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Sample records for acute migraine treatment

  1. Acute Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    ÖZTÜRK, Vesile

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent disabling neurological conditions with a major impact on the patient’s quality of life. Migraine has been described as a chronic disorder that characterized with attacks. Attacks are characterized by moderate–severe, often unilateral, pulsating headache attacks, typically lasting 4 to 72 hours. Migraine remains underdiagnosed and undertreated despite advances in the understanding of its pathophysiology. This article reviews management of migraine acute pharmacological treatment. Currently, for the acute treatment of migraine attacks, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and triptans (serotonin 5HT1B/1D receptor agonists) are recommended. Before intake of NSAID and triptans, metoclopramide or domperidone is useful. In very severe attacks, subcutaneous sumatriptan is first choice. The patient should be treated early in the attack, use an adequate dose and formulation of a medication. Ideally, acute therapy should be restricted to no more than 2 to 3 days per week to avoid medication overuse.

  2. A treatment for the acute migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Adam, E I

    1987-01-01

    A compound analgesic/anti-emetic formulation was significantly effective in reducing the severity of acute attacks of migraine, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial of 34 patients referred to a migraine clinic. The preparation contained paracetamol (acetaminophen) 500 mg, codeine phosphate 8 mg, buclizine hydrochloride 6.25 mg and dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate 10 mg. The dosage was two tablets taken as early as possible in the acute attack. No specific factors could be identified which influenced response to treatment. Patients with a long history of migraine (more than 10 years) responded as well as those with a recent onset of the condition.

  3. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  4. Basic mechanisms of migraine and its acute treatment.

    PubMed

    Edvinsson, Lars; Villalón, Carlos M; MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette

    2012-12-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular disorder characterized by recurrent unilateral headaches accompanied by nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. Current theories suggest that the initiation of a migraine attack involves a primary event in the central nervous system (CNS), probably involving a combination of genetic changes in ion channels and environmental changes, which renders the individual more sensitive to environmental factors; this may, in turn, result in a wave of cortical spreading depression (CSD) when the attack is initiated. Genetically, migraine is a complex familial disorder in which the severity and the susceptibility of individuals are most likely governed by several genes that vary between families. Early PET studies have suggested the involvement of a migraine active region in the brainstem. Migraine headache is associated with trigeminal nerve activation and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the trigeminovascular system. Administration of triptans (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists) causes the headache to subside and the levels of CGRP to normalize. Moreover, administration of CGRP receptor antagonists aborts the headache. Recent immunohistochemical and pharmacological results suggest that the trigeminal system has receptors for CGRP; further, 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors, which inhibit the action of CGRP in pain transmission when activated, have been demonstrated. This offers an explanation for the treatment response. The present review provides an updated analysis of the basic mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of migraine and the various pharmacological approaches (including 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists, CGRP receptor antagonists and glutamate receptor antagonists) that have shown efficacy for the acute treatment of this disorder.

  5. New paradigms in the recognition and acute treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Sheftell, Fred D; Tepper, Stewart J

    2002-01-01

    It would be ideal if clinical decisions regarding acute migraine treatment could be made on the basis of three parameters: a critical appraisal of available scientific evidence, clinical experience (including knowledge of the individual patient and his/her attack characteristics), and, of course, patient preferences. Patients are likely to prefer agents that offer rapid relief, pain-free status within 2 hours, no recurrence or need for rescue medication, extended time to recurrence (if present), consistency of therapeutic effect over multiple attacks, oral administration. good tolerability, safety, and minimal drug interactions. Fortunately, a number of specific therapies now are available which place these objectives within the patient's reach. Ongoing barriers to optimal migraine care include underrecognition, underconsultation, undertreatment, restrictions imposed by insurance companies, and exaggerated concerns regarding the safety of the triptans. Overcoming these barriers is likely to prove a more important contribution to patient care than endeavoring to establish the relative merits of one triptan over another. We have described in detail a number of strategies for improving recognition and treatment of migraine. Many headache specialists now believe that recurrent episodes of disabling headache, with a stable pattern over years, should be viewed as migraine until proven otherwise. In the end, this may represent the most useful paradigm in the primary care setting, where time is of the essence. Studies to validate this approach are needed. Acute treatment intervention that is based on scientific evidence, clinical experience, and patients' needs and desires will provide better outcomes than those presently obtained. Preliminary evidence favors early intervention with oral triptans, and randomized, prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, ideally employing a crossover design, are required to confirm this. The US Consortium's evidence

  6. Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    GÜRSOY, Azize Esra; ERTAŞ, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a common chronic neurological disease characterized by episodic attacks of headache and associated symptoms. The pharmacological treatment of migraine may be acute or prophylactic, and patients with frequent, severe headaches often require both approaches. Prophylactic treatment is used to reduce the frequency, duration, or severity of attacks, to enhance the benefits of acute treatments, and to improve patient’s ability to function normally. Prophylactic treatment may also prevent progression from episodic migraine to chronic migraine and may result in reductions in health-care cost. The currently available pharmacological options for migraine prophylaxis include a wide array of medications. The major medication groups for prophylactic treatment include β-blockers, anticonvulsant, drugs such as topiramate and valproate, antidepressant drugs, such as amitriptyline and selective serotonin and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), calcium channel antagonists and neurotoxins. The agent for prophylactic treatment should be chosen based on the efficacy and side-effect profile of the drug, and the patient’s coexistent and comorbid conditions.

  7. Management of the acute migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, Glen; Knutson, Doug; Miser, William F

    2002-12-01

    As many as 30 million Americans have migraine headaches. The impact on patients and their families can be tremendous, and treatment of migraines can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for family physicians. Abortive treatment options include nonspecific and migraine-specific therapy. Nonspecific therapies include analgesics (aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opiates), adjunctive therapies (antiemetics and sedatives), and other nonspecific medications (intranasal lidocaine or steroids). Migraine-specific abortive therapies include ergotamine and its derivatives, and triptans. Complementary and alternative therapies can also be used to abort the headache or enhance the efficacy of another therapeutic modality. Treatment choices for acute migraine should be based on headache severity, migraine frequency, associated symptoms, and comorbidities.

  8. NSAIDs in the Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Pardutz, Arpad; Schoenen, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurological disorder with a serious socio-economical burden. By blocking cyclooxygenase nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decrease the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are involved in the pathophysiology of migraine headaches. Despite the introduction more than a decade ago of a new class of migraine-specific drugs with superior efficacy, the triptans, NSAIDs remain the most commonly used therapies for the migraine attack. This is in part due to their wide availability as over-the-counter drugs and their pharmaco-economic advantages, but also to a favorable efficacy/side effect profile at least in attacks of mild and moderate intensity. We summarize here both the experimental data showing that NSAIDs are able to influence several pathophysiological facets of the migraine headache and the clinical studies providing evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of various subclasses of NSAIDs in migraine therapy. Taken together these data indicate that there are several targets for NSAIDs in migraine pathophysiology and that on the spectrum of clinical potency acetaminophen is at the lower end while ibuprofen is among the most effective drugs. Acetaminophen and aspirin excluded, comparative trials between the other NSAIDs are missing. Since evidence-based criteria are scarce, the selection of an NSAID should take into account proof and degree of efficacy, rapid GI absorption, gastric ulcer risk and previous experience of each individual patient. If selected and prescribed wisely, NSAIDs are precious, safe and cost-efficient drugs for the treatment of migraine attacks. PMID:27713337

  9. Rofecoxib versus ibuprofen for acute treatment of migraine: a randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Misra, U; Jose, M; Kalita, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Rofecoxib is a potent cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor with a long duration of action. Its role in migraine has not been systematically evaluated. Aim: To study the efficacy of rofecoxib in migraine. Method: In a randomised placebo controlled trial rofecoxib 25 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, and placebo were compared regarding their efficacy in relieving acute migraine attack. Migraine patients with 2–6 attacks per month were recruited. Headache severity, functional disability, and severity of associated symptoms were graded on a 0–3 scale. The primary endpoint was pain relief at two hours. Relief of associated symptoms and sustained pain relief for 24 hours were also noted. Result: One hundred and twenty four patients were randomised into rofecoxib (42), ibuprofen (40), and placebo (42) groups. One hundred and one patients were followed up: 33 on rofecoxib, 35 ibuprofen, and 33 placebo. Patients' ages ranged from 16–62 (mean 31.4) years, and 83 were females. Pain relief at two hours was noted in 45.5% on rofecoxib, 55.6% on ibuprofen, and 9.1% in the placebo group. The associated symptoms at two hours were reduced in 39.4% on rofecoxib, 50% on ibuprofen, and 9.1% in the placebo group. Sustained 24 hour pain relief was noted in 36.4% on rofecoxib, 41% on ibuprofen, and 6.1% in the placebo group. In the ibuprofen group, five patients had abdominal pain but there were no side effects in those on rofecoxib or in the control group. Both rofecoxib and ibuprofen were significantly effective in relieving pain, associated symptoms at two hours, and in sustained pain relief. There was no significant difference between rofecoxib and ibuprofen in aborting acute migraine attacks. Conclusions: Both ibuprofen and rofecoxib were superior to placebo in aborting an acute migraine attack, and there was no significant difference in their efficacy in an acute migraine attack. PMID:15579612

  10. [Chronic migraine: treatment].

    PubMed

    Pascual, Julio

    2012-04-10

    We define chronic migraine as that clinical situation in which migraine attacks appear 15 or more days per month. Until recently, and in spite of its negative impact, patients with chronic migraine were excluded of the clinical trials. This manuscript revises the current treatment of chronic migraine. The first step should include the avoidance of potential precipitating/aggravating factors for chronic migraine, mainly analgesic overuse and the treatment of comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The symptomatic treatment should be based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and triptans (in this case < 10 days per month). It is necessary to avoid the use of combined analgesics, opioids and ergotamine-containing medications. Preventive treatment includes a 'transitional' treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids, while preventive treatment exerts its actions. Even though those medications efficacious in episodic migraine prevention are used, the only drugs with demonstrated efficacy in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine are topiramate and pericranial infiltrations of Onabotulinumtoxin A.

  11. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination for acute treatment of migraine: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Chaouki K; Couch, James R

    2010-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including naproxen and naproxen sodium, are effective yet nonspecific analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, which work for a variety of pain and inflammatory syndromes, including migraine. In migraine, their analgesic effect helps relieve the headache, while their anti-inflammatory effect decreases the neurogenic inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion. This is the hypothesized mechanism by which they prevent the development of central sensitization. Triptans, including sumatriptan, work early in the migraine process at the trigeminovascular unit as agonists of the serotonin receptors (5-HT receptors) 1B and 1D. They block vasoconstriction and block transmission of signals to the trigeminal nucleus and thus prevent peripheral sensitization. Therefore, combining these two drugs is an attractive modality for the abortive treatment of migraine. Sumatriptan–naproxen fixed combination tablet (Treximet® [sumatriptan–naproxen]) proves to be an effective and well tolerated drug that combines these two mechanisms; yet is far from being the ultimate in migraine abortive therapy, and further research remains essential. PMID:20368903

  12. Migraine treatment and placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Speciali, José G; Peres, Mário; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2010-03-01

    Placebos are typically defined as physiologically inactive substances that elicit a therapeutic response. The antipode of the placebo effect is the nocebo effect, or the negative effects of placebo, where unpleasant symptoms (e.g., adverse events) emerge after the administration of placebo. Placebo analgesia is one of the most striking examples of the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Herein we focus on the importance of placebo in headache research. We first review the mechanisms of the placebo effect. We then focus on the importance of placebo in the acute treatment of migraine. We follow by discussing the importance of placebo on the preventive treatment of migraine and our perspectives for the 5 years to come regarding the study of the placebos.

  13. Complicated Migraines.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Alyssa E; Victorio, M Cristina; Berenson, Frank R

    2016-02-01

    Migraines are a common paroxysmal disorder that may present with a multitude of neurologic symptoms. Migraines have been re-categorized in the most recent edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. In this article, we review the literature on hemiplegic migraines, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, migraine with brainstem aura, retinal migraine, ophthalmoplegic migraine, Alice in Wonderland syndrome, and acute confusional migraine. We also discuss the principal clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and treatment options for these disorders.

  14. The pharmacological profile and clinical prospects of the oral 5-HT1F receptor agonist lasmiditan in the acute treatment of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Heike; Neeb, Lars

    2015-01-01

    More than 20 years have passed without the launch of a new substance class for acute migraine therapy. Triptans were the latest class of substances which successfully passed all developmental stages with a significant antimigraine efficacy and a sufficient safety profile. New drugs with a better adverse event profile and at least similar efficacy are needed for migraine subjects who cannot tolerate triptans for attack treatment. Lasmiditan is a novel highly specific 5-HT1F receptor agonist currently in clinical trials for acute migraine therapy and devoid of vasoconstriction in coronary arteries as determined in a surrogate assay. In both phase II randomized, placebo-controlled trials in acute migraine the primary endpoint was met. For the intravenous formulation a clear dose-dependent effect on headaches could be determined. Lasmiditan tablets in doses of 50–400 mg show significant headache relief after 2 hours compared with placebo and improved accompanying symptoms. This substance is chemically clearly different from other antimigraine drugs, which is also reflected by its dose-dependent adverse event profile chiefly including dizziness, vertigo, paresthesia and fatigue. Adverse events are usually linked to the central nervous system. Future phase III clinical trials with an active triptan comparator or in a preferential trial design will allow a better comparison of lasmiditan and triptans. They will also determine whether lasmiditan will become available to the migraine patient. PMID:25584073

  15. Clinical pharmacology of current and future drugs for the acute treatment of migraine: a review and an update.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-02-01

    Migraine is a common disorder with a female prevalence of 17% and a male prevalence of 9%. Migraine is most often disabling and the patients need treatment of the attacks. The introduction of triptans has been a revolution for many migraine patients but only a minority of patients use these specific drugs. The pharmacokinetics and efficacy and tolerability of triptans are reviewed. The triptans can most likely with advantage be combined with NSAIDs and prokinetic drugs. Among future drugs, CGRP receptor antagonists are the most promising. These drugs have shown excellent tolerability with no more adverse events than placebo, but only one quarter of migraine patients have been pain-free after 2 hours in phase III studies. The development of current CGRP antagonists has been stopped.

  16. New therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Charles, Andrew; Goadsby, Peter J; Holle, Dagny

    2015-10-01

    The management of patients with migraine is often unsatisfactory because available acute and preventive therapies are either ineffective or poorly tolerated. The acute treatment of migraine attacks has been limited to the use of analgesics, combinations of analgesics with caffeine, ergotamines, and the triptans. Successful new approaches for the treatment of acute migraine target calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT1F) receptors. Other approaches targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor, glutamate, GABAA receptors, or a combination of 5-HT1B/1D receptors and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis have been investigated but have not been successful in clinical trials thus far. In migraine prevention, the most promising new approaches are humanised antibodies against CGRP or the CGRP receptor. Non-invasive and invasive neuromodulation approaches also show promise as both acute and preventive therapies, although further studies are needed to define appropriate candidates for these therapies and optimum protocols for their use.

  17. Butterbur extract: prophylactic treatment for childhood migraines.

    PubMed

    Utterback, Gretchann; Zacharias, Rayna; Timraz, Shahrazad; Mershman, Denay

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of migraine headaches in childhood is increasing. Migraines are often difficult to diagnose in pediatrics and even more difficult to treat and prevent. In order to decrease the impact of the condition on the child and the family, prophylactic treatment is recommended if the child is experiencing disabling migraines. The medications currently prescribed for the prevention of pediatric migraines often have significant side effects and are of questionable therapeutic value. For those patients and parents who are interested in alternative therapies and natural remedies for preventive treatment of pediatric migraines, butterbur extract derived from the butterbur plant, Petasites hybridus, has emerged as a promising treatment. This paper discusses the impact of migraines among pediatric patients, the rationale for the preventative treatment of pediatric migraines, the current therapies and the relevance of butterbur extract as a prophylactic treatment for migraines in this patient population.

  18. Botulinum Toxin in Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ILGAZ AYDINLAR, Elif; YALINAY DİKMEN, Pınar; SAĞDUYU KOCAMAN, Ayşe

    2013-01-01

    Since botulinum toxin might have a therapeutic effect on pain, many studies investigating the efficiency of botulinum toxin in headache treatment have been done. The most satisfying results were achieved by botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) in the treatment of chronic migraine. In this paper, we reviewed the clinical effectiveness of BoNT/A in migraine and included our clinical experience. In our ongoing pilot study, where we have repeated BoNT/A injections every 12 weeks, The difference in the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) scores between the first and the second injections was 61.1%; and between the first and the 3rd injections was found to be 65.72%.

  19. Randomized, controlled trial of telcagepant for the acute treatment of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Connor, K M.; Shapiro, R E.; Diener, H -C.; Lucas, S; Kost, J; Fan, X; Fei, K; Assaid, C; Lines, C; Ho, T W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a key role in migraine pathophysiology. In this large phase 3 clinical trial, we sought to confirm the efficacy of telcagepant, the first orally bioavailable CGRP receptor antagonist. Methods: Adults with migraine with or without aura (International Headache Society criteria) treated a moderate or severe attack with oral telcagepant 50 mg (n = 177), 150 mg (n = 381), 300 mg (n = 371), or placebo (n = 365) in a randomized, double-blind trial. The 5 co-primary endpoints were pain freedom, pain relief, and absence of photophobia, absence of phonophobia, and absence of nausea, all at 2 hours postdose. The key secondary endpoint was 2–24 hour sustained pain freedom. The prespecified primary efficacy analyses evaluated the 150 mg and 300 mg groups; the 50-mg group was included on an exploratory basis to further characterize the dose response but was not prespecified for analysis. Tolerability was assessed by adverse experience reports. Results: Telcagepant 300 mg was more effective (p ≤ 0.001) than placebo on all primary endpoints and the key secondary endpoint, as was telcagepant 150 mg (p ≤ 0.05). Telcagepant 300 mg showed a slight numeric advantage over telcagepant 150 mg on most measures. Telcagepant 50 mg values were numerically intermediate between placebo and telcagepant 150 mg and 300 mg. The percentages of patients with adverse experiences were 32.2% for telcagepant 50 mg, 32.0% for telcagepant 150 mg, 36.2% for telcagepant 300 mg, and 32.2% for placebo. Conclusions: This study confirmed previous findings that telcagepant 300 mg was effective at relieving pain and other migraine symptoms at 2 hours and providing sustained pain freedom up to 24 hours. In this study, telcagepant 150 mg was also effective. Telcagepant was generally well tolerated. GLOSSARY CGRP = calcitonin gene-related peptide. PMID:19770473

  20. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  1. Optimizing prophylactic treatment of migraine: Subtypes and patient matching

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine have resulted in important breakthroughs in treatment. For example, understanding of the role of serotonin in the cerebrovascular circulation has led to the development of triptans for the acute relief of migraine headaches, and the identification of cortical spreading depression as an early central event associated wih migraine has brought renewed interest in antiepileptic drugs for migraine prophylaxis. However, migraine still remains inadequately treated. Indeed, it is apparent that migraine is not a single disease but rather a syndrome that can manifest itself in a variety of pathological conditions. The consequences of this may be that treatment needs to be matched to particular patients. Clinical research needs to be devoted to identifying which sort of patients benefit best from which treatments, particularly in the field of prophylaxis. We propose four patterns of precipitating factors (adrenergic, serotoninergic, menstrual, and muscular) which may be used to structure migraine prophylaxis. Finally, little is known about long-term outcome in treated migraine. It is possible that appropriate early prophylaxis may modify the long-term course of the disease and avoid late complications. PMID:19209286

  2. Evidence-Based Treatments for Adults with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Nimeri, Randa; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Migraine, a significantly disabling condition, is treated with acute and preventive medications. However, some individuals are refractory to standard treatments. Although there is a host of alternative management options available, these are not always backed by strong evidence. In fact, most of the drugs used in migraine were initially designed for other purposes. Whilst effective, the benefits from these medications are modest, reflecting the need for newer and migraine-specific therapeutic agents. In recent years, we have witnessed the emergence of novel treatments, of which noninvasive neuromodulation appears to be the most attractive given its ease of use and excellent tolerability profile. This paper reviews the evidence behind the available treatments for migraine. PMID:26839703

  3. Migraine: a review and future directions for treatment.

    PubMed

    Linde, M

    2006-08-01

    Migraine is a chronic, neurological disorder generally manifesting itself in attacks with severe headache, nausea and an increased reactivity to sensory stimuli. A low migraine threshold is set by genetic factors, although the phenotype also modulates the manifestations. The 1-year prevalence is approximately 13% and is higher among women. Patients usually experience neuropsychological dysfunction, and sometimes also reversible focal neurological symptoms. The trajectories of the characteristic symptoms of acute migraine usually follow a similar time course, indicating a reciprocal underlying mechanism. A central nervous system hyperexcitability has been demonstrated in neurophysiological studies. The dibilitating effects of migraine are not confined to the attacks per se. Many individuals do not recover completely between the attacks and most report a negative impact on the most important life domains, and an interest in testing other treatments. Young persons have a higher frequency of attacks. Acute treatment should routinely be initiated with an analgesic plus a prokinetic anti-emetic. Triptans must not be provided early during the attack to ensure their efficacy. The natural course of attacks is commonly only temporarily altered by acute treatment. Non-pharmacological treatment and drugs may be equally viable in prophylaxis for migraine. In more complicated cases, conjoint therapy should be considered. New strategies to improve adherence with existing therapeutic regimens might yield greater benefits than will new pharmacological agents.

  4. The TRPA1 channel in migraine mechanism and treatment.

    PubMed

    Benemei, S; Fusi, C; Trevisan, Gabriela; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2014-05-01

    Migraine remains an elusive and poorly understood disease. The uncertainty is reflected by the currently unsatisfactory acute and prophylactic treatments for this disease. Genetic and pharmacological information points to the involvement of some transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in pain mechanisms. In particular, the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels seem to play a major role in different models of pain diseases. Recent findings have underscored the possibility that TRP channels expressed in the nerve terminals of peptidergic nociceptors contribute to the migraine mechanism. Among this channel subset, TRPA1, a sensor of oxidative, nitrative and electrophilic stress, is activated by an unprecedented series of irritant and pain-provoking exogenous and endogenous agents, which release the pro-migraine peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, through this neuronal pathway. Some of the recently identified TRPA1 activators have long been known as migraine triggers. Furthermore, specific analgesic and antimigraine medicines have been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPA1 channels. Thus, TRPA1 is emerging as a major contributing pathway in migraine and as a novel target for the development of drugs for pain and migraine treatment.

  5. The TRPA1 channel in migraine mechanism and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Benemei, S; Fusi, C; Trevisan, Gabriela; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2014-01-01

    Migraine remains an elusive and poorly understood disease. The uncertainty is reflected by the currently unsatisfactory acute and prophylactic treatments for this disease. Genetic and pharmacological information points to the involvement of some transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in pain mechanisms. In particular, the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels seem to play a major role in different models of pain diseases. Recent findings have underscored the possibility that TRP channels expressed in the nerve terminals of peptidergic nociceptors contribute to the migraine mechanism. Among this channel subset, TRPA1, a sensor of oxidative, nitrative and electrophilic stress, is activated by an unprecedented series of irritant and pain-provoking exogenous and endogenous agents, which release the pro-migraine peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, through this neuronal pathway. Some of the recently identified TRPA1 activators have long been known as migraine triggers. Furthermore, specific analgesic and antimigraine medicines have been shown to inhibit or desensitize TRPA1 channels. Thus, TRPA1 is emerging as a major contributing pathway in migraine and as a novel target for the development of drugs for pain and migraine treatment. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24206166

  6. Update on the Pharmacological Treatment of Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Sun-Edelstein, Christina; Rapoport, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is a common and disabling disorder that remains underdiagnosed and poorly treated. Significant unmet therapeutic needs add to the burden of this disorder; even when CM is recognized, effective treatment options are limited and randomized controlled trials supporting the use of various preventive medications are sparse. In this review, we discuss the available options for CM treatment. Currently the only FDA-approved treatment for CM prevention is onabotulinumtoxinA. Two double-blind studies have demonstrated the efficacy of topiramate for CM prevention, but it is not FDA-approved for this indication. Treatments in development for migraine will also be reviewed. Advancements in the understanding of migraine pathogenesis have identified new targets for both acute and preventive treatment and have engendered the development of targeted and mechanism-based therapies. The need for more effective treatment for CM patients, which has long since been identified, is now being addressed. Several of the emerging treatments for migraine prevention are under investigation specifically for CM or high-frequency episodic migraine.

  7. Consistency of response to sumatriptan/naproxen sodium in a randomized placebo-controlled, cross-over study for the acute treatment of migraine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Winner, Paul; Linder, Steven; Hershey, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    A multi-centered, randomized, placebo-controlled, early intervention, cross-over study was conducted to evaluate the consistency of response of sumatriptan/naproxen sodium 85/500 mg (S/NS) over 4 attacks in the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents. Inclusion of subjects was dependent on their age of 12-17 years, frequency, and history of migraine headaches (1-8 per month) over the previous 6 months prior to screening and generally healthy males and females of non-childbearing potential that were not on excluded medications. Subjects were instructed to treat within 1 hour of pain onset, including when the pain was still mild. Subjects were randomized in a double-blind fashion using a computer-generated randomization list in which the study drug was prepared prior to study start, and subjects were allocated to a number in sequential order for each site. Each site was allocated number blocks in sets of 10 depending of the rate of enrollment. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of S/NS vs placebo in the primary end-points of pain-free response at 2 hours (2hPF), 24-hour sustained pain-free response (24hPF), and pain-free response at 2 hours with early intervention (2hPFE) calculated as percentage out of all attacks. In the study, 94 subjects treated 347 attacks in total: treating 277 with S/NS and 70 with placebo. Compared with placebo, S/NS produced higher 2hPF rates (S/NS 37%, placebo 18%; P < .004), and 2hPFE with rates (S/NS 32%, 18% placebo; P < .03). Compared with placebo, 24hPF rates were S/NS 86%, placebo 78%, P < .17, which were higher than placebo but not clinically significant. 2hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraines treated with S/NS in 40.4% of subjects. 24hPF was reported in at least 2 of the 3 migraine treated with S/NS in 86.2% subjects. Adverse reactions were generally low and comparable between S/NS and placebo.

  8. Providing Care for Patients with Chronic Migraine: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Carrie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic migraine, a subtype of migraine defined as ≥ 15 headache days per month for ≥ 3 months, in which ≥ 8 days per month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to migraine-specific treatment, is a disabling, underdiagnosed, and undertreated disorder associated with significant disability, poor health-related quality of life, and high economic burden. The keys to caring for chronic migraine patients include: (1) making a proper diagnosis; (2) identifying and eliminating exacerbating factors; (3) assessing for medication overuse (patients with chronic headache often overuse acute medications); and (4) continued management. Communication between patient and physician about treatment goals is important. The patient management guidelines presented in this article should help physicians improve treatment success and proactively address common comorbidities among their patients with chronic migraine.

  9. Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments for Individuals with Migraine and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, Cynthia; Bond, Dale S; Seng, Elizabeth K

    2016-02-01

    Migraine and obesity are each prevalent disorders involving significant personal and societal burden. Epidemiologic research demonstrates a link between migraine and obesity that is further substantiated by putative behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological mechanisms. As obesity is considered a modifiable risk factor for exacerbation of migraine, weight loss may be a particularly useful treatment option for people with comorbid migraine and obesity. Behavioral weight loss interventions complement existing behavioral treatments for migraine and offer patients evidence-based effective strategies for achieving weight loss that could help reduce frequency, severity, and impact of migraine attacks.

  10. Migraine.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2017-04-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of migraine, focusing on risk, prevention, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  11. Management considerations in the treatment of migraine in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matarese, Christine A; Mack, Kenneth J

    2010-01-01

    Migraine is common in adolescents. It can significantly reduce quality of life, may contribute to significant school absences, and disrupt social activities. This article will address the clinical presentation, natural history, types, evaluation, diagnosis and prognosis of migraine. Common adolescent lifestyle factors such as stress, irregular mealtimes, and sleep deprivation may exacerbate migraines. Management options are discussed including lifestyle modifications, acute and preventative therapies. Features of chronic daily headache including comorbid conditions, management, and outcome are also addressed. PMID:24600258

  12. Frovatriptan: A Review of Pharmacology, Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Potential in the Treatment of Menstrual Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Balbisi, Ebrahim A

    2006-01-01

    Frovatriptan is an orally active 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonist which binds with high affinity to 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors. Earlier clinical trials demonstrated that frovatriptan 2.5 mg is significantly more effective than placebo in the acute management of migraine and its associated symptoms. More recently, frovatriptan was shown to be effective in the management of menstrual migraine. The incidence of menstrual migraine in subjects receiving frovatriptan 2.5 mg twice daily during the six day perimenstrual period was 41% compared with 67% with placebo. Frovatriptan treatment is generally well tolerated. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dizziness, paresthesia, dry mouth, and fatigue. Pharmacologic studies demonstrated that frovatriptan is cerebroselective. Its selectivity for cerebral vessels lessens the potential for undesirable peripheral effects. Frovatriptan has a terminal deposition half-life of approximately 26 hours, which appears to be independent of age, gender, and renal function. This imparts that frovatriptan may be particularly well suited to patients with prolonged migraines and those who suffer migraine recurrence. Frovatriptan does not alter cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes, as such it is unlikely to affect the metabolism of other drugs. No dosage adjustments are necessary based on age, renal, or mild to moderate hepatic impairment. Apart from its efficacy in the acute management of migraine, frovatriptan is an effective agent when used as either acute therapy or as intermittent prophylaxis therapy of menstrual migraines, particularly in women who do not respond to conventional therapies. PMID:18360605

  13. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... my period. Could they be related to my menstrual cycle? More than half of migraines in women occur ... times of the month as well. How the menstrual cycle and migraine are linked is still unclear. We ...

  14. Episodic migraines in children: limited evidence on preventive pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Rema; Taylor, Frederick R

    2013-10-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review of preventive pharmacological treatments for episodic childhood migraines searching several databases through May 20, 2012. Episodic migraine prevention was examined in 24 publications of randomized controlled trials that enrolled 1578 children in 16 nonrandomized studies. Single randomized controlled trials provided low-strength evidence that propranolol would result in complete cessation of migraine attacks in 713 per 1000 children treated (95% confidence interval, 452-974); trazodone and nimodipine decreased migraine days, while topiramate, divalproex, and clonidine were no more effective than placebo in preventing migraines. Migraine prevention with multidisciplinary drug management was not sustained at 6 months. Divalproex resulted in treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects, and topiramate increased the risk of paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, and weight loss. Long-term preventive benefits and improvement in disability and quality of life are unknown. No studies examined quality of life or provided evidence for individualized treatment decisions.

  15. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Sara M; Gottschalk, Christopher H; Jabbari, Bahman

    2015-07-14

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  16. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Sara M.; Gottschalk, Christopher H.; Jabbari, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques. PMID:26184313

  17. Acute migraine in the Emergency Department: extending European principles of management.

    PubMed

    Martelletti, Paolo; Farinelli, Ivano; Steiner, Timothy J

    2008-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) placed migraine 19th among all causes of disability (12th in women) measured in years of healthy life lost to disability (YLD). The importance of headache disorders, particularly of the primary forms, is established by their distribution worldwide, their duration (the majority being life-long conditions) and their imposition of both disability and life-style restrictions among large numbers of people. For these reasons, headache disorders should represent a public-health priority. In the Emergency Department (ED), as elsewhere, migraine is often under-diagnosed-and under-treated when it is diagnosed. The result is likely to be failure of treatment. Particular attention to diagnosis is needed in ED patients with acute headache, since there is a higher probability of secondary headache due to underlying pathologies. According to European principles of management, acute migraine treatment generally is stepwise. Of the two main steps, the first relies on symptomatic medication, preferably NSAIDs with or without antiemetics. The second step uses specific therapies, usually triptans. Modifications to routine practice are appropriate in the ED. Parenteral administration of symptomatic therapies is a preferred first choice, whilst immediate resort to triptans may be appropriate, and achieve better outcomes, in patients with severe headache and diagnostic confirmation of migraine.

  18. [Use of antiepileptic drugs for the preventive treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junichi

    2009-10-01

    Migraine and epilepsy share several common characteristic clinical features, and epilepsy is a comorbid disorder of migraine. Clinical studies have shown that some antiepileptic drugs are effective for the preventive treatment of migraine. The rationale for the use of these antiepileptic drugs in migraine prophylaxis is the hypothesis that migraine and epilepsy have several common pathophysiological mechanisms. It has been suggested that in these 2 pathological conditions, an imbalance exists between excitatory glutamate-mediated transmission and inhibitory GABA-mediated transmission in cerebral tissues, mainly in specific brain areas. Moreover, it has been postulated that abnormal activation of some kinds of voltage-gated ionic channels has been postulated to have a key role in both migraine and epilepsy, especially when caused by a genetic abnormality. It has been found that cortical spreading depression is involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of epilepsy, in addition to the generation of migraine aura. Preventive antiepileptic drugs can be chosen for treatment after considering clinical efficacy- scientific evidence, side effects, and patients' specific personal conditions. Recently, scientific evidence was found to demonstrate efficacy of valproic acid and topiramate in the preventive treatment of migraine. These drugs can reduce the incidence of migraine attacks in the large clinical studies. Other new antiepileptic drugs can be tried in future clinical study.

  19. Treatment of migraine attacks with an analgesic combination (Mersyndol).

    PubMed

    Somerville, B W

    1976-06-05

    The relief of acute migraine attacks with an analgesic/antihistamine combination containing paracetamol, codeine phosphate, doxylamine succinate and caffeine (Mersyndol) compared with that achieved with a placebo has been studied in a double-blind, crossover trial. Mersyndol emerged as significantly better than placebo in the complete relief of migraine pain, and was clearly superior to placebo in partially relieving the pain of migraine. These results suggest that it could be a useful alternative to ergotamine, and a comparative trial with ergotamine is suggested. Side effects with this combination were fairly common but mild, and consisted mainly of drowsiness caused by the antihistamine component.

  20. Opioid Treatment of Migraine: Risk Factors and Behavioral Issues.

    PubMed

    Stone, Melissa T; Weed, Valerie; Kulich, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Migraine can impact every aspect of a person's functioning. Psychological comorbidities, cognitive constructs, and behavioral responses to pain greatly impact the perception of migraine pain, treatment efficacy and outcome, and overall quality of life and functioning. Current considerations for migraine treatment emphasize the utility of the biopsychosocial model in understanding and treating migraine, noting both the importance of addressing psychological factors such as cognitive beliefs as well as psychiatric comorbidities. The guidelines for migraine treatment implicate opioid therapy as a second or third tier treatment. Guidelines and recommendations for the safe use of opioid medications among patients with chronic pain emphasize the importance of screening prior to prescribing opioid medications. Chronic opioid therapy has been shown to further levels of disability, decrease quality of life, and correlate to psychiatric comorbidities, concerns that are already present in migraine patients. While opioid treatment provides an alternative for persons with contraindications for alternative migraine treatments, it is critical that opioids be used sparingly and exclusively in conjunction with comprehensive assessment and integration of psychological treatment.

  1. Migraine with Aura

    MedlinePlus

    Migraine with aura Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Migraine with aura (also called classic migraine) is a headache that strikes after or along ... tingling in your hand or face. Treatments for migraine with aura and migraine without aura (also called ...

  2. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group). All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society); 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician). Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine. PMID:22405186

  3. Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.

    PubMed

    Maghbooli, Mehdi; Golipour, Farhad; Moghimi Esfandabadi, Alireza; Yousefi, Mehran

    2014-03-01

    Frequency and torment caused by migraines direct patients toward a variety of remedies. Few studies to date have proposed ginger derivates for migraine relief. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of ginger in the ablation of common migraine attack in comparison to sumatriptan therapy. In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder or sumatriptan. Time of headache onset, its severity, time interval from headache beginning to taking drug and patient self-estimation about response for five subsequent migraine attacks were recorded by patients. Patients(,) satisfaction from treatment efficacy and their willingness to continue it was also evaluated after 1 month following intervention. Two hours after using either drug, mean headaches severity decreased significantly. Efficacy of ginger powder and sumatriptan was similar. Clinical adverse effects of ginger powder were less than sumatriptan. Patients' satisfaction and willingness to continue did not differ. The effectiveness of ginger powder in the treatment of common migraine attacks is statistically comparable to sumatriptan. Ginger also poses a better side effect profile than sumatriptan.

  4. Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... be triggered by many things. But the exact chain of events remains unclear. Most medical experts believe ... anxiety Migraines can also be triggered by certain foods. Most common are: Chocolate Dairy foods, especially certain ...

  5. Topiramate in migraine progression.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Luigi; Ferrandi, Delfina

    2009-12-01

    Increasing evidence shows that migraine, typically considered as an episodic disease, is a chronic and, in some patients, progressive disorder. Among neuromodulators used for migraine prevention, topiramate has a high level of evidence-based efficacy. Through its wide range of mechanisms of action topiramate increases the activation threshold resulting in neuronal stabilization and thereby reducing cortical neurons hyperexcitability, which is believed to be an important electrophysiological feature underlying the pathogenesis of epilepsy and migraine. Recent studies show that migraineurs have subclinical structural brain changes and persistent alteration of pain perception, in some cases correlated with the duration of the disease and the frequency of attacks that might play a role in the transformation of episodic migraine to chronic forms. An early and prolonged preventive treatment might reduce the risk of such transformation. Recent evidence suggests that topiramate, by reducing migraine frequency and use of acute medication, may prevent the negative progression of migraine. Furthermore, two recently completed multicenter, randomised, placebo-controlled trials have shown that treatment with topiramate 100 mg/day is effective and well tolerated in patients already progressed to chronic migraine and difficult to treat conditions associated with medication-overuse. Topiramate seems to be a preventive treatment, which might be able to act at different levels of the migraine cycle: reduction of frequency in episodic migraine, prevention, and treatment of chronic migraine.

  6. Integrated care for chronic migraine patients: epidemiology, burden, diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Solbach, Kasja; Holle, Dagny; Gaul, Charly

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder, characterised by severe headaches. Epidemiological studies in the USA and Europe have identified a subgroup of migraine patients with chronic migraine. Chronic migraine is defined as ≥15 headache days per month for ≥3 months, in which ≥8 days of the month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura, or respond to treatment specifically for migraine. Chronic migraine is associated with a higher burden of disease, more severe psychiatric comorbidity, greater use of healthcare resources, and higher overall costs than episodic migraine (<15 headache days per month). There is a strong need to improve diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of chronic migraine. Primary care physicians, as well as hospital-based physicians, are integral to the identification and treatment of these patients. The latest epidemiological data, as well as treatment options for chronic migraine patients, are reviewed here.

  7. Well-Established and Empirically Supported Behavioral Treatments for Migraine.

    PubMed

    Penzien, Donald B; Irby, Megan B; Smitherman, Todd A; Rains, Jeanetta C; Houle, Timothy T

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the well-established and empirically supported behavioral interventions for the treatment of migraine. The considerable evidence base addressing behavioral interventions amassed since 1969 has conclusively established the efficacy of therapies featuring combinations of relaxation, biofeedback, and stress management training, and demonstrated they are capable of yielding benefits on par with pharmacological therapies for migraine. Behavioral interventions also are well suited for delivery across a variety of different contexts (e.g., group vs. individual, standard clinic vs. limited therapist contact, face-to-face vs. technology-assisted). Despite the amply established efficacy and effectiveness of these self-management interventions for the treatment of migraine, the availability and implementation of these approaches remain limited for many headache sufferers. We anticipate the technological advances in delivery platforms will provide better access to behavioral self-management strategies for migraine.

  8. [Current approaches to treatment of migraine during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ekusheva, E V; Damulin, I V

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common complaints in the majority of pregnant women. Migraine without aura is the most frequent cause of headache. Improvement of this disease is reported in 50-80% of patient. However, about one third of pregnant women have severe prolonged attacks with marked concomitant symptoms and maladaptation that necessarily need treatment. Authors consider the issues of differential diagnosis and principles of management of these patients.

  9. Use of Common Migraine Treatments in Breast-Feeding Women: A Summary of Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Susan; Marmura, Michael J.; Calhoun, Anne; Lucas, Sylvia; Silberstein, Stephen; Peterlin, B. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast-feeding has important health and emotional benefits for both mother and infant, and should be encouraged. While there are some data to suggest migraine may improve during breast-feeding, more than half of women experience migraine recurrence with 1 month of delivery. Thus, a thorough knowledge base of the safety and recommended use of common acute and preventive migraine drugs during breast-feeding is vital to clinicians treating migraine sufferers. Choice of treatment should take into account the balance of benefit and risk of medication. For some of the medications commonly used during breast-feeding, there is not good evidence about benefits. Methods A list of commonly used migraine medications was agreed upon by the 6 authors, who treat migraine and other headaches on a regular basis and are members of the Women's Special Interest Section of the American Headache Society. Each medication was researched by the first author utilizing widely accepted data sources, such as the American Academy of Pediatrics publication “The Transfer of Drugs and Other Chemicals Into Human Milk; Thomas Hale's manual Medications and Mothers Milk; Briggs, Freeman, and Yaffe's reference book Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation; and the National Library of Medicine's Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed) – a peer-reviewed and fully referenced database available online. Results Many commonly used migraine medications may be compatible with breast-feeding based on expert recommendations. Ibuprofen, diclofenac, and eletriptan are among acute medications with low levels in breast milk, but studies of triptans are limited. Toxicity is a concern with aspirin due to an association with Reye's syndrome; sedation or apnea is a concern with opioids. Finally, preventive medications not recommended include zonisamide, atenolol, and tizanidine. Conclusions Several excellent resources are available for clinicians making treatment decisions in breast-feeding women. Clinicians

  10. Aberrant neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex in children with acute migraine: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinyao; Xiang, Jing; Wang, Yingying; O'Brien, Hope; Kabbouche, Marielle; Horn, Paul; Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Migraine attacks have been shown to interfere with normal function in the brain such as motor or sensory function. However, to date, there has been no clinical neurophysiology study focusing on the motor function in children with migraine during headache attacks. To investigate the motor function in children with migraine, twenty-six children with acute migraine, meeting International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria and age- and gender-matched healthy children were studied using a 275-channel magnetoencephalography system. A finger-tapping paradigm was designed to elicit neuromagnetic activation in the motor cortex. Children with migraine showed significantly prolonged latency of movement-evoked magnetic fields (MEF) during finger movement compared with the controls. The correlation coefficient of MEF latency and age in children with migraine was significantly different from that in healthy controls. The spectral power of high gamma (65-150 Hz) oscillations during finger movement in the primary motor cortex is also significantly higher in children with migraine than in controls. The alteration of responding latency and aberrant high gamma oscillations suggest that the developmental trajectory of motor function in children with migraine is impaired during migraine attacks and/or developmentally delayed. This finding indicates that childhood migraine may affect the development of brain function and result in long-term problems.

  11. Aspirin with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kirthi, Varo; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 10 March 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using aspirin to treat a discrete migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Thirteen studies (4222 participants) compared aspirin 900 mg or 1000 mg, alone or in combination with metoclopramide 10 mg, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 50 mg or 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes, all active treatments were superior to placebo, with NNTs of 8.1, 4.9 and 6.6 for 2-hour pain-free, 2-hour headache relief, and 24-hour headache relief with aspirin alone versus placebo, and 8.8, 3.3 and 6.2 with aspirin plus metoclopramide versus placebo. Sumatriptan 50 mg did not differ from aspirin alone for 2-hour pain-free and headache relief, while sumatriptan 100 mg was better than the combination of aspirin plus metoclopramide for 2-hour pain-free, but not headache relief; there were no data for 24-hour headache relief. Associated symptoms of nausea, vomiting

  12. Efficacy of feverfew as prophylactic treatment of migraine.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E S; Kadam, N P; Hylands, D M; Hylands, P J

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen patients who ate fresh leaves of feverfew daily as prophylaxis against migraine participated in a double blind placebo controlled trial of the herb: eight patients received capsules containing freeze dried feverfew powder and nine placebo. Those who received placebo had a significant increase in the frequency and severity of headache, nausea, and vomiting with the emergence of untoward effects during the early months of treatment. The group given capsules of feverfew showed no change in the frequency or severity of symptoms of migraine. This provides evidence that feverfew taken prophylactically prevents attacks of migraine, and confirmatory studies are now indicated, preferably with a formulation controlled for sesquiterpene lactone content, in migraine sufferers who have never treated themselves with this herb. PMID:3929876

  13. Treatment of Childhood Migraine Using Autogenic Feedback Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labbe, Elise L.

    1984-01-01

    Compared autogenic feedback training with a waiting-list control group as a treatment for children (N=28) with migraine headaches. Children in the treatment condition were significantly improved at the end of treatment and at one-month and six-month follow-up. No improvement was found for the children in the control condition. (BH)

  14. Role of dexamethasone in the prevention of migraine recurrence in the acute care setting: a review.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Christopher; Smalligan, Roger D; Mitchon, Greg; Chua, Matt

    2012-05-01

    Patients with migraine headaches are commonly encountered by clinicians both in the clinic and in the emergency department. Migraines impose a significant financial burden on patients, caregivers, and society. Up to 49% of patients treated acutely for migraine headache will have a recurrence within 72 hours. Recurrence of migraines is dependent on a number of factors, including the choice of abortive agent, age, sex, and initial severity of the migraine. Dexamethasone has been proposed and studied as a medication that may decrease the frequency of such recurrences of migraine headaches in affected patients. Dexamethasone is a corticosteroid that has been proposed to prevent recurrence of migraines through its prevention of neurogenic inflammation. Initial trials, with less-than-ideal methodology, showed large decreases in the number of patients experiencing recurrent migraines. Later randomized controlled trials revealed mixed results, with subsequent meta-analyses showing an overall benefit in the prevention of recurrence of migraines. These meta-analyses suggest that dexamethasone will prevent recurrence in about 10% of patients, although trials that used higher doses of dexamethasone and followed patients for ≥ 72 hours showed a larger benefit. Very few adverse events were reported in the randomized controlled trials following a single dose of dexamethasone. Given the benign side effect profile and wide tolerability to a single high dose of dexamethasone, it appears to be a safe and modestly effective addition to standard migraine abortive therapy for the prevention of migraine recurrence. Dexamethasone should not be used in patients with non-migraine headaches or contraindications to steroids. Further studies should help delineate if dexamethasone can be tailored to specific patient populations and hence enhance its therapeutic effectiveness.

  15. Episodic and chronic migraine headache: breaking down barriers to optimal treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-03-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder that affects an estimated 36 million Americans. Migraine headaches often occur over many years or over an individual's lifetime. By definition, episodic migraine is characterized by headaches that occur on fewer than 15 days per month. According to the recent International Classification of Headache Disorders (third revision) beta diagnostic criteria, chronic migraine is defined as "headaches on at least 15 days per month for at least 3 months, with the features of migraine on at least 8 days per month." However, diagnostic criteria distinguishing episodic from chronic migraine continue to evolve. Persons with episodic migraine can remit, not change, or progress to high-frequency episodic or chronic migraine over time. Chronic migraine is associated with a substantially greater personal and societal burden, more frequent comorbidities, and possibly with persistent and progressive brain abnormalities. Many patients are poorly responsive to, or noncompliant with, conventional preventive therapies. The primary goals of migraine treatment include relieving pain, restoring function, and reducing headache frequency; an additional goal may be preventing progression to chronic migraine. Although all migraineurs require abortive treatment, and all patients with chronic migraine require preventive treatment, there are no definitive guidelines delineating which persons with episodic migraine would benefit from preventive therapy. Five US Food and Drug Association strategies are approved for preventing episodic migraine, but only injections with onabotulinumtoxinA are approved for preventing chronic migraine. Identifying persons who require migraine prophylaxis and selecting and initiating the most appropriate treatment strategy may prevent progression from episodic to chronic migraine and alleviate the pain and suffering associated with frequent migraine.

  16. Exacerbation of migraine attacks during treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bickel, A; Kornhuber, J; Maihöfner, C; Ropohl, A

    2005-11-01

    Abnormal signal transmission in central serotonergic pathways is supposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of migraine and major depression. We report on a patient, who was treated during an episode of depression with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline and developed frequent migraine attacks under this therapeutical regime. Single migraine attacks were treated successfully with triptanes. Although SSRIs may be beneficial for migraine prophylaxis at long term administration, this case suggests that acute administration of SSRIs in migraineurs may include the risk of worsening migraine.

  17. Chronic migraine: current pathophysiologic concepts as targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Bert B

    2009-02-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) affects approximately 4% of the population and exerts a significant degree of disability on its sufferers. Chronic migraine (CM) is a subset of CDH that represents migraine without aura occurring on 15 or more days per month for at least 3 months. Although numerous risk factors are associated with the development of CM, the pathophysiology governing its genesis is largely unknown. The role of neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, as well as disruptions of antinociceptive systems and structures, are implicated in CM and are supported by the fact that treatments targeting these abnormalities are effective.

  18. Vitamin supplementation as possible prophylactic treatment against migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Munvar Miya; Gan, Siew Hua

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common form of headache disorder globally. The etiology of migraine is multifactorial, with genetic components and environmental interactions considered to be the main causal factors. Some researchers postulate that deficits in mitochondrial energy reserves can cause migraine or an increase in homocysteine levels can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, vitamins could play a vital role in migraine prevention. For instance, riboflavin influences mitochondrial dysfunction and prevents migraine. Genes such as flavoenzyme 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), especially the C677T variant, have been associated with elevated plasma levels of homocysteine and migraine with aura. Homocysteine catalyzation requires the presence of vitamins B6, B12, and folic acid, which can decrease the severity of migraine with aura, making these vitamins potentially useful prophylactic agents for treating migraine with aura. Menstrual migraine, on the other hand, is associated with increased prostaglandin (PG) levels in the endometrium, indicating a role for vitamin E, which is an anti-PG. Vitamin C can also be used as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species for treating neurogenic inflammation in migraine patients. This paper reviews possible therapies based on vitamin supplementation for migraine prophylaxis, focusing on migraine with aura and menstrual migraine.

  19. Migraine headaches: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Margaret F; Johnson, Constance J

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the fact that migraines are one of the major problems seen by primary care providers, almost half of people with migraines do not obtain appropriate diagnosis and/or treatment. Migraine occurs in about 18% of women, and is often aggravated by hormonal shifts occurring around women's menses, during pregnancy, and during perimenopause. Quality of life with migraines is often greatly diminished, and many women miss work days and/or are less productive with migraines. Women's health care providers are very likely to see women with poorly managed migraines, but are often not comfortable diagnosing and treating their patients with headaches. A variety of self-care treatments, acute care prescription and non-prescription headache medications, and preventive medications are available and if used by a knowledgeable provider can provide relief for many women who might not otherwise receive appropriate care.

  20. [What benefits does the preventive treatment of migraine have?].

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rosich, Patricia

    2014-03-10

    The preventive treatment of migraine is under-used. Moreover, treatment compliance and persistence rates are low. Yet, it is crucial to be able to control the frequency, intensity and duration of the attacks of migraine, which enables patients to resort to painkillers less often. All this plays a key role in improving the associated quality of life and disability. It is important to have a clear idea of the goals of preventive treatment, as well as the indications for starting it, its ideal duration and compliance. Enhancing and completing the knowledge we have about preventive treatment will probably improve its prescription and provide tools that allow an increase in patient compliance to be achieved.

  1. Increase in migraine diagnoses and guideline-concordant treatment in veterans, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Altalib, H H; Fenton, B T; Sico, J; Goulet, J L; Bathulapalli, H; Mohammad, A; Kulas, J; Driscoll, M; Dziura, J; Mattocks, K; Kerns, R; Brandt, C; Haskell, S

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Health administrators, policy makers, and educators have attempted to increase guideline adherence of migraine medications while reducing inappropriate use of opioid- and barbiturate-containing medications. We evaluated the burden of migraine and proportion of guideline-concordant care in a large, national health care system over time. Methods We conducted a time-series study using data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record. Veterans with migraines were identified by ICD-9 code (346.X). Prescriptions and comorbid conditions were evaluated before and after migraine diagnosis. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed. Results A total of 57,064 veterans were diagnosed with migraine headache (5.3%), with women significantly more likely diagnosed (11.6% vs. 4.4%, p < 0.0001). The number of veterans diagnosed with migraine has significantly increased over the years. By 2012, triptans were prescribed to 43% of people with migraine, with no difference by gender. However, triptan prescriptions increased from 2004 to 2012 in men, but not women, veterans. Preventive medicines showed a significant increase with the year of migraine diagnosis, after controlling for age, sex, race, and for comorbidities treated with medications used for migraine prevention. Conclusions The burden of migraines is increasing within the VHA, with a corresponding increase in the delivery of guideline-concordant acute and prophylactic migraine-specific medication.

  2. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  3. Chronic migraine: a therapeutic challenge for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Pablo; Carmona-Abellán, Mar; Martínez-Vila, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    Chronic migraine is a common disabling condition. Severe migraine attacks should be treated with triptans, but these agents are contraindicated in patients with vascular problems and may not be effective or tolerated in around one third of the patients. New acute migraine therapies without vasoconstrictive activity and triptan-specific side effects are emerging. For the prophylaxis of chronic migraine, only topiramate and OnabotulinumtoxinA have been shown to be effective in placebo-controlled randomized trials, so novel therapeutic strategies are needed. The growing understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic migraine will contribute to the identification of new treatment targets.

  4. Ibuprofen with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rabbie, Roy; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers do not seek professional help, relying instead on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce symptoms commonly associated with migraine headaches. Objectives To determine efficacy and tolerability of ibuprofen, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 22 April 2010. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered ibuprofen to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and number needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or other active treatment. Main results Nine studies (4373 participants, 5223 attacks) compared ibuprofen with placebo or other active comparators; none combined ibuprofen with a self-administered antiemetic. All studies treated attacks with single doses of medication. For ibuprofen 400 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (26% versus 12% with placebo), 2-hour headache relief (57% versus 25%) and 24-hour sustained headache relief (45% versus 19%) were 7.2, 3.2 and 4.0, respectively. For ibuprofen 200 mg versus placebo, NNTs for 2-hour pain-free (20% versus 10%) and 2-hour headache relief (52% versus 37%) were 9.7 and 6.3, respectively. The higher dose was significantly better for 2-hour headache relief than the lower dose. Soluble formulations of ibuprofen 400 mg were better than standard tablets for 1-hour, but not 2-hour headache relief

  5. High Frequency Migraine Is Associated with Lower Acute Pain Sensitivity and Abnormal Insula Activity Related to Migraine Pain Intensity, Attack Frequency, and Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vani A.; Moayedi, Massieh; Keaser, Michael L.; Khan, Shariq A.; Hubbard, Catherine S.; Goyal, Madhav; Seminowicz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a pain disorder associated with abnormal brain structure and function, yet the effect of migraine on acute pain processing remains unclear. It also remains unclear whether altered pain-related brain responses and related structural changes are associated with clinical migraine characteristics. Using fMRI and three levels of thermal stimuli (non-painful, mildly painful, and moderately painful), we compared whole-brain activity between 14 migraine patients and 14 matched controls. Although, there were no significant differences in pain thresholds nor in pre-scan pain ratings to mildly painful thermal stimuli, patients did have aberrant suprathreshold nociceptive processing. Brain imaging showed that, compared to controls, patients had reduced activity in pain modulatory regions including left dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and middle temporal cortices and, at a lower-threshold, greater activation in the right mid-insula to moderate pain vs. mild pain. We also found that pain-related activity in the insula was associated with clinical variables in patients, including associations between: bilateral anterior insula and pain catastrophizing (PCS); bilateral anterior insula and contralateral posterior insula and migraine pain intensity; and bilateral posterior insula and migraine frequency at a lower-threshold. PCS and migraine pain intensity were also negatively associated with activity in midline regions including posterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortices. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed a negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (a measure of white matter integrity; FA) and migraine duration in the right mid-insula and a positive correlation between left mid-insula FA and PCS. In sum, while patients showed lower sensitivity to acute noxious stimuli, the neuroimaging findings suggest enhanced nociceptive processing and significantly disrupted modulatory networks, particularly involving the insula, associated with indices

  6. Sumatriptan (oral route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of oral sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using oral sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Sixty-one studies (37,250 participants) compared oral sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 50 mg and 100 mg doses. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 50 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 6.1, 7.5, and 4.0 for pain-free at two hours and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively. NNTs for sustained pain-free and sustained headache relief during the 24 hours postdose were 9.5 and 6.0, respectively. For sumatriptan 100 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 4.7, 6.8, 3.5, 6.5, and 5.2, respectively, for the same outcomes. Results for the 25 mg dose were similar to the 50 mg dose, while sumatriptan 100 mg was significantly better than 50 mg for pain-free and headache relief at two hours, and for sustained pain-free during 24 hours. Treating early, during

  7. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with OnabotulinumtoxinA: Mode of Action, Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Szok, Délia; Csáti, Anett; Vécsei, László; Tajti, János

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic migraine is a common, highly disabling, underdiagnosed and undertreated entity of migraine. It affects 0.9%–2.2% of the general adult population. The present paper overviews the preclinical and clinical data regarding the therapeutic effect of onabotulinumtoxinA in chronic migraineurs. Methods: A literature search was conducted in the database of PubMed up to 20 May 2015 for articles related to the pathomechanism of chronic migraine, the mode of action, and the efficacy, safety and tolerability of onabotulinumtoxinA for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. Results: The pathomechanism of chronic migraine has not been fully elucidated. The mode of action of onabotulinumtoxinA in the treatment of chronic migraine is suggested to be related to the inhibition of the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in the trigeminovascular system. Randomized clinical trials demonstrated that long-term onabotulinumtoxinA fixed-site and fixed-dose (155–195 U) intramuscular injection therapy was effective and well tolerated for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. Conclusions: Chronic migraine is a highly devastating entity of migraine. Its exact pathomechanism is unrevealed. Two-third of chronic migraineurs do not receive proper preventive medication. Recent clinical studies revealed that onabotulinumtoxinA was an efficacious and safe treatment for chronic migraine. PMID:26193319

  8. Eletriptan in the management of acute migraine: an update on the evidence for efficacy, safety, and consistent response

    PubMed Central

    Capi, Matilde; Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; de Andrés, Fernando; Gentile, Giovanna; Negro, Andrea; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a multifactorial, neurological and disabling disorder, also characterized by several autonomic symptoms. Triptans, selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonists, are the first-line treatment option for moderate-to-severe headache attacks. In this paper, we review the recent data on eletriptan clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and potential clinically relevant interactions with other drugs. Among triptans, eletriptan shows a consistent and significant clinical efficacy and a good tolerability profile in the treatment of migraine, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors without coronary artery disease. It shows the most favorable clinical response, together with sumatriptan injections, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan. Additionally, eletriptan shows the most complex pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile compared with the other triptans. It is metabolized primarily by the CYP3A4 hepatic enzyme and therefore the concomitant administration of CYP3A4-potent inhibitors should be carefully evaluated. A relatively low risk of serotonin syndrome is given by the co-administration with serotoninergic drugs. No clinically relevant interaction has been found with drugs used for migraine prophylactic treatment or other acute drugs, with the exception of ergot derivatives that should not be co-administered with eletriptan. PMID:27582896

  9. Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults

    PubMed Central

    Holland, S.; Silberstein, S.D.; Freitag, F.; Dodick, D.W.; Argoff, C.; Ashman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for the preventive treatment of migraine headache. The clinical question addressed was: Are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or other complementary treatments effective for migraine prevention? Methods: The authors analyzed published studies from June 1999 to May 2009 using a structured review process to classify the evidence relative to the efficacy of various medications for migraine prevention. Results: The author panel reviewed 284 abstracts, which ultimately yielded 49 Class I or Class II articles on migraine prevention; of these 49, 15 were classified as involving nontraditional therapies, NSAIDs, and other complementary therapies that are reviewed herein. Recommendations: Petasites (butterbur) is effective for migraine prevention and should be offered to patients with migraine to reduce the frequency and severity of migraine attacks (Level A). Fenoprofen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, naproxen sodium, MIG-99 (feverfew), magnesium, riboflavin, and subcutaneous histamine are probably effective for migraine prevention (Level B). Treatments considered possibly effective are cyproheptadine, Co-Q10, estrogen, mefenamic acid, and flurbiprofen (Level C). Data are conflicting or inadequate to support or refute use of aspirin, indomethacin, omega-3, or hyperbaric oxygen for migraine prevention. Montelukast is established as probably ineffective for migraine prevention (Level B). PMID:22529203

  10. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Domenico; Tepper, Stewart J

    2008-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence. PMID:19337456

  11. Migraine in the era of precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lv-Ming; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder in the neurologic clinics whose mechanisms have been explored for several years. The aura has been considered to be attributed to cortical spreading depression (CSD) and dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system is the key factor that has been considered in the pathogenesis of migraine pain. Moreover, three genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A) have come from studies performed in individuals with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), a monogenic form of migraine with aura. Therapies targeting on the neuropeptids and genes may be helpful in the precision medicine of migraineurs. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated efficacy in the acute specific treatment of migraine attacks. Therefore, ongoing and future efforts to find new vulnerabilities of migraine, unravel the complexity of drug therapy, and perform biomarker-driven clinical trials are necessary to improve outcomes for patients with migraine. PMID:27127758

  12. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J

    2014-03-24

    Chronic migraine is a disabling neurologic condition that affects 2% of the general population. Patients with chronic migraine have headaches on at least 15 days a month, with at least eight days a month on which their headaches and associated symptoms meet diagnostic criteria for migraine. Chronic migraine places an enormous burden on patients owing to frequent headaches; hypersensitivity to visual, auditory, and olfactory stimuli; nausea; and vomiting. It also affects society through direct and indirect medical costs. Chronic migraine typically develops after a slow increase in headache frequency over months to years. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of transforming to chronic migraine. The diagnosis requires a carefully performed patient interview and neurologic examination, sometimes combined with additional diagnostic tests, to differentiate chronic migraine from secondary headache disorders and other primary chronic headaches of long duration. Treatment takes a multifaceted approach that may include risk factor modification, avoidance of migraine triggers, drug and non-drug based prophylaxis, and abortive migraine treatment, the frequency of which is limited to avoid drug overuse. This article provides an overview of current knowledge regarding chronic migraine, including epidemiology, risk factors for its development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and guidelines. The future of chronic migraine treatment and research is also discussed.

  13. Diagnosis and management of migraines and migraine variants.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Tomia Palmer

    2015-06-01

    Migraine headache is a neurologic disorder that occurs in 18% of women and 6% of men. Adults and children with mild to moderate migraine headaches seeking acute therapy should be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the efficacy, cost, and decreased side effects. Some children and adults require preventive therapy (those with headaches lasting >12 h, those patients with >4 headaches in 1 month, those with headaches that affect their ability to function). Studies have shown that early treatment with large doses of medication work well for the treatment of moderate to severe migraine headache.

  14. Early Diagnosis and Management of Acute Vertigo from Vestibular Migraine and Ménière's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry; Kaski, Diego; Lopez-Escamez, Jose Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular migraine is the most common cause of acute episodic vestibular symptoms after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In contrast, Ménière's disease is an uncommon disorder. For both conditions, early and accurate diagnosis (or its exclusion) enables the correct management of patients with acute episodic vestibular symptoms. Long-term management of migraine requires changes in lifestyle to avoid triggers of migraine and/or prophylactic drugs if attacks become too frequent. The long-term management of Ménière's disease also involves lifestyle changes (low salt diet), medications (betahistine, steroids), and ablative therapy applied to the diseased ear (eg, intratympanic gentamicin).

  15. The Role of Home Practice in the Thermal Biofeedback Treatment of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Janel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined role of home practice of hand warming in thermal biofeedback treatment of migraine headache. Seventeen female migraine sufferers were assigned to thermal biofeedback with or without regular home practice. Subjects on home practice group experienced decreases in headache activity and medication intake that were both statistically and…

  16. Symptomatic or prophylactic treatment of weekend migraine: an open-label, nonrandomized, comparison study of frovatriptan versus naproxen sodium versus no therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guidotti, Mario; Barrilà, Caterina; Leva, Serena; De Piazza, Claudio; Omboni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background Migraine often occurs during weekends. The efficacy of frovatriptan, naproxen sodium, or no therapy for the acute or prophylactic treatment of weekend migraineurs was tested in an open-label, nonrandomized pilot study. Methods Twenty-eight subjects (mean age 36 ± 12 years, including 18 females) suffering from migraine without aura were followed up for six consecutive weekends. No treatment was administered during the first two weekends. On the third and fourth weekends, patients were given frovatriptan 2.5 mg and on the fifth and sixth weekends naproxen sodium 500 mg. Treatment was taken on Saturday and Sunday morning, regardless of the occurrence of migraine. Efficacy was evaluated through a diary, where patients reported the severity of migraine on a scale from 0 (no migraine) to 10 (severe migraine) and use of rescue medication. Results The migraine severity score was significantly lower with frovatriptan (4.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8–5.9]) than with naproxen sodium (5.7 [CI 5.1–6.4], P< 0.05 versus frovatriptan) or no therapy (6.6 [6.2–7.0], P< 0.01 versus frovatriptan). The difference in favor of frovatriptan was more striking in patients not taking rescue medication (frovatriptan, 1.9 [1.5–2.3]) versus naproxen sodium 3.6 [3.0–4.2], P< 0.001) and versus no therapy (5.1 [4.4–5.8], P< 0.001) and on the second day of treatment. The rate of use of rescue medication was significantly (P< 0.05) lower on frovatriptan (12.5%) than on naproxen sodium (31.3%) or no therapy (56.3%). Conclusion This pilot study provides the first evidence of the efficacy of a second-generation triptan as symptomatic or prophylactic treatment for weekend migraine. PMID:23355779

  17. Vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2015-04-01

    Vestibular migraine is now considered a distinct diagnostic entity by both the Barany Society and the International Headache Society. The recognition of vestibular migraine as a diagnostic entity required decades and was presaged by several reports indicating that a large proportion of patients with migraine headaches have vestibular symptoms and that a large proportion of patients with undiagnosed episodic vestibular symptoms have migraine headache. Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, challenges to diagnosis include variability in terms of the character of dizziness, the presence or absence of clearly defined attacks, the duration of attacks, and the temporal association between headache or other migrainous features and vestibular symptoms. Also, symptoms of vestibular migraine often overlap with symptoms of other causes of dizziness, especially Ménière's disease and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). This article will discuss the demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, physical examination findings, laboratory testing, comorbidities, treatment options, and pathophysiology of vestibular migraine. Future research in the field of vestibular migraine should include both clinical and basic science efforts to better understand the pathophysiology of this condition. Controlled treatment trials for vestibular migraine are desperately needed.

  18. Chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Valade, D

    2013-05-01

    The second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders revised in 2006 (ICHD-2R) gives a definition which requires 15 or more headache days per month over the past 3months with at least eight headache days per month that meet criteria for migraine without aura or that responds to migraine specific treatment. Approximately 2% of the global population suffers of chronic migraine (CM). Frequency of headache and degree of disability distinguish CM from episodic migraine (EM). There is a high frequency of medication overuse. The treatment depends on evaluation with education, lifestyle modifications, and trigger management, behavioral and pharmacologic therapies.

  19. Assessing and Managing All Aspects of Migraine: Migraine Attacks, Migraine-Related Functional Impairment, Common Comorbidities, and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Buse, Dawn C.; Rupnow, Marcia F. T.; Lipton, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine can be characterized as a chronic disorder with episodic attacks and the potential for progression to chronic migraine. We conducted a PubMed literature search (January 1, 1970 through May 31, 2008) for studies on the impact of migraine, including disability, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), comorbidities, and instruments used by health care professionals to treat patients with migraine. Numerous studies have shown that migraine substantially impairs a person's functions during attacks and diminishes HRQoL during and between attacks. Despite its impact, migraine remains underestimated, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Several tools are available to help physicians assess the impact of migraine on the daily activities and HRQoL of their patients, such as the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey and the Headache Impact Test. Improving communication during the office visit through active listening, use of open-ended questions, and use of the “ask-tell-ask” strategy can also help in assessing migraine-related impairment. Together, these tools and communication techniques can lead to a more complete assessment of how migraine affects patients' lives and can aid in the development of the optimal treatment plan for each patient. Both pharmacotherapy (acute and preventive treatment strategies) and nonpharmacological therapies play important roles in the management of migraine. PMID:19411439

  20. Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    AKDAL, Gülden

    2013-01-01

    The co-occurrence between migraine and vertigo has been noticed for a long time ago. In recent years, however, growing numbers of epidemiological and clinical studies have definitely shown the significant relation between these two diseases. Recently, the term “vestibular migraine” is used commonly in studies. Vestibular migraine has taken place in appendix in the latest International Headache Society Classification. In this review, epidemiology, clinical features, diagnostic criteria and treatment of vesti-bular migraine will be discussed.

  1. [Chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Holle, D; Müller, D; Nägel, S; Rabe, K

    2013-12-01

    The classification of the International Headache Society (IHS) generally differentiates episodic from chronic headache. Chronic migraine is defined as headache on 15 and more days a month over more than 3 months and headache on 8 days or more fulfils the criteria for migraine or were triptan/ergot-responsive when thought to be migrainous in early stages of the attack. The prevalence of chronic migraine is estimated at 2-4 %. The quality of life is highly compromised in this condition and comorbidities are much more frequent compared to episodic migraine. Data from prospective randomized studies are scarce as most patients with chronic migraine were excluded from previous trials and only few studies were conducted for this condition. The efficacy for prophylactic treatment compared with placebo is proven for topiramate and onabotulinum toxin A.

  2. Onabotulinum toxin A (Botox) for chronic migraine treatment: an Italian experience.

    PubMed

    Grazzi, L; Usai, S

    2015-05-01

    Chronic migraine is a common and debilitating headache syndrome. Botulinum neurotoxin, a potent toxin produced by the anaerobic bacterium clostridium botulinum, used largely for treatment of disorders associated with increased muscle tone and hyperhidrosis, is used for patients suffering from chronic migraine. In this study, a group of patients suffering from chronic migraine with medication overuse was treated with onabotulinum toxin A (Botox) to verify its efficacy for chronic migraine. The results confirmed the efficacy of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox) when used at the dosage of 155 UI according to the PREEMPT protocol. Although these results are preliminary, they led to intense efforts to evaluate the analgesic properties of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox) and to assess its use in clinical practice, in particular in migraine field.

  3. Migraine management: How do the adult and paediatric migraines differ?

    PubMed Central

    Sonal Sekhar, M.; Sasidharan, Shalini; Joseph, Siby; Kumar, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is one of the common causes of severe and recurring headache. It may be difficult to manage in primary care settings, where it is under diagnosed and medically treated. Migraine can occur in children as well as in adults and it is three times more common in women than in men. Migraine in children is different from adults in various ways. Migraine management depends on the various factors like duration and severity of pain, associated symptoms, degree of disability, and initial response to treatment. The therapy of children and adolescents with migraines includes treatment modalities for acute attacks, prophylactic medications when the attacks are frequent, and biobehavioural modes of treatment to aid long-term management of the disorder. The long lasting outcome of childhood headaches and progression into adult headaches remains largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that adult migraine may represent a progressive disorder. In children, the progressive nature is uncertain and further investigations into longitudinal outcome and phenotypic changes in childhood headaches have yet to be recognized. Even though paediatric and adult migraines seem to be slightly different from one another, but not enough to categorize either as sole. PMID:23960771

  4. The Role of 5-Hydroxytryptamine in the Pathophysiology of Migraine and its Relevance to the Design of Novel Treatments.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; VanDenBrink, Antoinette Maassen

    2016-07-28

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder. Of the many factors that have been implicated over the years, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Certainly, some lines of evidence suggest: (i) a 5-HT depletion from blood platelets resulting in cranial extracerebral vasodilatation; and (ii) the effectiveness of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5 HT to abort migraine in some patients. More direct evidence comes from some drugs that influence 5-HT release and/or interact (as agonists or antagonists) with 5-HT receptors to treat this disorder. Indeed, the development of sumatriptan and second generation triptans in the 1990's led to discover that these drugs produce selective cranial extracerebral vasoconstriction (via 5 HT1B receptors) and inhibition of the trigeminovascular system responses implicated in migraine (via 5 HT1D/5 HT1F receptors). Although the triptans represent the current mainstay of acute antimigraine treatment, a number of patients do not respond well to the triptans and are contraindicated in patients with cardiovascular pathologies. This mini-review outlines further developments in the design of novel (non-vasoconstrictor) antimigraine treatments acting via 5-HT receptors, including selective agonists at 5 HT1D and 5-HT1F receptors, agonists at 5-HT1B/1D receptors combined with other properties as well as antagonists at 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3 and 5 HT7 receptors. It also touches upon the recent development of antagonists and antibodies at calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptors, which produce a direct blockade of the CGRPergic vasodilator mechanisms involved in migraine. These alternative pharmacological approaches will hopefully lead to less side effects.

  5. Migraine Headache Treatment & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches. Multiple Choice Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A,B, and C A,B,C and D True/False Migraines sometimes runs in families. True/False A bad headache is usually a sign of a brain tumor. Answer Key False . In most cases of ...

  6. TEV-48125 for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dodick, David W.; Krymchantowski, Abouch V.; VanderPluym, Juliana H.; Tepper, Stewart J.; Aycardi, Ernesto; Loupe, Pippa S.; Ma, Yuju; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the onset of efficacy of TEV-48125, a monoclonal antibody against calcitonin gene-related peptide, recently shown to be effective for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine (CM) and high-frequency episodic migraine. Methods: A randomized placebo-controlled study tested once-monthly injections of TEV-48125 675/225 mg or 900 mg vs placebo. Headache information was captured daily using an electronic headache diary. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in the number of headache hours in month 3. Herein, we assess the efficacy of each dose at earlier time points. Results: The sample consisted of 261 patients. For headache hours, the 675/225-mg dose separated from placebo on day 7 and the 900-mg dose separated from placebo after 3 days of therapy (p = 0.048 and p = 0.033, respectively). For both the 675/225-mg and 900-mg doses, the improvement was sustained through the second (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001) and third (p = 0.025 and p < 0.001) weeks of therapy and throughout the study (month 3, p = 0.0386 and p = 0.0057). For change in weekly headache days of at least moderate intensity, both doses were superior to placebo at week 2 (p = 0.031 and p = 0.005). Conclusions: TEV-48125 demonstrated a significant improvement within 1 week of therapy initiation in patients with CM. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, TEV-48125 significantly decreases the number of headache hours within 3 to 7 days of injection. PMID:27281531

  7. [Recommendations guide for the treatment of migraine in the clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Láinez, J M; Castillo, J; González, V M; Otero, M; Mateos, V; Leira, R; Pascual, J

    2007-04-01

    Migraine is the most frequent neurological reason for consultation. The differences regarding health care system, type of professional seeing these patients and therapeutic armamentarium available in the different countries are important, which makes it very recommendable to have an action guide that reflects the local clinical practice. Following the year 2005 WHO recommendations in its "Global Campaign" against migraine, the coordinators of the Headache Study Groups of the Spanish Society of Neurology, the Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine, the Spanish Society of Rural and General Medicine, the Spanish Society of General Medicine and the Global Campaign decided to jointly make this guide. To do so, they made a search in MEDLINE, using the terms "migraine", "migraine treatment" and "headache guidelines" and "migraine guidelines". The most relevant articles were analyzed, including the references that we considered to be of interest. Furthermore, we reviewed the most important textbooks on headache and migraine. In this paper, we detail the recommendations agreed on, according to the evidence grade, on symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine.

  8. Treatment of Pediatric Migraine in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared to adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. This paper reviews what is known about pediatric migraineurs who present to the emergency room and how they are currently managed, then goes on to summarize the best evidence currently available to guide clinical decision making. PMID:22964436

  9. Characterization of a novel model of chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; McGuire, Brenna; Tarash, Igal; Evans, Christopher J; Charles, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling condition that affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. The development of novel migraine treatments has been slow, in part as a result of a lack of predicative animal models. We have developed a new model of chronic migraine involving the use of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known migraine trigger in humans. Chronic intermittent administration of NTG to mice resulted in acute mechanical hyperalgesia with each exposure as well as a progressive and sustained basal hyperalgesia. This chronic basal hyperalgesia occurred in a dose-dependent fashion and persisted for days after cessation of NTG administration. NTG-evoked hyperalgesia was exacerbated by the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil, also a human migraine trigger, consistent with nitric oxide as a primary mediator of this hyperalgesia. The acute but not the chronic basal hyperalgesia was significantly reduced by the acute migraine therapy sumatriptan, whereas both the acute and chronic hyperalgesia was significantly attenuated by the migraine preventive therapy topiramate. Chronic NTG-induced hyperalgesia is a mouse model that may be useful for the study of mechanisms underlying progression of migraine from an episodic to a chronic disorder, and for the identification and characterization of novel acute and preventive migraine therapies.

  10. Development and validation of a pharmacy migraine questionnaire to assess suitability for treatment with a triptan.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dowson, Andrew; Whicker, Susan; Bacon, Teresa

    2008-12-01

    A questionnaire (Migraine Questionnaire; MQ) was developed to help pharmacists identify consumers with migraine suitable for non-prescription treatment with a triptan. Adults, who knew or thought that they had migraine, participated in three, sequential, community-based studies to validate the MQ. Overall, 1,353 subjects completed independent assessments with a pharmacist and a clinician (reference standard). The accuracy of the pharmacist assessment of suitability for a triptan was compared with the clinician assessment. Clinicians using their standard practice determined that triptan therapy was suitable in 76.8% of cases compared with 48.8% for pharmacists using the MQ. The lack of concordance between pharmacists and clinicians in the false-positive cases (n = 113 of 660 subjects considered suitable for triptan by the pharmacists) usually related to headache diagnosis (57.5%), not safety aspects. The MQ is an effective tool for pharmacists to guide appropriate recommendation of a non-prescription triptan for migraine.

  11. Migraine Preventive Treatment and Its Influence on the Change in Therapeutic Intensity with Disease-Specific Abortive Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-09

    the headache allowing a return to normal function. Despite availability of effective abortive medication, several problems with this treatment have...Working Title: MIGRAINE PREVENTIVE TREATMENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE CHANGE IN THERAPEUTIC INTENSITY WITH DISEASE-SPECIFIC ABORTIVE AGENTS ABSTRACT...Objective: To (1) examine prescribing patterns of migraine-specific abortive medication among new users and non-users of migraine preventive therapy

  12. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe they prevent people from being able to work or go about their daily activities. NINDS has helped to uncover why, when the level of a certain brain molecule goes up, migraine pain increases. Clinical trials are currently studying how to block the molecule and thus reduce ...

  13. Combination monoamine oxidase inhibitor and beta-blocker treatment of migraine, with anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Merikangas, K R; Merikangas, J R

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a study comparing the effectiveness of a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, atenolol, a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAO-I), phenelzine, and the combination in treatment of 61 adults with migraine headache. The goals of the study are (1) to investigate the safety of concomitant treatment of migraine with beta-blockers and phenelzine, (2) to assess whether orthostatic hypertension and other side effects would be relieved, and (3) to compare the results of this open trial of phenelzine to those of a previous study using similar methods. Phenelzine was associated with a large decrease in the frequency and severity of migraine attacks. Anxiety and depression were also reduced by phenelzine both alone, and in combination with a beta-blocker. The results show that the combination of MAO-I's and beta-blockers can be administered safely, and can lead to the reduction in the side effects with either drug alone.

  14. The Impact of Migraine and the Effect of Migraine Treatment on Workplace Productivity in the United States and Suggestions for Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Wayne N.; Landy, Stephen H.; Downs, Kristen E.; Runken, M. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that migraine is associated with decreased productivity. This article describes the results of a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed publications that measured the impact of migraine on workplace productivity in the United States and provides recommendations for future research. A MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1, 1990 to July 31, 2008. Articles were included if the results were from a prospective or retrospective study that reported work-specific productivity outcomes in adults with migraine in the United States. Twenty-six studies were included. Nine studies found that diagnosed and/or undiagnosed migraine had a negative impact on worker productivity. Although one migraine prophylactic study found a statistically significant improvement in worker productivity for topiramate-treated patients, another found an insignificant difference in lisinopril-treated patients. Fifteen studies compared the impact of triptan therapy with a control group. The control groups in these studies differed with regard to recall periods, time to follow-up, and types of questionnaires used. Almost all studies found that triptan therapy was associated with a statistically significant improvement in loss in worker productivity vs the control group. Health care professionals can reduce the impact of migraine on worker productivity with appropriate therapy. Researchers should collect presenteeism and absenteeism data, report results in units of time, use a validated instrument, carefully consider recall periods, and report worker productivity separately. In addition, patients with undiagnosed migraine should be included in disease burden studies. When evaluating effects of treatment on productivity, researchers should target well-controlled, double-blind studies and conduct productivity research for new treatments. PMID:19411440

  15. Migraine attacks in the pharmacy: a gender subanalysis on treatment preferences.

    PubMed

    Brusa, P; Allais, G; Rolando, S; Baratta, F; Giaccone, M; Bussone, G; Allais, R; Benedetto, C

    2015-05-01

    In 2014 our group published the results of a survey conducted in Piedmont, Italy, on the patterns of use and dispensing of drugs in patients requesting assistance from pharmacists for relief of a migraine attack. Epidemiological studies on migraine have consistently shown that migraine is far more common among women than men. This gender difference is also reflected in the higher percentage of women visiting a pharmacy to obtain treatment or advice for headache attacks. In this study, we further explored gender differences in healthcare-seeking behavior and use of migraine medications. The aim of the study was to determine whether women made better selective use of migraine medications and whether visiting a headache center for consultation and treatment reflected awareness of how best to manage their condition. Among the drugs usually taken for relieving head pain, there was no statistically significant difference between men and women in the routine use of NSAIDs (55.6 vs. 51.6 %) or ergot derivatives (8.7 vs. 9.3 %). Statistically significant differences emerged between men and women (27.9 vs. 35.4 %) in the use of triptans (p = 0.003; OR 1.41, 95 % CI 1.12-1.78) and in the use of combined medications (8.5 vs. 12.2 %) (p = 0.029; OR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.04-2.14) but not in the use of simple OTC non-NSAIDs. Less men than women sought professional medical care for managing migraine (65.7 vs. 72.4 %) (p = 0.003; OR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.57-0.89); more women than men sought treatment at a headache center (21.7 vs. 17.4 %) (p = 0.044; OR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.07-1.72).

  16. Comorbidity of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    BIÇAKCI, Şebnem

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder and can be severely disabling during attacks. The highest prevalence occurs between the ages of 25 and 55 years. Prior studies have found that migraine occurs together with other illnesses at a greater coincidental rate than is seen in the general population. These occurrences are called “comorbidities”. To delineate the comorbidities of migraine is important, because it can help improve treatment strategies and the understanding of the possible pathophysiology of migraine.

  17. Are antiepileptic drugs used in the treatment of migraine associated with an increased risk of suicidality?

    PubMed

    Kanner, Andres M

    2011-06-01

    Three antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), valproic acid, gabapentin, and topiramate (TPM), are used frequently in the prophylactic treatment of migraines. In December 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning suggesting that the use of all AEDs is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. This warning has been received by the medical community with great skepticism, and the validity of the findings of the meta-analysis that led to its publication has been questioned because of various methodological problems. Yet, migraine by itself is associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and behavior as well as with an increased risk of psychiatric disorders that facilitate the development of suicidal behavior. Furthermore, TPM has been associated with psychiatric adverse events that potentially could result in suicidal ideation and behavior. In this article, we review data to determine whether the AEDs used in the prevention of migraine are associated with an increased risk of suicidality.

  18. Spectrum of complicated migraine in children: A common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Fields, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Complicated migraine encompasses several individual clinical syndromes of migraine. Such a syndrome in children frequently presents with various neurological symptoms in the Emergency Department. An acute presentation in the absence of headache presents a diagnostic challenge. A delay in diagnosis and treatment may have medicolegal implication. To date, there are no reports of a common clinical profile proposed in making a clinical diagnosis for the complicated migraine. In this clinical review, we propose and describe: (1) A common clinical profile in aid to clinical diagnosis for spectrum of complicated migraine; (2) How it can be used in differentiating complicated migraine from migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and seizure; (3) We discuss the status of complicated migraine in the International Headache Society classification 2013; and (4) In addition, a common treatment strategy for the spectrum of migraine has been described. To diagnose complicated migraine clinically, it is imperative to adhere with the proposed profile. This will optimize the use of investigation and will also avoid a legal implication of delay in their management. The proposed common clinical profile is incongruent with the International Headache Society 2013. Future classification should minimize the dissociation from clinically encountered syndromes and coin a single word to address collectively this subtype of migraine with an acute presentation of a common clinical profile. PMID:25664241

  19. Cost effectiveness of topiramate in the prevention of migraines in the United States: an update.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jeffrey S; Rupnow, Marcia F T; Neumann, Peter; Friedman, Mark; Menzin, Joseph

    2006-12-01

    A previously published decision-analytic model assessing the clinical and economic consequences of topiramate versus no preventive treatment in migraineurs was updated with new published literature and unpublished clinical trial data. The model captured baseline migraine days, treatment discontinuation, treatment response (i.e., > or = 75%, 50%-74%, and < 50% reduction in migraine frequency), hours of disability, cost of preventive therapy, cost of acute treatment (pharmacy and medical service), and wages. Topiramate was associated with 29 fewer migraine-days and 78 fewer hours of disability per year, compared with no preventive treatment. The incremental cost per migraine-day averted for topiramate versus no preventive treatment was dollar 29 when only direct medical costs were considered and dollar 2 when total costs were included. Model results were sensitive to baseline migraine-days, response probability, and probability of an attack being treated with a triptan. Topiramate may be a cost-effective treatment for the prevention of migraine.

  20. Altered periaqueductal gray resting state functional connectivity in migraine and the modulation effect of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengjie; Liu, Mailan; Lan, Lei; Zeng, Fang; Makris, Nikos; Liang, Yilin; Guo, Taipin; Wu, Feng; Gao, Yujie; Dong, Mingkai; Yang, Jie; Li, Ying; Gong, Qiyong; Liang, Fanrong; Kong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to 1) compare resting state functional connectivity (rs-fc) of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key region in the descending pain modulatory system (DPMS) between migraine without aura (MwoA) patients and healthy controls (HC), and 2) investigate how an effective treatment can influence the PAG rs-fc in MwoA patients. One hundred MwoA patients and forty-six matched HC were recruited. Patients were randomized to verum acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and waiting list groups. Resting state fMRI data were collected and seed based functional connectivity analysis was applied. Compared with HC, MwoA patients showed reduced rs-fc between the PAG and rostral anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex (rACC/mPFC), key regions in the DPMS and other pain related brain regions. The reduced rs-fc between the PAG and rACC/mPFC was associated with increased migraine headache intensity at the baseline. After treatments, rs-fc between the PAG and the rACC in MwoA patients significantly increased. The changes of rs-fc among the PAG, rACC and ventral striatum were significantly associated with headache intensity improvement. Impairment of the DPMS is involved in the neural pathophysiology of migraines. Impaired DPMS in migraine patients can be normalized after effective treatment. PMID:26839078

  1. A Narrative Review of Evidence-Based Preventive Options for Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Starling, Amaal J; Vargas, Bert B

    2015-10-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating disorder that affects 2 % of the global population and imparts a significant societal and economic impact. The cornerstones of chronic migraine management include making an accurate diagnosis, patient education, treatment of comorbid conditions, and selection of an appropriate, evidence-based acute and preventive treatment regimen. Although it is common to treat chronic migraine with preventive medications effective for episodic migraine, a number of treatment options exist with specific evidence for effectiveness in chronic migraine. Currently, onabotulinumtoxinA injections are the only FDA-approved preventive treatment for chronic migraine. A number of non-medication treatment options including occipital nerve and supraorbital nerve stimulation have shown promise as effective prevention for patients either unable to tolerate or unable to obtain relief from oral medications, but more research is necessary.

  2. Chronic migraine in women.

    PubMed

    Cady, Roger K

    2014-02-01

    Chronic migraine is a frequent, severely disabling headache that often evolves from EM. Treatment should be individualized with consideration of the patient as a whole person rather than just the headaches. Many options have been used for acute and preventive pharmacologic management, although good scientific and clinical evidence is limited to a few options. Evidence supports the efficacy and tolerability of both topiramate and onabotulinumtoxinA for prevention of CM headaches. However, only onabotulinumtoxinA is approved by the FDA for preventive treatment of CM.

  3. Vertigo as a migraine phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Migraine is a complex disorder with many different manifestations. There has been an increasing interest in the association of migraine and vertigo. Many different terms have been developed to describe this concept, the more popular being vestibular migraine, migrainous vertigo, and migraine-associated vertigo. The most commonly cited diagnostic criteria are that of Neuhauser though this has yet to be included in the International Classification of Headache Disorders (2nd edition). At this time, there is a lack of consensus regarding migraine-related vertigo and its pathomechanism. Regardless, a few randomized controlled prospective studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of various medications. Topiramate has been shown to be effective for migraine-related vertigo. At this time there is no specific treatment for migraine-related dizziness outside of conventional migraine management. The genetics have yet to be fully realized though an autosomal dominant familial migraine vertigo disorder has been identified.

  4. A comparison of outcome of medical and surgical treatment of migraine headache: In 1 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Omranifard, Mahmood; Abdali, Hossein; Ardakani, Mehdi Rasti; Talebianfar, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare the efficacy of the medical treatment versus the surgical treatment approach to decompression of trigger point nerves in patients with migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: Fifty volunteers were randomly assigned to the medical treatment group (n = 25) or the surgical treatment group (n = 25) after examination by the team neurologist to ensure a diagnosis of migraine headache. All patients received botulinum toxin type A to confirm the trigger sites. The surgical treatment group underwent surgical deactivation of the trigger site(s). The medical treatment group underwent prophylactic pharmacologic interventions by the neurologist. Pretreatment and 12-month posttreatment migraine headache frequency, duration, and intensity were analyzed and compared to determine the success of the treatments. Results: Nineteen of the 25 patients (76%) in the surgical treatment group and 10 of the 25 patients (40%) in the medical treatment group experienced a successful outcome (at least a 50% decrease in migraine frequency, duration, or intensity) after 1 year from surgery. Surgical treatment had a significantly higher success rate than medical treatment (P < 0.001). Nine patients (36%) in the surgical treatment group and one patient (4%) in the medical treatment group experienced cessation of migraine headaches. The elimination rate was significantly higher in the surgical treatment group than in the medical treatment group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on the 1-year follow-up data, there is strong evidence that surgical manipulation of one or more migraine trigger sites can successfully eliminate or reduce the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraine headaches in a lasting manner. PMID:27563631

  5. Migraine Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Danys, Irena

    1991-01-01

    While the pathophysiology of recurrent migraine remains elusive, effective treatment for the prevention of attacks is available. Pharmacologic agents are useful adjuncts to a therapeutic approach that includes abundant patient education, rigorous follow up by the treating physician, and a commitment by both patient and physician to work out an individualized solution over time. PMID:21234086

  6. Pediatric migraine variants: a review of epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lagman-Bartolome, Ana Marissa; Lay, Christine

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric migraine variants, previously known as childhood periodic syndromes, migraine equivalents, or migraine precursors, are a group of periodic or paroxysmal disorders occurring in patients who also have migraine with or without aura, or who have an increased likelihood of developing migraine. They have common key clinical features including periodic or paroxysmal character, normal neurological examination between attacks, family history of migraine, and clinical evolution to classic types of migraine. This article aims to review the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of the pediatric migraine variants including abdominal migraine, benign paroxysmal vertigo, cyclic vomiting syndrome, and benign paroxysmal torticollis as well as the episodic syndromes that may lead to migraine, infantile colic, alternating hemiplegia of childhood, and vestibular migraine.

  7. Weight change and clinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk during preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Bigal, M E; Lipton, R B; Biondi, D M; Xiang, J; Hulihan, J

    2009-11-01

    Migraine, particularly migraine with aura, and increased body weight are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The association of weight change and clinical markers of CVD risk was evaluated in subjects participating in a randomized double-blind, parallel-group study of migraine-preventive treatment comparing 100 mg/day of topiramate and amitriptyline. Individuals from both treatment groups were pooled and stratified into three groups. The 'major weight gain' group gained > or = 5% of their baseline body weight at the conclusion of the study; the 'major weight loss' group lost > or = 5% of their baseline body weight. The third group had < 5% of weight change. The influence of weight change in headache outcomes, as well as in markers of CVD (blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein), was assessed using analysis of covariance. Of 331 subjects, 52 (16%) experienced major weight gain and 56 (17%) experienced major weight loss. Weight change was not associated with differential efficacy for the treatment of headache. However, contrasted with those with major weight loss, those who gained weight experienced elevations in mean diastolic blood pressure (+2.5 vs. -1.2 mmHg), heart rate (+7.6 vs. -1.3 beats per minute), glycosylated haemoglobin (+0.09% vs. -0.04%), total cholesterol (+6.4 vs. -6.3 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+7.0 vs. -4.4 mg/dl) and triglycerides (+15.3 vs. -10.4 mg/dl) and an increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (+1.8 vs. -1.9 mg/l). Both groups experienced decreases in systolic blood pressure (-4.0 vs. -1.3 mmHg) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-3.7 vs. -0.8 mg/dl). Increased weight during migraine treatment is not associated with poor headache treatment outcomes, but is associated with deterioration of CVD risk markers.

  8. Molecular factors in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Marta; Prendecki, Michał; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lianeri, Margarita; Dorszewska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects 11% of adults worldwide. This disease most likely has a neurovascular origin. Migraine with aura (MA) and more common form - migraine without aura (MO) – are the two main clinical subtypes of disease. The exact pathomechanism of migraine is still unknown, but it is thought that both genetic and environmental factors are involved in this pathological process. The first genetic studies of migraine were focused on the rare subtype of MA: familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). The genes analysed in familial and sporadic migraine are: MTHFR, KCNK18, HCRTR1, SLC6A4, STX1A, GRIA1 and GRIA3. It is possible that migraine is a multifactorial disease with polygenic influence. Recent studies have shown that the pathomechanisms of migraine involves both factors responsible for immune response and oxidative stress such as: cytokines, tyrosine metabolism, homocysteine; and factors associated with pain transmission and emotions e.g.: serotonin, hypocretin-1, calcitonin gene-related peptide, glutamate. The correlations between genetic variants of the HCRTR1 gene, the polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and hypocretin-1, and serotonin were observed. It is known that serotonin inhibits the activity of hypocretin neurons and may affect the appearance of the aura during migraine attack. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of migraine, including genotype-phenotype correlations, may contribute to finding markers important for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. PMID:27191890

  9. Functional Assessment and Treatment of Migraine Reports and School Absences in an Adolescent with Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvans, Rebecca K.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Psychological interventions for migraines typically include biofeedback training, stress-management training, or relaxation training and are implemented without consideration of environmental variables that might maintain migraines or complaints of migraines. An adolescent with daily reports of migraines that negatively impacted school attendance…

  10. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  11. Migraine madness: recurrent psychosis after migraine.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, G N; Marshall, A; Flint, J; Lewis, S; Wise, R J

    1993-01-01

    A 69 year old man with longstanding migraine with aura had four episodes of psychosis lasting 7-28 days during a 17 year period. During attacks he had formed visual hallucination and delusions, including reduplicative paramnesia. His mother was similarly affected. His EEG showed symmetrical frontal delta waves. The time course and EEG changes are similar to acute confusional migraine. The reduplicative paramnesia suggests a focal non-dominant hemisphere dysfunction. PMID:8482964

  12. Effects of symptomatic treatments on cutaneous hyperalgesia and laser evoked potentials during migraine attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Losito, L; Libro, G; Guido, M; Di Fruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Sciruicchio, V; Lamberti, P; Livrea, P

    2005-05-01

    Previously an amplitude enhancement of laser evoked potentials (LEPs) was detected during migraine attack: we further examined pain threshold to CO2 laser stimuli and LEPs during attacks, evaluating the effect of almotriptan, lysine-acetylsalicylate and placebo treatment on cutaneous hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli delivered by CO2 laser and on LEP components. Eighteen patients suffering from migraine without aura were analysed. They were divided into three groups of six patients each, randomly assigned to lysine acetyl-salicylate, almotriptan or placebo treatments. The supraorbital zones and the dorsum of the hand were stimulated on both the symptomatic and not symptomatic side in all patients. The LEPs were recorded by 25 scalp electrodes. During attacks, the P2 wave was significantly enhanced; the amplitude of the P2 component obtained by the stimulation of the supraorbital zone during the attack on the side of the headache was significantly correlated with the intensity of pain and the frequency of headache. Both almotriptan and lysine acetyl-salicylate significantly reduced the P2 amplitude but they showed no effects on hyperalgesia to laser stimulation; headache relief following therapy was correlated with the reduction of the P2 amplitude. The cortical elaboration of laser-induced experimental pain seemed increased during migraine attack, and the severity of headache was mainly related to the increase of the later LEPs components expressing the attentive and emotive compounds of suffering. Reversion of this process appeared to be primarily responsible for the efficacy of drugs in treating migraine, though both almotriptan and lysine-acetil salicilate seemed to have no effect in reducing sensitization at second and third order nociceptive neurons.

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide targeted immunotherapy for migraine: progress and challenges in treating headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    A role for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the pathophysiology of migraine has been established over the past 25 years. There have now been at least five different small-molecule CGRP antagonists that have demonstrated statistical proof of efficacy in the acute treatment of migraine. At present, multiple clinical trials are underway that are assessing the ability of long-acting antibodies against CGRP to prevent frequent migraine attacks. This review summarizes the existing data concerning the role of CGRP in migraine and attempts to highlight some possible outcomes from the ongoing anti-CGRP antibody trials.

  14. Migraine Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your head, almost like someone stretched a rubber band around it. A migraine is different. Doctors ... provokes a migraine attack. Common migraine triggers include: stress menstruation (periods) skipping meals dehydration too much caffeine ( ...

  15. Migraine - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation -- www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation -- www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  16. [Botulinum neurotoxin--a therapy in migraine].

    PubMed

    Tajti, János; Szok, Délia; Tuka, Bernadett; Csáti, Anett; Kuris, Anikó; Majláth, Zsófia; Lukács, Melinda; Vécsei, László

    2012-03-30

    Although migraine is a common, paroxysmal, highly disabling disorder, the primary cause and the pathomechanism of migraine attacks are enigmatic. Experimental results suggest that activation of the trigeminovascular system is crucial in its pathogenesis. This activation leads to the release of vasoactive neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide - CGRP, and substance P - SP) and to neurogenic inflammation, and peripheral and central sensitisation are expressed. Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A), a potent toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum, affects the nervous system through specific cleavage of the soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor complex (SNARE), like synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The result of this multistage process is blockade of the presynaptic release of pain neurotransmitters such as CGRP, SP and glutamate. A pooled analysis of the data from two programmes of Phase 3 Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy (PREEMPT 1 and 2) with BoNT-A in chronic migraine demonstrated significant benefit of BoNT-A over placebo with regard to the numbers of headache days and migraine episodes. BoNT-A diminished the frequency of acute headache pain medication intake, and resulted in reductions in headache impact and improvements in scores on the Migraine-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire. The treatments with BoNT-A proved safe and were well tolerated.

  17. Polytherapy for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Casucci, G; Villani, V; Cologno, D; D'Onofrio, F

    2012-05-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder with episodic manifestations, progressive in some individuals. Preventive treatment is recommended for patients with frequent or disabling attacks. A sizeable proportion of migraineurs in need of preventive treatment does not significantly benefit from monotherapy. This short review evaluates the role of pharmacological polytherapy in migraine prevention.

  18. Effects of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment on efficacy, depression, anxiety, and disability in Turkish patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Demiryurek, Bekir Enes; Ertem, Devrimsel Harika; Tekin, Atilla; Ceylan, Mustafa; Aras, Yesim Guzey; Gungen, Belma Dogan

    2016-11-01

    Chronic migraine causes a serious labour loss and disability in the society and increases the risk of depression and anxiety by negatively affecting the quality of life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) treatment on efficacy before and after treatment in our cases with chronic migraine as well as on depression, anxiety and disability caused by migraine. According to the International Headache Classification (ICHD-III beta version), 60 adult patients who were diagnosed with chronic migraine were included in the study. A total of 155 IU BoNT-A treatment from 31 regions was administered in accordance with the protocol of PREEMPT study. Information about the characteristics of patients' headaches, background and family history, drugs they used was recorded. At the baseline and in the first and third month after the BoNT-A injection, VAS scores, the number of both headache days and attacks, the headache duration, the frequency of application to emergency services and the intake of both analgesics and triptans during attacks were evaluated. MIDAS, BDI and BAI were evaluated at the baseline and in the third month after the BoNT-A injection. BoNT-A injection provided a significant decrease in the number of days and severity of headaches, MIDAS disability scores and psychiatric complaints in cases with chronic migraine who did not respond to prophylactic treatments in the third month of the treatment.

  19. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  20. A conservative method of testing whether combination analgesics produce additive or synergistic effects using evidence from acute pain and migraine.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Derry, C J; Derry, S; Straube, S; McQuay, H J

    2012-04-01

    Fixed-dose combination analgesics are used widely, and available both on prescription and over-the-counter. Combination drugs should provide more analgesia than with any single drug in the combination, but there is no evidence in humans about whether oral combinations have just additive effects, or are synergistic or even subadditive. We suggest that the measured result for the combination would be the summation of the absolute benefit increase (effect of active drug minus effect of placebo) of each component of a combination if effects were (merely) additive, and greater than the sum of the absolute benefits if they were synergistic. We tested measured effects of combination analgesics against the sum of the absolute benefits in acute pain and migraine using meta-analysis where individual components and combinations were tested against placebo in the same trials, and verified the result with meta-analyses where individual components and combinations were tested against placebo in different trials. Results showed that expected numbers needed to treat (NNT) for additive effects were generally within the 95% confidence interval of measured NNTs. This was true for combinations of paracetamol plus ibuprofen and paracetamol plus opioids in acute pain, and naproxen plus sumatriptan in migraine, but not where efficacy was very low or very high, nor combinations of paracetamol plus dextropropoxyphene. There was no evidence of synergy, defined as supra-additive effects.

  1. Considerations for management of migraine symptoms in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder that affects one in seven US citizens annually. The burden of migraine is substantial, both in economic terms and for individual patients and their close family members. Initial medical consultations for migraine are usually with a primary care physician (PCP), and it is predominantly managed in a primary care setting; therefore, PCPs need a thorough understanding of migraine and the treatment options. This review provides an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, burden, and diagnosis of migraine with a focus on adults. Important aspects of migraine management, such as medication overuse and chronic migraine, are highlighted and insight is provided into factors for consideration when prescribing acute/abortive treatment for migraine to ensure that individual patients receive optimal pharmaceutical management. The effects of associated symptoms, e.g. nausea/vomiting, on treatment efficacy are pertinent in migraine; however, many therapy options, including alternative delivery systems, are available, thus facilitating the selection of optimal treatment for an individual patient.

  2. Greater occipital nerve blocks in the treatment of refractory chronic migraine: An observational report of nine cases

    PubMed Central

    Koçer, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report the effects of greater occipital nerve (GON) blocks on refractory chronic migraine headache. METHODS Nine patients who were receiving the conventionally accepted preventive therapies underwent treatment with repeated GON block to control chronic migraine resistant to other treatments. GON blocking with lidocaine and normal saline mixture was administered by the same physician at hospital once a month (for three times in total). Patients were assessed before the injection and every month thereafter for pain frequency and severity, number of times analgesics were used and any appearant side effects during a 6 mo follow-up. RESULTS Eight of nine patients reported a marked decrease in frequency and severity of migraine attacks in comparison to their baseline symptoms; one reported no significant change (not more than 50%) from baseline and did not accept the second injection. GON block resulted in considerable reduction in pain frequency and severity and need to use analgesics up to three months after the injection in the present cases. The patients did not report any adverse effects. CONCLUSION Hereby we noticed a remarkable success with refractory chronic migraine patients. We believe that this intervention can result in rapid relief of pain with the effects lasting for perhaps several weeks or even months. Further controlled clinical trials are warranted to evaluate the effect of GON block in the treatment of refractory migraine cases. PMID:27803914

  3. Migraine in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aubé, M

    1999-01-01

    Migraine does not increase the risk for complications of pregnancy for the mother or for the fetus: the incidences of toxemia, miscarriages, abnormal labour, congenital anomalies, and stillbirths are comparable to those of the general population. Several retrospective studies have shown a tendency for migraine to improve with pregnancy. Between 60 and 70% of women either go into remission or improve significantly, mainly during the second and third trimesters. Women with migraine onset at menarche and those with perimenstrual migraine are more likely to go into remission during pregnancy. The migraine type does not seem to be a significant prognostic factor for improvement. However, in the small number of women (4-8%) whose migraines worsen with pregnancy, migraine with aura appears to be overrepresented. In a small number of cases (1.3-16.5%), migraine appears to start with pregnancy, often in the first trimester; these headaches involve a higher proportion of migraine with aura. Management of migraine during pregnancy should first focus on avoiding potential triggers. Consideration should also be given to nonpharmacologic therapies. If pharmacologic treatment becomes necessary, acetaminophen and codeine can be used safely as abortive agents; ASA and NSAIDs (ibuprofen, naproxen) can be used as a second choice, but not for long periods of time, and they should be avoided during the last trimester. For treatment of severe attacks of migraine, chlorpromazine, dimenhydrinate, and diphenhydramine can be used; metoclopramide should be restricted to the third trimester. According to the United States FDA risk categories, meperidine and morphine show no evidence of risk in humans but should not be used at the end of the third trimester. In some refractory cases, dexamethasone or prednisone can be considered. Should prophylactic treatment become indicated, the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (e.g., propranolol) can be used.

  4. [Antidepressants in migraine prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Eiichiro

    2009-10-01

    The initiation of a prophylactic treatment for migraine depends on the frequency of migraine attacks and the extent of the function disability associated with these attacks. Antidepressants have good evidence of efficacy in the prophylactic treatment for migraine. In general, among the antidepressants, amitriptyline is the most frequently prescribed by headache specialists. Several clinical trials on this drug have also evidenced the remarkable benefits of amitriptyline in the prophylactic treatment of migraine attack. In evidence-based guidelines developed by Japanese Headache Society and American Neurological Association, it is classified as a Group 1 drugs (effective drug for the prevention of migraine attack). Moreover, these drugs are more useful in cases where there is comorbidity with conditions such as depression. The side-effects of these drugs are sleepiness and dry mouth. Administration of amytriptyline at low dose can reduce the frequency of side effects such as sleepiness.

  5. Acupuncture as prophylaxis for menstrual-related migraine: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Menstrual-related migraine is a common form of migraine affecting >50% of female migraineurs. Acupuncture may be a choice for menstrual-related migraine, when pharmacological prophylaxis is not suitable. However, the efficacy of acupuncture has not been confirmed. We design and perform a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared with naproxen in menstrual-related migraine patients. Methods/Design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. A total of 184 participants will be randomly assigned to two different groups. Participants will receive verum acupuncture and placebo medicine in the treatment group, while participants in the control group will be treated with sham acupuncture and medicine (Naproxen Sustained Release Tablets). All treatments will be given for 3 months (menstrual cycles). The primary outcome measures are the change of migraine days inside the menstrual cycle and the proportion of responders (defined as the proportion of patients with at least a 50% reduction in the number of menstrual migraine days). The secondary outcome measures are the change of migraine days outside the menstrual cycle, duration of migraine attack, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and intake of acute medication. The assessment will be made at baseline (before treatment), 3 months (menstrual cycles), and 4 months (menstrual cycles) after the first acupuncture session. Discussion The results of this trial will be helpful to supply the efficacy of acupuncture for menstrual-related migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57133712 PMID:24195839

  6. The Effects of Exposure to Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in the Treatment of Migraine Headache: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadianinejad, Seyed Ehsan; Babaei, Manuchehr; Nazari, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Findings have indicated that increased usage of mobile phones may be concomitant with higher rate of headache attacks due to the low radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of low RF-EMF on the treatment outcome in migraine patients. Methods This cohort study was performed on 114 migraine patients referred to the Neurology Clinic of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Southwest Iran, from September 2014 to March 2015. Patients with migraine were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire exploring mobile phones, Wi-Fi devices and fixed-line telephone use as RF-EMF sources. After 3 months, we determined patients’ response to treatment. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) tests were carried out to analyze data, using SPSS version 17. Results Out of 114 individuals who participated, 82 (71.9%) were female and 32 (28.1%) cases were male. The number and severity of migraine headaches were correlated significantly with an increased use of mobile phones during day and Wi-Fi per week (p<0.05). The usage of fixed-line telephones had no significant relationship with the study variables (p>0.05). Conclusion It is recommended that the patients with migraine headache limit mobile phone use and instead, use the fixed-line telephone for their daily telecommunications. PMID:28163863

  7. Thin-film optical notch filter spectacle coatings for the treatment of migraine and photophobia.

    PubMed

    Hoggan, Ryan N; Subhash, Amith; Blair, Steve; Digre, Kathleen B; Baggaley, Susan K; Gordon, Jamison; Brennan, K C; Warner, Judith E A; Crum, Alison V; Katz, Bradley J

    2016-06-01

    Previous evidence suggests optical treatments hold promise for treating migraine and photophobia. We designed an optical notch filter, centered at 480nm to reduce direct stimulation of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. We used thin-film technology to integrate the filter into spectacle lenses. Our objective was to determine if an optical notch filter, designed to attenuate activity of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, could reduce headache impact in chronic migraine subjects. For this randomized, double-masked study, our primary endpoint was the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6; GlaxoSmithKline, Brentford, Middlesex, UK). We developed two filters: the therapeutic filter blocked visible light at 480nm; a 620nm filter was designed as a sham. Participants were asked to wear lenses with one of the filters for 2weeks; after 2weeks when no lenses were worn, they wore lenses with the other filter for 2weeks. Of 48 subjects, 37 completed the study. Wearing either the 480 or 620nm lenses resulted in clinically and statistically significant HIT-6 reductions. However, there was no significant difference when comparing overall effect of the 480 and 620nm lenses. Although the 620nm filter was designed as a sham intervention, research published following the trial indicated that melanopsin, the photopigment in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, is bi-stable. This molecular property may explain the unexpected efficacy of the 620nm filter. These preliminary findings indicate that lenses outfitted with a thin-film optical notch filter may be useful in treating chronic migraine.

  8. Early treatment of migraine attacks with triptans: a strategy to enhance outcomes and patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Domenico; Moschiano, Franca; Bussone, Gennaro

    2006-07-01

    Treating migraine attacks early with triptans may be more effective than late triptan administration. However, in published studies, the definition of 'early' varied (in terms of time, pain intensity or presence of allodynia) or was unclear. Therefore, clear clinical indications have not been established. Appropriately designed trials to address this issue remain a priority. Early triptan treatment may also have disadvantages, including inadvertent treatment of tension-type headaches and danger of medication overuse. At present, only those migraineurs with rapid pain worsening, high pain recurrence rate and clinical indications of allodynia should be encouraged to take triptans as quickly as possible. This recommendation implies a requirement for patient education and the need to carefully tailor treatment to individual needs.

  9. Recent Advances in the Understanding of Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population and 10% of patients with migraine suffer from vestibular migraine (VM). However, this condition remains relatively unknown; therefore, it is often underdiagnosed despite the recent adoption of international diagnostic criteria for VM. The diagnosis of VM is based on the symptoms, degree, frequency, and duration of the vestibular episodes, a history of migraine, the temporal association of migraine symptoms with vestibular episodes in at least 50% of cases, and the exclusion of other causes. Physical examination and laboratory findings are usually normal in patients with VM but can be used to rule out other vestibular disorders with similar symptoms. The pathophysiology of VM remains incompletely understood; however, several mechanisms link the trigeminal system, which is activated during migraine attacks, and the vestibular system. Because few controlled trials have specifically investigated VM, the treatment options for this order are largely the same as those for migraine and include antiemetics for severe acute attacks, pharmacological migraine prophylaxis, and lifestyle changes. PMID:27821976

  10. Migraine and the presidency.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2011-10-01

    The disclosure that 2012 presidential candidate Michele Bachmann has migraines resulted in intense public and physician interest in the migraine of presidents, migraine and potential presidential disability, and the politics of migraine that are reviewed in this article. Jefferson had severe headaches that may have been a migraine variant. Lincoln, Grant, and Wilson were, John Adams and Eisenhower might have been, and Truman and Kennedy may have been migraineurs. First Ladies Abigail Adams, Lincoln, Eisenhower, and Kennedy all suffered from migraines. Although migraines can usually be effectively treated, disabling attacks could occur because of the accentuated triggers of office that could prevent a future president from being temporarily able to discharge the duties of office. The 25th amendment is available to voluntarily transfer powers of office to the vice president even for a short period of time. The current $13 million per year in research funding provided by the National Institutes of Health is clearly inadequate to the task of improving treatment for such a pervasive, disabling disease that so profoundly affects so many Americans including presidential candidates, presidents, and first ladies. A survey of the Southern Headache Society on migraine and presidential disability is also presented.

  11. A functional MRI study of language disturbances in subjects with migraine headache during treatment with topiramate.

    PubMed

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Muti, Marco; Piccolini, Carlo; Principi, Massimo; Di Renzo, Antonio; De Ciantis, Rita; Frondizi, Domenico; Iannone, Gregorio; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Piccirilli, Massimo

    2008-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a new antiepileptic drug approved for the prevention of migraine headache. However its use is limited by treatment-emergent adverse events; in particular, therapy can exert profound impact on language function. In this investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the anatomofunctional correlates of language disturbances in TPM patients experiencing subjective cognitive impairment. Ten right-handed individuals receiving therapy (five with and five without language disfluency) and five matched healthy control subjects took part in this study. During fMRI subjects alternately rested and performed a word-generating task. The task comprised the silent generation of words beginning with a different input letter visually presented. The activation paradigm consisted of six activation blocks alternating with six baseline rest blocks. The main fMRI measure was the pattern activation of the prefrontal regions (Brodmann's areas 44, 45, and 46) in both left and right hemispheres. Patients receiving TPM (50-100 mg/day) significantly reduced mean monthly migraine frequency. However several differences in fMRI activation were evident in the subject group comparison. Notably, changes in brain activity were observed during the phonemic task in patients with language disturbances. It is likely that TPM therapy is associated with a "remapping" of the language cerebral network.

  12. TRPM8 and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dussor, Greg; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is among the most common diseases on earth and one of the most disabling, the latter due in large part to poor treatment efficacy. Development of new therapeutics is dependent on the identification of mechanisms contributing to migraine and discovery of targets for new drugs. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated the transient receptor-potential M8 (TRPM8) channel in migraine. This channel is predominantly expressed on peripheral sensory neurons and is known as the sensor for cold temperature in cutaneous tissue but is also expressed on deep visceral afferents where cold is not likely a stimulus. Consequently, a number of alternative endogenous agonists have been proposed. Apart from its role in cold sensation, TRPM8 also contributes to cold allodynia after nerve injury or inflammation, and it is necessary for cooling/menthol-based analgesia. How it might contribute to migraine is less clear. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anatomical and physiological mechanisms by which meningeal TRPM8 may play a role in migraine as well as the potential of TRPM8 as a therapeutic target. TRPM8 is expressed on sensory afferents innervating the meninges, and these neurons are subject to developmental changes that may influence their contribution to migraine. As in viscera, meningeal TRPM8 channels are unlikely to be activated by temperature fluctuations and their endogenous ligands remain unknown. Preclinical migraine studies show that activation of meningeal TRPM8 by exogenous agonists can both cause and alleviate headache behaviors, depending on whether other meningeal afferents concurrently receive noxious stimuli. This is reminiscent of the fact that cold can trigger migraine in humans but menthol can also alleviate headache. We propose that both TRPM8 agonists and antagonists may be potential therapeutics, depending on how migraine is triggered in individual patients. In this regard, TRPM8 may be a novel target for personalized

  13. Symptomatic pharmacotherapy of migraine.

    PubMed

    Lobo, B L; Cooke, S C; Landy, S H

    1999-07-01

    This review summarizes data on the effectiveness of various symptomatic migraine pharmacotherapies and makes recommendations for treatment. A wide variety of agents are available for the symptomatic treatment of migraine headache, including over-the-counter analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), combination products, opiates, ergot alkaloids, corticosteroids, dopamine antagonists, and triptans. In the stepped-care approach, simple analgesics and NSAIDs are the recommended first step for the treatment of mild-to-moderate migraine headaches. Patients who do not respond to first-step treatments may be given ergots, combination products, dopamine antagonists, or triptans as the second step. Corticosteroids or opiates may be used as rescue treatment in patients who do not respond to second-step treatment. A stratified approach to care individualizes treatment based on the severity of the headache and other patient-specific factors. In a stratified approach, dihydroergotamine or triptans may be the first-step treatment for patients who present with a history of severe migraines that have responded poorly to previous treatments. Sumatriptan was the first triptan approved for the symptomatic treatment of migraine headache; newer triptans include zolmitriptan, naratriptan, and rizatriptan. Since sumatriptan is rapidly absorbed by the subcutaneous route, its time to onset of effect is shortest. Among triptan drugs that are administered orally, the relative time to onset may be shorter with rizatriptan than sumatriptan. Naratriptan has a longer time to onset but is associated with a lower rate of migraine recurrence than other triptans. graine headache, ergot alkaloids, triptans,

  14. [Therapeutic exercise as treatment for migraine and tension-type headaches: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Kindelan-Calvo, Paula; Agudo-Carmona, Diego; Muñoz-Plata, Rosa; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy

    2013-11-16

    AIM. To analyse the effectiveness of therapeutic exercise on migraines and tension-type headaches (TTH). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Electronic databases were used to search the literature for relevant articles. Eligibility criteria were: controlled randomised clinical trials (RCT), conducted on patients with migraine or TTH, in which the therapeutic intervention was based on therapeutic exercise, and the papers had been published in English and Spanish. Two independent reviewers performed the analysis of the methodological quality using the Delphi scale. RESULTS. Ten RCT were selected, seven of which offered good methodological quality. According to all the studies analysed, the intensity and frequency of pain diminished in comparison to the situation prior to establishing therapeutic exercise, and in five studies the effect was higher than in the control group. The qualitative analysis showed strong evidence of the absence of adverse events following the application of therapeutic exercise. Furthermore, strong evidence was also found of the effect of physiotherapeutic treatment, including therapeutic exercise, in lowering the intensity, frequency and duration of pain in patients with TTH. Limited evidence was also found of the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in patients with migraine, although it was not better than the effects derived from other forms of treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Results show that therapeutic exercise is a safe treatment that provides beneficial effects on migraines or TTH. Further RCT are required in the future with appropriate methodological designs to confirm these results.

  15. [Integrated headache care network. Kiel Migraine and Headache Center and German National Headache Treatment Network].

    PubMed

    Göbel, H; Heinze-Kuhn, K; Petersen, I; Göbel, A; Heinze, A

    2013-04-01

    Migraine and other headaches affect 54 million people in Germany. They rank among the ten most severely disabling complaints and the three most expensive neurological disorders. Nevertheless, they are not adequately recognized in the healthcare system with sketchy diagnoses and inadequate treatment. This inadequate care is not primarily due to a lack of medical and scientific knowledge on the development and treatment of headaches but is predominantly due to organizational deficits in the healthcare system and in the implementation of current knowledge. To overcome the organizational barriers the national headache treatment network was initiated in Germany. For the first time it allows national cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary links between inpatient and outpatient care. A hand in hand treatment programme, better education, better information exchange between all partners and combined efforts using clearly defined treatment pathways and goals are the basis for state of the art and efficient treatment results. The treatment network is geared towards the specialized treatment of severely affected patients with chronic headache disorders. A national network of outpatient and inpatient pain therapists in both practices and hospitals works hand in hand to optimally alleviate pain in a comprehensive cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary manner. For therapy refractive disorders, a high-intensive supraregional fully inpatient treatment can be arranged. This concept offers for the first time a nationwide coordinated treatment without limitation by specialization and bureaucratic remuneration sectors.

  16. CGRP receptor antagonists: A new frontier of anti-migraine medications

    PubMed Central

    de Prado, Blanca Marquez; Russo, Andrew F.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a chronic pain condition that affects 12% of the population. Currently, the most effective treatments are the triptans, but they are limited in their efficacy and have potentially deleterious cardiovascular complications. Based on basic science studies over the past decade, a new generation of anti-migraine drugs is now being developed. At the forefront of these studies is a new calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist that is as effective as triptans in the acute treatment of migraines, without the cardiovascular effects. This review will address the likely mechanisms and therapeutic potential of CGRP receptor antagonists. PMID:19784396

  17. The effect of migraine prophylaxis on migraine-related resource use and productivity.

    PubMed

    Láinez, Miguel J A

    2009-09-01

    In the US, it is estimated that up to 10% of men and 25% of women, particularly those aged 25-55 years, experience debilitating migraines, such that the condition presents an enormous economic burden for patients, health systems, employers and society. Migraine headache is a particularly prevalent condition associated with major reductions in patients' quality of life. From a payer perspective, the implementation of relevant programmes of migraine prophylaxis is highly desirable. Consistent evidence exists, from several randomized, controlled studies, of the efficacy of amitriptyline, divalproex sodium, propranolol, timolol and topiramate in migraine prophylaxis. Considering resource utilization, various studies suggest that migraine prophylaxis with antiepileptics, antidepressants, beta-blockers or calcium channel antagonists markedly reduces triptan use and visits to physician offices and emergency departments (EDs), without compromising quality of care or treatment outcomes. Over recent years, the effects of topiramate in reducing resource utilization in patients with migraine have been relatively widely studied. In US claims database analyses involving >4000 patients with migraine, topiramate significantly reduced triptan use by up to 20% in the 12-month period after starting treatment. Reductions were also noted in the numbers of ED visits, diagnostic procedures, hospital admissions and migraine-related hospitalization days. These long-term benefits of topiramate manifested without any increase in overall headache-related costs. Furthermore, in detailed modelling analyses based on UK and US data, topiramate-induced savings in acute medical services were estimated to offset about one-quarter of the monthly per patient cost of the topiramate regimen, which was shown to be a dominant cost-effective intervention relative to no preventive therapy: cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated as pound 5728 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) [2005 costings] and $US10

  18. Autogenic Training and Hand Temperature Biofeedback in the Treatment of Migraine: A Preliminary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup, B.; And Others

    The possibility of alleviating migraine headaches by autogenic relaxation training, with or without hand temperature biofeedback, was assessed. The study examined five independent groups in a bi-directional control group design. Volunteer migraine sufferers served as subjects, each participating for 12 weeks. The first four weeks of the study were…

  19. Activity of botulinum toxin type A in cranial dura: implications for treatment of migraine and other headaches

    PubMed Central

    Filipović, Boris; Matak, Ivica; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) is approved for chronic migraine treatment, its mechanism of action is still unknown. Dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) commonly used to investigate migraine pathophysiology can be evoked by trigeminal pain. Here, we investigated the reactivity of cranial dura to trigeminal pain and the mechanism of BoNT/A action on DNI. Experimental Approach Because temporomandibular disorders are highly comorbid with migraine, we employed a rat model of inflammation induced by complete Freund's adjuvant, followed by treatment with BoNT/A injections or sumatriptan p.o. DNI was assessed by Evans blue‐plasma protein extravasation, cell histology and RIA for CGRP. BoNT/A enzymatic activity in dura was assessed by immunohistochemistry for cleaved synaptosomal‐associated protein 25 (SNAP‐25). Key Results BoNT/A and sumatriptan reduced the mechanical allodynia and DNI, evoked by complete Freund's adjuvant. BoNT/A prevented inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the increase of CGRP levels in dura. After peripheral application, BoNT/A‐cleaved SNAP‐25 colocalized with CGRP in intracranial dural nerve endings. Injection of the axonal transport blocker colchicine into the trigeminal ganglion prevented the formation of cleaved SNAP‐25 in dura. Conclusions and Implications Pericranially injected BoNT/A was taken up by local sensory nerve endings, axonally transported to the trigeminal ganglion and transcytosed to dural afferents. Colocalization of cleaved SNAP‐25 and the migraine mediator CGRP in dura suggests that BoNT/A may prevent DNI by suppressing transmission by CGRP. This might explain the effects of BoNT/A in temporomandibular joint inflammation and in migraine and some other headaches. PMID:26493010

  20. What Is Migraine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Migraine Headaches What is Migraine? Past Issues / Fall 2015 Table of Contents If ... exhausted or weak following a migraine. Who Gets Migraines? Migraines occur in both children and adults, but ...

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in migraine.

    PubMed

    Yorns, William R; Hardison, H Huntley

    2013-09-01

    DNA and migraine will require very large sample sizes to obtain statistically significant results. (4) Therapeutic evidence: Several agents that have a positive effect on mt metabolism have shown to be effective in the treatment of migraines. The agents include riboflavin (B2), coenzyme Q10, magnesium, niacin, carnitine, topiramate, and lipoic acid. Further study is warranted to learn how mt interact with other factors to cause migraines. This will facilitate the development of new and more specific treatments that will reduce the frequency or severity or both of this disease.

  2. Manual therapies for migraine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Tuchin, Peter J; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2011-04-01

    Migraine occurs in about 15% of the general population. Migraine is usually managed by medication, but some patients do not tolerate migraine medication due to side effects or prefer to avoid medication for other reasons. Non-pharmacological management is an alternative treatment option. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on manual therapies for migraine. The RCTs suggest that massage therapy, physiotherapy, relaxation and chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy might be equally effective as propranolol and topiramate in the prophylactic management of migraine. However, the evaluated RCTs had many methodological shortcomings. Therefore, any firm conclusion will require future, well-conducted RCTs on manual therapies for migraine.

  3. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  4. [Headache Treatment].

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans Christoph; Holle-Lee, Dagny; Nägel, Steffen; Gaul, Charly

    2017-03-01

    A precondition for the successful treatment of headaches is the correct headache diagnosis. Triptans are effective for attack treatment of migraine and cluster headache. However, there are not effective for the treatment of tension-type headache. For the prevention of frequent episodic migraine betablockers, flunarizine, topiramate and amitriptyline are recommended. For the prevention of chronic migraine evidence is only available for onabotulinumtoxinA and topiramate. For prophylactic treatment of tension-type headaches tricyclic antidepressants are used. In cluster headache verapamil (in combination with steroids) is the most frequently used prophylactic agent. This article focusses on the current acute and prophylactic treatment of common headache syndromes.

  5. Managing Migraine Headaches in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Green, Antoinette; Kabbouche, Marielle; Kacperski, Joanne; Hershey, Andrew; O'Brien, Hope

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of migraine headaches can be challenging in children and adolescents. The description of migraine in this population may include symptoms that are not typically described in adults. Treatment options for pediatric migraine is increasing, however remain limited. This article will go through the key components to diagnosing migraine in pediatric patients as well as give options for short and long-term management.

  6. Pharmacological characterization of a novel gastrodin derivative as a potential anti-migraine agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Han; Zhao, Li-Xue; Wan, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Xiao-Na; Long, Fang-Yi; Zhang, Shuang; Chen, Chu; Du, Jun-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder in the brain. An optimal therapy for migraine has not yet been developed. Gastrodin (Gas), the main effective constitute from Gastrodiae Rhizoma (Tianma in Chinese), has been indicated for migraine treatment and prophylaxis more than 30 years, with demonstrated safety. However, Gas is a phenolic glycoside, with relatively low concentrations and weak efficacy in the central nervous system. To develop more effective anti-migraine agents, we synthesized a novel Gas derivative (Gas-D). In the present study, comparative pharmacodynamic evaluations of Gas and Gas-D were performed in a model of nitroglycerin (NTG)-induced migraine in rats and the hot-plate test in mice. Following behavioral testing in this migraine model, external jugular vein blood and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) were collected to analyze plasma nitric oxide (NO) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations and c-Fos expression in the TNC. The acute oral toxicity of Gas and Gas-D was also examined. We found that Gas-D had potent anti-migraine effects, likely attributable to inhibition of both trigeminal nerve activation at central sites and the peripheral release of CGRP following NO scavenging. Additionally, Gas-D exerted significant anti-nociceptive effect in response to thermal pain compared with Gas. Furthermore, a single dose of 2.048 g/kg Gas or Gas-D presented no acute oral toxicity in mice. Altogether, the potent anti-migraine and anti-hyperalgesic effects of Gas-D suggest that it might be a potentially novel drug candidate for migraine treatment or prophylaxis.

  7. Occipital nerve stimulation for the treatment of intractable chronic migraine headache: ONSTIM feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Joel R; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; McCarville, Sally; Sun, Mark; Goadsby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medically intractable chronic migraine (CM) is a disabling illness characterized by headache ≥15 days per month. Methods: A multicenter, randomized, blinded, controlled feasibility study was conducted to obtain preliminary safety and efficacy data on occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in CM. Eligible subjects received an occipital nerve block, and responders were randomized to adjustable stimulation (AS), preset stimulation (PS) or medical management (MM) groups. Results: Seventy-five of 110 subjects were assigned to a treatment group; complete diary data were available for 66. A responder was defined as a subject who achieved a 50% or greater reduction in number of headache days per month or a three-point or greater reduction in average overall pain intensity compared with baseline. Three-month responder rates were 39% for AS, 6% for PS and 0% for MM. No unanticipated adverse device events occurred. Lead migration occurred in 12 of 51 (24%) subjects. Conclusion: The results of this feasibility study offer promise and should prompt further controlled studies of ONS in CM. PMID:20861241

  8. Lomerizine therapy for the treatment of benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood transitioning into atypical basilar migraine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, YUTA; YABE, TAKAO

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) of childhood transitioning into basilar migraine (BM) that was effectively treated with lomerizine. A 6-year-old male visited our hospital complaining of repeated attacks of vertigo for 3 months. The patient’s vertigo attacks lasted for several hours and were accompanied by nausea, vomiting, intense fear and loss of consciousness. No nystagmus was observed during the vertigo attacks. Blood tests and imaging examinations revealed no abnormal findings. The results of electronystagmography and the caloric test were unremarkable. Pure-tone audiometry revealed profound right-side sensorineural hearing loss. Among the differential diagnoses, delayed endolymphatic hydrops, epilepsy and BM were considered. Delayed endolymphatic hydrops was considered unlikely since no nystagmus occurred during the vertigo attacks and there was no change in hearing; electroencephalography revealed no epileptic seizure waves. The attacks of vertigo were well-controlled with lomerizine. The patient was diagnosed with BM since the use of lomerizine, an agent for the treatment for migraine, was effective. Since it was reported that BPV is closely related to migraine and the onset of the vertigo attacks was accompanied by a loss of consciousness, we concluded that this patient had BM transitioning from BPV. PMID:23837033

  9. Obsessive-compulsive aspects as predictors of poor response to treatments in patients with chronic migraine and medication overuse.

    PubMed

    Curone, M; D'Amico, D; Bussone, G

    2012-05-01

    Patients with chronic migraine (CM) and medication overuse (MO) have a high frequency of psychiatric comorbidity or psychopathological traits, the presence of which may have important implications for the course of the CM and the MO, both for response to treatment and possible relapses. Overuse of symptomatic drugs is regarded as one of the most important risk factor for the transformation of episodic migraine into CM and drug-seeking tendency due to fear of headache in chronic migraine patients shares with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) the compulsive quality of the behavior. Aim of this study was to review the clinical history of a sample of CM patients with MO in which an obsessive-compulsive trait was identified, performing a comparison with a sample of patients without obsessive-compulsive trait. We selected 14 patients with positivity to Spectrum Project OBS (obsessive-compulsive disorder) questionnaire and other 14 patients with negativity to the same tool from among a sample of patients who were enrolled in a previous study on the psychopathological profile of patients suffering from CM with MO. According to data obtained from the clinical records referring to the previous 5 years, patients with OBS questionnaire positivity showed a worse clinical course and a tendency to early relapse in MO after symptomatic medication withdrawal. Our results show that the comorbidity of OCD should be always evaluated in patients with CM and MO as it may play a relevant role--particularly if not treated--among the risk factors favoring the progression of episodic migraine to the chronic form, and/or the tendency to a pathological behavior that prompts the overuse of symptomatic medications.

  10. [Gap junctional intercellular communication: a new mechanism in pathophysiology of migraine with aura. Therapeutic applications].

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2012-12-01

    Migraine is a common, recurrent and disabling primary headache disorder, which affects up to 20% of the population. About a third of patients with migraine have attacks with aura, a focal neurological disturbance that manifests itself as visual, sensitive or motor symptoms. Cortical spreading depression, a wave of electrical activity that moves across the cerebral cortex through neuronal-glial cell gap junctions, would be involved in the triggering of migraine aura. Moreover, cortical spreading depression activates perivascular trigeminal afferents in the neocortex, that through central and peripheral reflex, cause inflammatory reaction in the meninges to generate the headache. Tonabersat, a novel benzopyran compound, was selected for clinical trial on the basis of its inhibitory activity on cortical spreading depression and neurogenic inflammation in animal models of migraine. Moreover, tonabersat inhibited trigeminal ganglion neuronal-glial cell gap junctions, suggesting that this compound could prevent peripheral sensitization within the ganglion. In clinical trial, tonabersat showed a preventive effect on attacks of migraine with aura but had no efficacy on non-aura attacks and in the acute treatment of migraine. In conclusion, neuronal-glial cell gap junctional intercellular communication seems to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine with aura and is emerging as a new promising therapeutic target for prophylactic treatment of patients with chronic attacks.

  11. Lifestyle Factors and Migraine in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Bruno, Antonio; Trojsi, Francesca; Tessitore, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2016-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common pain symptoms in children. Indeed, a high percentage of adult migraine patients report to have suffered from recurrent headache during the childhood. In particular, children could experience the so-called childhood periodic syndromes (such as cyclic vomiting, abdominal migraine, and benign paroxysmal vertigo) that have been usually considered precursors of migraine or they could develop overt migraine headaches. However, typical cohort of migraine symptoms could be absent and children could not achieve all clinical features necessary for a migraine attack diagnosis according to classification criteria. Nevertheless, migraine is characterized also in childhood by a significant negative impact on the quality of life and a high risk of developing chronic and persistent headache in adulthood. Several studies have emphasized the role of different risk factors for migraine in children. Among these, obesity and overweight, particular food or the regular consumption of alcohol or caffeine, dysfunctional family situation, low level of physical activity, physical or emotional abuse, bullying by peers, unfair treatment in school, and insufficient leisure time seem to be strictly related to migraine onset or progression. Consequently, both identification and avoidance of triggers seem to be mandatory in children with migraine and could represent an alternative approach to the treatment of migraine abstaining from pharmacologic therapies.

  12. [Mental disorders and migraine: epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Guillem, E; Pelissolo, A; Lepine, J P

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies in the general population, taking into account certain bias inherent to the clinical observation have confirmed the clinical impression reporting a higher psychiatric comorbidity with persons suffering from migraine than in persons without migraine. Persons with migraine are at increased risk for affective and anxiety disorders, personality traits disorders (neuroticism), suicide attempts, but not for alcohol or illicit drug abuse. The comorbidity is more important in migraine with aura than in migraine without aura. Concerning affective disorders, the lifetime prevalence of major depression is 34.4% in persons with migraine and 10.4% in persons without migraine. For bipolar I disorder, prevalence is 6.8% in migraine with aura versus 0.9% when no migraine. Compared to no migraine, the lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorders in migraine is significantly increased in: panic disorder (10.9% vs 1.8%); generalized anxiety disorder (10.2% vs 1.9%); obsessive-compulsive disorder (8.6% vs 1.8%); phobic disorder (39.8% vs 20.6%). In addition, no psychopathological, biological or genetic explanation seems to be meaningful for the comprehension of this comorbidity pattern. These results remain primarily descriptive but they justify a clinical investigation of affective and anxiety disorders, and suicide attempts, in all person with migraine, and it also justifies the treatment of pain associated with the treatment of eventual affective or anxiety disorders.

  13. Per cent of patients with chronic migraine who responded per onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle: PREEMPT

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Stephen D; Dodick, David W; Aurora, Sheena K; Diener, Hans-Christoph; DeGryse, Ronald E; Lipton, Richard B; Turkel, Catherine C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The approved use of onabotulinumtoxinA for prophylaxis of headaches in patients with chronic migraine (CM) involves treatment every 12 weeks. It is currently unknown whether patients who fail to respond to the first onabotulinumtoxinA treatment cycle will respond to subsequent treatment cycles. To help inform decisions about treating non-responders, we examined the probability of treatment cycle 1 non-responders responding in cycle 2, and cycle 1 and 2 non-responders responding in cycle 3. Methods Pooled PREEMPT data (two studies: a 24-week, 2-cycle, double-blind, randomised (1:1), placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase, followed by a 32-week, 3-cycle, open-label phase) evaluated onabotulinumtoxinA (155–195 U) for prophylaxis of headaches in persons with CM (≥15 days/month with headache ≥4 h/day). End points of interest included the proportion of study patients who first achieved a ≥50% reduction in headache days, moderate/severe headache days, total cumulative hours of headache on headache days, or a ≥5-point improvement in Headache Impact Test (HIT)-6. For treatment cycle 1, all eligible participants were included. For subsequent cycles, responders in a previous cycle were no longer considered first responders. Results Among onabotulinumtoxinA-treated patients (n=688) 49.3% had a ≥50% reduction in headache-day frequency during treatment cycle 1, with 11.3% and 10.3% of patients first responding during cycles 2 and 3, respectively. 54.2%, 11.6% and 7.4% of patients first responded with a ≥50% reduction in cumulative hours of headache, and 56.3%, 14.5% and 7.7% of patients first responded with a ≥5-point improvement in total HIT-6 during treatment cycles 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Conclusions A meaningful proportion of patients with CM treated with onabotulinumtoxinA who did not respond to the first treatment cycle responded in the second and third cycles of treatment. Trial registration number NCT00156910, NCT00168428. PMID

  14. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Intravenous Prochlorperazine Versus Subcutaneous Sumatriptan in Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department(Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    were effective . However, IV prochlorperazine with diphenhydramine was superior to subcutaneous sumatriptan in the abortive therapy of migraine...College of Emergency Physicians. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2009.11.020INTRODUCTION Background Intravenous (IV) prochlorperazine is safe and effective in...migraine abortive therapy.1-5 It is often given in conjunction with diphenhydramine to minimize the risk of akathisia.6 Subcutaneously injected

  15. Anaphylaxis: acute treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Ring, Johannes; Grosber, Martine; Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Brockow, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is the maximal variant of an acute life-threatening immediate-type allergy. Due to its often dramatic onset and clinical course, practical knowledge in the management of these reactions is mandatory both for physicians and patients. It has to be distinguished between acute treatment modalities and general recommendations for management of patients who have suffered from an anaphylactic reaction. Acute treatment comprises general procedures like positioning, applying an intravenous catheter, call for help, comfort of the patient as well as the application of medication. The acute treatment modalities are selected depending upon the intensity of the clinical symptomatology as they are categorized in 'severity grades'. First of all it is important to diagnose anaphylaxis early and consider several differential diagnoses. This diagnosis is purely clinical and laboratory tests are of no help in the acute situation. Epinephrine is the essential antianaphylactic drug in the pharmacologic treatment. It should be first applied intramuscularly, only in very severe cases or under conditions of surgical interventions intravenous application can be tried. Furthermore, glucocorticosteroids are given in order to prevent protracted or biphasic courses of anaphylaxis; they are of little help in the acute treatment. Epinephrine autoinjectors can be used by the patient him/herself. Histamine H(1)-antagonists are valuable in mild anaphylactic reactions; they should be given intravenously if possible. The replacement of volume is crucial in antianaphylactic treatment. Crystalloids can be used in the beginning, in severe shock colloid volume substitutes have to be applied. Patients suffering from an anaphylactic episode should be observed over a period of 4-10 h according to the severity of the symptomatology. It is crucial to be aware or recognize risk patients as for example patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, or under beta-adrenergic blockade. When bronchial

  16. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    NTG. However, previous work has shown that the locomotor stimulants, morphine and cocaine, both showed enhanced conditioned place preference in state...hydrocodone, oxycodone, meperidine and morphine , are commonly used in North America as ‘rescue’ therapy for migraine (Bigal and Lipton, 2009). In Europe... morphine and naltrexone in mice. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 141: 118–122. Bigal ME, Lipton RB (2008). Excessive acute migraine medication use and migraine

  17. A basis for migraine therapy- the autonomic theory reappraised.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The concept that migraine results from an initial vasoconstriction due to increased release of noradrenaline from the sympathetic nerves to cranial blood vessels has been reappraised in the light of recently acquired knowledge of the mechanisms of action of drugs used in the treatment of migraine, physiological and pharmacological evidence implicating noradrenaline, and the observations by others that several migraine variants may be associated with some degree of sympathetic overactivity. If the theory is correct, it suggests that both prophylaxis and management of the acute condition should be possible by means of selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism. The use of drugs with potentially dangerous vasoconstrictor properties appears to be unnecessary. The suggestion is made that the increased adrenergic activity might result from changes within the hypothalamus. PMID:26908

  18. The treatment of acute vertigo.

    PubMed

    Cesarani, A; Alpini, D; Monti, B; Raponi, G

    2004-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are very common symptoms in the general population. The aim of this paper is to describe the physical and pharmacological treatment of symptoms characterized by sudden onset of rotatory vertigo. Acute vertigo can be subdivided into two main groups: (1) spontaneous vertigo and (2) provoked vertigo, usually by postural changes, generally called paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Sudden onset of acute vertigo is usually due to acute spontaneous unilateral vestibular failure. It can be also fluctuant as, e.g., in recurrent attacks of Ménière's disease. Pharmacotherapy of acute spontaneous vertigo includes Levo-sulpiride i.v., 50 mg in 250 physiologic solution, once or twice a day, methoclopramide i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, or triethilperazine rectally, once or twice a day, to reduce neurovegetative symptoms; diazepam i.m., 10 mg once or twice a day, to decrease internuclear inhibition, sulfate magnesium i.v., two ampoules in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, or piracetam i.v., one ampoule in 500 cc physiological solution, twice a day, to decrease vestibular damage. At the onset of the acute symptoms, patients must lie on their healthy side with the head and trunk raised 20 degrees. The room must be quiet but not darkened. If the patient is able to swallow without vomiting, it is important to reduce nystagmus and stabilize the visual field with gabapentine, per os, 300 mg twice or three times a day. The first step of the physical therapy of acute vertigo is vestibular electrical stimulation, that is to say, a superficial paravertebral electrical stimulation of neck muscles, aimed to reduce antigravitary failure and to increase proprioceptive cervical sensory substitution. PPV is a common complaint and represents one of the most common entities in peripheral vestibular pathology. While the clinical picture is well known and widely described, the etiopathogenesis of PPV is still a matter of debate. Despite the different

  19. Migraine-like episodic pain behavior in a dog: can dogs suffer from migraines?

    PubMed

    Plessas, I N; Volk, H A; Kenny, P J

    2013-01-01

    Migraines and other primary headache disorders commonly affect people. There is evidence to suggest that migraines can occur in dogs. In this review, we present a dog with paroxysmal episodes that have a striking resemblance to human migraine, and we give an overview of migraine in people. The current classification, clinical signs, and diagnosis in people are discussed, as well as the anatomy of head pain, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment options.

  20. Altitude-induced migraine headache secondary to pravastatin: case report.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, C S; Snyder, Q C

    1998-06-01

    A 46-yr-old airline captain with many exposures to altitude chamber, fighter, and airliner flight developed migraine-type headaches after exposure to cabin altitudes above 6,000 feet. He had no prior history of chronic headaches or migraine. Symptoms began within days of starting pravastatin for hypercholesterolemia, but had not occurred during 4 yr of treatment with lovastatin. Headache intensity related directly to increasing pressure altitudes above 6,000 ft for periods of time greater than 45 min. Descent below 5,000 ft cabin altitudes relieved headaches. Exposure to barometric pressure changes has been associated with migraine headache. Vascular headaches are also a prominent feature of acute mountain sickness. Although the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are reported to be associated with increased occurrence of headache, the mechanism is poorly understood. Migraine headaches may be triggered in previously asymptomatic individuals by unique combinations of trigger factors. However, there have been no prior reports of migraine headaches triggered by the combined exposure to pravastatin and reduced barometric pressure.

  1. Topiramate: the evidence for its therapeutic value in the prevention of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Nadin, Carole

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Preventive therapy is recommended in patients with migraines frequent and/or severe enough to interfere with daily life, and/or with an inadequate response to acute therapy (26–43% of patients with migraine in a recent US survey). Preventive treatments include beta blockers, amitriptyline, and antiepileptics (sodium valproate, gabapentin), but these may have significant adverse effects and are contraindicated in some patients. Topiramate is an antiepileptic recently approved for prevention of migraine. Aims: To assess the evidence on the therapeutic value of topiramate as preventive treatment for migraine in adults. Evidence review: All identified outcomes were patient-oriented. Strong evidence shows that topiramate 100 or 200 mg/day is more effective than placebo in reducing mean monthly migraine frequency, and further evidence shows better effectiveness than placebo on responder rate, rescue medication use, migraine severity, and migraine duration. The 100 mg/day dose appears generally better tolerated than 200 mg/day. Evidence shows that topiramate is associated with weight loss rather than weight gain. Limited evidence suggests that topiramate can improve health-related quality of life and reduce days with disability. Uncontrolled studies indicate effectiveness in refractory migraine. Limited evidence indicates broadly similar efficacy and tolerability for topiramate 100 mg/day and propranolol 160 mg/day, though more comparative trials are required. There is insufficient economic evidence to assess the cost effectiveness of topiramate. Place in therapy: Topiramate 100 mg/day is the dose with the best balance between efficacy and tolerability, and offers therapeutic value in patients in whom propranolol or other preventive migraine therapies are contraindicated, poorly tolerated, or ineffective. PMID:22500148

  2. Migraine with brainstem aura presenting as recurrent hypersomnia (Kleine-Levin syndrome).

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Alexander D; Leschziner, Guy D

    2016-10-01

    Recurrent hypersomnia, or Kleine-Levin syndrome, is rare and frequently causes substantial diagnostic anxiety and delay. Patients often undergo multiple investigations to rule out other causes of encephalopathy. The treatment options are unsatisfactory. Migraine with brainstem aura has not previously been widely considered in the medical literature as a differential diagnosis. We describe two patients referred to a tertiary sleep neurology service with a putative diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. Each described attacks of hypersomnia with elements of migraine with brainstem aura, in addition to having a history of migraine with aura. Simple acute migraine treatment clearly attenuated further attacks. These cases generate discussion as to the common features and potential mechanisms underlying both disorders. Furthermore, they highlight a hitherto underexplored alternative diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. This provides scope for offering established and effective migraine treatment options to patients who with a potential misdiagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome, providing scope for offering established and effective migraine treatment to some patients originally diagnosed with a rare condition for which there is no current consistently effective therapeutic options.

  3. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  4. A new horizon into the pathobiology, etiology and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Kundan Singh; Singh, Jasmer; Lyall, Jarnail Singh

    2011-07-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the prevalence of migraine (70% women 30% men) suggests the involvement of reproductive hormones in a women's life. Excessive estrogen during menstruation directly stimulate estrogen receptor alpha thickly populated in trigeminal ganglia and periaqueductal gray which manifest as menstrual migraine. In contrast increased progesterone during pregnancy evokes progesterone receptors A/B, which coexist with ERs, providing complete remission from migraine episodes. Moreover, estrogen also increases nociception through extracellularly signal-regulated kinase (ERK) stimulation and down-regulating antinociceptive GABA, IL-R1 and Zn-fingers. Hormones may provoke migraine indirectly by disrupting mineral homeostasis. Estrogen enhances the absorption and half-life of copper which in turn inhibits the absorption of zinc. Zinc is required for the synthesis of melatonin and CoQ10 essential for growing women. Excess of copper exacerbates the deficiency of zinc, melatonin and CoQ10 typically low in migraineurs. Melatonin is an antioxidant, free radical scavenger and activates antioxidant enzymes like CuZn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (a Se-enzyme) and glutathione reductase. Zinc deficiency reduces activity of CuZn-SOD. Magnesium and vitamin B6 modulates the level of NO in the cell, both of which are deficient in migraineurs. Magnesium is essential for the removal of trapped NO from within the cell which does not occur under low magnesium levels, which reacts with superoxide generating dangerous peroxynitrite. Iron stimulates nitric oxide synthase producing more NO which is inhibited by zinc, thus, antagonizing peroxynitrite generation. Female hormones lowers magnesium but increase calcium levels which enhance migraine ubiquitousness. Accumulation of copper and iron in deep areas of brain and peripheral nerves typically catalyses the oxidation of catecholamines and generate free radicals involved in lipid-peroxidation, demyelination

  5. Psychiatric comorbidities of episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Buse, Dawn C; Silberstein, Stephen D; Manack, Aubrey N; Papapetropoulos, Spyros; Lipton, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Migraine is a prevalent disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Population- and clinic-based studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities, particularly mood and anxiety disorders, are more common among persons with chronic migraine than among those with episodic migraine. Additional studies suggest that psychiatric comorbidities may be a risk factor for migraine chronification (i.e., progression from episodic to chronic migraine). It is important to identify and appropriately treat comorbid psychiatric conditions in persons with migraine, as these conditions may contribute to increased migraine-related disability and impact, diminished health-related quality of life, and poor treatment outcomes. Here, we review the current literature on the rates of several psychiatric comorbidities, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder, among persons with migraine in clinic- and population-based studies. We also review the link between physical, emotional, and substance abuse, psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Finally, we review the data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification and explore theories and evidence underlying the comorbidity between migraine and these psychiatric disorders.

  6. Effectiveness of coenzyme Q10 in prophylactic treatment of migraine headache: an open-label, add-on, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shoeibi, Ali; Olfati, Nahid; Soltani Sabi, Mohsen; Salehi, Maryam; Mali, Sara; Akbari Oryani, Mahsa

    2017-03-01

    Despite the huge health and economic burden of migraine headache, few medications have been approved for its prophylactic treatment, most of which can potentially induce serious adverse effects. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a supplement and has shown preliminary benefits in migraine prophylaxis. We aimed to assess this effect in an adult population. This is an open-label, parallel, add-on, match-controlled trial. Eighty patients diagnosed with migraine headache based on International Headache Society criteria were allocated to receiving only their current preventive drugs or their current preventive drugs plus 100 mg CoQ10 daily, matching for their baseline characteristics, and were assessed for frequency and severity of attacks, and ≥50 % reduction in attack frequency per month. Thirty-six and 37 patients were analyzed in CoQ10 and control groups, respectively. Number of attacks per month dropped significantly in the CoQ10 group (mean decrease: 1.6 vs. 0.5 among CoQ10 and control groups, respectively, p < 0.001). A significant reduction was also evident in the severity of headaches (mean decrease: 2.3 vs. 0.6 among CoQ10 and control groups, respectively, p < 0.001). For ≥50 % reduction in the frequency of attacks per month, the number needed to treat was calculated as 1.6. No side effects for CoQ10 were observed. This study suggests that CoQ10 might reduce the frequency of headaches, and may also make them shorter in duration, and less severe, with a favorable safety profile.

  7. Dietary and Lifestyle Changes in the Treatment of a 23-Year-Old Female Patient With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Brett R.; Seaman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with atypical migraine headache. Clinical Features A 23-year-old woman experienced migraines for 3 months. She had no previous history of migraines and was unresponsive to pharmaceutical and musculoskeletal therapies. The migraine headaches could not be classified according to the common categories associated with migraines. She had a change in diet due to severe gastroesophageal reflux causing her to reduce or avoid consuming foods. She also had a history of smoking and alcohol consumption. Intervention and Outcome Dietary and lifestyle changes were recommended in conjunction with the administration of a multivitamin, magnesium oxide, and Ulmus rubra. Her migraine headaches improved with the resolution of her gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Conclusion This patient with atypical migraines and a history of poor dietary and lifestyle choices improved using nutritional changes and supplementing with a multivitamin and magnesium oxide. PMID:26778934

  8. Placebo effects in treating migraine and other headaches.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2010-07-01

    Evaluating the efficacy of a drug therapy in the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine requires the conduct of placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials. In order to plan and conduct these studies in the most appropriate manner, it is desirable to know which factors influence the placebo response. This editorial overview discusses the factors that influence placebo response in trials for migraine and other headaches; such factors include expectation, blinding, route of drug administration, patient age and gender, and geographic distribution of the trials. The placebo response rates in the treatment of acute headache episodes are higher than in headache prophylaxis, and invasive procedures, such as injections, have a higher placebo response compared with orally administered drugs.

  9. On the pathophysiology of migraine--links for "empirically based treatment" with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Peter; Siniatchkin, Michael; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2002-09-01

    Psychophysiological data support the concept that migraine is the result of cortical hypersensitivity, hyperactivity, and a lack of habituation. There is evidence that this is a brain-stem related information processing dysfunction. This cortical activity reflects a periodicity between 2 migraine attacks and it may be due to endogenous or exogenous factors. In the few days preceding the next attack slow cortical potentials are highest and habituation delay experimentally recorded during contingent negative variation is at a maximum. These striking features of slow cortical potentials are predictors of the next attack. The pronounced negativity can be fed back to the patient. The data support the hypothesis that a change in amplitudes of slow cortical potentials is caused by altered habituation during the recording session. This kind of neurofeedback can be characterized as "empirically based" because it improves habituation and it proves to be clinically efficient.

  10. Postdischarge Secobarbital After ED Migraine Treatment Decreases Pain and Improves Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    barbiturate hypnotic agent. It lost favor due largely to its narrow therapeutic index, addiction potential, and deleterious interaction with ethanol [8...durations, particularly when compared with other more common hypnotic agents such as zolpidem or temazepam. It is noteworthy that we encountered no...of headache resolution in the secobarbital group. We conclude that postdischarge hypnotic therapy for migraine patients treated in the ED is

  11. Chronic ghrelin treatment reduced photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors in nitroglycerin- induced migraine: role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Farajdokht, Fereshteh; Babri, Shirin; Karimi, Pouran; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Bughchechi, Ramin; Mohaddes, Gisou

    2017-03-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating disorder that has a significant impact on patients and society. Nearly all migraineurs frequently reported light sensitivity during a headache attack. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) plays an important role in the activation of trigeminal system and migraine pain. To identify the effect of chronic ghrelin treatment on endogenous PACAP and associated symptoms of migraine, an experimental chronic migraine model was induced by intermittent intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of nitroglycerin (NTG). Photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors were determined in the modified elevated plus maze on days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 and in the light/dark box on days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Blood levels of PACAP and cortisol were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) kits. Chronic injection of NTG evoked photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors and treatment with ghrelin (150 μg/kg) for 11 days effectively attenuated photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors in the both paradigms. We further found that NTG increased the blood levels of PACAP and cortisol, which was significantly reduced by ghrelin treatment. Additionally, staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) revealed that ghrelin reduced NTG-induced increase in the number of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion. Furthermore, for the first time we showed that repeated administrations of NTG increased white blood cell (WBC) counts and mean platelet volume (MPV), and decreased platelet counts. These results indicated that ghrelin decreased migraine associated symptoms possibly through attenuating endogenous PACAP and cortisol levels. Therefore, ghrelin may hold therapeutic potentialities in managing the chronic migraine.

  12. Survey of Migraine Sufferers with Dogs to Evaluate for Canine Migraine-Alerting Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Amrita

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Anecdotal reports suggest that changes in dog behavior might be used to predict impending migraine episodes. This survey was designed to investigate how companion dogs react to migraines that occur in their owners. Design Online survey was available from January 4–31, 2012. Settings/location Survey was conducted through SurveyMonkey, with links to the survey posted at Migraine.com and promoted through social media. Subjects Adults ≥18 years old who experience migraine episodes and live with a dog were eligible to participate. Interventions and outcome measures Participants completed an 18-question online survey that asked about participant demographics, migraines, and their dog's behavior before or during migraine episodes. Results The survey was completed by 1029 adult migraineurs (94.9% women), with migraines typically occurring ≤8 days per month in 63.4% of participants. A recognized change in the dog's behavior prior to or during the initial phase of migraine was endorsed by 552 participants (53.7%), most commonly unusual attentiveness to the owner (39.9%). Among the 466 participants providing details about their dog's behavior with their migraines, 57.3% were able to identify dog alerting behavior before symptoms of a migraine attack would typically begin, with changes usually noticed within 2 hours before the onset of initial migraine symptoms. The dog's behavior was considered to be often or usually linked with the development of a migraine for 59.2% of migraineurs, and 35.8% of migraineurs endorsed beginning migraine treatments after the dog's behavior was recognized and before migraine symptoms had started. Participant demographics, migraine frequency, and breed of dog in the home were similar between the 470 participants with no alerting behavior endorsed and the 466 participants providing detailed alerting information. Conclusions About one in four migraineurs living with a companion dog endorsed recognizing a change in their

  13. Visual Attention in Children With Migraine: The Importance of Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Villa, Thaís Rodrigues; Agessi, Larissa M; Moutran, Andréa R C; Gabbai, Alberto A; Carvalho, Deusvenir de S

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the visual attention performance of children newly diagnosed with migraine, children undergoing migraine prophylaxis, and a healthy control group. Eighty-two children aged 8 to 12 years were divided into 3 groups: untreated migraine (n = 30), migraine prophylaxis (n = 22), and control (n = 30). All were subjected to a visual attention assessment with the Trail Making Test parts A and B, Letter-Cancellation Test, and the Brazilian Visual Attention Test 3rd edition. Although performance in attention tasks was within the normal range in all groups, children with untreated migraine performed significantly worse in some visual attention tests than did the control children or children undergoing migraine prophylaxis. The migraine prophylaxis group performed as well as the control group. The deregulation of the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the physiopathology of migraine might induce visual attention deficits, but an effective prophylactic treatment might reverse migraine symptoms.

  14. Visually triggered migraine headaches affect spatial orientation and balance in a helicopter pilot.

    PubMed

    Cho, A A; Clark, J B; Rupert, A H

    1995-04-01

    The authors present a case of an attack helicopter pilot with recurrent spatial disorientation (SD) flying with night vision goggles (NVG's), diagnosed as having visually triggered migraine headaches. Serial Dynamic Platform Posturography testing during an acute migraine attack demonstrated balance dysfunction under visual and somatosensory deficient conditions, correlating with headache intensity. Vestibular symptoms are associated with migraine, and may be triggered by visual stimuli. NVG scintillations in susceptible individuals may act as a visual trigger for migraine. Migraine phenomenon may be a contributing factor to SD, especially during NVG operations. The association of visual and vestibular dysfunction with migraine and aeromedical disposition of migraine in aviators is discussed.

  15. [The use of drugs in migraine].

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, M

    1976-06-02

    Drugs may be given either for treatment of the acute attack or as prophylaxis. Those most commonly used for the acute attack are analgesics, anti-emetics and ergotamine tartrate. A recent work (Volans, 1974) has shown that absorption may be impaired during a migraine attack. It is important therefore that not only is the analgesic given in an easily absorbed form but that a drug such as metaclopromide should be given to help restore the normal activity of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients having one or more attacks of migraine a week may need prophylactic treatment. The drugs now used include: Methysergide, should only be used for severe cases when no other treatment has been found helpful. Dihydroergotamine, the vasoconstrictor activity is less than in ergotamine tartrate and can therefore be used prophylactically. Pizotifen, possesses powerful anti-serotonin properties. It also has marked antihistamine and antitryptamine properties as well as being a central sedative and anti-depressant. Clonidine, in doses of 1 mugm/Kg renders the blood vessels less sensitive to circulating amines and seems to be effective in about one third of patients with classical or common migraine. Sympathetic Blocking Agents: alpha-blockers: indoramine has recently given some good results; beta-blockers: such as propanolol and pindolol have also been used. Full trials of all the substances are now in progress. Tranquilisers and anti-depressants, two of those commonly used are diazepam and amitryptiline. In either cases a small dose only should be used. Anticonvulsants, phenytoin in doses of 50-100 mgs per day is sometimes helpful particularly in children or in those who have abnormal electroencephalograms.

  16. [New physiopathological knowledge applied to migraine therapy and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Visens, Laura S

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is a very common condition that has a significant socioeconomic impact. Based on the most recent reports from the World Health Organization, its diagnosis and treatment are far from being optimal. Specialists have made great efforts to classify headaches, including migraines, in order to have a useful diagnostic tool and to guide treatment. On the other hand, advances made in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of migraines, new treatment options were developed. These new options include onabotulinum toxin A and topiramate. The prompt detection of migraine disorders and an appropriate treatment, both symptomatic and preventive, are key to relieve the personal, familiar, and social burden with special focus on chronic migraine.

  17. Chronic Migraine in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Özge, Aynur; Yalin, Osman Özgür

    2016-02-01

    Chronic migraine is defined as having more than 15 headache days in a month, half of these showing migraine features, for at least 3 months. It is a chronic painful syndrome with aspects such as psychiatric comorbid, decreased quality of life, and environmental and intrinsic psychological factors that make face-to-face treatment difficult. Children and adolescent migraine differ from adults as a result of growing brain and evolving disorder. In this paper, we will emphasize the definition, diagnosis, epidemiology, burden of life, and management of chronic migraine in children and adolescent.

  18. [Pharmacological treatment of acute catatonia].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Delgado, Christian L

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a neuropsychiatric syndrome of psychomotor dysregulation that can be present in a broad spectrum of clinical situations. Advances made over the last decades have progressively contributed to its clinical differentiation and its conceptual delimitation. Both Benzodiazepines (BZD) and Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) have been consolidated as first-line therapy. In this regard, a BZD response rate ranging from 70 to 90 per cent has been reported in different case series. Furthermore, NMDA receptor antagonists represent an emerging strategy in the therapeutic approach to the disorder. Most of the evidence that supports the aforementioned treatment recommendations arises from descriptive observational studies. Traditionally, catatonia pathophysiological research focused on the study of subcortical brain structures. Currently there exists compelling evidence that supports a cortical origin of the syndrome, emphasizing the role of the prefrontal cortex. Neuropsychiatric catatonia models that integrate clinical, pathophysiological, and neurobiological findings have been postulated. The aim of the present review is to summarize up-to-date available evidence associated with the pharmacotherapeutic approach to acute catatonia as well as the neurochemical basis of its effectiveness. Likewise, general measures intended to prevent morbimortality are subject to discussion herein.

  19. Efficacy and Tolerability of STOPAIN for a Migraine Attack

    PubMed Central

    St. Cyr, Andrea; Chen, Ashley; Bradley, Kathleen C.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Young, William B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether topical menthol 6% gel will relieve a migraine attack. Materials and Methods: A single-center, open-label pilot trial of 25 patients with at least 1 year of diagnosed episodic migraine and <15 headache days per month. Patients treated one migraine attack with STOPAIN topical menthol 6% gel to skull base within 2 h of headache onset. Headache pain severity was assessed prior to and after gel application. Results: Thirty-two patients enrolled and 25 completed the study. Prior to treatment, 7 patients had mild pain, 13 moderate pain, and 5 severe pain. Two hours following gel application, 7 (28%) patients had no pain, 7 (28%) mild pain, 6 (25%) moderate pain, and 5 (20%) severe pain. The majority of patients had similar pain intensity (8; 32%) or improvement (13; 52%). At 24-h, only two non-rescued patients still had mild headache. Of the 25 completers, 2 patients took rescue medication prior to the 2-h period, and an additional 10 patients rescued between 2 and 24 h. Conclusion: Study results showed a significant improvement in headache intensity by 2 h after gel application. This pilot study shows STOPAIN gel may be effective in treating an acute migraine attack. PMID:25699012

  20. New advances in prevention of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.; Assaedi, Ekhlas S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common disabling primary headaches, migraine continues to be under-diagnosed and under-treated. A migraine challenges not only the patient suffering from the migraine, but also physicians; especially in recognizing candidates for prophylaxis and selecting the appropriate preventive medication. Recently, there have been major advances in the diagnosis and treatment of migraine, with different guidelines of migraine management across the world. Here, we review migraine’s abortive and prophylactic medications, based on their pharmacologic category, citing their recommended doses, efficacy, and side effects. Additionally, we highlight the prophylactic treatment of specific patient populations and present suggested treatment approaches in view of recent international treatment guidelines that consider factors other than drug efficacy when choosing the optimal preventive therapy. Finally, we introduce drugs in different stages of development, which have novel mechanisms of action or have new therapeutic targets. PMID:27356650

  1. What efficacy measures are clinically relevant and should be used in Cochrane reviews of acute migraine trials? An alternative viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Steiner, T J

    2015-04-01

    I briefly review the purposes of efficacy measures, which go far beyond supporting new drug development. I use vignettes to illustrate the importance of functional recovery during the migraine attack, and argue that headache relief provides this. Sustained headache relief (SHR) is therefore a very worthwhile outcome when the alternative is a day of debilitating pain. As a measure, SHR may not be ideal for new drug development but it is informative to individuals, health care providers and politicians, and serves cost-effectiveness analysis better than any other. Cochrane are absolutely right to use it in systematic reviews along with the IHS-recommended measures.

  2. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, and C A, B, C, and D True/False: Migraines sometimes run in families. True/False: A bad headache is usually a sign of a brain tumor. Answer Key False. In most cases of ...

  3. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. [Antiepileptic drugs for the prevention of pediatric migraine].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Migraine, according to the criteria of the International Headache Society, occurs in about 5 to 10% of children and adolescents. Pediatric migraine can cause a significant impact on quality of life. As stated by the American Academy of Neurology and Child Neurology Society's migraine guidelines, situations for prophylaxis consideration include recurring migraines that significantly interfere with daily activities, despite acute therapy; frequent headaches; contraindication, overuse, or failure of acute therapy; adverse reactions to acute therapy; cost of acute and preventive therapies; patient preferences; and presence of uncommon migraine conditions. Preventive therapy may be warranted in as many as 30% of young patients with migraine seen in tertiary headache centers. Headache related disability can be measured by scoring systems such as the Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment Scale. Numerous medications have been studied to prevent migraines in children, including antihistamines, antidepressants, and antihypertensive agents. However, few high quality clinical trials actually demonstrate efficacy in this population. Recently, many studies dealt with the use of antiepileptic drugs in this indication but there is a paucity of placebo controlled studies. Both topiramate (TPM) and divalproex sodium have been studied in a randomized-controlled study. Only TPM showed efficacy, though, clearly, further controlled trials are needed to confirm these data. Besides unproven efficacy, adverse effects of valproic acid, such as weight gain, somnolence, and alopecia may limit its use. Additional studies are warranted before recommending levetiracetam (LVT), zonisamide (ZNS) and gabapentin (GBP) agents for migraine prophylaxis in children and adolescents.

  7. [Progression from episodic migraine to chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kiyomi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine is, essentially, an episodic disease. However, characteristics of headache of some episodic migraine change like as tension-type headache and number of headache days also increased, as a result, develop into chronic migraine.However, it is difficult to distinguish chronic migraine and medication oversuse headache. For this reason, and because of the general rule, The international Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta version (ICHD- 3beta) defined the patients meeting criteria for chronic migraine and for medication overuse headache should be given both diagnoses. The pathophysiology of transformation from episodic to chronic migraine is still unknown. Epidemiological study revealed several risk factors such as medication overusue, frequency of headache, obesity, low education, low income, snoring, depression, neck/head trauma and so on. It is important to control these risk factors for migraine chronification.

  8. Genetics of Migraine: Insights into the Molecular Basis of Migraine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-01

    migraine. Further studies are required to fully understand these findings and translate them into treatment options for migraine patients.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and potential cortical and trigeminothalamic mechanisms in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Anna P.; Holland, Philip R.; Akerman, Simon; Summ, Oliver; Fredrick, Joe

    2016-01-01

    A single pulse of transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be effective for the acute treatment of migraine with and without aura. Here we aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation, using a transcortical approach, in preclinical migraine models. We tested the susceptibility of cortical spreading depression, the experimental correlate of migraine aura, and further evaluated the response of spontaneous and evoked trigeminovascular activity of second order trigemontothalamic and third order thalamocortical neurons in rats. Single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited both mechanical and chemically-induced cortical spreading depression when administered immediately post-induction in rats, but not when administered preinduction, and when controlled by a sham stimulation. Additionally transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly inhibited the spontaneous and evoked firing rate of third order thalamocortical projection neurons, but not second order neurons in the trigeminocervical complex, suggesting a potential modulatory effect that may underlie its utility in migraine. In gyrencephalic cat cortices, when administered post-cortical spreading depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation blocked the propagation of cortical spreading depression in two of eight animals. These results are the first to demonstrate that cortical spreading depression can be blocked in vivo using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and further highlight a novel thalamocortical modulatory capacity that may explain the efficacy of magnetic stimulation in the treatment of migraine with and without aura. PMID:27246325

  10. Headache Following Occipital Brain Lesion: A Case of Migraine Triggered by Occipital Spikes?

    PubMed

    Vollono, Catello; Mariotti, Paolo; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Valentini, Piero; De Rose, Paola; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2015-10-01

    This study describes the case of an 8-year-old boy who developed a genuine migraine after the surgical excision, from the right occipital lobe, of brain abscesses due to selective infestation of the cerebrum by Entamoeba histolytica. After the surgical treatment, the boy presented daily headaches with typical migraine features, including right-side parieto-temporal pain, nausea, vomiting, and photophobia. Electroencephalography (EEG) showed epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe, although he never presented seizures. Clinical and neurophysiological observations were performed, including video-EEG and polygraphic recordings. EEG showed "interictal" epileptiform discharges in the right occipital lobe. A prolonged video-EEG recording performed before, during, and after an acute attack ruled out ictal or postictal migraine. In this boy, an occipital lesion caused occipital epileptiform EEG discharges without seizures, probably prevented by the treatment. We speculate that occipital spikes, in turn, could have caused a chronic headache with features of migraine without aura. Occipital epileptiform discharges, even in absence of seizures, may trigger a genuine migraine, probably by means of either the trigeminovascular or brainstem system.

  11. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case.

  12. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  13. Acute scurvy during treatment with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, D T; Dasanu, C A; Kauffman, C L

    2009-10-01

    The association of vitamin C deficiency with nutritional factors is commonly recognized. However, an acute form of scurvy can occur in patients with an acute systemic inflammatory response, which is produced by sepsis, medications, cancer or acute inflammation. The frequency of acute hypovitaminosis C in hospitalized patients is higher than previously recognized. We report the occurrence of acute signs and symptoms of scurvy (perifollicular petechiae, erythema, gingivitis and bleeding) in a patient hospitalized for treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma with high-dose interleukin-2. Concomitantly, serum vitamin C levels decreased to below normal. Better diets and longer lifespan may result a lower frequency of acute scurvy and a higher frequency of scurvy associated with systemic inflammatory responses. Therefore, increased awareness of this condition can lead to early recognition of the cutaneous signs of acute scurvy in hospitalized patients with acute illnesses or in receipt of biological agents, and prevent subsequent morbidity such as bleeding, anaemia, impaired immune defences, oedema or neurological symptoms.

  14. Treatment of acute lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Acute lower limb ischaemia poses a major threat to limb survival. For many years surgical thromboembolectomy was the mainstay of treatment. Recent years have brought an endovascular revolution in the management of acute lower limb ischaemia. A wide range of endovascular procedures can nowadays be employed, providing results at least as good as the traditional surgical approach. This paper is an overview of currently utilised endovascular options as well as recent modifications of standard surgical techniques.

  15. BGC20-1531, a novel, potent and selective prostanoid EP4 receptor antagonist: a putative new treatment for migraine headache

    PubMed Central

    Maubach, KA; Davis, RJ; Clark, DE; Fenton, G; Lockey, PM; Clark, KL; Oxford, AW; Hagan, RM; Routledge, C; Coleman, RA

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Prostanoid EP4 receptor antagonists may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of migraine since EP4 receptors have been shown to be involved in prostaglandin (PG)E2-induced cerebral vascular dilatation, which may be an important contributor to migraine pain. This study reports the pharmacological characterization of BGC20-1531, a novel EP4 receptor antagonist. Experimental approach: BGC20-1531 was characterized in radioligand binding and in vitro functional assays employing recombinant and native EP4 receptors. Changes in canine carotid haemodynamics were used to assess the pharmacodynamic profile of BGC20-1531 in vivo. Key results: BGC20-1531 exhibited high affinity at recombinant human EP4 receptors expressed in cell lines (pKB 7.6) and native EP4 receptors in human cerebral and meningeal artery (pKB 7.6–7.8) but showed no appreciable affinity at a wide range of other receptors (including other prostanoid receptors), channels, transporters and enzymes (pKi < 5). BGC20-1531 competitively antagonized PGE2-induced vasodilatation of human middle cerebral (pKB 7.8) and meningeal (pKB 7.6) arteries in vitro, but had no effect on responses induced by PGE2 on coronary, pulmonary or renal arteries in vitro. BGC20-1531 (1–10 mg·kg−1 i.v.) caused a dose-dependent antagonism of the PGE2-induced increase in canine carotid blood flow in vivo. Conclusions and implications: BGC20-1531 is a potent and selective antagonist at EP4 receptors in vitro and in vivo, with the potential to alleviate the symptoms of migraine that result from cerebral vasodilatation. BGC20-1531 is currently in clinical development for the treatment of migraine headache. PMID:19154437

  16. [Psychological therapy of migraine: systematic review].

    PubMed

    Fritsche, G; Kröner-Herwig, B; Kropp, P; Niederberger, U; Haag, G

    2013-06-01

    This review summarizes the various forms of behavioral treatment of migraine which could demonstrate empirical efficacy. The main unimodal kinds of treatment are thermal and electromyography (EMG) biofeedback training and progressive muscle relaxation. The various relaxation techniques do not differ in their efficacy in treating migraine. On average a reduction in migraine frequency of 35-45 % is achieved. The mean effect sizes (ES) of various biofeedback techniques are between 0.4 and 0.6. Cognitive-behavioral treatment is applied as a multimodal treatment and on average achieves an improvement in migraine activity by 39 % and an ES of 0.54. All behavioral procedures can be used in combination or as an alternative to drug prophylaxis with comparable success. A combination of pharmacological and behavioral treatment can achieve additional success. There is strong evidence for the clinically significant efficacy of all forms of behavioral treatment in childhood and adolescence. There are no signs of differential indications.

  17. Epigone migraine vertigo (EMV): a late migraine equivalent.

    PubMed

    Pagnini, P; Vannucchi, P; Giannoni, B; Pecci, R

    2014-02-01

    Migrainous headache is determined by pathogenetic mechanisms that are also able to affect the peripheral and/or central vestibular system, so that vestibular symptoms may substitute and/or present with headache. We are convinced that there can be many different manifestations of vestibular disorders in migrainous patients, representing true different clinical entities due to their different characteristics and temporal relashionship with headache. Based on such considerations, we proposed a classification of vertigo and other vestibular disorders related to migraine, and believe that a particular variant of migraine-related vertigo should be introduced, namely "epigone migraine vertigo" (EMV): this could be a kind of late migraine equivalent, i.e. a kind of vertigo, migrainous in origin, starting late in the lifetime that substitutes, as an equivalent, pre-existing migraine headache. To clarify this particular clinical picture, we report three illustrative clinical cases among 28 patients collected during an observation period of 13 years (November 1991 - November 2004). For all patients, we collected complete personal clinical history. All patients underwent standard neurotological examination, looking for spontaneous-positional, gaze-evoked and caloric induced nystagmus, using an infrared video camera. We also performed a head shaking test (HST) and an head thrust test (HTT). Ocular motility was tested looking at saccades and smooth pursuit. To exclude other significant neurological pathologies, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium was performed. During the three months after the first visit, patients were invited to keep a diary noting frequency, intensity and duration of vertigo attacks. After that period, we suggested that they use prophylactic treatment with flunarizine (5 mg per day) and/or acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg per day), or propranolol (40 mg twice a day). All patients were again recommended to note in their diary the frequency

  18. [Chronic migraine: its epidemiology and impact].

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rosich, Patricia

    2012-04-10

    Chronic migraine (that is to say, cases where migraine is suffered on 15 or more days per month) is an illness that affects approximately 0.5-2.5% of the population, depending on the statistics that are analysed and the definition of chronic migraine used. The incidence of transformation from episodic to chronic migraine is 3% per year, and 6% go from low-frequency (1-9 days/month) to high-frequency migraine (10-14 days/month). The risk factors for developing chronic migraine are genetic, frequent use of painkillers, being female, having poor hygienic-dietary habits, developing anxiety/depression, having a low socioeconomic status, suffering from obesity and being divorced or widowed. Despite the modification of the risk factors, it has still not been proved that the chances of developing chronic migraine can be lowered. Chronic migraine has an important impact on patients' quality of life, as measured on disability, quality of life and impact on daily activities scales. These patients have twice the chance of suffering from depression, anxiety and chronic pain, which means they therefore need greater health care. Many have still to be diagnosed and treated, however. In a Spanish epidemiological study, a follow-up was carried out on patients with chronic daily headache after undergoing a therapeutic intervention and up to 60% of the patients showed improvement. In other words, with increased interest and diagnosis of this illness, many patients would benefit from suitable treatments.

  19. Modeling Neural Immune Signaling of Episodic and Chronic Migraine Using Spreading Depression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Heidi M.; Kraig, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Migraine and its transformation to chronic migraine are healthcare burdens in need of improved treatment options. We seek to define how neural immune signaling modulates the susceptibility to migraine, modeled in vitro using spreading depression (SD), as a means to develop novel therapeutic targets for episodic and chronic migraine. SD is the likely cause of migraine aura and migraine pain. It is a paroxysmal loss of neuronal function triggered by initially increased neuronal activity, which slowly propagates within susceptible brain regions. Normal brain function is exquisitely sensitive to, and relies on, coincident low-level immune signaling. Thus, neural immune signaling likely affects electrical activity of SD, and therefore migraine. Pain perception studies of SD in whole animals are fraught with difficulties, but whole animals are well suited to examine systems biology aspects of migraine since SD activates trigeminal nociceptive pathways. However, whole animal studies alone cannot be used to decipher the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms of SD. Instead, in vitro preparations where environmental conditions can be controlled are necessary. Here, it is important to recognize limitations of acute slices and distinct advantages of hippocampal slice cultures. Acute brain slices cannot reveal subtle changes in immune signaling since preparing the slices alone triggers: pro-inflammatory changes that last days, epileptiform behavior due to high levels of oxygen tension needed to vitalize the slices, and irreversible cell injury at anoxic slice centers. In contrast, we examine immune signaling in mature hippocampal slice cultures since the cultures closely parallel their in vivo counterpart with mature trisynaptic function; show quiescent astrocytes, microglia, and cytokine levels; and SD is easily induced in an unanesthetized preparation. Furthermore, the slices are long-lived and SD can be induced on consecutive days without injury, making this preparation the

  20. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine (like cola drinks) certain foods (cheese, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, fatty or fried food, lunch meats, ... from your migraine triggers. If certain foods like chocolate or cheese or caffeinated drinks trigger your migraines, ...

  1. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  2. Migraine disorder: workplace implications and solutions.

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy A

    2007-02-01

    Migraine disorder is disabling, costly, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. It affects employees' quality of life and ability to work or attend school, potentially decreasing their earning ability. Migraine disorder impacts the workplace substantially through absenteeism and presenteeism and increases health care costs. Although research on migraine disorder is expansive, no systematic research tool or design exists within population studies. This may account for the different prevalence rates seen, especially in African studies, which rely on verbal interviews instead of mail or telephone surveys. Women have a higher prevalence rate throughout the research, but they seek help more often than men. This may contribute to their higher rates, although hormones also play a role. Occupational health nurses can affect the outcome of migraine disorder for employees and employers. They can assist in identifying those employees with migraine disorder who are not diagnosed, those who have not investigated the various available medications, or the lifestyle changes that would decrease the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. Research is needed to quantify the cost savings of workplace intervention in identifying employees with migraine disorder and its effect on absenteeism, presenteeism, and health care use. Occupational health nurses can determine the effectiveness of education by measuring motivation, lifestyle changes, and workplace modification against the intensity and frequency of migraine attacks. This, in turn, will yield measurable results in reducing absenteeism and presenteeism in the workplace. Occupational health nurses can spread this information through employees to their families. As more undiagnosed and undertreated individuals with migraine become educated and pursue diagnosis, treatment, and lifestyle changes, a measurable decrease in health care use and costs may occur. The economic impact of migraine disorder, in terms of workplace absenteeism and

  3. Management of menstrual migraine: a review of current abortive and prophylactic therapies.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Elizabeth; Bushnell, Cheryl

    2010-10-01

    After menarche, women have an increased prevalence of migraine compared to men. There is significant variability in the frequency and severity of migraine throughout the menstrual cycle. Women report migraines occur more frequently during menses, and that those are more severe than other migraines. This creates a unique challenge of effectively treating menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. As with treatment of other migraines, both abortive and prophylactic treatment regimens are used. Triptans demonstrate efficacy in the abortive management of menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. For migraines that occur primarily during menses or that are particularly resistant to other therapies, intermittent prophylactic therapies can be used. Naproxen and estrogens have been studied for this use. More recently, triptans have been examined and have shown efficacy for intermittent prophylaxis of menstrual migraine.

  4. Management of Menstrual Migraine: A Review of Current Abortive and Prophylactic Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    After menarche, women have an increased prevalence of migraine compared to men. There is significant variability in the frequency and severity of migraine throughout the menstrual cycle. Women report migraines occur more frequently during menses, and that those are more severe than other migraines. This creates a unique challenge of effectively treating menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. As with treatment of other migraines, both abortive and prophylactic treatment regimens are used. Triptans demonstrate efficacy in the abortive management of menstrually related and pure menstrual migraines. For migraines that occur primarily during menses or that are particularly resistant to other therapies, intermittent prophylactic therapies can be used. Naproxen and estrogens have been studied for this use. More recently, triptans have been examined and have shown efficacy for intermittent prophylaxis of menstrual migraine. PMID:20697846

  5. Bowenwork for Migraine Relief: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Migraine is a complex neurological disorder characterized by episodic, neurogenic, cerebrovascular inflammation and hypersensitization of brain tissues and the central nervous system, causing severe pain and debility. Research literature points mostly to pharmaceutical prophylactic and symptomatic treatments, nonpharmaceutical, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches, acupuncture, massage and bodywork studies, and none has been published on Bowenwork for migraine intervention. This prospective case report describes one migraineur’s response to Bowenwork (a soft-tissue bodywork technique) with cessation of migraine, neck pain, and analgesic consumption, and improved well-being and activity function. Methods The client received 14 Bowenwork sessions over a four-month period using the self-reporting Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile version 2 (MYMOP2) to evaluate clinically meaningful changes. Baseline MYMOP2 data were recorded prior to the first and subsequent Bowenwork sessions to track changes in migraine and neck pain occurrences, other symptoms, medication use, functional ability and sense of well-being. Specific Bowenwork procedures were applied in each session to address various symptoms. The client did not receive other migraine treatment during this study. Participant A 66-year-old Caucasian female with a history of debilitating migraine since childhood, and severe neck pain and jaw injuries resulting from two motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) sustained as an adult. She had previously sought medical, pharmaceutical and CAM treatments for migraine, neck pain, and right-sided thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) symptoms, with no satisfactory relief. Results The client progressively reported decreased migraine and neck pain until acquiring a respiratory infection with prolonged coughing spells causing symptoms to recur (session 11). Prior to session 12, she experienced an allergic reaction to ingesting an unknown food allergen

  6. Abdominal Migraine in a Middle-aged Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kunishi, Yosuke; Iwata, Yuri; Ota, Mitsuyasu; Kurakami, Yuichi; Matsubayashi, Mao; Kanno, Masatomo; Kuboi, Yoriko; Yoshie, Koichiro; Kato, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with recurrent, severe abdominal pain. Laboratory tests and imaging were insignificant, and treatment for functional dyspepsia was ineffective. The poorly localized, dull, and severe abdominal pain, associated with anorexia, nausea, and vomiting, was consistent with abdominal migraine. The symptoms were relieved by loxoprofen and lomerizine, which are used in the treatment of migraine. We herein report a case of abdominal migraine in a middle-aged woman. Abdominal migraine should be considered as a cause of abdominal pain as it might easily be relieved by appropriate treatment. PMID:27725538

  7. Treatment of acute and remote symptomatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2009-07-01

    In principle, the use of anticonvulsant drugs does not differ between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, but control of acute symptomatic seizures requires simultaneous treatment of the underlying etiology. Prevention of remote seizures when the risk is known to be high has been the subject of intense efforts at antiepileptogenesis, but the optimal duration of treatment after an injury is not yet known. Appropriate evaluation of a seizure depends on individual circumstances, but findings on examination, laboratory tests (serum electrolytes, magnesium, glucose, assessment of hepatic and renal function), and brain imaging (CT scan or MRI) are necessary to determine the most likely cause. Lumbar puncture is always required when there is suspicion of meningitis or encephalitis. Preferred medications for treatment of acute symptomatic seizures or status epilepticus are those available for intravenous use, such as benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin or phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, and phenobarbital. Diazepam is also available as a gel for rectal administration. Seizures that occur in patients with epilepsy because of missed antiepileptic drugs or inadequate serum levels should be treated with additional doses of their regular medications; loading doses can be administered with minimal toxicity in tolerant patients. Surgery is rarely necessary in the acute setting except for intracerebral lesions with rapidly rising intracranial pressure and impending herniation. After seizures are controlled, the provoking condition must also be determined and treated.

  8. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Migraine Patients: Migraine, Trauma and Alexithymia

    PubMed Central

    KARŞIKAYA, Süreyya; KAVAKCI, Önder; KUĞU, Nesim; GÜLER, Ayşegül Selcen

    2013-01-01

    whether the practices aimed at treating the PTSD and alexithymic features can contribute to the treatment of migraine headaches or not.

  9. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  10. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  12. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  13. Genetics Home Reference: sporadic hemiplegic migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions sporadic hemiplegic migraine sporadic hemiplegic migraine Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Sporadic hemiplegic migraine is a rare form of migraine headache. Migraines ...

  14. The Face of Chronic Migraine Which Has Started to be Clarified

    PubMed Central

    AYDIN ÖZEMİR, Zeynep; BAYKAN, Betül

    2013-01-01

    Recently, information about migraine which is generally characterized with attacks has gradually increased. In some patients with migraine, progression may be observed such that the frequency and time of the attacks are increased and an attack lasts for days. This condition is called chronic migraine (CM). According to the last classification, chronic migraine is defined as headache which occurs 15 days a month or more frequently at least 8 of which show the characteristic properties of migraine or response to migraine-specific treatment. The diagnostic cirteria of chronic migraine, its differences from other chronic daily headaches and the question if it is a migraine form with a high frequency which transforms from episodic migraine or a completely different pathophysiological picture are still contradictory. Clarifying these issues is possible with clinical studies as well as increasing the studies directed to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms.

  15. Intravenous dihydroergotamine therapy for pediatric abdominal migraines.

    PubMed

    Raina, Madiha; Chelimsky, Gisela; Chelimsky, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal migraines present with debilitating symptoms in adolescence. At our institution, the gastroenterology, neurology, and autonomic departments collaborated in treating patients with such presentations. This case series describes 6 patients who were given intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE) for presumed abdominal migraines. DHE was only used when other agents like amitriptyline, verapamil, topiramate, or depakote had proved ineffective. DHE was started at 0.5 mg dose and on average 7 to 9 mg were given on each hospitalization. Patient ages ranged from 13 to 19 years with the majority being female. One patient did not respond to treatment. One patient was admitted 4 times for symptoms of abdominal migraines resolving with DHE. The average time between symptom relapse was about 5 to 12 months. Five of our 6 patients responded to the infusion without significant side effects. Based on these case series, DHE may be a treatment option in children with intractable abdominal migraine.

  16. Pycnogenol treatment of acute hemorrhoidal episodes.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Errichi, Bruno; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Ricci, Andrea; Dugall, Mark; Cornelli, Umberto; Cacchio, Marisa; Rohdewald, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 h of onset of an acute attack, patients were enrolled and signs and symptoms were scored. This evaluation was repeated after seven days' treatment and again seven days following treatment cessation. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol-treated groups than in the control group given placebo (p < 0.05), showing the efficacy of Pycnogenol for relieving signs and symptoms of acute external hemorrhoids. In a group of patients given topical (0.5%) Pycnogenol in addition to oral Pycnogenol the improvement in symptoms set in significantly faster and was more pronounced. The most prominent symptom, hemorrhoidal bleeding, was completely absent in all patients treated with Pycnogenol for seven days and also at the 14 days follow-up. In contrast, bleedings were still observed in the control group during the two weeks follow-up. This study indicates that Pycnogenol, both in oral and in topical form, is effective for controlling this common, disabling health problem. The application of Pycnogenol eases the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks and help avoid bleedings.

  17. Acute hepatitis C: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozaras, Resat; Tahan, Veysel

    2009-04-01

    HCV can cause acute or chronic hepatitis and is a health problem all over the world. It is one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and is a common indication for liver transplantation. Unrecognized patients with HCV infection may transmit the virus to uninfected people. The acute form of the disease leads to chronic hepatitis in the majority of cases. Since the success rate of treatment given in the chronic phase is much lower than that given in the acute phase, recognizing acute hepatitis is critical. Although HCV is less prevalent since 1990s in the Western world after improved blood-donor screening programs, needle-exchange facilities and education among intravenous drug users, it is still endemic in some regions, including African countries, Egypt, Taiwan, China and Japan. Acute HCV infection may be a challenge for the clinician; since it is often asymptomatic, detection and diagnosis are usually difficult. After an incubation period of 7 weeks (2-12 weeks), only a minority of patients (10-15%) report symptoms. The spontaneous clearance of the virus is more frequent primarily during the first 3 months of clinical onset of the disease, but may occur anytime during the 6 months of acute infection. This spontaneous resolution seems to be more frequent in symptomatic cases. Viremia persisting more than 6 months is accepted as chronic infection. The virus is transmitted more frequently through infected blood or body fluids. Detection of antibodies against HCV is not a reliable method of diagnosing acute HCV infection since the appearance of antibodies against HCV can be delayed in up to 30% of patients at the onset of symptoms. Thus, the diagnosis of acute hepatitis C relies on the qualitative detection of HCV RNA, which may appear as early as 1-2 weeks after exposure quickly followed by highly elevated alanine aminotransferase. After a follow-up period of 8-12 weeks for allowing spontaneous resolution, treatment should be initiated

  18. The Cerebellum and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Maurice; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and pathophysiological evidences connect migraine and the cerebellum. Literature on documented cerebellar abnormalities in migraine, however, is relatively sparse. Cerebellar involvement may be observed in 4 types of migraines: in the widespread migraine with aura (MWA) and migraine without aura (MWoA) forms; in particular subtypes of migraine such as basilar-type migraine (BTM); and in the genetically driven autosomal dominant familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) forms. Cerebellar dysfunction in migraineurs varies largely in severity, and may be subclinical. Purkinje cells express calcium channels that are related to the pathophysiology of both inherited forms of migraine and primary ataxias, mostly spinal cerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA-6) and episodic ataxia type 2 (EA-2). Genetically driven ion channels dysfunction leads to hyperexcitability in the brain and cerebellum, possibly facilitating spreading depression waves in both locations. This review focuses on the cerebellar involvement in migraine, the relevant ataxias and their association with this primary headache, and discusses some of the pathophysiological processes putatively underlying these diseases. PMID:17578530

  19. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in patients with and without vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Vitkovic, Jessica; Winoto, Arimbi; Rance, Gary; Dowell, Richard; Paine, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation programs do appear to play a beneficial role in the treatment of dizziness in patients with vestibular migraine. Anecdotally, however, patients with vestibular migraine may report persistent significant symptoms at the end of a standard treatment period where other non-migrainous patients are accomplishing their treatment goals. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation in patients with vestibular migraine compared to patients with vestibular symptoms without migraine. Thirty-six patients (vestibular migraine = 20, vestibular impairment = 16) with significant daily vestibular symptoms received a nine week customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Each subject attended five therapy appointments occurring at initial, two, five, nine and six months. A range of subjective and physical performance outcome measures were taken at baseline, nine weeks and six months. The vestibular migraine group showed poorer subjective performance at the onset of therapy, which was not reflected in the difference in physical performance between the groups. Both groups benefitted equally from rehabilitation. The same degree of improvement was observed in the migraine group regardless of medication regime. This study has validated vestibular rehabilitation as an effective treatment in dizzy patients both with and without vestibular migraine where the use of medication did not preclude benefit from therapy. However, further research is required to clarify the role of specific vestibular suppressant medications and the scheduling of their use in relation to physical therapy.

  20. Migraine with aura and patent foramen ovale: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Finocchi, C; Del Sette, M

    2015-05-01

    Several observational studies report that subjects with migraine with aura have a higher prevalence of right-to left shunt, commonly due to patent foramen ovale, and that patent foramen ovale is more prevalent in subjects with migraine with aura. Although migraine without aura has been less extensively studied, it does not seem to be associated with an increased prevalence of right-to left shunt. The mechanism that underlies the possible relationship between patent foramen ovale and migraine with aura remains speculative. The proposed mechanisms are migraine-triggering vasoactive chemicals bypassing the pulmonary filter and reaching the cerebral circulation and paradoxical microembolization. However, it is unclear, at this time, if there is a causal or comorbid association between the two conditions. In some families atrial shunts show a dominant inheritance that seems to be linked to inheritance of migraine with aura. Migraine with aura is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, and patent foramen ovale is present more frequently in patients with cryptogenic stroke than in controls. At this moment, there is no convincing evidence that excess stroke risk of migraine is simply mediated by patent foramen ovale through paradoxical embolism. Several non-controlled studies suggest that closure of the foramen ovale significantly reduces attack frequency in migraine patient, but the only prospective placebo-controlled trial does not support these results. Patent foramen ovale closure, at present, is not indicated as a treatment for migraine in clinical practice.

  1. Human factors validation study of 3 mg sumatriptan autoinjector, for migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Munjal, Sagar; Kumar, Rajesh; Andre, Anthony D; Valladao, Will; Ramirez, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine pain relief is reported by more than 50% of patients who receive low dose (3 mg) of sumatriptan. Currently, there is no two-step autoinjector of low-dose sumatriptan available on the market for acute migraine treatment. To fulfill this need, a fully assembled, single-dose, subcutaneous autoinjector (sumatriptan 3 mg; product-code DFN-11) was developed. The device allows for injection with a simple two-step, push-to-inject process and provides feedback of the injection activation, progress, and completion. Objective To determine if DFN-11 autoinjector can be used correctly and safely by migraine patients. Methods and participants A human factors validation study was conducted with 45 migraine patients (30 oral-only medications users; 15 injectable sumatriptan users) who performed one unaided simulated injection. Two days prior, half the oral participants were briefly trained. All others were only given the device to inspect and written instructions to review. No injections were performed during the initial session. All participants received written instructions at the injection session. Results All participants (45/45; 100%) performed the injection without any errors. Objective measures included device removal from packaging, cap removal, expiration date check, inspection of fluid in window, identification of allowable injection site, proper device positioning, dose confirmation, and device disposal. All participants (45/45; 100%) reported no difficulty administering the injection and no concerns about using the autoinjector during a severe migraine onset. Conclusion The results showed that the DFN-11 autoinjector can be used with safe handling without patterns of confusion, failures, high-risk errors, wet injections, or patient safety risks. The DFN-11 autoinjector was validated to be used correctly and safely by migraine patients, whether they were injection experienced, unexperienced, trained, or self-trained. PMID:27313479

  2. Spectrum of migraine variants and beyond: The individual syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Borad, Nirali

    2016-01-01

    "Migraine-related conditions" are probably the second most common condition after seizure encountered in pediatric neurology requiring frequent Emergency Department visits. Among migraines, migraine-related condition presents with an acute onset sign or symptom other than headache or visual aura of unknown etiology. A delay in diagnosis is a common occurrence. Previously, the authors proposed a common clinical profile and suggested that the future review should seek the applicability of the common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis of migraine-related individual syndromes. Authors describe the clinical characteristics and differential diagnosis of the spectrum of migraine variants and beyond in children.

  3. Headache-related health resource utilisation in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Joanna C; Devine, Emily B; Lipton, Richard B; Bloudek, Lisa M; Varon, Sepideh F; Blumenfeld, Andrew M; Goadsby, Peter J; Buse, Dawn C; Sullivan, Sean D

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe headache-related health resource usage in chronic and episodic migraine across six countries. Methods A web-based questionnaire eliciting data on several topics, including health resource usage, was administered to panellists with migraine from the USA, Canada, UK, Germany, France and Australia. Respondents were grouped into episodic and chronic migraine, based on reported headache phenotype and headache-day frequency. ORs were calculated, comparing usage in each country to that in the US, controlling for chronic versus episodic migraine and other factors. Results Relative to the USA, the odds of visiting a provider for headache during the preceding 3 months were significantly higher in all countries, except Germany. Respondents in France were more likely to report having a provider they typically visited for headache-related care. The odds of visiting the emergency department for headache were significantly lower in France, the UK and Germany, and hospitalisation for headache was significantly more frequent in Canada and Australia. Respondents from all countries, except Canada, were more likely to report currently using a prescription-acute treatment, and those from France were more likely to report trying more than three acute treatments. Preventive treatment use did not differ significantly. Conclusions Headache-related resource usage differed significantly between the USA and other countries. US respondents were generally less likely to report recent provider visits and use of prescription-acute treatments. They were more likely to report emergency department visits than in European countries, but less likely to report hospitalisation than in Canada and Australia. PMID:23813744

  4. The use of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox(®)) in the treatment of chronic migraine at the Parma Headache Centre: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Russo, Marco; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Taga, Arens; Genovese, Antonio; Veronesi, Licia; Pasquarella, Cesira; Sansebastiano, Giuliano Ezio; Torelli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating headache, whose treatment is often complicated by the concomitant overuse of symptomatic medication and by the poor efficacy of standard prophylactic treatments. The PREEMPT studies have demonstrated the efficacy and tolerability of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox(®)) in the treatment of this headache type. Data about its use in clinical practice are still scarce. Our study evaluated all subjects with chronic migraine who were treated with onabotulinum toxin A between February 2014 and November 2015 at the Parma Headache Centre. Botox was injected according to the PREEMPT paradigm every 3 months. The data about variations in the number of headache days and in symptomatic medication intake before and after the Botox injections were collected from the patients' headache diaries. The study also evaluated tolerability to treatment, disability, and depressive symptoms. Of the 52 treated subjects, 14 received Botox treatment for at least 9 months and showed a significant decrease in the median number of headache days (from 19 to 14.5, p = 0.011) and in the median number of days of symptomatic medications intake and symptomatic drugs. Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. The average MIDAS and BDI-II scores after 9 months were reduced, though not significantly. The treatment with Botox proved effective and well tolerated in our clinical practice. Further studies on larger patient samples will help shed light on the persistence of the drug's effect at long term and identify the predictive factors of response to treatment.

  5. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  6. Calcium channels and migraine.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  7. Pathophysiology of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    BORAN, H. Evren; BOLAY, Hayrunnisa

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a serious health problem which impair quality of life. It is the second most common primary headache that affects approximately more than %10 people in general population. Migraine pathophysiology is still unclear. Increasing results of studies suggest to migraine pathophysiology is related with primary neuronal mechanisms. Migraine pain starts in which region of brain and what brain regions are activated in different stages is unenlightened. There is evidences that growing number of studies which using new imaging techniques as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonans imaging (fMRI) show that migraine and cluster headaches are related with neuronal structures and vasodilatation. There are four phases to a migraine. The prodrome phase, aura, the attack, and the postdrome phase. Some datas obtained from last ten years indicate that cortical excitability has increased in interictal phase too. For many years, studies in rodents show trgimenial nerve is activated and it leads to vasodilatation and neurogenic inflammation in the headache phase. Although the majority of patients encountered in clinical practice are migraine without aura or chronic migraine, experimental studies of the migraine pathophysiology are focusing on the aura model which is used cortical spreading depression.

  8. Migraine in women.

    PubMed

    Lay, Christine L; Broner, Susan W

    2009-05-01

    Of the nearly 32 million Americans with migraine, 24 million are women. It is a disorder affecting women throughout their lifetimes, from childhood and puberty through the postmenopausal years. In childhood, before puberty girls are afflicted with migraine at approximately the same rate as boys, but after puberty, there is an emerging female predominance. Estrogen plays a key role in this epidemiologic variation but is not the only factor. There are numerous times when hormonal influences have an impact on migraine and its pattern, including menarche, oral contraceptive use, pregnancy, perimenopause, and menopause. Hence practitioners treating women with migraine need to have a clear understanding of these special considerations.

  9. Art and Migraine: Researching the Relationship between Artmaking and Pain Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    This research project extends a previous study (Vick & Sexton-Radek, 1999) in examining the relationship between artmaking and pain among 127 migraine sufferers. A basic overview of migraine symptoms and treatment is presented along with a discussion of concepts relating to "migraine art" in order to provide a context for this project. Surveys…

  10. Art and Migraine: Researching the Relationship between Artmaking and Pain Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This research project extends a previous study (Vick & Sexton-Radek, 1999) in examining the relationship between artmaking and pain among 127 migraine sufferers. A basic overview of migraine symptoms and treatment is presented along with a discussion of concepts relating to "migraine art" in order to provide a context for this project. Surveys…

  11. Acupoint injection of onabotulinumtoxin A for migraines.

    PubMed

    Hou, Min; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Zhang, Yi; Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Ren, Wen-Ting; Cui, Guang-Fu; Xin, Le; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2015-10-30

    Onabotulinumtoxin A (BoNTA) has been reported to be effective in the therapy for migraines. Acupuncture has been used worldwide for the treatment of migraine attacks. Injection of a small amount of drug at acupuncture points is an innovation as compared to traditional acupuncture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of fixed (muscle)-site and acupoint-site injections of BoNTA for migraine therapy in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial extending over four months. Subjects with both episodic and chronic migraines respectively received a placebo (n = 19) or BoNTA (2.5 U each site, 25 U per subject) injection at fixed-sites (n = 41) including occipitofrontalis, corrugator supercilii, temporalis and trapeziue, or at acupoint-sites (n = 42) including Yintang (EX-HN3), Taiyang (EX-HN5), Baihui (GV20), Shuaigu (GB8), Fengchi (GB20) and Tianzhu (BL10). The variations between baseline and BoNTA post-injection for four months were calculated monthly as outcome measures. BoNTA injections at fixed-sites and acupoint-sites significantly reduced the migraine attack frequency, intensity, duration and associated symptoms for four months compared with placebo (p < 0.01). The efficacy of BoNTA for migraines in the acupoint-site group (93% improvement) was more significant than that in the fixed-site group (85% improvement) (p < 0.01). BoNTA administration for migraines is effective, and at acupoint-sites shows more efficacy than at fixed-sites. Further blinded studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of a low dose toxin (25 U) introduced with this methodology in chronic and episodic migraines.

  12. Migraine and erythrocyte biology: a review.

    PubMed

    Lippi, G; Cervellin, G; Mattiuzzi, C

    2014-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder that is conventionally classified according to the presence or absence of aura. The pathogenesis of this disorder entails a complex interplay of neurovascular factors, that trigger reduction of cerebral blood flow followed by reactive vasodilatation. Despite major emphasis has been placed on the investigation of putative biomarkers that could predict response to specific treatments and prophylaxis, less focus has been directed at the association between migraine and erythrocytosis. Erythrocytosis is typically accompanied by hyperviscosity, that is now considered a crucial determinant in the pathogenesis of migraine. The results of some epidemiological investigations are in substantial agreement to confirm the existence of a significant relationship between increased haemoglobin levels and migraine, whereas some case reports have also reported an effective improvement of symptoms after reduction of erythrocyte count by therapeutic venesection. Interesting evidence has recently emerged from the assessment of red blood cell distribution width (RDW), a simple and inexpensive measure of anysocytosis that has been also associated with a variety of ischaemic and thrombotic disorders other than migraine. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the current clinical and epidemiological evidence linking migraine and erythrocyte biology.

  13. Gabapentin inhibits central sensitization during migraine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanbo; Shao, Guo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Sijie; Niu, Jingzhong; Hu, Dongmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Ji, Xunming

    2013-11-15

    Peripheral and central sensitizations are phenomena that occur during migraine. The role of pentin, a migraine preventive drug, on central sensitization remains unclear. In this study, a rat model of migraine was established by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, and the an-imals were given intragastric gabapentin. Changes in amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and protein kinase C membrane translocation in the spinal trigeminal nucleus were examined to clarify the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of gabapentin in the treatment of central sensitization during migraine. Electrophysiology, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and western blot analysis results revealed that gabapentin reduces neuronal excitability in the spinal nucleus in the trigeminal nerve, decreases excitatory amino acid content and inhibits the activation of protein ki-nase C. This provides evidence that excitatory amino acids and protein kinase C are involved in the formation and maintenance of central sensitization during migraine. Gabapentin inhibits migraine by reducing excitatory amino acid content in the cerebrospinal fluid and inhibiting protein kinase C ac-tivation.

  14. [Migraine and epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are both common episodic disorders that share many clinical features and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The comorbidity of these two conditions is well known. However, the temporal association between migraine and epilepsy is a controversial issue, since these two conditions may occur in numerous ways. Four types of association between headache and epileptic seizure are recognized: pre-ictal headache, headache as the expression of an epileptic manifestation, post-ictal headache, and inter-ictal headache. The classification of epilepsy by the International League Against Epilepsy did not refer to the epileptic headache. On the other hand, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (ICHD-3) defines three entities: migraine aura-triggered seizure which sometimes referred to as migralepsy, hemicrania epileptica, and post-ictal headache. However, ICHD-3 mentions that there is a complex and bidirectional association between migraine and epilepsy. Most of the previous reports of migralepsy corresponded to occipital seizures that mimic migraine with aura. The term migralepsy has recently been criticized. Migraine and epilepsy share several pathophysiological mechanisms which involve neurotransmitters and iron channel dysfunctions. There is the hypothesis of a shared genetic susceptibility to migraine and epilepsy. Strong support of a shared genetic basis comes from familial hemiplegic migraine.

  15. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... after age 12, during and after puberty, migraines affect girls three times more often than boys. Migraines aren't contagious, ... Answer all the questions in the diary each time you have a headache. The ... which can help you to go to sleep and get rid of the headache medicines to ...

  16. Reversible hypohidrosis with topiramate therapy for chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Shira Y; Robbins, Matthew S; Cascella, Clair; Sheikh, Huma U; Grosberg, Brian M

    2010-04-01

    Topiramate is an anticonvulsant medication that is widely used for migraine prophylaxis. Hypohidrosis and hyperthermia are 2 rare adverse effects of topiramate treatment, which have mainly occurred in pediatric epilepsy patients. Herein, we describe the first case of reversible hypohidrosis in an adult patient treated with topiramate for chronic migraine.

  17. Treatment of acute cyanide intoxication with hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wesson, D E; Foley, R; Sabatini, S; Wharton, J; Kapusnik, J; Kurtzman, N A

    1985-01-01

    A dramatic response was noted in a patient at our hospital who received hemodialysis therapy for severe acidosis secondary to an unknown toxin, subsequently identified as cyanide. We were unable to find any information concerning the hemodialysis clearance and extraction ratio of cyanide; thus, we studied the effect of hemodialysis in dogs receiving a constant infusion of cyanide with and without a simultaneous infusion of thiosulfate. The hemodialysis clearance of cyanide in the presence of thiosulfate was 38.3 +/- 5.4 ml/min with an extraction ratio of 0.43 +/- 0.06 (n = 4). Hemodialysis was found to increase the lethal dose of cyanide without thiosulfate infusion, and a further increase was noted with the thiosulfate infusion. Thiosulfate promotes mitochondrial metabolism of cyanide to thiocyanate. The end product, thiocyanate, is quickly removed by hemodialysis. We believe that the demonstrated effectiveness of hemodialysis in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication is related not only to the hemodialysis clearance of cyanide, but also to the removal of its metabolic end product, thiocyanate. Based on our observations, we feel that hemodialysis is an effective adjunct in the treatment of acute cyanide intoxication.

  18. [Surgical and therapeutic treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Sandakov, P Ia; Samartsev, V A; Mineev, D A

    2014-01-01

    It was analyzed the features of different forms of acute pancreatitis in 1001 patients including 324 cases with pancreatonecrosis and 245 patients with middle severity of disease. It was shown that monitoring of patients' condition and destructive process in pancreas by using of modified SOFA-scale and evaluation of sonographic signs of inflammation are advisable. Flow indicators including resistance index and the maximum flow velocity in celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery represented severity of gland's destruction. Sonographic investigation revealed small-focal pancreonecrosis. It allows to differentiate medical tactics. Surgical treatment was performed in 582 patients. Efficiency of surgical treatment is determined by diagnostic methods, timely sanation of destructive focuses of pancreas, abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal fiber, adequate drainage and mini-invasive techniques using in case of purulent complications. The main prognostic factors of development of complications and adverse outcomes are determined.

  19. [Migraine - established concepts and new developments].

    PubMed

    Speck, V; Maihöfner, C

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a very common primary headache disorder associated with intermittent attacks and great suffering. Despite extensive research efforts in the recent years, many pathophysiological aspects remain unclear. An altered cortical adaptability and the brainstem as a migraine generator are probably involved in the initiation of a (silent) cortical spreading depression and other processes that lead to neurogenic inflammation of the meninges causing the headache. Numerous studies in the last years have examined somatic, especially cerebrovascular and also psychological comorbidities. For attack therapy, CGRP antagonists have emerged as promising non-vasoconstrictive acting alternatives for triptans. However, they were so far not approved due to liver enzyme elevations in safety studies. Another new approach without vasoconstrictive action are the selective 5-HT1F agonists (especially Lasmiditan). Large placebo-controlled and triptan-controlled trials need to be awaited. For migraine prophylaxis, a comparable effect of sports and pharmacological prophylaxis using topiramate could be found. Particularly the combination of drug and non-drug therapies (such as the combination of stress management training with a beta-blocker treatment) achieves high efficacy. Also interdisciplinary, multimodal treatment approaches are important options. Two large multicentre studies have demonstrated the efficacy of botulinum toxin A as a prophylactic treatment for chronic migraine. Neuromodulative and neurostimulative procedures are promising but still experimental treatment options for patients with refractory migraine.

  20. [Treatment guidelines for acute and preventive treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Kun; Chen, Hsi-Ming; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yeng-Yu; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lee, Lian-Hui; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Kao-Chang; Tseng, Hung-Ping; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wang, Po-Jen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Yang, Chun-Pai; Yiu, Chun-Hing; Wu, Zin-An

    2011-09-01

    The Treatment Guideline Subcommittee of the Taiwan Headache Society evaluated both the acute and the preventive treatments for cluster headache now being used in Taiwan, based on the principles of evidence- based medicine. We assessed the quality of clinical trials and levels of evidence, and referred to other treatment guidelines proposed by other countries. Throughout several panel discussions, we merged opinions from the subcommittee members and proposed a consensus on the major roles, recommended levels, clinical efficacy, adverse events and cautions of clinical practice regarding acute and preventive treatments of cluster headache. The majority of Taiwanese patients have episodic cluster headaches, because chronic clusters are very rare. Cluster headache is characterized by severe and excruciating pain which develops within a short time and is associated with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Therefore, emergency treatment for a cluster headache attack is extremely important. Within the group of acute medications currently available in Taiwan, the subcommittee determined that high-flow oxygen inhalation has the best evidence of effectiveness, followed by intranasal triptans. Both are recommended as first-line medical treatments for acute attacks. Oral triptans were determined to be second-line medications. For transitional prophylaxis, oral corticosteroids are recommended as the first-line medication, and ergotamine as the second-line choice. As for maintenance prophylaxis, verapamil has the best evidence and is recommended as the first-line medication. Lithium, melatonin, valproic acid, topiramate and gabapentin are suggested as the second-line preventive medications. Surgical interventions, including occipital nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, radiofrequency block of the sphenopalatine ganglion, percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and trigeminal nerve section, are invasive and their long-term efficacy and adverse events are still not clear in

  1. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-08

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies.

  2. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  3. OnabotulinumtoxinA for chronic migraine: efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients who received all five treatment cycles in the PREEMPT clinical program

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, SK; Dodick, DW; Diener, H-C; DeGryse, RE; Turkel, CC; Lipton, RB; Silberstein, SD

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic migraine (CM) is a prevalent and disabling neurological disorder. Phase III REsearch Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy (PREEMPT) clinical program assessed efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®) for prophylaxis of headaches in adults with CM. This secondary analysis assessed patients who received all five treatment cycles and completed the study. Materials and methods PREEMPT (two phase III studies: 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled [DBPC], parallel-group phase, followed by 32-week open-label [OL] phase) evaluated the efficacy and safety of onabotulinumtoxinA in CM (≥15 days/month with headache lasting ≥4 h a day). Patients were randomized (1:1) to onabotulinumtoxinA or placebo every 12 weeks for two cycles, followed by onabotulinumtoxinA for three cycles. Multiple headache symptom measures were evaluated. Results for the completer (five cycles) subgroup of patients are reported. Results Of 1384 total PREEMPT patients, 1005 received all five treatment cycles (513 received onabotulinumtoxinA only [onabotulinumtoxinA/onabotulinumtoxinA (O/O)] and 492 received two cycles of placebo then three cycles of onabotulinumtoxinA [placebo/onabotulinumtoxinA (P/O)]). Demographics were similar between treatment groups. At Week 56, after all patients were treated with onabotulinumtoxinA, there continued to be significant between-group differences favoring the O/O vs P/O group for the following headache symptom measures: LS mean change from baseline in frequencies of headache days (−12.0 O/O, −11.1 P/O; P = 0.035), migraine days (−11.6 O/O, −10.7 P/O; P = 0.038), and moderate/severe headache days (−11.0 O/O, −10.1 P/O; P = 0.042). For other measures (cumulative hours of headache on headache days, frequency of headache episodes, and percentage with severe Headache Impact Test (HIT)-6 score, and total HIT-6 and Migraine-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire scores), there were also large mean improvements from

  4. Migraine prophylaxis, ischemic depolarizations and stroke outcomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yalcin, Nilufer; Yu, Esther Sori; Daneshmand, Ali; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Can, Anil; Sengul, Buse; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Ayata, Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine with aura is an established stroke risk factor, and excitatory mechanisms such as spreading depression are implicated in the pathogenesis of both migraine and stroke. Spontaneous spreading depression waves originate within the peri-infarct tissue and exacerbate the metabolic mismatch during focal cerebral ischemia. Genetically enhanced spreading depression susceptibility facilitates anoxic depolarizations and peri-infarct spreading depressions and accelerates infarct growth, suggesting that susceptibility to spreading depression is a critical determinant of vulnerability to ischemic injury. Because chronic treatment with migraine prophylactic drugs suppresses spreading depression susceptibility, we tested whether migraine prophylaxis can also suppress ischemic depolarizations and improve stroke outcome. Methods We measured the cortical susceptibility to spreading depression and ischemic depolarizations, and determined tissue and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in wild type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 knock-in mice treated with vehicle, topiramate or lamotrigine daily for 7 weeks or as a single dose shortly before testing. Results Chronic treatment with topiramate or lamotrigine reduces the susceptibility to KCl- or electrical stimulation-induced spreading depressions as well as ischemic depolarizations in both wild-type and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice. Consequently, both tissue and neurological outcomes are improved. Notably, treatment with a single dose of either drug is ineffective. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of hyperexcitability as a mechanism for increased stroke risk in migraineurs, and suggest that migraine prophylaxis may not only prevent migraine attacks but also protect migraineurs against ischemic injury. PMID:25424478

  5. Application of Design of Experiment for Polyox and Xanthan Gum Coated Floating Pulsatile Delivery of Sumatriptan Succinate in Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jagdale, Swati C.; Pawar, Chandrakala R.

    2014-01-01

    Migraine follows circadian rhythm in which headache is more painful at the awakening time. This needs administration of dosage form at night time to release drug after lag period when pain gets worse. Sumatriptan succinate is a drug of choice for migraine. Sumatriptan succinate has bitter taste, low oral bioavailability, and shorter half-life. Present work deals with application of design of experiment for polyox and xanthan gum in development of press coated floating pulsatile tablet. Floating pulsatile concept was applied to increase gastric residence of the dosage form. Burst release was achieved through immediate release tablet using crospovidone as superdisintegrant (10%). Pulse lag time was achieved using swellable polymer polyox WSR 205 and xanthan gum. 32 experimental design was applied. Optimized formulation was evaluated for physical characteristics and in-vitro and in-vivo study. From results, it can be concluded that optimized batch F8 containing polyox WSR205 (72.72%) and xanthan gum (27.27%) of total weight of polymer has shown floating lag time of 55 ± 2 sec, drug content of 100.35 ± 0.4%, hardness of 6 ± 0.1 Kg/cm2, and 98.69 ± 2% drug release in pulse manner with lag time of 7 ± 0.1 h. Optimized batch showed prolong gastric residence which was confirmed by in-vivo X-ray study. PMID:25530963

  6. Application of design of experiment for polyox and xanthan gum coated floating pulsatile delivery of sumatriptan succinate in migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Jagdale, Swati C; Pawar, Chandrakala R

    2014-01-01

    Migraine follows circadian rhythm in which headache is more painful at the awakening time. This needs administration of dosage form at night time to release drug after lag period when pain gets worse. Sumatriptan succinate is a drug of choice for migraine. Sumatriptan succinate has bitter taste, low oral bioavailability, and shorter half-life. Present work deals with application of design of experiment for polyox and xanthan gum in development of press coated floating pulsatile tablet. Floating pulsatile concept was applied to increase gastric residence of the dosage form. Burst release was achieved through immediate release tablet using crospovidone as superdisintegrant (10%). Pulse lag time was achieved using swellable polymer polyox WSR 205 and xanthan gum. 3(2) experimental design was applied. Optimized formulation was evaluated for physical characteristics and in-vitro and in-vivo study. From results, it can be concluded that optimized batch F8 containing polyox WSR205 (72.72%) and xanthan gum (27.27%) of total weight of polymer has shown floating lag time of 55 ± 2 sec, drug content of 100.35 ± 0.4%, hardness of 6 ± 0.1 Kg/cm(2), and 98.69 ± 2% drug release in pulse manner with lag time of 7 ± 0.1 h. Optimized batch showed prolong gastric residence which was confirmed by in-vivo X-ray study.

  7. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    PubMed Central

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care. PMID:25709653

  8. Chronic Migraine: An Update on Physiology, Imaging, and the Mechanism of Action of Two Available Pharmacologic Therapies.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Sheena K; Brin, Mitchell F

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of research support the hypothesis that migraine is a spectrum of illness, with clinical symptoms that vary along a continuum from episodic migraine to chronic migraine. Physiologic changes may result in episodic migraine evolving into chronic migraine over months to years in susceptible individuals. With chronification, headache frequency increases, becoming more disabling and less responsive to therapy. Neurophysiologic and functional imaging research has reported that chronic migraine may be associated with severity-specific metabolic, functional, and structural abnormalities in the brainstem. Without longitudinal studies, it is unclear whether these changes may represent a continuum of individual progression and/or are reversible. Furthermore, chronic migraine is associated with larger impairments in cortical processing of sensory stimuli when compared with episodic migraine, possibly caused by more pronounced cortical hyperexcitability. Progressive changes in nociceptive thresholds and subsequent central sensitization due to recurrent migraine attacks in vulnerable individuals contribute to the chronic migraine state. This may result in changes to baseline neurologic function between headache attacks, evident in both electrophysiological and functional imaging research. Patients experiencing migraine chronification may report increased non-headache pain, fatigue, psychiatric disorders (eg, depression, anxiety), gastrointestinal complaints, and other somatic conditions associated with their long-term experience with migraine pain. Recent research provides a foundation for differentiating episodic and chronic migraine based on neurophysiologic and neuroimaging tools. In this literature review, we consider these findings in the context of models designed to explain the physiology and progression of episodic migraine into chronic migraine, and consider treatment of chronic migraine in susceptible individuals. Advances in pharmacotherapy provide

  9. Genetics Home Reference: familial hemiplegic migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial hemiplegic migraine familial hemiplegic migraine Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial hemiplegic migraine is a form of migraine headache that runs ...

  10. Acute Iliac Artery Rupture: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Mourikis, D.; Katsimilis, J.; Skiadas, V. Koutoulidis, V.; Katsenis, K.; Vlahos, L.

    2007-04-15

    The authors present 7 patients who suffered iliac artery rupture over a 2 year period. In 5 patients, the rupture was iatrogenic: 4 cases were secondary to balloon angioplasty for iliac artery stenosis and 1 occurred during coronary angioplasty. In the last 2 patients, the rupture was secondary to iliac artery mycotic aneurysm. Direct placement of a stent-graft was performed in all cases, which was dilated until extravasation was controlled. Placement of the stent-graft was successful in all the cases, without any complications. The techniques used, results, and mid-term follow-up are presented. In conclusion, endovascular placement of a stent-graft is a quick, minimally invasive, efficient, and safe method for emergency treatment of acute iliac artery rupture, with satisfactory short- and mid-term results.

  11. [Hemoperfusion in the treatment of acute valproic acid intoxication].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Fernández, E J; Sánchez, R J; Peces, C; Montero, A; Selgas, R

    2007-01-01

    Valproic acid is increasingly used in the treatment of epilepsy, and also prescribed for bipolar affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, schizophrenia and migraine prophylaxis. Valproic acid intoxication with suicide attempt is a relatively common clinical problem that can result in coma, respiratory depression, pancytopenia, hemodynamic instability and death. The drug's relatively low molecular weight, small volume of distribution and saturable protein-binding render it potentially amenable to exracorporeal removal (hemodialysis, hemoperfusion or hemofiltration ), but published experience is scarce. We describe a case report involving valproic acid intoxication with ingestion of ethanol, who was successfully treated with charcoal hemoperfusion. With this treatment the half-life of valproic acid was reduced with rapid lowering of valproic acid levels and clinical improvement. Based on our experience in this patient and a review of previously reported cases, charcoal hemoperfusion should be considered for serious valproic acid intoxication because free as well as bound drug fractions are eliminated via this technique.

  12. Migraine and metaphor.

    PubMed

    Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    The metaphors of migraine make it a challenging source of inspiration for writers of fiction. The visual aura is a hallucination, the outside world - the so-called 'reality' - is distorted. The excruciating pain can stand for horror, punishment, and fate. Photophobia, phonophobia, and osmophobia underline visual, acoustic, and olfactoric stimuli. The protagonist sees, hears, and smells more, but not always better. Paradoxically, this increased awareness of 'reality' results in a need to seek isolation. Often, the end of a migraine attack is like a rescue. Immediately after an attack the fear of the next one begins. As migraine is hereditary, there are also aspects of solidarity, but shame and blame are nearby.

  13. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  14. The TRPA1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic pain and migraine.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Benemei, Silvia; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a member of the TRP superfamily of channels, is primarily localized to a subpopulation of primary sensory neurons of the trigeminal, vagal, and dorsal root ganglia. This subset of nociceptors produces and releases the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which mediate neurogenic inflammatory responses. TRPA1 is activated by a number of exogenous compounds, including molecules of botanical origin, environmental irritants, and medicines. However, the most prominent feature of TRPA1 resides in its unique sensitivity for large series of reactive byproducts of oxidative and nitrative stress. Here, the role of TRPA1 in models of different types of pain, including inflammatory and neuropathic pain and migraine, is summarized. Specific attention is paid to TRPA1 as the main contributing mechanism to the transition of mechanical and cold hypersensitivity from an acute to a chronic condition and as the primary transducing pathway by which oxidative/nitrative stress produces acute nociception, allodynia, and hyperalgesia. A series of migraine triggers or medicines have been reported to modulate TRPA1 activity and the ensuing CGRP release. Thus, TRPA1 antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and migraine.

  15. Case reports on two patients with episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and migraine responding to prophylactic drugs for migraine. Menière's disease or migraine-associated vertigo?

    PubMed

    Teggi, R; Fabiano, B; Recanati, P; Limardo, P; Bussi, M

    2010-08-01

    Recent reports have focused on a possible association between migraine and Menière's disease; patients suffering from Menière's disease present a higher rate of migraine. In some cases, the clinical features of migraine-associated vertigo may mimic the presentation of Menière's disease. The present report focuses on two cases of females with recurrent episodes of rotational vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss and tinnitus lasting from a few minutes to several hours; both cases also presented migrainous attacks. As a result of repeated cochleovestibular attacks, both patients presented a permanent low frequency sensorineural hearing loss. Preventive therapies for Menière's disease did not reduce vertigo attacks, while topiramate and acetylsalicylic acid treatment resulted in a significant reduction of both migraine and vertigo. Both the diagnosis of Menière's disease and of migraine-associated vertigo rely on clinical history and both disorders lack a specific diagnostic test. In the early stages, differential diagnosis between Menière's disease and migraine-associated vertigo is often very difficult; previous investigations focused on the possibility that subjects with migraine may experience all symptoms of Menière's disease, including sensorineural fluctuating hearing loss. In conclusion, a trial with prophylactic drug treatment for migraine might be suggested in patients with clear symptoms of migraine and recurrent cochleovestibular disorders.

  16. Functional imaging in chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Maniyar, Farooq H; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Chronic migraine is a relatively common disorder in neurological terms that causes very significant disability at a high cost. The precise mechanisms behind the progression of episodic migraine to chronic migraine are not well understood. Functional neuro-imaging works on the basis that neuronal activations are associated with changes in regional cerebral blood flow, and it can help us answer some of these questions. In this review, we discuss important recent studies in chronic migraine or studies relating to increasing frequency of migraine attacks. The findings show that increasing frequency of migraine attacks is associated with changes in key brainstem areas, basal ganglia and various cortical areas involved in pain.

  17. Migraine and neurogenetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Swati

    2013-09-01

    In the current classification of headache disorders, headache attributable to genetic disorders is not classified separately, rather as headache attributed to cranial or cervical vascular disorder. The classification thus implies that a vascular pathology causes headache in these genetic disorders. Unquestionably, migraine is one of the prominent presenting features of several genetic cerebral small vessel diseases such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy, retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, and hereditary infantile hemiparessis, retinal arteriolar tortuosity and leukoencephalopahty. Shared genetic features, increased susceptibility, and/or vascular endothelial dysfunction may play a role in pathogenesis of migraine. Common or overlapping pathways involving the responsible genes may provide insight regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms that can explain their comorbidity with migraine. This review focuses on clinical features of genetic vasculopathies. An independent category-migraine related to genetic disorders-should be considered to classify these disorders.

  18. Targeting TRP Channels For Novel Migraine Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of “triggers” may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics. PMID:25138211

  19. Pulmonary embolism: treatment of the acute episode.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Franco; Roncon, Loris; Greco, Francesco

    2005-10-01

    The prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is mainly related to the clinical presentation and circulatory state of the patient: the therapeutic strategy is consequently different, ranging from an aggressive treatment in patients in life-threatening clinical conditions to a "stabilization" treatment in those hemodynamically stable. Since the majority of PE patients are clinically stable, a well conducted anticoagulant therapy, either with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparins together with a vitamin K antagonist, is sufficient to stop thrombus extension, to minimize the risk of recurrent embolism and prevent mortality. In about 15-20% of cases presenting with clinical instability of variable severity, prompt intravenous thrombolysis with a short-acting compound often represents a life-saving treatment and should be the first-line approach. In normotensive patients with right ventricular dysfunction at echocardiography, who represent about 30% of PE patients, the debate regarding the optimal therapy is still open and further studies are required to document a clinically relevant improvement in the benefit-risk ratio of thrombolytic agents over heparin alone: young people, with a very low risk of bleeding and a concomitant reduction of cardiopulmonary reserve might be the best candidates to systemic thrombolysis. In any case such patients should be admitted to an intensive care unit to monitor the clinical status for at least 48-72 hours and detect signs of possible hemodynamic worsening. Mechanical thrombectomy, either percutaneous or surgical, are ancillary procedures and should be reserved to a minority of highly compromised patients who are unable to receive thrombolysis.

  20. Source localization of intermittent rhythmic delta activity in a patient with acute confusional migraine: cross-spectral analysis using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Eun; Shin, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Eom, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, Jung-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acute confusional migraine (ACM) shows typical electroencephalography (EEG) patterns of diffuse delta slowing and frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA). The pathophysiology of ACM is still unclear but these patterns suggest neuronal dysfunction in specific brain areas. We performed source localization analysis of IRDA (in the frequency band of 1-3.5 Hz) to better understand the ACM mechanism. Typical IRDA EEG patterns were recorded in a patient with ACM during the acute stage. A second EEG was obtained after recovery from ACM. To identify source localization of IRDA, statistical non-parametric mapping using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography was performed for the delta frequency band comparisons between ACM attack and non-attack periods. A difference in the current density maximum was found in the dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (ACC). The significant differences were widely distributed over the frontal, parietal, temporal and limbic lobe, paracentral lobule and insula and were predominant in the left hemisphere. Dorsal ACC dysfunction was demonstrated for the first time in a patient with ACM in this source localization analysis of IRDA. The ACC plays an important role in the frontal attentional control system and acute confusion. This dysfunction of the dorsal ACC might represent an important ACM pathophysiology.

  1. Migraine--new perspectives from chaos theory.

    PubMed

    Kernick, D

    2005-08-01

    Converging from a number of disciplines, non-linear systems theory and in particular chaos theory offer new descriptive and prescriptive insights into physiological systems. This paper briefly reviews an approach to physiological systems from these perspectives and outlines how these concepts can be applied to the study of migraine. It suggests a wide range of potential applications including new approaches to classification, treatment and pathophysiological mechanisms. A hypothesis is developed that suggests that dysfunctional consequences can result from a mismatch between the complexity of the environment and the system that is seeking to regulate it and that the migraine phenomenon is caused by an incongruity between the complexity of mid brain sensory integration and cortical control networks. Chaos theory offers a new approach to the study of migraine that complements existing frameworks but may more accurately reflect underlying physiological mechanisms.

  2. Topiramate weight loss in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Alberici, Antonella; Borroni, Barbara; Manelli, Filippo; Griffini, Simona; Zavarise, Paola; Padovani, Alessandro; Dalla Volta, Giorgio

    2009-03-15

    Topiramate (TPM) is generally recognized efficacious and safe in migraine prevention. A significant proportion of patients undergoing TPM administration may show weight loss. In epileptic subjects, high body mass index (BMI) was found to be predictive of weight loss under TPM therapy. We therefore aimed to study whether common clinical determinants may be associated to TPM weigh loss in migraine patients. In our clinical series, high BMI was not found a predictor of weight loss under TPM treatment. Unknown genetic and environmental factors that may determine the courses of weight loss under TPM therapy are still do be identified.

  3. [Acute acalculous cholecystitis. Results of surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    de la Garza Villaseñor, L

    1993-01-01

    During an 11 year period, 47 patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis were operated on. Two to one male/female ratio was observed with a mean age of 55 age of 55 years. No one had a past history of biliary tract pathology but 70 per cent of the patients had risk factors, mainly diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and collagenous diseases, some different of those reported in the world literature (sepsis, trauma, non biliary tract surgery, etc.). The ultrasound was the best diagnostic tool. Open cholecystectomy was performed in all patients and some sort of local complication was found in 85 per cent of patients (empyema, gangrene or perforation) in spite of the surgical procedure was done on emergency or early elective basis, a 31 per cent operative mortality rate was found and a 10.6% Operative mortality rates was observed. The bacterial cultures showed gram negative and anaerobic flora. This report shows that an early diagnosis and surgical treatment keeps a low morbidity and mortality rates but the gallbladder late complications have a high rates.

  4. What Is an Ocular Migraine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... When to seek help What is an ocular migraine? Is it a sign of something serious? Answers ... the other which might have more–serious complications. Migraine aura involving your vision In some cases, ocular ...

  5. CADASIL: Migraine, Encephalopathy, Stroke and Their Inter-Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is common in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) but its treatment responses are not well described, and its relationship to stroke risk unknown. Encephalopathy is a less common presentation; it has been suggested it is related to migraine. We characterised migraine patterns and treatment responses in CADASIL, and examined associations between migraine and both stroke risk and encephalopathy. Methods 300 symptomatic CADASIL patients were prospectively recruited from a national referral clinic over a nineteen year period, from 1996 to 2015. Data was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Migraine was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on the data collected. Results Migraine was present in 226 (75.3%), and the presenting feature in 203 (67.7%). It was usually accompanied by aura (89.8%). Patients showed variable responses to a variety of drugs for migraine. Of 24 given triptans, 45.5% had consistent or partial responses. None had complications following triptans. Thirty-three (11.0%) patients experienced encephalopathy lasting on average 8.1 ± 3.4 days. Patients with migraine with aura had higher odds of encephalopathy (OR = 5.4; 95%CI 1.6–28.4; p = 0.002). Patients with confusional aura had higher odds of encephalopathy than those with other aura types (OR = 2.5, 95%CI = 1.0–5.8, p = 0.04). There was also no increase in risk of encephalopathy with sex or age at onset of migraine. Migraineurs had a lower stroke risk than non-migraineurs (HR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.3–0.6, p = 2.1x10-6). Conclusions Migraine with aura is a prominent feature of CADASIL. Treatment responses are similar to those seen in the general migraine population and no complications were observed with triptans. Migraine with aura was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy suggesting

  6. [Some aspects of the complex treatment of acute suppurative perionitis].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, M M; Roĭ, V P; Zaritskiĭ, I; Konovalenko, V V; Mellin, V M

    1976-10-01

    The authors present an analysis of the results of complex treatment in 4318 patients operated upon for acute peritonitis, caused by acute appendicitis, perforating gastric and duodenal ulcers, acute cholecystitis, ruptures and perforations of the intestine and other surgical and gynecological diseases. Patients with diffuse purulent peritonitis showed marked disorders in protein-aminoacid, nitrogen, and water electrolyte metabolism, acid-base balance, a reduced nonspecific immune responsiveness of the organism. Therpeutic tactics was delineated taking into account the revealed changes.

  7. Efficacy and mechanism of anticonvulsant drugs in migraine.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jan; Akerman, Simon; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Anticonvulsants represent one of the main substance classes used for the preventive treatment of migraine. Efficacy has been demonstrated in randomized placebo-controlled trials for topiramate and valproic acid including divalproex sodium. In the case of topiramate, efficacy has recently been proven for chronic migraine and even medication overuse headache, questioning the established concept of medication withdrawal. However, preventive treatment with anticonvulsants is frequently hampered by side effects that occasionally require treatment discontinuation. In addition, these data indicate that some anticonvulsant drugs are effective in migraine, while a number are clearly not useful. Effective anticonvulsants, such as topiramate and valproate, target nociceptive trigeminovascular and trigeminothalamic dural pathways or mechanisms involved in cortical spreading depression. Dissecting out how the anticonvulsants that do not work differ mechanistically from those that do will almost certainly provide avenues through which one can develop new treatments to bring to patients with migraine.

  8. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute unstable bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    Bradycardia is a slow heart rate that can lead to cardiac arrest or occur after initial resuscitation following cardiac arrest. This article provides information on acute unstable bradycardia and common arrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment of patients with acute bradycardia and how the presence or absence of adverse clinical features, in conjunction with an arrhythmia, dictates the necessity and choice of treatment.

  9. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  10. The Episodic Syndromes That Maybe Associated with Migraines.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Diana; Vasconcellos, Elza

    2016-02-01

    The "childhood periodic syndromes" have been renamed "the episodic syndromes that maybe associated with migraines". These syndromes were initially considered precursors of migraines that only occurred in childhood; however recent literature suggests that the episodic syndromes can occur in adults with known migraine and does not necessarily present as a precursor. This review article discusses the recent literature regarding the episodic syndromes and potential treatments. These disorders are seen by multiple subspecialists, therefore it is important to recognize and use the same definitions, criteria and nomenclature. A collaborative and multidisciplinary approach is critical to characterize, manage and potentially improve outcomes.

  11. The role of the blood-brain barrier in the development and treatment of migraine and other pain disorders.

    PubMed

    DosSantos, Marcos F; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde C; Lima, Rodrigo L; DaSilva, Alexandre F; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    The function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) related to chronic pain has been explored for its classical role in regulating the transcellular and paracellular transport, thus controlling the flow of drugs that act at the central nervous system, such as opioid analgesics (e.g., morphine) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Nonetheless, recent studies have raised the possibility that changes in the BBB permeability might be associated with chronic pain. For instance, changes in the relative amounts of occludin isoforms, resulting in significant increases in the BBB permeability, have been demonstrated after inflammatory hyperalgesia. Furthermore, inflammatory pain produces structural changes in the P-glycoprotein, the major efflux transporter at the BBB. One possible explanation for these findings is the action of substances typically released at the site of peripheral injuries that could lead to changes in the brain endothelial permeability, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and interleukin-1 beta. Interestingly, inflammatory pain also results in microglial activation, which potentiates the BBB damage. In fact, astrocytes and microglia play a critical role in maintaining the BBB integrity and the activation of those cells is considered a key mechanism underlying chronic pain. Despite the recent advances in the understanding of BBB function in pain development as well as its interference in the efficacy of analgesic drugs, there remain unknowns regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this review, we explore the connection between the BBB as well as the blood-spinal cord barrier and blood-nerve barrier, and pain, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms of BBB permeabilization induced by inflammatory or neuropathic pain and migraine.

  12. The role of the blood–brain barrier in the development and treatment of migraine and other pain disorders

    PubMed Central

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde C.; Lima, Rodrigo L.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    The function of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) related to chronic pain has been explored for its classical role in regulating the transcellular and paracellular transport, thus controlling the flow of drugs that act at the central nervous system, such as opioid analgesics (e.g., morphine) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Nonetheless, recent studies have raised the possibility that changes in the BBB permeability might be associated with chronic pain. For instance, changes in the relative amounts of occludin isoforms, resulting in significant increases in the BBB permeability, have been demonstrated after inflammatory hyperalgesia. Furthermore, inflammatory pain produces structural changes in the P-glycoprotein, the major efflux transporter at the BBB. One possible explanation for these findings is the action of substances typically released at the site of peripheral injuries that could lead to changes in the brain endothelial permeability, including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and interleukin-1 beta. Interestingly, inflammatory pain also results in microglial activation, which potentiates the BBB damage. In fact, astrocytes and microglia play a critical role in maintaining the BBB integrity and the activation of those cells is considered a key mechanism underlying chronic pain. Despite the recent advances in the understanding of BBB function in pain development as well as its interference in the efficacy of analgesic drugs, there remain unknowns regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this review, we explore the connection between the BBB as well as the blood–spinal cord barrier and blood–nerve barrier, and pain, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms of BBB permeabilization induced by inflammatory or neuropathic pain and migraine. PMID:25339863

  13. Animal models of monogenic migraine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Tolner, Else A; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder with a strong genetic component. Rare monogenic forms of migraine, or syndromes in which migraine frequently occurs, help scientists to unravel pathogenetic mechanisms of migraine and its comorbidities. Transgenic mouse models for rare monogenic mutations causing familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome (FASPS), have been created. Here, we review the current state of research using these mutant mice. We also discuss how currently available experimental approaches, including epigenetic studies, biomolecular analysis and optogenetic technologies, can be used for characterization of migraine genes to further unravel the functional and molecular pathways involved in migraine.

  14. Animal models of chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Storer, Robin James; Supronsinchai, Weera; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan

    2015-01-01

    Many animal models of migraine have been described. Some of them have been useful in the development of new therapies. All of them have their shortcomings. Animal models of chronic migraine have been relatively less frequently described. Whether a rigid distinction between episodic and chronic migraine is useful when their underlying pathophysiology is likely to be the same and that migraine frequency probably depends on complex polygenic influences remains to be determined. Any model of chronic migraine must reflect the chronicity of the disorder and be reliable and validated with pharmacological interventions. Future animal models of chronic migraine are likely to involve recurrent activation of the trigeminal nociceptive system. Valid models would provide a means for investigating pathophysiological mechanism of the transformation from episodic to chronic migraine and may also be used to test the efficacy of potential preventive medications.

  15. Prophylaxis of migraine in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    While it has been established that headaches in the pediatric age group are relatively common, the characterization of headache disorders and their treatment in this group has historically been limited. Due to the paucity of controlled studies on prophylaxis of the primary headache disorders in children, the diagnosis of migraine often rests on criteria similar to those used in adults. Data from adult studies are often extrapolated and applied to the pediatric patient. Although it appears that many prophylactic agents are safe, well tolerated and efficacious in children, currently only topiramate is FDA-approved for use in patients 12 years and over. As a result, despite often experiencing significant disability, many children who present to their physician with migraines do not receive preventive therapy. One-third of adolescents meet the criteria for warranting prophylactic therapy, yet few are offered a preventative medication. Moreover, controlled clinical trials investigating the use of both abortive and prophylactic medications in children have suffered from high placebo response rates. A diverse group of medications are used to prevent migraine attacks, including antidepressants, antiepileptics, antihistamines and antihypertensive agents, yet there still remains a serious lack of controlled studies on the pharmacological treatment of pediatric migraine.

  16. Resolution of chronic migraine headaches with intrathecal ziconotide: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Sachin; Al-Khoury, Lama; Chang, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Migraine headaches are a common and functionally debilitating disorder affecting approximately 17% of women and 5.6% of men. Compared to episodic migraine patients, chronic migraineurs are more likely to be occupationally disabled, miss family activities, have comorbid anxiety and/or chronic pain disorders, and utilize significantly more health care dollars. Ziconotide is a calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of chronic severe pain without issues of tolerance or dependency found with opioid therapy. Case A 59-year-old female had an intrathecal baclofen pump placed for spasticity secondary to multiple sclerosis. Her symptoms also included lower extremity neuropathic pain and severe migraine headaches with 22 migraine headache days per month. Prior treatments included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, triptans, anticonvulsants, antihypertensives, and Botox injections which reduced her symptoms to four migraine days per month at best. While her spasticity had markedly improved with intrathecal baclofen, ziconotide was added to help her neuropathic pain complaints. Following initiation of low-dose ziconotide (1 µg/day), the patient noted both lower extremity pain improvement and complete resolution of migraine headaches resulting in zero migraine days per month. She has now been migraine free for 8 months. Conclusion Upon review of the available literature, there are no published cases of migraine improvement with intrathecal ziconotide. This represents the first case describing resolution of migraine symptoms with low-dose ziconotide. PMID:26392785

  17. Optimization of combinational intranasal drug delivery system for the management of migraine by using statistical design.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Animesh; Garg, Tarun; Sarma, Ganti S; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-04-05

    Migraine is a chronic disorder characterized by significant headache and various associated symptoms which worsen with exertion. Zolmitriptan approved for use in the acute treatment of migraine and related vascular headaches but are limited by high pain recurrence due to rapid drug elimination. Combinationalformulationof triptans and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may provide a quicker and longer duration of relief from the subsequent pain during the attack. In this study, we formulate a Zolmitriptan (ZT) & ketorolac tromethamine (KT) loaded thermo reversible in-situ mucoadhesive intranasal gel (TMISG) formulation which gels at the nasal mucosal temperature and contains a bioadhesive polymer (Xyloglucan) that lengthens the residence time will enhance the bioavailability of the combinational drugs. This study uses Box-Behnken design for the first time to develop, optimize the TMISG and assess factors affecting the critical quality attributes. Histopathological study of the nasal mucosa suggested that the formulation was safe for nasal administration. The statistical difference in absolute bioavailability between oral and intranasal route suggested that intranasal route had almost 21% increases in bioavailability for ZT and for KT there was 16% increase over oral formulations. Optimized formulation would help mitigate migraine associated symptoms much better over the currently available formulations.

  18. Allergens might trigger migraine attacks.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Karabulut, Hayriye; Doganay, Beyza; Acar, Baran

    2017-03-01

    Migraine is a common primary headache disorder. The mechanisms underlying the onset of a migraine attack are not completely understood. Environmental changes and a number of other factors could induce migraine attacks. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the frequency of migraine attacks and allergens. Migraine patients without aura, and healthy individuals similar in age and gender without a history of headache and allergy were prospectively included in the study. The duration of migraine, the frequency of migraine attacks, the medication history, and the symptoms during attacks were questioned. Migraine disability assessment score (MIDAS) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were obtained. Allergen extracts including dust, fungi, insect, animal epithelium, pollens, and food allergens were applied for allergy tests. 49 migraine patients and 49 healthy individuals were enrolled in the study. There was no significant difference in terms of age and gender. The median migraine disease duration, the number of attacks in a month, and the duration of attacks were, respectively, 5.5 years (1-44), 4 (1-10) day/month, and 24 (4-72) h. The mean MIDAS grade was 2.45 ± 0.14 (1-4), and mean VAS score was 7.89 ± 0.27 (4-10). The positivity of allergy tests was 55.1 % (27/49) in the migraine group and 32.7 % (16/49) in the control group (p < 0.05). The allergy tests were positive for house dust, red birch, hazel tree, olive tree, nettle, and wheat. The frequency of migraine attacks was higher in allergy-test-positive patients than in negative ones in the migraine group (p = 0.001). The migraine patients who had frequent attacks should be examined for allergies.

  19. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of acute bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Albert, Ross H

    2010-12-01

    Cough is the most common symptom bringing patients to the primary care physician's office, and acute bronchitis is usually the diagnosis in these patients. Acute bronchitis should be differentiated from other common diagnoses, such as pneumonia and asthma, because these conditions may need specific therapies not indicated for bronchitis. Symptoms of bronchitis typically last about three weeks. The presence or absence of colored (e.g., green) sputum does not reliably differentiate between bacterial and viral lower respiratory tract infections. Viruses are responsible for more than 90 percent of acute bronchitis infections. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for bronchitis, and should be used only if pertussis is suspected to reduce transmission or if the patient is at increased risk of developing pneumonia (e.g., patients 65 years or older). The typical therapies for managing acute bronchitis symptoms have been shown to be ineffective, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends against using cough and cold preparations in children younger than six years. The supplement pelargonium may help reduce symptom severity in adults. As patient expectations for antibiotics and therapies for symptom management differ from evidence-based recommendations, effective communication strategies are necessary to provide the safest therapies available while maintaining patient satisfaction.

  1. Migraine and periodic limb movement disorders in sleep in children: a preliminary case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The relationships between sleep and headaches are complex and manifold. About the variety of phenomena that can disrupt the sleep macrostructure and can impact its restorative function, the periodic limb movements disorder (PLMd) can be considered as the most powerful. No studies are known about the role of PLMd in the pathophysiology of migraine in children. Aim of study is to assess the prevalence of PLMd and migraine and their relationship with disability and pain intensity in a pediatric sample, referred for migraine without aura by pediatricians. Methods After a preliminary sleep habits screening with the Sleep Disturbances Scale for Children, 34 migraine subjects affected by migraine without aura (20 M, 14 F) (mean age 9.08; SD ± 2.28) and 51 volunteers healthy children (28 M, 23 F) (mean age 9.37; SD ± 1.81) accepted to underwent overnight PSG recordings in the Sleep Laboratory of the Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, in order to define the macrostructural sleep characteristics and the prevalence of PLMd. Subsequently, the migraineurs sample was studied in order to define the relationship between disability, pain intensity, therapeutical responsiveness and the presence of PLMd. Results In the migraineurs children group, the individuals with PLM pathological index (PLMI ≥ 5) represent the 26.47% of sample and present higher frequency (p < 0.001), intensity (p < 0.001), duration (p = 0.006) and life impairment as scored in the PedMIDAS (p < 0.001) of headache and lower efficacy of prophylactic (p = 0.001) and acute (p = 0.006) pharmacological treatment than MoA children without PLM pathological index. Conclusions This preliminary study indicates the potential value of the determination of the PLMd signs, and the importance of the PSG evaluation in children affected by migraine, particularly when the clinical and pharmacological management tend to fail in the attacks control. PMID:23815623

  2. "Alice in Wonderland syndrome" associated with topiramate for migraine prevention.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, T P; Ihle, K; Stork, J-H; May, A

    2011-02-01

    Various visual and sensory phenomena have been described in migraine with aura. Among those, the 'Alice in Wonderland' syndrome is defined as a distortion of the body image with the patient being aware of its unreal nature. Here, the case of a 17-year-old girl with migraine without aura who developed an 'Alice in Wonderland' syndrome repeatedly on topiramate treatment was presented and potential pathophysiological concepts were discussed.

  3. Chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for migraine: a study protocol of a single-blinded placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Tuchin, Peter J; Russell, Michael Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Migraine affects 15% of the population, and has substantial health and socioeconomic costs. Pharmacological management is first-line treatment. However, acute and/or prophylactic medicine might not be tolerated due to side effects or contraindications. Thus, we aim to assess the efficacy of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (CSMT) for migraineurs in a single-blinded placebo-controlled randomised clinical trial (RCT). Method and analysis According to the power calculations, 90 participants are needed in the RCT. Participants will be randomised into one of three groups: CSMT, placebo (sham manipulation) and control (usual non-manual management). The RCT consists of three stages: 1 month run-in, 3 months intervention and follow-up analyses at the end of the intervention and 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary end point is migraine frequency, while migraine duration, migraine intensity, headache index (frequency x duration x intensity) and medicine consumption are secondary end points. Primary analysis will assess a change in migraine frequency from baseline to the end of the intervention and follow-up, where the groups CSMT and placebo and CSMT and control will be compared. Owing to two group comparisons, p values below 0.025 will be considered statistically significant. For all secondary end points and analyses, a p value below 0.05 will be used. The results will be presented with the corresponding p values and 95% CIs. Ethics and dissemination The RCT will follow the clinical trial guidelines from the International Headache Society. The Norwegian Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services have approved the project. Procedure will be conducted according to the declaration of Helsinki. The results will be published at scientific meetings and in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT01741714. PMID:26586317

  4. [New options in the treatment of acute heart failure].

    PubMed

    Link, A; Böhm, M

    2014-06-01

    Acute heart failure is defined as the acute onset of symptoms due to hear failure necessitating emergency therapy. The in-hospital mortality rate ranges up to 10 % and in cardiogenic shock is 50-70 %. In acute heart failure, rapid diagnosis and causal therapy are necessary to avoid cardiogenic shock. In cases of acute coronary syndromes, primary percutaneous intervention should be performed immediately. Medical and apparative treatment strategies focus on decreasing pulmonary congestion, afterload, and neurohormonal activation in order to improve hemodynamics and reduce symptoms of dyspnea. In contrast to chronic heart failure, no medical therapy has been able to reduce mortality rates in acute heart failure. However, new medical therapies should at least improve clinical symptoms of congestion and favorably reduce cardiovascular events, re-hospitalization, and mortality rates.

  5. Daily Migraine Prevention and Its Influence on Resource Utilization in the Military Health System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    of migraine and the evolution of treatment. One of the earliest known references comes from a historical Mesopotamian text dated around 3000 B.C...care resource utilization. b. Economic Impact and Resource Utilization Associated with Migraine The Natio t for 3.5 million ambulatory visits...prom aine patients who met one or more of th . T ily Migraine Prevention by the International Headache Consortium oted the use of daily

  6. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Proposal for Acute Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Keine, Kátia Cristina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Kamila Figueiredo; Diniz, Ana Carolina Soares; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Galoza, Marina Oliveira Gonçalves; Magro, Miriam Graziele; de Barros, Yolanda Benedita Abadia Martins; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the main lesions that simulate clinically and propose a treatment protocol for acute endodontic infection. Signs and clinical symptoms of periodontal abscess, gingival abscess, odontoma, herpes simplex, pericoronitis, acute pulpitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis/periodontitis (NUG/NUP) were described and compared with acute endodontic infections. A treatment protocol was described by optimizing the procedures in access cavity, microbial decontamination and detoxification of the root canal, apical debridement, intracanal and systemic medication and surgical drainage procedures. The convenience of the use of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, root canal instrumentation using a crown-down technique, intracanal medication with 2% chlorhexidine or triple antibiotic paste and the convenience of the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and surgical drainage to solve cases of acute dentoalveolar abscess was discussed.

  7. Psychiatric disorders and muscle tenderness in episodic and chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Mongini, Franco; Deregibus, Andrea; Rota, Eugenia

    2005-09-01

    This review first reports on the data concerning the relationship between migraine and personality traits and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and tenderness of the pericranial and cervical muscles is then discussed. In one study, a psychologic assessment was performed in 56 women with migraine, and the Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI) and State Trait Anxiety Inventory were administered at baseline (T0) and after 6-7 years (T2). Frequency, severity and duration of migraine were recorded at T0, after treatment (T1) and at T2, and their relationship to the prevalence of depression, MMPI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory data were examined. Pain parameters improved in all patients in T0-1, but were higher at T2 in patients with depression at T0. The patients whose migraine improved at T2 had significantly lower MMPI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory scores at T0 and T2. Moreover, the prevalence of depression of the patients whose migraine improved at T2 was 37.5% at T0 and decreased to 12.5% at T2. The authors subsequently studied the function of the frontal lobe in 23 female patients previously treated for chronic migraine and 23 controls by applying three neuropsychologic tests (gambling task, tower of hanoi-3 and object alternation test). The patient group performed significantly worse on the tower of hanoi-3 and the object alternation test. In order to assess the extent to which muscle tenderness may relate to psychiatric disorders in patients with migraine and tension-type headache, diagnosed according International Headache Society criteria [2004], a psychologic assessment was performed and palpation tenderness scores calculated for the pericranial and cervical muscles in 459 patients. In total, 125 patients had frequent episodic migraine, 97 had chronic migraine, 82 had frequent episodic tension-type headache and chronic tension-type headache was present in 83. In a further 72 patients, both episodic migraine and

  8. [The fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase of acute arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Ballester, A; Donato di Paola, M; Saccà, A; Cappello, I; D'Addato, M

    1993-01-01

    We present our experiences on 86 patients with acute arterial thrombosis of the legs, undergoing a fibrinolytic treatment with urokinase. Results from the treatment are analyzed according to: the administration way (systemic, locoregional, intrathrombotic), the level of thrombosis (upper or lower legs), the associated morbidity and mortality.

  9. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  10. Painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kanemitu, Toshiyuki; Kamoto, Akihito; Satoh, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Kenichiro; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Itatani, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of metastatic renal-cell carcinoma. We report the case of a patient with painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. The patient was a 71-year-old man who had undergone surgery for left renal carcinoma and tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium (IVC-RA). After a follow-up period of 3 years, he developed right adrenal metastasis and received interferon (IFN)-alpha treatment. One year later, progression of the adrenal metastasis was observed, and he was admitted to a hospital for treatment with sorafenib, which was administered at a dose of 800 mg/day. Two weeks later, he developed painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment. Thereafter, sorafenib treatment was discontinued, and he was treated with conservative therapy. Three weeks later, he was discharged. Even though painless acute pancreatitis associated with sorafenib treatment is rare, the possible development of painless acute pancreatitis in patients undergoing sorafenib treatment must be kept in mind.

  11. Pediatric Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Andrea; England, Jasmin; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2015-11-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS) is a common complication of a simple upper respiratory infection. Acute bacterial sinusitis and an upper respiratory infection, however, have different management plans. This article will help clinicians establish when a diagnosis of ABS can be made based on the latest guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Also covered will be the pathophysiology of ABS, the role of diagnostic imaging, the recognition of complications of ABS, and treatment options.

  12. [Cerebrolysin in treatment of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Domzał, T; Zaleska, B

    1995-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is composed of low molecular peptides and free amino-acids and as a nootropic drug it administered in various diseases of central nervous system. In an open clinical trial patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the region of the middle cerebral artery, were treated. Cerebrolysin was administered as intravenous infusion in daily dose of 15 ml during 21 days. Recovery in 10 patients and improvement in 3 was obtained and only one patient died. The results were compared to the large group of 108 patients treated earlier with other drugs. Therapeutic effect was similar in all groups.

  13. Low brain magnesium in migraine

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadan, N.M.; Halvorson, H.; Vande-Linde, A.; Levine, S.R.; Helpern, J.A.; Welch, K.M.

    1989-10-01

    Brain magnesium was measured in migraine patients and control subjects using in vivo 31-Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. pMg and pH were calculated from the chemical shifts between Pi, PCr and ATP signals. Magnesium levels were low during a migraine attack without changes in pH. We hypothesize that low brain magnesium is an important factor in the mechanism of the migraine attack.

  14. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Gipponi, Stefano; Scaroni, Niccolò; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Forbice, Eliana; Rao, Renata; Liberini, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    confocal images. The statistical analysis has been performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences program. The Student's t test has been used to compare numeric variables between migraine and control groups. p value >0.05 has been considered not significant. We have analyzed 40 female subjects, 24 included in the study group and 16 included in the control group. Two migraine patients have been excluded. No differences have been found in the visual acuity between the two groups. Comparing RNFLs of a single eye per person in the two groups, we have found that migraine patients showed significant reduction in the superior quadrants (p < 0.005). Also evaluating both eyes per person there was a significant difference in the same quadrant between the two groups (p < 0.05). The result of this present study show that migraine patients have RNFL thickness reduction in the superior retinal quadrant compared with normal subjects. It is important to underline that RNFL thickness measurement could be a new interesting technique to evaluate the evolution of migraine and perhaps to study if prophylactic treatment could reduce retinal abnormalities seen in migraine patients. OCT-SD is a simple exam that could be repeated and then used for evaluation of headache progression during the time. Our study shows that RNFLs thickness does not depend on illness duration and frequency.

  15. Acute treatment of mania: an update on new medications.

    PubMed

    Gajwani, Prashant; Kemp, David E; Muzina, David J; Xia, Guohua; Gao, Keming; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2006-12-01

    Acute mania is frequently a medical emergency requiring hospitalization for behavioral control, rapid resolution of irritability, agitation, de-escalation of mood, and decreasing of risk-taking behavior. Lithium efficacy in the management of acute mania was reported in 1949 and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970. Chlorpromazine, from the class of typical antipsychotics, was approved for treatment of bipolar disorder in 1973. Typical antipsychotics were frequently used alone and as adjunct for the treatment of bipolar mania for the next 2 decades. Divalproex was approved by the FDA for the treatment of acute mania in 1994. Since the approval of olanzapine in 2000, all five atypical antipsychotics, namely risperidone (2003), quetiapine (2004), ziprasidone (2004), and aripiprazole (2004), have been approved by the FDA for the management of acute mania. Clozapine is the only atypical antipsychotic not FDA approved for any phase of bipolar disorder. This article will systematically review some of the major studies published, randomized controlled monotherapy, and adjunct therapy trials involving five atypical antipsychotics and newer anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  16. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  17. [CONSERVATIVE THERAPY IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Khomyak, I V

    2015-07-01

    Developed and implemented a phased differentiated treatment tactics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis, based on the theory of phase course of acute pancreatitis. Treatment started with conservative measures. Applications developed set of measures allowed us to achieve recovery of 39.53% patients without any instrumental interventions performans, including diapevtycal. Laparotomy reduced frequency performance of 57.14%--in the control group to 33.07%--in the main. Mortality in the main group was 6.72%; complication rate decreased 2.26 times; postoperative mortality was 9.83%.

  18. 77 FR 61417 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Acute Bacterial Sinusitis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's... an indication for the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS). This guidance finalizes...

  19. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    treatments on migraine-related brain excitability, pain -sensing mechanisms, and behavior. The major findings of the research in the second year of the...inhibit nociceptive signaling in the brainstem. These results are consistent with the potential efficacy of memantine as a preventive therapy, but not...related pain behaviors, also supporting the clinical investigation of these compounds. Overall, we have made significant progress in the

  20. Profound reduction of somatic and visceral pain in mice by intrathecal administration of the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan.

    PubMed

    Nikai, Tetsuro; Basbaum, Allan I; Ahn, Andrew H

    2008-10-31

    Sumatriptan and the other triptan drugs target the serotonin receptor subtypes1B, 1D, and 1F (5-HT(1B/D/F)), and are prescribed widely in the treatment of migraine. An anti-migraine action of triptans has been postulated at multiple targets, within the brain and at both the central and peripheral terminals of trigeminal "pain-sensory" fibers. However, as triptan receptors are also located on "pain-sensory" afferents throughout the body, it is surprising that triptans only reduce migraine pain in humans, and experimental cranial pain in animals. Here we tested the hypothesis that sumatriptan can indeed reduce non-cranial, somatic and visceral pain in behavioral models in mice. Because sumatriptan must cross the blood brain barrier to reach somatic afferent terminals in the spinal cord, we compared systemic to direct spinal (intrathecal) sumatriptan. Acute nociceptive thresholds were not altered by sumatriptan pre-treatment, regardless of route. However, in behavioral models of persistent inflammatory pain, we found a profound anti-hyperalgesic action of intrathecal, but not systemic, sumatriptan. By contrast, sumatriptan was completely ineffective in an experimental model of neuropathic pain. The pronounced activity of intrathecal sumatriptan against inflammatory pain in mice raises the possibility that there is a wider spectrum of therapeutic indications for triptans beyond headache.

  1. Current Understanding on Pain Mechanism in Migraine and Cluster Headache

    PubMed Central

    Buture, Alina; Gooriah, Rubesh; Nimeri, Randa; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2016-01-01

    Context Migraine and cluster headache are undoubtedly painful conditions. The respective pathogenesis of these two conditions is incompletely understood. In both cases, the treatments used have largely been empirical and have relied to a much lesser extent on our understanding of the mechanisms causing pain. We hereby review the pain mechanisms in migraine and cluster headache, two of the commonest primary headache disorders. Evidence Acquisition A review of the English literature was conducted by searching PubMed for studies on pain mechanism in migraine and cluster headache. We entered [migraine] and [pain mechanism] in Pubmed and 488 articles were obtained. Articles were then included according to their relevance to the topic. Similarly, [cluster headache] and [pain mechanism] revealed 79 search results. Results There is evidence that the trigeminovascular system and neurogenic inflammation play important roles, together with certain areas of the brain, leading to these conditions being termed ‘neurovascular headaches’. Functional imaging findings suggest a possible role of the dorsolateral pons in generating migraine attacks while the role of the hypothalamus in cluster headache is more firmly established. Conclusions Migraine and cluster headache have complex pathophysiologies. The exact mechanism causing pain in both conditions is incompletely understood and more research needs to be undertaken in this area. PMID:27642579

  2. Resilience in migraine brains: decrease of coherence after photic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça-de-Souza, Mayara; Monteiro, Ubirakitan M.; Bezerra, Amana S.; Silva-de-Oliveira, Ana P.; Ventura-da-Silva, Belvânia R.; Barbosa, Marcelo S.; de Souza, Josiane A.; Criado, Elisângela C.; Ferrarezi, Maria C. M.; Alencar, Giselly de A.; Lins, Otávio G.; Coriolano, Maria das G. W. S.; Costa, Belmira L. S. A.; Rodrigues, Marcelo C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: During migraine attacks, patients generally have photophobia and phonophobia and seek for environments with less sensorial stimulation. Present work aimed to quantify cortical partial directed coherence (PDC) of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from migraine patients and controls in occipital, parietal, and frontal areas with or without photic stimulation. Our hypothesis is that migraine patients with visual aura might have neuronal networks with higher coherence than controls even in interictal periods due to a predisposition in sensory cortical processing. Methods: Eleven adult women with migraine with visual aura (at least 48 h without previous attacks) and seven healthy adult woman were submitted to EEG recording in basal state and during photic stimulation. Results: When compared to healthy volunteers, migraine patients show different coherence profiles. Migraine patients had greater coherence than controls during the basal period (without photic stimulation), showing predisposition for sensory processing in many frequency ranges. After photic stimulation, patients showed a decrease in cortical coherence while controls had an increase. Conclusions: When compared to healty subjects, migraineurs show increased cortical coherence before photic stimulation, but a decrease when stimulation starts. This may be the expression of a resilience mechanism that allows migraineurs the interictal period. The PDC analysis permits to address a patient coherence profile, or “coherence map,” that can be utilized for management of the headache disorder or following up treatments. PMID:22837743

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Migraine Intervention Prior to Discharge From an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Benjamin W.; Solorzano, Clemencia; Norton, Jennifer; Adewumni, Victoria; Campbell, Caron M.; Esses, David; Bijur, Polly E.; Solomon, Seymour; Lipton, Richard B.; Gallagher, E. John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Patients who use an emergency department (ED) for acute migraine headaches have higher migraine disability scores and lower socioeconomic status and are unlikely to have used a migraine-specific medication prior to presentation to the ED. The objective was to determine if a comprehensive migraine intervention, delivered just prior to ED discharge, could improve migraine impact scores 1 month after the ED visit. Methods This was a randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive migraine intervention versus typical care among patients who presented to an ED for management of acute migraine. At the time of discharge, for patients randomized to comprehensive care, the authors’ protocol reinforced their diagnosis, shared a migraine education presentation from the National Library of Medicine, provided them with six tablets of sumatriptan 100 mg and 14 tablets of naproxen 500 mg, and if they wished, provided them with an expedited free appointment to our institution's headache clinic. Patients randomized to typical care received the care their attending emergency physicians (EPs) felt was appropriate. The primary outcome was a between-group comparison of the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) score, a validated headache assessment instrument, 1 month after ED discharge. Secondary outcomes included an assessment of satisfaction with headache care and frequency of use of migraine-specific medication within that 1-month period. Results Over a 19-month period, 50 migraine patients were enrolled. One-month follow-up was successfully obtained in 92% of patients. Baseline characteristics were comparable. One-month HIT-6 scores in the two groups were nearly identical (59 vs. 56, 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference of 3 = –5 to 11), as was dissatisfaction with overall headache care (17% vs. 18%, 95% CI for difference of 1% = –22% to 24%). Patients randomized to the comprehensive intervention were more likely to be using triptans or migraine-specific therapy (43

  4. Common hippocampal structural and functional changes in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Becerra, Lino; Brawn, Jennifer; McEwen, Bruce; Burstein, Rami; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is classically involved in memory consolidation, spatial navigation and is involved in the stress response. Migraine is an episodic disorder characterized by intermittent attacks with a number of physiological and emotional stressors associated with or provoking each attack. Given that migraine attacks can be viewed as repeated stressors, alterations in hippocampal function and structure may play an important role in migraine pathophysiology. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, hippocampal morphometric and functional differences (in response to noxious heat stimulation) were compared in age and gender-matched acute episodic migraineurs with high (HF) versus low (LF) frequency of migraine attacks. Morphometric results were compared with age and gender-matched healthy control (HC) cohort. Significant larger bilateral hippocampal volume was found in LF group relative to the HF and HC groups suggestive of an initial adaptive plasticity that may then become dysfunctional with increased frequency. Functional correlates of greater deactivation (LF > HF) in the same hippocampal regions in response to noxious stimulation was also accompanied by overall reduction in functional connectivity of the hippocampus with other brain regions involved in pain processing in the HF group. The results implicate involvement of hippocampus in the pathophysiology of the migraine. PMID:22760159

  5. Treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L; Novitzky, N

    1990-01-01

    Eighty-five consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 24 years (range 10-69 years), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, Adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate and monthly intrathecal therapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, Adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was obtained in 59 patients (69%) and only the French-American-British (FAB) L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (P = 0.048). Twenty-three patients failed to achieve CR and of these 12 had primary drug resistance. Median follow-up is currently 260 weeks, median predicted survival of all patients is 58 weeks and for those who achieved CR it is 104 weeks. Median duration of CR is 70 weeks. Of the prognostic factors for survival, only FAB L1 subtype was significant. Bone marrow relapses occurred in 29 patients, and of these 9 (31%) achieved CR. There has been CNS relapse in two patients and both have died. Eleven patients continue in CR off therapy, with a median of 152 weeks. This regimen is effective, with acceptable toxicity, and a number of patients are potentially cured. The incidence of resistant and relapsing disease is an argument for further intensifying both induction and postinduction therapy.

  6. Octreotide treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Mayo, A; Paran, D; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Zissin, R; Singer, P; Kaplan, O; Skornik, Y; Freund, U

    2000-11-01

    We investigated the effect of octreotide in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a case-control study. Experimental and clinical studies on the effect of octreotide in the treatment of acute pancreatitis have shown controversial results. Since January 1992, we have been conducting a prospective randomized study on the effect of octreotide in severe acute pancreatitis, in three hospitals in Israel. The entering criteria included three or more of the Ranson prognostic signs and CT findings of severe pancreatitis. Patients were randomly assigned to conservative treatment either with or without octreotide (0.1 mg subcutaneously three times a day). The end points of the study included: complication rate (ARDS, sepsis, renal failure, pseudocyst, fistula, and abscess), length of hospital stay, and mortality. From January 1992 to December 1996, 60 patients entered the study. After evaluating the files, 10 patients were excluded due to failure to meet the entering criteria, incomplete data, or incorrect diagnosis. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were assigned to octreotide (treatment group) and 25 to conservative treatment only (control group). The two groups matched with regard to age, sex, etiology, and severity of the disease. The complication rate was lower in the treatment group with regard to sepsis (24% vs 76%, P = 0.0002) and ARDS (28% vs 56%, P = 0.04). The hospital stay was shorter in the treatment group (20.6 vs 33.1 days, P = 0.04). Two patients died in the treatment group and eight in the control group (P < 0.019). These results suggest that octreotide may have a beneficial effect in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

  7. The lesson of chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Bonavita, V; De Simone, R

    2015-05-01

    The hypothesis that central sensitization/allodynia is the common final mechanism responsible for the progression of migraine pain is supported by the possibility of tracing back to allodynic mechanisms the action of the main risk factors for chronic migraine validated by the recent literature. The comorbidity between migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema is emerging as a new, commonly overlooked risk factor for migraine progression whose putative mechanism might also converge on the sensitization of central pain pathways. If headache progression always occurs at the end of a pathogenetic sequence typical of an individual susceptibility to allodynia, then the primary character of chronic migraine might be debated. Allodynia is not specific to migraine but is implied in the progressive amplification of pain after repeated stimuli, a universal adaptive phenomenon. Being largely conditioned by the individual comorbidity profile, allodynia may only in part be defined as primary in itself. Many migraine comorbid conditions, including a hidden idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema, may emphasize susceptibility to allodynia and promote chronic migraine. These factors and comorbid conditions require to be individually assessed and adequately treated to optimize the therapeutic response.

  8. Early rehabilitative treatment for pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Carlisi, E; Pavese, C; Mandrini, S; Carenzio, G; Dalla Toffola, E

    2015-06-01

    Although the diagnosis of and therapy for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) have been extensively investigated, the role of rehabilitation in modifying its functional outcome has received little attention in the literature so far. We report a case of pediatric ADEM who showed complete functional recovery following early rehabilitative treatment, started in the Intensive Care Unit.

  9. Validity of Sudden Gains in Acute Phase Treatment of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the validity of sudden gains identified with T. Z. Tang and R. J. DeRubeis's (1999) method in 2 clinical data sets that involved treatment of major depressive disorder (N=227). Sudden gains replicated among self- and clinician reports of depressive symptoms and predicted better psychosocial functioning at the acute phase…

  10. Pulmonary function after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Nysom, K.; Holm, K.; Olsen, J. H.; Hertz, H.; Hesse, B.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine pulmonary function after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and identify risk factors for reduced pulmonary function. We studied a population-based cohort of 94 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood who were in first remission after treatment without spinal irradiation or bone marrow transplantation. Pulmonary function test results were compared with reference values for our laboratory, based on 348 healthy subjects who had never smoked from a local population study. A median of 8 years after cessation of therapy (range 1-18 years) the participants had a slight, subclinical, restrictive ventilatory insufficiency and reduced transfer factor and transfer coefficient. The changes in lung function were related to younger age at treatment and to more dose-intensive treatment protocols that specified more use of cranial irradiation and higher cumulative doses of anthracyclines, cytosine arabinoside and intravenous cyclophosphamide than previous protocols. We conclude that, 8 years after treatment without bone marrow transplantation or spinal irradiation, survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission were without pulmonary symptoms but had signs of slight restrictive pulmonary disease including reduced transfer factor. The increased dose intensity of many recent protocols for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may lead to increased late pulmonary toxicity. PMID:9662245

  11. Treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Wood, L

    1992-08-01

    Forty-six consecutive patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), having a median age of 23 years (range 14 to 64), underwent induction and consolidation chemotherapy with weekly parenteral vincristine, adriamycin, l-asparaginase and daily oral prednisone (VAAP), followed by standard central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. Maintenance therapy was given for 3 years and consisted of daily 6-mercaptopurine, weekly methotrexate, and monthly intrathecal chemotherapy, with drug intensification comprising either vincristine, adriamycin and l-asparaginase (VAA) or cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside and prednisone (COAP). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 36 patients (78%) and only the FAB L1 morphology was a significant predictive factor (Chi-squared = 3.91: p < 0.05). Eight of the 10 non-responders had significant drug resistance and 3 deaths were associated with marrow hypoplasia. Median follow-up is 52 months. Median duration of CR is 28 months, median survival of all patients is 16 months, and for those who achieved CR is 44 months. There was no difference between the two maintenance arms. Significant prognostic factors for survival are French-American-British (FAB) subtype, in which the L1 is better than L2 (p = 0.05), and age (p = 0.035). Nineteen patients have experienced medullary relapse and 7 (37%) achieved subsequent CR; this is durable in a single patient who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Eight patients (17%) had CNS disease at diagnosis; 5 achieved CR and 1 is alive and disease-free at 65+ months. There has been 1 CNS relapse. These results demonstrate that prolonged remissions and survival can be achieved with this protocol and many patients possibly cured. The level of toxicity is acceptable and the pattern of induction failure indicates that a margin exists for intensifying chemotherapy and thereby possibly further improving results.

  12. Acute behavioral interventions and outpatient treatment strategies with suicidal adolescents

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Kimberly H. McManama; Singer, Jonathan B.; LeCloux, Mary; Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among adolescents, there is limited knowledge of effective interventions to use with this population. This paper reviews the findings of studies on behavioral interventions for adolescents who are at acute suicide risk, as well as outpatient treatment and risk management strategies with suicidal adolescents. The importance of addressing comorbid behaviors and enhancing protective factors are discussed. Cultural considerations in working with suicidal adolescents and strategies for conducting culturally competent treatment are explored. PMID:26279646

  13. [Monitorering and complications by conservative treatment of severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Novovic, Srdan; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Møller Andersen, Anders; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Philipsen, Else; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with a high morbidity and a mortality risk of up to 20%. Although much progress has occurred during the latest couple of years, there are still some major controversies on important issues such as monitoring, fluid therapy, antibiotic treatment, and nutrition. In this article we describe the underlying, pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for organ failure in SAP, and the rationale for monitoring and conservative treatment of SAP.

  14. Migraine headache prophylaxis in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2014-01-01

    Migraine headache is estimated to affect up to 28 percent of adolescents, most of whom are female. Chronic migraine in this population has been associated with reduced quality of life and academic disruption due to missed school days. Historically, migraine headache was treated episodically as it occurred. In March 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an existing medication, topiramate (Topamax®), for migraine prophylaxis in adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17. This is the first FDA approval of a drug for migraine prevention in this population. There are several possible adverse effects of taking topiramate, some potentially serious, so adequate education for adolescents and their families on all the potential benefits and risks is imperative.

  15. The impact of migraine: a case study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sharon

    2007-08-01

    Migraine headaches are common and among the most disabling nonfatal conditions of humankind. They are frequently misdiagnosed, which may lead to undertreatment. Patients often self-diagnose and self-medicate, resulting in inadequate treatment. Consequently, patients may take additional doses, trying to gain relief with inappropriate medications. Rebound can ensue. With adequate treatment, a patient's condition and quality of life may improve considerably. Patient education is extremely important to help patients identify appropriate self-care measures, such as identification of triggering events and coping with the chronic nature of their condition. This case study presents a patient who began experiencing migraines following a neck injury. His headaches became more frequent, and ergotamine and caffeine (Cafergot) suppositories were prescribed. When he presented, he was experiencing daily headaches and using daily ergotamine and caffeine suppositories. He was using the emergency department (ED) frequently because of severe headaches. Cervical spasm was recognized as his trigger, and the ergotamine and caffeine suppositories were discontinued. After 3 days of severe headaches, his rebound ceased. He reverted back to episodic migraines, which he treated with zolmitriptan (Zomig) nasal spray, which was effective. His cervical spasm was treated with botulinum toxin type A (Botox), with excellent results. He has maintained reasonable headache control for 2 years.

  16. Elevated levels of GABA+ in migraine detected using (1) H-MRS.

    PubMed

    Aguila, Maria-Eliza R; Lagopoulos, Jim; Leaver, Andrew M; Rebbeck, Trudy; Hübscher, Markus; Brennan, Patrick C; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2015-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been implicated in several pain conditions, yet no study has systematically evaluated GABA levels in migraine using (1) H-MRS. The accurate detection, separation and quantification of GABA in individuals with migraine could elucidate the role of this neurotransmitter in migraine pathophysiology. Such information may eventually be useful in the diagnosis and development of more effective treatments for migraine. The aims of this study were therefore to compare the concentration of GABA+ in individuals with migraine with that in asymptomatic individuals, and to determine the diagnostic potential of GABA+ in the classification of those with or without migraine. In this case-control study, GABA+ levels in the brain were determined in 19 participants with migraine and 19 matched controls by (1) H-MRS using Mescher-Garwood point-resolved spectroscopy (MEGA-PRESS) sequence. The diagnostic accuracy of GABA+ for the detection of migraine and the optimal cut-off value were determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. GABA+ levels were significantly higher (p = 0.002) in those with migraine [median, 1.41 institutional units (IU); interquartile range, 1.31-1.50 IU] than in controls (median, 1.18 IU; interquartile range, 1.12-1.35 IU). The GABA+ concentration appears to have good accuracy for the classification of individuals with or without migraine [area under the curve (95% confidence interval), 0.837 (0.71-0.96); p < 0.001]. The optimal GABA+ cut-off value for migraine was 1.30 IU, with a sensitivity of 84.2%, specificity of 68.4% and positive likelihood ratio of +2.67. The outcomes of this study suggest altered GABA metabolism in migraine. These results add to the scarce evidence on the putative role of GABA in migraine and provide a basis to further explore the causal relationship between GABA+ and the pathophysiology of migraine. This study also demonstrates that GABA+ concentration has good diagnostic accuracy for migraine

  17. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  18. [State-of-the-art Treatment of Acute Stroke].

    PubMed

    Weber, R; Nordmeyer, H

    2015-11-01

    This article gives an overview about diagnostic imaging and treatment options of acute patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke with emphasis on evidence from relevant studies published in the last 2 years. A computed tomography of the brain with CT-angiography should be the minimal standard imaging modality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Diffusion-weighted/imaging-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)-mismatch magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in patients with wake-up stroke to select patients for recanalisation therapies. Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA within 4.5 hours after symptom onset and mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers within 6 hours and proven occlusion of a large vessel in the anterior brain circulation are both evidence-based treatments. In contrast, there are no major therapeutic advances in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The systolic blood pressure should be lowered < 140  mm Hg in these patients within one hour. Both acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and patients with a transient ischemic attack should be monitored and treated on a stroke unit due to an improved outcome. A prophylactic antibiotic treatment and very early mobilization during the first 24 hours is not recommended in acute stroke patients.

  19. Anatomical Regional Targeted (ART) BOTOX Injection Technique: A Novel Paradigm for Migraines and Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Sanniec, Kyle; Pezeshk, Ronnie; Chung, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Migraine headaches are a debilitating disease that causes significant socioeconomic problems. One of the speculated etiologies of the generation of migraines is peripheral nerve irritation at different trigger points. The use of Onabotulinum toxin A (BOTOX), although initially a novel approach, has now been determined to be a valid treatment for chronic headaches and migraines as described in the Phase III Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy trials that prompted the approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of chronic migraines. The injection paradigm established by this trial was one of a broad injection pattern across large muscle groups that did not always correspond to the anatomical locations of nerves. The senior author developed the Anatomical Regional Targeted BOTOX injection paradigm as an alternative to the current injection model. This technique targets both the anatomical location of nerves known to have causal effects with migraines and the region where the pain localizes, to provide relief across a wide distribution of the peripheral nerve. This article serves as a guide to the Anatomical Regional Targeted injection technique, which, to our knowledge, is the first comprehensive BOTOX injection paradigm described in the literature for treatment of migraines that targets nerves and nerve areas rather than purely muscle groups. This technique is based on the most up-to-date anatomical and scientific studies and large-volume migraine surgery experience. PMID:28293532

  20. Treatment of acute experimental toxoplasmosis with investigational poloxamers.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Fukutomi, Y; Gu, L

    1993-01-01

    Because of the limited chemotherapeutic approaches available to treat reactivated latent Toxoplasma gondii infection manifested as toxoplasmic encephalitis in AIDS patients, investigation of novel chemotherapeutic agents is warranted. Several poloxamers (nonionic block copolymers composed of a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene flanked by two hydrophilic chains of polyoxyethylene) were tested for their abilities to alter the course of acute infection with a highly virulent T. gondii in mice. The effect varied markedly with the length of the constituent chains of the copolymers. The most effective preparations were highly effective when administered after infection and afforded remarkable protection against 10 to 1,000 100% lethal doses of T. gondii. Protection was dose dependent, and multiple treatments were more effective than single treatment. These preliminary findings warrant additional studies to determine whether this novel form of antitoxoplasma chemotherapy may prove promising in the treatment or prevention of acute toxoplasmic encephalitis in humans. PMID:8285605

  1. Treatment of hyperglycaemia in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Hewitt, J

    2016-03-01

    The proportion of diabetic patients who are hospitalised for stroke has been increasing in recent years, currently reaching almost a third of all cases of stroke. In addition, about half of patients with acute stroke present hyperglycaemia in the first hours of the stroke. Although hyperglycaemia in the acute phase of stroke is associated with a poor prognosis, its treatment is currently a topic of debate. There is no evidence that the adminstration of intravenous insulin to these patients offers benefits in terms of the evolution of the stroke. New studies in development, such as the SHINE study (Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort), may contribute to clarifying the role of intensive control of glycaemia during the acute phase of the stroke. Ultimately, patients who have presented with stroke should be screened for diabetes.

  2. Normobaric oxygen treatment in acute ischemic stroke: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shu-hai; Qi, Zhi-feng; Luo, Yu-min; Ji, Xun-ming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a common and serious neurological disease. Oxygen therapy has been shown to increase oxygen supply to ischemic tissues and improve outcomes after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Normobaric hyperoxia (NBO), an easily applicable and non-invasive method, shows protective effects on acute ischemic stroke animals and patients in pilot studies. However, many critical scientific questions are still unclear, such as the therapeutic time window of NBO, the long-term effects and the benefits of NBO in large clinic trials. In this article, we review the current literatures on NBO treatment of acute ischemic stroke in preclinical and clinical studies and try to analyze and identify the key gaps or unknowns in our understanding about NBO. Based on these analyses, we provide suggestions for future studies. PMID:27867482

  3. [Treatment of patients with acute asthma exacerbation].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Jelena; Mose, Jakov

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. The global prevalence of asthma ranges from 1% to 18% of the population, so it remains a common problem with enormous medical and economic impacts. In majority of patients, asthma can be well controlled with simple regimens of inhaled anti-inflammatory and bronchodilating medications. However, some patients tend to suffer from poorly controlled disease in terms of chronic symptoms with episodic severe exacerbations. Major factors that may be related to the emergency department visits and hospitalisation include prior severe attacks, nonadherence to therapeutic regimens, inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids, poor self-management skills, frequent use of inhaled short-acting beta-agonists, cigarette smoking, poor socioeconomic status and age over 40 years. Severe exacerbations of asthma are life-threatening medical emergencies and require careful brief assesment, treatment according to current GINA (Global Initiative for Asthma) guidelines with periodic reassesment of patient's response to therapy usually in an emergency department.

  4. Paradoxical topiramate-induced hyperphagia successfully treated with phentermine in a woman with migraine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacinta L; Rolan, Paul E

    2015-08-01

    We report a 49-year-old female migraineur who experienced paradoxical hyperphagia and concurrent intrusive food thoughts leading to rapid weight gain and a substantial increase in waist circumference. A significant reduction in migraine frequency was also observed during topiramate treatment, a widely used migraine prophylactic agent which is generally associated with weight loss. Withdrawal of topiramate saw appetite return to baseline levels, however, migraine frequency was again increased. Topiramate was reinitiated in combination with phentermine, a drug indicated for weight management, without reoccurrence of adverse effects. Migraine control was maintained and progressive weight loss ensued. Combination treatment with phentermine may be a useful strategy should other patients experience this adverse reaction while gaining therapeutic anti-migraine benefit from topiramate.

  5. Differentiation syndrome in acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Christin B; Roberts, Owen

    2015-11-01

    We report a case report of hyperleukocytosis, fever, hypotension, pulmonary and pericardial effusions, and acute kidney injury during initial treatment with azacitidine in a patient with AML-MRC. Collectively, the symptomatology resembled differentiation syndrome. Azacitidine has been previously associated with fever, peripheral edema, and hyperleukocytosis, but its side effect profile has never been described as similar to differentiation syndrome. The patient's deteriorating course quickly turned around after treatment with dexamethasone. This potential reaction, and potential treatment, is important for clinicians to be aware of.

  6. Re-evaluating the treatment of acute optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jeffrey L; Nickerson, Molly; Costello, Fiona; Sergott, Robert C; Calkwood, Jonathan C; Galetta, Steven L; Balcer, Laura J; Markowitz, Clyde E; Vartanian, Timothy; Morrow, Mark; Moster, Mark L; Taylor, Andrew W; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Frohman, Teresa; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports and prospective trials have demonstrated a reproducible benefit of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation on the rate of recovery from acute inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) demyelination. As a result, corticosteroid preparations and adrenocorticotrophic hormones are the current mainstays of therapy for the treatment of acute optic neuritis (AON) and acute demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Despite facilitating the pace of recovery, HPA axis modulation and corticosteroids have failed to demonstrate long-term benefit on functional recovery. After AON, patients frequently report visual problems, motion perception difficulties and abnormal depth perception despite ‘normal’ (20/20) vision. In light of this disparity, the efficacy of these and other therapies for acute demyelination require re-evaluation using modern, high-precision paraclinical tools capable of monitoring tissue injury. In no arena is this more amenable than AON, where a new array of tools in retinal imaging and electrophysiology has advanced our ability to measure the anatomic and functional consequences of optic nerve injury. As a result, AON provides a unique clinical model for evaluating the treatment response of the derivative elements of acute inflammatory CNS injury: demyelination, axonal injury and neuronal degeneration. In this article, we examine current thinking on the mechanisms of immune injury in AON, discuss novel technologies for the assessment of optic nerve structure and function, and assess current and future treatment modalities. The primary aim is to develop a framework for rigorously evaluating interventions in AON and to assess their ability to preserve tissue architecture, re-establish normal physiology and restore optimal neurological function. PMID:25355373

  7. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  8. 'Visual snow' - a disorder distinct from persistent migraine aura.

    PubMed

    Schankin, Christoph J; Maniyar, Farooq H; Digre, Kathleen B; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    were common comorbidities over time. Eight patients had first degree relatives with visual snow. Clinical investigations were not contributory. Only a few treatment trials have been successful in individual patients. Our data suggest that 'visual snow' is a unique visual disturbance clinically distinct from migraine aura that can be disabling for patients. Migraine is a common concomitant although standard migraine treatments are often unhelpful. 'Visual snow' should be considered a distinct disorder and systematic studies of its clinical features, biology and treatment responses need to be commenced to begin to understand what has been an almost completely ignored problem.

  9. Headaches and Migraines: Understanding Headaches, From Mild to Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... through them was to lie down in a dark room and just suffer through it." "For us, ... and Migraine pages on MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov) The Web site for the National Institute for Neurological Disorders: ...

  10. A strategic plan to accelerate development of acute stroke treatments.

    PubMed

    Marler, John R

    2012-09-01

    In order to reenergize acute stroke research and accelerate the development of new treatments, we need to transform the usual design and conduct of clinical trials to test for small but significant improvements in effectiveness, and treat patients as soon as possible after stroke onset when treatment effects are most detectable. This requires trials that include thousands of acute stroke patients. A plan to make these trials possible is proposed. There are four components: (1) free access to the electronic medical record; (2) a large stroke emergency network and clinical trial coordinating center connected in real time to hundreds of emergency departments; (3) a clinical trial technology development center; and (4) strategic leadership to raise funds, motivate clinicians to participate, and interact with politicians, insurers, legislators, and other national and international organizations working to advance the quality of stroke care.

  11. Treatment of acute abscesses in the casualty department.

    PubMed Central

    Simms, M H; Curran, F; Johnson, R A; Oates, J; Givel, J C; Chabloz, R; ALexander-Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    In the treatment of acute pyogenic soft-tissue abscess incision, curettage, and primary suture was compared with incision and drainage alone in a randomised prospective trial. Operations were performed under antibiotic cover by casualty officers, and patients were reviewed by an independent observer in a septic dressing clinic. Altogether 114 patients were studied, of whom 54 were treated by curettage and primary suture and 60 by simple drainage. The mean healing time was 8.9 days in those treated by primary suture and 7.8 days in those treated by simple drainage (p less than 0.05). Primary healing failed to occur in 19 (35%) of the sutured wounds, but there were no other complications in either group. It is concluded that incision and drainage alone is adequate treatment for acute soft-tissue abscess. PMID:6805714

  12. Association of COX-2 Promoter Polymorphisms -765G/C and -1195A/G with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    MOZAFFARI, Elahe; DOOSTI, Abbas; ARSHI, Asghar; FAGHANI, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common debilitating primary headache disorder with current head pain attacks, which contributes to physical activity dysfunctions in chronic pain phase. PGE2 and PGI2 are two important prostaglandins synthesised by COX-2 enzymes, involved in migraine pain signals. COX-2 modulation is essential in treatment and pathogenesis of migraine. This study aimed to investigating the association between COX-2 gene polymorphisms with the risk of migraine susceptibility in migraine patients with related and unrelated parents. Methods: This case- control study was based on 100 migraine patients and 100 non-migraine subjects in Bushehr province, Iran in 2013. Genomic DNA of blood samples was extracted and genotyping of COX-2-765G>C (rs20417) and COX-2-1195A>G (rs689466) gene variants was investigated by PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analyses were accomplished using the SPSS software package. Results: There was a significant differences in the frequencies of the COX-2-765G>C and COX-2-1195A>G genotypes between migraine patients and controls (P≤0.05). Conclusion: COX-2-765CC, COX-2-765CG, COX-2-1195GG and COX-2-1195AG genotypes can increase the risk of migraine significantly. As the first study in Iran, we are hopeful to achieve greater results about the relevancy of COX-2 gene, migraine and pain signals pathway by repeating these experiments on more samples. PMID:28053929

  13. Hydrocortisone treatment of early SIRS in acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gloor, B; Uhl, W; Tcholakov, O; Roggo, A; Muller, C A; Worni, M; Büchler, M W

    2001-10-01

    This work studied the effects of hydrocortisone treatment in experimental acute pancreatitis on cytokines, phospholipase A2, and breakdown products of arachidonic acid and survival. Edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis were induced in Wistar rats by cerulein hyperstimulation and retrograde intraductal infusion of sodium taurocholate, respectively. Hydrocortisone (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously 10 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis. Serum was assayed for phospholipase A2; interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-6, IL-10, thromboxane B2; Prostaglandin E2; and leukotriene B4 at five different time points. A significant release of inflammatory mediators was seen only in the severe model. Hydrocortisone powerfully suppressed arachidonic acid breakdown products and only mildly attenuated the systemic increase of phospholipase A2 and pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. The mortality rate after 72 hr in the severe model was 86%. Hydrocortisone treatment reduced mortality to 13% (P = 0.001; Fisher's exact test). Hydrocortisone seems to be effective in the treatment of the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome associated with severe acute pancreatitis.

  14. Selecting initial treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Stahl, Maximilian; Zeidan, Amer M; Gore, Steven D

    2016-10-08

    More than half of the patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are older than 60years. The treatment outcomes in this group remain poor with a median overall survival of <1year. Selecting initial treatment for these patients involves an assessment of 'fitness' for induction chemotherapy. This is done based on patient and disease-related characteristics which help to estimate treatment-related mortality and chance of complete remission with induction chemotherapy. If the risk of treatment-related mortality is high and/or the likelihood of a patient achieving a complete remission is low, lower-intensity treatment (low-dose cytarabine, decitabine and azacitidine) should be discussed. As outcomes in both groups of patients remain poor, enrolment into clinical trials of novel agents with varying mechanisms of action should be considered for all older adults with AML. Novel agents in Phase III development include CPX-351, guadecitabine (SGI-110), quizartinib, crenolanib, sapacitabine, vosaroxin and volasertib.

  15. Optimal management of severe nausea and vomiting in migraine: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Láinez, Miguel JA; García-Casado, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a common and potentially disabling disorder for patients, with wide-reaching implications for health care services, society, and the economy. Nausea and vomiting during migraine attacks are common symptoms that affect at least 60% of patients suffering from migraines. These symptoms are often more disabling than the headache itself, causing a great burden on the patient’s life. Nausea and vomiting may delay the use of oral abortive medication or interfere with oral drug absorption. Therefore, they can hinder significantly the management and treatment of migraine (which is usually given orally). The main treatment of pain-associated symptoms of migraine (such as nausea and vomiting) is to stop the migraine attack itself as soon as possible, with the effective drugs at the effective doses, seeking if necessary alternative routes of administration. In some cases, intravenous antiemetic drugs are able to relieve a migraine attack and associated symptoms like nausea and vomiting. We performed an exhaustive PubMed search of the English literature to find studies about management of migraine and its associated symptoms. Search terms were migraine, nausea, and vomiting. We did not limit our search to a specific time period. We focused on clinical efficacy and tolerance of the various drugs and procedures based on data from human studies. We included the best available studies for each discussed drug or procedure. These ranged from randomized controlled trials for some treatments to small case series for others. Recently updated books and manuals on neurology and headache were also consulted. We herein review the efficacy of the different approaches in order to manage nausea and vomiting for migraine patents. PMID:24143125

  16. Optimal management of severe nausea and vomiting in migraine: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Láinez, Miguel Ja; García-Casado, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2013-10-11

    Migraine is a common and potentially disabling disorder for patients, with wide-reaching implications for health care services, society, and the economy. Nausea and vomiting during migraine attacks are common symptoms that affect at least 60% of patients suffering from migraines. These symptoms are often more disabling than the headache itself, causing a great burden on the patient's life. Nausea and vomiting may delay the use of oral abortive medication or interfere with oral drug absorption. Therefore, they can hinder significantly the management and treatment of migraine (which is usually given orally). The main treatment of pain-associated symptoms of migraine (such as nausea and vomiting) is to stop the migraine attack itself as soon as possible, with the effective drugs at the effective doses, seeking if necessary alternative routes of administration. In some cases, intravenous antiemetic drugs are able to relieve a migraine attack and associated symptoms like nausea and vomiting. We performed an exhaustive PubMed search of the English literature to find studies about management of migraine and its associated symptoms. Search terms were migraine, nausea, and vomiting. We did not limit our search to a specific time period. We focused on clinical efficacy and tolerance of the various drugs and procedures based on data from human studies. We included the best available studies for each discussed drug or procedure. These ranged from randomized controlled trials for some treatments to small case series for others. Recently updated books and manuals on neurology and headache were also consulted. We herein review the efficacy of the different approaches in order to manage nausea and vomiting for migraine patents.

  17. Roads Less Traveled: Sexual Dimorphism and Mast Cell Contributions to Migraine Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Loewendorf, Andrea I.; Matynia, Anna; Saribekyan, Hakob; Gross, Noah; Csete, Marie; Harrington, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common, little understood, and debilitating disease. It is much more prominent in women than in men (~2/3 are women) but the reasons for female preponderance are not clear. Migraineurs frequently experience severe comorbidities, such as allergies, depression, irritable bowel syndrome, and others; many of the comorbidities are more common in females. Current treatments for migraine are not gender specific, and rarely are migraine and its comorbidities considered and treated by the same specialist. Thus, migraine treatments represent a huge unmet medical need, which will only be addressed with greater understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. We discuss the current knowledge about sex differences in migraine and its comorbidities, and focus on the potential role of mast cells (MCs) in both. Sex-based differences in pain recognition and drug responses, fluid balance, and the blood–brain barrier are recognized but their impact on migraine is not well studied. Furthermore, MCs are well recognized for their prominent role in allergies but much less is known about their contributions to pain pathways in general and migraine specifically. MC-neuron bidirectional communication uniquely positions these cells as potential initiators and/or perpetuators of pain. MCs can secrete nociceptor sensitizing and activating agents, such as serotonin, prostaglandins, histamine, and proteolytic enzymes that can also activate the pain-mediating transient receptor potential vanilloid channels. MCs express receptors for both estrogen and progesterone that induce degranulation upon binding. Furthermore, environmental estrogens, such as Bisphenol A, activate MCs in preclinical models but their impact on pain pathways or migraine is understudied. We hope that this discussion will encourage scientists and physicians alike to bridge the knowledge gaps linking sex, MCs, and migraine to develop better, more comprehensive treatments for migraine patients. PMID:27148260

  18. Topiramate-induced paresthesia is more frequently reported by migraine than epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Shafiei, Kaveh; Azizpour, Iman

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate is an approved and effective drug in migraine prophylaxis. Paresthesia is the most commonly reported side effect. The primary objective of this study was to compare the frequency of topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine headache to epileptic patients. Patients with migraine without aura and epilepsy were enrolled in this observational study. All cases were interviewed by telephone about their history of paresthesia. Confounding factors were controlled through logistic regression. The odds ratio of developing topiramate-induced paresthesia in migraine compared to epilepsy patients was 3.4. Three factors were independent contributors to developing topiramate-induced paresthesia: female sex (odds ratio 2.1), topiramate dosage (odds ratio 0.3) and duration of therapy. Our findings indicate an independent association between migraine and development of paresthesia. Migraineurs were more likely than epileptic patients to report paresthesia as topiramate adverse effects. Female sex, treatment duration and topiramate dosage contribute significantly to subsequent development of paresthesia.

  19. Filgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; MacVittie, T J

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Neupogen(®) (filgrastim) for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced myelosuppression following a radiological/nuclear incident. It is the first medical countermeasure currently approved by the FDA for this indication under the criteria of the FDA "animal rule". This article summarizes the consequences of high-dose radiation exposure, a description of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS), the use of hematopoietic growth factors in radiation accident victims and current available treatments for H-ARS with an emphasis on the use of Neupogen in this scenario.

  20. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  1. Therapeutic strategies in migraine patients with mood and anxiety disorders: clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Finocchi, Cinzia; Villani, Veronica; Casucci, Gerardo

    2010-06-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are comorbid with migraine. The coexistence of a psychiatric disorder alters the quality of life, the total disability, the course of migraine and the final prognosis; it increases the probability of central sensitization, other chronic pain conditions and the evolution to chronic migraine. All patients presenting with frequent episodic and chronic migraine should be screened for depression and anxiety. When these conditions are present, drugs for migraine prevention that may worsen the psychiatric comorbid disorder have to be avoided. When it is possible, both conditions should be treated with a single agent. Amitriptiline can be used both in mood disorders and migraine prevention. Flunarizine and beta-blockers may help if anxiety is present. Pregabalin has demonstrated efficacy in anxiety disorders and fibromyalgia. Divalproex sodium, topiramate and lamotrigine that have demonstrated efficacy in mood stabilization are also indicated in migraine without aura (divalproex sodium and topiramate) and with aura (lamotrigine). When a specific treatment for the comorbid psychiatric disorder is needed, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are the drugs of choice both in depression and anxiety, and the cognitive behavioural therapy has good evidence of efficacy in anxiety disorders. Vagal nerve stimulation may be an option in patients with refractory chronic migraine and depression.

  2. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hung-Jin; Kuo, Chia-Chen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX) is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs) inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS). Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment. PMID:25136372

  3. Evaluating conservative treatment for acute appendicitis with lump formation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz Ahmad; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Irshad, Ifat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Interval appendectomy after acute appendicitis with lump formation (phlegmon) remains controversial. We conducted this study to determine the risk of recurrent appendicitis following initial non-operative treatment for appendicitis, and evaluate factors associated with recurrence. Secondarily, we evaluate the efficacy of interval appendectomy versus no appendectomy. Materials and Methods: Patients who received conservative treatment for appendicitis with lump formation were prospectively studied from June 2006 to June 2008. These patients were followed for recurrence of appendicitis. Results: Of 763 patients with acute appendicitis some 220 patients had lump formation (28.8%). Median age was 28 years. Conservative treatment was successful in 213 (96.8%) patients. The rate of recurrence was 13.1%, all occurring within six months after the index admission. Mean follow-up was 26±18 months. Conclusion: Conservative treatment of appendicitis with lump formation is efficient and the recurrence rate is low. Routine interval appendectomy after initial conservative treatment for lump formation is not a cost-effective intervention and not recommended. PMID:22416152

  4. [Mnemonic complaints and chronic migraine].

    PubMed

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Morandeira-Rivas, C; Lopez Del Val, L J; Bellosta-Diago, E; Velazquez-Benito, A

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Patients with chronic migraine often report lower cognitive performance, which affects their quality of life. AIMS. To analyse whether the mnemonic capacity of patients with chronic migraine is altered or not. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with chronic migraine evaluated consecutively in our unit, and paired by age (18-60 years) and gender with a control group consisting of cognitively healthy volunteers. The following cognitive instruments were administered: Folstein Minimental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Alteration Test (M@T), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and working memory. RESULTS. A total of 30 patients with chronic migraine were included (mean age: 49.33 ± 10.05 years) paired with a control group of 30 healthy volunteers (mean age: 44.83 ± 10.91 years). The mean elapsed time since onset of the patients with chronic migraine was 4.47 ± 2.74 years. On performing a comparative analysis between the two groups, significant differences were found with overall lower scores in the group of patients with chronic migraine in the MoCA (24.16 versus 29), M@T (43.76 versus 48.8) and working memory tests (17.5 versus 24.26). Performance in the MMSE was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with chronic migraine can have lower cognitive performance regardless of distracting elements, such as pharmacological factors or psychiatric comorbidity, since chronic migraine can be understood as yet another element within the spectrum of chronic pain.

  5. Are Episodic and Chronic Migraine One Disease or Two?

    PubMed

    Burshtein, Reuben; Burshtein, Aaron; Burshtein, Joshua; Rosen, Noah

    2015-12-01

    Migraine is a debilitating headache disorder that has a significant impact on the world population, in both economic and sociologic capacities. Migraine has two main categories: (1) chronic migraine (CM), defined as the patient having 15 or more headache days per month, with at least five attacks fulfilling measures for EM with aura or EM without aura, and (2) episodic migraine (EM), defined as less than 15 headache days per month. With this definition, CM can only exist in the presence of EM, and it questions whether the two are separate diseases. Migraine has a significant impact on the population, as each year, about 2.5 % of patients with EM develop new-onset CM (Manack et al., Curr Pain Headache Rep 15:70-78, 2011) (Loder et al. Headache 55:214-228, 2015), with certain risk factors being evident only with CM. In addition, there are comorbid diseases that are only associated with CM, suggesting two separate diseases rather than one. Differentiation in response to treatments, both preventive and abortive, demonstrates both a similarity and a difference in EM versus CM. Also, comparing the two processes based upon functional imaging has been a recent development, beginning to show a physiological difference in regional cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and regional volumes in patients with EM and CM. Evidence regarding whether EM and CM demonstrate one disease with a significant level of complication or if two independent processes is inconclusive, and additional research must be performed to further characterize their relationship.

  6. The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon; Yee, Michelle M

    2003-01-01

    Diet can play an important role in the precipitation of headaches in children and adolescents with migraine. The diet factor in pediatric migraine is frequently neglected in favor of preventive drug therapy. The list of foods, beverages, and additives that trigger migraine includes cheese, chocolate, citrus fruits, hot dogs, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, fatty foods, ice cream, caffeine withdrawal, and alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and beer. Underage drinking is a significant potential cause of recurrent headache in today's adolescent patients. Tyramine, phenylethylamine, histamine, nitrites, and sulfites are involved in the mechanism of food intolerance headache. Immunoglobulin E-mediated food allergy is an infrequent cause. Dietary triggers affect phases of the migraine process by influencing release of serotonin and norepinephrine, causing vasoconstriction or vasodilatation, or by direct stimulation of trigeminal ganglia, brainstem, and cortical neuronal pathways. Treatment begins with a headache and diet diary and the selective avoidance of foods presumed to trigger attacks. A universal migraine diet with simultaneous elimination of all potential food triggers is generally not advised in practice. A well-balanced diet is encouraged, with avoidance of fasting or skipped meals. Long-term prophylactic drug therapy is appropriate only after exclusion of headache-precipitating trigger factors, including dietary factors.

  7. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month). The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human) brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF) to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication) group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF). Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine. PMID:21936901

  8. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  9. Biopsy proven acute interstitial nephritis after treatment with moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of reversible acute kidney injury. At least 70% of AIN is caused by various drugs, mainly penicillines and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Quinolones are only rarely known to cause AIN and so far cases have been mainly described with older fluoroquinolones. Case Presentation Here we describe a case of biopsy proven interstitial nephritis after moxifloxacin treatment. The patient presented with fever, rigors and dialysis dependent acute kidney injury, just a few days after treatment of a respiratory tract infection with moxifloxacin. The renal biopsy revealed dense infiltrates mainly composed of eosinophils and severe interstitial edema. A course of oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) was commenced and rapidly tapered to zero within three weeks. The renal function improved, and the patient was discharged with a creatinine of 107 μmol/l. Conclusion This case illustrates that pharmacovigilance is important to early detect rare side effects, such as AIN, even in drugs with a favourable risk/benefit ratio such as moxifloxacin. PMID:20731847

  10. Treatment of Orbital Complications Following Acute Rhinosinusitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yuzhu; Shi, Guanggang; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The orbital complications account for about 80% of all complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. If the treatment is not correct and in time, orbital complications could progress rapidly, leading to optic neuritis, cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis or life-threatening intracranial complications. Aims: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of conservative therapy for the patients with orbital cellulitis and endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) performed on patients with subperiosteal abscess (SPA) secondary to acute rhinosinusitis in children. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: The retrospective study included 31 pediatric patients with orbital complications secondary to acute rhinosinusitis. In all cases, intensive treatment was initiated with a combination of oral or intravenous antibiotics, glucocorticoid and gelomyrtol forte after admission. ESS was performed if an improvement in the condition of patients did not occur after 48 hours. However, the patients with orbital SPA, motility disorders of eyeball or decreased vision received ESS immediately within 24 hours. Results: Sixteen patients were cured by conservative therapy and 15 patients by ESS. All of the signs and symptoms disappeared after conservative therapy or ESS. There were no recurrences within the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years. Conclusion: Conservative therapy is an effective method for patients with inflammatory edema and most cases of orbital cellulitis in children. SPA can be cured by ESS. PMID:27606135

  11. Migraine with Aura or Sports-Related Concussion: Case Report, Pathophysiology, and Multidisciplinary Approach to Management.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Cordingley, Dean; Girardin, Richard; Ritchie, Lesley; Johnston, Janine

    The evaluation and management of athletes presenting with clinical features of migraine headache with aura in the setting of sports-related head trauma is challenging. We present a case report of a 15-yr-old boy with a history of migraine with visual aura that developed acute visual disturbance and headache after a head injury during an ice hockey game. The patient underwent comprehensive assessment at a multidisciplinary concussion program, including neuro-ophthalmological examination, neurocognitive testing, and graded aerobic treadmill testing. Clinical history and multidisciplinary assessment was consistent with the diagnosis of coexisting sports-related concussion and migraine with brainstem aura. The authors discuss the pearls and pitfalls of managing patients who develop migraine headache with visual aura after sports-related head injury and the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to this unique patient population.

  12. Treatment of acute erythroleukemia with Azacitidine: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Pierdomenico, Francesca; Almeida, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute erythroleukemia (AEL) is a rare form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) often associated with a poor prognosis. It is more frequent in elderly patients, limiting the use aggressive therapies. Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent with recognized efficacy in high risk myelodysplasia and AML in the elderly. Here we report 5 cases of AEL treated with Azacitidine. The cohort included 4 men and 1 woman, median age 70. One patient had been refractory to intensive chemotherapy, the others received Azacitidine as first line. Treatment was well tolerated. Four patients achieved transfusion independence. Two patients achieved complete remission and 1 achieved partial remission. After a median follow up time of 20 months, the median survival of the cohort was 20 months. Three patients died of disease progression. These results confirm the therapeutic value of Azacitidine in AEL. PMID:24371777

  13. Acute pancreatitis in ICU secondary to treatment with tigecycline.

    PubMed

    Bernas Albeniz, A; Aveiga Valencia, D A; Etxeberria Zabala, L; Zaldibar-Gerrikagoitia Bilbao, J; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2017-01-01

    Tigecycline is a broad spectrum antimicrobial agent, structurally similar to minocycline and that shares some tetracycline-related side effects. A case report is presented on a 68-year-old female who received tigecycline for a sepsis of unknown origin and who, in the following 5days, developed abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes, which suggested acute pancreatitis. After ruling out other origins, and according to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, tigecycline was the probable cause of the acute pancreatitis, a complication that has been reported 5 times in the database of the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system since 2009. Close monitoring of abdominal signs and symptoms is recommended during treatment with tigecycline, since adverse effects affecting the digestive system are the most prevalent ones when using this drug.

  14. Vestibular migraine: the most frequent entity of episodic vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Obermann, Mark; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in adults as well as in children. The diagnostic criteria of the consensus document of the International Bárány Society for Neuro-Otology and the International Headache Society (2012) combine the typical signs and symptoms of migraine with the vestibular symptoms lasting 5 min to 72 h and exclusion criteria. Although VM accounts for 7% of patients seen in dizziness clinics and 9% of patients seen in headache clinics it is still underdiagnosed. This review provides an actual overview on the pathophysiology, the clinical characteristics to establish the diagnosis, the differential diagnosis, and the treatment of VM.

  15. Migraine Medications and Antidepressants: A Risky Mix?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the health risks associated with taking migraine medications and antidepressants at the same time? Answers from ... Swanson, M.D. Reports suggest that combining migraine medications called triptans with certain antidepressants — including selective serotonin ...

  16. A Healthier Weight May Mean Fewer Migraines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an association, and not a cause-and-effect relationship, between weight and migraine risk. The review was ... care professionals should discuss with their patients the relationship with migraines, and help them by providing education ...

  17. Impact of Migraine on School Performance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The impact of migraine on school performance Daniel Kantor, MD e168 WHAT ... this study tackle an often overlooked problem: how migraine headache affects the school performance of children. 1 ...

  18. Migraines and perimenopause: helping women in midlife manage and treat migraine.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is more common in women than men, with lifetime prevalence rates between 15 percent and 26 percent for women. The World Health Organization ranks migraine as 12th among all causes of years lived with disability in women. This article reviews diagnostic criteria for migraine with and without aura, the impact of fluctuating hormones in perimenopause on the experience of migraine and medication and nonmedication approaches to managing migraine.

  19. Development of anti-migraine therapeutics using the capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Buntinx, Linde; Vermeersch, Steve; de Hoon, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide (receptor) (CGRP-(R)) blocking therapeutics in the treatment of acute migraine headache provided proof-of-concept for the involvement of CGRP in the pathophysiology of this disorder. One of the major hurdles for the development of any class of drugs, including CGRP blocking therapeutics, is the early clinical development process during which toxic and inefficacious compounds need to be eliminated as early as possible in order to focus on the most promising molecules. At this stage, human models providing proof of target engagement, combined with safety and tolerability studies, are extremely valuable in focusing on those therapeutics that have the highest engagement from the lowest exposure. They guide the go/no-go decision making, establish confidence in the candidate molecule by de-risking toxicity and safety issues and thereby speed up the early clinical development. In this review the focus is on the so called 'capsaicin model' as a typical example of a target engagement biomarker used as a human model for the development of CGRP blocking therapeutics. By applying capsaicin onto the skin, TRPV1 channels are activated and a CGRP-mediated increase in dermal blood flow can be quantified with laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Effective CGRP blocking therapeutics in turn, display blockade of this response. The translation of this biomarker model from animals to humans is discussed as well as the limitations of the assay in predicting the efficacy of anti-migraine drugs.

  20. Migraine: pharmacotherapy in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A.

    2000-01-01

    Migraine can be a disabling condition for the sufferer. For the small number of patients who fail home therapy and seek treatment in an emergency department, there are a number of therapeutic options. This paper reviews the evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of the following therapies: the phenothiazines, lignocaine (lidocaine), ketorolac, the ergot alkaloids, metoclopramide, the "triptans", haloperidol, pethidine and magnesium. Based on available evidence, the most effective agents seem to be prochlorperazine, chlorpromazine and sumatriptan, each of which have achieved greater then 70% efficacy in a number of studies. PMID:10921808

  1. Development of TRPM8 Antagonists to Treat Chronic Pain and Migraine.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Andy D; Lehto, Sonya G

    2017-03-30

    A review. Development of pharmaceutical antagonists of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) have been pursued for the treatment of chronic pain and migraine. This review focuses on the current state of this progress.

  2. [Immunotherapy for the treatment of acute appendicitis in children].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, A A; Akhanzaripov, Z A

    1994-08-01

    The immune status was studied during the development of the disease in 182 children who were operated on for acute appendicitis. T lymphocytes and their subpopulations circulating in the blood, as well as B lymphocytes, immunoglobulins A, M, G, and immune complexes were determined. The character of changes of these values before the operation and in various postoperative periods were determined. The effect of complex treatment, including T-activin, on the clinical and immunological parameters in children with acute appendicitis was appraised. Analysis of the results showed that a transitory immunodepressive state forms in children with the disease, which is more marked in the destructive form, with normalization of the main values of cell-mediated and humoral immunity by the 7th day after appendectomy. In a complicated course of acute appendicitis the state of immunodeficiency is torpid in character and does not return to normal values even after clinical recovery, i.e. before discharge from the clinic. Inclusion of the immunostimulating agent T-activin into the complex treatment of patients with appendicitis ensures a more rapid involution of the main clinical manifestations of the disease. The therapeutic effect was most pronounced in destructive appendicitis: after 3 days of treatment the pain syndrome was encountered twice less frequently and intestinal paresis more than twice less frequently in these patients, and the term of hospital stay (8.8 +/- 0.4 days) was less shorter than for children of the control group (12.2 +/- 1.9 days) who did not receive T-activin in the therapeutic complex.

  3. Pathophysiology and Surgical Treatment of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Miyamoto, Takuma; Matsuki, Yusuke; Isoda, Susumu; Goda, Motohiko; Suzuki, Shinichi; Masuda, Munetaka; Imoto, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We report the pathophysiology and treatment results of type A acute aortic dissection from our 20-year experience. Methods: We studied 673 patients with type A acute aortic dissection who underwent initial treatment from 1994 through July 2014. We divided these patients into two groups. The former group comprised 448 patients from 1994 through 2008, and the latter group comprised 225 patients from 2009 onward, when the current strategy of initial treatment and surgical technique including the early organ reperfusion therapies were established. Results: Women were significantly often presented than men in patients over 60 years of age. Thrombosed-type dissection accounted for more than half in patients over 70 years, and significantly often complicated pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade than patent type. Malperfusion occurred in 26% of patients. Central repair operations were performed in 579 patients. In-hospital mortality for all patients was 15%, and for the patients who underwent central repair operations was 10%. Former period of operation, malperfusion, and preoperative cardiopulmonary arrest were significant risk factor of in-hospital death. Preoperative left main trunk (LMT) stents were placed in eight patients and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) intervention was performed in five, they were effective to improve the outcome. From 2009 onward, in-hospital mortality was 5.0% and there was no significant risk factor. Conclusion: Surgical results of type A acute aortic dissection were dramatically improved in the past 20 years. Early reperfusion strategy for the patients with malperfusion improved the outcomes. (This article is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 127–134.) PMID:27738456

  4. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  5. [Acute kidney injury and septic shock: experiences in treatment].

    PubMed

    Pozzato, Marco; Ferrari, Fiorenza; Livigni, Sergio; Quarello, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 5-45% of critically ill patients, and renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required in 4-10% of patients with AKI. AKI has long been considered to be hemodynamic damage from low blood flow resulting in shock, and efforts have been made to prevent and cure it by increasing the renal blood flow and improving the cardiac output and perfusion pressure. In recent years, new experimental studies on patients with septic AKI have shown that the renal blood flow remains unaltered or even increases in septic shock. An important mechanism in the pathophysiology of sepsis and septic shock appears to be apoptosis rather than ischemic necrosis. The type of treatment as well as the dose and timing of initiation of RRT seem to have strategic importance in the recovery of AKI in patients admitted to the ICU. In critically ill (often postsurgical and septic) patients with acute renal failure the use of new anticoagulation strategies has permitted to perform treatments for a sufficient number of hours to achieve the correct level of purification by minimizing the downtime and the bleeding risk. In our center the use of protocols for different methods and different types of anticoagulants has simplified the treatment of all patients with AKI and septic shock admitted to the ICU.

  6. Morphine in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema--Why?

    PubMed

    Ellingsrud, C; Agewall, S

    2016-01-01

    Morphine has for a long time, been used in patients with acute pulmonary oedema due to its anticipated anxiolytic and vasodilatory properties, however a discussion about the benefits and risks has been raised recently. A literature search in Medline and Embase using the keywords "pulmonary oedema" OR "lung oedema" OR "acute heart failure" AND "morphine" was performed. A certain vasodilation has been described after morphine administration, but the evidence for this mechanism is relatively poor and morphine-induced anxiolysis may possibly be the most important factor of morphine in pulmonary oedema and therefore some authors have suggested benzodiazepines as an alternative treatment. Respiratory depression seems to be a less relevant clinical problem according to the literature, whereas vomiting is common, which may cause aspiration. In the largest outcome study, based on the ADHERE registry, morphine given in acute decompensated heart failure was an independent predictor of increased hospital mortality, with an odds ratio of 4.8 (95% CI: 4.52-5.18, p<0.001). Other, smaller studies have shown a significant association between morphine administration and mortality, which was lost after adjusting for confounding factors. Morphine is still used for pulmonary oedema in spite of poor scientific background data. A randomised, controlled study is necessary in order to determine the effect--and especially the risk--when using morphine for pulmonary oedema. Since the positive effects are not sufficiently documented, and since the risk for increased mortality cannot be ruled out, one can advocate that the use should be avoided.

  7. [Protocol for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis with necrosis].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luis; Targarona, Javier; Rodriguez, César

    2005-01-01

    The Severe Acute Pancreatic Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital was officially created in the year 2000. Up to date, we have cared for more than 195 patients with Pancreatic Necrosis. All of them have been treated under a management protocol presented by us. This has helped us to standardize treatment and also to compare results with work groups around the world. This Protocol comes from our own experience and that of our colleagues abroad with a wide knowledge in this kind of pathology abroad, with whom we maintain close ties.

  8. [The efficacy of the acute pancreatitis' surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskiĭ, V K; Rodionov, P N; Makarov, S V

    2012-01-01

    The comparative analysis of blood levels of leukocytes, lymphocytes, the leukocytic intoxication index, amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase, measured in operated patients with the acute pancreatitis, demonstrated the general positive dynamics of the patients condition. The higher blood levels of the substances in died patients demonstrate the important prognostic value of them. The higher levels of amylase, lipase, lactatdehydrogenase and creatinphosphokinase by the end of the clinical treatment together with the normalization of the rest laboratory data may witness the higher risk of the chronisation of the pancreatitis.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs.

  10. Fosfomycin for the initial treatment of acute haematogenous osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Corti, N; Sennhauser, F; Stauffer, U; Nadal, D

    2003-01-01

    Background and Aims: At our institution there has been a dichotomous antimicrobial treatment behaviour for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) since 1984. The surgical department favoured fosfomycin as initial choice and the medical department ß lactams. We aimed to compare the performance of both strategies. Methods: Data from patients discharged with the diagnosis of AHOM between January 1984 and January 1998 were gathered from the charts by means of a questionnaire. Patients receiving fosfomycin treatment (FT) were compared with those receiving fosfomycin plus other antimicrobials (FT+) and those receiving no fosfomycin treatment (NFT). Results: A total of 103 patients aged 0.1–15.5 years (mean 6.5, median 6.9) with AHOM received no surgical treatment initially. In 23 (22.3%) FT was instilled initially, in 47 (45.6%) FT+, and in 33 (32.0%) NFT. The pathogen was established in 30%, 36%, and 42% of FT, FT+, and NFT patients, respectively, Staphylococcus aureus being the predominant isolate. Mean C reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rates normalised in all treatment groups after two and four weeks, respectively. The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment in FT patients was 2.5 weeks, in FT+ patients 3.1 weeks, and in NFT patients 3.8 weeks (p < 0.05), whereas the mean duration of intravenous plus oral treatment was comparable (7.1 v 6.8 v 6.5 weeks). Conclusions: The leucocyte penetrating fosfomycin performed similarly to extracellular ß lactams in the treatment of AHOM. Intravenous treatment for longer than 2.5 weeks offered no advantage. PMID:12765918

  11. Acute Coronary Syndromes in Women: Recent Treatment Trends and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    In the USA and internationally, women experience farranging differences with respect to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). Women suffer from more comorbidities than men, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and poor mental health. They some-times exhibit atypical MI presentation symptoms and are overall less likely to present with chest pain. Women are more likely than men to encounter delays between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital or to guideline treatment. The use of various surgical and pharmacological treatments, including revascularization approaches, also differs. Women, on average, have worse outcomes than men following MI, with more complications, higher mortality rates, and poorer recovery. Internationally, outcomes are similar despite various differences in health care and culture in non-US countries. In this review, we detail differences regarding ACS and MI in women, describing their complex correlations and discussing their possible causes. Educational approaches that are tailored to women might help to reduce the incidence of ACS and MI, as well as outcomes following hospitalization. Although outcomes following acute MI have been improving over the years, women may require special consideration in order to see continued improvement. PMID:26884685

  12. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  13. Stenting in the Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Dabus, Guilherme; Linfante, Italo

    2011-01-01

    Recanalization of acute large artery occlusions is a strong predictor of good outcome. The development of thrombectomy devices resulted in a significant improvement in recanalization rates compared to thrombolytics alone. However, clinical trials and registries with these thrombectomy devices in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have shown recanalization rates in the range of 40–81%. The last decade has seen the development of nickel titanium self-expandable stents (SES). These stents, in contrast to balloon-mounted stents, allow better navigability and deployment in tortuous vessels and therefore are optimal for the cerebral circulation. SES were initially used for stent-assisted coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms and for treatment of intracranial stenosis. However, a few authors have recently reported feasibility of deployment of SES in AIS. The use of these devices yielded higher recanalization rates compared to traditional thrombectomy devices. Encouraged by these results, retrievable SES systems have been recently used in AIS. These devices offer the advantage of resheathing and retrieving of the stent even after full deployment. Some of these stents can also be detached in case permanent stent placement is needed. Retrievable SES are being used in Europe and currently tested in clinical trials in the United States. We review the recent literature in the use of stents for the treatment of AIS secondary to large vessel occlusion. PMID:22163225

  14. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  15. [Evidence for treatment of acute syndesmosis injuries in sports].

    PubMed

    Best, R; Mauch, F; Bauer, G

    2013-06-01

    Injuries of the distal syndesmosis often accompany acute ankle sprains especially in professional team sports. While small partial syndesmosis lesions can often be missed as a consequence of impressive symptoms due to ventrolateral capsuloligamentous injuries, higher grade injuries of the syndesmosis can mostly be diagnosed without any problem. Furthermore, there is a consensus concerning the necessity of operative treatment in significantly unstable situations as well concerning conservative treatment of incomplete partial lesions. Consequently, the greatest challenge regarding diagnostic tools, quantification and optimal therapy arises in the most common form of sport-associated, complete or partial lesions of the distal syndesmosis. This review article summarizes sports-associated injuries of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis considering the current literature and placing the emphasis on the anatomy, pathobiomechanics, diagnostics and therapy of syndesmosis lesions from an evidence-based viewpoint.

  16. [Consensus conference on acute bronchiolitis (IV): Treatment of acute bronchiolitis. Review of scientific evidence].

    PubMed

    González de Dios, J; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2010-04-01

    A review of the evidence on treatment of acute bronchiolitis is presented. There is sufficient evidence on the lack of effectiveness of most interventions tested in bronchiolitis. Apart from oxygen therapy, fluid therapy, aspiration of secretions and ventilation support, few treatment options will be beneficial. There are doubts about the efficacy of inhaled bronchodilators (salbutamol or adrenaline), with or without hypertonic saline solution, suggesting that these options should be selectively used as therapeutic trials in moderate-severe bronchiolitis. Heliox and non-invasive ventilation techniques, methylxanthine could be used in cases with respiratory failure, in patients with apnea, and surfactant and inhaled ribavirin in intubated critically ill patients. The available evidence does not recommend the use of oral salbutamol, subcutaneous adrenaline, anticholinergic drugs, inhaled or systemic corticosteroids, antibiotics, aerosolized o intravenous immunoglobulin, respiratory physiotherapy and others (nitric oxide, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease, recombinant interferon, nebulised furosemide and so on).

  17. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  19. Recent advances and novel treatment paradigms in acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papadantonakis, Nikolaos; Advani, Anjali S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an exciting time in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) given the advances in the relapsed/refractory setting. The development of antibody treatments (including antibody drug conjugates with toxins) offers a different treatment approach compared with conventional chemotherapy regimens. Moreover, the use of bispecific T-cell-engager antibodies (BiTEs) such as blinatumomab harness the cytotoxic activity of T cells against CD19-positive lymphoblasts. Another strategy involves the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. CAR T cells have demonstrated promising results in the relapsed/refractory setting. However, the use of BiTEs and CAR T cells is also associated with a distinct set of adverse reactions that must be taken into account by the treating physician. Apart from the above strategies, the use of other targeted therapies has attracted interest. Namely, the discovery of the Philadelphia (Ph)-like signature in children and young adults with ALL has led to the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in these patients. The different drugs and strategies that are being tested in the relapsed/refractory ALL setting pose a unique challenge in identifying the optimum sequence of treatment and determining which approaches should be considered for frontline treatment. PMID:27695616

  20. The role of genetics on migraine induction triggered by CGRP and PACAP38.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song

    2017-03-01

    induction. In conclusion, the present thesis suggests that genetics factors such as family load and genetic variants do not contribute to susceptibility of migraine attacks induced by CGRP or PACAP38. Additionally, our data indicate that CGRP and PACAP38 primarily have a peripheral site of action. We believe that the acquired knowledge from this thesis on how CGRP and PACAP38 might be involved in migraine pathophysiology would contribute to the development of novel and better migraine treatments in the future.

  1. Shortened Antimicrobial Treatment for Acute Otitis Media in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Paradise, Jack L; Rockette, Howard E; Kearney, Diana H; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Shope, Timothy R; Martin, Judith M; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Copelli, Susan J; Colborn, D Kathleen; Block, Stan L; Labella, John J; Lynch, Thomas G; Cohen, Norman L; Haralam, MaryAnn; Pope, Marcia A; Nagg, Jennifer P; Green, Michael D; Shaikh, Nader

    2016-12-22

    Background Limiting the duration of antimicrobial treatment constitutes a potential strategy to reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance among children with acute otitis media. Methods We assigned 520 children, 6 to 23 months of age, with acute otitis media to receive amoxicillin-clavulanate either for a standard duration of 10 days or for a reduced duration of 5 days followed by placebo for 5 days. We measured rates of clinical response (in a systematic fashion, on the basis of signs and symptomatic response), recurrence, and nasopharyngeal colonization, and we analyzed episode outcomes using a noninferiority approach. Symptom scores ranged from 0 to 14, with higher numbers indicating more severe symptoms. Results Children who were treated with amoxicillin-clavulanate for 5 days were more likely than those who were treated for 10 days to have clinical failure (77 of 229 children [34%] vs. 39 of 238 [16%]; difference, 17 percentage points [based on unrounded data]; 95% confidence interval, 9 to 25). The mean symptom scores over the period from day 6 to day 14 were 1.61 in the 5-day group and 1.34 in the 10-day group (P=0.07); the mean scores at the day-12-to-14 assessment were 1.89 versus 1.20 (P=0.001). The percentage of children whose symptom scores decreased more than 50% (indicating less severe symptoms) from baseline to the end of treatment was lower in the 5-day group than in the 10-day group (181 of 227 children [80%] vs. 211 of 233 [91%], P=0.003). We found no significant between-group differences in rates of recurrence, adverse events, or nasopharyngeal colonization with penicillin-nonsusceptible pathogens. Clinical-failure rates were greater among children who had been exposed to three or more children for 10 or more hours per week than among those with less exposure (P=0.02) and were also greater among children with infection in both ears than among those with infection in one ear (P<0.001). Conclusions Among children 6 to 23 months of age with acute

  2. Lithium Treatment of Acute Mania in Adolescents: A Placebo-Controlled Discontinuation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Coletti, Daniel J.; Dicker, Robert; Padula, Gina; Pleak, Richard R.; Alvir, Jose Ma. J.; Kane, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: There are no published placebo-controlled studies of any agent in the treatment of acute mania in children or adolescents. This is the first placebo-controlled study of lithium's efficacy in the treatment of acute mania in adolescents. Method: In this discontinuation study, participants received open treatment with lithium at…

  3. 77 FR 60126 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ...; Formerly 2008N-0004] Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Otitis Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment... Media: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' This guidance addresses FDA's current thinking regarding the... treatment of acute bacterial otitis media (ABOM). This guidance finalizes the revised draft guidance of...

  4. [Recurring loss of conciousness with middle brain symptoms in migraine].

    PubMed

    Walser, H; Isler, H; Hess, R

    1979-03-31

    A 49-year-old woman subject to frequent migraine attacks since childhood was seen for repeated episodes of confusion followed by loss of consciousness lasting for several hours. EEG during the acute stages showed marked slowing with bifrontal monorhythmic delta waves. After each episode, both the clinical and EEG findings subsided within hours. A similar course is described in a man who died at the age of 69 after preterminal mental deterioration. Autopsy showed evidence of bilateral damage to the hippocampal regions, apparently due to frequent impairment of perfusion in the last years of life. Atherosclerotic changes were within the normal range for his age. In both cases, the ischemic episodes are interpreted as consequences of constriction of the basilar artery, and it is assumed that the underlying mechanism is at least akin to that of migraine.

  5. Shared genetic factors in migraine and depression

    PubMed Central

    Stam, A H.; de Vries, B; Janssens, A C.J.W.; Vanmolkot, K R.J.; Aulchenko, Y S.; Henneman, P; Oostra, B A.; Frants, R R.; van den Maagdenberg, A M.J.M.; Ferrari, M D.; van Duijn, C M.; Terwindt, G M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the co-occurrence of migraine and depression and assess whether shared genetic factors may underlie both diseases. Methods: Subjects were 2,652 participants of the Erasmus Rucphen Family genetic isolate study. Migraine was diagnosed using a validated 3-stage screening method that included a telephone interview. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale and the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D). The contribution of shared genetic factors in migraine and depression was investigated by comparing heritability estimates for migraine with and without adjustment for symptoms of depression, and by comparing the heritability scores of depression between migraineurs and controls. Results: We identified 360 migraine cases: 209 had migraine without aura (MO) and 151 had migraine with aura (MA). Odds ratios for depression in patients with migraine were 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.98–1.70) for MO and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28–2.24) for MA. Heritability estimates were significant for all migraine (0.56), MO (0.77), and MA (0.96), and decreased after adjustment for symptoms of depression or use of antidepressant medication, in particular for MA. Comparison of the heritability scores for depression between patients with migraine and controls showed a genetic correlation between HADS-D score and MA. Conclusions: There is a bidirectional association between depression and migraine, in particular migraine with aura, which can be explained, at least partly, by shared genetic factors. GLOSSARY CES-D = Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; CI = confidence interval; ERF = Erasmus Rucphen Family; HADS-D = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IHS = International Headache Society; MA = migraine with aura; MO = migraine without aura; OR = odds ratio. PMID:20071666

  6. Application of simplified bioclean apparatuses for treatment of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Horiuchi, A

    1983-01-01

    We used a portable horizontal laminar-air-flow clean bed and an open horizontal laminar-air-flow fan (clean wall unit) for treating patients with acute leukemia. The level of cleanliness as shown in the nonviable and viable particle counts was class 100 and class 1,000 at the head and foot, respectively, of the bed in the clean-bed rooms, while it was class 100 and class 10,000 respectively, in the clean-wall-unit rooms. The level of cleanliness in the open wards, on the other hand, was class 1,000,000. The incidence of infectious complications in the clean-bed rooms was 3.1/100 days when the granulocyte count was 1,000/mm3 or less, 3.9/100 days when the count was 500/mm3 or less and 6.1/100 days when it was 100/mm3 or less. In the clean-wall-unit rooms, these values were 3.1, 3.7 and 7.1, respectively, while in the open wards they were 4.6, 6.1 and 15.0. Thus, it was ascertained that, as the granulocyte count decreased, the incidence of infectious complications became significantly higher in the open wards than in the clean-bed rooms or the clean-wall-unit rooms. No complication of pneumonia was found in 37 patients with acute leukemia in the clean-bed rooms or in 40 in the clean-wall-unit rooms. Among 36 patients treated in the open wards, on the other hand, the complication of pneumonia was found in four. From the above results, it is believed that the use of clean-bed rooms or clean-wall-unit rooms is an extremely effective supplementary treatment method for preventing respiratory tract infection complications in patients with acute leukemia.

  7. [CHANGES OF A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Kostyrnoy, O V; Kosenko, A V; Bayomi, Imad Mokhamed Abdel S K

    2015-11-01

    Pathogenetically substantiated program of complex diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of purulent-necrotic complications (PNC) was elaborated for improvement of results of the necrotic pancreatitis treatment. With the objective to study the PNC pathogenesis and a probation of new preparations for local treatment the experimantal simulation of the disease was accomplished. There was proved, that during the disease course the integrity of pancreatic ductal system is disordered . A 42-year experience of treatment of an acute pancreatitis was analyzed. In I period (1970 - 1980) the operative interventions were conducted; in 11 period (1981 - 1991)--a scientifically substantiated conservative therapy; in III period (1992 - 2000)--the diagnostic procedures possibilities were extended, and operative intervention were performed in accordance to severe indications. There was established, that the main cause of PNC is a secondary microbal contamination occurrence on the third-fifth postoperative days, the immediate manipulations on pancreatic gland are forbidden; a one-time surgical processing of the necrosis foci is insufficient; the staged necrsequestrectomy constitutes the optimal operation.

  8. Neuromagnetic Abnormality of Motor Cortical Activation and Phases of Headache Attacks in Childhood Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korman, Abraham M.; Allen, Janelle R.; O'Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral cortex serves a primary role in the pathogenesis of migraine. This aberrant brain activation in migraine can be noninvasively detected with magnetoencephalography (MEG). The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in motor cortical activation between attacks (ictal) and pain free intervals (interictal) in children and adolescents with migraine using both low- and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals. Thirty subjects with an acute migraine and 30 subjects with a history of migraine, while pain free, were compared to age- and gender-matched controls using MEG. Motor cortical activation was elicited by a standardized, validated finger-tapping task. Low-frequency brain activation (1∼50 Hz) was analyzed with waveform measurements and high-frequency oscillations (65–150 Hz) were analyzed with wavelet-based beamforming. MEG waveforms showed that the ictal latency of low-frequency brain activation was significantly delayed as compared with controls, while the interictal latency of brain activation was similar to that of controls. The ictal amplitude of low-frequency brain activation was significantly increased as compared with controls, while the interictal amplitude of brain activation was similar to that of controls. The ictal source power of high-frequency oscillations was significantly stronger than that of the controls, while the interictal source power of high-frequency oscillations was significantly weaker than that of controls. The results suggest that aberrant low-frequency brain activation in migraine during a headache attack returned to normal interictally. However, high-frequency oscillations changed from ictal hyper-activation to interictal hypo-activation. Noninvasive assessment of cortical abnormality in migraine with MEG opens a new window for developing novel therapeutic strategies for childhood migraine by maintaining a balanced cortical excitability. PMID:24386250

  9. [Calcitonin gene-related peptide: a key player neuropeptide in migraine].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Romero, M L; Sobrino-Mejia, F E

    2016-11-16

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a multifunctional neuropeptide produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP is widely distributed in the nervous system, particularly at anatomical areas thought to be involved with migraine pathophysiology, including the trigeminovascular nociceptive system. Over the past two decades, a convergence of basic and clinical evidence has established the CGRP as a key player in migraine. CGRP enhances sensitivity to sensory input at multiple levels in both the periphery and central nervous system. Within the brain, the wide distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptors provides numerous possible targets for CGRP to act as a neuromodulator. Now, CGRP has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for a number of novel treatments for migraine. This review discusses the evidence behind the role of CGRP in migraine and the state of CGRP-based mechanism treatment development.

  10. Acute urticaria and angioedema: diagnostic and treatment considerations.

    PubMed

    Frigas, Evangelo; Park, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Urticaria is defined as wheals consisting of three features: (i) central swelling of various sizes, with or without surrounding erythema; (ii) pruritus or occasional burning sensations; and (iii) the skin returning to normal appearance, usually within 1-24 hours. Angioedema is defined as: (i) abrupt swelling of the lower dermis and subcutis; (ii) occasional pain instead of pruritus; (iii) commonly involving the mucous membranes; and (iv) skin returning to normal appearance, usually within 72 hours. Acute urticaria and angioedema is defined by its duration (<6 weeks) compared with chronic urticaria and angioedema. The most common causes are infections, medications, and foods. The best tools in the evaluation of these patients are a comprehensive history and physical examination. There are a variety of skin conditions that may mimic acute urticaria and angioedema and the various reaction patterns associated with different drugs. Oral antihistamines are first-line treatment. In the event of a life-threatening reaction involving urticaria with angioedema, epinephrine may be needed to stabilize the patient. This review focuses on the value of a comprehensive clinical evaluation at the onset of symptoms. It underscores the importance of coordination of care among physicians, and the development of an action plan for evidence-based investigations, diagnosis, and therapy.

  11. Acute cyanide poisoning: clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Borron, S W; Baud, F J

    1996-09-01

    Cyanide poisoning presents in many forms. Industrial intoxications occur due to extensive use of cyanide compounds as reaction products. Smoke inhalation, a polyintoxication, is most often responsible for domestic cyanide poisonings. Suicidal poisonings are rare. Cyanogenic compounds may produce acute or subacute toxicity. Signs of cyanide poisoning include headache, vertigo, agitation, confusion, coma, convulsions and death. Definitive laboratory confirmation is generally delayed. Elevated plasma lactate, associated with cardiovascular collapse, should suggest cyanide intoxication. Immediate treatment includes 100% oxygen, assisted ventilation, decontamination, correction of acidosis and blood pressure support. Antidotes include oxygen, hydroxocobalamin, di-cobalt EDTA and methaemoglobin-inducers. Hydroxocobalamin is an attractive antidote due to its rapid cyanide binding and its lack of serious side-effects, even in the absence of cyanide intoxication. Sodium thiosulphate acts more slowly than other antidotes and is indicated in subacute cyanogen poisoning and as an adjunct to acute cyanide poisoning. Initial evaluation of antidotal efficacy is based on correction of hypotension and lactic acidosis; the final analysis rests on the degree of permanent central nervous system injury.

  12. [Surgical treatment of acute deep leg and pelvic vein trombosis].

    PubMed

    Gall, F; Husfeldt, K J

    1977-08-25

    In the last 3 years 93 cases of iliofermoral trombosis were treated by surgery. We prefer the method used by Brunner, but under general anaesthesia and using a Bentley-Autotransfusion-System (ATS). The average age of our patients was 55 years (age ranged between 17 and 87 years). No lethal pulmonary embolism was observed. 2, 1 percent of the patients died following apoplex or acute heart failure. Of 67 patients who were operated on 6 months ago or more 70 percent have no further complaints, 28 percent still have some residual edema and only 2 patients have a severe postthrombotic syndrome. 50 percent of 40 control-phlebograms demonstrated patency of all veins. 20 percent had short segmentary occlusions with definite signs of recanalisation, while in 27 percent of the cases occlusions of the lower leg and thigh were found, the iliac veins being free. Only 2 postoperative phlebograms showed a complete iliofemoral venous occlusion. Our results prove, that the operative thrombectomy is a successful method, with which the main complications of the iliofemoral thrombosis-pulmonary embolisation and postthrombotic syndrome-can difinitely be reduced. Also because of better long term results, the operative therapy of acute ilofemoral thrombosis should be generally prefered instead of conservative treatment.

  13. Acute renal and hepatic failure associated with allopurinol treatment.

    PubMed

    Fagugli, R M; Gentile, G; Ferrara, G; Brugnano, R

    2008-12-01

    Hyperuricemia is present in about 5% of the population, and allopurinol is frequently used to treat it. The use of this drug can be associated with a number of side effects, indicating allergic reactions, such as skin rash, reversible after its withdrawal. In some cases more severe hypersensitivity reactions may be seen, such as erythema multiforme exudativum, or Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS). Reversible clinical hepatotoxicity, as well as acute renal failure, may also develop after allopurinol therapy. We describe here the case of a 74-year-old woman with chronic renal failure who was admitted to hospital after 1 week of sore throat and fever, presenting mucous membrane lesions, widespread blistering of the skin, evolving to flaccid vesicles and bullae, and extensive epidermal detachment associated with acute renal failure and cholestatic jaundice. A diagnosis of allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) was established. Allopurinol was discontinued, and intensive care management was required: the patient was successfully treated by using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), standard hemodialysis, and albumin dialysis (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System - MARS, Teraklin AG, Rostock, Germany). Allopurinol-induced TEN is extremely rare, however, the survival rate is extremely low. Clinicians should be aware of this potentially severe adverse effect. This report emphasizes the importance of an aggressive pharmacological and dialysis treatment in the case of TEN.

  14. The Prevalence of Migraine in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Zeynab; Alidoost, Saeideh; Behzadifar, Meysam; Mohammadibakhsh, Roghayeh; Khodadadi, Najmeh; Sepehrian, Razieh; Sohrabi, Rahim; Taheri Mirghaed, Masood; Salemi, Morteza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Context Migraine is a major dilemma and problem which affects public health and results to reduced quality of life. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of migraine in Iran. Evidence Acquisition A systematic search was conducted using Pub Med, Web of Science, Embase, Scopus, Ovid, Google Scholar, as well as Iranian databases including: MagIran, IranMedex and Scientific Information Databank, from 2000 to November, 2015. The Der-Simonian/Laird’s random-effects model, with a 95% confidence interval was employed to estimate the overall pooled prevalence. Heterogeneity was investigated using subgroup analysis based on sample size and time of study. Results Thirty studies comprising 33,873 participants met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. The overall prevalence of migraine in Iran was 14% (95% CI, 12% to 17%), respectively. The overall prevalence was (8%; 95% CI 6% to 11%) according to the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD-1), (17%; 95% CI 13% to 21%) according to ICHD-2, and (18%; 95% CI 7% to 30%) according to the other questionnaire for migraine screener (ID Migraine), respectively. Meta-regression demonstrated that the prevalence of migraine increased by year of publication and decreased by sample size. Conclusions The prevalence of migraine in Iran, which was estimated as 14%, was similar or even higher than that reported world-wide. Migraine can have impact on the economic productivity of any country; therefore it is necessary to educate people on the early detection and the discovery of an effective treatment of migraine. More thorough review of further studies in this field is recommended. PMID:28184330

  15. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  16. Pharmacogenomics and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Bosó, Virginia; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous malignancy that is primarily treated with combinations of cytarabine and anthracyclines. Although this scheme remains effective in most of the patients, variability of outcomes in patients has been partly related with their genetic variability. Several pharmacogenetic studies have analyzed the impact of polymorphisms in genes encoding transporters, metabolizers or molecular targets of chemotherapy agents. A systematic review on all eligible studies was carried out in order to estimate the effect of polymorphisms of anthracyclines and cytarabine pathways on efficacy and toxicity of AML treatment. Other emerging genes recently studied in AML, such as DNA repair genes, genes potentially related to chemotherapy response or AML prognosis, have also been included.

  17. [Intracranial pressure targeted treatment in acute bacterial meningitis increased survival].

    PubMed

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-12-16

    To evaluate the efficacy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness, a prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study was performed. Included were patients with confirmed ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at a neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All patients received intensive care with me-chanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. ICP-targeted treatment was performed in the intervention group, aiming at ICP 50 mmHg. The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered, compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group. Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission.

  18. New agents approved for treatment of acute staphylococcal skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Tatarkiewicz, Jan; Staniszewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin has been a predominant treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections for decades. However, growing reservations about its efficacy led to an urgent need for new antibiotics effective against MRSA and other drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. This review covers three new anti-MRSA antibiotics that have been recently approved by the FDA: dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid. The mechanism of action, indications, antibacterial activity profile, microbial resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, interactions as well as available formulations and administration of each of these new antibiotics are described. Dalbavancin is a once-a-week, two-dose, long-acting intravenous bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic. Oritavancin, a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity, was developed as a single-dose intravenous treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI), which offers simplifying treatment of infections. Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone-class bacteriostatic once-daily agent, available for intravenous as well as oral use. Increased ability to overcome bacterial resistance is the main therapeutic advantage of the novel agents over existing antibiotics. PMID:27904526

  19. Treatment of simultaneous acute antibody-mediated rejection and acute cellular rejection with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jirasiritham, S; Khunprakant, R; Techawathanawanna, N; Jirasiritham, Si; Mavichak, V

    2010-04-01

    This is a case report of a living related donor kidney transplantation using basiliximab induction and maintenance immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate sodium, and steroid. On the second posttransplant day, the patient developed acute antibody-mediated rejection, which was treated with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Five days later, the graft had still not responded to the treatment. Another biopsy revealed additional acute cellular rejection (Banff IIA). As alemtuzumab can rapidly deplete T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, and natural killer cells, the patient was treated with alemtuzumab (30 mg subcutaneously) together with methylprednisolone (500 mg) and two more plasmaphereses. The kidney graft responded within 48 hours, producing more than 4 L of urine per day. The total lymphocyte decreased from 530/microL to 50/microL remaining in the 50 to 220/microL range. The patient received valgancyclovir and cotrimoxazole as infection prophylaxis. The kidney graft responded well to the rescue treatment and the patient was discharged with a serum creatinine of 1.1 mg/mL and has been uneventfully followed in the outpatient clinic for 8 months. Today, with the potent, effective, and selective immunosuppressive regimens, the rate and severity of acute cellular rejection in kidney transplantation has decreased in most centers. However, the rate of acute antibody-mediated rejection has increased to levels greater than those of acute cellular rejection in many centers. Acute antibody-mediated rejection is more difficult and expensive to treat successfully. The treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection included plasmapheresis and IVIG. Herein we have reported a case of kidney transplantation simultaneously developing acute antibody-mediated and acute cellular rejection; the patient was successfully treated with alemtuzumab.

  20. Comorbidity of Migraine with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Riise, Trond; Lund, Anders; Dilsaver, Steven C.; Hundal, Oivind; Oedegaard, Ketil J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate how often drugs used to treat migraine and ADHD are prescribed to the same patients to assess, indirectly, the comorbidity of these disorders. Method: We used data from the Norwegian prescription database for 2006, including the total Norwegian population (N = 4,640,219). Results:…

  1. A review on the management of migraine in the Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zargaran, Arman; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Faridi, Pouya; Daneshamouz, Saeid; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2016-03-01

    Migraine is a common type of headache which has a deep history dating back thousands of years. Avicenna (980-1032), a Persian scholar, made a great contribution to neurology including headache and migraine. The aim of this study is to consider Avicenna's description about migraine (Shaghighe in Persian language) including definition, etiology and intervention. Also, his definition and treatment approaches were considered based on current concepts and findings. Although Avicenna believed in humoral theory and divided migraine into two categories, hot and cold, and suggested special treatments for them as well as general considerations, most of his definitions and explained pathologies are supported by current concepts of medicine. He believed that the migraine can result from bone of skull and also intra-parenchymal; or from skull underneath membrane (dura-mater); or reaching substances from the painful side or from outer vein and arteries (extra cranial); or from brain and meninges (pia-mater). Furthermore, current findings show most medicinal plants mentioned by Avicenna for the treatment of migraine can have potentially significant effects such as remedies which stop central and peripheral sensitization [anti-neuroinflammatory agents, decreasing nitric oxide level, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors], as well as serotonergics, neuroprotective agents and analgesics.

  2. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Patients with Migraine

    PubMed Central

    KARAKURUM GÖKSEL, Başak

    2013-01-01

    Although many patients with migraine get positive benefits from conventional pharmacological treatments, many others do not benefit sufficiently or experience adverse effects from these treatments. For that reason, these patients usually seek complementary and/or alternative medical (CAM) treatments all over the world. In general, although CAM therapies are not recommended by neurologist in Turkey, most of migraine patients, who do not respond conventional medicine treatments, seek alternative therapy. Acupuncture, botulinum toxin, mind-body interventions, and nutraceutical options are the most popular treatments. In this review, the available evidence for all these treatments will be discussed.

  3. Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics, Quinolones, and General Gnotobiological Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    Armed Forces Ra ioloy Research Institute Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones, and General...Gnotobiological Isolation Russia State Medical University 19990119 114 Treatment of Experimental Acute Radiation Disease in Mice with Probiotics , Quinolones...effects of antibiotics and probiotics (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) in mice irradiated with 7 Gy. The effects were studied in normal mice and mice

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advancements in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zheng, Hu-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Among all subtypes, a lack of consensus exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patient survival rates have remained modest for the past three decades in AML. Recently, targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research papers on diagnostic development, target therapy, and other novel therapies of AML. Clinical trial information was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov. For the major purpose of this review that is to outline the latest therapeutic development of AML, we only listed the ongoing clinical trials for reference. However, the published results of complete clinical trials were also mentioned. Study Selection: This article reviewed the latest developments related to the diagnosis and treatment of AML. In the first portion, we provided some novel insights on the molecular basis of AML, as well as provided an update on the classification of AML. In the second portion, we summarized the results of research on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. We will also highlight ongoing research and clinical trials in pediatric AML. Results: We described clonal evolution and how it changes our view on leukemogenesis, treatment responses, and disease relapse. Pediatric-specific genomic mapping was discussed with a novel diagnostic method highlighted. In the later portion of this review, we summarized the researches on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/FLT3 inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. Conclusion: Gene sequencing techniques should set the basis for next-generation diagnostic

  5. Early Prediction of Acute Antidepressant Treatment Response and Remission in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Rongrong; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Nakonezny, Paul; Kennard, Betsy; Hughes, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    The rate of symptom improvement during the early weeks of acute fluoxetine treatment is a good indicator of remission. This finding was made after evaluating the outcome of the fluoxetine treatment on 168 children and adults with depression.

  6. Psychiatric comorbidity in patients with chronic daily headache and migraine: a selective overview including personality traits and suicide risk.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Di Cosimo, Daniela; Innamorati, Marco; Lester, David; Tatarelli, Roberto; Martelletti, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Studies on the prevalence and impact of psychiatric disorders among headache patients have yielded findings that have clarified the relationship between migraine and major affective disorders, anxiety, illicit drug abuse, nicotine dependence, and suicide attempts. Studies in both clinical and community-based settings have demonstrated an association between migraine and a number of specific psychiatric disorders. In large-scale population-based studies, persons with migraine are from 2.2 to 4.0 times more likely to have depression. In longitudinal studies, the evidence supports a bidirectional relationship between migraine and depression, with each disorder increasing the risk of the other disorder. Although a strong association has been demonstrated consistently for migraine and major depression, especially for migraine with aura, there has been less systematic research on the links between migraine and bipolar disorder. This review will focus on the way in which psychiatric disorders decrease the quality of life and result in a worse prognosis, chronicity of the disease, and a worse response to treatment. Short-term pharmaceutical care intervention improves the patients' mental health, but it does not significantly change the number and severity of headaches. The increase in self-efficacy and mental health associated with pharmaceutical care may be instrumental in improving the long-term pharmacotherapy of patients with migraine and headache.

  7. Evaluation and treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kinkade, Scott

    2007-04-15

    Acute low back pain with or without sciatica usually is self-limited and has no serious underlying pathology. For most patients, reassurance, pain medications, and advice to stay active are sufficient. A more thorough evaluation is required in selected patients with "red flag" findings associated with an increased risk of cauda equina syndrome, cancer, infection, or fracture. These patients also require closer follow-up and, in some cases, urgent referral to a surgeon. In patients with nonspecific mechanical low back pain, imaging can be delayed for at least four to six weeks, which usually allows the pain to improve. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, skeletal muscle relaxants, heat therapy, physical therapy, and advice to stay active. Spinal manipulative therapy may provide short-term benefits compared with sham therapy but not when compared with conventional treatments. Evidence for the benefit of acupuncture is conflicting, with higher-quality trials showing no benefit. Patient education should focus on the natural history of the back pain, its overall good prognosis, and recommendations for effective treatments.

  8. Beginning treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: the family connection.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Paton, Mary Anne; Huff, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    There is a loud silence on psycho-oncology research in relation to pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). This article is part of a series that begins to address the psycho-social hiatus. The present article documents the less obvious, often hidden, aspect of beginning treatment for pediatric AML--the "behind the scenes" experience of the home and family connection. The findings are from the first stage of a five year longitudinal study that examines through qualitative research the experience of childhood leukemia from the perspective of the child, siblings and parents. Open-ended interviews, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, were thematically analyzed with the assistance of the Non-numerical Unstructured Data by processes of Indexing Searching and Theory-building (NUD*IST) computer program. The findings emphasize the disruption to normalcy in relation to home life, school, and work, which is exacerbated for families who relocate for specialist treatment. The findings emphasise the need for support for families coping with childhood AML.

  9. Successful implementation of spacer treatment guideline for acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C; Maskell, G; Marks, M; South, M; Robertson, C; LENNEY, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination.
METHODS—Defined strategies were used for the development and implementation of a guideline, assessed by a prospective, descriptive, study using notes review, and patient, nursing, and medical staff telephone contact. The setting was a tertiary referral hospital in Victoria, Australia with 25 000 yearly admissions, and asthma accounting for about 7% of total. The first 200 children and families to use the guideline after its introduction were evaluated.
RESULTS—A total of 191 (95.5%) children were treated according to the guideline. Six (3.0%) children were given nebulisers appropriately based on severity; five (2.5%) were given nebulisers at parental or child choice; and four (2.0 %) who did not have severe asthma, received nebulised treatment inappropriately.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful implementation of a new evidence based guideline can be achieved using specific strategies for promoting the application of research findings in the clinical arena.

 PMID:11159290

  10. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  11. Evaluation of artemisinins for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Drenberg, Christina D.; Buaboonnam, Jassada; Orwick, Shelley J.; Hu, Shuiying; Li, Lie; Fan, Yiping; Shelat, Anang A.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Rubnitz, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Investigate antileukemic activity of artemisinins, artesunate (ART), and dihydroartemisinin (DHA), in combination with cytarabine, a key component of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) chemotherapy using in vitro and in vivo models. Methods Using ten human AML cell lines, we conducted a high-throughput screen to identify antimalarial agents with antileukemic activity. We evaluated effects of ART and DHA on cell viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, lysosomal integrity, and combination effects with cytarabine in cell lines and primary patient blasts. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies and efficacy of single-agent ART or combination with cytarabine were evaluated in three xenograft models. Results ART and DHA had the most potent activity in a panel of AML cell lines, with selectivity toward samples harboring MLL rearrangements and FLT3-ITD mutations. Combination of ART or DHA was synergistic with cytarabine. Single-dose ART (120 mg/kg) produced human equivalent exposures, but multiple dose daily administration required for in vivo efficacy was not tolerated. Combination treatment produced initial regression, but did not prolong survival in vivo. Conclusions The pharmacology of artemisinins is problematic and should be considered in designing AML treatment strategies with currently available agents. Artemisinins with improved pharmacokinetic properties may offer therapeutic benefit in combination with conventional therapeutic strategies in AML. PMID:27125973

  12. Discovery of (5S,6S,9R)-5-amino-6-(2,3-difluorophenyl)-6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5H-cyclohepta[b]pyridin-9-yl 4-(2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (BMS-927711): an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist in clinical trials for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Conway, Charles M; Denton, Rex; Keavy, Deborah; Signor, Laura; Kostich, Walter; Lentz, Kimberley A; Santone, Kenneth S; Schartman, Richard; Browning, Marc; Tong, Gary; Houston, John G; Dubowchik, Gene M; Macor, John E

    2012-12-13

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute migraine. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a highly potent, oral CGRP receptor antagonist BMS-927711 (8). Compound 8 has good oral bioavailability in rat and cynomolgus monkey, attractive overall preclinical properties, and shows dose-dependent activity in a primate model of CGRP-induced facial blood flow. Compound 8 is presently in phase II clinical trials.

  13. Low molecular weight heparin for treatment of acute myocardial infarction (FAMI): Fragmin (dalteparin sodium) in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, V V; Iyengar, S S; De Lorenzo, F; Hargreaves, J R; Kadziola, Z A

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of using subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin sodium) for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction in patients not treated with thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-nine cardiological centres from leading hospitals in India participated in this prospective, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in two phases which included 1128 patients with acute myocardial infarction. In the acute phase (between day 1 and 3 of admission) all the patients received a weight-adjusted dose of subcutaneous dalteparin (120 IU/kg twice daily). In the second, double-blind phase of acute myocardial infarction, patients were randomised to receive a fixed dose of dalteparin (7,500 IU) or an identical placebo injection for 30 days. A composite primary endpoint of death, reinfarction, recurrence of angina and emergency revascularisation was used. All the 1128 patients with acute myocardial infarction were included in the trial. In the acute phase, the composite primary endpoint was observed in 58 (5.1%) patients. Of 1037 paients who were randomly assigned to receive a fixed dose of dalteparin (n=519) or placebo (n=518), the composite primary event rate was 6.7 percent and 7.0 percent, respectively (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.62-1.52; p=0.90). To conclude, treatment with dalteparin administered subcutaneously in a weight-adjusted dose of 120 IU/kg twice daily resulted in a lower than expected mortality during the acute phase of myocardial infarction. A lower fixed once daily dose of 7,500 IU during the chronic phase did not confer additional protection.

  14. The efficacy of Kiko exercises on the prevention of migraine headaches: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Elinoff, Victor; Lynn, Steven Jay; Ochiai, Hidy; Hallquist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Migraine headaches, a common chronic medical problem, require prophylactic treatment when they are frequent and severe. This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of Kiko, a Japanese practice of Qigong that uses repetitive coordinated breathing and movement as a prophylactic treatment of migraine headaches. This pilot study, a single arm, non-randomized 4-month trial, investigated whether 3 months of Kiko training would reduce the severity and/or frequency of migraine and/or MIDAS scores. The baseline migraine data were collected from participants in the first month and then participants were taught Kiko exercises in 3 monthly sessions. Participants practiced at home and had the opportunity to utilize a Kiko DVD. The participants were instructed by Washin-Ryu style martial arts Master, Hidy Ochiai. Subjects completed monthly diaries that recorded the frequency and severity of their migraines, as well as the frequency and duration of their home Kiko practice. Six of the original 13 subjects completed the trial. All the individuals who completed the study had measurable improvement in their migraines. All participants reported a positive experience in learning the technique, and there were no reported adverse effects. Although the results of this study need to be confirmed in a larger clinical trial with adequate controls for placebo effects, these preliminary results are consistent with other trials that have documented the potential benefits of mind-body practices in controlling symptoms and improving the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic medical illness.

  15. Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0646 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine ...COVERED 1 Sep 2011 – 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Targets for Chronic Migraine 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chronic migraine is a disabling disorder

  16. Basilar artery migraine and reversible imaging abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Maytal, J; Libman, R B; Lustrin, E S

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a basilar artery migraine in a 17-year-old boy with transient CT and MR abnormalities after each of two migraine episodes. A repeat MR study 6 months after the last event showed complete resolution of the lesion. Transient abnormalities on brain images similar to those shown in our case have been reported in patients with migraine and other neurologic conditions and are most likely related to cerebral vasogenic edema.

  17. The effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation in migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tarighat Esfanjani, Ali; Mahdavi, Reza; Ebrahimi Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Talebi, Mahnaz; Nikniaz, Zeinab; Safaiyan, Abdolrasool

    2012-12-01

    Given the conflicting results about the positive effects of magnesium and L-carnitine and as there is no report concerning concurrent supplementation of magnesium and L-carnitine on migraine prophylaxis, the effects of magnesium, L-carnitine, and concurrent magnesium-L-carnitine supplementation on migraine indicators were assessed. In this clinical trial, 133 migrainous patients were randomly assigned into three intervention groups: magnesium oxide (500 mg/day), L-carnitine (500 mg/day), and Mg-L-carnitine (500 mg/day magnesium and 500 mg/day L-carnitine), and a control group. After 12 weeks of supplementation, the checklist of migraine indicators including migraine attacks/month, migraine days/month, and headache severity was completed, and serum concentrations of magnesium and L-carnitine were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and enzymatic UV test, respectively. The results showed a significant reduction in all migraine indicators in all studied groups (p < 0.05). The ANOVA results showed a significant reduction in migraine frequency across various supplemented and control groups (p = 0.008). By separating the effects of magnesium supplementation from other confounding factors such as routine treatments using the repeated measures and nested model, it was clarified that magnesium supplementation had a significant effect on all migraine indicators. Oral supplementation with magnesium oxide and L-carnitine and concurrent supplementation of Mg-L-carnitine besides routine treatments could be effective in migraine prophylaxis; however, larger trials are needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  18. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  19. Adipokines and Migraine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, B. Lee; Sacco, Simona; Bernecker, Claudia; Scher, Ann I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Migraine is comorbid with obesity. Recent research suggests an association between migraine and adipocytokines, proteins that are predominantly secreted from adipose tissue and which participate in energy homeostasis and inflammatory processes. Objectives In this review, we first briefly discuss the association between migraine and obesity and the importance of adipose tissue as a neuroendocrine organ. We then present a systematic review of the extant literature evaluating circulating levels of adiponectin and leptin in those with migraine. Methods A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the keywords “migraine,” “adiponectin,” and “leptin.” In addition reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed for possible inclusion. English language studies published between 2005 and 2015 evaluating circulating blood concentration of adiponectin or leptin in those with migraine were included. Conclusions While the existing data are suggestive that adipokines may be associated with migraine, substantial study design differences and conflicting results limit definitive conclusions. Future research utilizing carefully considered designs and methodology is warranted. In particular careful and systematic characterization of pain states at the time of samples, as well as systematic consideration of demographic (eg, age, sex) and other vital covariates (eg, obesity status, lipids) are needed to determine if adipokines play a role in migraine pathophysiology and if any adipokine represents a viable, novel migraine biomarker, or drug target. PMID:27012149

  20. The prognosis of childhood abdominal migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dignan, F; Abu-Arafeh, I; Russell, G

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the clinical course of childhood abdominal migraine, seven to 10 years after the diagnosis.
METHODS—A total of 54 children with abdominal migraine were studied; 35 were identified from a population survey carried out on Aberdeen schoolchildren between 1991 and 1993, and 19 from outpatient records of children in the same age group who had attended the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital. Controls were 54 children who did not have abdominal pain in childhood, matched for age and sex, obtained from either the population survey or the patient administration system. Main outcome measures were presence or resolution of abdominal migraine and past or present history of headache fulfilling the International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for the diagnosis of migraine.
RESULTS—Abdominal migraine had resolved in 31 cases (61%). Seventy per cent of cases with abdominal migraine were either current (52%) or previous (18%) sufferers from headaches that fulfilled the IHS criteria for migraine, compared to 20% of the controls.
CONCLUSIONS—These results support the concept of abdominal migraine as a migraine prodrome, and suggest that our diagnostic criteria for the condition are robust.

 PMID:11316687

  1. Migraine headache and labor market outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rees, Daniel I; Sabia, Joseph J

    2015-06-01

    While migraine headache can be physically debilitating, no study has attempted to estimate its effects on labor market outcomes. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the effect of being diagnosed with migraine headache on labor force participation, hours worked, and wages. Ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates suggest that migraines are associated with reduced labor force participation and lower wages among females. A negative association between migraine headache and the wages of female respondents is also obtained using an instrumental variables (IV) approach, although the IV estimates are imprecise relative to the OLS estimates.

  2. Use of medications in the treatment of acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Gerard A; Dennis, Robin L

    2006-01-01

    The prescription of medications continues to be one of the mainstays of treatment of acute low back pain episodes. The goals of the pharmacologic treatment for acute low back are reduction of pain and return of normal function. Often, nociception is a result of secondary inflammation and muscle spasm after acute injury of a structure of the spine, which may include muscle, tendon, ligament, disc, or bone. An understanding of the appropriate use of medications to address the underlying pain generator and the current evidence for using these medications is essential for any physician who sees and treats patients with acute low back pain.

  3. OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®): a review of its use in the prophylaxis of headaches in adults with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2012-04-16

    This article reviews the pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy and tolerability profile of intramuscularly injected onabotulinumtoxinA (onaBoNTA; BOTOX®) for headache prophylaxis in adults with chronic migraine, with a focus on UK labelling for the drug. The pharmacological actions of onaBoNTA include a direct antinociceptive (analgesic) effect; while not fully understood, the mechanism of action underlying its headache prophylaxis effect in chronic migraine is presumed to involve inhibition of peripheral and central sensitization in trigeminovascular neurones. Pooled findings from two large phase III studies of virtually identical design (PREEMPT [Phase III REsearch Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy] 1 and 2) showed that treatment with up to five cycles of onaBoNTA (155-195 units/cycle) at 12-week intervals was effective in reducing headache symptoms, decreasing headache-related disability, and improving health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in patients with chronic migraine, approximately two-thirds of whom were overusing acute headache medications at baseline. During the double-blind phase of both trials, significantly more patients treated with onaBoNTA (two cycles) than placebo experienced clinically meaningful improvements in the monthly frequencies of headache days, moderate to severe headache days and migraine days, and in the cumulative hours of headache on headache days/month. OnaBoNTA therapy also resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in functioning and HR-QOL compared with placebo. Notably, improvements in headache symptoms, functioning and HR-QOL favouring onaBoNTA over placebo were seen regardless of whether or not patients were medication overusers and irrespective of whether or not they were naive to (oral) prophylactic therapy. Further improvements relative to baseline in headache symptoms, functioning and HR-QOL were observed during the open-label extension phase of both trials (all patients received

  4. Outcome of Chronic Daily Headache or Chronic Migraine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Chu, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a common neurological condition that affects 1-4% of the general population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that CDH is mainly represented by chronic migraine (CM). Owing to the frequent headaches, associated symptoms, and comorbid conditions associated with CDH/CM, disability, quality of life (QoL), economic burden, and treatment outcome have become important personal and social issues. There have been several studies assessing the disability, QoL, and economic burden associated with CDH/CM. These studies, conducted in different settings, consistently reported significantly higher disability and economic burden and lower QoL among CDH/CM patients compared to patients with episodic headache (EH) or episodic migraine (EM). Treatment outcome of CDH/CM is often poor. In this review, we describe and summarize the results of relevant studies performed to date.

  5. 75 FR 32490 - Issues in the Development of Medical Products for the Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Prophylaxis and/or Treatment of Acute Antibody Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients; Public... prophylaxis and/or treatment of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in kidney transplant recipients....

  6. Technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1998-02-09

    From October 1994 to June 1997, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were funded through LDRD to develop and integrate technologies for diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke. The project was summarized in a Science and Technology Review article `Brain Attack` that appeared in June 1997 and again in the Center for Healthcare Technologies Report (UCRL-LR-124761). This article is the best overview of the project, epidemiology of stroke and technical progress. Most of the technical progress has been documented in conference papers and presentations and refereed journal articles. Additional technical publication can be expected as our remaining patent applications progress through the US Patent and Trademark Office. The purpose of this report is to provide an appropriate introduction and organization to the numerous publications so that interested readers can quickly find information. Because there is no documentation for the history of this project, this report provides a summary. It also provides the final status report for the LDRD funding.

  7. Genetics and Treatments Options for Recurrent Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion Statement Worldwide research efforts demonstrate a major role of gene-environment interactions for the risk, development, and progression of most pancreatic diseases, including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. New findings of pancreas disease-associated risk variants have been reported in the CPA1, GGT1, CLDN2, MMP1, MTHFR, and other genes. These risk genes and their regulatory regions must be added to the known pathogenic variants in the PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, CTRC, CASR, UBR1, SBDS, CEL, and CTSB genes. This new knowledge promises to improve disease management and prevention through personalized medicine. At the same time, however, knowledge of an increasing number of pathogenic variants, and their complicated effects when present in combination, results in increasing difficulty in interpretation and development of recommendations. Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic testing results also adds complexity to disease management paradigms, especially without interpretation and, in many cases, proven accuracy. While improvements in the ability to rapidly and accurately interpret complex genetic tests are clearly needed, some results, such as pathogenic CFTR variants – including a new class of bicarbonate-defective mutations – and PRSS1 variants have immediate implications that direct management. In addition, discovery of pancreatitis-associated genetic variants in patients with glucose intolerance may suggest underlying type 3c diabetes, which also has implications for treatment and disease management. PMID:24954874

  8. Capsaicin failed in suppressing cortical processing of CO2 laser pain in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Losito, Luciana; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the nociceptive system in eight migraine without aura patients in the pain-free phase with 10 healthy controls, by evaluating the topography and the source of the CO2 laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) obtained by the right supraorbital skin, during and after capsaicin topical application. In healthy subjects the acute cutaneous pain induced by capsaicin reduced the amplitude of the vertex LEPs and induced a posterior shifting of the P2 wave dipolar source within the anterior cingulate cortex. These functional changes seemed significantly reduced in migraine patients, for a disturbed pattern of pain modulation at the cortical level, which may subtend the onset and persistence of migraine.

  9. Effects of Coriandrum sativum Syrup on Migraine: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Delavar Kasmaei, Hosein; Ghorbanifar, Zahra; Zayeri, Farid; Minaei, Bagher; Kamali, Seyed Hamid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Amin, Gholamreza; Ghobadi, Ali; Mirzaei, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is one of the most common and debilitating neurological problems. Although numerous preventive drugs are used to treat migraine, their complications are unavoidable. Application of herbal medicine, especially well-known medicinal plants, to treatment of chronic diseases, like migraine, could be effective. Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum) fruit is one of the most commonly prescribed herbs in Persian medicine, which has been used to treat headache. Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the effects of C. sativum syrup on duration, severity and frequency of migraine. Patients and Methods: A total of 68 migraineurs, who had the eligibility criteria, according to international headache society diagnostic criteria, were randomly assigned to intervention group (n = 34) or control group (n = 34). In addition to 500 mg of sodium valproate per day, in intervention group, they received 15 mL of Coriander fruit syrup and 15 mL of placebo syrup, in control group, three times a day, during a month. The subjects were followed for clinical efficacy at weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4. The number of migraine attacks per week, as well as the duration and severity of attacks, were evaluated. Results: Of 68 patients randomized, 66 were included in analysis. The generalized estimating equations analysis showed that the Coriander fruit syrup decreased duration, severity and frequency of migraine, in the intervention group (P < 0.001). To be more precise, the mean migraine duration, severity and frequency, in the intervention group, were 5.7 hours, 3.65 units and about 50% less than control group, respectively. Conclusions: Results of this study showed that C. sativum fruit is efficient in reduction of the duration and frequency of migraine attacks and in diminishing pain degree. PMID:26889386

  10. Migraine and Stroke: “Vascular” Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Guidetti, Donata; Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola; Immovilli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several comorbidities are associated to migraine. Recent meta-analyses have consistently demonstrated a relationship between migraine and stroke, which is well-defined for ischemic stroke and migraine with aura (MA), even stronger in females on oral contraceptives or smokers. However, there seems to be no clear-cut association between stroke in migraineurs and the common vascular risk factors, at least in the young adult population. Migraineurs also run an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke, while the association between migraine and cardiovascular disease remains poorly defined. Another aspect is the relationship between migraine and the presence of silent brain lesions. It has been demonstrated that there is an increased frequency of ischemic lesions in the white matter of migraineurs, especially silent infarcts in the posterior circulation territory in patients with at least 10 attacks per month. Although there is a higher prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in migraineurs, the relationship between migraine and PFO remains controversial and PFO closure is not a recommended procedure to prevent migraine. As an increased frequency of cervical artery dissections has been observed in migrainous patients, it has been hypothesized that migraine may represent a predisposing factor for cervical artery dissection. There still remains the question as to whether migraine should be considered a true “vascular disease” or if the comorbidity between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may have underlying shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms. Although further studies are required to clarify this issue, current evidence supports a clinical management where MA patients should be screened for other concomitant vascular risk factors and treated accordingly. PMID:25339937

  11. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset.

  12. Defective glutamate and K+ clearance by cortical astrocytes in familial hemiplegic migraine type 2.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Clizia; Melone, Marcello; Tottene, Angelita; Bragina, Luca; Crivellaro, Giovanna; Santello, Mirko; Casari, Giorgio; Conti, Fiorenzo; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder. A subtype of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2: FHM2) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in α2 Na(+),K(+) ATPase (α2 NKA), an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in adult brain. Cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon that underlies migraine aura and activates migraine headache mechanisms, is facilitated in heterozygous FHM2-knockin mice with reduced expression of α2 NKA The mechanisms underlying an increased susceptibility to CSD in FHM2 are unknown. Here, we show reduced rates of glutamate and K(+) clearance by cortical astrocytes during neuronal activity and reduced density of GLT-1a glutamate transporters in cortical perisynaptic astrocytic processes in heterozygous FHM2-knockin mice, demonstrating key physiological roles of α2 NKA and supporting tight coupling with GLT-1a. Using ceftriaxone treatment of FHM2 mutants and partial inhibition of glutamate transporters in wild-type mice, we obtain evidence that defective glutamate clearance can account for most of the facilitation of CSD initiation in FHM2-knockin mice, pointing to excessive glutamatergic transmission as a key mechanism underlying the vulnerability to CSD ignition in migraine.

  13. Oxidative stress and decreased thiol level in patients with migraine: cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasemin; Dirik, Ebru; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan

    2015-12-01

    Although migraine is a neurological disorder known since long, its physiopathology remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that migraine is associated with oxidative stress; however, they report divergent results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and serum thiol level in migraine patients with or without aura. The study group consisted of 141 migraine patients. The control group included 70 healthy subjects. TAS, TOS, OSI were evaluated using a method developed by Erel. Serum thiol level was measured using the Hu method. No difference was found in TAS, TOS, OSI between the patients and controls. The level of thiol was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Negative correlations were detected between thiol level and Migraine Disability Assessment score in patients. Although TAS, TOS, and OSI were similar to those of the control group, serum thiol level, an important marker of antioxidant capacity, was significantly lower in migraines compared with controls, and caused more serious disability. Novel treatment approaches may be developed based on these data, and compounds containing thiol, such as alpha lipoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine, may be used in prophylaxis.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of topiramate and sodium valproate in pediatric migraine.

    PubMed

    Unalp, Aycan; Uran, Nedret; Oztürk, Aysel

    2008-12-01

    Frequent migraine headaches can have a significant impact on disability, prompting the need for early recognition and treatment. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of topiramate and sodium valproate for the prevention of pediatric migraine, retrospectively. Mean monthly migraine frequency, intensity, and duration in the 28 patients treated with topiramate decreased from 15.3 +/- 10.1 to 4.4 +/- 5.5 episode, from 6.8 +/- 1 to 3.2 +/- 1, and from 10.2 +/- 9.4 to 2.4 +/- 3.1 hours, respectively. Headache disability improved with a reduction of Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment score from 36 +/- 29.5 to 4.6 +/- 6.5 (P < .05). Similarly, mean monthly headache frequency, headache intensity, headache duration, and Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment score in the 20 patients treated with sodium valproate decreased from 20.1 +/- 10.2 to 6.6 +/- 8.6, from 7.1 +/- 1 to 3.4 +/- 2.1, from 7 +/- 12 to 1.4 +/- 2.5 hours, and from 20.5 +/- 16.1 to 5.5 +/- 9.2, respectively (P < .05). In conclusion, valproate and topiramate seem to be able to manage successfully childhood migraine without substantial differences in efficacy.

  15. [Migraine: ignition of the brain].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-del-Río González, Margarita

    2013-12-01

    Although our knowledge of which systems are activated during migraine is reasonably complete, why the system is activated remains unknown. Incorporating the findings obtained in studies on pain in general has allowed a more integrated model to be generated. According to this new model, there is an anatomical substrate consisting in a complex framework of pain that is made up not only of the trigeminovascular system (end pathway) but of a number of networks that are in turn connected to one another, like the neurolimbic, the ascending and descending modulatory system. This complex network is responsible for modulating and conveying nociceptive signals. In patients with migraine, hyperexcitability of this framework is conditioned by genetic and epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic changes are chemical modifications affecting chromatin, which modulates the activity of genes without modifying the DNA sequence, and which are capable of modulating the expression of genes involved in a number of different aspects, such as plasticity, system excitability, memory of pain or moods. In turn, the presence of external factors (such as environmental changes or alcohol) and internal factors (such as hormones or sleep disorders) contribute to activate this loaded anatomical substrate, resulting in the attack of migraine.

  16. Anthroposophic Therapy for Migraine: A Two-Year Prospective Cohort Study in Routine Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hamre, Harald J; Witt, Claudia M; Kienle, Gunver S; Glockmann, Anja; Ziegler, Renatus; Rivoir, Andreas; Willich, Stefan N; Kiene, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Background and Methods: Anthroposophic treatment for migraine is provided by physicians and includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 45 consecutive adult outpatients (89% women) starting anthroposophic treatment for migraine under routine conditions. Main outcomes were Average Migraine Severity (physician and patient ratings 0-10, primary outcome), Symptom Score (patient rating, 0-10), and quality of life (SF-36); main follow-up time point was after six months. Results: The anthroposophic treatment modalities used were medications (67% of patients), eurythmy therapy (38%), art therapy (18%), and rhythmical massage therapy (13%). Median therapy duration was 105 days. In months 0-6, conventional prophylactic antimigraine medications were used by 14% (n=5/36) of evaluable patients. From baseline to six-month follow-up, physician-rated Average Migraine Severity improved by 3.14 points (95% confidence interval 2.40-3.87, p<0.001); patient-rated Average Migraine Severity improved by 2.82 points (2.05-3.64, p<0.001); and Symptom Score improved by 2.32 points (1.68-2.95, p<0.001). In addition, three SF-36 scales (Social Functioning, Bodily Pain, Vitality), the SF-36 Physical Component summary measure, and the SF-36 Health Change item improved significantly. All improvements were maintained at last follow-up after 24 months. Patients not using conventional prophylactic antimigraine medications had improvements similar to the whole cohort. Conclusions: Patients with migraine under anthroposophic treatment had long-term improvement of symptoms and quality of life. Although the pre-post design of the present study does not allow for conclusions about comparative effectiveness, study findings suggest that anthroposophic therapies may be useful in the long-term care of patients with migraine. PMID:21673981

  17. Acute and chronic tianeptine treatments attenuate ethanol withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Kayir, Hakan; Celik, Turgay; Yüksel, Nevzat

    2006-05-01

    Effects of acute and chronic tianeptine treatments on ethanol withdrawal syndrome were investigated in rats. Ethanol (7.2% v/v) was given to adult male Wistar rats by a liquid diet for 30 days. Acute or chronic (twice daily) tianeptine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and saline were administered to rats intraperitoneally. Acute and last chronic tianeptine injections and saline were done 30 min before ethanol withdrawal testing. After 2nd, 4th and 6th hours of ethanol withdrawal, rats were observed for 5 min, and withdrawal signs which included locomotor hyperactivity, agitation, tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behavior and audiogenic seizures were recorded or rated. Locomotor activity in naive (no ethanol-dependent rats) was also tested after acute tianeptine treatments. Acute but not chronic tianeptine treatment attenuated locomotor hyperactivity and agitation in ethanol-dependent rats. Both acute and chronic tianeptine treatment produced some significant inhibitory effects on tremor, wet dog shakes, stereotyped behaviors and audiogenic seizures during the ethanol withdrawal. Our results suggest that acute or chronic tianeptine treatment attenuates ethanol withdrawal syndrome in ethanol-dependent rats and this drug may be useful for treatment of ethanol-type dependence.

  18. Nutrition intervention for migraine: a randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited evidence suggests that dietary interventions may offer a promising approach for migraine. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a low-fat plant-based diet intervention on migraine severity and frequency. Methods Forty-two adult migraine sufferers were recruited from the general community in Washington, DC, and divided randomly into two groups. This 36-week crossover study included two treatments: dietary instruction and placebo supplement. Each treatment period was 16 weeks, with a 4-week washout between. During the diet period, a low-fat vegan diet was prescribed for 4 weeks, after which an elimination diet was used. Participants were assessed at the beginning, midpoint, and end of each period. Significance was determined using student’s t-tests. Results Worst headache pain in last 2 weeks, as measured by visual analog scale, was initially 6.4/10 cm (SD 2.1 cm), and declined 2.1 cm during the diet period and 0.7 cm during the supplement period (p=0.03). Average headache intensity (0–10 scale) was initially 4.2 (SD 1.4) per week, and this declined by 1.0 during the diet period and by 0.5 during the supplement period (p=0.20). Average headache frequency was initially 2.3 (SD 1.8) per week, and this declined by 0.3 during the diet period and by 0.4 during the supplement period (p=0.61). The Patient’s Global Impression of Change showed greater improvement in pain during the diet period (p<0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that a nutritional approach may be a useful part of migraine treatment, but that methodologic issues necessitate further research. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01699009 and NCT01547494. PMID:25339342

  19. Formaldehyde, aspartame, and migraines: a possible connection.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Stechschulte, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener that has been linked to pediatric and adolescent migraines. Upon ingestion, aspartame is broken, converted, and oxidized into formaldehyde in various tissues. We present the first case series of aspartame-associated migraines related to clinically relevant positive reactions to formaldehyde on patch testing.

  20. Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levor, Robert M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

  1. Asynchronicity of facial blood perfusion in migraine.

    PubMed

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A; Kamshilin, Alexei A; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology.

  2. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  3. Associations Between Sleep Quality and Migraine Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Kai; Lin, Guan-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Hsu, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yu-Zhen; Tsai, Yi-Chien; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine has been associated with sleep disturbances. Relationship between sleep quality and migraine frequency is yet to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate sleep disturbances among low-frequency, moderate-frequency, high-frequency, and chronic migraineurs, with and without auras, with well-controlled confounding variables. This cross-sectional controlled study included 357 subjects from an outpatient headache clinic in Taiwan. Standardized questionnaires were utilized to collect demographic, migraine, sleep, depression, anxiety, and restless leg syndrome characteristics in all participants. According to frequency of migraine attacks, patients were divided into 4 groups: with 1 to 4 migraine days per month, 5 to 8 migraine days in a month, 9 to 14 migraine days in a month, and >14 migraine days per month. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and subgroup items were used to evaluate sleep quality. The association between migraine frequency and sleep quality was investigated using multivariable linear regression and logistic regression. The PSQI total score was highest in patients with high frequent migraine (10.0 ± 3.4) and lowest in controls (7.0 ± 3.4) with a significant trend analysis (P for trend = 0.006). Migraine frequency had an independent effect on the items “Cannot get to sleep within 30 minutes” (P < 0.001), “Wake up in the middle of the night or early morning” (P < 0.001), “Bad dreams” (P = 0.001), “Pain” (P = 0.004), and “Quality of sleep” (P < 0.001). The result showed the effect of migraine frequency in both the aura-present (P for trend = 0.008) and the aura-absent subgroups (P for trend = 0.011). High migraine frequency correlates with poor sleep quality and a higher prevalence of poor sleepers. These associations occur in migraine with aura and without aura. PMID:27124064

  4. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  5. Targeted fibrillar nanocarbon RNAi treatment of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Alidori, Simone; Akhavein, Nima; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Behling, Katja; Romin, Yevgeniy; Queen, Dawn; Beattie, Bradley J.; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Bergkvist, Magnus; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has tremendous yet unrealized potential to treat a wide range of illnesses. Innovative solutions are needed to protect and selectively deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) cargo to and within a target cell to fully exploit siRNA as a therapeutic tool in vivo. Herein, we describe ammonium-functionalized carbon nanotube (fCNT)–mediated transport of siRNA selectively and with high efficiency to renal proximal tubule cells in animal models of acute kidney injury (AKI). fCNT enhanced siRNA delivery to tubule cells compared to siRNA alone and effectively knocked down the expression of several target genes, including Trp53, Mep1b, Ctr1, and EGFP. A clinically relevant cisplatin-induced murine model of AKI was used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of fCNT-targeted siRNA to effectively halt the pathogenesis of renal injury. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of fCNT/siMep1b and fCNT/siTrp53 significantly improved progression-free survival compared to controls via a mechanism that required concurrent reduction of meprin-1β and p53 expression. The fCNT/siRNA was well tolerated, and no toxicological consequences were observed in murine models. Toward clinical application of this platform, fCNTs were evaluated for the first time in nonhuman primates. The rapid and kidney-specific pharmacokinetic profile of fCNT in primates was comparable to what was observed in mice and suggests that this approach is amenable for use in humans. The nanocarbon-mediated delivery of siRNA provides a therapeutic means for the prevention of AKI to safely overcome the persistent barrier of nephrotoxicity during medical intervention. PMID:27009268

  6. Hormonal management of migraine at menopause.

    PubMed

    Nappi, Rossella E; Sances, Grazia; Detaddei, Silvia; Ornati, Alessandra; Chiovato, Luca; Polatti, Franco

    2009-06-01

    In this review, we underline the importance of linking migraine to reproductive stages for optimal management of such a common disease across the lifespan of women. Menopause has a variable effect on migraine depending on individual vulnerability to neuroendocrine changes induced by estrogen fluctuations and on the length of menopausal transition. Indeed, an association between estrogen 'milieu' and attacks of migraine is strongly supported by several lines of evidence. During the perimenopause, it is likely to observe a worsening of migraine, and a tailored hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) to minimize estrogen/progesterone imbalance may be effective. In the natural menopause, women experience a more favourable course of migraine in comparison with those who have surgical menopause. When severe climacteric symptoms are present, postmenopausal women may be treated with continuous HRT. Even tibolone may be useful when analgesic overuse is documented. However, the transdermal route of oestradiol administration in the lowest effective dose should be preferred to avoid potential vascular risk.

  7. Clinical Pain Catastrophizing in Women with Migraine and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Buse, Dawn C.; Lipton, Richard B.; Thomas, J. Graham; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Evans, E. Whitney; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background Obesity is related to migraine. Maladaptive pain coping strategies (e.g., pain catastrophizing), may provide insight into this relationship. In women with migraine and obesity, we cross-sectionally assessed: 1) prevalence of clinical catastrophizing; 2) characteristics of those with and without clinical catastrophizing; and 3) associations of catastrophizing with headache features. Methods Obese women migraineurs seeking weight loss treatment (n=105) recorded daily migraine activity for 1-month via smartphone and completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Clinical catastrophizing was defined as total PCS score ≥30. The Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), Allodynia Symptom Checklist (ASC-12), Headache Management Self-Efficacy Scale (HMSE), and assessments for depression (CES-D) and anxiety (GAD-7) were also administered. Using PCS scores and Body Mass Index (BMI) as predictors in linear regression, we modeled a series of headache features (i.e., headache days, HIT-6, etc.) as outcomes. Results One-quarter (25.7%;95%CI=17.2%–34.1%) of participants met criteria for clinical catastrophizing: they had higher BMI(37.9±7.5 vs. 34.4±5.7 kg/m2, p=0.035), longer migraine attack duration(160.8±145.0 vs. 97.5±75.2 hours/month, p=0.038), higher HIT-6 scores(68.7±4.6 vs. 64.5±3.9, p<0.001), more allodynia(7.0±4.1 vs. 4.5±3.5, p<0.003), depression(25.4±12.4 vs. 13.3±9.2, p<0.001), and anxiety(11.0±5.2 vs. 5.6±4.1, p<0.001), and lower self-efficacy(80.1±25.6 vs. 104.7±18.9, p<0.001) compared to participants without clinical catastrophizing. The odds of chronic migraine were nearly 4-fold greater in those with (n=8/29.6%) versus without (n=8/10.3%) clinical catastrophizing (OR=3.68;95%CI=1.22–11.10, p=0.021). In all participants, higher PCS scores were related to more migraine days(β=0.331, p=0.001), longer attack duration(β=0.390, p<0.001), higher HIT-6 scores(β=0.425, p<0.001), and lower HMSE scores (β=−0.437, p<0.001). Higher BMI

  8. Childhood abuse and migraine: epidemiology, sex differences, and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tietjen, Gretchen E; Peterlin, B Lee

    2011-06-01

    Migraine and maltreatment are both common conditions that are more prevalent in women. Epidemiological evidence supports an association between childhood abuse and headache, as well as pain in general, although some controversy exists based on methodological concerns of studying the influence of remote, traumatic, stigmatizing events in an often depressed population. There is a growing scientific body of knowledge regarding the neurobiological effects of abuse on brain function and structure that suggest a possible role of early life stress in the pathogenesis of migraine, and a differential impact based on sex. Advances in our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which an adverse environment interacts with and changes the genome, may suggest new treatment strategies.

  9. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  10. Acetazolamide in vestibular migraine prophylaxis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Çelebisoy, Neşe; Gökçay, Figen; Karahan, Ceyda; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazlı, Tayfun; Karapolat, Hale; Köse, Timur

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to check the efficacy of acetazolamide in the prophylaxis of vestibular migraine (VM). Treatment options in VM are mainly based on migraine guidelines. We tried to assess the efficacy of acetazolamide in these patients depending on clinical similarities with episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine responding to the drug. This is a retrospective cohort study. Among 50 patients with VM and prescribed acetazolamide 500 mg/day, 39 patients were studied as five had been lost on follow-up and six had stopped taking the drug due to side effects. Vertigo and headache frequency determined by number of attacks per month, and the severity determined by visual analog scales measured in centimeters from 0 to 10 were collected from the records. Initial reported figures for frequency and severity were compared with the results gathered after 3 months of treatment. The results were compared. Acetazolamide was effective in reducing both the frequency and severity of vertigo and headache attacks and this effect was more prominent for vertigo frequency and severity.

  11. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  12. Chronomodulation of topotecan or X-radiation treatment increases treatment efficacy without enhancing acute toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, Dana; Proulx, Denise; Saoudi, A.; Ng, Cheng E. . E-mail: cng@ohri.ca

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Topotecan (TPT), a camptothecin analog, is currently used to treat human ovarian and small-cell lung cancer and is in clinical trials for other tumor sites. However, it is unknown whether chronomodulation of TPT treatment is beneficial. We examined the effects of administering TPT or X-radiation (XR) alone at different times of the day or night. Methods: We treated mice bearing human colorectal tumor xenografts at four different times representing the early rest period (9 AM or 3 HALO [hours after light onset]), late rest period (3 PM or 9 HALO), early active period (9 PM or 15 HALO), and late active period (3 AM or 21 HALO) of the mice. We gave either TPT (12 mg/kg, injected i.p.) or XR (4 Gy, directed to the tumor) twice weekly on Days 0, 4, 7, 10 within 2 weeks. Results: Treatment with either TPT or XR at 3 AM demonstrated the greatest efficacy (measured by a tumor regrowth assay) without significantly increasing acute toxicity (assessed by a decrease in leukocyte counts or body weight). Conversely, treatment at 3 PM, in particular, showed increased toxicity without any enhanced efficacy. Conclusions: Our study provided the first evidence that chronomodulation of TPT treatments, consistent with the findings of other camptothecin analogs, is potentially clinically beneficial. Additionally, our findings suggest that chronomodulation of fractionated XR treatments is also potentially clinically beneficial.

  13. Transcriptomic Changes in Rat Cortex and Brainstem After Cortical Spreading Depression With or Without Pretreatment With Migraine Prophylactic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Sintas, Cèlia; Fernàndez-Castillo, Noèlia; Vila-Pueyo, Marta; Pozo-Rosich, Patricia; Macaya, Alfons; Cormand, Bru

    2017-04-01

    Migraine with aura is a subtype of migraine characterized by transient neurological disturbances that usually precede headache. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the likely pathophysiological correlate of the aura phase of migraine, found in common and rare forms of migraine, such as familial hemiplegic migraine. CSD is a depolarization wave that propagates across the cerebral gray matter transiently suppressing neuronal activity. Prophylactic treatments for migraine, such as topiramate or valproate, reduce the number of CSD events. We evaluated changes in gene expression in rat cortex and brainstem after inducing CSD in the cortex, with and without a prophylactic treatment with topiramate or valproate. CSD induction showed similar transcriptomic profiles with and without treatment in cortex, involving genes related to hormone stimulus, apoptosis, synaptic transmission, and interleukin signaling. In brainstem, CSD with and without treatment, although to a lesser extent, also induced gene expression changes involving genes related to apoptosis. Half of the genes altered in brainstem after CSD were also differentially expressed in the same direction in cortex. No differences in gene expression were identified after CSD as a consequence of the treatments, neither in cortex nor in brainstem.

  14. Successful treatment of acute systemic anaphylaxis in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Hayman, David T S; King, Tony; Cameron, Kenneth

    2010-09-01

    This brief communication describes the successful treatment of acute systemic anaphylaxis in a wild-born but captive infant western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the Republic of Congo. The infant demonstrated signs of acute respiratory distress, lingual swelling, and reaction to intradermal tuberculin, given 55 hr earlier. Details of the treatment with steroids, anesthetic induction, and i.v. epinephrine are all reported, and potential antigens that may have initiated the anaphylactic shock are discussed.

  15. Treatment of angular deformities of the tibia in children: acute versus gradual correction.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James J; Mark, Arthur K; Davidson, Richard S

    2007-01-01

    This is a retrospective review of 25 tibial osteotomies (in 19 patients) performed with either acute or gradual correction to determine the outcome of treatment and incidence of neurovascular complications. Patients undergoing gradual correction had fewer neurovascular complications and greater correction than those undergoing acute correction (27 degrees vs. 18 degrees, respectively). It was concluded that gradual correction tends to be a safer technique for the treatment of tibial deformities and allows greater correction.

  16. [Formalized consensus: clinical practice recommendations for the management of the migraine in African adult patients].

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mahmoud Ait Kaci; Haddad, Monia; Kouassi, Beugré; Ouhabi, Hamid; Serrie, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a primary headache disorder (according to the latest International Headache Society criteria) affecting approximately 8% of African population. Women are more often affected than men and attacks usually occur before the age of 40 years Although some treatments, hygienic-dietary measures and other non-pharmacological methods can reduce the intensity and frequency of attacks, medicinal treatment of migraine attack is often necessary. Availability of treatments and access to care differ in Africa and led to the implementation of the first expert consensus recommendations for the management of the migraine in african adult patients. This multinational collaborative study is intended for health practitioners. It aims to provide 16 simple, evidence-based recommendations and is adapted to african medical practice.

  17. A Single Case Study: Treating Migraine Headache With Acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, and Diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acupuncture is an often sought-out treatment modality for migraine. The World Health Organization lists headache as one of the several conditions treated effectively by acupuncture. Case Description: This single case reports on a 32-year-old woman who presented with a 10-year history of migraine. Methods: The patient was treated with acupuncture, dietary modifications, and Chinese herbal medicine enemas over a course of 2 months. Results: The patient experienced pain relief that resulted in several months without any migraine. Conclusion: This article may aid in expanding practitioners’ treatment options to include a more diverse set of modalities such as Chinese herbal enemas. More research is needed to investigate the role of Oriental medicine and Chinese herbal enemas in the treatment of pain conditions. PMID:24753996

  18. Effectiveness and Safety of Transcatheter Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Migraine (EASTFORM) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ying-qi; Guo, Yu-Zhu; Gao, Yong-Sheng; Guo, Zhen-Ni; Niu, Peng-Peng; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of transcatheter patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure for the treatment of migraine in a Chinese population. This non-randomized clinical trial enrolled 258 consecutive substantial or severe migraineurs with a right-to-left shunt (RLS) (grade II–IV) and grouped subjects according to their election or refusal of PFO closure. Migraine was diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders III-beta and evaluated using the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6). In total, 241 participants (125 in the transcatheter closure group and 116 in the control group) were included in the study. In general, the PFO closure procedure was found to be safe. At 1 month after closure, 76.1% of patients returned for c-TCD evaluation; of these, 85.7% were downgraded to negative status or a grade-I shunt. Residual shunts and placebo effects were thought to resolve by 12 months post-procedure, when migraine impact was reported to decrease by 73.6%. Transcatheter PFO closure was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of migraine by comparing HIT-6 scores between the transcatheter closure and control groups (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that transcatheter PFO closure is a safe and effective approach for the treatment of migraine in the Chinese population, especially in females with constant RLS. Clinical trial no. NCT02127294 (registered on April 29, 2014). PMID:27966652

  19. [Prevention and treatment of acute diarrhea in infants].

    PubMed

    Turck, D

    2007-11-01

    The prognosis of acute diarrhoea in infants is most often satisfactory in industrialized countries. However, it has been estimated that 10 to 15 children die every year in France from acute dehydration due to acute diarrhoea. In spite of an increasing use over the least few years, oral rehydration solutions (ORS) are used in only 70% of infants presenting with acute diarrhoea. The use of homemade ORS, plain water or fizzy drink should be strictly avoided. In case of acute diarrhoea there is no indication to stop breastfeeding or the use of infant formula for more than 4 hours. Lactose intolerance is observed in only 5-10% of infants. Lactose free formulae should only be used in infants with severe, persistent or recurrent diarrhoea. Under 3-4 months of age, infants with severe diarrhoea should receive for a period of 2-4 weeks lactose free protein hydrolysate formulae. Racecadotril is the only drug with anti-diarrheal properties, with a reduction of the stool output of 50%. Oral antibiotics should only be used in case of Shigella infection or in case of bacterial infection with severe sepsis or underlying debilitating disease. Oral Rotavirus vaccine, that is not reimbursed yet in France, has been shown to dramatically reduce the number of severe cases of diarrhoea with dehydration, and has been associated with a striking reduction of both morbidity and mortality, as well as of the number of hospitalisations during periods of epidemics.

  20. [Cardiogenic shock in acute myocardial infarct. Its coronary angioplasty treatment].

    PubMed

    Fernández Valadez, E; García y Otero, J M; Escobar, G P; Frutos Rangel, E; Zúñiga Sedano, J; García García, R; Verduzco Bazavilvazo, S; López Aranda, J; López Ruiz, J

    1993-01-01

    Ventricular dysfunction is the most common cause of in-hospital death in patients with acute myocardial infarction. When cardiogenic shock is manifested the mortality is very high. Seven patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction were treated with emergency coronary angioplasty. Four patients required cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 2 intraaortic balloon pump support and one femoro-femoral bypass pump support during the coronary angioplasty. The angiography success rate was 86%. Two patients died, one in the catheterization laboratory and the other one 24 hours later. The hospital mortality was 29%. Of the patients who survived 4 are in functional class I and one in functional class II (NYHA). Coronary angioplasty therapy in patients with cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction plays a decisive role in the reduction of mortality.

  1. Craniosacral therapy for migraine: Protocol development for an exploratory controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mann, John D; Faurot, Keturah R; Wilkinson, Laurel; Curtis, Peter; Coeytaux, Remy R; Suchindran, Chirayath; Gaylord, Susan A

    2008-01-01

    Background Migraine affects approximately 20% of the population. Conventional care for migraine is suboptimal; overuse of medications for the treatment of episodic migraines is a risk factor for developing chronic daily headache. The study of non-pharmaceutical approaches for prevention of migraine headaches is therefore warranted. Craniosacral therapy (CST) is a popular non-pharmacological approach to the treatment or prevention of migraine headaches for which there is limited evidence of safety and efficacy. In this paper, we describe an ongoing feasibility study to assess the safety and efficacy of CST in the treatment of migraine, using a rigorous and innovative randomized controlled study design involving low-strength static magnets (LSSM) as an attention control intervention. Methods The trial is designed to test the hypothesis that, compared to those receiving usual care plus a treatment with low-strength static magnets (attention-control complementary therapy), subjects receiving usual medical care plus CST will demonstrate significant improvement in: quality-of-life as measured by the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6); reduced frequency of migraine; and a perception of clinical benefit. Criteria for inclusion are either gender, age > 11, English or Spanish speaking, meeting the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) criteria for migraine with or without aura, a headache frequency of 5 to 15 per month over at least two years. After an 8 week baseline phase, eligible subjects are randomized to either CST or an attention control intervention, low strength static magnets (LSSM). To evaluate possible therapist bias, videotaped encounters are analyzed to assess for any systematic group differences in interactions with subjects. Results 169 individuals have been screened for eligibility, of which 109 were eligible for the study. Five did not qualify during the baseline phase because of inadequate headache frequency. Nineteen have withdrawn from the

  2. Usage of triptans among migraine patients: an audit in nine GP practices.

    PubMed

    Williams, D; Cahill, T; Dowson, A; Fearon, H; Lipscombe, S; O'Sullivan, E; Rees, T; Strang, C; Valori, A; Watson, D

    2002-01-01

    A retrospective audit was carried out to investigate triptan usage over a period of one year among 360 adult patients with migraine in nine GP practices in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. Data from patient records were analysed, in conjunction with replies to a questionnaire about patients' perceptions of their migraine and its treatment. The majority of patients included in the audit were women (83%), and most patients (81%) were aged between 35 and 64 years. Most patients in the audit population (60%) were in the lowest band of triptan usage (1-36 tablets prescribed over 12 months); 7% had moderate usage (37-53 tablets). A minority of patients appeared to be taking triptans in higher quantities: about 15% of patients had been prescribed 54-94 triptan tablets over a year, 9% had received prescriptions for 95-149 tablets and 7% had received prescriptions for 150 or more tablets. These results indicated that some migraine patients were using triptans at higher than expected rates, and suggested that some patients might have been using their prescribed triptans inappropriately to treat a headache that they incorrectly perceived as migraine (e.g. chronic daily headache). Analyses were carried out to identify predictors of high usage. Predictors identified included the use of several other (non-triptan) medications to treat conditions other than migraine, one triptan dose being reported as sufficient to treat an attack, patient's perception of all headaches as migraine and lack of concern about taking too much medication. Patients identified as using triptans at a higher than expected rate can be called in for review of migraine diagnosis, identification of possible causes of any increased frequency of attacks, and investigation of suspected non-migrainous headaches, such as chronic daily headache and medication-induced headaches. For GPs, such actions would help achieve and maintain a high standard of care for their migraine patients, thus helping to contribute

  3. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: new issues on pathogenesis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vitoux, Dominique; Nasr, Rihab; de The, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia appears to be one of the best understood among human malignancies. The ability of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide to directly target the oncogenic promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic receptor A (PML-RARA) fusion protein also made this disease the first model for oncogene-targeted therapies. A set of recent data has significantly increased the complexity of our view of acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis, as well as of therapeutic response. This review summarizes and discusses these findings, which yield novels questions and models.

  4. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers.

  5. Pulmonary oedema during treatment of acute water intoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, D.; Champion, M.; Trash, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Acute water intoxication with deepening coma and uncontrolled epileptiform seizures in a 25-year-old previously fit male schizophrenic was treated with hypertonic (2 N) saline and a 20% mannitol solution. This improved his neurological state but precipitated severe pulmonary oedema. Intravenous frusemide increased his urinary output sufficiently to clear the pulmonary oedema. In acute water intoxication the use of hypertonic solutions may thus precipitate left heart failure by expanding the intra-pulmonary blood volume beyond the capacity of even a healthy left ventricle to compensate. Simple water restriction will produce a slower but perhaps safer improvement. Images Fig. 1 PMID:981097

  6. fNIRS measurements in migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Ata; Emir, Uzay E.; Bilensoy, Didem; Erdogan, Gulin; Candansyar, Selcuk; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2005-04-01

    Migraine is a complex chronic neurovascular disorder in which the interictal changes in neuronal excitability and vascular reactivity in the cerebral cortex were detected. The extent and direction of the changes in cerebral blood flow that affect cerebral hemodynamics during attacks, however, are still a matter of debate. This may have been due to the logistic and technical problems posed by the different techniques to determine cerebral blood flow during migraine attacks and the different definitions of patient populations. In this study, we have investigated hypercapnia challenges by breath holding task on subjects with and without migraine by using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Measurements of the relative changes in concentration of deoxy-hemoglobin [Hb] and oxy-hemoglobin [HbO2] are performed on four healthy subjects during three breath holdings of 30 seconds (s.) interleaved with 90 s. of normal breathing. We have observed [Hb]increase during breath holding interval in subject without migraine whereas in subject with migraine [Hb] decreases during breath holding interval. The result of our study suggest that hypercapnia effect on cerebral hemodynamic of subject with migraine and without migraine could be due to different vascular reactivity to PCO2 (carbon dioxide partial pressure) in arteries.

  7. Migraine and epilepsy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nye, Barbara L; Thadani, Vijay M

    2015-03-01

    Migraine and epilepsy are disorders that are common, paroxysmal, and chronic. In many ways they are clearly different diseases, yet there are some pathophysiological overlaps, and overlaps in clinical symptomatology, particularly with regard to visual and other sensory disturbances, pain, and alterations of consciousness. Epidemiological studies have revealed that the two diseases are comorbid in a number of individuals. Both are now recognized as originating from electrical disturbances in the brain, although their wider manifestations involve the recruitment of multiple pathogenic mechanisms. An initial excess of neuronal activity in migraine leads to cortical spreading depression and aura, with the subsequent recruitment of the trigeminal nucleus leading to central sensitization and pain. In epilepsy, neuronal overactivity leads to the recruitment of larger populations of neurons firing in a rhythmic manner that constitutes an epileptic seizure. Migraine aura and headaches may act as a trigger for epileptic seizures. Epilepsy is not infrequently accompanied by preictal, ictal, and postictal headaches that often have migrainous features. Genetic links are also apparent between the two disorders, and are particularly evident in the familial hemiplegic migraine syndromes where different mutations can produce either migraine, epilepsy, or both. Also, various medications are found to be effective for both migraine and epilepsy, again pointing to a commonality and overlap between the two disorders.

  8. Chronic migraine headache prevention with noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Anne H.; Lipton, Richard B.; Grosberg, Brian M.; Cady, Roger K.; Dorlas, Stefanie; Simmons, Kristy A.; Mullin, Chris; Liebler, Eric J.; Goadsby, Peter J.; Saper, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and tolerability of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) for the prevention of chronic migraine (CM) attacks. Methods: In this first prospective, multicenter, double-blind, sham-controlled pilot study of nVNS in CM prophylaxis, adults with CM (≥15 headache d/mo) entered the baseline phase (1 month) and were subsequently randomized to nVNS or sham treatment (2 months) before receiving open-label nVNS treatment (6 months). The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Efficacy endpoints in the intent-to-treat population included change in the number of headache days per 28 days and acute medication use. Results: Fifty-nine participants (mean age, 39.2 years; mean headache frequency, 21.5 d/mo) were enrolled. During the randomized phase, tolerability was similar for nVNS (n = 30) and sham treatment (n = 29). Most adverse events were mild/moderate and transient. Mean changes in the number of headache days were −1.4 (nVNS) and −0.2 (sham) (Δ = 1.2; p = 0.56). Twenty-seven participants completed the open-label phase. For the 15 completers initially assigned to nVNS, the mean change from baseline in headache days after 8 months of treatment was −7.9 (95% confidence interval −11.9 to −3.8; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Therapy with nVNS was well-tolerated with no safety issues. Persistent prophylactic use may reduce the number of headache days in CM; larger sham-controlled studies are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01667250. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, nVNS is safe, is well-tolerated, and did not significantly change the number of headache days. This pilot study lacked the precision to exclude important safety issues or benefits of nVNS. PMID:27412146

  9. [Guideline on diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis: imaging prior to appendectomy is recommended].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Olaf J; Go, Peter M N Y H; Puylaert, Julien B C M; Kazemier, Geert; Heij, Hugo A

    2010-01-01

    Every year, over 2500 unnecessary appendectomies are carried out in the Netherlands. At the initiative of the Dutch College of Surgeons, the evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis was developed. This guideline recommends that appendectomy should not be carried out without prior imaging. Ultrasonography is the recommended imaging technique in patients with suspected appendicitis. After negative or inconclusive ultrasonography, a CT scan can be carried out. Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis; this can be done either by open or laparoscopic surgery. The first choice treatment of appendicular infiltrate is conservative treatment.

  10. Assessing candidacy for acute hepatitis C treatment among active young injection drug users: a case-series report.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has significantly better outcomes than treatment for chronic infection. The short window of the acute period poses challenges for young injection drug users (IDU), who are at highest risk of HCV infection, to demonstrate treatment candidacy. We recruited patients with acute HCV from a prospective cohort study to examine clinical and behavioral issues related to treatment candidacy. We report on outcomes and how nursing case management affected candidacy. All five acutely-infected participants reported daily drug use at baseline. All established primary care and decreased their drug use. None received treatment for their acute infection; one was treated within 12 months of infection. Establishing treatment candidacy for young IDU in the acute phase involves various health domains. An acute infection's short period poses many challenges to establishing candidacy, but it is a window of opportunity to engage young IDU in health care.

  11. Development of onabotulinumtoxinA for chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Whitcup, Scott M; Turkel, Catherine C; DeGryse, Ronald E; Brin, Mitchell F

    2014-11-01

    Discovery of the neuromuscular effects of botulinum toxin began in the early 19th century and has continued to evolve. Currently, onabotulinumtoxinA is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for two cosmetic and eight medical indications, including chronic migraine (CM). CM is a disabling form of migraine characterized by ≥15 headache days monthly and is believed to result from neuronal hypersensitivity to proinflammatory mediators, upregulation of sensory receptors, and consequent maladaptive pain responses with peripheral and central sensitization. OnabotulinumtoxinA achieves migraine prophylaxis in CM through regulation of vesicular trafficking and exocytosis, inhibition of peripheral release of neuropeptides and inflammatory peptides, and reduced cell surface expression of certain ion channels and receptors. Clinically, efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA for CM has been shown in two phase III, placebo-controlled trials (PREEMPT 1 and PREEMPT 2). OnabotulinumtoxinA significantly reduced the number of headache days per 28-day cycle relative to placebo at week 24 (change from baseline: -8.4 days for onabotulinumtoxinA versus -6.6 days for placebo; P < 0.001, pooled data). OnabotulinumtoxinA improved health-related quality of life and had an acceptable safety profile. OnabotulinumtoxinA is the only approved treatment specifically for CM prevention and represents a safe and effective therapeutic for chronic migraineurs.

  12. TRPA1 and other TRP channels in migraine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ever since their identification, interest in the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in health and disease has steadily increased. Robust evidence has underlined the role of TRP channels expressed in a subset of primary sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion to promote, by neuronal excitation, nociceptive responses, allodynia and hyperalgesia. In particular, the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and the TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are expressed in nociceptive neurons, which also express the sensory neuropeptides, tachykinins, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which mediate neurogenic inflammatory responses. Of interest, CGRP released from the trigeminovascular network of neurons is currently recognized as a main contributing mechanism of migraine attack. The ability of TRPA1 to sense and to be activated by an unprecedented series of exogenous and endogenous reactive molecules has now been extensively documented. Several of the TRPA1 activators are also known as triggers of migraine attack. Thus, TRP channels, and particularly TRPA1, may be proposed as novel pathways in migraine pathophysiology and as possible new targets for its treatment. PMID:23941062

  13. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  14. [Treatment of acute porphyrias. The importance of follow-up of patients and carriers].

    PubMed

    Tasnádi, Gyöngyi; Bor, Márta; Pusztai, Agnes

    2003-05-11

    Acute porphyrias are caused by the inherited decreased activity of the enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Depending on the affected enzyme there are 4 types of them: acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria variegata, coproporphyria and delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficient porphyria, listed in order of their frequency. Basically the clinical picture is the same in the four types of acute porphyria. The most frequent complaints and symptoms are: cramping abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness of the limbs then, in the advanced phase, there is a red-colored urine, hyponatremia, subileus, acute psychosis and Landry-type paralysis. Without proper treatment death is caused by respiratory paralysis or serious arrhythmia. In case of suspicion of acute porphyria it is mandatory to identify the type of the acute porphyria and the actual status of the patient. The later indicates what kind of treatment should be used. In the acute phase the early therapy with heme arginate is the treatment of choice. Since the clinical symptoms are precipitated by endogenous or exogenous inducing factors--most often by drugs-, the drugs negatively affecting the heme biosynthesis should be omitted at once even in the suspicion of acute porphyria. The role of the inducing factors in the manifestation of the clinical symptoms makes possible the prevention. It is possible to avoid the inducing factors and this way to prevent the acute attack if the acute porphyrias are recognized in time and the patients and the carriers are under regular control. The patients receive special identification card and the up-to-date list of safe drugs. They can use only these drugs in any kind of illness. Other drugs should be considered as porphyrinogenic since it is impossible to predict based on their chemical structure if they negatively affect the heme biosynthesis.

  15. The effects of the multispecies probiotic mixture Ecologic®Barrier on migraine: results of an open-label pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Roos, N M; Giezenaar, C G T; Rovers, J M P; Witteman, B J M; Smits, M G; van Hemert, S

    2015-01-01

    Migraine prevalence is associated with gastrointestinal disorders. Possible underlying mechanisms could be increased gut permeability and inflammation. Probiotics may decrease intestinal permeability as well as inflammation, and therefore may reduce the frequency and/or intensity of migraine attacks. Therefore we assessed feasibility, possible clinical efficacy, and adverse reactions of probiotic treatment in migraine patients. 29 migraine patients took 2 g/d of a probiotic food supplement (Ecologic(®)Barrier, 2.5×10(9) cfu/g) during 12 weeks. Participants recorded frequency and intensity of migraine in a headache diary and completed the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS) and Henry Ford Hospital Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Compliance was measured every 4 weeks by counting the remaining sachets with probiotics. The study was completed by 27/29 (93%) patients who took 95% of the supplements. Obstipation was reported by 4 patients during the first 2 weeks of treatment only. The mean±standard deviation (SD) number of migraine days/month decreased significantly from 6.7±2.4 at baseline to 5.1±2.2 (P=0.008) in week 5-8 and 5.2±2.4 in week 9-12 (P=0.001). The mean±SD intensity of migraine decreased significantly from 6.3±1.5 at baseline to 5.5±1.9 after treatment (P=0.005). The MIDAS score improved from 24.8±25.5 to 16.6±13.5 (P=0.031). However, the mean HDI did not change significantly. In conclusion, probiotics may decrease migraine supporting a possible role for the intestine in migraine management. Feasibility and lack of adverse reactions justify further placebo-controlled studies.

  16. Assessment and treatment of patients with acute tachyarrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jennie

    A tachyarrhythmia is defined as a heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute in conjunction with abnormal cardiac conduction. This article aims to inform nurses and other healthcare professionals about the predominant acute tachyarrhythmias. It focuses on the assessment and management of patients with this condition using case study examples.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  18. Visual prognosis following treatment of acute central retinal artery obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Augsburger, J J; Magargal, L E

    1980-01-01

    The authors report the visual outcome in 34 consecutive cases of treated acute central retinal artery obstruction. Visual acuity equal to or better than 6/30 was recovered in 35% of the cases. The presenting visual acuity and duration of visual impairment appear to correlate with visual prognosis. PMID:7448144

  19. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  20. Acute Stress Disorder: Conceptual Issues and Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koucky, Ellen M.; Galovski, Tara E.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2012-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) was included as a diagnosis to the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a way of describing pathological reactions in the first month following a trauma. Since that time, ASD has been the focus of some controversy, particularly regarding the theoretical basis…

  1. Acute myocardial infarction in a young woman on isotretinoin treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Natalia; Antuña, Paula; Dominguez, Lourdes; Rivero, Fernando; Bastante, Teresa; Alfonso, Fernando

    2015-02-15

    The use of isotretinoin has been associated with mild changes in the metabolic profile of adolescents. In very rare cases, a possible association with myocardial infarction, stroke and thromboembolic events has been reported. In this report we describe the potential association of isotretinoin with the occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction in a very young girl. OCT provided unique visualization of the culprit lesion.

  2. Communication Disorders and Treatment in the Acute Trauma Center Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz-Cowley, Roberta; Stepanik, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shock Trauma Center of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems instituted a comprehensive speech-language pathology program to provide acute intervention for communicative disorders in a critical/intensive care environment. This article provides a profile of the Center, a review of communicative impairments, and examples…

  3. Vestibular Migraine in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Findings and Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Langhagen, Thyra; Lehrer, Nicole; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Jahn, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. We summarize the clinical findings and laboratory test results in a cohort of children and adolescents with VM. We discuss the limitations of current classification criteria for dizzy children. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 118 children with migraine related vertigo at a tertiary care center. Patients were grouped in the following categories: (1) definite vestibular migraine (dVM); (2) probable vestibular migraine (pVM); (3) suspected vestibular migraine (sVM); (4) benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV); and (5) migraine with/without aura (oM) plus vertigo/dizziness according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). Results: The mean age of all patients was 12 ± 3 years (range 3–18 years, 70 females). 36 patients (30%) fulfilled criteria for dVM, 33 (28%) for pVM, 34 (29%) for sVM, 7 (6%) for BPV, and 8 (7%) for oM. Somatoform vertigo (SV) co-occurred in 27% of patients. Episodic syndromes were reported in 8%; the family history of migraine was positive in 65%. Mild central ocular motor signs were found in 24% (most frequently horizontal saccadic pursuit). Laboratory tests showed that about 20% had pathological function of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, and almost 50% had abnormal postural sway patterns. Conclusion: Patients with definite, probable, and suspected VM do not differ in the frequency of ocular motor, vestibular, or postural abnormalities. VM is the best explanation for their symptoms. It is essential to establish diagnostic criteria in clinical studies. In clinical practice, however, the most reasonable diagnosis should be made in order to begin treatment. Such a procedure also minimizes the fear of the parents and children, reduces the need to interrupt leisure time and school activities, and prevents the development of SV. PMID:25674076

  4. Hypothalamic involvement in chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Peres, M; del Rio, M S.; Seabra, M; Tufik, S; Abucham, J; Cipolla-Neto, J; Silberstein, S; Zukerman, E

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Chronic migraine (CM), previously called transformed migraine, is a frequent headache disorder that affects 2%-3% of the general population. Analgesic overuse, insomnia, depression, and anxiety are disorders that are often comorbid with CM. Hypothalamic dysfunction has been implicated in its pathogenesis, but it has never been studied in patients with CM. The aim was to analyze hypothalamic involvement in CM by measurement of melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol nocturnal secretion.
METHODS—A total of 338 blood samples (13/patient) from 17 patients with CM and nine age and sex matched healthy volunteers were taken. Melatonin, prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol concentrations were determined every hour for 12 hours. The presence of comorbid disorders was also evaluated.
RESULTS—An abnormal pattern of hypothalamic hormonal secretion was found in CM. This included: (1) a decreased nocturnal prolactin peak, (2) increased cortisol concentrations, (3) a delayed nocturnal melatonin peak in patients with CM, and (4) lower melatonin concentrations in patients with CM with insomnia. Growth hormone secretion did not differ from controls.
CONCLUSION—These results support hypothalamic involvement in CM, shown by a chronobiologic dysregulation, and a possible hyperdopaminergic state in patients with CM. Insomnia might be an important variable in the study findings.

 PMID:11723194

  5. Psychological factors affecting migraine.

    PubMed

    Shulman, B H

    1989-01-01

    Psychological factors are known to increase the severity and intensity of headaches. When they are shown to be present, an appropriate psychiatric diagnosis is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual's (DSMIII-R) category of psychological factors affecting physical condition (code no. 316.0). These factors can be differentiated into stress factors, personality traits, psychodynamic factors, learned behaviors, and mood disturbances. The factors overlap and intertwine in the average headache patient. Attention to these factors in a systematic way should enhance our understanding and treatment of the chronic headache patient.

  6. The debate on the link between subclinical hypothyroidism and childhood migraine: is initial endocrinological evaluation necessary for children with migraine?

    PubMed

    Ekici, Bariş; Cebeci, Ayşe Nurcan

    2015-06-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) is characterized by mildly elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels with normal serum-free thyroxine (fT4). While the prevalence of SH is 2 % in pediatric population, it has been reported much higher in children with migraine headache. In this study, the presence of subclinical hypothyroidism and associated endocrinological abnormalities in children with migraine naïve to treatment was investigated. Children with migraine who were diagnosed in Pediatric Neurology Clinic based on the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and who did not receive any medication were recruited in this cross-sectional study. All patients were examined by the same pediatric endocrinologist and anthropometric measurements, systemic blood pressure, pubertal stages were recorded. Fasting serum levels of thyroid function tests, lipids, glucose and insulin were obtained. Ninety-eight children (55 female) with a mean age of 11.45 ± 3.1 years were evaluated. Of those, 39 were prepubertal and 59 were pubertal. Subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH ≥ 5.0 mIU/L with normal fT4) was detected in five patients (5.1 %); none had positive thyroid antibodies. Other conditions were obesity (n = 6), hirsutism (n = 4), short stature (n = 3), polycystic ovaries (PCO, n = 3), precocious puberty (n = 2) and gynecomastia (n = 1). Of five patients with SH, only one had obesity. Our results revealed that the prevalence of SH in children with migraine is not as high as previously reported. Since no significant endocrinologic disturbance was found in those children, we suggest that the initial endocrinological evaluation or screening for SH is unnecessary.

  7. [Sodium valproate as a cause of acute pancreatitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Barreda, Luís; Rosas, Johana; Milian, William; Valdivia, Duilio; Targarona, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used medication approved by the U.S. FDA for the treatment of epilepsy, migraines and bipolar disorders. Adverse effects associated with VPA are typically benign, but there are more serious effects that are less frequent. These effects include hepatotoxicity, teratogenicity, possible polycystic ovaries with a potential sterile effect and acute pancreatitis. Even though acute pancreatitis is an adverse effect of very low frequency, it is very important due to the high mortality rate of patients with acute pancreatitis as a consequence of the use of valproic acid. In medical literature, by 2005, 80 cases of acute pancreatitis caused by valproic acid were reported, 33 of these cases were patients under the age of 18. This is a description of the clinical case of a 16 year old patient with necrotic pancreatitis caused by VPA, who was treated at the Acute Pancreatitis Unit of Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital.

  8. Monitoring and Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After High Dose Methotrexate Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate acute kidney injury (AKI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received high dose methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy and explore the corresponding treatment. Methods 180 children who received high dose MTX chemotherapy were observed with serum MTX concentration and serum creatinine. Patients with AKI of stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment were performed on hemodialysis and assessed the treatment outcome. Results 9 patients (5%) have appeared AKI, including 7 cases of AKI of stage 3. However, there were not any significant correlation between age, gender, serum MTX concentration and AKI, respectively. Compared with normal serum MTX concentration, the patients with high serum MTX concentration easily were developed to AKI, the MTX and serum creatinine concentration had been significantly decreased in 9 patients after hemodialysis. Conclusion AKI has appeared in some children with ALL who receive high dose MTX chemotherapy, and this may due to increase of serum MTX concentration. The monitoring of serum MTX concentration and AKI index could help to find out AKI, and even to prevent the occurrence of it. Furthermore, once AKI is present, those patients with AKI stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment should be performed on hemodialysis treatment. PMID:28243295

  9. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms.

  10. Treatment of acute renal failure due to myeloma kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bear, R A; Cole, E H; Lang, A; Johnson, M

    1980-01-01

    Severe renal insufficiency is considered to indicate a poor prognosis in patients with multiple myeloma, their reported median survival being approximately 2 months. In five consecutive patients with severe renal failure secondary to acute myeloma kidney early aggressive therapy, including chemotherapy and peritoneal dialysis, led to a significant improvement in the renal function of four; the fifth patient received a cadaveric renal transplant after 1 year of peritoneal dialysis. After a median follow-up period of 12 months all the patients were alive and had improved renal function. This experience contrasts with that previously reported and suggests that aggressive management may improve the survival of patients with acute renal failure due to myeloma kidney. PMID:7004618

  11. [Acute myocardial infarction during tocolytic treatment with ritodrine].

    PubMed

    Fornet, I; Calvo, M; Gimeno, M; Canser, E; Alonso, E; Gilsanz, F

    2006-05-01

    Ritodrine, a beta2-adrenergic agonist with a selective effect on the uterine muscle, is prescribed to prevent premature labor and to treat a hypertonic uterus. At therapeutic doses ritodrine has chronotropic and peripheral vasodilator effects. At high doses it has been related to sporadic cases of subendocardial necrosis, pulmonary edema, and death in pregnancy. We report the case of a pregnant woman who had a non-Q wave acute myocardial infarction after administration of ritodrine.

  12. Hemiplegic Migraine Presenting with Prolonged Somnolence: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Christian; Pierquin, Geneviève; Beyenburg, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare and complex disease, characterized by migraine with a reversible motor aura. Hemiplegic migraine can be easily misdiagnosed at its first presentation with an atypical severe form of migraine, a stroke, multiple sclerosis, metabolic disorders, conversion disorder or an epilepsy. We present the case of a young 24-year-old male patient, who since the age of 4 years had been having multiple episodes of migraine associated with hemiparesis, paraesthesia, prolonged somnolence, aphasia and confusion. We review the literature and discuss important diagnostic findings in hemiplegic migraine to help establishing a prompt diagnosis. PMID:27790126

  13. Holmium:YAG laser angioplasty: treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On

    1993-06-01

    We report our clinical experience with a group of 14 patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction. A holmium:YAG laser was applied to the infarct-related artery. This laser emits 250 - 600 mJ per pulse, with a pulse length of 250 microseconds and repetition rate of 5 Hz. Potential benefits of acute thrombolysis by lasers include the absence of systemic lytic state; a shortened thrombus clearing time relative to using thrombolytics; safe removal of the intracoronary thrombus and facilitation of adjunct balloon angioplasty. Potential clinical difficulties include targeting the obstructive clot and plaque, creation of debris and distal emboli and laser-tissue damage. It is conceivable that holmium:YAG laser can be a successful thrombolytic device as its wave length (2.1 microns) coincides with strong water absorption peaks. Since it is common to find an atherosclerotic plaque located under or distal to the thrombotic occlusion, this laser can also be applied for plaque ablation, and the patient presenting with acute myocardial infarction can clearly benefit from the combined function of this laser system.

  14. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for treatment of acute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Michael; Käunicke, Matthias; Hailer, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Acute and subacute ischemia of the legs in acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion is a dramatic situation that endangers the survival of the limbs, depending on the severity of the ischemia. Different therapy options like percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedures, which include rotational thrombectomy, have become available in recent years, in addition to local lysis and surgical thrombectomy. Surgical thrombectomy using the Fogarty catheter technique, in particular, shows an increased incidence of perioperative complications but only small technical success rates in randomized trials. On the other hand, local lysis is associated with increased costs due to resource-consuming measures, such as intensive monitoring and repeat angiographies, in addition to bleeding complications. In the past, further development of the Straub Rotarex(®) system as an endovascular therapy option has demonstrated good success leading to amputation-free survival in multiple studies. At the same time, a low rate of complications with use has been documented. Most examinations have been conducted in the thigh. To date, there are little investigational data on its use in acutely and subacutely occluded femoropopliteal bypasses. In this paper, the current study-based significance of the Rotarex system for this indication is analyzed based on the existing literature and the authors' own experiences with 22 patients.

  15. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy for treatment of acute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Michael; Käunicke, Matthias; Hailer, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Acute and subacute ischemia of the legs in acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusion is a dramatic situation that endangers the survival of the limbs, depending on the severity of the ischemia. Different therapy options like percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy procedures, which include rotational thrombectomy, have become available in recent years, in addition to local lysis and surgical thrombectomy. Surgical thrombectomy using the Fogarty catheter technique, in particular, shows an increased incidence of perioperative complications but only small technical success rates in randomized trials. On the other hand, local lysis is associated with increased costs due to resource-consuming measures, such as intensive monitoring and repeat angiographies, in addition to bleeding complications. In the past, further development of the Straub Rotarex® system as an endovascular therapy option has demonstrated good success leading to amputation-free survival in multiple studies. At the same time, a low rate of complications with use has been documented. Most examinations have been conducted in the thigh. To date, there are little investigational data on its use in acutely and subacutely occluded femoropopliteal bypasses. In this paper, the current study-based significance of the Rotarex system for this indication is analyzed based on the existing literature and the authors’ own experiences with 22 patients. PMID:22661895

  16. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  17. Conventional and emerging treatments in the management of acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Boey, Pui Yi; Singhal, Shweta; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    The management of acute primary angle closure is directed at lowering the intraocular pressure and relieving pupil block. Conventional treatment involves the use of medical treatment and laser peripheral iridotomy, respectively, as a means for achieving these aims. Newer therapeutic strategies have been described that are potentially useful adjuncts or alternatives to conventional treatment. Emerging strategies that lower intraocular pressure include anterior chamber paracentesis, as well as laser procedures such as iridoplasty and pupilloplasty. A possible alternative to relieving pupil block is lens extraction, and may be combined with adjunctive measures such as goniosynechiolysis and viscogoniosynechiolysis. Trabeculectomy has a limited role in the acute setting. This review paper reviews the current evidence regarding conventional and newer treatment modalities for acute primary angle closure. PMID:22536030

  18. Limb pain in migraine and cluster headache.

    PubMed Central

    Guiloff, R J; Fruns, M

    1988-01-01

    Upper limb pain occurred in close temporal association with attacks of migraine, cluster headache and cluster-migraine in 22 cases. Seven had also lower limb pain. Limb pain was usually ipsilateral to the headache but could alternate sides and behaved like other accepted migraine accompaniments. It was always ipsilateral to the associated paraesthesiae/numbness (9 cases) and weakness (6 cases). The distribution and restricted localisations of limb pain were similar to those of the sensory symptoms and could not be accounted for by primary dysfunction of the peripheral or autonomic nervous systems. A central origin for limb pain is postulated. A temporary dysfunction in the somatosensory cortex, and/or its thalamic connections, during migraine or cluster headache attacks, might mediate such pain in a number of patients. PMID:3216204

  19. Migraine in childhood: biobehavioural or psychosomatic disorder?

    PubMed

    Guidetti, Vincenzo; Faedda, Noemi; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2016-12-01

    It is well documented that headache is a multifactorial disorder which includes not only genetic, biological, medical and neuropsychological factor but also psychological and personality traits. The close relationship between stress and migraine attacks and the significant psychiatric comorbidities in migraine provide evidence of a "paradigm" of tight interaction between somatic and psychological aspects in paediatric migraine. In particular in younger children, an uncomfortable situation, a psychological problem or an emotional distress is rarely expressed directly but usually through physical symptoms. So migraine may be considered as a disorder of psychobiological adaptation in which genetic predisposition interplays with internal and/or external environmental influences such as psycho-emotional, climatic, hormonal, dietary or other factors.

  20. The experience of chronic illness in women: a comparison between women with endometriosis and women with chronic migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Barnack, Jessica L; Chrisler, Joan C

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic illness is a life changing event that affects the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of a person's life. The purpose of the present study was to compare the experiences of pain, physical and psychological well-being, stress, patient satisfaction, social support, and attitudes toward menstruation of women who suffer from endometriosis and women who suffer from chronic migraine headaches. It was hypothesized that women with endometriosis would have more negative scores than women who have migraines on all measures because endometriosis is not understood by society to be a valid source of pain. Participants were 41 women with endometriosis and 32 women with migraines who were recruited from support groups and online listservs. Women with endometriosis reported significantly more pain, stress, and negative attitudes toward menstruation than did women with migraines. Implications for the differential treatment of women with chronic illnesses related to the menstrual cycle are discussed.