone cannot be used to decipher the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms of SD. Instead, in vitro preparations where environmental conditions can be controlled are necessary. Here, it is important to recognize limitations of acute slices and distinct advantages of hippocampal slice cultures. Acute brain slices cannot reveal subtle changes in immune signaling since preparing the slices alone triggers: pro-inflammatory changes that last days, epileptiform behavior due to high levels of oxygen tension needed to vitalize the slices, and irreversible cell injury at anoxic slice centers. In contrast, we examine immune signaling in mature hippocampal slice cultures since the cultures closely parallel their in vivo counterpart with mature trisynaptic function; show quiescent astrocytes, microglia, and cytokine levels; and SD is easily induced in an unanesthetized preparation. Furthermore, the slices are long-lived and SD can be induced on consecutive days without injury, making this preparation the

  10. Modeling Neural Immune Signaling of Episodic and Chronic Migraine Using Spreading Depression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Heidi M.; Kraig, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Migraine and its transformation to chronic migraine are healthcare burdens in need of improved treatment options. We seek to define how neural immune signaling modulates the susceptibility to migraine, modeled in vitro using spreading depression (SD), as a means to develop novel therapeutic targets for episodic and chronic migraine. SD is the likely cause of migraine aura and migraine pain. It is a paroxysmal loss of neuronal function triggered by initially increased neuronal activity, which slowly propagates within susceptible brain regions. Normal brain function is exquisitely sensitive to, and relies on, coincident low-level immune signaling. Thus, neural immune signaling likely affects electrical activity of SD, and therefore migraine. Pain perception studies of SD in whole animals are fraught with difficulties, but whole animals are well suited to examine systems biology aspects of migraine since SD activates trigeminal nociceptive pathways. However, whole animal studies alone cannot be used to decipher the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms of SD. Instead, in vitro preparations where environmental conditions can be controlled are necessary. Here, it is important to recognize limitations of acute slices and distinct advantages of hippocampal slice cultures. Acute brain slices cannot reveal subtle changes in immune signaling since preparing the slices alone triggers: pro-inflammatory changes that last days, epileptiform behavior due to high levels of oxygen tension needed to vitalize the slices, and irreversible cell injury at anoxic slice centers. In contrast, we examine immune signaling in mature hippocampal slice cultures since the cultures closely parallel their in vivo counterpart with mature trisynaptic function; show quiescent astrocytes, microglia, and cytokine levels; and SD is easily induced in an unanesthetized preparation. Furthermore, the slices are long-lived and SD can be induced on consecutive days without injury, making this preparation the

  11. [Migraine: ignition of the brain].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-del-Río González, Margarita

    2013-12-01

    Although our knowledge of which systems are activated during migraine is reasonably complete, why the system is activated remains unknown. Incorporating the findings obtained in studies on pain in general has allowed a more integrated model to be generated. According to this new model, there is an anatomical substrate consisting in a complex framework of pain that is made up not only of the trigeminovascular system (end pathway) but of a number of networks that are in turn connected to one another, like the neurolimbic, the ascending and descending modulatory system. This complex network is responsible for modulating and conveying nociceptive signals. In patients with migraine, hyperexcitability of this framework is conditioned by genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications affecting chromatin, which modulates the activity of genes without modifying the DNA sequence, and which are capable of modulating the expression of genes involved in a number of different aspects, such as plasticity, system excitability, memory of pain or moods. In turn, the presence of external factors (such as environmental changes or alcohol) and internal factors (such as hormones or sleep disorders) contribute to activate this loaded anatomical substrate, resulting in the attack of migraine.

  12. Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Successfully Treated with Multimodal Antimicrobial Therapy and Hyperbaric Oxygen▿

    PubMed Central

    Maritschnegg, P.; Sovinz, P.; Lackner, H.; Benesch, M.; Nebl, A.; Schwinger, W.; Walochnik, J.; Urban, C.

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is the causative agent of granulomatous amebic encephalitis, a rare and usually fatal disease. We report a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed brain abscesses caused by Acanthamoeba during induction therapy. Multimodal antimicrobial chemotherapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in complete resolution of symptoms and of pathology as seen by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:21084511

  13. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in acute severe asthma. A randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Engel, T; Dirksen, A; Frølund, L; Heinig, J H; Svendsen, U G; Pedersen, B K; Weeke, B

    1990-04-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) has been shown to possess a long-lasting effect in other immune-inflammatory diseases without the well-known side effects caused by long-term treatment with glucocorticosteroids. In an attempt to reduce the long-term use of oral steroids in asthmatics, we conducted this double-blind, double-dummy study to compare the use of MPPT (1 g of methylprednisolone intravenously) (8 patients) with a short course of oral prednisolone (10 patients) in asthmatics presenting with acute severe asthma. Both treatments were effective in relieving the acute attack of asthma. The MPPT-treated patients did not show a faster resolution than did the orally treated group. No patients needed assisted ventilation, and no deaths occurred. One week after the treatment FEV1 tended to decrease in the methylprednisolone group compared with the oral prednisolone group (P = 0.06). The patients initially receiving MPPT needed supplementary prednisolone earlier and in higher doses than did the patients receiving oral prednisolone as initial treatment. At the end of the 12 weeks' study period, the groups reached identical FEV1. In conclusion, we did not find intravenous methylprednisolone superior to oral prednisolone in the treatment of acute attacks of severe asthma, but methylprednisolone pulse therapy had a shorter duration as regards protection against future asthma attacks. PMID:2183645

  14. What is the Role for Intra-Arterial Therapy in Acute Stroke Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mark N.; Chong, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator continues to be first-line therapy for patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within the appropriate time window, but one potential limitation is the low rate of recanalization in the setting of large artery occlusions. Intra-arterial (IA) treatment is effective for emergency revascularization of proximal intracranial arterial occlusions, but proof of benefit has been lacking until recently. Our goal is to outline the history of endovascular therapy and review both IA thrombolysis and mechanical interventions. In addition, we will discuss the impact of important trials such as the Third Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS3) trial, and the more recent trials Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN), Endovascular Treatment for Small Core and Proximal Occlusion Ischemic Stroke (ESCAPE), Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits—Intra-Arterial (EXTEND-IA), and Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment (SWIFT PRIME) on acute stroke management and the implications for the practicing neurohospitalist. PMID:26288670

  15. Preventing cerebral oedema in acute liver failure: the case for quadruple-H therapy.

    PubMed

    Warrillow, S J; Bellomo, R

    2014-01-01

    Severe cerebral oedema is a life-threatening complication of acute liver failure. Hyperammonaemia and cerebral hyperaemia are major contributing factors. A multimodal approach, which incorporates hyperventilation, haemodiafiltration, hypernatraemia and hypothermia (quadruple-H therapy), may prevent or attenuate severe cerebral oedema. This approach is readily administered by critical care clinicians and is likely to be more effective than the use of single therapies. Targeting of PaCO2 in the mild hyperventilation range, as seen in acute liver failure patients before intubation, aims to minimise hyperaemic cerebral oedema. Haemodiafiltration aims to achieve the rapid control of elevated blood ammonia concentrations by its removal and to reduce production via the lowering of core temperature. The administration of concentrated saline increases serum tonicity and further reduces cerebral swelling. In addition, the pathologically increased cerebral blood-flow is further attenuated by therapeutic hypothermia. The combination of all four treatments in a multimodal approach may be a safe and effective means of attenuating or treating the cerebral oedema of acute liver failure and preventing death from neurological complications. PMID:24471667

  16. Dual antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes and coronary artery interventions.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Jayanthi, K

    2014-07-01

    Optimization of platelet inhibition in patients with acute coronary syndromes reduces the risk for ischemic events, but at the same time increases the risk for bleeding. There are several predictors of bleeding risk in patients with acute coronary syndromes. These include demographic variables such as advanced age, female gender, low body weight, concomitant diseases such as diabetes,renal insufficiency, noncardiac vascular disease such as cerebral vascular disease and a history of bleeding. It also includes the type of acute coronary syndromes such as patients presenting with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, high killip class and low blood pressure. The diabetic population contains a higher proportion of patients who do not respond to antiplatelet drugs as expected and who also have more activated platelets that deserve very vigorous inhibition. The importance of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and stenting is much discussed. Yet there are some questions which are to be answered clearly such as the following:- 1) In the need to balance the benefit of clot prevention with bleeding risk, is it better to continue dual antiplatelet therapy for longer than one year? 2) If so, is this benefit specific to drug eluting stents or to a more general population of stent patients? 3) Is the benefit mediated by prevention of stent thrombosis or is there a global reduction in cardiovascular risk? This review is to understand all these aspects and help a physician use antiplatelet drugs appropriately in day to day clinical practice for better patient outcomes. PMID:25672032

  17. Capsaicin failed in suppressing cortical processing of CO2 laser pain in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Losito, Luciana; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the nociceptive system in eight migraine without aura patients in the pain-free phase with 10 healthy controls, by evaluating the topography and the source of the CO2 laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) obtained by the right supraorbital skin, during and after capsaicin topical application. In healthy subjects the acute cutaneous pain induced by capsaicin reduced the amplitude of the vertex LEPs and induced a posterior shifting of the P2 wave dipolar source within the anterior cingulate cortex. These functional changes seemed significantly reduced in migraine patients, for a disturbed pattern of pain modulation at the cortical level, which may subtend the onset and persistence of migraine. PMID:15927376

  18. Capsaicin failed in suppressing cortical processing of CO2 laser pain in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Losito, Luciana; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the nociceptive system in eight migraine without aura patients in the pain-free phase with 10 healthy controls, by evaluating the topography and the source of the CO2 laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) obtained by the right supraorbital skin, during and after capsaicin topical application. In healthy subjects the acute cutaneous pain induced by capsaicin reduced the amplitude of the vertex LEPs and induced a posterior shifting of the P2 wave dipolar source within the anterior cingulate cortex. These functional changes seemed significantly reduced in migraine patients, for a disturbed pattern of pain modulation at the cortical level, which may subtend the onset and persistence of migraine.

  19. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  20. [Suppressing effect of the serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonist rizatriptan on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentration in migraine attacks].

    PubMed

    Stepień, Adam; Jagustyn, Piotr; Trafny, Elzbieta Anna; Widerkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the neuropeptides most abundant in the nervous tissue. Recent studies indicate that local cranial release of CGRP from the trigeminal nerve perivascular endings within arachnoidea plays an important role in the pathophysiology of migraine attacks and cluster headaches. Elevated CGRP levels in cranial venous blood (in the jugular vein) during an acute spontaneous migraine attack have been reported in rather few studies so far. Sumatriptan--a selective serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonist, highly effective in terminating migraine attacks, decreases the elevated CGRP level back to normal. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of rizatriptan (a drug from a new generation of triptans) on CGRP release in migraine attacks. In 45 patients suffering from migraine attacks with and without aura, plasma CGRP levels were assessed during an attack twice: before treatment and two hours after rizatriptan administration. In the group under study the plasma CGRP level before treatment was significantly higher than that measured two hours after rizatriptan administration. The decrease in CGRP levels was associated with subsidence of the migraine attack. There was no difference between migraine patients with and without aura. These results suggest that triptans as serotonin 5HT1B/D receptor agonists decrease CGRP plasma concentration in migraine attacks. PMID:15174248

  1. Clinical Response to Valproate in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Mizuki; Katoh, Hirotaka; Kurihara, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Valproate is used as a prophylactic drug for migraine, but it is not be effective in all patients. We used medical records to investigate which clinical factors affected the response to valproate in patients with migraine as an original headache, and established a scoring system for predicting the clinical response to prophylactic therapy. Methods We investigated clinical factors from the medical records of 95 consistent responders (CRs) and 24 inconsistent responders (IRs) to valproate. Results Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that a history of hyperlipidemia and hay fever and the complication of depression or other psychiatric disorder were significant factors that independently contributed to a negative response, with odds ratios of 6.024 [no vs. yes; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.616–22.222], 2.825 (no vs. yes; 95% CI=1.046–7.634), and 2.825 (no vs. yes; 95% CI=1.052–7.576), respectively. A predictive index (PI) of the clinical response to valproate in patients with migraine was calculated using the regression coefficients of these three factors as an integer, and the index was significantly higher for IRs than for CRs (1.46±1.10 vs. 0.69±0.74, mean±SD, p<0.001). Conclusions The obtained PI may represent an appropriate scoring system for predicting the responses in these patients.

  2. CGRP Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.; Vause, Carrie V.

    2011-01-01

    Based on preclinical and clinical studies, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is proposed to play a central role in the underlying pathology of migraine. CGRP and its receptor are widely expressed in both the peripheral and central nervous system by multiple cell types involved in the regulation of inflammatory and nociceptive responses. Peripheral release of CGRP from trigeminal nerve fibers within the dura and from the cell body of trigeminal ganglion neurons is likely to contribute to peripheral sensitization of trigeminal nociceptors. Similarly, the release of CGRP within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis can facilitate activation of nociceptive second order neurons and glial cells. Thus, CGRP is involved in the development and maintenance of persistent pain, central sensitization, and allodynia, events characteristic of migraine pathology. In contrast, CGRP release within the brain is likely to function in an anti-nociceptive capacity. This review will focus on the development and clinical data on CGRP receptor antagonists as well as discussing their potential roles in migraine therapy via modulation of multiple cell types within the peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:20433208

  3. Hypoxia facilitates neurogenic dural plasma protein extravasation in mice: a novel animal model for migraine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Hunfeld, Anika; Segelcke, Daniel; Bäcker, Ingo; Mecheri, Badreddine; Hemmer, Kathrin; Dlugosch, Elisabeth; Andriske, Michael; Paris, Frank; Zhu, Xinran; Lübbert, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Migraine animal models generally mimic the onset of attacks and acute treatment processes. A guinea pig model used the application of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) to trigger immediate dural plasma protein extravasation (PPE) mediated by 5-HT2B receptors. This model has predictive value for antimigraine drugs but cannot explain the delayed onset of efficacy of 5-HT2B receptor antagonists when clinically used for migraine prophylaxis. We found that mCPP failed to induce dural PPE in mice. Considering the role 5-HT2B receptors play in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vessel muscularization, we were encouraged to keep mice under hypoxic conditions and tested whether this treatment will render them susceptible to mCPP-induced dural PPE. Following four-week of hypoxia, PPE, associated with increased transendothelial transport, was induced by mCPP. The effect was blocked by sumatriptan. Chronic application of 5-HT2B receptor or nitric oxide synthase blockers during hypoxia prevented the development of susceptibility. Here we present a migraine model that distinguishes between a migraine-like state (hypoxic mice) and normal, normoxic mice and mimics processes that are related to chronic activation of 5-HT2B receptors under hypoxia. It seems striking, that chronic endogenous activation of 5-HT2B receptors is crucial for the sensitization since 5-HT2B receptor antagonists have strong, albeit delayed migraine prophylactic efficacy. PMID:26644235

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  5. Headache Following Occipital Brain Lesion: A Case of Migraine Triggered by Occipital Spikes?

    PubMed

    Vollono, Catello; Mariotti, Paolo; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Valentini, Piero; De Rose, Paola; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the case of an 8-year-old boy who developed a genuine migraine after the surgical excision, from the right occipital lobe, of brain abscesses due to selective infestation of the cerebrum by Entamoeba histolytica. After the surgical treatment, the boy presented daily headaches with typical migraine features, including right-side parieto-temporal pain, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Electroencephalography (EEG) showed epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe, although he never presented seizures. Clinical and neurophysiological observations were performed, including video-EEG and polygraphic recordings. EEG showed "interictal" epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe. A prolonged video-EEG recording performed before, during, and after an acute attack ruled out ictal or postictal migraine. In this boy, an occipital lesion caused occipital epileptiform EEG discharges without seizures, probably prevented by the treatment. We speculate that occipital spikes, in turn, could have caused a chronic headache with features of migraine without aura. Occipital epileptiform discharges, even in absence of seizures, may trigger a genuine migraine, probably by means of either the trigeminovascular or brainstem system.

  6. Prevention of comorbidity and acute attack of gout by uric acid lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kowoon; Kwon, Seong-Ryul; Lim, Mie-Jin; Jung, Kyong-Hee; Joo, Hoyeon; Park, Won

    2014-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of uric acid lowering therapy in reducing the new development of comorbidities and the frequency of acute attacks in gout patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients who were diagnosed to have gout with at least 3 yr of follow up. They were divided into 2 groups; 53 patients with mean serum uric acid level (sUA)<6 mg/dL and 147 patients with mean sUA≥6 mg/dL. Comorbidities of gout such as hypertension (HTN), type II diabetes mellitus (DM), chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and urolithiasis were compared in each group at baseline and at last follow-up visit. Frequency of acute gout attacks were also compared between the groups. During the mean follow up period of 7.6 yr, the yearly rate of acute attack and the new development of HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis was lower in the adequately treated group compared to the inadequately treated group. Tight control of uric acid decreases the incidence of acute gout attacks and comorbidities of gout such as HTN, DM, CVD and urolithiasis.

  7. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials. PMID:26928248

  8. Acute hypophosphataemia and hypokalaemia in a patient starting antiretroviral therapy in Zambia-a new context for refeeding syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nyirenda, Christopher; Zulu, Isaac; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Bagchi, Shashwatee; Potter, Dara; Bosire, Claire; Krishnasami, Zipporah; Heimburger, Douglas C

    2009-01-01

    High mortality rates have been reported in the first 90 days of antiretroviral therapy in Zambia and other low-income countries. We report a case of acute hypophosphataemia and hypokalaemia in the first week of antiretroviral therapy in a patient with extreme AIDS wasting. Given its occurrence in an extremely wasted patient, it may be physiologically similar to refeeding syndrome but other causes could be relevant as well. Acute hypophosphataemia may contribute to early antiretroviral therapy associated mortality in low-income countries.

  9. A case of acute hepatitis B in a chronic hepatitis C patient after daclatasvir and asunaprevir combination therapy: hepatitis B virus reactivation or acute self-limited hepatitis?

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Ishizu, Yoji; Kuzuya, Teiji; Honda, Takashi; Nishimura, Daisaku; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-08-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive patients treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known. HBV reactivation in patients with HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection caused by direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy has also recently been reported. We report a case of acute hepatitis B in a patient with HCV infection after DAA therapy. An 83-year-old woman was referred for chronic hepatitis C. She was infected with HCV genotype 1b and negative for HBsAg at baseline. She received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy, and HCV became negative at 4 weeks and remained negative until 6 months after the end of DAA therapy. Acute hepatitis B developed 5 months after ending DAA therapy. Genome sequencing revealed the subgenotype as B1, and the serological subtype as adr. T118 K mutation at the S region as an immune escape mutant was identified. These virologic features led to HBV reactivation. The presence of hepatitis B core antibody or HBs antibody was not determined before DAA therapy, so prior HBV infection status was unclear. This case is speculated to represent HBV reactivation in a patient with previously resolved HBV induced by DAA therapy, based on virologic analysis and clinical status. The risk might be very low, but DAA therapy can cause HBV reactivation in chronic hepatitis C patients with prior HBV infection. When acute hepatitis emerges in patients who have received DAA therapy for HCV, HBV reactivation should be considered to allow early initiation of anti-HBV therapy. PMID:27329484

  10. Use of Common Migraine Treatments in Breast-Feeding Women: A Summary of Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Susan; Marmura, Michael J.; Calhoun, Anne; Lucas, Sylvia; Silberstein, Stephen; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast-feeding has important health and emotional benefits for both mother and infant, and should be encouraged. While there are some data to suggest migraine may improve during breast-feeding, more than half of women experience migraine recurrence with 1 month of delivery. Thus, a thorough knowledge base of the safety and recommended use of common acute and preventive migraine drugs during breast-feeding is vital to clinicians treating migraine sufferers. Choice of treatment should take into account the balance of benefit and risk of medication. For some of the medications commonly used during breast-feeding, there is not good evidence about benefits. Methods A list of commonly used migraine medications was agreed upon by the 6 authors, who treat migraine and other headaches on a regular basis and are members of the Women's Special Interest Section of the American Headache Society. Each medication was researched by the first author utilizing widely accepted data sources, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics publication “The Transfer of Drugs and Other Chemicals Into Human Milk; Thomas Hale's manual Medications and Mothers Milk; Briggs, Freeman, and Yaffe's reference book Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation; and the National Library of Medicine's Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) – a peer-reviewed and fully referenced database available online. Results Many commonly used migraine medications may be compatible with breast-feeding based on expert recommendations. Ibuprofen, diclofenac, and eletriptan are among acute medications with low levels in breast milk, but studies of triptans are limited. Toxicity is a concern with aspirin due to an association with Reye's syndrome; sedation or apnea is a concern with opioids. Finally, preventive medications not recommended include zonisamide, atenolol, and tizanidine. Conclusions Several excellent resources are available for clinicians making treatment decisions in breast-feeding women. Clinicians

  11. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  12. Delayed onset of acute limb compartment syndrome with neuropathy after venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy.

    PubMed

    Go, Jin Young; Min, Yu-Sun; Jung, Tae-Du

    2014-08-01

    Acute limb compartment syndrome (ALCS) is defined as compound symptoms resulting from poor oxygenation and decreased nutrition supply to muscles and nerves in a tightly confined compartment. The most common cause of ALCS is tibia fracture, followed by blunt trauma to soft tissue. However, non-traumatic causes are rare. We report an iatrogenic, non-traumatic ALCS case after venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygen (VA-ECMO) therapy. A 14-year-old male received VA-ECMO therapy due to cardiorespiratory failure after drowning. Although he had no symptoms during therapy, leg swelling appeared 10 hours after ECMO treatment. Two days after the leg swelling, the patient underwent a fasciotomy. Unfortunately, nerve conduction studies and electromyography showed multiple neuropathies in the lower leg. Despite 2 weeks of rehabilitation with electrical stimulation, an exercise program, and physical therapy, there was no definite change in muscle strength. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of non-traumatic ALCS after VA-ECMO therapy in Korea.

  13. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-01-01

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms. PMID:27323085

  14. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30 years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20–40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including L-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopruine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapy. PMID:25614322

  15. Formaldehyde, aspartame, and migraines: a possible connection.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Stechschulte, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener that has been linked to pediatric and adolescent migraines. Upon ingestion, aspartame is broken, converted, and oxidized into formaldehyde in various tissues. We present the first case series of aspartame-associated migraines related to clinically relevant positive reactions to formaldehyde on patch testing.

  16. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  17. Diagnosis and treatment for chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Maureen; Mallick-Searle, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Migraine is a debilitating headache disorder that is underdiagnosed and undertreated worldwide, partially attributable to misdiagnosis and expectations of poor treatment outcomes. This article provides a review of chronic migraine, including pathophysiology, burden, diagnosis, and management, with special emphasis on the role of NPs. PMID:27203455

  18. Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levor, Robert M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Poppe, Matthew; Jabbour, Salma; David, Vera; Garofalo, Michael; Pandya, Naimesh; Alexander, Richard; Hanna, Nader; Regine, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  20. Associations Between Sleep Quality and Migraine Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Lin, Guan-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Hsu, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Tsai, Yi-Chien; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine has been associated with sleep disturbances. Relationship between sleep quality and migraine frequency is yet to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate sleep disturbances among low-frequency, moderate-frequency, high-frequency, and chronic migraineurs, with and without auras, with well-controlled confounding variables. This cross-sectional controlled study included 357 subjects from an outpatient headache clinic in Taiwan. Standardized questionnaires were utilized to collect demographic, migraine, sleep, depression, anxiety, and restless leg syndrome characteristics in all participants. According to frequency of migraine attacks, patients were divided into 4 groups: with 1 to 4 migraine days per month, 5 to 8 migraine days in a month, 9 to 14 migraine days in a month, and >14 migraine days per month. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and subgroup items were used to evaluate sleep quality. The association between migraine frequency and sleep quality was investigated using multivariable linear regression and logistic regression. The PSQI total score was highest in patients with high frequent migraine (10.0 ± 3.4) and lowest in controls (7.0 ± 3.4) with a significant trend analysis (P for trend = 0.006). Migraine frequency had an independent effect on the items “Cannot get to sleep within 30 minutes” (P < 0.001), “Wake up in the middle of the night or early morning” (P < 0.001), “Bad dreams” (P = 0.001), “Pain” (P = 0.004), and “Quality of sleep” (P < 0.001). The result showed the effect of migraine frequency in both the aura-present (P for trend = 0.008) and the aura-absent subgroups (P for trend = 0.011). High migraine frequency correlates with poor sleep quality and a higher prevalence of poor sleepers. These associations occur in migraine with aura and without aura. PMID:27124064

  1. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Chin Yee; Tan, Jane An Qi; Foong, Yi-Lin; Koh, Hui Mien; Chen, Denise Zhen Yue; Tan, Jessie Joon Chen; Ng, Chong Jin; Yap, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT) programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD) in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4) were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy) on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music) and days 2 and 3 (with CMT). Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES) and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS). Results Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01) in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01) in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014). Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01) and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045) were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation. PMID:27489560

  2. Intravenous immunoglobulin in the therapy of adult acute fulminant myocarditis: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-Qing; Wang, Ying; Ma, Gui-Zhou; Xu, Rong-He; Cai, Zhi-Xiong; Ni, Chu-Min; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Zhi-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Acute fulminant myocarditis (AFM) is a serious heart disease with limited treatment. This observational retrospective study aimed to investigate whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was able to improve left ventricular function and reduce the episodes of arrhythmia in adult patients with AFM. The medical records of all patients with AFM who were admitted to the Critical Care Unit of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangzhou, China) between January 2001 and December 2010 were reviewed. A cohort of 58 patients was included in the study. Of these 58, 32 patients were treated with IVIG (400 mg/kg per day) for five days, while the remaining patients did not receive IVIG therapy. The patients who received IVIG therapy had a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and a reduced left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDD) compared with the non-IVIG therapy patients four weeks subsequent to the treatment (PLVEF=0.011 and PLVDD=0.048). The post-treatment incidence of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF) and atrioventricular block (AVB) was reduced in the patients who received IVIG therapy compared with the baseline values (PVT/VF=0.025, PAVB=0.003); however, no significant differences were observed in the non-IVIG therapy patients (PVT/VF=0.564, PAVB=0.083) following treatment. There were two mortalities in the IVIG therapy group and seven in the non-IVIG therapy group (P=0.072). This retrospective study suggested that the use of IVIG for the treatment of AFM may be associated with improved left ventricular function and reduced episodes of fulminant arrhythmias. PMID:24348772

  3. Talking therapy groups on acute psychiatric wards: patients' experience of two structured group formats

    PubMed Central

    Radcliffe, Jonathan; Bird, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We report the results of a clinical audit of patients' reactions to two types of talking therapy groups facilitated by assistant psychologists and psychology graduates on three acute wards. Patients' experiences of problem-solving and interpersonal group formats were explored via focus groups and structured interviews with 29 group participants. Results Both group formats generated high satisfaction ratings, with benefits related mostly to generic factors. Clinical implications Adequately trained and supported assistant psychologists and psychology graduates can provide supportive talking groups that patients find helpful. PMID:27512586

  4. The acute promyelocytic leukaemia success story: curing leukaemia through targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Rice, K L; de Thé, H

    2014-07-01

    The recent finding that almost all patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) may be cured using a combination of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) (N Engl J Med, 369, 2013 and 111) highlights the progress made in our understanding of APL pathogenesis and therapeutic approaches over the past 25 years. The study of APL has revealed many important lessons related to transcriptional control, nuclear organization, epigenetics and the role of proteolysis in biological control. Even more important has been the clinical demonstration that molecularly targeted therapy can eradicate disease.

  5. Does Migraine Increase the Risk of Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether migraine influences the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in Taiwan. We retrieved the data analyzed in this study from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 17,606 newly diagnosed migraine patients without preexisting glaucoma and randomly selected and matched 70,423 subjects without migraine as the comparison cohort. The same exclusion criteria were also applied to comparison subjects. Multivariate Cox proportion-hazards regression model was used to assess the effects of migraines on the risk of glaucoma after adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities. The cumulative incidence of POAG was higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (log-rank P = 0.04). The overall incidence of POAG (per 10,000 person-years) was 9.62 and 7.69, respectively, for migraine cohort and nonmigraine cohort (crude hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–1.54). After adjusting the covariates, the risk of POAG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (adjusted HR [aHR] = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.93–1.42). The cumulative incidence of PACG did not differ between the migraine cohort and the comparison cohort (log-rank test P = 0.53). The overall incidence of PACG was not significantly higher in the migraine cohort than that in the comparison cohort (7.42 vs 6.84 per 10,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.82–1.32). This study shows that migraines are not associated with a higher risk either in POAG or in PACG. PMID:27175700

  6. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  7. Review of technology development and clinical trials of transcranial laser therapy for acute ischemic stroke treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzaro, Brian E.; Streeter, Jackson; de Taboada, Luis

    2010-02-01

    Stroke is the one of the leading causes of mortality in the United States, claiming 600,000 lives each year. Evidence suggests that near infrared (NIR) illumination has a beneficial effect on a variety of cells when these cells are exposed to adverse conditions. Among these conditions is the hypoxic state produced by acute ischemic stroke (AIS). To demonstrate the impact NIR Transcranial Laser Therapy (TLT) has on AIS in humans, a series of double blind, placebo controlled clinical trials were designed using the NeuroThera(R) System (NTS). The NTS was designed and developed to treat subjects non-invasively using 808 nm NIR illumination. TLT, as it applies to stroke therapy, and the NTS will be described. The results of the two clinical trials: NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 1 (NEST-1) and NeuroThera(R) Safety and Efficacy Trial 2 (NEST-2) will be reviewed and discussed.

  8. Metabolic reprogramming induces resistance to anti-NOTCH1 therapies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Daniel; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sudderth, Jessica; Sánchez-Martín, Marta; Belver, Laura; Tosello, Valeria; Xu, Luyao; Wendorff, Agnieszka A.; Castillo, Mireia; Haydu, J. Erika; Márquez, Javier; Matés, José M.; Kung, Andrew L.; Rayport, Stephen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in NOTCH1 are common in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (TALL). Here we identify glutaminolysis as a critical pathway for leukemia cell growth downstream of NOTCH1 and a key determinant of clinical response to anti-NOTCH1 therapies. Mechanistically, inhibition of NOTCH1 signaling in T-ALL induces a metabolic shutdown with prominent inhibition of glutaminolysis and triggers autophagy as a salvage pathway supporting leukemia cell metabolism. Consequently, both inhibition of glutaminolysis and inhibition of autophagy strongly and synergistically enhance the antileukemic effects of anti-NOTCH1 therapies. Moreover, we demonstrate that Pten loss induces increased glycolysis and consequently rescues leukemic cell metabolism abrogating the antileukemic effects of NOTCH1 inhibition. Overall, these results identify glutaminolysis as a major node in cancer metabolism controlled by NOTCH1 and as therapeutic target for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:26390244

  9. Using biomaterials to improve the efficacy of cell therapy following acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Traverse, Jay H

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular cell therapy has the potential to improve left ventricular (LV) function and alter the course of adverse LV remodeling following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, current therapy using autologous intracoronary bone marrow mononuclear cells results in only minimal recovery of LV function. A major impediment appears to be limited retention and engraftment of the transplanted cells, in part due to loss of the extracellular matrix (ECM) following AMI that can lead to apoptosis of the delivered cells through the mechanism of anoikis. Recent pre-clinical studies suggest that the delivery of ECM surrogates to the infarct zone following AMI significantly improves LV function through multiple mechanisms. The use of ECM surrogates in conjunction with stem cell administration may represent a new paradigm for cardiac repair following AMI. This review discusses the potential use of biologically based ECM surrogates in the clinical setting following STEMI.

  10. Current antiplatelet therapy for Japanese patients with ST elevation acute myocardial infarction: J-AMI registry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Ueno, Takafumi; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ishiwata, Sugao; Itoh, Tomonori; Hamanaka, Ichiro; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Wakatsuki, Tetuszo; Sugano, Teruyasu; Kawai, Kazuya; Kimura, Takeshi

    2013-04-01

    Antiplatelet therapy could prevent stent thrombosis, but may be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Recent studies have revealed that bleeding complications are relatively frequent in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Our aim was to describe the current status of antiplatelet therapy for Japanese patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The Japan AMI (J-AMI) registry is a prospective observational study that has enrolled 2,030 consecutive patients with stent thrombosis elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) admitted to 213 participating Japanese institutions. Current antiplatelet therapy for STEMI was assessed, and the occurrence of bleeding complications (based on GUSTO bleeding criteria) and stent thrombosis was also evaluated. Additionally, the clinical course after bleeding episodes was investigated. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was done in 97.2% of the patients, using a drug-eluting stent in 30% and a bare metal stent in 63% of PCI cases. A 300-mg loading dose of clopidogrel followed by its administration at 75 mg/day with aspirin was the current standard treatment for Japanese STEMI patients. In-hospital bleeding complications occurred in 1.9%, especially in patients with severe clinical features or a history of cerebrovascular disease. Moderate to severe bleeding complications were associated with 10 deaths. The in-hospital stent thrombosis (ST) rate was 1.47 %, and loading with clopidogrel prior to PCI was significantly less frequent in patients who developed ST (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the J-AMI registry revealed that severe symptoms of STEMI increased the risk of bleeding, while delay of clopidogrel loading was associated with ST. These findings suggest the need for treatment based on risk stratification to improve the balance between the beneficial and adverse effects of antiplatelet therapy in Japanese STEMI patients. PMID:23233418

  11. Mesotherapy versus Systemic Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Cosimo; Marangio, Emilio; Coruzzi, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological therapy of back pain with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs is frequently associated with adverse effects, particularly in the elderly. Aim of this study was to compare mesotherapic versus conventional systemic administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids in patients with acute low back pain. Eighty-four patients were randomized to receive anti-inflammatory therapy according to the following protocols: (a) mesotherapy group received the 1st and 4th day 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 40 mg (1 mL), then on 7th, 10th, and 13th day, 2% lidocaine (1 mL) + ketoprofen 160 mg (1 mL) + methylprednisolone 20 mg (1 mL) (b) conventional therapy group received ketoprofen 80 mg × 2/die and esomeprazole 20 mg/die orally for 12 days, methylprednisolone 40 mg/die intramuscularly for 4 days, followed by methylprednisolone 20 mg/die for 3 days, and thereafter, methylprednisolone 20 mg/die at alternate days. Pain intensity and functional disability were assessed at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and 6 months thereafter (T2) by using visual analogic scale (VAS) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ). In both groups, VAS and RMDQ values were significantly reduced at the end of drug treatment and after 6 months, in comparison with baseline. No significant differences were found between the two groups. This suggests that mesotherapy may be a valid alternative to conventional therapy in the treatment of acute low back pain with corticosteroids and NSAIDs. PMID:20953425

  12. Migraine disorder: workplace implications and solutions.

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy A

    2007-02-01

    Migraine disorder is disabling, costly, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. It affects employees' quality of life and ability to work or attend school, potentially decreasing their earning ability. Migraine disorder impacts the workplace substantially through absenteeism and presenteeism and increases health care costs. Although research on migraine disorder is expansive, no systematic research tool or design exists within population studies. This may account for the different prevalence rates seen, especially in African studies, which rely on verbal interviews instead of mail or telephone surveys. Women have a higher prevalence rate throughout the research, but they seek help more often than men. This may contribute to their higher rates, although hormones also play a role. Occupational health nurses can affect the outcome of migraine disorder for employees and employers. They can assist in identifying those employees with migraine disorder who are not diagnosed, those who have not investigated the various available medications, or the lifestyle changes that would decrease the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. Research is needed to quantify the cost savings of workplace intervention in identifying employees with migraine disorder and its effect on absenteeism, presenteeism, and health care use. Occupational health nurses can determine the effectiveness of education by measuring motivation, lifestyle changes, and workplace modification against the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. This, in turn, will yield measurable results in reducing absenteeism and presenteeism in the workplace. Occupational health nurses can spread this information through employees to their families. As more undiagnosed and undertreated individuals with migraine become educated and pursue diagnosis, treatment, and lifestyle changes, a measurable decrease in health care use and costs may occur. The economic impact of migraine disorder, in terms of workplace absenteeism and

  13. Septic acute kidney injury: molecular mechanisms and the importance of stratification and targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Eric D; Kellum, John A; Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients is sepsis. However, the molecular pathways and mechanisms that mediate septic AKI are not well defined. Experiments performed over the past 20 years suggest that there are profound differences in the pathogenesis between septic and ischemic AKI. Septic AKI often occurs independently of hypoperfusion, and is mediated by a concomitant pro- and anti-inflammatory state that is activated in response to various pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as endotoxin, as well as damage-associated molecular patterns. These molecular patterns are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) found in the kidney, and effectuate downstream inflammatory pathways. Additionally, apoptosis has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of septic AKI. However, targeted therapies designed to mitigate the above aspects of the inflammatory state, TLR-related pathways, and apoptosis have failed to show significant clinical benefit. This failure is likely due to the protean nature of septic AKI, whereby different patients present at different points along the immunologic spectrum. While one patient may benefit from targeted therapy at one end of the spectrum, another patient at the other end may be harmed by the same therapy. We propose that a next important step in septic AKI research will be to identify where patients lie on the immunologic spectrum in order to appropriately target therapies at the inflammatory cascade, TLRs, and possibly apoptosis. PMID:25575158

  14. A pre-clinical model of resistance to induction therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samuels, A L; Beesley, A H; Yadav, B D; Papa, R A; Sutton, R; Anderson, D; Marshall, G M; Cole, C H; Kees, U R; Lock, R B

    2014-01-01

    Relapse and acquired drug resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. This study was designed to establish a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy in childhood T-ALL to examine the emergence of drug resistance and identify novel therapies. Patient-derived T-ALL xenografts in immune-deficient (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice were exposed to a four-drug combination of vincristine, dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase and daunorubicin (VXLD). 'Relapse' xenografts were characterized by responses to drugs, changes in gene expression profiles and Connectivity Map (CMap) prediction of strategies to reverse drug resistance. Two of four xenografts developed ex vivo and in vivo drug resistance. Both resistant lines showed altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism, yet they had a distinct drug resistance pattern. CMap analyses reinforced these features, identifying the cholesterol pathway inhibitor simvastatin (SVT) as a potential therapy to overcome resistance. Combined ex vivo with DEX, SVT was significantly synergistic, yet when administered in vivo with VXLD it did not delay leukemia progression. Synergy of SVT with established chemotherapy may depend on higher drug doses than are tolerable in this model. Taken together, we have developed a clinically relevant in vivo model of T-ALL suitable to examine the emergence of drug resistance and to identify novel therapies.

  15. A pre-clinical model of resistance to induction therapy in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samuels, A L; Beesley, A H; Yadav, B D; Papa, R A; Sutton, R; Anderson, D; Marshall, G M; Cole, C H; Kees, U R; Lock, R B

    2014-01-01

    Relapse and acquired drug resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. This study was designed to establish a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy in childhood T-ALL to examine the emergence of drug resistance and identify novel therapies. Patient-derived T-ALL xenografts in immune-deficient (non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient) mice were exposed to a four-drug combination of vincristine, dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase and daunorubicin (VXLD). 'Relapse' xenografts were characterized by responses to drugs, changes in gene expression profiles and Connectivity Map (CMap) prediction of strategies to reverse drug resistance. Two of four xenografts developed ex vivo and in vivo drug resistance. Both resistant lines showed altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism, yet they had a distinct drug resistance pattern. CMap analyses reinforced these features, identifying the cholesterol pathway inhibitor simvastatin (SVT) as a potential therapy to overcome resistance. Combined ex vivo with DEX, SVT was significantly synergistic, yet when administered in vivo with VXLD it did not delay leukemia progression. Synergy of SVT with established chemotherapy may depend on higher drug doses than are tolerable in this model. Taken together, we have developed a clinically relevant in vivo model of T-ALL suitable to examine the emergence of drug resistance and to identify novel therapies. PMID:25083816

  16. Outcome of patients with ventricular assist devices and acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaltenmaier, B; Pommer, W; Kaufmann, F; Hennig, E; Molzahn, M; Hetzer, R

    2000-01-01

    The significance of acute renal failure (ARF) for patients treated with a ventricular assist device (VAD) is uncertain. There is little information on the outcome of patients who require renal replacement therapy during treatment with a VAD. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the impact of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy on such patients. Studied were 227 patients who were supplied with a VAD at the German Heart Institute Berlin. Fifty-five patients required renal replacement therapy during treatment with a VAD. These were compared with patients not needing renal replacement therapy (ARF and non-ARF groups). Significant differences for the end points of survival, heart transplantation, and discharge from hospital were observed in patients with ARF (p < 0.01). Survival was then analyzed according to indications for treatment with a VAD (bridge to transplantation or cardiac recovery after cardiotomy, transplantation, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and endocarditis). Survival for bridge-to-transplantation patients was clearly influenced in a negative way by ARF (p < 0.01). For cardiac recovery patients, only a small difference in survival was observed (p = 0.05). We conclude that ARF is a negative predictor for bridge-to-transplantation patients. For cardiac recovery patients the impact of ARF on survival is marginally significant.

  17. Arsenic trioxide therapy for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia: an useful salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Huan, S Y; Yang, C H; Chen, Y C

    2000-07-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) was recently identified as a very potent agent against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Intravenous infusion of 10 mg As2O3 daily for one to two months can induce significant complete remission (CR) of APL, and there is no cross drug-resistance between As2O3 and other antileukemic agents, including all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The CR rate of relapsed and/or refractory APL patients who received As2O3 treatment ranged from 52.3% to 93.3%. The median duration to CR ranged from 38 to 51 days, with accumulative As2O3 dosage of 340-430 mg. Although most adverse reactions of As2O3 treatment were tolerable, certain infrequent but severe toxicities related to As2O3 were observed, including renal failure, hepatic damage, cardiac arrhythmia and chronic neuromuscular degeneration, which should be monitored carefully. As2O3 can induce partial differentiation and subsequent apoptosis of APL cells through degradation of wild type PML and PML/RAR alpha chimeric proteins and possible anti-mitochondrial effects. Like the treatment of ATRA in APL, early relapses from As2O3 treatment within a few months were not infrequently seen, indicating that rapid emerging resistance to As2O3 can occur. Nevertheless, the PML/RAR alpha fusion protein was reported to disappear in some APL patients who received As2O3, and who might earn long-survival. However, the follow-up is still too short to draw the conclusion. Intriguingly, it has been shown that As2O3 can also induce apoptosis of other non-APL tumor cells with clinical achievable concentrations. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Further studies regarding to the pharmacological characters, clinical efficacies, toxicities, apoptogenic mechanisms, and spectrum of anti-tumor activity of As2O3 are warranted.

  18. Role of myocardial perfusion imaging in evaluating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy is being increasingly employed as a method for assessing the efficacy of coronary reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction. New thallium uptake after intracoronary tracer administration after successful recanalization indicates that nutrient blood flow has been successfully restored. One may also presume that some myocardial salvage occurred if thallium administered in this manner is transported intracellularly by myocytes with intact sarcolemmal membranes. However, if one injects thallium by way of the intracoronary route immediately after reperfusion, the initial uptake of thallium in reperfused myocardium may predominantly represent hyperemic flow and regional thallium counts measured may not be proportional to the mass of viable myocytes. When thallium is injected intravenously during the occlusion phase the degree of redistribution after thrombolysis is proportional to the degree of flow restoration and myocardial viability. When thallium is injected for the first time intravenously immediately after reperfusion, an overestimation of myocardial salvage may occur because of excess thallium uptake in the infarct zone consequent to significant hyperemia. Another approach to myocardial thallium scintigraphy in patients undergoing thrombolytic therapy is to administer two separate intravenous injections before and 24 hours or later after treatment. Finally, patients with acute myocardial infarction who receive intravenous thrombolytic therapy are candidates for predischarge exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy for risk stratification and detection of residual ischemia.

  19. Multidimensional Approach to Adequacy of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Villa, Gianluca; Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently observed among hospitalized and critical care patients. In the absence of any effective therapies aiming to actively restore kidney function, AKI is usually managed through acute renal replacement therapy (ARRT). 'Optimization' of ARRT may reduce the mortality of patients with AKI. Although several studies have tried to identify the most adequate approach to ARRT in terms of dose, treatment modality and all other important dimensions, the literature has provided controversial results. Nowadays, adequate ARRT still appears difficult to dose, prescribe, deliver and monitor among different critical care patients. The identification of the major elements involved for a multidimensional approach to adequacy of ARRT in patients with AKI should consider the patient, the applied technology and the environment. All these aspects should be carefully evaluated and adequately applied in clinical practice through a patient-oriented approach. Adequacy of ARRT imposes the concomitant consideration of more complex issues, such as the timing, modality and technique of ARRT delivery; anticoagulation and substitution fluid choice; membrane selection; monitor accuracy; the role of fluid overload; and other patient comorbidities. The capacity of clinicians to consider all these aspects through a multidimensional approach, adapting the different dimensions of ARRT to actual patients' needs, might be the fundamental missing element in the pathway toward significant outcome improvements among critically ill patients with AKI. This narrative review provides a systematic approach to the major dimensions of ARRT and their multidimensional rationalization for adequate treatment prescription, monitoring and evaluation. PMID:26881756

  20. Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Acute Low Back Pain: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Mark J.; Maher, Christopher G.; Latimer, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is an extremely common cause of pain and disability. While many treatments for acute LBP exist, one of the most widely used, but also most controversial, is spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). This therapy includes both high-velocity manipulative techniques and low-velocity mobilization techniques. The literature regarding the use of SMT is often conflicting, which explains the difference in recommendations regarding SMT in international LBP guidelines. The lack of a clear tissue diagnosis in the majority of patients with LBP combined with the unknown mechanism of action of SMT adds to the difficulty for clinicians in providing SMT in a logical and effective manner. Despite these limitations, the existing literature does provide some assistance to clinicians on when to provide SMT and how to provide it in an optimal way. This review aims to summarize the key research literature investigating SMT in LBP in order to help clinicians make informed decisions about the use of SMT for their patients with acute LBP. PMID:19771190

  1. Insertional oncogenesis by non-acute retroviruses: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hung; Johnson, Chassidy

    2011-04-01

    Retroviruses cause cancers in a variety of animals and humans. Research on retroviruses has provided important insights into mechanisms of oncogenesis in humans, including the discovery of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes. The subject of this review is the mechanisms by which retroviruses that do not carry oncogenes (non-acute retroviruses) cause cancers. The common theme is that these tumors result from insertional activation of cellular proto-oncogenes by integration of viral DNA. Early research on insertional activation of proto-oncogenes in virus-induced tumors is reviewed. Research on non-acute retroviruses has led to the discovery of new proto-oncogenes through searches for common insertion sites (CISs) in virus-induced tumors. Cooperation between different proto-oncogenes in development of tumors has been elucidated through the study of retrovirus-induced tumors, and retroviral infection of genetically susceptible mice (retroviral tagging) has been used to identify cellular proto-oncogenes active in specific oncogenic pathways. The pace of proto-oncogene discovery has been accelerated by technical advances including PCR cloning of viral integration sites, the availability of the mouse genome sequence, and high throughput DNA sequencing. Insertional activation has proven to be a significant risk in gene therapy trials to correct genetic defects with retroviral vectors. Studies on non-acute retroviral oncogenesis provide insight into the potential risks, and the mechanisms of oncogenesis.

  2. Biology, Risk Stratification, and Therapy of Pediatric Acute Leukemias: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Carroll, William L.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Arceci, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We review recent advances in the biologic understanding and treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), identify therapeutically challenging subgroups, and suggest future directions of research. Methods A review of English literature on childhood acute leukemias from the past 5 years was performed. Results Contemporary treatments have resulted in 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% for childhood ALL and almost 60% for pediatric AML. The advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses has provided new insights into leukemogenesis and identified many novel subtypes of leukemia. Virtually all ALL and the vast majority of AML cases can be classified according to specific genetic abnormalities. Cooperative mutations involved in cell differentiation, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, drug responsiveness, and apoptosis have also been identified in many cases. The development of new formulations of existing drugs, molecularly targeted therapy, and immunotherapies promises to further advance the cure rates and improve quality of life of patients. Conclusion The application of new high-throughput sequencing techniques to define the complete DNA sequence of leukemia and host normal cells and the development of new agents targeted to leukemogenic pathways promise to further improve outcome in the coming decade. PMID:21220611

  3. Migraine: Clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Manjeet Singh; Gupta, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disorder which has psychiatric sequelae. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical pattern and psychiatric comorbidity of migraine. Materials and Methods: 100 cases of migraine seen over a period of one year were analysed to know the sociodemographic characteristics, clinical pattern and psychiatric morbidity. Results: Maximum patients were between 31-40 years of age group (40%), females (78.0%), married (76%) and housewives (56.0%). Family history of migraine was present in 12% cases. Average age of onset was 22 years. Unilateral and throbbing type of headache was most common. The commonest frequency was one to two per week. Migraine without aura was commonest sub-type (80%). Generalized anxiety disorder (F41.1) was the most common psychiatric disorder (34%), followed by mixed anxiety and depressive disorder (F41.2) (18%) and depressive episode (F32) (14%). In 22% cases, no psychiatric disorder could be elicited. Conclusion: The present study confirms that majority patients with migraine had psychiatric disorders. This needs timely detection and appropriate intervention to treat and control the migraine effectively. PMID:23766573

  4. Migraine and epilepsy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nye, Barbara L; Thadani, Vijay M

    2015-03-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are disorders that are common, paroxysmal, and chronic. In many ways they are clearly different diseases, yet there are some pathophysiological overlaps, and overlaps in clinical symptomatology, particularly with regard to visual and other sensory disturbances, pain, and alterations of consciousness. Epidemiological studies have revealed that the two diseases are comorbid in a number of individuals. Both are now recognized as originating from electrical disturbances in the brain, although their wider manifestations involve the recruitment of multiple pathogenic mechanisms. An initial excess of neuronal activity in migraine leads to cortical spreading depression and aura, with the subsequent recruitment of the trigeminal nucleus leading to central sensitization and pain. In epilepsy, neuronal overactivity leads to the recruitment of larger populations of neurons firing in a rhythmic manner that constitutes an epileptic seizure. Migraine aura and headaches may act as a trigger for epileptic seizures. Epilepsy is not infrequently accompanied by preictal, ictal, and postictal headaches that often have migrainous features. Genetic links are also apparent between the two disorders, and are particularly evident in the familial hemiplegic migraine syndromes where different mutations can produce either migraine, epilepsy, or both. Also, various medications are found to be effective for both migraine and epilepsy, again pointing to a commonality and overlap between the two disorders.

  5. fNIRS measurements in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Ata; Emir, Uzay E.; Bilensoy, Didem; Erdogan, Gulin; Candansyar, Selcuk; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2005-04-01

    Migraine is a complex chronic neurovascular disorder in which the interictal changes in neuronal excitability and vascular reactivity in the cerebral cortex were detected. The extent and direction of the changes in cerebral blood flow that affect cerebral hemodynamics during attacks, however, are still a matter of debate. This may have been due to the logistic and technical problems posed by the different techniques to determine cerebral blood flow during migraine attacks and the different definitions of patient populations. In this study, we have investigated hypercapnia challenges by breath holding task on subjects with and without migraine by using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Measurements of the relative changes in concentration of deoxy-hemoglobin [Hb] and oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] are performed on four healthy subjects during three breath holdings of 30 seconds (s.) interleaved with 90 s. of normal breathing. We have observed [Hb]increase during breath holding interval in subject without migraine whereas in subject with migraine [Hb] decreases during breath holding interval. The result of our study suggest that hypercapnia effect on cerebral hemodynamic of subject with migraine and without migraine could be due to different vascular reactivity to PCO2 (carbon dioxide partial pressure) in arteries.

  6. Reduction of the systemic inflammatory induced by acute cerebral infarction through ultra-early thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    YE, LICHAO; CAI, RUOWEI; YANG, MEILI; QIAN, JIAQIANG; HONG, ZHILIN

    2015-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke induces systemic inflammation, exhibited as changes in body temperature, white blood cell counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of intravenous thrombolytic therapy on inflammatory indices in order to investigate the hypothesis that post-stroke systemic inflammatory response occurs in response to the necrosis of brain tissues. In this study, 62 patients with acute cerebral infarction and indications for intravenous thrombolysis were divided into three groups on the basis of their treatment and response: Successful thrombolysis (n=36), failed thrombolysis (n=12) and control (n=14) groups. The body temperature, white blood cell counts and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP levels were recorded pre-treatment and on post-stroke days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the pre-treatment National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score positively correlated with body temperature, white blood cell count and hs-CRP levels. On day 3 of effective intravenous thrombolysis, the body temperature and white blood cell were decreased and on days 3 and 5, the serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced compared with those in the failed thrombolysis and control groups. The results indicate that the systemic inflammatory response following acute cerebral infarction was mainly caused by ischemic injury of local brain tissue; the more serious the stroke, the stronger the inflammatory response. Ultra-early thrombolytic therapy may inhibit the necrosis of brain tissue and thereby reduce the inflammatory response. PMID:26622513

  7. Physical therapy for airway clearance improves cardiac autonomic modulation in children with acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacinto, Cynthia P.; Gastaldi, Ada C.; Aguiar, Daniela Y.; Maida, Karina D.; Souza, Hugo C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of physical therapy on heart rate variability (HRV), especially in children, are still inconclusive. Objective We investigated the effects of conventional physical therapy (CPT) for airway clearance and nasotracheal suction on the HRV of pediatric patients with acute bronchiolitis. Method 24 children were divided into two groups: control group (CG, n=12) without respiratory diseases and acute bronchiolitis group (BG, n=12). The heart rate was recorded in the BG at four different moments: basal recording (30 minutes), 5 minutes after the CPT (10 minutes), 5 minutes after nasotracheal suction (10 minutes), and 40 minutes after nasotracheal suction (30 minutes). The CG was subjected to the same protocol, except for nasotracheal suction. To assess the HRV, we used spectrum analysis, which decomposes the heart rate oscillations into frequency bands: low frequency (LF=0.04-0.15Hz), which corresponds mainly to sympathetic modulation; and high frequency (HF=0.15-1.2Hz), corresponding to vagal modulation. Results Under baseline conditions, the BG showed higher values in LF oscillations, lower values in HF oscillations, and increased LF/HF ratio when compared to the CG. After CPT, the values for HRV in the BG were similar to those observed in the CG during basal recording. Five minutes after nasotracheal suction, the BG showed a decrease in LF and HF oscillations; however, after 40 minutes, the values were similar to those observed after application of CPT. Conclusions The CPT and nasotracheal suction, both used for airway clearance, promote improvement in autonomic modulation of HRV in children with acute bronchiolitis. PMID:24271093

  8. [Possibilities of magnetic-laser therapy in comprehensive treatment of patients with brain concussion in acute period].

    PubMed

    Zubkova, O V; Samosiuk, I Z; Polishchuk, O V; Shul'ga, N M; Samosiuk, N I

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of magnetic-laser therapy used according to the method developed by us was studied in patients having the brain concussion (BC) in an acute period. The study was based on the dynamics of values of the evoked vestibular potentials and the disease clinical course. It was shown that following the magnetic-laser therapy in combination with traditional pharmacotherapy in BC acute period, the statistically significant positive changes were registered in the quantitative characteristics of the evoked vestibular brain potentials that correlated with the dynamics of the disease clinical course. The data obtained substantiate the possibility of using the magnetic-laser therapy in patients with a mild craniocereblal injury in an acute period.

  9. Acute eosinophilic myocarditis with dramatic response to steroid therapy: the central role of echocardiography in diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Eppenberger, Manuela; Hack, Dietrich; Ammann, Peter; Rickli, Hans; Maeder, Micha T

    2013-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic myocarditis is a rare cause of acute heart failure. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who had presumptive eosinophilic myocarditis as part of a generalized hypersensitivity reaction (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms [DRESS] syndrome) that exhibited a dramatic response to steroid therapy. We highlight the central role of 2-dimensional and tissue-Doppler echocardiography in the diagnosis of myocarditis and the serial evaluation of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in this setting.

  10. Migraine prevalence, socioeconomic status, and social causation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Jason; Lipton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the known higher prevalence of migraine in lower household (HH) income groups is explained by a higher incidence rate or a lower remission rate. Methods: We used data from the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study, a US national sample of 132,674 females (with a 64.3% response rate) and 124,665 males (with a 62.0% response rate) 12 years of age and older. Data were previously collected on migraine symptoms, onset age, and demographics. Previously validated methods applied to the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention Study data were used to simulate a cohort study. Incidence and remission rates were estimated within 3 sex-specific HH income groups (<$22,500, $22,500–$59,999, and ≥$60,000). The χ2 test was used to determine whether the incidence or remission rates differed by HH income group as an explanation for differences in migraine prevalence by HH income. Results: Migraine prevalence increased as HH income decreased for females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Differences were not explained by race and other known confounders. Variation in prevalence was explained, in large part, by a higher incidence rate in the lower HH income groups for both females (χ2, p < 0.01) and males (χ2, p < 0.01). Migraine remission rates did not differ by HH income. Conclusions: The higher incidence of migraine in lower HH income groups is compatible with the social causation hypothesis. Once initiated, migraine remission is independent of HH income. Onset and remission may have etiologically distinct causes. PMID:23990405

  11. Hepatoprotectant ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide increasing phosphatidylcholine levels as a potential therapy of acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Chamulitrat, Walee; Zhang, Wujuan; Xu, Weihong; Pathil, Anita; Setchell, Kenneth; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    It has been long known that hepatic synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) is depressed during acute such as carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. Anti-hepatotoxic properties of PC as liposomes have been recognized for treatment of acute liver damage. Ursodeoxycholate (UDCA) is a known hepatoprotectant in stabilizing cellular membrane. For therapeutic management of liver injury, we coupled UDCA with a phospholipid known as ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide (UDCA-LPE). UDCA-LPE has been shown to first-in-class hepatoprotectant being superior to UDCA or PC. It inhibits mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, elicits survival signaling pathway, and promotes regeneration of hepatocytes. We herein report that a unique contribution of UDCA-LPE in increasing concentrations of PC in vitro and in vivo. UDCA-LPE-treated hepatocytes contained significantly increased PC levels. UDCA-LPE underwent the hydrolysis to LPE which was not the precursor of the increased PC. The levels of PC in the liver and blood were increased rapidly after intraperitoneally administration UDCA-LPE, and were found to be sustained even after 24 h. Among PC synthesis genes tested, UDCA-LPE treatment of mouse hepatocytes increased transcription of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase 1 which is an enzyme catalyzing phosphatidic acid to generate intermediates for PC synthesis. Thus, UDCA-LPE as a hepatoprotectant was able to induce synthesis of protective PC which would supplement for the loss of PC occurring during acute liver injury. This property has placed UDCA-LPE as a candidate agent for therapy of acute hepatotoxicity such as acetaminophen poisoning. PMID:22363296

  12. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  13. Migraine pathogenesis: the neural hypothesis reexamined.

    PubMed

    Blau, J N

    1984-05-01

    The hypothesis that migraine is a primary neurological disturbance with secondary vascular manifestations is tested by analysing the five phases of migraine attacks and the eight groups of recognised precipitating factors. Accessory evidence from cerebral blood flow and EEG recordings taken during attacks is also considered. The evidence supports the concept that the sensory cortex and hypothalamus could be initiating sites for migraine attacks, and indicates that a neurological mechanism, suggested by Liveing and Gowers 100 years ago, remains viable and needs to be considered in future research.

  14. Bowenwork for Migraine Relief: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Migraine is a complex neurological disorder characterized by episodic, neurogenic, cerebrovascular inflammation and hypersensitization of brain tissues and the central nervous system, causing severe pain and debility. Research literature points mostly to pharmaceutical prophylactic and symptomatic treatments, nonpharmaceutical, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches, acupuncture, massage and bodywork studies, and none has been published on Bowenwork for migraine intervention. This prospective case report describes one migraineur’s response to Bowenwork (a soft-tissue bodywork technique) with cessation of migraine, neck pain, and analgesic consumption, and improved well-being and activity function. Methods The client received 14 Bowenwork sessions over a four-month period using the self-reporting Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile version 2 (MYMOP2) to evaluate clinically meaningful changes. Baseline MYMOP2 data were recorded prior to the first and subsequent Bowenwork sessions to track changes in migraine and neck pain occurrences, other symptoms, medication use, functional ability and sense of well-being. Specific Bowenwork procedures were applied in each session to address various symptoms. The client did not receive other migraine treatment during this study. Participant A 66-year-old Caucasian female with a history of debilitating migraine since childhood, and severe neck pain and jaw injuries resulting from two motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) sustained as an adult. She had previously sought medical, pharmaceutical and CAM treatments for migraine, neck pain, and right-sided thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) symptoms, with no satisfactory relief. Results The client progressively reported decreased migraine and neck pain until acquiring a respiratory infection with prolonged coughing spells causing symptoms to recur (session 11). Prior to session 12, she experienced an allergic reaction to ingesting an unknown food allergen

  15. Migraine and genetic polymorphisms: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Vincenzo; Agresta, Anella; Agresta, Antonio; Lamaida, Eros; Lamaida, Norman; Infante, Francesco; Capasso, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between genetic polymorphisms and migraine as a cause of an increased risk of thrombotic disorders development is still debated In this respect, factor V Leiden, factor V (H1299R), prothrombin G20210A, factor XIII (V34L), β-fibrinogen, MTHFR (C677T), MTHFR (A1298C), APO E, PAI-1, HPA-1 and ACE I/D seem to play a determinant role in vascular diseases related to migraine. The present review analyzes both the incidence of the above genetic vascular mutations in migraineurs and the most re-cent developments related to genetic polymorphisms and migraine.

  16. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  17. Human factors validation study of 3 mg sumatriptan autoinjector, for migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Munjal, Sagar; Kumar, Rajesh; Andre, Anthony D; Valladao, Will; Ramirez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine pain relief is reported by more than 50% of patients who receive low dose (3 mg) of sumatriptan. Currently, there is no two-step autoinjector of low-dose sumatriptan available on the market for acute migraine treatment. To fulfill this need, a fully assembled, single-dose, subcutaneous autoinjector (sumatriptan 3 mg; product-code DFN-11) was developed. The device allows for injection with a simple two-step, push-to-inject process and provides feedback of the injection activation, progress, and completion. Objective To determine if DFN-11 autoinjector can be used correctly and safely by migraine patients. Methods and participants A human factors validation study was conducted with 45 migraine patients (30 oral-only medications users; 15 injectable sumatriptan users) who performed one unaided simulated injection. Two days prior, half the oral participants were briefly trained. All others were only given the device to inspect and written instructions to review. No injections were performed during the initial session. All participants received written instructions at the injection session. Results All participants (45/45; 100%) performed the injection without any errors. Objective measures included device removal from packaging, cap removal, expiration date check, inspection of fluid in window, identification of allowable injection site, proper device positioning, dose confirmation, and device disposal. All participants (45/45; 100%) reported no difficulty administering the injection and no concerns about using the autoinjector during a severe migraine onset. Conclusion The results showed that the DFN-11 autoinjector can be used with safe handling without patterns of confusion, failures, high-risk errors, wet injections, or patient safety risks. The DFN-11 autoinjector was validated to be used correctly and safely by migraine patients, whether they were injection experienced, unexperienced, trained, or self-trained. PMID:27313479

  18. Hypothalamic involvement in chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Peres, M; del Rio, M S.; Seabra, M; Tufik, S; Abucham, J; Cipolla-Neto, J; Silberstein, S; Zukerman, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Chronic migraine (CM), previously called transformed migraine, is a frequent headache disorder that affects 2%-3% of the general population. Analgesic overuse, insomnia, depression, and anxiety are disorders that are often comorbid with CM. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in its pathogenesis, but it has never been studied in patients with CM. The aim was to analyze hypothalamic involvement in CM by measurement of melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol nocturnal secretion.
METHODS—A total of 338 blood samples (13/patient) from 17 patients with CM and nine age and sex matched healthy volunteers were taken. Melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol concentrations were determined every hour for 12 hours. The presence of comorbid disorders was also evaluated.
RESULTS—An abnormal pattern of hypothalamic hormonal secretion was found in CM. This included: (1) a decreased nocturnal prolactin peak, (2) increased cortisol concentrations, (3) a delayed nocturnal melatonin peak in patients with CM, and (4) lower melatonin concentrations in patients with CM with insomnia. Growth hormone secretion did not differ from controls.
CONCLUSION—These results support hypothalamic involvement in CM, shown by a chronobiologic dysregulation, and a possible hyperdopaminergic state in patients with CM. Insomnia might be an important variable in the study findings.

 PMID:11723194

  19. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  20. Stroke and migraine is there a possible comorbidity?

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Del Balzo, Francesca; Papetti, Laura; Zicari, Anna Maria; Properzi, Enrico; Occasi, Francesca; Nicita, Francesco; Duse, Marzia

    2016-04-26

    The association between migraine and stroke is still a dilemma for neurologists. Migraine is associated with an increased stroke risk and it is considered an independent risk factor for ischaemic stroke in a particular subgroup of patients. The pathogenesis is still unknown even if several studies report some common biochemical mechanisms between these two diseases. A classification of migraine-related stroke that encompasses the full spectrum of the possible relationship between migraine and stroke includes three main entities: coexisting stroke and migraine, stroke with clinical features of migraine, and migraine-induced stroke. The concept of migraine-induced stroke is well represented by migrainous infarction and it is described in the revised classification of the International Headache Society (IHS), representing the strongest demonstration of the relationship between ischaemic stroke and migraine. A very interesting common condition in stroke and migraine is patent foramen ovale (PFO) which could play a pathogenetic role in both disorders. The neuroradiological evidence of subclinical lesions most typical in the white matter and in the posterior artery territories in patients with migraine, opens a new field of research. In conclusion the association between migraine and stroke remains an open question. Solving the above mentioned issues is fundamental to understand the epidemiologic, pathogenetic and clinical aspects of migraine-related stroke.

  1. Acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the acute and chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on blood circulation of human muscle and tendon in vivo. Using near-infrared spectroscopy and red laser lights, we determined acute changes in blood volume (THb) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of the medial gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon during 60 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (1.3 atm absolute and 50% O2, experiment 1). In addition, we determined the chronic effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (60 minutes, 2 times per week, 6 weeks) on THb and StO2 of muscle and tendon (experiment 2). In experiment 1, THb of the muscle increased gradually from resting level, but StO2 did not change. On the other hand, THb and StO2 of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In experiment 2, the pattern of changes in the measured variables during 60 minutes of therapy was similar for both the muscle and tendon between the first and last therapies. During resting, THb and StO2 of the tendon were significantly lower after 6 weeks of therapy, although those of the muscle were not. In conclusion, oxygen saturation of the tendon increased during hyperbaric oxygen therapy, whereas that of the muscle did not. This result would be related to the difference in the treated effects between muscle and tendon. However, oxygen saturation of the tendon, but not the muscle, during resting decreased after 6 weeks of therapy.

  2. Endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber as a treatment for septic shock-associated severe acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Gaku; Kojika, Masahiro; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2013-10-01

    The application of endotoxin adsorption therapy for severe acute cholangitis is controversial. We present a survival case of septic shock and multiple organ failure due to severe acute cholangitis. The patient was treated by endotoxin adsorption therapy using polymyxin B-immobilized fiber because he continued to remain in shock even after successful endoscopic nasobiliary drainage. The patient was an 84-year-old male diagnosed with acute cholangitis and acute pancreatitis who was transferred to our department because of shock and severe dyspnea. The patient had already developed acute respiratory failure, acute renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. We performed endoscopic nasobiliary drainage immediately, but the patient continued to remain in shock and plasma endotoxin level was markedly elevated at 133.6 pg/mL. Therefore, we performed direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber. On starting the hemoperfusion, blood pressure and urine volume increased, and the plasma endotoxin level reduced considerably. On the basis of our experience in this case, we think that direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber may be a useful modality in the management of severe acute cholangitis.

  3. Manipulative therapy and/or NSAIDs for acute low back pain: design of a randomized controlled trial [ACTRN012605000036617

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Mark J; Maher, Christopher G; Latimer, Jane; McLachlan, Andrew J; Cooper, Chris W; Day, Richard O; Spindler, Megan F; McAuley, James H

    2005-01-01

    Background Acute low back pain is a common condition resulting in pain and disability. Current national and international guidelines advocate general practitioner care including advice and paracetamol (4 g daily in otherwise well adults) as the first line of care for people with acute low back pain. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) are advocated in many guidelines as second line management options for patients with acute low back pain who are not recovering. No studies have explored the role of NSAIDs and/or SMT in addition to first line management for acute low back pain. The primary aim of this study is to investigate if NSAIDs and/or SMT in addition to general practitioner advice and paracetamol results in shorter recovery times for patients with acute low back pain. The secondary aims of the study are to evaluate whether the addition of SMT and/or NSAIDs influences pain, disability and global perceived effect at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after onset of therapy for patients with significant acute low back pain. Methods/design This paper presents the rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial examining the addition of NSAIDs and/or SMT in 240 people who present to their general practitioner with significant acute low back pain. PMID:16280089

  4. Reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+) stores and acute pancreatitis; a step closer to therapy?

    PubMed

    Criddle, David N

    2016-09-01

    Disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis can lead to severe damage of the pancreas, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes, vacuolisation and necrotic cell death, features typical of acute pancreatitis (AP). Therefore a fine balance between Ca(2+) release from internal stores, Ca(2+) entry and extrusion mechanisms is necessary to avoid injury. Precipitants of AP induce Ca(2+) overload of the pancreatic acinar cell that causes mitochondrial dysfunction, via formation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), loss of ATP production and consequent necrosis. Oxidative stress has been shown to occur in the development of AP and may modify Ca(2+) signalling events in the acinar cell. However, the precise pathophysiological involvement is currently unclear and antioxidant therapy in the clinic has largely proved ineffective. Possible reasons for this are discussed, including evidence that ROS generation may determine cell death patterns. In contrast, recent evidence has indicated the potential for AP therapy via the prevention of Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial damage. Multiple approaches are indicated from preclinical findings; 1) inhibition of Ca(2+) release by IP3R blockade, 2) inhibition of Ca(2+) entry through Orai1 blockade and 3) prevention of MPTP formation. Clinical trials of drugs which prevent mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Ca(2+) overload of pancreatic acinar cells are imminent and may provide patient benefit for a disease that currently lacks specific therapy. PMID:27229361

  5. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Teachey, David T.; Porter, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell–specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. PMID:25999455

  6. Prophylaxis for acute gout flares after initiation of urate-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Latourte, Augustin; Bardin, Thomas; Richette, Pascal

    2014-11-01

    This review summarizes evidence relating to prophylaxis for gout flares after the initiation of urate-lowering therapy (ULT). We searched MEDLINE via PubMed for articles published in English from 1963 to 2013 using MEsH terms covering all aspects of prophylaxis for flares. Dispersion of monosodium urate crystals during the initial phase of deposit dissolution with ULT exposes the patient to an increased rate of acute flares that could contribute to poor treatment adherence. Slow titration of ULT might decrease the risk of flares. According to the most recent international recommendation, the two first-line options for prophylaxis are low-dose colchicine (0.5 mg once or twice a day) or low-dose NSAIDs such as naproxen 250 mg orally twice a day. They can be given for up to 6 months. If these drugs are contraindicated, not tolerated or ineffective, low-dose corticosteroids (prednisone or prednisolone) might be used. Recently, reports for four trials described the efficacy of canakinumab and rilonacept, two IL-1 inhibitors, for preventing flares during the initiation of allopurinol therapy. Prophylaxis for flares induced by ULT is an important consideration in gout management. Low-dose colchicine and low-dose NSAIDs are the recommended first-line therapies. Although no IL-1 blockers are approved as prophylactic treatment, this class of drug could become an interesting option for patients with gout with intolerance or contraindication to colchicine, NSAIDs or corticosteroids.

  7. Central Nervous System Involvement in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostic Tools, Prophylaxis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; De Santis, Giovanna; Di Veroli, Ambra; Ditto, Concetta; Nasso, Daniela; Postorino, Massimiliano; Refrigeri, Marco; Attrotto, Cristina; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC) and flow cytometry (FCM). Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of a large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. An early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review discusses risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. PMID:25408861

  8. Pathogen-directed Therapy in Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J.

    2007-01-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are important events in the natural history of this chronic lung disorder. These events can be caused by a large number of infectious and noninfectious agents and are associated with an increased local and systemic inflammatory response. Their frequency and severity have been linked to progressive deterioration in lung function and health status. Infectious pathogens ranging from viral to atypical and typical bacteria have been implicated in the majority of episodes. Most therapeutic regimens to date have emphasized broad, nonspecific approaches to bronchoconstriction and pulmonary inflammation. Increasingly, therapy that targets specific etiologic pathogens has been advocated. These include clinical and laboratory-based methods to identify bacterial infections. Further additional investigation has suggested specific pathogens within this broad class. As specific antiviral therapies become available, better diagnostic approaches to identify specific pathogens will be required. Furthermore, prophylactic therapy for at-risk individuals during high-risk times may become a standard therapeutic approach. As such, the future will likely include aggressive diagnostic algorithms based on the combination of clinical syndromes and rapid laboratory modalities to identify specific causative bacteria or viruses. PMID:18073397

  9. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  10. Chronic migraine headache prevention with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Anne H.; Lipton, Richard B.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Cady, Roger K.; Dorlas, Stefanie; Simmons, Kristy A.; Mullin, Chris; Liebler, Eric J.; Goadsby, Peter J.; Saper, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the prevention of chronic migraine (CM) attacks. Methods: In this first prospective, multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled pilot study of nVNS in CM prophylaxis, adults with CM (≥15 headache d/mo) entered the baseline phase (1 month) and were subsequently randomized to nVNS or sham treatment (2 months) before receiving open-label nVNS treatment (6 months). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Efficacy endpoints in the intent-to-treat population included change in the number of headache days per 28 days and acute medication use. Results: Fifty-nine participants (mean age, 39.2 years; mean headache frequency, 21.5 d/mo) were enrolled. During the randomized phase, tolerability was similar for nVNS (n = 30) and sham treatment (n = 29). Most adverse events were mild/moderate and transient. Mean changes in the number of headache days were −1.4 (nVNS) and −0.2 (sham) (Δ = 1.2; p = 0.56). Twenty-seven participants completed the open-label phase. For the 15 completers initially assigned to nVNS, the mean change from baseline in headache days after 8 months of treatment was −7.9 (95% confidence interval −11.9 to −3.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Therapy with nVNS was well-tolerated with no safety issues. Persistent prophylactic use may reduce the number of headache days in CM; larger sham-controlled studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01667250. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, nVNS is safe, is well-tolerated, and did not significantly change the number of headache days. This pilot study lacked the precision to exclude important safety issues or benefits of nVNS. PMID:27412146

  11. Hemiplegic Migraine Presenting with Prolonged Somnolence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Christian; Pierquin, Geneviève; Beyenburg, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare and complex disease, characterized by migraine with a reversible motor aura. Hemiplegic migraine can be easily misdiagnosed at its first presentation with an atypical severe form of migraine, a stroke, multiple sclerosis, metabolic disorders, conversion disorder or an epilepsy. We present the case of a young 24-year-old male patient, who since the age of 4 years had been having multiple episodes of migraine associated with hemiparesis, paraesthesia, prolonged somnolence, aphasia and confusion. We review the literature and discuss important diagnostic findings in hemiplegic migraine to help establishing a prompt diagnosis. PMID:27790126

  12. Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments for Individuals with Migraine and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, Cynthia; Bond, Dale S; Seng, Elizabeth K

    2016-02-01

    Migraine and obesity are each prevalent disorders involving significant personal and societal burden. Epidemiologic research demonstrates a link between migraine and obesity that is further substantiated by putative behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological mechanisms. As obesity is considered a modifiable risk factor for exacerbation of migraine, weight loss may be a particularly useful treatment option for people with comorbid migraine and obesity. Behavioral weight loss interventions complement existing behavioral treatments for migraine and offer patients evidence-based effective strategies for achieving weight loss that could help reduce frequency, severity, and impact of migraine attacks.

  13. Does low atmospheric pressure independently trigger migraine?

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Rapoport, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Although atmospheric weather changes are often listed among the common migraine triggers, studies to determine the specific weather component(s) responsible have yielded inconsistent results. Atmospheric pressure change produces air movement, and low pressure in particular is associated with warm weather, winds, clouds, dust, and precipitation, but how this effect might generate migraine is not immediately obvious. Humans are exposed to low atmospheric pressure in situations such as ascent to high altitude or traveling by airplane in a pressurized cabin. In this brief overview, we consider those conditions and experimental data delineating other elements in the atmosphere potentially related to migraine (such as Saharan dust). We conclude that the available data suggest low atmospheric pressure unaccompanied by other factors does not trigger migraine.

  14. Does low atmospheric pressure independently trigger migraine?

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Rapoport, Alan

    2011-10-01

    Although atmospheric weather changes are often listed among the common migraine triggers, studies to determine the specific weather component(s) responsible have yielded inconsistent results. Atmospheric pressure change produces air movement, and low pressure in particular is associated with warm weather, winds, clouds, dust, and precipitation, but how this effect might generate migraine is not immediately obvious. Humans are exposed to low atmospheric pressure in situations such as ascent to high altitude or traveling by airplane in a pressurized cabin. In this brief overview, we consider those conditions and experimental data delineating other elements in the atmosphere potentially related to migraine (such as Saharan dust). We conclude that the available data suggest low atmospheric pressure unaccompanied by other factors does not trigger migraine. PMID:21906054

  15. Migraine in childhood: biobehavioural or psychosomatic disorder?

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Vincenzo; Faedda, Noemi; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2016-12-01

    It is well documented that headache is a multifactorial disorder which includes not only genetic, biological, medical and neuropsychological factor but also psychological and personality traits. The close relationship between stress and migraine attacks and the significant psychiatric comorbidities in migraine provide evidence of a "paradigm" of tight interaction between somatic and psychological aspects in paediatric migraine. In particular in younger children, an uncomfortable situation, a psychological problem or an emotional distress is rarely expressed directly but usually through physical symptoms. So migraine may be considered as a disorder of psychobiological adaptation in which genetic predisposition interplays with internal and/or external environmental influences such as psycho-emotional, climatic, hormonal, dietary or other factors. PMID:27619362

  16. Visual Disturbances: Related to Migraine or Not?

    MedlinePlus

    ... vision, sparkles, dots, stars, spots, squiggles, and “flash bulb” effects. The “classic” migraine visual aura consists of ... are painless. There may also be flashes of light in the eye and loss of vision. These ...

  17. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26696729

  18. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:26696729

  19. Intranasal medications for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alan M; Bigal, Marcelo E; Tepper, Stewart J; Sheftell, Fred D

    2004-01-01

    Intranasal medications for the treatment of headache have recently received increased attention. This paper reviews intranasal formulations of a variety of available medications (dihydroergotamine mesylate [dihydroergotamine mesilate], sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, butorphanol, capsaicin and lidocaine [lignocaine]) and one experimental medication (civamide, a cis-isomer of capsaicin) for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Although the efficacy of intranasal agents varies with the product used, intranasal delivery may be both convenient and more effective than other modes of drug delivery for a variety of reasons: (i) intranasal administration bypasses small bowel gastrointestinal tract absorption, which is often significantly delayed during the acute phase of a migraine attack; (ii) nauseated patients may prefer non-oral formulations as they decrease the chance of vomiting and are more rapidly effective; (iii) intranasal administration causes no pain or injection site reaction and is easier and more convenient to administer than injection or suppository and so may be used earlier in a migraine attack, resulting in better efficacy; (iv) intranasal medication produces the same number or fewer adverse events than injections; and (v) intranasal formulations offer a more rapid onset of action than oral medications, for some of the above reasons and, as such, may be more useful in patients with cluster headache, although this needs to be verified. However, it is important to emphasise that a preference study showed that most patients prefer oral tablets to an intranasal formulation. Also, some nasal preparations have significant adverse effects or are not well absorbed and therefore do not work consistently; others are more challenging to administer as a result of their delivery apparatus. Nevertheless, it is our opinion that nasal preparations increase therapeutic options and may result in faster response times and better efficacy than oral formulations and

  20. [Stress as a precipitating factor in migraine].

    PubMed

    Galiano, L; Montiel, I; Falip, R; Asensio, M; Matías-Guiu, J

    1995-01-01

    Stress is the precipitating factor in migraine which is most commonly recognized by patients. There are many affected who describe headaches brought on by stressful situations and events, although they also speak of the onset of their attacks during the period of calm immediately after such moments of stress. There are however few objective works in the literature which study the relationship between stress and migraine. In the present work we review that literature which does exist concerning such a relationship.

  1. Cross-Sectional Study of Patients With Onset of Acute Coronary Syndrome During Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Akuzawa, Nobuhiro; Hatori, Takashi; Imai, Kunihiko; Kitahara, Yonosuke; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy significantly reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, atherosclerotic plaque progresses in some patients taking statins. This study investigated the factors associated with onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) early after the initiation of statin therapy. Methods Consecutive patients taking statins who presented with ACS (n = 64) were divided into < 1-year and > 1-year groups based on the duration of statin therapy. Patient characteristics, coronary risk factors, lesion locations, and percutaneous intervention procedures were compared between groups. Results The < 1-year group was significantly younger (57.6 ± 11.9 years vs. 76.6 ± 9.1 years, P < 0.01), had significantly higher body mass index (27.22 ± 4.20 kg/m2 vs. 24.60 ± 4.65 kg/m2, P < 0.05), higher proportion of males (94% vs. 70%, P < 0.05), higher proportion of current smokers (61% vs. 17%, P < 0.01), and lower proportions taking aspirin and calcium antagonists (both 17% vs. 57%, P < 0.05) than the > 1-year group. In the < 1-year group, there were significant correlations between the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels (r = 0.649, P = 0.004) and between the TG and hemoglobin (Hb)A1c levels (r = 0.552, P = 0.018), but these correlations were not observed a year before admission. TG level was the only parameter associated with LDL-C and HbA1c levels. Conclusions A linear correlation between the LDL-C and TG levels, obesity, older age, male sex, and smoking may be associated with increased risk of onset of ACS early after the initiation of statin therapy. Prospective cohort studies are needed to further explore these interactions. PMID:25780481

  2. Randomized controlled trial: targeted neck cooling in the treatment of the migraine patient.

    PubMed

    Sprouse-Blum, Adam S; Gabriel, Alexandra K; Brown, Jon P; Yee, Melvin Hc

    2013-07-01

    Cold therapy has long been the number one self-care treatment employed for migraine without aura and the second most common for migraine with aura, yet its mechanism remains elusive. In this study, a mechanism by which this time-tested therapy works is proposed (by cooling the blood passing through intracranial vessels) in an attempt to further elucidate its beneficial effects. The study is designed as a randomized, controlled, crossover clinical trial utilizing an adjustable wrap containing two freezable ice packs targeting the carotid arteries at the neck, where they come close to the skin surface. Fifty-five participants successfully completed the study. Pain at onset, as recorded on a visual analog scale, was similar between the two treatment arms. Maximum pain reduction was observed at the 30 minute time point with a 31.8% ± 15.2% decrease in pain in the treatment arm compared to a 31.5% ± 20.0% increase in pain at the same time interval in the control arm. These findings confirm the application of a frozen neck wrap at onset of migraine headache targeting the carotid arteries at the neck significantly reduced recorded pain in participants with migraine headaches (P<.001). PMID:23901394

  3. Severe acute interstitial nephritis after combination immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Naoka; Borges, Thiago J.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Riella, Leonardo V.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors are emerging as revolutionary drugs for certain malignancies. However, blocking the co-inhibitory signals may lead to immune-related adverse events, mainly in the spectrum of autoimmune diseases including colitis, endocrinopathies and nephritis. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old man with metastatic malignant melanoma treated with a combination of nivolumab (anti-PD1-antibody) and ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody) who developed systemic rash along with severe acute tubulointerstitial nephritis after two doses of combination therapy. Kidney biopsy and peripheral blood immune profile revealed highly proliferative and cytotoxic T cell features. Herein, we discuss the pathophysiology and management of immune checkpoint blockade-related adverse events. PMID:27274826

  4. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  5. Moving beyond supportive care--current status of specific therapies in pediatric acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Symons, Jordan M

    2014-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a significant challenge, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. Therapy for AKI to this point has largely been supportive; specific interventions to treat established AKI have had minimal effect. Review of the pathogenesis of AKI reveals complex, interacting mechanisms, including changes in microcirculation, the immune system, and inflammation, and cell death from both necrosis and apoptosis. Past definitions of AKI have been imprecise; newer methods for AKI identification and classification, including novel biomarkers and improved criteria for defining AKI, may permit earlier intervention with greater potential for success. With improved understanding of pathophysiology and the opportunity for intervention before AKI is fully established, clinicians may be able to move beyond supportive care and improve outcomes.

  6. Acute spinal cord compression: a rare complication of dual antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Muhammad Zaid; Chong, Victor; Hutcheon, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with acute shortness of breath and exacerbation of chronic back pain. She was diagnosed with pulmonary oedema and a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction following chest X-ray, ECG and high sensitivity troponin levels. She subsequently underwent coronary angioplasty with deployment of drug-eluting stents to her circumflex and left anterior descending arteries and was started on aspirin and clopidogrel for her dual antiplatelet therapy. Unfortunately, following the procedure, she gradually lost power and sensation in both lower limbs. MRI of her spine confirmed an extradural haematoma causing thoracic cord compression. She was managed conservatively following discussions with neurosurgeons and developed further complications secondary to her immobility. PMID:26202314

  7. Reduction of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T-cells in migraine: Is migraine an autoimmune disorder?

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Murugesan; Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2016-01-15

    Migraine is believed to be a chronic neurological disorder with the exact aetiology being unknown. But, there is a debate on the role of immune dysfunction in migraine pathophysiology. Hence, authors made a debut attempt to explore the link between lymphocyte subset populations and migraine. A significant increase in CD4(+) and decrease in CD8(+) population were observed in migraine patients compared to healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the immunoregulator CD4(+)CD25(+) levels were less in migraine patients compared to the healthy volunteers. The results of the present study indicate that failure of immunoregulation could be implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine.

  8. Gabapentin inhibits central sensitization during migraine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbo; Shao, Guo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Sijie; Niu, Jingzhong; Hu, Dongmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Ji, Xunming

    2013-11-15

    Peripheral and central sensitizations are phenomena that occur during migraine. The role of pentin, a migraine preventive drug, on central sensitization remains unclear. In this study, a rat model of migraine was established by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, and the an-imals were given intragastric gabapentin. Changes in amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and protein kinase C membrane translocation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus were examined to clarify the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of gabapentin in the treatment of central sensitization during migraine. Electrophysiology, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and western blot analysis results revealed that gabapentin reduces neuronal excitability in the spinal nucleus in the trigeminal nerve, decreases excitatory amino acid content and inhibits the activation of protein ki-nase C. This provides evidence that excitatory amino acids and protein kinase C are involved in the formation and maintenance of central sensitization during migraine. Gabapentin inhibits migraine by reducing excitatory amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and inhibiting protein kinase C ac-tivation. PMID:25206620

  9. Migraine and erythrocyte biology: a review.

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Cervellin, G; Mattiuzzi, C

    2014-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder that is conventionally classified according to the presence or absence of aura. The pathogenesis of this disorder entails a complex interplay of neurovascular factors, that trigger reduction of cerebral blood flow followed by reactive vasodilatation. Despite major emphasis has been placed on the investigation of putative biomarkers that could predict response to specific treatments and prophylaxis, less focus has been directed at the association between migraine and erythrocytosis. Erythrocytosis is typically accompanied by hyperviscosity, that is now considered a crucial determinant in the pathogenesis of migraine. The results of some epidemiological investigations are in substantial agreement to confirm the existence of a significant relationship between increased haemoglobin levels and migraine, whereas some case reports have also reported an effective improvement of symptoms after reduction of erythrocyte count by therapeutic venesection. Interesting evidence has recently emerged from the assessment of red blood cell distribution width (RDW), a simple and inexpensive measure of anysocytosis that has been also associated with a variety of ischaemic and thrombotic disorders other than migraine. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current clinical and epidemiological evidence linking migraine and erythrocyte biology.

  10. Homocysteine and migraine. A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Meschi, Tiziana; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Borghi, Loris

    2014-06-10

    Recent evidence suggests that migraine is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disorders, so that it is increasingly hypothesized that this primary form of headache may be linked to thrombotic diseases by some biological pathways and risk factors. Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing molecule, is now recognized as an independent risk factor for a variety of thrombotic disorders, especially ischemic heart disease and stroke. This article is hence aimed to provide an overview of epidemiological evidence about the association between homocysteine and migraine published in cross-sectional, prospective or interventional studies. Overall, the evidence gathered from cross-sectional studies that measured plasma homocysteine levels suggests that the epidemiological link between the plasma concentration of this biomarker and migraine is very weak, at best. Contradictory evidence emerged from interventional studies, in which treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia with folic acid or vitamin B supplementation was effective to lower plasma homocysteine and decrease frequency and/or severity of migraine. The association remains largely speculative, however, since it could not be clearly demonstrated that these two biological effects were directly linked. The only study that has assessed homocysteine in cerebrospinal fluid reported that the concentration of this biomarker in migraine patients was significantly increased compared to controls. Although this evidence must be obviously confirmed in larger trials, some putative mechanisms may support a causal link between increased generation of homocysteine in the brain environment and migraine.

  11. Anxiety and life events in childhood migraine.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P J; Bawden, H N; Camfield, P R; Camfield, C S

    1987-06-01

    The assumption that anxiety and stressful life events are major precipitants of childhood migraine was examined by comparing a group of children referred for evaluation of headaches with their headache-free best friends. Before assessment, 39 children (average age 11 years, 20 girls) and their parents completed standard anxiety, personality, and life events scales. The same scales were administered to the control children and their parents. All subjects met Prensky's criteria for migraine, and all reviewed an audiovisual program on migraine and were given the same instruction about analgesic medications. History of headache averaged 35 months (1 to 132 months). No statistically significant differences were found between patients and controls or between the two groups of parents on any of the anxiety or life events scales. Children's anxiety scores were not related to parents' anxiety scores. Personality profiles of patients were similar to controls. Headache diaries were used to assess headache severity and frequency during a 4-month follow-up period. Although all patients had anxiety scores within the normal range, those with higher self-rated anxiety scores at initial assessment had significantly more frequent and severe headaches during the follow-up period (P less than .001). We conclude that children with migraines are not more anxious or stressed than their friends. Normal amounts of stress and anxiety appear to lead to the expression of migraine; however, more anxious children with migraines have more frequent and severe headaches.

  12. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sujan, M. U.; Rao, M. Raghavendra; Kisan, Ravikiran; Abhishekh, Hulegar A.; Nalini, Atchayaram; Raju, Trichur R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20) or conventional medication only (n = 20). Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F) and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT), visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV) before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017), increase in high frequency (HF) (P = 0.014) and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004) in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients. PMID:26933356

  13. Comparison of propranolol and pregabalin for prophylaxis of childhood migraine: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bakhshandeh Bali, MohammadKazem; Rahbarimanesh, Ali Akbar; Sadeghi, Manelie; Sedighi, Mostafa; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Migraine involves 5-10% of children and adolescents. Thirty percent of children with severe migraine attacks have school absence and reduced quality of life that need preventive therapy. The purpose of this randomised control trial study is to compare the effectiveness, safety and the tolerability of pregabalin toward Propranolol in migraine prophylaxis of children. From May 2011 to October 2012, 99 children 3-15 years referred to the neurology clinic of Mofid Children's Hospital with a diagnosis of migraine enrolled the study. Patients randomly divided into two groups (A&B). We treated children of group A with capsule of pregabalin as children of group B with tablet of propranolol for at least 8 weeks. In this study, 99 patients were examined that 91 children reached the last stage. The group A consistsed of 46 patients, 12(26.1%) girls, 34 (73.9%) boys and the group B consisted of 45 patients, 14(31.1%) girls, 31 (68.9%) boys. Basis of age, gender, headache onset, headache frequency, migraine type, triggering and relieving factors there was no significant difference among these groups (P>0.05). After 4 and 8 weeks of Pregabalin usage monthly headache frequency decreased to 2.2±4.5 and 1.76±6.2 respectively. Propranolol reduced monthly headache frequency up to 3.73±6.11 and 3.34±5.95 later 4 and 8 weeks respectively. There was a significant difference between these two groups according to headache frequency reduction (P=0.04). Pregabalin efficacy in reducing the frequency and duration of pediatric migraine headache is considerable in comparison with propranolol.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of zinc as adjunct therapy for acute childhood diarrhoea in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Robberstad, Bjarne; Strand, Tor; Black, Robert E.; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the incremental costs, effects and cost-effectiveness of zinc used as adjunct therapy to standard treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea, including dysentery, and to reassess the cost-effectiveness of standard case management with oral rehydration salt (ORS). METHODS: A decision tree was used to model expected clinical outcomes and expected costs under four alternative treatment strategies. The best available epidemiological, clinical and economic evidence was used in the calculations, and the United Republic of Tanzania was the reference setting. Probabilistic cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Monte-Carlo simulation technique and the potential impacts of uncertainty in single parameters were explored in one-way sensitivity analyses. FINDINGS: ORS was found to be less cost-effective than previously thought. The use of zinc as adjunct therapy significantly improved the cost-effectiveness of standard management of diarrhoea for dysenteric as well as non-dysenteric illness. The results were particularly sensitive to mortality rates in non-dysenteric diarrhoea, but the alternative interventions can be defined as highly cost-effective even in pessimistic scenarios. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to recommend the inclusion of zinc into standard case management of both dysenteric and non-dysenteric acute diarrhoea.A direct transfer of our findings from the United Republic of Tanzania to other settings is not justified, but there are no indications of large geographical differences in the efficacy of zinc. It is therefore plausible that our findings are also applicable to other developing countries. PMID:15500284

  15. Preventive Antibacterial Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klehmet, Juliane; Rogge, Witold; Drenckhahn, Christoph; Göhler, Jos; Bereswill, Stefan; Göbel, Ulf; Wernecke, Klaus Dieter; Wolf, Tilo; Arnold, Guy; Halle, Elke; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. Methods Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily) or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. Findings On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients), the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114). On per protocol analysis (n = 66), moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032). Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression) at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. Interpretation PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize the

  16. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  17. Synergistic targeted therapy for acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a model of translational research in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Mi, J-Q; Chen, S-J; Zhou, G-B; Yan, X-J; Chen, Z

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), the M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia, was once a lethal disease, yet nowadays the majority of patients with APL can be successfully cured by molecularly targeted therapy. This dramatic improvement in the survival rate is an example of the advantage of modern medicine. APL is characterized by a balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation fusing the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) gene on chromosome 15 with the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) gene on chromosome 17. It has been found that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or arsenic trioxide (ATO) alone exerts therapeutic effect on APL patients with the PML-RARα fusion gene, and the combination of both drugs can act synergistically to further enhance the cure rate of the patients. Here, we provide an insight into the pathogenesis of APL and the mechanisms underlying the respective roles of ATRA and ATO. In addition, treatments that lead to more effective differentiation and apoptosis of APL cells, including leukaemia-initiating cells, and more thorough eradication of the disease will be discussed. Moreover, as a model of translational research, the development of a cure for APL has followed a bidirectional approach of 'bench to bedside' and 'bedside to bench', which can serve as a valuable example for the diagnosis and treatment of other malignancies.

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy exerts mainly acute molecular changes in serum of major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Stelzhammer, Viktoria; Guest, Paul C; Rothermundt, Matthias; Sondermann, Carina; Michael, Nikolaus; Schwarz, Emanuel; Rahmoune, Hassan; Bahn, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is mainly used to treat medication resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, with a remission rate of up to 90%. However, little is known about the serum molecular changes induced by this treatment. Understanding the mechanisms of action of ECT at the molecular level could lead to identification of response markers and potential new drug targets for more effective antidepressant treatments. We have carried out a pilot study which analysed serum samples of MDD patients who received a series of ECT treatments over 4 weeks. Patients received only ECT treatments over the first two weeks and a combination of ECT and antidepressant drugs (AD) over the subsequent two weeks. Blood serum analyses were carried out using a combination of multiplex Human MAP® immunoassay and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) profiling. This showed that ECT had a predominant acute effect on the levels of serum proteins and small molecules, with changes at the beginning of ECT treatment and after administration of the ECT+AD combination treatment. This suggested a positive interaction between the two types of treatment. Changed molecules included BDNF, CD40L, IL-8, IL-13, EGF, IGF-1, pancreatic polypeptide, SCF, sortilin-1 and others which have already been implicated in MDD pathophysiology. We conclude that ECT appears to exert mainly acute effects on serum molecules.

  19. Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of intravenous antioxidant (n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C) therapy in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Siriwardena, Ajith K; Mason, James M; Balachandra, Srinivasan; Bagul, Anil; Galloway, Simon; Formela, Laura; Hardman, Jonathan G; Jamdar, Saurabh

    2007-01-01

    Background Based on equivocal clinical data, intravenous antioxidant therapy has been used for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. To date there is no randomised comparison of this therapy in severe acute pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial of intravenous antioxidant (n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C) therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Forty‐three patients were enrolled from three hospitals in the Manchester (UK) area over the period June 2001 to November 2004. Randomisation stratified for APACHE‐II score and hospital site, and delivered groups that were similar at baseline. Results Relative serum levels of antioxidants rose while markers of oxidative stress fell in the active treatment group during the course of the trial. However, at 7 days, there was no statistically significant difference in the primary end point, organ dysfunction (antioxidant vs placebo: 32% vs 17%, p = 0.33) or any secondary end point of organ dysfunction or patient outcome. Conclusions This study provides no evidence to justify continued use of n‐acetylcysteine, selenium, vitamin C based antioxidant therapy in severe acute pancreatitis. In the context of any future trial design, careful consideration must be given to the risks raised by the greater trend towards adverse outcome in patients in the treatment arm of this study. PMID:17356040

  20. Rumination in migraine: Mediating effects of brooding and reflection between migraine and psychological distress

    PubMed Central

    Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Szabo, Edina; Kocsel, Natalia; Edes, Andrea; Eszlari, Nora; Pap, Dorottya; Magyar, Mate; Kovacs, David; Zsombok, Terezia; Elliott, Rebecca; Anderson, Ian Muir; William Deakin, John Francis; Bagdy, Gyorgy; Juhasz, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The relationship between migraine and psychological distress has been consistently reported in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. We hypothesised that a stable tendency to perseverative thoughts such as rumination would mediate the relationship between migraine and psychological distress. Design and Main Outcomes Measures: Self-report questionnaires measuring depressive rumination, current psychological distress and migraine symptoms in two independent European population cohorts, recruited from Budapest (N = 1139) and Manchester (N = 2004), were used. Structural regression analysis within structural equation modelling was applied to test the mediational role of brooding and reflection, the components of rumination, between migraine and psychological distress. Sex, age and lifetime depression were controlled for in the analysis. Results: Migraine predicted higher brooding and reflection scores, and brooding proved to be a mediator between migraine and psychological distress in both samples, while reflection mediated the relationship significantly only in the Budapest sample. Conclusions: Elevated psychological distress in migraine is partially attributed to ruminative response style. Further studies are needed to expand our findings to clinical samples and to examine how rumination links to the adjustment to migraine. PMID:27616579