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Sample records for acute minor thoracic

  1. [Paraplegia after acute thoracic pain].

    PubMed

    Kleinfeldt, T; Rehders, T C; Raab, U; Ince, H; Nienaber, C A

    2006-01-01

    Severe neurological complications such as spinal cord ischemia and paraplegia can occur with acute aortic dissection in 3%. This report describes the case of a 67-year old patient with delayed onset of paraplegia 8 h after acute chest pain. Contrast enhanced computed tomography documented Stanford type B dissection confined to a short segment of the aorta. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging revealed intraspinal intraaxial hematoma of the myelon, which can explain the neurological complication. This case shows that even in the scenario of acute aortic dissection other mechanisms for paraplegia may be operational than dissection itself. Paraplegia in this case results from intramyelon bleeding preceding aortic dissection.

  2. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  3. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  4. Acute thoracic aortic dissection: how to defuse a time bomb.

    PubMed

    McClarren-Curry, C; Shaughnessy, K

    1999-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection is frequently misdiagnosed, and even with surgical intervention, the mortality rate is 50%. This article focuses on assessment, interventions, and postoperative care of patients with aortic dissection.

  5. [The diagnostic dilemma of acute thoracic pain].

    PubMed

    Kleinfeldt, T; Ince, H; Rehders, T C; Nienaber, C A

    2007-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is gaining recognition in Western societies, and is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. New diagnostic imaging modalities, longer life expectancy in general, as well as the increase in the number of hypertension patients have all contributed to the growing awareness of aortic dissections. Compared with acute coronary syndrome and lung embolism, aortic dissection is among the most frequently diagnosed life-threatening conditions involving chest pain. Here we report the case of a 59 year old patient suffering from hypertension and discuss the latest diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the setting of acute chest pain.

  6. Acute cholecystitis developed immediately after thoracic kyphoplasty -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    An, Sang-Bum; Yim, Jiyeon; Kim, Eunjung; Shin, Jae-Hyuck; Lee, Sang Chul

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative acute cholecystitis is a rare complication of orthopaedic surgery and is unrelated to the biliary tract. In particular, in the case of immediate postoperative state after surgery such as kyphoplasty at the thoracic vertebra, symptoms related to inflammation mimic those of abdominal origin, so the diagnosis and the treatment of acute cholecystitis can be delayed leading to a fatal outcome. It is important that physicians should be aware of the postoperative patient's condition in order to make an early diagnosis and determine treatment. PMID:23060986

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael; Lewis, Jaime; Guitron, Julian; Reed, Michael; Pritts, Timothy; Starnes, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13%) following blunt injury and 20 (87%) after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury. PMID:23723618

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  9. Early recognition of acute thoracic aortic dissection and aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) and aneurysm (TAA) are rare but catastrophic. Prompt recognition of TAD/TAA and differentiation from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is difficult yet crucial. Earlier identification of TAA/TAD based upon routine emergency department screening is necessary. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients that presented with acute thoracic complaints to the ED from January 2007 through June 2012 was performed. Cases of TAA/TAD were compared to an equal number of controls which consisted of patients with the diagnosis of ACS. Demographics, physical findings, EKG, and the results of laboratory and radiological imaging were compared. P-value of > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results In total, 136 patients were identified with TAA/TAD, 0.36% of patients that presented with chest complaints. Compared to ACS patients, TAA/TAD group was older (68.9 vs. 63.2 years), less likely to be diabetic (13% vs 32%), less likely to complain of chest pain (47% vs 85%) and head and neck pain (4% vs 17%). The pain for the TAA/TAD group was less likely characterized as tight/heavy in nature (5% vs 37%). TAA/TAD patients were also less likely to experience shortness of breath (42% vs. 51%), palpitations (2% vs 9%) and dizziness (2% vs 13%) and had a greater incidence of focal lower extremity neurological deficits (6% vs 1%), bradycardia (15% vs. 5%) and tachypnea (53% vs. 22%). On multivariate analysis, increasing heart rate, chest pain, diabetes, head & neck pain, dizziness, and history of myocardial infarction were independent predictors of ACS. Conclusions Increasing heart rate, chest pain, diabetes, head & neck pain, dizziness, and history of myocardial infarction can be used to differentiate acute coronary syndromes from thoracic aortic dissections/aneurysms. PMID:24499618

  10. Surgical treatment of acute traumatic tear of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, W H; Lee, R B; Hammon, J W; Frist, W H; Stewart, J R; Bender, H W

    1988-01-01

    Acute traumatic tear of the thoracic aorta is a severe injury with a high mortality rate. This condition requires expeditious evaluation and prompt surgical intervention in order to improve patient survival. The experience at the authors' institution from 1971 to 1987 includes 41 patients who sustained acute traumatic tear of the thoracic aorta and reached the hospital alive. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the surgical management of this injury with regards to mortality rate and the incidence of spinal cord injury. Five patients died from exsanguination before definitive repair could be undertaken. Thirty-six patients had repair of traumatic aortic tear in the area of the isthmus. Nine patients were operated upon with the clamp and sew technique, 20 patients had a heparin-bonded shunt placed, and seven patients were treated by repair with cardiopulmonary bypass. There were five operative deaths that were not related to the technique employed. Two patients without preoperative evidence of spinal cord injury developed paraparesis. No patient had postoperative paraplegia. Despite rapid transport, expeditious evaluation, and emergency thoracotomy, some patients die from exsanguination prior to definitive repair. Even with the provision of distal aortic perfusion during clamping, the risk of spinal cord injury is not eliminated. PMID:3389938

  11. Clinical prediction rule for delayed hemothorax after minor thoracic injury: a multicentre derivation and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Émond, Marcel; Guimont, Chantal; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Daoust, Raoul; Bergeron, Éric; Vanier, Laurent; Moore, Lynne; Plourde, Miville; Kuimi, Batomen; Boucher, Valérie; Allain-Boulé, Nadine; Le Sage, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Background: About 75% of patients with minor thoracic injury are discharged after an emergency department visit. However, complications such as delayed hemothorax can occur. We sought to derive and validate a clinical decision rule to predict hemothorax in patients discharged from the emergency department. Methods: We conducted a 6-year prospective cohort study in 4 university-affiliated emergency departments. Patients aged 16 years or older presenting with a minor thoracic injury were assessed at 5 time points (initial visit and 7, 14, 30 and 90 d after the injury). Radiologists' reports were reviewed for the presence of hemothorax. We used log-binomial regression models to identify predictors of hemothorax. Results: A total of 1382 patients were included: 830 in the derivation phase and 552 in the validation phase. Of these, 151 (10.9%) had hemothorax at the 14-day follow-up. Patients 65 years of age or older represented 25.3% (210/830) and 23.7% (131/552) of the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. The final clinical decision rule included a combination of age (> 70 yr, 2 points; 45-70 yr, 1 point), fracture of any high to mid thorax rib (ribs 3-9, 2 points) and presence of 3 or more rib fractures (1 point). Twenty (30.8%) of the 65 high-risk patients (score ≥ 4) experienced hemothorax during the follow-up period. The clinical decision rule had a high specificity (90.7%, 95% confidence interval 87.7%-93.1%) in this high-risk group, thus guiding appropriate post-emergency care. Interpretation: One patient out of every 10 presented with delayed hemothorax after discharge from the emergency department. Implementation of this validated clinical decision rule for minor thoracic injury could guide emergency discharge plans. PMID:28611156

  12. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  13. Recurrent neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome stressing the importance of pectoralis minor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Although first described over 60 years ago, neurogenic pectoralis minor syndrome (NPMS) has only recently been noted to be present in over half the patients with a clinical diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Similarly, NPMS has also been observed in the majority of patients with recurrent NTOS. This study explores the role of pectoralis minor tenotomy (PMT) in patients with recurrent NTOS. A total of 86 patients with symptoms of recurrent NTOS, who had failed to improve on conservative management, were evaluated by history and physical examination for both NPMS and NTOS. Diagnostic tests included pectoralis minor muscle (PMM) blocks, scalene muscle blocks, and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MAC) measurements. Surgery was either PMT alone or PMT plus brachial plexus decompression (BPD). Follow-up was 1 to 3 years. All patients had multiple symptoms of pain, weakness, and paresthesia. Patients who qualified for PMT alone had slightly fewer symptoms than those who required PMT plus BPD. There was essentially no difference in physical findings between the 2 groups. It was the response to PMM blocks and scalene muscle blocks that determined which of the 2 operations was performed. Pectoralis minor tenotomy alone gave 69% good results in 65 operations, with 8% fair and 23% failures. Pectoralis minor tenotomy plus BPD in 39 operations gave 58% good improvement, 20% fair and 22% failures. All patients with recurrent NTOS should be evaluated clinically for NPMS. If patients complain of pain or tenderness in the anterior chest wall and axilla, a diagnostic PMM block should be performed. A good response to the block suggests that consideration be given to performing PMT alone as it a simple, low-risk outpatient procedure. If unsuccessful, BPD can be performed at a later date. If there is a poor response to the PMM block, BPD is indicated along with PMT, provided there were some symptoms of NPMS.

  14. Death from undetected acute myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery dissection after blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Puanglumyai, Supot; Thamtakerngkit, Somboon; Lekawanvijit, Suree

    2016-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma is a common occurrence in automobile accidents. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by coronary dissection following blunt thoracic trauma is rare. We report a case of healthy 24-year-old man with a history of blunt thoracic injury with subsequent undetected AMI who died of acute decompensated heart failure 4 days after the insult. The autopsy findings showed a 90% luminal narrowing of the left anterior descending coronary artery by dissecting hematoma, 3 cm in length. The myocardium revealed transmural myocardial infarction affecting apex, most part of left ventricular free wall, and interventricular septum. Both lungs were heavy, wet, and noncrepitant. Histological findings of the infarcted myocardium were consistent with 3-5 days post-AMI. Sections from both lungs revealed massive pulmonary edema, reflecting acute decompensated heart failure following a large AMI secondary to coronary dissection. Blunt thoracic trauma may obscure typical chest pain associated with cardiac ischemia especially in cases with a high tolerance for pain.

  15. Guide to thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic imaging is commonly ordered in general practice. Guidelines exist for ordering thoracic imaging but few are specific for general practice. This article summarises current indications for imaging the thorax with chest X-ray and computed tomography. A simple frame-work for interpretation of the chest X-ray, suitable for trainees and practitioners providing primary care imaging in rural and remote locations, is presented. Interpretation of thoracic imaging is best done using a systematic approach. Radiological investigation is not warranted in un-complicated upper respiratory tract infections or asthma, minor trauma or acute-on-chronic chest pain.

  16. Penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign body: can video-assisted thoracic surgery take up the leading role in acute management?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Chan, Herman H. M.; Lau, Rainbow W. H.; Capili, Freddie G.; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is widely adopted in acute management of patient with thoracic trauma, but its use in penetrating thoracic injuries with retained foreign bodies were rarely reported. We described three of such cases using VATS as the first line approach. Identification of injuries, control of bleeders, clot evacuation, resection of damaged lung parenchyma and safe retrieval of foreign bodies were all performed via complete VATS within short operative time. Patient were uneventfully discharged during early post-operative period. We suggest that, for haemodynamically stable patients, VATS offers a safe and minimally-invasive alternative to conventional thoracotomy for penetrating thoracic injury with retained foreign bodies. PMID:27621884

  17. Endovascular stent-graft repair of acute thoracic aortic dissection--early clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Tiesenhausen, K; Amann, W; Koch, G; Hausegger, K A; Oberwalder, P; Rigler, B

    2001-02-01

    Standard treatment of acute thoracic aortic dissection type B is the medical therapy used for most patients, according to Stanford. Surgical therapy involves a high mortality rate and is reserved for patients with complicated dissections. We report from four patients with acute thoracic aortic dissection, treated endoluminally by stent-graft implantation. Four patients with complicated acute thoracic aortic dissections type B were treated endoluminally by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. Preoperative evaluation was performed with spiral-computed tomography and calibrated aortography. The Talent stent-graft system (Metronic) was used in all patients. The primary entry tear could be sealed successfully and complete thrombosis of the false thoracic aortic lumen was obtained in all cases. In one patient, transposition of the left subclavian artery was performed, in two patients the stent-grafts had to be placed across the origin of the left subclavian artery. No severe intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Endoluminal treatment of acute thoracic aortic dissection seems to be a less invasive and effective therapy. Long-term results for this method are necessary.

  18. Myocardial Microvascular Responsiveness During Acute Cardiac Sympathectomy Induced by Thoracic Epidural Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bulte, Carolien S E; Boer, Christa; Hartemink, Koen J; Kamp, Otto; Heymans, Martijn W; Loer, Stephen A; de Marchi, Stefano F; Vogel, Rolf; Bouwman, R Arthur

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute cardiac sympathectomy by thoracic epidural anesthesia on myocardial blood flow and microvascular function. A prospective observational study. The study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital. Ten patients with a mean age of 48 years (range 22-63 years) scheduled for thoracic surgery. Myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to study myocardial blood flow and microvascular responsiveness at rest, during adenosine-induced hyperemia, and after sympathetic stimulation by the cold pressor test. Repeated measurements were performed without and with thoracic epidural anesthesia. An increased myocardial blood volume was observed with thoracic epidural anesthesia compared to baseline (from 0.08±0.02 to 0.10±0.03 mL/mL; p = 0.02). No difference existed in resting myocardial blood flow between baseline conditions and epidural anesthesia (0.85±0.24 v 1.03±0.27 mL/min/g, respectively). Hyperemia during thoracic epidural anesthesia increased myocardial blood flow to 4.31±1.07 mL/min/g (p = 0.0008 v baseline) and blood volume to 0.17±0.04 mL/mL (p = 0.005 baseline). After sympathetic stimulation, no difference in myocardial blood flow parameters was observed CONCLUSIONS: Acute cardiac sympathectomy by thoracic epidural anesthesia increased the blood volume in the myocardial capillary system. Also, thoracic epidural anesthesia increased hyperemic myocardial blood flow, indicating augmented endothelial-independent vasodilator capacity of the myocardium. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Acute traumatic transection of the thoracic aorta: endovascular treatment].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Nelson; Mertens, Renato; Valdés, Francisco; Krämer, Albrecht; Mariné, Leopoldo; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Geni, Ricardo; Aguilera, Hernán; Heiremans, Guy; Vergara, Jeannette; Valdebenito, Magaly

    2003-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of the aorta has a near 80% mortality. Most patients die on the site of the accident. Conventional surgical repair of these lesions has a high morbidity and mortality, generally associated to the severity of associated lesions. Over the last decade, endovascular treatment has become an effective therapeutic alternative. We report a 40 years old male, that suffered a traumatic rupture of the descending thoracic aorta in a car accident. A successful endovascular repair was performed, installing an endoprothesis on the site of the lesion, using a femoral artery approach. The patient had a good postoperative evolution and was discharged from the hospital once complete rehabilitation of his associated lesions was obtained.

  20. Corticosteroids prevent acute lung dysfunction caused by thoracic irradiation in unanesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Wickersham, N.; Malcolm, A.W.; Brigham, K.L.

    1988-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of corticosteroid therapy in a new acute model of oxidant lung injury, thoracic irradiation in awake sheep. Sheep were irradiated with 1,500 rads to the whole chest except for blocking the heart and adjacent ventral lung. Seven experimental sheep were given methylprednisolone (1 g intravenously every 6 h for four doses) and thoracic irradiation; control sheep received only irradiation. In irradiated control sheep, lung lymph flow increased from baseline (7.6 ml/h) to peak at 3 h (13.2), and lung lymph protein clearance increased from 5.1 to 9.7 ml/h. Mean pulmonary artery pressure increased in the irradiated control sheep from 19 to 32.4 cm H/sub 2/O, whereas the lung lymph thromboxane concentration increased from 0.09 to 6.51 ng/ml at 3 h. Arterial oxygen tension in irradiated control sheep fell gradually from 86 mm Hg at baseline to 65 mm Hg at 8 h. Methylprednisolone administration significantly prevented the increase in lung lymph protein clearance, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and lung lymph thromboxane concentration. Methylprednisolone also prevented the fall in arterial oxygen tension after thoracic irradiation, but did not prevent a further decrease in lymphocytes in blood or lung lymph after radiation. We conclude that corticosteroid therapy prevents most of the acute physiologic changes caused by thoracic irradiation in awake sheep.

  1. Thoracic endovascular repair for acute type A aortic dissection: operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a potentially lethal condition which requires immediate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Open surgical repair remains the standard of care as survival rates continue to improve in the modern surgical era. Unfortunately, up to twenty percent of patients are denied surgical therapy because they are deemed medically unfit to undergo open repair. The application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has changed the treatment paradigm for aortic disease involving the descending thoracic aorta and may be a viable rescue option for patients with type A dissection who are not eligible for open surgical repair. New endovascular devices and advanced image-guided procedures are continually evolving. This article summarizes the pathology of aortic dissection and focuses on currently available endovascular solutions for transapical and transfemoral stent graft deployment for acute aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta for selected patients who are ineligible for open surgical repair. PMID:27563553

  2. A case of painless acute Type-A thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Catlow, Jamie; Cross, Tarquin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old lady with a known aneurysmal thoracic aorta, developing acute breathlessness and hypoxia, with no pain and unremarkable cardiovascular examination. As D-dimers were raised, she was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for suspected pulmonary embolism. CT pulmonary angiography showed acutely dissecting, Type-A, thoracic aortic aneurysm. The patient was treated medically with β-blockers. Despite a poor prognosis, she remains well 2 months later. Observational studies of patients over 70 with Type-A dissection show only 75.3% experience pain, are offered surgery less and have higher mortality. d-Dimers are almost always elevated in aortic dissection. No previous studies document breathlessness as the only presenting symptom. This case emphasises the need, in older populations, for a low suspicion threshold for aortic dissection.

  3. Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Harbo, Frederik Severin Gråe; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier in the index pregnancy, she had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery (ARS) for a hiatus hernia because of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. Owing to increasing epigastric pain a CT scan was carried out which diagnosed wrap disruption with gastric herniation into the thoracic cavity and threatened incarceration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of severe adverse outcome after ARS during pregnancy, with acute intrathoracic gastric herniation. We recommend the avoidance of ARS in pregnancy, and the need to advise women undergoing ARS of the postoperative risks if pregnancy occurs within a few years of ARS. PMID:23378556

  4. Thoracic paravertebral catheter placement for acute rib pain in a pregnant patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Jacob L; Jacobs, Robert Alexander

    2015-02-01

    A 30-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis at 33 weeks, 4 days' gestation sustained a rib injury during an acute pulmonary exacerbation, resulting in noncompliance with her chest wall oscillation therapy and worsening of her respiratory status with concern for inducing labor early. Insertion of an ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral catheter produced immediate pain relief, eliminating the need for further opioids, and she was able to tolerate her chest wall oscillation treatment. She was discharged home after 7 days and was able to deliver a healthy baby at 38 weeks via spontaneous vaginal delivery.

  5. Acute thoracic aortic dissection presenting as sore throat: report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Pin; Ng, Kim-Choy

    2004-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be one of the most dramatic of cardiovascular emergencies. Its symptoms can occur abruptly and progress rapidly. Prompt recognition and appropriate intervention is crucial. However, not all aortic dissections present with classic symptoms of abrupt chest, back, or abdominal pain, and the diagnosis may be missed. Aortic dissection presenting as a sore throat is quite unusual. A 53-year-old man presented with sore throat as the early symptom of an acute thoracic aortic dissection. Unfortunately, the diagnosis was delayed, and the patient died. Given the high morbidity and mortality after delayed recognition or misdiagnosis, aortic dissection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with sore throat and normal findings of neck and throat, even when there is no classic symptoms. PMID:15829145

  6. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  7. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  8. Feasibility of emergency department point-of-care ultrasound for rib fracture diagnosis in minor thoracic injury.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Élizabeth; Guimont, Chantal; Émond, Marcel; Parent, Marc Charles; Topping, Claude; Kuimi, Brice Lionel Batomen; Boucher, Valérie; Le Sage, Natalie

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of emergency department (ED) point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) for rib fracture diagnosis in patients with minor thoracic injury (mTI). Secondary objectives were to 1) evaluate patients' pain during the PoCUS procedure, 2) identify the limitations of the use of PoCUS technique, and 3) compare the diagnosis obtained with PoCUS to radiography results. Adult patients who presented with clinical suspicion of rib fractures after mTI were included. All patients underwent PoCUS performed by emergency physicians (EPs) prior to a rib view X-ray. A visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 100 was used to ascertain feasibility, patients' pain and clinicians' degree of certitude. Feasibility was defined as a score of more than 50 on the VAS. We documented the radiologists' interpretation of rib view X-ray. Radiologists were blinded to the PoCUS results. Ninety-six patients were included. A majority (65%) of EPs concluded that the PoCUS technique to diagnose rib fracture was feasible (VAS score > 50). Median score for feasibility was 63. Median score was 31 (Interquartile range [IQR] 5-57) for patients' pain related to the PoCUS. The main limiting factor of the PoCUS technique was pain during patient examination (15%). PoCUS examination appears to be a feasible technique for a rib fracture diagnosis in the ED.

  9. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  10. Prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Criner, Gerard J; Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L; Ouellette, Daniel R; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G; Celli, Bartolome R; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T; Fiel, Stanley B; Foreman, Marilyn G; Hanania, Nicola A; Ireland, Belinda K; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Mularski, Richard A; Ornelas, Joseph; Road, Jeremy D; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in the field of COPD would lead to

  11. Recurrent Gain-of-Function Mutation in PRKG1 Causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S. Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S.; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17–51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  12. Recurrent gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 causes thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-08

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17-51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime.

  13. Midterm results after endovascular treatment of acute, complicated type B aortic dissection: the Talent Thoracic Registry.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Marek P; Rousseau, Herve; Heijmen, Robin; Piquet, Philippe; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Nienaber, Christoph A; Sodeck, Gottfried; Fattori, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute complicated type B dissection. From January 1998 to March 2004, 29 patients (7 women and 22 men) with acute complicated aortic type B dissection (mean age, 61 years; range, 22-78), defined as aortic rupture, malperfusion, intractable pain, or uncontrolled hypertension, underwent endovascular stent graft placement with the Medtronic Talent device. Five patients (17%) had undergone previous surgery on the ascending aorta and/or aortic valve. The mean aortic diameter at intervention was 48 ± 13 mm. Follow-up was 100% complete and averaged 53 ± 41 months. The technical feasibility and success with deployment proximal to the entry tear was 100%, requiring partial or total coverage of the left subclavian artery in only 1 patient (3%). Hospital mortality was 17% ± 7% (70% confidence limit) with 6 late deaths. The causes of hospital death included multiorgan failure in 2 patients, aortic rupture in 2, and retrograde dissection in 1 patient. Three patients (10%) who survived the procedure developed neurologic complications (2 strokes and 1 transient ischemic attack). One patient required early conversion to surgery because of retrograde type A dissection. Furthermore, 4 patients developed a type Ia endoleak. A postprocedural increase in the distal aortic diameter was observed in 3 patients. The actuarial survival at 1 and 5 years was 79% and 61%, respectively. Freedom from treatment failure at 1 and 5 years (including reintervention, aortic rupture, device-related complications, aortic-related death, or sudden, unexplained late death) was 82% and 77%, respectively. Endovascular stent graft placement in acute complicated type B aortic dissection proves to be a promising alternative therapeutic treatment modality in this relatively difficult patient cohort. Refinements, especially in stent design and application, could further improve the prognosis of patients in this life-threatening situation

  14. Thoracic epidural analgesia: a new approach for the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Windisch, Olivier; Heidegger, Claudia-Paula; Giraud, Raphaël; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-05-04

    This review article analyzes, through a nonsystematic approach, the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) with a focus on the effects of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the disease. The benefit-risk balance is also discussed. AP has an overall mortality of 1 %, increasing to 30 % in its severe form. The systemic inflammation induces a strong activation of the sympathetic system, with a decrease in the blood flow supply to the gastrointestinal system that can lead to the development of pancreatic necrosis. The current treatment for severe AP is symptomatic and tries to correct the systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the multiorgan dysfunction. Besides the removal of gallstones in biliary pancreatitis, no satisfactory causal treatment exists. TEA is widely used, mainly for its analgesic effect. TEA also induces a targeted sympathectomy in the anesthetized region, which results in splanchnic vasodilatation and an improvement in local microcirculation. Increasing evidence shows benefits of TEA in animal AP: improved splanchnic and pancreatic perfusion, improved pancreatic microcirculation, reduced liver damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Until now, only few clinical studies have been performed on the use of TEA during AP with few available data regarding the effect of TEA on the splanchnic perfusion. Increasing evidence suggests that TEA is a safe procedure and could appear as a new treatment approach for human AP, based on the significant benefits observed in animal studies and safety of use for human. Further clinical studies are required to confirm the clinical benefits observed in animal studies.

  15. Thoracic duct ligation in the rat attenuates lung injuries in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Tsui, N; Li, Y; Wang, F

    2013-09-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), inflammatory cells and products disseminated in abdominal lymph and blood induce systemic inflammation. Interruption of abdominal lymph flow, and thereby reduction of lymphatic dissemination, could alter the course of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether thoracic duct ligation (TDL) in a rat model of cerulein-induced AP results in reduced lung damage as a marker for reduction of systemic dissemination through the lymphatic system. Thirty-four male rats were assigned to TDL (TDL-rats, n=8), AP (AP-rats, n=8), TDL+AP (TDL+AP-rats, n=9) or sham TDL (Ctr-rats, n=9) groups. TDL and sham TDL were established first. Two days later, AP was induced in AP- and TDL+AP-rats by a series of subcutaneous injections of cerulein. Vehicle was injected in the same manner in Ctr- and TDL-rats as controls. Rats were sacrificed six hours after the end of the serial injections. Histological examination showed that AP-induced damage to the pancreas and ileum were similar in AP- and TDL+AP-rats whereas lung damage was less severe in TDL+AP-rats than in AP-rats. Assays demonstrated that: hepatic and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activities were increased in AP-rats but not in the TDL+AP-rats; more Il-6 was found in AP-rat than TDL+AP-rat lungs; and lung-lavage fluid from AP-rats yielded more angiopoietin-2 than TDL+AP-rats. In conclusion, prior TDL in the rat attenuates lung damage in acute pancreatitis.

  16. The Use of Computed Tomography Attenuation to Evaluate Osteoporosis Following Acute Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Cagan, Amanda; Morgan, Robert; Davis, Rick; Asis, Martin; Switzer, Julie; Polly, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Relatively few patients have dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to quantify the magnitude of bone loss as they age. Recent work correlates mean computed tomography (CT) attenuation in the level I (L1) vertebra with bone mineral density (BMD), making it possible to objectively evaluate the magnitude of bone loss in osteoporosis by this method. The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of using CT scans in patients with acute thoracic and lumbar spine fractures to diagnose osteoporosis and using CT attenuation to evaluate the association between age and BMD. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients with acute fractures of the thoracic or lumbar spine who had also undergone an abdominal (or L1) CT scan and compared mean CT attenuation in L1 against threshold values. We also compared differences in CT attenuation between younger (<65 years) and older (≥65 years) and older patients. Results: A total of 124 patients were evaluated (74 thoracic and 50 lumbar fractures). Overall, there was a strong correlation between age and bone density as measured by CT attenuation (r = −.76). Among those with thoracic fractures (<65 years), mean CT attenuation was 196.51 HU. Forty-one patients were ≥65 years and had mean CT attenuation of 105.90 HU (P < .001). In patients with lumbar fractures, 27 patients were <65 years and had a mean CT attenuation of 192.26 HU and 23 patients were ≥65 years and had mean CT attenuation of 114.31 HU (P < .001). At the threshold of 110 HU, set for specificity, the magnitude of difference between the age-stratified cohorts was greater in the thoracic spine (P < .0001 vs P = .003). Discussion: Using opportunistic CT, we demonstrate the relative frequency of osteoporosis in patients with acute fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine and confirm that the association increases with age. The CT attenuation may provide a cheap and convenient method to help confirm a clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis in patients

  17. Thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kagan, K G

    1980-08-01

    The physiologic equilibrium of chest injury patients is frequently precarious, and mild stress during examination and treatment may precipitate acute decompensation and death. This is particularly true with the respiratory system, where the normally large respiratory reserve capacity may be rapidly lost. Accurate assessment of the nature of the thoracic injury and the severity of that injury must be determined in order to formulate a therapeutic plan. Many thoracic injuries, such as pneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, or rib fractures, will be self-limiting. Other conditions must be recognized for their potentially lethal nature and dealt with aggressively, and these include cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal perforation. By performing a systematic evaluation of the patient and confirming or denying the presence of all possible types of thoracic injury, the veterinarian may avoid overtreatment of self-limiting lesions and recognize and aggressively treat those with potentially fatal outcomes.

  18. Use of computed tomographic scanning and aortography in the diagnosis of acute dissection of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J M; Oldershaw, P J; Gray, H H

    1990-01-01

    Before the introduction of computed tomographic (CT) scanning, aortography was the investigation of choice for acute aortic dissection. Between 1978 and 1982, 24 patients were referred to the Brompton Hospital with suspected acute thoracic aortic dissection; all had aortography with diagnosis confirmed at surgery (n = 12) or necropsy (n = 2) or supported by clinical outcome (n = 8). One patient in whom aortography was negative had type B dissection at necropsy and another patient was lost to follow up. CT scanning became available in this unit in 1983 and between 1983 and 1987 was used as the only imaging investigation in 32 patients with suspected acute dissection of the thoracic aorta while in a further 22 patients aortography was used alone. Results were confirmed at surgery (n = 18), necropsy (n = 3), or supported by clinical outcome (n = 31). Two patients were lost to follow up. In an additional 16 patients both aortography and CT scanning were performed with concordant findings in 10. In six in whom the results were discordant, aortography was normal in three in whom subsequent CT scanning showed type B dissection and CT scanning was normal in three patients in whom aortography showed type A dissection. Both CT scanning and aortography are reliable techniques for assessment of suspected acute dissection of the thoracic aorta. Both techniques misdiagnose occasionally and the frequency of misdiagnosis will be minimised by performing both investigations in patients where the level of clinical suspicion is high and the initial investigation negative. CT scanning tends to miss type A dissection and in view of the success of surgery in this condition this failing has the more serious clinical consequences. PMID:2223304

  19. Early and midterm outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for acute and chronic complicated type B aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min-Hong; Du, Xin; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin; Ge, Yang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in the current era has been chosen as a dominant and minimally invasive treatment for complicated aorta dissection. This study aimed to assess safety and feasibility of TEVAR in acute and chronic type B aortic dissection. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 85 patients with complicated type B aortic dissection undergoing TEVAR were divided into acute aortic dissection (AAD) (n = 60) group and chronic aortic dissection (CAD) group (n = 25). Computed tomography was used to evaluate postoperative changes in maximal aortic diameter and true and false lumen diameters at 3 levels during a mean follow-up period of 26.4 ± 15.6 months. The technical success rate was 100%. In-hospital and 30-day rates of death were 3.3% in acute group and 0 in chronic group. Postdischarge rates of type I leak, type II leak, and retrograde type A dissection were 6.7%, 5.2%, and 3.4% (acute) and 0%, 4.0%, and 4.0% (chronic), respectively. The maximal aorta diameter remained stable in all the 3 levels in both acute and chronic group. The cumulative freedom from all-cause mortality at 3 years was similar in acute and chronic groups (89.5% vs 95.5%, P = .308). The cumulative freedom from aortic-related mortality was also not significantly different in the acute and chronic groups (92.8% vs 95.2%, P = .531). In the thoracic aorta, TEVAR treatment resulted in a significant increase in true lumen (TL) diameter and decrease in false lumen (FL). However, in the abdominal aorta, TEVAR did not lead to significant change in TL and FL diameters. The rates of complete thrombosis thoracic false lumens were better than that in the abdominal false lumen. TEVAR was a safe and effect therapy for complicated acute and chronic type B dissection with low early and mid-term mortality and morbidity. PMID:28700467

  20. Thoracic disc herniation and acute myelopathy: clinical presentation, neuroimaging findings, surgical considerations, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Cornips, Erwin M J; Janssen, Marcus L F; Beuls, Emile A M

    2011-04-01

    Thoracic disc herniations (TDHs) may occasionally present with an acute myelopathy, defined as a variable degree of motor, sensory, and sphincter disturbances developing in less than 24 hours, and resulting in a Frankel Grade C or worse. Confronted with such a patient, the surgeon has to decide whether to perform an emergency operation and whether to use an anterior or posterior approach. The authors analyze their own experience and the pertinent literature, focusing on clinical presentation, imaging findings, surgical timing, technique, and outcome. Among 250 patients who underwent surgery for symptomatic TDH, 209 had at least 1 year of follow-up at the time of writing, including 8 patients who presented with an acute myelopathy. They were surgically treated using standard thoracoscopic microdiscectomy, careful blood pressure monitoring, and intravenous methylprednisolone. The authors analyzed pre- and postoperative neuroimaging, and Frankel scores preoperatively, at discharge, and 1 year postoperatively. Although 5 patients had multiple TDHs, the symptomatic TDH was invariably situated between T9-10 and T11-12. Seven TDHs were giant, 6 were calcified, 6 were accompanied by myelomalacia, and 4 were accompanied by segmental stenosis. Although sudden dorsalgia was the initial symptom in 6, a precipitating event was noted in only 1. All patients had severe neurological deficits by the time they underwent surgery. Frankel grades improved from B to D in 2 patients, from C to E in 4, and from C to D and B to E in 1 patient each. All patients regained continence and ambulation. Transient complications were CSF leak (in 2 patients), and intraoperative blood loss greater than 1000 ml, reversible ischemic neurological deficit, and subileus (in 1 patient each). Approximately 4% of TDHs present with an acute myelopathy. They are often situated between T9-10 and T11-12, large or giant, and even calcified. They almost invariably cause important cord compression (sometimes

  1. Ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral catheter management of acute rib pain secondary to cystic fibrosis exacerbation in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cutshall, Chad; Hutchins, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    An ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral catheter was placed at T8 in a 15-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis and right-sided chest pain from avulsion of the eighth rib, secondary to coughing. She was discharged home after respiratory stabilization and returned to school with the catheter in place. We report the effective use of an ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block in the management of acute rib pain in a pediatric patient with cystic fibrosis.

  2. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene.

  3. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid as a Predictor of Neurological Deterioration in Acute Minor Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingyang; Han, Zhao; Zhou, Qiang; Lin, Jing; Liu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between high plasma 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels and neurological deterioration (ND) has not been investigated in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke. Plasma levels of 20-HETE were measured at admission in all patients. The primary end point of the study was ND within 10 days after admission. The degree of disability was assessed using modified Rankin scale at 3 months after admission. A total of 322 patients were enrolled, of which 85 patients (26.4%) developed ND. Mean 20-HETE level was 1687±158 pmol/L. On multivariate analyses, high level (>1675 pmol/L) of 20-HETE was an independent predictor of ND (third and fourth quartiles). Neurological deterioration was associated with a higher risk of poor outcome (modified Rankin scale scores 3-6) at 3 months. ND is fairly common in acute minor ischemic stroke and is associated with poor prognosis. Elevated plasma level of 20-HETE may be a predictor for ND in acute minor ischemic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The Effect of Massage on Acute Postoperative Pain in Critically and Acutely Ill Adults Post-thoracic Surgery: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Boitor, Madalina; Gélinas, Céline; Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Thombs, Brett D

    Critical care practice guidelines identify a lack of clear evidence on the effectiveness of massage for pain control. To assess the effect of massage on acute pain in critically and acutely ill adults post-thoracic surgery. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases were searched. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of massage compared to attention control/sham massage or standard care alone on acute pain intensity post-thoracic surgery. Twelve RCTs were included. Of these, nine evaluated massage in addition to standard analgesia, including 2 that compared massage to attention control/sham massage in the intensive care unit (ICU), 6 that compared massage to standard analgesia alone early post-ICU discharge, and 1 that compared massage to both attention control and standard care in the ICU. Patients receiving massage with analgesia reported less pain (0-10 scale) compared to attention control/sham massage (3 RCTs; N = 462; mean difference -0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.25 to -0.35; p < 0.001; I(2) = 13%) and standard care (7 RCTs; N = 1087; mean difference -0.85, 95% CI -1.28 to -0.42; p < 0.001; I(2) = 70%). Massage, in addition to pharmacological analgesia, reduces acute post-cardiac surgery pain intensity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-clinical detection of amiodarone-induced acute fibrosing alveolitis by intra-thoracic impedance monitor of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Jin-Long; Chin, Chun-Shih; Lin, Tung-Chao; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Ting, Chih-Tai; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2011-01-01

    A 66-year-old male received an implant of a dual-chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and was prescribed amiodarone (400 mg/day). The intra-thoracic impedance monitor in the ICD antecedently detected amiodarone-induced acute fibrosing alveolitis >3 months prior to clinical symptoms.

  6. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of an Acute Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta Complicated by a Distal Low-Flow Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Wery, Didier; Dubois, Eric; El Nakadi, Badih; Dueren, Eric van; Verhelst, Guy; Delcour, Christian

    1999-11-15

    We report the case of a patient who suffered major trauma following a motorcycle accident that resulted in multiple fractures, bilateral hemopneumothorax, pulmonary contusions, and an isthmic rupture of the aorta with a pseudoaneurysm compressing the descending aorta. This compression was responsible for distal hypotension and low flow, leading to acute renal insufficiency and massive rhabdomyolysis. Due to the critical clinical status of the patient, which prevented any type of open thoracic surgery, endovascular treatment was performed. An initial stent-graft permitted alleviation of the compression and the re-establishment of normal hemodynamic conditions, but its low position did not allow sufficient coverage of the rupture. A second stent-graft permitted total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm while preserving the patency of the left subclavian artery.

  7. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture. PMID:21887041

  8. Surviving a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by an acute superior vena cava and thoracic compartment syndromes.

    PubMed

    Parra, Michael W; Rodas, Edgar B; Bartnik, Jakub P; Puente, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We describe the first reported survivor of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture complicated by acute superior vena cava (SVCS) and thoracic compartment syndromes (TCS). A thirty one year old male was involved in a boating accident. The patient was diagnosed with a grade IV liver laceration, which was initially managed with both angio-embolization and open surgical repair. Exactly one month from admission, the patient presented with an abrupt cardiac arrest, which was further complicated by a SVCS and TCS. The SVCS was managed with bilateral thoracostomies which revealed a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture into the right chest cavity. The TCS was managed with a decompressive thoraco-abdominal incision. The patient survived and is now leading a normal life. Our success was largely due to an integrated trauma system of physicians, nurses and technicians that prompted the early recognition of two potentially life threatening complications of a delayed trans-diaphragmatic hepatic rupture.

  9. Hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma presenting with intradural hematoma and acute paraplegia after spinal manipulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Sciubba, Daniel; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy; Gokaslan, Ziya L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic conversion of spinal schwannomas represents a rare occurrence; also rare is the development of a spinal intradural hematoma after spinal manipulation therapy. We report a unique presentation of paraplegia in a patient who underwent spinal manipulation therapy and was found to have a hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma at time of surgery in the setting of anti-platelet therapy use. In patients with spinal schwannomas, tumor hemorrhage is a rare occasion, which can be considered in the setting of additive effects of spinal manipulation therapy and antiplatelet therapy. PMID:28377856

  10. [Perioperative pain management for abdominal and thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Englbrecht, J S; Pogatzki-Zahn, E M

    2014-06-01

    Abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures can result in significant acute postoperative pain. Present evidence shows that postoperative pain management remains inadequate especially after "minor" surgical procedures. Various therapeutic options including regional anesthesia techniques and systemic pharmacotherapy are available for effective treatment of postoperative pain. This work summarizes the pathophysiological background of postoperative pain after abdominal and thoracic surgery and discusses the indication, effectiveness, risks, and benefits of the different therapeutic options. Special focus is given to the controversial debate about the indication for epidural analgesia, as well as various alternative therapeutic options, including transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, paravertebral block (PVB), wound infiltration with local anesthetics, and intravenous lidocaine. In additional, indications and contraindications of nonopioid analgesics after abdominal and thoracic surgery are discussed and recommendations based on scientific evidence and individual risk and benefit analysis are made. All therapeutic options discussed are eligible for clinical use and may contribute to improve postoperative pain outcome after abdominal and thoracic surgical procedures.

  11. Sex disparities in acute myocardial infarction incidence: do ethnic minority groups differ from the majority population?

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, Aloysia A M; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Stronks, Karien; Bots, Michiel L; Agyemang, Charles

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in men exceeds that in women. The extent of this sex disparity varies widely between countries. Variations may also exist between ethnic minority groups and the majority population, but scientific evidence is lacking. A nationwide register-based cohort study was conducted (n = 7,601,785) between 1997 and 2007. Cox Proportional Hazard Models were used to estimate sex disparities in AMI incidence within the Dutch majority population and within ethnic minority groups, stratified by age (30-54, 55-64, ≥65 years). AMI incidence was higher in men than in women in all groups under study. Compared with the majority population (hazard ratio (HR): 2.23; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.21-2.25), sex disparities were similar among minorities originating from the immediate surrounding countries (Belgium, Germany), whereas they were greater in most other minority groups. Most pronounced results were found among minorities from Morocco (HR: 3.48; 95% CI: 2.48-4.88), South Asia (HR: 3.92; 95% CI: 2.45-6.26) and Turkey (HR: 3.98; 95% CI: 3.51-4.51). Sex disparity differences were predominantly evident in those below 55 years of age, and were mainly provoked by a higher AMI incidence in ethnic minority men compared with men belonging to the Dutch majority population. Sex disparities in AMI incidence clearly varied between ethnic minorities and the Dutch majority population. Health prevention strategies may first target at a reduction of AMI incidence in young ethnic minority men, especially those originating from Turkey and South Asia. Furthermore, an increase in AMI incidence in their female counterparts should be prevented. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on survival and microcirculation in severe acute pancreatitis: a randomized experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Severe acute pancreatitis is still a potentially life threatening disease with high mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) on survival, microcirculation, tissue oxygenation and histopathologic damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis in a prospective animal study. Methods In this study, 34 pigs were randomly assigned into 2 treatment groups. After severe acute pancreatitis was induced by intraductal injection of glycodesoxycholic acid in Group 1 (n = 17) bupivacaine (0.5%; bolus injection 2 ml, continuous infusion 4 ml/h) was applied via TEA. In Group 2 (n = 17) no TEA was applied. During a period of 6 hours after induction, tissue oxygen tension (tpO2) in the pancreas and pancreatic microcirculation was assessed. Thereafter animals were observed for 7 days followed by sacrification and histopathologic examination. Results Survival rate after 7 days was 82% in Group 1 (TEA) versus 29% in Group 2: (Control) (P <0.05). Group 1 (TEA) also showed a significantly superior microcirculation (1,608 ± 374 AU versus 1,121 ± 510 AU; P <0.05) and tissue oxygenation (215 ± 64 mmHg versus 138 ± 90 mmHG; P <0.05) as compared to Group 2 (Control). Consecutively, tissue damage in Group 1 was reduced in the histopathologic scoring (5.5 (3 to 8) versus 8 (5.5 to 10); P <0.05). Conclusions TEA led to improved survival, enhanced microcirculatory perfusion and tissue oxygenation and resulted in less histopathologic tissue-damage in an experimental animal model of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:24314012

  13. CT findings of a thoracic vertebral hemangioma presenting with acute neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sinan; Kurt, Aydın; Okutan, Ozerk; Keskin, Suat

    2011-01-01

    Vertebral body hemangiomas are benign lesions and account for 4% of all spinal tumors. The most common histological type is cavernous hemangioma. These tumors generally locate in the vertebral body as a solitary lesion. Multiple lesions are seen in approximately 25-30% of vertebral hemangiomas. Mostly they are asymptomatic and incidentally found with radiological studies. Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are rare and represent < 1% of all hemangiomas; however, if untreated, they may cause local or radicular pain and neurological deficits ranging from myeloradiculopathy to paralysis. In this case we aim to present preoperative and postoperative Computed Tomography findings of a cavernous hemangioma that caused sudden motor deficit and was localised to the thoracic vertebra corpus and posterior elements.

  14. Acute changes in glenohumeral range-of-motion following in-season minor league pitching starts.

    PubMed

    Case, Jordan M; Mannava, Sandeep; Fallin, Joshua H; Stone, Austin V; Freehill, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric glenohumeral range-of-motion (ROM) between the throwing and non-throwing arms of overhead athletes has been well described in the literature. Thresholds of internal rotation (IR) loss have been associated with throwing arm injury in baseball players. Acute changes in shoulder ROM following an individual pitching appearance remain poorly understood. To determine the acute change of external rotation (ER), IR, and total arc-of-motion (TAM) in minor league starting pitchers immediately following an in-season starting pitching appearance. Nine minor league starting pitchers participated in the study with data collected for 22 individual starts. IR, ER and TAM were measured in the throwing shoulder and non-throwing shoulder at three time points for each appearance: before, immediately following, and at 24 hours following the pitching appearance. In the throwing arm, IR significantly decreased (49.4 vs 46.0, p = 0.037) immediately after pitching, and ER significantly increased immediately following an appearance (150.7 vs 153.6, p = 0.030) and at 24 hours (150.7 vs 154.0, p = 0.028). No difference was detected in throwing arm TAM and IR at 24 hours, or TAM immediately following an appearance. Minor league pitchers demonstrate the dynamic glenohumeral ROM changes after starting appearances of increased ER and diminished IR with maintenance of TAM. At 24 hours, the observed loss of IR had resolved, whereas the gains in ER remained present. Our study supports the need to further assess the acute changes of glenohumeral ROM in pitchers, and the association of acute glenohumeral ROM change with the development of pathologic ROM profiles and injury.

  15. Prognostic value of trans-thoracic echocardiography in patients with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation: findings from the RAF study.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Falocci, Nicola; Caso, Valeria; Becattini, Cecilia; Marcheselli, Simona; Rueckert, Christina; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Csiba, Laszló; Szabó, Lilla; Sohn, Sung-Il; Tassinari, Tiziana; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H; Michel, Patrik; Cordier, Maria; Vanacker, Peter; Remillard, Suzette; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; D'Amore, Cataldo; Mosconi, Maria Giulia; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Orlandi, Giovanni; Chiti, Alberto; Gialdini, Gino; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Masotti, Luca; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Martini, Giuseppe; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrissoula; Corea, Francesco; Del Sette, Massimo; Ageno, Walter; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Baldi, Antonio; D'Anna, Sebastiano; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Pieroni, Alessio; Toni, Danilo; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario Maimone; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Kepplinger, Jessica; Bodechtel, Ulf; Gerber, Johannes; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-02-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is recommended for the secondary prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). T he identification of patients at high risk for early recurrence, which are potential candidates to prompt anticoagulation, is crucial to justify the risk of bleeding associated with early anticoagulant treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate in patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF the association between findings at trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) and 90 days recurrence. In consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke and AF, TTE was performed within 7 days from hospital admission. Study outcomes were recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events (stroke or TIA) and systemic embolism. 854 patients (mean age 76.3 ± 9.5 years) underwent a TTE evaluation; 63 patients (7.4%) had at least a study outcome event. Left atrial thrombosis was present in 11 patients (1.3%) among whom 1 had recurrent ischemic event. Left atrial enlargement was present in 548 patients (64.2%) among whom 51 (9.3%) had recurrent ischemic events. The recurrence rate in the 197 patients with severe left atrial enlargement was 11.7%. On multivariate analysis, the presence of atrial enlargement (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.06-4.29, p = 0.033) and CHA2DS2-VASc score (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.04-1.45, p = 0.018, for each point increase) were correlated with ischemic recurrences. In patients with AF-associated acute stroke, left atrial enlargement is an independent marker of recurrent stroke and systemic embolism. The risk of recurrence is accounted for by severe atrial enlargement. TTE-detected left atrial thrombosis is relatively uncommon.

  16. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Therapeutics Targeting Drivers of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections: Insights from Predisposing Genes and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Prakash, Siddharth K; Ramirez, Francesco

    2017-01-14

    Thoracic aortic diseases, including aneurysms and dissections of the thoracic aorta, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for thoracic aortic disease include increased hemodynamic forces on the ascending aorta, typically due to poorly controlled hypertension, and heritable genetic variants. The altered genes predisposing to thoracic aortic disease either disrupt smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction or adherence to an impaired extracellular matrix, or decrease canonical transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling. Paradoxically, TGF-β hyperactivity has been postulated to be the primary driver for the disease. More recently, it has been proposed that the response of aortic SMCs to the hemodynamic load on a structurally defective aorta is the primary driver of thoracic aortic disease, and that TGF-β overactivity in diseased aortas is a secondary, unproductive response to restore tissue function. The engineering of mouse models of inherited aortopathies has identified potential therapeutic agents to prevent thoracic aortic disease.

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy after Acute Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: Improvement of Locomotor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Figueiró, Manuela Peletti; da Silva, Pedro Guarise; Conzatti, Lucas Piccoli; Rizkalla, Elisa Braun; Santos, Scheila Cardoso Dos; de Quadros, Francine Würzius; Radaelli, Lucas

    2017-08-23

    controlled laboratory study. analyse the effectiveness of HT using mild and moderate models of SCI. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) can cause permanent impairment with socioeconomic consequences. The motor deficit occurs by two mechanisms: destruction of neuronal cells and local inflammatory response, resulting in hypoxia. Hyperbaric Therapy (HT) acts by increasing oxygen in the injured area. thoracic laminectomy was performed in 72 female Wistar rats. The MASCIS impactor was used at 12.5 mm (n = 35) and 25 mm (n = 35) of height to perform, respectively, mild and moderate SCI. Muscle strength was assessed through the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale (BBB) on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after SCI. The animals were randomized into 5 subgroups with seven animals each: (1) control group had SCI without HT; (2) HT 30 minutes after SCI; (3) HT 30 minutes after SCI and daily for 7 days; (4) HT 12 hours after SCI; and (5) HT 12 hours after SCI and daily for 7 days. HT was performed at 2.5 atm for one hour. there was a linear relationship between injury severity and motor deficit until day 21, with similar BBB scores on day 28. A pattern of uniform lesions was observed in the mild SCI, with lower variation of BBB when compared to moderate SCI. All animals that underwent HT had significant improvement in motor function and histology when compared to control group. Regardless of the injury model, animals submitted to 7-day protocols had an early improvement in motor function and a smaller area of histological injury. the present study reported that the sooner HT is begun after mild and moderate SCI and the larger the number of sessions, the greater and earlier is the motor recovery and smaller is the tissue injury. N/A.

  19. Repeated Applications of Thoracic Spine Thrust Manipulation do not Lead to Tolerance in Patients Presenting with Acute Mechanical Neck Pain: A Secondary Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-De-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Huijbregts, Peter; Palomeque-Del-Cerro, Luis; González-Iglesias, Javier

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients receiving mobilization techniques do not exhibit tolerance to repeated applications. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated for thoracic manipulation. Our aim was to determine if patients receiving thoracic thrust manipulation exhibit tolerance to repeated applications in acute mechanical neck pain. Forty-five patients were randomly assigned to two groups. The control group received electro- and thermotherapy for 5 sessions, and the experimental group received the same program and also received a thoracic thrust manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain and cervical mobility. Within-session change scores for pain and mobility during treatment sessions #1, 3, and 5 were examined with a one-way repeated measured ANOVA. A 2-way ANOVA with session as within-subject variable and group as between-subject variable was used to compare change scores for each visit between groups to ascertain if there were significant between-group differences in within-session changes for the experimental versus the control group. The ANOVA showed that for either group the 3 within-session change scores were not significantly different (P > 0.1). The 2-way ANOVA revealed significant differences between groups for both pain and neck mobility in within-session change scores (all, P < 0.001). Change scores in each session were superior in the experimental group as compared to those in the control group. The results suggest that patients receiving thoracic manipulation do not exhibit tolerance to repeated applications with regard to pain and mobility measures in acute mechanical neck pain. Further studies should investigate the dose-response relationship of thoracic thrust manipulation in this population. PMID:20046622

  20. Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand oxygen guidelines for acute oxygen use in adults: ‘Swimming between the flags’*

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Richard; Chien, Jimmy; Douglas, James; Eastlake, Leonie; Farah, Claude; King, Gregory; Moore, Rosemary; Pilcher, Janine; Richards, Michael; Smith, Sheree; Walters, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand guidelines is to provide simple, practical evidence-based recommendations for the acute use of oxygen in adults in clinical practice. The intended users are all health professionals responsible for the administration and/or monitoring of oxygen therapy in the management of acute medical patients in the community and hospital settings (excluding perioperative and intensive care patients), those responsible for the training of such health professionals, and both public and private health care organizations that deliver oxygen therapy. PMID:26486092

  1. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  2. Inclusion of thoracic spine thrust manipulation into an electro-therapy/thermal program for the management of patients with acute mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    González-Iglesias, Javier; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Cleland, Joshua A; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Méndez-Sánchez, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    Our aim was to examine the effects of a seated thoracic spine distraction thrust manipulation included in an electrotherapy/thermal program on pain, disability, and cervical range of motion in patients with acute neck pain. This randomized controlled trial included 45 patients (20 males, 25 females) between 23 and 44 years of age presenting with acute neck pain. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: an experimental group which received a thoracic manipulation, and a control group which did not receive the manipulative procedure. Both groups received an electrotherapy program consisting of 6 sessions of TENS (frequency 100Hz; 20min), superficial thermo-therapy (15min) and soft tissue massage. The experimental group also received a thoracic manipulation once a week for 3 consecutive weeks. Outcome measures included neck pain (numerical pain rate scale; NPRS), level of disability (Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire; NPQ) and neck mobility. These outcomes were assessed at baseline and 1 week after discharge. A 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA with group as between-subject variable and time as within-subject variable was used. Patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater reductions in both neck pain, with between-group difference of 2.3 (95% CI 2-2.7) points on a 11-NPRS, and perceived disability with between-group differences 8.5 (95% CI 7.2-9.8) points. Further, patients receiving thoracic manipulation experienced greater increases in all cervical motions with between-group differences of 10.6 degrees (95% CI 8.8-12.5 degrees) for flexion; 9.9 degrees (95% CI 8.1-11.7 degrees) for extension; 9.5 degrees (95% CI 7.6-11.4 degrees) for right lateral-flexion; 8 degrees (95% CI 6.2-9.8 degrees) for left lateral-flexion; 9.6 degrees (95% CI 7.7-11.6 degrees) for right rotation; and 8.4 degrees (95% CI 6.5-10.3 degrees) for left rotation. We found that the inclusion of a thoracic manipulation into an electrotherapy/thermal program was effective in

  3. Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Neurological Deterioration in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Minor Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhi; Sun, Wen; Scalzo, Fabien; Xiong, Yunyun; Zhang, Xiaohao; Qiu, Zhongming; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Xu, Gelin; Lu, Guangming; Liebeskind, David S; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    Early neurological deterioration (END) is an important factor associated with worse clinical outcome in minor strokes. Early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can provide better sensitivity to delineate stroke pathophysiology and have diagnostic value associated with causative mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between early MRI finding and the presence of END in minor stroke patients with lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Consecutive MCA minor stroke patients who were admitted to our center within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI within 24 hours of admission. We analyzed baseline characteristics, infarction patterns, and treatment algorithms. The correlation between early MRI findings and END, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score increasing more than 2 points during 72 hours after admission, was also determined. Across 211 patients meeting entry criteria between January 2010 and December 2013, internal border-zone (IBZ) infarcts on early MRI scan were observed in 23 of 65 patients with END (35.4%) and in 18 of 146 patients without END (12.3%, P < .001). Patients with IBZ infarcts were found to have more hyperlipidemia, less perforating artery infarcts, more pial artery infarcts, more cortical border-zone infarcts and more ipsilateral large arterial stenosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that IBZ infarct was independently associated with END after adjustment for other factors (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.74; P = .031). Early MRI patterns of IBZ infarction are associated with END in minor stroke patients with acute infarcts of the MCA territory. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Successes and challenges of using whole exome sequencing to identify novel genes underlying an inherited predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Regalado, Ellen S; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Guo, Dong-chuan

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD) that can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Putative genes are validated by identifying additional families with a causative mutation in the genes. This approach has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD.

  5. Successes and Challenges of Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Identify Novel Genes Underlying an Inherited Predisposition for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Regalado, Ellen; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Guo, Dongchuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD), which can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Further validation of putative genes by sequencing of additional families with TAAD has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD. PMID:23953976

  6. Dabigatran following acute transient ischemic attack and minor stroke II (DATAS II).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kuan H; Sharma, Mukul; Benavente, Oscar; Gioia, Laura; Field, Thalia S; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Butcher, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke are at high risk of early recurrent cerebrovascular events. Anticoagulation with heparin or warfarin acutely after ischemic stroke is at least as efficacious as aspirin for preventing recurrent events but is associated with an increased risk of clinical worsening due to hemorrhagic transformation. Aim and hypothesis We aim to demonstrate the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, in acute cerebrovascular syndrome patients. The primary hypothesis is that symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rates in dabigatran and aspirin-treated patients will be similar. Sample size estimates At least 136 participants in two groups required to demonstrate an absolute between-group difference in the rate of hemorrhagic transformation of 5.6% with 80% power, assuming alpha = 5%. Methods and design A randomized, multicenter open-label clinical trial (NCT02295826). Three-hundred participants with a transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤ 9) will undergo magnetic resonance imaging within 72 h of symptom onset and will be randomized to aspirin 81 mg daily or dabigatran 150 mg twice daily for 30 days. Participants undergo repeat magnetic resonance imaging at 30 days and clinical assessment to 90 days. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rate. Secondary outcomes include recurrent stroke and new ischemic lesions on repeat magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion This study will determine the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran in patients with acute transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke and will inform the design of a phase III randomized trial aimed at demonstrating reduced recurrent early ischemic events after acute transient ischemic attack/stroke.

  7. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  8. Thoracic spine thrust manipulation versus cervical spine thrust manipulation in patients with acute neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Puentedura, Emilio J; Landers, Merrill R; Cleland, Joshua A; Mintken, Paul E; Huijbregts, Peter; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2011-04-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To determine if patients who met the clinical prediction rule (CPR) criteria for the success of thoracic spine thrust joint manipulation (TJM) for the treatment of neck pain would have a different outcome if they were treated with a cervical spine TJM. A CPR had been proposed to identify patients with neck pain who would likely respond favorably to thoracic spine TJM. Research on validation of that CPR had not been completed when this trial was initiated. In our clinical experience, though many patients with neck pain responded favorably to thoracic spine TJM, they often reported that their symptomatic cervical spine area had not been adequately addressed. Twenty-four consecutive patients, who presented to physical therapy with a primary complaint of neck pain and met 4 out of 6 of the CPR criteria for thoracic TJM, were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups. The thoracic group received thoracic TJM and a cervical range-of-motion (ROM) exercise for the first 2 sessions, followed by a standardized exercise program for an additional 3 sessions. The cervical group received cervical TJM and the same cervical ROM exercise for the first 2 sessions, and the same exercise program given to the thoracic group for the next 3 sessions. Outcome measures collected at 1 week, 4 weeks, and 6 months from start of treatment included the Neck Disability Index, numeric pain rating scale, and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Patients who received cervical TJM demonstrated greater improvements in Neck Disability Index (P ≤.001) and numeric pain rating scale (P ≤.003) scores at all follow-up times. There was also a statistically significant improvement in the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire physical activity subscale score at all follow-up times for the cervical group (P ≤.004). The number needed to treat to avoid an unsuccessful overall outcome was 1.8 at 1 week, 1.6 at 4 weeks, and 1.6 at 6 months. Patients with neck pain who met 4 of 6

  9. A program of nurse algorithm-guided care for adult patients with acute minor illnesses in primary care.

    PubMed

    Fabrellas, Núria; Sánchez, Carmen; Juvé, Eulàlia; Aurin, Eva; Monserrat, Dolors; Casanovas, Esther; Urrea, Magali

    2013-05-16

    Attention to patients with acute minor-illnesses requesting same-day consultation represents a major burden in primary care. The workload is assumed by general practitioners in many countries. A number of reports suggest that care to these patients may be provided, at in least in part, by nurses. However, there is scarce information with respect to the applicability of a program of nurse management for adult patients with acute minor-illnesses in large areas. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a program of nurse algorithm-guided care for adult patients with acute minor illnesses requesting same-day consultation in primary care in a largely populated area. A cross-sectional study of all adult patients seeking same day consultation for 16 common acute minor illnesses in a large geographical area with 284 primary care practices. Patients were included in a program of nurse case management using management algorithms. The main outcome measure was case resolution, defined as completion of the algorithm by the nurse without need of referral of the patient to the general practitioner. The secondary outcome measure was return to consultation, defined as requirement of new consultation for the same reason as the first one, in primary care within a 7-day period. During a two year period (April 2009-April 2011), a total of 1,209,669 consultations were performed in the program. Case resolution was achieved by nurses in 62.5% of consultations. The remaining cases were referred to a general practitioner. Resolution rates ranged from 94.2% in patients with burns to 42% in patients with upper respiratory symptoms. None of the 16 minor illnesses had a resolution rate below 40%. Return to consultation during a 7-day period was low, only 4.6%. A program of algorithms-guided care is effective for nurse case management of patients requesting same day consultation for minor illnesses in primary care.

  10. One-year outcomes and secondary prevention in patients after acute minor stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Pan, Yuesong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on secondary preventive therapy use and patient outcomes after acute minor ischemic stroke in China. This study investigated secondary prevention strategies and outcomes up to 1 year after minor ischemic stroke. Patients from the China National Stroke Registry experienced a minor ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score ≤5) and admitted to hospital within 24 hours of symptom onset were included. One-year rates of recurrent stroke, stroke-related disability, and all-cause death were evaluated. Risk factors associated with 1-year stroke recurrence were examined in a multivariate model. The secondary prevention strategies in the acute phase were evaluated as combination of secondary prevention medication classes and the medications used in 1 year follow-up were examined. The study included 1913 patients who had experienced acute minor ischemic stroke (mean age: 65.1 years; 67.3% men; mean NIHSS score: 2.5). Rates of recurrent stroke, disability, and death were 13.2, 17.0, and 6.3% at 1 year, respectively. History of hypertension, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and atrial fibrillation were independent predictors of one-year stroke recurrence. Rate of 1 year all-cause death in patients with triple combined therapy in acute phase was 4.1%, whereas in patients with none was 14.5%. At 1 year, only half patients continued the secondary prevention medications. Outcomes in individuals in China who had experienced acute minor stroke were unfavorable, underscoring the importance of early, sustained preventive therapy in this patient population. Combination of secondary prevention medication classes was associated with a lower risk of death.

  11. [Minor phenotypic variants in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia from west Mexico].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Padilla, S A; Corona-Rivera, J R; Sánchez-Zubieta, F; Bobadilla-Morales, L; Corona-Rivera, A

    2015-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with an excess of minor phenotypic variants (MPV), including common variants and minor anomalies, indicative of an altered phenogenesis. The objective of the study was to determine the association between MPV and ALL. In a hospital based case-control study, we studied 120 children with ALL (including standard and high risk) and 120 healthy children as a control group, matched for age and sex, seen in the Hospital Civil de Guadalajara Dr. Juan I. Menchaca (Guadalajara, Mexico). In both groups, 28 anthropometric measurements were made, as well as a systematic search for 405 MPV, through a physical examination. Adjusted odds ratio was estimated (aOR) with its intervening variables by logistic regression. The confidence interval was 95% (95%CI). Anthropometric signs associated with ALL were: long upper segment (aOR= 2.19, 95%CI: 1.01-4.76), broad jaw (aOR= 2.62, 95%CI: 1.29-5.30), narrow ears (aOR= 6.22, 95%CI: 2.60-14.85), and increase in internipple distance (aOR= 2.53, 95%CI: 1.07-5.98). The hypoplasia mesofacial, broad forehead, small nose, short columella, narrow ears, telethelia, Sydney crease (SC), Greek type feet and café-au-lait spots (CALS), had a 3 to 17 times higher frequency in children with ALL. By number, an association was found from ≥4 MPV (aOR= 2.14, 95%CI: 1.25-3.66, P=.004). From ≥4 MPV, an association was found with ALL, suggesting prenatal factors in phenogenesis and leukemogenesis. CALS and SC were confirmed as MPV in children with ALL. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Serial montreal cognitive assessments demonstrate reversible cognitive impairment in patients with acute transient ischemic attack and minor stroke.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Leka; Kate, Mahesh; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Camicioli, Richard; Buck, Brian; Butcher, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive changes after ischemic stroke are often overlooked, particularly acutely and in patients with mild or transient deficits. We assessed patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA)/minor stroke with serial cognitive screening tests. We tested the hypothesis that mild acute deficits are transient and improve after TIA/minor stroke. Patients with acute TIA/minor ischemic stroke, without a history of cognitive impairment, presenting with a National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score ≤3 were assessed <72 hours of onset. Patients were administered the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) at days 1, 7, 30, and 90. Cognitive impairment was defined as MoCA <26 and MMSE ≤26. One hundred patients with a median (interquartile range) National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score of 1 (2) and median age of 68 (20) years were included. Baseline median MoCA score (26 [4]) was lower than the MMSE (29 [2]; P<0.0001). Cognitive impairment was detected in 54 of 100 patients (54%) with MoCA and 16 of 100 (16%; P=0.001) with MMSE. MoCA scores improved at day 7 (27 [5]), day 30 (28 [2]), and day 90 (28 [2]; P<0.0001). Resolution of cognitive deficits was because of resolution of recall deficits. Acute temporary cognitive impairment after TIA/minor stroke is common. The MoCA is sensitive to these changes, but the MMSE is not. Routine cognitive assessment after TIA/minor stroke may be warranted and relevant to return to activities even when other neurological deficits are not evident. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Case report: ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block for outpatient acute pain management of multilevel unilateral rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroaki; Salviz, Emine Aysu; Chen, Stephanie; Vandepitte, Catherine; Hadzic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple unilateral rib fractures (T3-T8) gained the ability to breathe deeply and to ambulate after ultrasound-guided continuous thoracic paravertebral block and was discharged home after being observed for 15 hours after the block. The ultrasound guidance was helpful in determining the site of rib fractures and the optimal level for catheter placement. This report also discusses the management of analgesia using continuous paravertebral block in an outpatient with trauma.

  14. Hypertension, acute stent thrombosis and paraplegia 6 months after TEVAR for blunt thoracic aortic injury in a 22 year old patient.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, O; Faccenna, F; Malaj, A; Jabbour, J; Venosi, S; Gattuso, R; Gossetti, B; Irace, L

    2017-09-09

    TEVAR is a less invasive option for managing traumatic injuries of the descending aorta in polytraumatized patients. Concerns arise when treating young patients with TEVAR. A 22-year old male was admitted to the Emergency Department following a high-impact road traffic collision. Whole body CT scan documented multiple injuries, including rupture of descending thoracic aorta just below the isthmus. There was no evidence of paraplegia or stroke. We decided to treat him in an endovascular fashion with a Zenith Cook (Cook Incorporated, Bloomington, IN) endograft. Final angiography confirmed the proper positioning of the device, no infoldings and the optimal filling of the thoracic aorta downstream of the endoprosthesis. In the postoperative period, the patient showed high blood pressure which was treated with 4 different antihypertensive drugs. He was discharged on Cardioaspirine. CT scan control was scheduled after 30 days and 6 months, but he referred to our Emergency Department after less than 6 months with paraplegia, abdominal pain and acute renal failure. He had independently discontinued antiplatelet therapy three months before. Emergency CT control documented the presence of intimal flap and thrombus at the distal edge of the device. The MR imaging revealed ischemic damage of the spinal cord. We decided to reline the endograft using another Zenith Cook device with very good results. Renal failure and bowel pain gradually improved, but paraplegia is still present. TEVAR is the most suitable treatment for BTAI in the modern era. Concerns arise from what can happen to a young aorta receiving a stiff endovascular graft that should be carried all lifelong. These devices have been associated with acute hypertension and cardiac remodelling. Less stiffer stent grafts shoul be studied for young patients. High attention must be posed in the follow-up for the immediate resolution of eventual problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Feasibility, safety and cost of outpatient management of acute minor ischaemic stroke: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nicola L M; Koton, Silvia; Simoni, Michela; Geraghty, Olivia C; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-03-01

    Outpatient management safely and effectively prevents early recurrent stroke after transient ischaemic attack (TIA), but this approach may not be safe in patients with acute minor stroke. To study outcomes of clinic and hospital-referred patients with TIA or minor stroke (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score ≤3) in a prospective, population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study). Of 845 patients with TIA/stroke, 587 (69%) were referred directly to outpatient clinics and 258 (31%) directly to inpatient services. Of the 250 clinic-referred minor strokes (mean age 72.7 years), 237 (95%) were investigated, treated and discharged on the same day, of whom 16 (6.8%) were subsequently admitted to hospital within 30 days for recurrent stroke (n=6), sepsis (n=3), falls (n=3), bleeding (n=2), angina (n=1) and nursing care (n=1). The 150 patients (mean age 74.8 years) with minor stroke referred directly to hospital (median length-of-stay 9 days) had a similar 30-day readmission rate (9/150; 6.3%; p=0.83) after initial discharge and a similar 30-day risk of recurrent stroke (9/237 in clinic patients vs 8/150, OR=0.70, 0.27-1.80, p=0.61). Rates of prescription of secondary prevention medication after initial clinic/hospital discharge were higher in clinic-referred than in hospital-referred patients for antiplatelets/anticoagulants (p<0.05) and lipid-lowering agents (p<0.001) and were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The mean (SD) secondary care cost was £8323 (13 133) for hospital-referred minor stroke versus £743 (1794) for clinic-referred cases. Outpatient management of clinic-referred minor stroke is feasible and may be as safe as inpatient care. Rates of early hospital admission and recurrent stroke were low and uptake and maintenance of secondary prevention was high.

  16. Minorities, men, and unmarried amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients are more likely to die in an acute care facility.

    PubMed

    Goutman, Stephen A; Nowacek, Dustin G; Burke, James F; Kerber, Kevin A; Skolarus, Lesli E; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest that dying at home is a more favorable experience. This study investigated where amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients die and the patient demographics associated with dying in an acute care facility or nursing home compared to home or hospice. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Multiple Cause Mortality Files from 2005 to 2010 were used to identify ALS patients and to classify place of death. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between patient demographics and place of death. Between 2005 and 2010, 40,911 patients died of ALS in the United States. Place of death was as follows: home or hospice facility 20,231 (50%), acute care facility (25%), and nursing home (20%). African Americans (adjusted multinomial odds ratio (aMOR) 2.56, CI 2.32-2.83), Hispanics (aMOR 1.44, CI 1.30-1.62), and Asians (aMOR 1.87, CI 1.57-2.22) were more likely to die in an acute care facility, whereas females (aMOR 0.76, CI 0.72-0.80) and married individuals were less likely. Hispanics (aMOR 0.68, CI 0.58-0.79) and married individuals were less likely to die in a nursing home. In conclusion, minorities, men, and unmarried individuals are more likely to die in an acute care facility. Further studies are needed to better understand place of death preferences.

  17. Thoracic Radiation Normal Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B

    2017-10-01

    Thoracic malignancies are often a difficult group of tumors to treat definitively as the radiation doses needed to achieve a high probability for tumor control are often associated with high rates of radiation-induced toxicities. The lungs are particularly radiosensitive and are susceptible to radiation pneumonitis in the acute and subacute settings and pulmonary fibrosis in the late setting. Acute esophagitis is common and affects patient quality of life. Beyond acute pericarditis, late cardiac toxicities are increasingly being recognized as clinically relevant when delivering thoracic radiotherapy and can affect overall survival. This review details the common and dose-limiting acute and late toxicities associated with thoracic radiation therapy. As radiation-induced toxicities are often amplified with concurrent chemotherapy, this article focuses on the toxicities associated with irradiation for lung cancer, the most common thoracic malignancy, which is often treated with multimodality therapy. The management of radiation-induced toxicities and the changing patterns of toxicities with advanced radiation delivery modalities are also described. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stimulation of abdominal and upper thoracic muscles with surface electrodes for respiration and cough: acute studies in adult canines.

    PubMed

    Walter, James S; Posluszny, Joseph; Dieter, Raymond; Dieter, Robert S; Sayers, Scott; Iamsakul, Kiratipath; Staunton, Christine; Thomas, Donald; Rabbat, Mark; Singh, Sanjay

    2017-06-14

    To optimize maximal respiratory responses with surface stimulation over abdominal and upper thorax muscles and using a 12-Channel Neuroprosthetic Platform. Following instrumentation, six anesthetized adult canines were hyperventilated sufficiently to produce respiratory apnea. Six abdominal tests optimized electrode arrangements and stimulation parameters using bipolar sets of 4.5 cm square electrodes. Tests in the upper thorax optimized electrode locations, and forelimb moment was limited to slight-to-moderate. During combined muscle stimulation tests, the upper thoracic was followed immediately by abdominal stimulation. Finally, a model of glottal closure for cough was conducted with the goal of increased peak expiratory flow. Optimized stimulation of abdominal muscles included three sets of bilateral surface electrodes located 4.5 cm dorsal to the lateral line and from the 8(th) intercostal space to caudal to the 13(th) rib, 80 or 100 mA current, and 50 Hz stimulation frequency. The maximal expired volume was 343 ± 23 ml (n=3). Optimized upper thorax stimulation included a single bilateral set of electrodes located over the 2(nd) interspace, 60 to 80 mA, and 50 Hz. The maximal inspired volume was 304 ± 54 ml (n=4). Sequential stimulation of the two muscles increased the volume to 600 ± 152 ml (n=2), and the glottal closure maneuver increased the flow. Studies in an adult canine model identified optimal surface stimulation methods for upper thorax and abdominal muscles to induce sufficient volumes for ventilation and cough. Further study with this neuroprosthetic platform is warranted.

  19. Thoracic outlet syndrome in whiplash injury.

    PubMed Central

    Capistrant, T D

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five cases of thoracic outlet syndrome complicating whiplash or cervical strain injury were studied. Thirty cases had confirmation by the demonstration of slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity (UNCV) through the thoracic outlet. Two distinct groups of patients were found. An acute group, seen an average of 3 1/2 months post injury, had severe neck pain with often mild or incidental thoracic outlet syndrome. A chronic group, with symptoms persisting more than 2 years after cervical injury, often had thoracic outlet symptoms as the predominant complaint. This study suggests that the arm aches and parethesias seen in association with both acute and chronic cervical strain injury are most often secondary to thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:836089

  20. An impacted minor papilla stone in a patient with pancreas divisum that caused acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Isono, Yoshiaki; Matsusaki, Shimpei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Tochio, Tomomasa; Kumazawa, Hiroaki; Sase, Tomohiro; Saito, Tomonori; Okano, Hiroshi; Baba, Youichirou; Mukai, Katsumi

    A 75-year-old woman with epigastric pain was admitted to our emergency department. She was diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis based on the results of blood tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The abdominal CT and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed pancreas divisum. Abdominal CT also showed a stone in the minor papilla, with impaction of the stone being the most likely cause of the acute episode. Therefore, endoscopic sphincterotomy of the minor papilla and endoscopic naso-pancreatic duct drainage were performed to remove the stone and decrease the internal pressure of the pancreatic duct. These procedures improved the patient's clinical status. The naso-pancreatic drainage tube was removed, and her pancreatitis has not recurred. Herein, we report a rare case of an impacted minor papilla stone in a patient with pancreas divisum that caused an acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  2. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: features and measurements of experimental acute lung injury in animals.

    PubMed

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Downey, Gregory; Moore, Bethany B; Groshong, Steve D; Matthay, Michael A; Slutsky, Arthur S; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2011-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is well defined in humans, but there is no agreement as to the main features of acute lung injury in animal models. A Committee was organized to determine the main features that characterize ALI in animal models and to identify the most relevant methods to assess these features. We used a Delphi approach in which a series of questionnaires were distributed to a panel of experts in experimental lung injury. The Committee concluded that the main features of experimental ALI include histological evidence of tissue injury, alteration of the alveolar capillary barrier, presence of an inflammatory response, and evidence of physiological dysfunction; they recommended that, to determine if ALI has occurred, at least three of these four main features of ALI should be present. The Committee also identified key "very relevant" and "somewhat relevant" measurements for each of the main features of ALI and recommended the use of least one "very relevant" measurement and preferably one or two additional separate measurements to determine if a main feature of ALI is present. Finally, the Committee emphasized that not all of the measurements listed can or should be performed in every study, and that measurements not included in the list are by no means "irrelevant." Our list of features and measurements of ALI is intended as a guide for investigators, and ultimately investigators should choose the particular measurements that best suit the experimental questions being addressed as well as take into consideration any unique aspects of the experimental design.

  3. [Postoperative acute mitral regurgitation. Unexpected finding after minor non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Wagner, K J; Unterbuchner, C; Bogdanski, R; Martin, J; Kochs, E F; Tassani-Prell, P

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the case of a 59-year-old man who was scheduled for general anesthesia with propofol, sufentanil and sevoflurane for removal of a metal implant. The patient was classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) II status because of an asymptomatic mitral valve prolapse and medically treated arterial hypertension. During induction of narcosis a pulsoxymetrically measured inadequate increase in oxygen saturation after preoxygenation was noticed and a moderate respiratory obstruction occurred intraoperatively, but anesthesia was uneventfully completed and the patient was extubated. However, 3 h later the patient developed severe dyspnea, hypoxia, tachycardia and arterial hypotension. Physical examination revealed a new grade 4/6 systolic murmur radiating to the axilla and X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary edema. Neither electrocardiographic nor biochemical manifestations of acute myocardial infarction were identified but transthoracic echocardiography revealed fluttering of the posterior leaflet of the mitral valve with grade III regurgitation and dilation of the left atrium. Coronary angiography was normal and left ventriculography confirmed severe mitral regurgitation. Mitral valve repair was successfully performed 22 h after presentation of symptoms. Mitral regurgitation is a common finding on echocardiography, seen to some degree in over 75% of the population. The etiology of mitral valve insufficiency which can be caused by pathologic changes of one or more of the components of the mitral valve, including the leaflets, annulus, chordae tendineae, papillary muscles, or by abnormalities of the surrounding left ventricle and/or atrium are discussed. Rupture of mitral chordae tendineae is infrequent and causes acute hemodynamic deterioration and needs corrective surgery. Valve replacement should be performed only if mitral valve repair is not possible. Echocardiography is an invaluable tool in determining the severity of regurgitation

  4. Minor ABO-mismatches are risk factors for acute graft-versus-host disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ludajic, Katarina; Balavarca, Yesilda; Bickeböller, Heike; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Fischer, Gottfried F; Faé, Ingrid; Kalhs, Peter; Pohlreich, David; Kouba, Michal; Dobrovolna, Marie; Greinix, Hildegard T

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the impact of ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group matching on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) of 154 patients matched at 10/10 HLA loci with unrelated donors. ABO and Rh, as potential risk factors, were modeled with the clinical outcome--acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD), relapse, treatment-related mortality (TRM), and overall survival (OS)--by simple, multiple, and competing risk analyses. We found that minor ABO-mismatches represent a significant risk factor for aGVHD (II-IV) with an estimated risk increase of almost 3-fold (hazard ratio [HR]=2.92, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43-5.95, P=.003), and even 4-fold for aGVHD (III-IV) (HR=4.24, 95% CI: 1.70-10.56, P=.002), but not for other transplant endpoints. No significant association of the Rh matching status with any of the HSCT endpoints was seen. These results suggest that ABO minor mismatches may play a role in aGvHD pathophysiology, possibly by providing the setting for T cell activation and antibody mediated damage. To decrease the risk of aGVHD, ABO matching should be considered in HSCT.

  5. Chronobiology of Acute Aortic Dissection in the Marfan Syndrome (from the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions and the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection).

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Hasan K; Luminais, Steven N; Montgomery, Dan; Bossone, Eduardo; Dietz, Harry; Evangelista, Arturo; Isselbacher, Eric; LeMaire, Scott; Manfredini, Roberto; Milewicz, Dianna; Nienaber, Christoph A; Roman, Mary; Sechtem, Udo; Silberbach, Michael; Eagle, Kim A; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease associated with acute aortic dissection (AAD). We used 2 large registries that include patients with MFS to investigate possible trends in the chronobiology of AAD in MFS. We queried the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) and the Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) registry to extract data on all patients with MFS who had suffered an AAD. The group included 257 patients with MFS who suffered an AAD from 1980 to 2012. The chi-square tests were used for statistical testing. Mean subject age at time of AAD was 38 years, and 61% of subjects were men. AAD was more likely in the winter/spring season (November to April) than the other half of the year (57% vs 43%, p = 0.05). Dissections were significantly more likely to occur during the daytime hours, with 65% of dissections occurring from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. (p = 0.001). Men were more likely to dissect during the daytime hours (6 a.m. to 6 p.m.) than women (74% vs 51%, p = 0.01). These insights offer a glimpse of the times of greatest vulnerability for patients with MFS who suffer from this catastrophic event. In conclusion, the chronobiology of AAD in MFS reflects that of AAD in the general population.

  6. S(p)O(2) values in acute medical admissions breathing air--implications for the British Thoracic Society guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Prytherch, David R; Watson, Duncan; Forde, Val; Windsor, Alastair; Schmidt, Paul E; Featherstone, Peter I; Higgins, Bernie; Meredith, Paul

    2012-10-01

    S(p)O(2) is routinely used to assess the well-being of patients, but it is difficult to find an evidence-based description of its normal range. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) has published guidance for oxygen administration and recommends a target S(p)O(2) of 94-98% for most adult patients. These recommendations rely on consensus opinion and small studies using arterial blood gas measurements of saturation (S(a)O(2)). Using large datasets of routinely collected vital signs from four hospitals, we analysed the S(p)O(2) range of 37,593 acute general medical inpatients (males: 47%) observed to be breathing room air. Age at admission ranged from 16 to 105 years with a mean (SD) of 64 (21) years. 19,642 admissions (52%) were aged <70 years. S(p)O(2) ranged from 70% to 100% with a median (IQR) of 97% (95-98%). S(p)O(2) values for males and females were similar. In-hospital mortality for the study patients was 5.27% (range 4.80-6.27%). Mortality (95% CI) for patients with initial S(p)O(2) values of 97%, 96% and 95% was 3.65% (3.22-4.13); 4.47% (3.99-5.00); and 5.67% (5.03-6.38), respectively. Additional analyses of S(p)O(2) values for 37,299 medical admissions aged ≥18 years provided results that were distinctly different to those upon which the current BTS guidelines based their definition of normality. Our findings suggest that the BTS should consider changing its target saturation for actively treated patients not at risk of hypercapnic respiratory failure to 96-98%.

  7. CT of suspected thoracic acute aortic injury in the emergency department: is routine abdominopelvic imaging worth the additional collective radiation dose?

    PubMed

    Haji-Momenian, Shawn; Rischall, Jonathan; Okey, Neil; Taffel, Myles; Khati, Nadia; Zeman, Robert

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the incidence of non-traumatic acute aortic injury (AAI) extending from the chest into the abdomen or pelvis in emergency department (ED) patients with acute aortic syndrome (AAS), to estimate the effective dose of the abdominopelvic portion of these CT exams, and to compare the number needed to screen (NNS) with the collective population radiation dose of imaging those stations. All patients (n = 238) presenting to the ED with AAS between March 2014 and June 2015 who were imaged per CT AAI protocol (noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT angiography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis) were retrospectively identified in this IRB-approved HIPAA-compliant study. The Stanford classification for positive cases of AAI was further subclassified based on chest, abdominal, or pelvic involvement. The dose length product (DLP) of each exam was used to estimate the dose of the abdominal and pelvic stations and the collective effective dose for the population. There were five cases of aortic dissection (AD) and two of intramural hematoma (IMH), with an AAI incidence of 2.9/100. Three cases of AAI were confined to the chest. Two cases of AAI were confined to the chest and abdomen, and two cases involved the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. There was only one case of AAI involving the ascending aorta that extended into the abdomen or pelvis. The number needed to screen to identify (a) AAI extending from the chest into the abdomen or pelvis was 59.5 and (b) Stanford A AAI extending into the abdomen or pelvis was 238. The estimated mean effective dose for the abdominopelvic stations were unenhanced abdomen 2.3 mSv, unenhanced pelvis 3.3 mSv, abdominal CTA 2.5 mSv, and pelvic CTA 3.6 mSv. The collective effective doses to the abdomen and pelvis with unenhanced CT and CTA in 59.5 patients and 238 patients were 761.6 and 3046.4 mSv, respectively. While the estimated mean effective dose for imaging of the abdominopelvic stations are low, the collective

  8. Incidence of acute myocardial infarction in first and second generation minority groups: does the second generation converge towards the majority population?

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, A A M; Vaartjes, I; Stronks, K; Bots, M L; Agyemang, C

    2013-10-15

    Differences in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) incidence between ethnic minority and migrant groups (henceforth, minority groups) and the majority population have been reported. Health differences may converge towards the majority population over generations. We assessed whether AMI incidence differences between minority groups living in the Netherlands and the Dutch majority population exist, and whether the incidence converges towards the majority population over generations. A nationwide register-based cohort study was conducted from 1997 to 2007. Using Cox Proportional Hazard Models AMI incidence differences between minorities and the majority population were estimated. When possible, analyses were stratified by generation. AMI incidence differences between minorities and the majority population depended on the country of origin, and often varied between minorities originating from the same geographical region. For example, among North African and Mediterranean minorities, incidence was higher in Turkish (Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.34; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI): 1.28-1.41), but lower in Moroccans (HR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.40-0.52) compared with the majority population. Most minorities had a similar or lower incidence than the majority population, which remained similar or converged towards the incidence of the majority population over generations. In contrast, among minorities from the former Dutch colonies (Suriname, Indonesia, Netherlands Antilles) beneficial intergenerational changes were observed. Health care professionals and policy makers should be aware of substantial AMI incidence differences between minority groups and the majority population, and the often unbeneficial change over generations. Future research should be cautious when clustering minority groups based on geographical region of the country of origin. © 2013.

  9. Emergency Thoracic US: The Essentials.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Sawatmongkorngul, Sorravit; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2016-01-01

    Acute thoracic symptoms are common among adults visiting emergency departments in the United States. Adults with these symptoms constitute a large burden on the overall resources used in the emergency department. The wide range of possible causes can make a definitive diagnosis challenging, even after clinical evaluation and initial laboratory testing. In addition to radiography and computed tomography, thoracic ultrasonography (US) is an alternative imaging modality that can be readily performed in real time at the patient's bedside to help diagnose many thoracic diseases manifesting acutely and in the trauma setting. Advantages of US include availability, relatively low cost, and lack of ionizing radiation. Emergency thoracic US consists of two main parts, lung and pleura US and focused cardiac US, which are closely related. Acoustic mismatches among aerated lungs, pleura, chest wall, and pathologic conditions produce artifacts useful for diagnosis of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema and help in detection of subpleural, pleural, and chest wall pathologic conditions such as pneumonia, pleural effusion, and fractures. Visual assessment of cardiac contractility and detection of right ventricular dilatation and pericardial effusion at focused cardiac US are critical in patients presenting with acute dyspnea and trauma. Additional US examinations of the inferior vena cava for noninvasive volume assessment and of the groin areas for detection of deep venous thrombosis are often performed at the same time. This multiorgan US approach can provide valuable information for emergency treatment of both traumatic and nontraumatic thoracic diseases involving the lungs, pleura, chest wall, heart, and vascular system. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  10. Interactive gaming consoles reduced pain during acute minor burn rehabilitation: A randomized, pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Parker, Matthew; Delahunty, Brett; Heberlein, Nicolas; Devenish, Neale; Wood, Fiona M; Jackson, Teresa; Carter, Theresa; Edgar, Dale W

    2016-02-01

    Interactive gaming consoles (IGCs) have been used successfully in rehabilitation settings as an adjunct to conventional exercise for restoring or maintaining active function and augmenting pharmacological analgesia. The objective of this pilot study was to assess if adjunctive use of the Nintendo Wii IGC was of benefit to acute burn patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial. The intervention group received routine rehabilitation in addition to up to 5 days of twice daily, 20-30 min of exercise using the Nintendo Wii IGC. The control group received routine rehabilitation exercise therapy. A total of 22 subjects were recruited and randomized by location of burn to intervention and control groups. Pain scores were significantly improved in the intervention group (r(2)=1.18; 95%CI -0.584 to -0.298, p=0.019) as indicated by a 17% greater drop in the pre-post-study pain compared to controls. Fear avoidance and ROM measurements were not statistically different between the groups. The Nintendo Wii IGC was associated with a greater reduction in pain, particularly in those with higher levels of pain at baseline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Human parechovirus as a minor cause of acute otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, Saara; Oikarinen, Sami; Sipilä, Markku; Seppälä, Elina; Nurminen, Noora; Rautiainen, Markus; Laranne, Jussi; Hyöty, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) cause mild upper respiratory infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, central nervous system infections and some studies have linked them with acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of the present study was to study further the role of HPeV infections in AOM by detecting these viruses directly from middle ear fluid (MEF), respiratory and stool samples collected from children during AOM episodes. A total of 91 MEF samples, 98 nasal swab (NS) samples and 92 stool samples were collected during 100 AOM episodes in a total of 87 children aged between five to 42 months. All specimens were analyzed by real time RT-PCR for the presence of HPeV RNA. HPeV infection was diagnosed in 12 (14%) patients. HPeV RNA was detected in altogether 13 samples, including four MEF samples, three NS samples and six stool samples. One patient was positive in both stool and MEF samples. The results suggest that HPeV may play a role in some AOM cases, but it is not a major cause of AOM in children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thoracic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shumway, N E

    2000-07-01

    Experimental orthotopic transplantation of the heart was accomplished in 1959. Long-term survival was achieved in 1965 with a chemical immunosuppression protocol substantially different from that used for renal and hepatic transplants. Performance characteristics of the transplanted denervated heart were found to differ only slightly from normal. It appeared by the time of the Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons in October 1967 that clinical heart transplantation might be justified if the concept of brain death could be legally recognized. The Stanford program in clinical heart transplantation was inaugurated on January 6, 1968 and has been in continuous operation. To date, more than 1000 patients have undergone transplantation of the heart with the 5-year survival at 75%. The first long-term success in lung transplantation occurred at Stanford in 1981, with transplantation of the heart and both lungs. In 1990 the concept of living pulmonary lobar donors was introduced and is slowly finding its clinical role. The steroid-sparing capability of cyclosporine made possible both successful lung and pediatric heart transplantation. Only the donor shortage remains as a substantial barrier to widespread thoracic transplantation. Xenotransplantation is under intense scrutiny, with some encouraging experimental results. Development of the artificial heart continues to offer some relief for patients with end-stage heart disease.

  13. Self-perceived video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy proficiency by recent graduates of North American thoracic residencies.

    PubMed

    Boffa, Daniel J; Gangadharan, Sidharta; Kent, Michael; Kerendi, Faraz; Onaitis, Mark; Verrier, Edward; Roselli, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer several advantages over traditional open procedures, yet the pathway to minimally invasive proficiency can be difficult to navigate. As a part of an effort of the Joint Council of Thoracic Surgical Education to increase access to this skill set in the general thoracic community, recent graduates of thoracic residencies were surveyed to determine the self-reported achievement of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy proficiency and the merits of various educational opportunities. The objective of this study was to estimate the comfort level of recent graduates with the minimally invasive approach, as this demographic not only reflects the current status of training, but represents the future of the specialty. Surgeons graduating North American thoracic residencies between 2006 and 2008 identifying themselves as practitioners of general thoracic surgery were surveyed. A total of 271 surgeons completed training between 2006 and 2008 and indicated general thoracic to be a part of their practice (84 dedicated thoracic and 187 mixed). One hundred and forty-six surgeons completed the survey (54%) including 74 of 84 (88%) dedicated thoracic surgeons. Overall, 58% of recent graduates who perform general thoracic procedures consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies (86% of dedicated thoracic surgeons and 28% of surgeons with a mixed practice, P < 0.0001). Of surgeons considering themselves to be proficient at VATS lobectomies, 66% felt thoracic residency was critical or very important to achieving proficiency. Fellowships after completing board residency, animal labs, and follow-up VATS courses put on by experts were much less consistently beneficial. The vast majority of the 25 dedicated general thoracic surgeons who graduate each year consider themselves proficient in VATS lobectomies, largely due to training in their thoracic residencies. On the other hand, the minority of surgeons performing general

  14. Transient ischemic attack and minor stroke are the most common manifestations of acute cerebrovascular disease: a prospective, population-based study--the Aarhus TIA study.

    PubMed

    von Weitzel-Mudersbach, Paul; Andersen, Grethe; Hundborg, Heidi H; Johnsen, Søren P

    2013-01-01

    Severity of acute vascular illness may have changed in the last decades due to improvements in primary and secondary prevention. Population-based data on the severity of acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease are sparse. We aimed to examine incidence, characteristics and severity of acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease in a well-defined population. All patients admitted with transient ischemic attack (TIA) or acute ischemic stroke from March 1, 2007, to February 29, 2008, with residence in the Aarhus area, were included. Incidence rates and characteristics of TIA and ischemic stroke were compared. TIA accounted for 30%, TIA and minor stroke combined for 65% of all acute ischemic cerebrovascular events. Age-adjusted incidence rates of TIA and ischemic stroke were 72.2/100,000 and 129.5/100,000 person-years, respectively. TIA patients were younger than stroke patients (66.3 vs. 72.7 years; p < 0.001). Atrial fibrillation, previous myocardial infarction and previous stroke were significantly more frequent in stroke patients; no differences in other baseline characteristics were found. Minor events are the most common in ischemic cerebrovascular disease, and may constitute a larger proportion than previously reported. TIA and stroke patients share many characteristics; however, TIA patients are younger and have fewer manifestations of atherosclerotic diseases, indicating a high potential for secondary prevention. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The Torg-Pavlov ratio for the prediction of acute spinal cord injury after a minor trauma to the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Aebli, Nikolaus; Wicki, Anina G; Rüegg, Tabea B; Petrou, Nassos; Eisenlohr, Heidrun; Krebs, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) has been observed in some patients after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. The discrepancy between the severity of the trauma and the clinical symptoms has been attributed to spinal canal stenosis. However, to date, there is no universally established radiological parameter for identifying critical spinal stenosis in these patients. The spinal canal-to-vertebral body ratio (Torg-Pavlov ratio) has been proposed for assessing developmental spinal canal stenosis. The relevance of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting the occurrence and severity of acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has not yet been established. To investigate the Torg-Pavlov ratio values of the cervical spine in patients suffering from acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine and the use of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for identifying patients at risk of cervical SCI and predicting the severity and course of symptoms. Retrospective radiological study of consecutive patients. Forty-five patients suffering from acute cervical SCI and 68 patients showing no neurologic symptoms after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. Midvertebral sagittal cervical spinal canal diameter and the sagittal vertebral body diameter. Calculation of the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Conventional lateral radiographs of the cervical spine (C3-C7) were analyzed to determine the Torg-Pavlov ratio values. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the Torg-Pavlov ratio for predicting SCI. The Torg-Pavlov ratio values in the SCI group were significantly (p<.04) smaller compared with that in the control group. A Torg-Pavlov ratio cutoff value of 0.7 yielded the greatest positive likelihood ratio for predicting the occurrence of SCI. However, there were no significant differences in the Torg-Pavlov ratio values between the different American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Score groups and

  16. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  17. Prior exposure to capture heightens the corticosterone and behavioural responses of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Gemma; Turner, Emma; Dann, Peter; Harcourt, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Studies of physiology can provide important insight into how animals are coping with challenges in their environment and can signal the potential effects of exposure to human activity in both the short and long term. In this study, we measured the physiological and behavioural response of little penguins (Eudyptula minor) that were naïve to human activity over 30 min of capture and handling. We assessed relationships between corticosterone secretion, behaviour, sex and time of day in order to characterize the determinants of the natural stress response. We then compared the response of these naïve penguins with the responses of female little penguins that had been exposed to research activity (bimonthly nest check and weighing) and to both research activity (monthly nest check and weighing) and evening viewing by tourists. We found that corticosterone concentrations increased significantly over 30 min of capture, with naïve penguins demonstrating a more acute stress response during the day than at night. Penguins that had previously been exposed to handling at the research and research/visitor sites showed elevated corticosterone concentrations and consistently more aggressive behaviour after 30 min compared with naïve birds, although there were no significant differences in baseline corticosterone concentrations. Our findings demonstrate that these little penguins have not habituated to routine capture, but rather mount a heightened physiological and behavioural response to handling by humans. Less invasive research monitoring techniques, such as individual identification with PIT tags and automatic recording and weighing, and a reduction in handling during the day should be considered to mitigate some of the potentially negative effects of disturbance. Given the paucity of data on the long-term consequences of heightened stress on animal physiology, our study highlights the need for further investigation of the relationship between the corticosterone

  18. Recent trends in survival of adult patients with acute leukemia: overall improvements, but persistent and partly increasing disparity in survival of patients from minority groups.

    PubMed

    Pulte, Dianne; Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Jansen, Lina; Brenner, Hermann; Jeffreys, Mona

    2013-02-01

    The survival of younger patients with acute leukemia has improved in the early 21(st) century, but it is unknown whether people of all ethnic and racial backgrounds have benefited equally. Using cancer registry data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program, we assessed trends in 5-year relative survival for patients aged 15 years or more with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloblastic leukemia divided by racial and ethnic group, including non-Hispanic whites, African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asian-Pacific Islanders in the 1990s and the early 21(st) century. Modeled period analysis was used to obtain the most up-to-date estimates of survival. Overall, the 5-year survival increased from 31.6% in 1997-2002 to 39.0% in 2003-2008 for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and from 15.5% in 1991-1996 to 22.5% in 2003-2008 for those with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Nevertheless, among patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, age-adjusted 5-year relative survival rates remained lower for African-Americans and Hispanics than for non-Hispanic whites. Among patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia, the increase in survival was greatest (from 32.6% in 1991-1996 to 47.1% in 2003-2008) for younger patients (15-54 years), and was more pronounced for non-Hispanic whites (+16.4% units) than for other patients (+10.8% units). Increases in survival are observed in all ethnic or racial groups. Nevertheless, among patients with acute leukemias, disparities in survival persist between non-Hispanic white people and people of other ethnic or racial groups. Disparities are increasing in younger patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. Improvements in access to treatment, especially for minority patients, may improve outcomes.

  19. Acute toxicity and environmental risk of teflubenzuron to Daphnia magna, Poecilia reticulata and Lemna minor in the absence and presence of sediment.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Louise S; Souza, Jaqueline P; Winkaler, Elissandra U; Carraschi, Silvia P; Cruz, Claudinei; Souza-Júnior, Severino C; Machado-Neto, Joaquim G

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the acute toxicity of teflubenzuron (1-(3,5-dichloro-2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea) (TFB) for Daphnia magna, Lemna minor and Poecilia reticulata, in the absence and presence of sediment; evaluate the effect of sediment on the TFB bioavailability; and to classify this insecticide according to its environmental poisoning risk for agricultural and aquaculture uses. The tests of TFB acute toxicity were conducted in static system in a completely randomized design with increasing TFB concentrations, and a control group. The TFB has been classified according to the estimated values of EC50 and LC50 by its acute toxicity and environmental risk. The sediment significantly reduced toxicity and bioavailability of TFB in water column. Therefore, the insecticide can be classified as being highly toxic to Daphnia magna, which means the agricultural and aquacultural uses of TFB pose a high risk of environmental toxicity to non-target organisms. However, it was practically non-toxic to L. minor and P. reticulata.

  20. Long thoracic neuropathy from athletic activity.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J S; Leonard, J A

    1992-01-01

    Four cases of long thoracic mononeuropathy associated with sports participation are presented. Each patient developed shoulder pain or dysfunction after an acute event or vigorous activity, and demonstrated scapular winging consistent with serratus anterior weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed with electromyography in each case. It is suggested that the athletic activity caused a stretch injury to the long thoracic nerve. Conservative management, consisting of range of motion exercises for the shoulder and strengthening of the serratus anterior muscle, resulted in a favorable outcome in all patients.

  1. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  2. A prospective randomized trial of nebulized morphine compared with patient-controlled analgesia morphine in the management of acute thoracic pain.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Gerard J; Giberson, Frederick; Fagraeus, Lennart

    2005-08-01

    Successfully managing pain for the trauma patient decreases morbidity, improves patient satisfaction, and is an essential component of critical care. Using patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine to control pain may be complicated by concerns of respiratory depression, hemodynamic instability, addiction, urinary retention, and drug-induced ileus. Morphine is rapidly absorbed by mucosal surfaces in the respiratory tract, achieving systemic concentrations equal to 20% of equivalent intravenous doses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and utility of nebulized morphine in patients with posttraumatic thoracic pain. This double-blinded, prospective study randomized patients with severe posttraumatic thoracic pain into two groups. The experimental group (NMS) received nebulized morphine every 4 hours and normal saline by PCA. The control group (PCA) received nebulized saline every 4 hours and morphine by PCA. Dose adjustments were made based on patient response to treatments using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. Pulmonary function, pain relief (VAS), level of sedation (0-3), total drug administration, and systematic side effects were recorded. Forty-four patients were randomized (22 per group). Seven hundred seventy observations were made. The mean 4-hour dose of morphine was 11.96 +/- 3.4 mg for NMS and 6.22 +/- 4.7 mg for PCA (p < 0.001). Patients with NMS had lower heart rates compared with PCA (79 +/- 11 bpm versus 92 +/- 12 bpm; p < 0.001) and were less sedated (0.33 +/- 0.7 versus 0.56 +/- 0.9; p = 0.03). The mean pain level (VAS) was 3.38 +/- 1.8 for NMS and 3.84 +/- 2.7 for PCA (p = 0.2). There was no difference between pain levels before and after dosing. There were no differences between groups with respect to arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, vital capacity, mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second, spirometric volumes, or Sao2. Nebulized morphine can be safely and effectively used to control

  3. Imaging of thoracic textiloma.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Imene; Hantous-Zannad, Saoussen; Zidi, Asma; Smati, Belhassen; Baccouche, Ines; Kilani, Tarek; Ben Miled-M'rad, Khaoula

    2011-03-01

    Intrathoracic textiloma or gossypiboma, a retained surgical sponge in the thoracic cavity, is an exceptional but serious complication following thoracic or abdominal surgery. The purpose of this work is to highlight the topographic features of thoracic textiloma and to describe imaging aspects, and, particularly, computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients have been operated in our thoracic surgery department for thoracic gossypiboma. In the past, three patients had undergone hepatic surgery and the five others had a history of thoracic surgery. All the patients had a chest radiograph, five of them had a thoracic ultrasonography, all had a chest CT, and one patient had a chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In patients with a history of abdominal surgery, the foreign body was located in the parenchyma of the right lower lobe. In the other patients, the foreign body was either intrapleural or mediastinal. Ultrasonography suggested the diagnosis of textiloma in three of the five patients by demonstrating a non-calcified hyperechoic mass with acoustic shadow. At CT, the gossypiboma was a low-attenuating mass containing trapped gas lucencies in six patients and it was a high-attenuating mass in two patients. MRI showed a diaphragmatic defect in one patient with an intrapulmonary gossypiboma that migrated from the abdomen. The CT aspect of thoracic gossypiboma may be different according to pleural or parenchymal location. The spongiform appearance, characteristic in abdominal gossypiboma, is not the only CT presentation of thoracic gossypiboma. The confrontation of the surgical history with the CT signs helps to have a preoperative diagnosis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  5. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  6. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... STS Participant User File Research Program Videos Lung Cancer Screening Adoption How to Build Your Academic Career New Technologies in Mitral Valve Replacement Enhanced Recovery Pathways in Thoracic Surgery New STS Clinical Practice Guidelines ...

  7. Paravertebral block versus thoracic epidural for patients undergoing thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Joyce H Y; Gates, Simon; Naidu, Babu V; Wilson, Matthew J A; Gao Smith, Fang

    2016-02-21

    Operations on structures in the chest (usually the lungs) involve cutting between the ribs (thoracotomy). Severe post-thoracotomy pain can result from pleural (lung lining) and muscular damage, costovertebral joint (ribcage) disruption and intercostal nerve (nerves that run along the ribs) damage during surgery. Poor pain relief after surgery can impede recovery and increase the risks of developing complications such as lung collapse, chest infections and blood clots due to ineffective breathing and clearing of secretions. Effective management of acute pain following thoracotomy may prevent these complications and reduce the likelihood of developing chronic pain. A multi-modal approach to analgesia is widely employed by thoracic anaesthetists using a combination of regional anaesthetic blockade and systemic analgesia, with both non-opioid and opioid medications and local anaesthesia blockade.There is some evidence that blocking the nerves as they emerge from the spinal column (paravertebral block, PVB) may be associated with a lower risk of major complications in thoracic surgery but the majority of thoracic anaesthetists still prefer to use a thoracic epidural blockade (TEB) as analgesia for their patients undergoing thoracotomy. In order to bring about a change in practice, anaesthetists need a review that evaluates the risk of all major complications associated with thoracic epidural and paravertebral block in thoracotomy. To compare the two regional techniques of TEB and PVB in adults undergoing elective thoracotomy with respect to:1. analgesic efficacy;2. the incidence of major complications (including mortality);3. the incidence of minor complications;4. length of hospital stay;5. cost effectiveness. We searched for studies in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2013, Issue 9); MEDLINE via Ovid (1966 to 16 October 2013); EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 16 October 2013); CINAHL via EBSCO host (1982 to 16 October 2013); and reference lists of

  8. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Moraites, Eleni; Vaughn, Olushola Akinshemoyin; Hill, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is a surgical technique most commonly used in the treatment of severe palmar hyperhidrosis in selected patients. The procedure also has limited use in the treatment axillary and craniofacial hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is associated with a high rate of the development of compensatory hyperhidrosis, which may affect patient satisfaction with the procedure and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Four patients with a history of acute exacerbations of COPD: implementing the CHEST/Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for preventing exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Goodridge, Donna; Marciniuk, Darcy; Hull, Sally; Bourbeau, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society have jointly produced evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This educational article gives four perspectives on how these guidelines apply to the practical management of people with COPD. A current smoker with frequent exacerbations will benefit from support to quit, and from optimisation of his inhaled treatment. For a man with very severe COPD and multiple co-morbidities living in a remote community, tele-health care may enable provision of multidisciplinary care. A woman who is admitted for the third time in a year needs a structured assessment of her care with a view to stepping up pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment as required. The overlap between asthma and COPD challenges both diagnostic and management strategies for a lady smoker with a history of asthma since childhood. Common threads in all these cases are the importance of advising on smoking cessation, offering (and encouraging people to attend) pulmonary rehabilitation, and the importance of self-management, including an action plan supported by multidisciplinary teams. PMID:25950092

  10. Acute complete paraplegia of 8-year-old girl caused by spinal cord infarction following minor trauma complicated with longitudinal signal change of spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kosei; Tanaka, Yuji; Kanai, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Yasushi

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord infarction followed by minor trauma in pediatric patients is rare and causes serious paralysis. Fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) is a possible diagnosis and there have been no consecutive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports. Here, we report a case of an acute complete paraplegia with spinal cord infarction and longitudinal spinal cord signal change following minor trauma in an 8-year-old girl. An 8-year-old girl presented to our hospital emergency services with total paraplegia 2 h after she hit her back and neck after doing a handstand and falling down. She completely lost pain, temperature sensation, and a sense of vibration below her bilateral anterior thighs. Four hours later on MRI, the T2-weighted sequence showed no spinal cord compression or signal change in vertebral bodies. The patient was treated with rehabilitation after complete bed rest. A week after the trauma, the T2-weighted sequence indicated longitudinal extension of the lesion between T11 and C6 vertebral level with ring-shaped signal change. In addition, the diffusion-weighted MRI showed increased signal below C6 vertebral level. Two weeks after the trauma, we performed the T2 star sequence images, which showed minor bleeding at T11 vertebral area and spinal cord edema below C6. Four weeks after the trauma, MRI showed minor lesion at C6 vertebral level, but spinal cord atrophy was observed at T11 vertebral level without disc signal change. Thirteen weeks after the trauma, her cervical spinal cord became almost intact and severe atrophy of the spinal cord at T11 vertebral level. At 1 year following her injury, complete paraplegia remained with sensory loss below T11 level. Her clinical presentation, lack of evidence for other plausible diagnosis, and consecutive MRI findings made FCE at T11 vertebral level with pencil-shaped softening the most likely diagnosis. In addition, consecutive cervical MRI indicated minor cervical spinal cord injury. This Grand Round case highlights

  11. Perioperative epidural or intravenous ketamine does not improve the effectiveness of thoracic epidural analgesia for acute and chronic pain after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Tena, Beatriz; Gomar, Carmen; Rios, Jose

    2014-06-01

    Persistent postsurgical pain (PPP) after thoracotomy effect 50% to 80%. Nerve damage and central sensitization involving NDMDAr activation may play an important role. This study evaluates the efficacy of adding intravenous (IV) or epidural ketamine to thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) after thoracotomy. Double-blind randomized study on patients undergoing thoracotomy allocated to one of the following: group Kiv (IV racemic ketamine 0.5 mg/kg preincisional +0.25 mg/kg/h for 48 h), group Kep (epidural racemic ketamine 0.5 mg/kg preincisional +0.25 mg/kg/h for 48 h), or group S (saline). Postoperative analgesia was ensured by TEA with ropivacaine and fentanyl. Pain visual analog scales (VAS), Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory, Catastrophizing Scale, and Quantitative Sensory Testing, measuring both the peri-incisional and distant hyperalgesia area, were conducted preoperatively and postoperatively until 6 months. Plasma ketamine levels and stability of the analgesic solutions were analyzed. A total of 104 patients were included. PPP incidence was 20% at 6 months. Pain scores on coughing were significantly lower in Kiv and Kep than in S at 24 and 72 hours, but there were no differences afterwards. There were no significant differences in pain at rest, Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory, and Catastrophizing Scale, or in the area of mechanical allodynia at any time. Adverse effects were mild. Plasma ketamine levels did not differ significantly between groups. Analgesic solutions were stable. Adding epidural or IV racemic ketamine to TEA after thoracotomy did not lead to any reduction in PPP or allodynia. Epidural administration produced similar plasma ketamine levels to the IV route.

  12. Arthroscopic stabilisation of an acute acromioclavicular dislocation grade III in a patient with ectopic insertion of the pectoralis minor: technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Minuesa-Asensio, Alvaro; Barrio-Asensio, Carmen; González-Gómez, Ignacio; Murillo-González, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    The different approaches used in arthroscopic stabilisation of the acromioclavicular joint are well known. However, and despite a great incidence of ectopic pectoralis minor insertion, an alternative choice for the use of arthroscopic portal has not being sufficiently described. Here, we describe a case of acute acromioclavicular dislocation grade III. The arthroscopic stabilisation was achieved using the TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, USA) implant. Through this technique, the approach to the articular portion of the coracoid process can be made intra-articularly or from the subacromial space. We accessed intra-articularly, by opening the rotator interval to reach the coracoid process from the joint cavity. After opening the rotator interval, an ectopic insertion of the pectoralis minor was observed. The choice of approach of the coracoid process from the subacromial space would have complicated the intervention, making it necessary to sever the ectopic tendon to complete the technique, lengthening the surgical time and increasing the chance of complications. For this reason, the use of a standard posterior portal providing intra-articular arthroscopic access through the rotator interval is recommended since the aforementioned anatomical variation is not infrequent. Level of evidence Therapeutic studies-investigating the results of treatment, Level V.

  13. Managing Dissections of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    WONG, DANIEL R.; LEMAIRE, SCOTT A.; COSELLI, JOSEPH S.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and it requires timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Long-term antihypertensive therapy remains critical for the treatment of this disease. Surgical intervention, although still a formidable undertaking, has evolved to better address both acute and chronic dissection, and the results have improved. Basic and clinical research, as well as technological advances, have increased our understanding of this challenging disease state. PMID:18481490

  14. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  15. Transesophageal echocardiography evaluation of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Patil, T. A.; Nierich, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can be used to identify risk factors such as aortic atherosclerosis[2] before any sort of surgical manipulations involving aorta and its related structures. TEE has become an important noninvasive tool to diagnose acute thoracic aortic pathologies. TEE evaluation of endoleaks helps early detection and immediate corrective interventions. TEE is an invaluable imaging modality in the management of aortic pathology. TEE has to a large extent improved the patient outcomes. PMID:27762248

  16. [Blunt thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Taira, O; Hiraguri, S; Uchida, O; Hagiwara, M; Ikeda, T; Kato, H

    1998-06-01

    Of 161 patients with blunt thoracic injury, 135 were male (83.9%) and 26 were female. The most common cause of injury was traffic accidents (130 patients, 80.7%), followed by falls (22 patients), and crushing (7 patients). There were 46 third decade and 36 second decade patients. Thirty-two patients had single thoracic injury and the other had multiple organ injury. The most common associated injury was head injury (65 patients). Most traffic accidents involved motor cycle accident. Forty-four patients died, 32 within 24 hours, and 4 died to thoracic injury. These 4 patients were shock on arrival and died within 24 hours. The injury severity score, which was under 30 in 78.3% of patients, correlated to the mortality rate. Rib fracture was the most common thoracic injury in 96 patients followed by hemothorax in 91, pulmonary contusion in 79, and pneumothorax in 64. Most of the thoracic injuries were treated conservatively. Thoracotomy was performed in 6 patients. Other than one patient with rupture of the left pulmonary vein, 5 patients recovered. Continued bleeding at a rate of more than 200 ml/h from the chest drainage tube or no recovery from shock and large air leakage preventing re-expansion of the lung are indications for emergency thoracotomy. Thoracotomy should also be considered after conservative treatment in patients with continued air leakage or intrabronchial bleeding negatively affecting respiration. Indications for thoracotomy should be determined individually based on evaluating of vital sign.

  17. Comparison of minimally invasive surgery with standard open surgery for vertebral thoracic metastases causing acute myelopathy in patients with short- or mid-term life expectancy: surgical technique and early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Miscusi, Massimo; Polli, Filippo Maria; Forcato, Stefano; Ricciardi, Luca; Frati, Alessandro; Cimatti, Marco; De Martino, Luca; Ramieri, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Spinal metastasis is common in patients with cancer. About 70% of symptomatic lesions are found in the thoracic region of the spine, and cord compression presents as the initial symptom in 5%-10% of patients. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) has recently been advocated as a useful approach for spinal metastases, with the aim of decreasing the morbidity associated with more traditional open spine surgery; furthermore, the recovery time is reduced after MISS, such that postoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy can begin sooner. METHODS Two series of oncological patients, who presented with acute myelopathy due to vertebral thoracic metastases, were compared in this study. Patients with complete paraplegia for more than 24 hours and with a modified Bauer score greater than 2 were excluded from the study. The first group (n = 23) comprised patients who were prospectively enrolled from May 2010 to September 2013, and who were treated with minimally invasive laminotomy/laminectomy and percutaneous stabilization. The second group (n = 19) comprised patients from whom data were retrospectively collected before May 2010, and who had been treated with laminectomy and stabilization with traditional open surgery. Patient groups were similar regarding general characteristics and neurological impairment. Results were analyzed in terms of neurological recovery (American Spinal Injury Association grade), complications, pain relief (visual analog scale), and quality of life (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BM22 scales) at the 30-day follow-up. Operation time, postoperative duration of bed rest, duration of hospitalization, intraoperative blood loss, and the need and length of postoperative opioid administration were also evaluated. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of neurological recovery and complications. Nevertheless, the MISS group showed a clear and significant

  18. Thoracic arachnoid cyst resection.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts in the spinal cord may be asymptomatic. In some cases arachnoid cysts may exert mass effect on the thoracic spinal cord and lead to pain and myelopathy symptoms. Arachnoid cysts may be difficult to visualize on an MRI scan because the thin walled arachnoid may not be visible. Focal displacement of the thoracic spinal cord and effacement of the spinal cord with apparent widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space is seen. This video demonstrates surgical techniques to remove a dorsal arachnoid cyst causing spinal cord compression. The surgery involves a thoracic laminectomy. The dura is opened sharply with care taken not to open the arachnoid so that the cyst can be well visualized. The thickened arachnoid walls of the cyst are removed to alleviate the compression caused by the arachnoid cyst. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/pgUrl9xvsD0.

  19. Complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, N; Venugopal, P S; Deshpande, R; Anderson, D

    2003-03-01

    Thoracic ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect with very few reported survivors after surgical correction. We report a case of complete thoracic ectopia cordis with double outlet right ventricle. The diagnosis was established antenatally and a repair was undertaken soon after birth. The child remained stable and was extubated on the fifth post-operative day. Forty-eight hours later the child succumbed to an unexplained respiratory arrest. Also presented is a review of the different surgical strategies for this unusual condition.

  20. Thoracic ectopia cordis

    PubMed Central

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5–7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures. PMID:23035158

  1. Thoracic ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Shad, Jimmy; Budhwani, Keshav; Biswas, Rakesh

    2012-09-30

    Ectopia cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect in fusion of the anterior chest wall resulting in extra thoracic location of the heart. Its estimated prevalence is 5.5-7.9 per million live births. The authors had one such case of a 15-h-old full-term male neonate weighing 2.25 kg with an externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. The neonate had difficulty in respiration with peripheral cyanosis. Patient died of cardiorespiratory arrest before any surgical intervention could be undertaken inspite of best possible resuscitative measures.

  2. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  3. [Minor bcr/abl positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia preceded by knee joint pain due to bone marrow necrosis].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuya; Mori, Masaki; Meguro, Akiko; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nagai, Tadashi; Muroi, Kazuo; Komatsu, Norio; Ozawa, Keiya

    2004-11-01

    A 16-year-old male was referred to our hospital in April 2003 due to severe knee joint pain from five months previously. Lymphoblasts were identified in his peripheral blood, resulting in a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Bone marrow examination revealed massive necrosis with clusters of lymphoblasts and the bcr/abl fusion gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and peripheral rim enhancement on Gd-DTPA enhanced fat suppression images, which was compatible with bone marrow necrosis. After the patient achieved complete remission (CR), the knee joint pain has disappeared. He was treated with an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-identical unrelated donor and has been in CR for 26 months after the diagnosis of ALL. In the knee joint, the replacement of fatty marrow after BMT has been confirmed with MRI. Hematological malignancies including ALL should be considered in the cases of bone marrow necrosis and adequate treatment may improve necrosis.

  4. European perspectives in thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Europe, the old Continent, has been the cradle of thoracic surgery from the beginning of the last century. The structure and the activities of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) activities are directed to enlighten the path, provide the tools and set the standards for a quality inspired practice in thoracic surgery. PMID:24868436

  5. Detection of minor clones with internal tandem duplication mutations of FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia using delta-PCR.

    PubMed

    Beierl, Katie; Tseng, Li-Hui; Beierl, Russell; Haley, Lisa; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2013-03-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene have been associated with inferior prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Detection of minor clones or minimal residual clones with ITD mutations is desirable, but is challenging when the mutant signal determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis is weak. In this study, we applied delta-PCR, which is a triple-primer strategy, to ensure PCR specificity and improve the sensitivity to 0.1% leukemic cells with ITD mutation. We also applied a reference peak to calculate ITD allelic burdens of <2% threshold of technical limitation for evaluating the relative ratio of 2 signals by capillary electrophoresis. Delta-PCR was able to detect single or multiple ITD mutations with an allelic burden (peak height ratio of mutant allele and wild-type allele) ranging from 0.4% to >100% among all 31 cases with previous documented ITD mutations. In one of the 3 cases with previously reported negative ITD mutation in the initial diagnostic specimen and ITD-positive results in the follow-up specimens, an ITD of 0.04% allele burden was retrospectively detected in the initial diagnosis specimen using delta-PCR. We also demonstrated that minor ITD mutant clones with an allelic burden of <1% present at diagnosis may become a dominant clone at the later refractory status, suggesting that detection of leukemic clones with allelic burdens of <1% may be clinically significant. Delta-PCR can detect ITD mutations with improved sensitivity and specificity and may be useful for the detection of minimal residual leukemia.

  6. Whole Genome Deep Sequencing of HIV-1 Reveals the Impact of Early Minor Variants Upon Immune Recognition During Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew R.; Lennon, Niall J.; Power, Karen A.; Macalalad, Alexander R.; Berlin, Aaron M.; Malboeuf, Christine M.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Gnerre, Sante; Zody, Michael C.; Erlich, Rachel L.; Green, Lisa M.; Berical, Andrew; Wang, Yaoyu; Casali, Monica; Streeck, Hendrik; Bloom, Allyson K.; Dudek, Tim; Tully, Damien; Newman, Ruchi; Axten, Karen L.; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Battis, Laura; Kemper, Michael; Zeng, Qiandong; Shea, Terrance P.; Gujja, Sharvari; Zedlack, Carmen; Gasser, Olivier; Brander, Christian; Hess, Christoph; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; Bazner, Suzane; Rychert, Jenna; Tinsley, Jake P.; Mayer, Ken H.; Rosenberg, Eric; Pereyra, Florencia; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah K.; Jessen, Heiko; Altfeld, Marcus; Birren, Bruce W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Allen, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing technologies have the potential to transform the study of highly variable viral pathogens by providing a rapid and cost-effective approach to sensitively characterize rapidly evolving viral quasispecies. Here, we report on a high-throughput whole HIV-1 genome deep sequencing platform that combines 454 pyrosequencing with novel assembly and variant detection algorithms. In one subject we combined these genetic data with detailed immunological analyses to comprehensively evaluate viral evolution and immune escape during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. The majority of early, low frequency mutations represented viral adaptation to host CD8+ T cell responses, evidence of strong immune selection pressure occurring during the early decline from peak viremia. CD8+ T cell responses capable of recognizing these low frequency escape variants coincided with the selection and evolution of more effective secondary HLA-anchor escape mutations. Frequent, and in some cases rapid, reversion of transmitted mutations was also observed across the viral genome. When located within restricted CD8 epitopes these low frequency reverting mutations were sufficient to prime de novo responses to these epitopes, again illustrating the capacity of the immune response to recognize and respond to low frequency variants. More importantly, rapid viral escape from the most immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses coincided with plateauing of the initial viral load decline in this subject, suggestive of a potential link between maintenance of effective, dominant CD8 responses and the degree of early viremia reduction. We conclude that the early control of HIV-1 replication by immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses may be substantially influenced by rapid, low frequency viral adaptations not detected by conventional sequencing approaches, which warrants further investigation. These data support the critical need for vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to target more highly constrained

  7. Whole genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 reveals the impact of early minor variants upon immune recognition during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Henn, Matthew R; Boutwell, Christian L; Charlebois, Patrick; Lennon, Niall J; Power, Karen A; Macalalad, Alexander R; Berlin, Aaron M; Malboeuf, Christine M; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Gnerre, Sante; Zody, Michael C; Erlich, Rachel L; Green, Lisa M; Berical, Andrew; Wang, Yaoyu; Casali, Monica; Streeck, Hendrik; Bloom, Allyson K; Dudek, Tim; Tully, Damien; Newman, Ruchi; Axten, Karen L; Gladden, Adrianne D; Battis, Laura; Kemper, Michael; Zeng, Qiandong; Shea, Terrance P; Gujja, Sharvari; Zedlack, Carmen; Gasser, Olivier; Brander, Christian; Hess, Christoph; Günthard, Huldrych F; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Bazner, Suzane; Rychert, Jenna; Tinsley, Jake P; Mayer, Ken H; Rosenberg, Eric; Pereyra, Florencia; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah K; Jessen, Heiko; Altfeld, Marcus; Birren, Bruce W; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2012-01-01

    Deep sequencing technologies have the potential to transform the study of highly variable viral pathogens by providing a rapid and cost-effective approach to sensitively characterize rapidly evolving viral quasispecies. Here, we report on a high-throughput whole HIV-1 genome deep sequencing platform that combines 454 pyrosequencing with novel assembly and variant detection algorithms. In one subject we combined these genetic data with detailed immunological analyses to comprehensively evaluate viral evolution and immune escape during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection. The majority of early, low frequency mutations represented viral adaptation to host CD8+ T cell responses, evidence of strong immune selection pressure occurring during the early decline from peak viremia. CD8+ T cell responses capable of recognizing these low frequency escape variants coincided with the selection and evolution of more effective secondary HLA-anchor escape mutations. Frequent, and in some cases rapid, reversion of transmitted mutations was also observed across the viral genome. When located within restricted CD8 epitopes these low frequency reverting mutations were sufficient to prime de novo responses to these epitopes, again illustrating the capacity of the immune response to recognize and respond to low frequency variants. More importantly, rapid viral escape from the most immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses coincided with plateauing of the initial viral load decline in this subject, suggestive of a potential link between maintenance of effective, dominant CD8 responses and the degree of early viremia reduction. We conclude that the early control of HIV-1 replication by immunodominant CD8+ T cell responses may be substantially influenced by rapid, low frequency viral adaptations not detected by conventional sequencing approaches, which warrants further investigation. These data support the critical need for vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses to target more highly constrained

  8. [Traumatic diaphragmatic herniation after continuous thoracic drainage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, A; Inasawa, K; Suzuki, T; Ishiyama, T; Sugawara, H; Kimura, K; Moriya, T; Nakamura, T

    2001-03-01

    We report a case of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia (TDH) resulting from continuous thoracic drainage and was successfully treated by surgical procedures. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our department due to shock after a blunt trauma by a traffic accident. As he revealed left hemothorax on admission, continuous thoracic drainage was performed. Soon after the drainage, diaphragmatic hernia occurred as an incarceration of the spleen into the thoracic cavity. In the literature, 80 cases with TDH have been reported in Japan since 1986. The purpose of this study is to discuss the mechanism of TDH in the acute phase and to consider its appropriate diagnostic tools. The following two results were obtained. (1) TDH may be appeared during the clinical course, especially after a continuous thoracic drainage, in patients with damaged diaphragm by blunt traumas. (2) CT is the most effective tool for the diagnosis of TDH.

  9. Thoracic anesthesia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Kretzschmar, Moritz A; Schilling, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The mean age of patients presenting for thoracic surgery is rising steadily, associated with an increased demand for thoracic surgical treatments by geriatric patients. With increasing age, physiologic changes and comorbidities have to be considered. Thoracic anesthesia for elderly patients requires greater specific knowledge. Respiratory mechanics change progressively during aging, and the pharmacology of different drugs is also altered with increasing age. This has implications for the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management of elderly patients scheduled for thoracic surgery. Special focus has to be placed on preoperative evaluation, the ventilation regime and general intraoperative management. Effective postoperative pain treatment after geriatric thoracic surgery requires careful pain assessment and drug titration. Considering key points of physiology and pharmacology can help to provide best possible care for the increasing number of elderly patients in thoracic surgery. Management of geriatric patients in thoracic surgery offer opportunities for anaesthetic interventions including protective ventilation, use of different anesthetics, anaesthesia monitoring, fluid management and pain therapy.

  10. Robotics in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kernstine, Kemp H

    2004-10-01

    Surgical use of robotics, or computer-assisted surgical systems (CAS), has evolved over the last 10 years; for the treatment of chest diseases, however, the development has really occurred in the last 3 to 4 years. This brief history means that there have been few publications in the medical literature, and those that exist are mostly case reports. Moreover, because of this modest experience, robotic thoracic procedures currently take more time than nonrobotic cases and, thus, are more expensive. The surgical learning curve appears to be steep, especially for the more complex procedures. As surgeons gain greater experience and the complexity and cost of the equipment are reduced, we should expect to see greater utility of CAS in thoracic surgery.

  11. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  12. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  13. [Thoracic actinomycosis: three cases].

    PubMed

    Herrak, L; Msougar, Y; Ouadnouni, Y; Bouchikh, M; Benosmane, A

    2007-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare condition which, in the thoracic localisation, can mimic cancer or tuberculosis. We report a series of three case of thoracic actinomycosis treated in the Ibn Sina University Thoracic Surgery Unit in Rabat, Morocco. CASE N degrees 1: This 45-year-old patient presented a tumefaction on the left anterior aspect of the chest. Physical examination identified a parietal mass with fistulisation to the skin. Radiography demonstrated a left pulmonary mass. Transparietal puncture led to the pathological diagnosis of actinomycosis. The patient was given medical treatment and improved clinically and radiographically. CASE N degrees 2: This 68-year-old patient presented repeated episodes of hemoptysis. The chest x-ray revealed atelectasia of the middle lobe and bronchial fibroscopy demonstrated the presence of a bud in the middle lobar bronchus. Biopsies were negative. The patient underwent surgery and the histology examination of the operative specimen revealed pulmonary actinomycosis. The patient recovered well clinically and radiographically with antibiotic therapy. CASE N degrees 3: This 56-year-old patient presented cough and hemoptysis. Physical examination revealed a left condensation and destruction of the left lung was noted on the chest x-ray. Left pleuropulmonectomy was performed. Histological analysis of the surgical specimen identified associated Aspergillus and Actinomyces. The outcome was favorable with medical treatment. The purpose of this work was to recall the radiological, clinical, histological, therapeutic, outcome aspects of this condition and to relate the problems of differential diagnosis when can suggest other diseases.

  14. Viroimmunotherapy of Thoracic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Alexander S.; Patel, Manish R.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MM), cause the highest rate of cancer mortality worldwide. Most of these deaths are as a result of NSCLC; however, prognoses for the other two diseases remain as some of the poorest of any cancers. Recent advances in immunotherapy, specifically immune checkpoint inhibitors, have begun to help a small population of patients with advanced lung cancer. People who respond to these immune therapies generally have a durable response and many see dramatic decreases in their disease. However, response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Therefore, intense research is now underway to rationally develop combination therapies to expand the range of patients who will respond to and benefit from immune therapy. One promising approach is with oncolytic viruses. These oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been found to be selective for or have been engineered to preferentially infect and kill cancer cells. In pre-clinical models of different thoracic cancers, it has been found that these viruses can induce immunogenic cell death, increase the number of immune mediators brought into the tumor microenvironment and broaden the neoantigen-specific T cell response. We will review here the literature regarding the application of virotherapy toward augmenting immune responses in thoracic cancers. PMID:28536345

  15. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  16. Laminoplasty versus conservative treatment for acute cervical spinal cord injury caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament after minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong; Chen, Liang; Dong, Ren-Bin; Feng, Yu; Yang, Hui-Lin; Tang, Tian-Si

    2014-02-01

    No reports to date have accurately evaluated the management for acute spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) after minor trauma. To assess whether outcomes of laminoplasty is better than conservative treatment. A retrospective study. Thirty-one patients underwent surgery (L group) and 29 patients underwent conservative treatment (C group). Disability, muscle strength, sensation, and general health status. Patients were managed according to routine clinical practice and the results between groups were compared. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed at admission, discharge, 6 months and at the final visit. Causes for trauma, duration of hospital stay, and complication were also evaluated. Causes for trauma included falling, traffic accidents and sports. Mixed and segmental types were the most frequent cause of OPLL resulting into SCI. Duration of hospital stay and complications were less in the L group. Motor and sensory scores increased in the L group at discharge (p<.05) and at 6 months (p<.05), and maintained thereafter (p>.05); scores improved significantly in the C group at 6 months (p<.05), with a slight deterioration with time (p>.05); scores in the L group were higher than in the C group at each time point after surgery (p<.05). Bodily pain and mental health in SF-36 improved at discharge in the L group (p<.05); all scores improved at 6 months in both the groups (p<.05), with better improvements in the L group (p<.05). The canal diameter increased and occupation ratio decreased in the L group (p<.05), and maintained thereafter (p<.05); a slight increase of occupation ratio was observed in the C group (p>.05). Lordotic angle and range of motion were maintained in both the groups, with no significance between groups (p>.05). High-signal intensity decreased at 6 months (p<.05) in the L group; no significant change was found in the C group during the follow-up (p>.05); Significant difference was

  17. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  18. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  19. Penetrating thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Renata; Baisden, Clinton E; Harker, Lori; Calhoon, John H

    2008-01-01

    The initial approach to penetrating thoracic trauma is directed towards the pathophysiologic syndrome upon presentation. Most patients are successfully treated with drainage tubes. The unstable patient may necessitate thoracotomy at the emergency room to drain cardiac tamponade, provide cardiac massage and control bleeding. The guidelines for this procedure are reviewed. Need for further work-up of potential injuries to other mediastinal organs is frequently screened by computerized tomography. Surgery might still be needed, on a less emergent basis, in order to repair injuries to the trachea/esophagus, retained hemothorax, or to rule out diaphragmatic injury. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures may be used in specific situations.

  20. Results of endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta with the Talent Thoracic stent graft: the Talent Thoracic Retrospective Registry.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Rossella; Nienaber, Christoph A; Rousseau, Hervé; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Heijmen, Robin; Grabenwöger, Martin; Piquet, Philippe; Lovato, Luigi; Dabbech, Chaouki; Kische, Stephan; Gaxotte, Virginia; Schepens, Marc; Ehrlich, Marek; Bartoli, Jean-Michelle

    2006-08-01

    Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic diseases demonstrated low perioperative morbidity and mortality when compared with conventional open repair. Long-term effectiveness of this minimally invasive technique remains to be proven. The Talent Thoracic Retrospective Registry was designed to evaluate the impact of this therapy on patients treated in 7 major European referral centers over an 8-year period. Data from 457 consecutive patients (113 emergency and 344 elective cases) who underwent endovascular thoracic aortic repair with the Medtronic Talent Thoracic stent graft (Medtronic/AVE, Santa Rosa, Calif) were collected. Follow-up analysis (24 +/- 19.4 months, range 1-85.1 months) was based on clinical and imaging findings, including all adverse events. To ensure consistency of data interpretation and event reporting, one physician reviewed all adverse events and deaths for the whole cohort of patients. In the case of discrepancies, the treating physicians were queried. Among 422 patients who survived the interventional procedure (in-hospital mortality 5%, 23 patients), mortality during follow-up was 8.5% (36 patients), and in 11 of them the death was related to the aortic disease. Persistent endoleak was reported at imaging follow-up in 64 cases: 44 were primary (9.6%) and 21 occurred during follow-up (4.9%). Seven patients with persistent endoleak had aortic rupture during follow-up, at a variable time from 40 days to 35 months, and all subsequently died. A minor incidence of migration of the stent graft (7 cases), graft fabric alteration (2 cases), and modular disconnection (3 cases) was observed at imaging. Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimate at 1 year was 90.97%, at 3 years was 85.36%, and at 5 years was 77.49%. At the same intervals, freedom from a second procedure (either open conversion or endovascular) was 92.45%, 81.3%, and 70.0%, respectively. Endovascular treatment for thoracic aortic disease with the Talent stent graft is associated with low early

  1. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  2. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  3. [Development of treatment of severe thoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Le Brigand, H

    1975-11-01

    About 25 p. 100 of cases of closed trauma of the thorax may be classified as severe, for they rapidly endanger life. Their treatment has made considerable progress since the report of J. Dor and H. Le Brigand in 1960. However, when severe trauma is treated, the mortality has remained unchanged over the last ten years. The treatment of fractures of the sternum includes respiratory assistance and internal fixation of the fractured bones, these two methods together, when correctly applied, give good results. Endothoracic lesions are now better recognised. Hemothorax and pneumothorax are now treated by a well recognised method. Visceral lesions, such as bronchial rupture, or major vascular ruptures, e.g. aorta, and heart lesions may be diagnosed at an early stage and be operated on more often. On the other hand, it is now better recognised that diffuse pulmonary lesions, e.g. pulmonary contusions or "shock lung", which is usually treated by artificial respiration alone, still may have a poor prognosis in some cases. From this it results that many surgical teams have enlarged the indications for early thoracotomy in the same way as laparotomy is more often carried out in abdominal trauma. In fact, these indications require circumspection and thoracotomy should only be carried out in specialised thoracic surgery units. If this is not available, aspiration, drainage, tracheotomy, continuous extension, are still applicable, but it is also necessary for them to be carried out correctly; if not, failures and complications of these minor measures are frequent. The use of these methods has shown the existence of therapeutic failures, including major bilateral bony lesions, diffuse severe lung injuries with resistant anoxia, complex multiple injuries with thoracic involvement and, finally, combined thoracic and cranial lesions, the mortality of which is about 50 p. 100. These facts explain why treatment of severe thoracic trauma gives variable results. The mortality varies from

  4. Endovascular Repair of Contained Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Robert; Loosemore, Tom; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2002-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of stent-grafts for the treatment of acute rupture of the thoracic aorta. Methods: Four patients with acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta were treated by insertion of stent-grafts. The underlying aortic lesions were aneurysm, acute aortic ulcer, acute type B dissection and giant cell aortitis. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia in three patients and local anesthesia in one patient. Results: All stent-grafts were successfully deployed. All patients survived the procedure and are now alive and well at follow-up (mean 6.3 months, range 44 days-16 months). One patient underwent a second stent procedure 10 days after the first procedure because of a proximal endoleak. All hemothoraces have resolved. There were no complications. Conclusion:Treatment of acute contained ruptures of the thoracic aorta by the insertion of stent-grafts is feasible. The technical success rates,complication rates and patient survival compare favorably with emergency surgery.

  5. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for awake thoracic surgery in severely dyspnoeic patients excluded from general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Claret, Antoine; Desbordes, Jacques; Porte, Henri

    2014-11-01

    acute respiratory distress 7 days postoperatively and died of intestinal bleeding on Day 25. There were no postoperative complications in other patients. Excluding Patient 9 always remaining in a medical intensive care unit (ICU), the mean postoperative ICU stay in thoracic surgery was 4.4 days (SD 5.2). Hospital discharge was between 5 and 40 days after surgery. TEATS with/without sedation was an alternative to GA for thoracotomy/thoracoscopy in severely dyspnoeic patients (MMRC grade 4, ASA 4) without postoperative sequelae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Specific donor Vbeta-associated CD4 T-cell responses correlate with severe acute graft-versus-host disease directed to multiple minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen C; Friedman, Thea M; Murphy, George F; Korngold, Robert

    2004-02-01

    CXB-2/By (CXB-2) recombinant inbred mice express a subset of the minor histocompatibility antigen (miHA) repertoire expressed by C.B10-H2(b)/LiMcdJ (BALB.B) mice. On lethal irradiation and the transplantation of H2(b)-matched C57BL/6 (B6) T cell-depleted bone marrow cells, along with naive unfractionated T cells, both strains succumb to acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Although alloreactive B6 CD4(+) T cells are a necessary source of T-cell help for the B6 CD8(+) component of the GVHD response in both recipient strains, they are capable of mediating severe GVHD by themselves only in BALB.B mice. Previous CD4(+) T-cell receptor repertoire analysis demonstrated overlapping oligoclonal Vbeta use between the CD4(+) B6 anti-BALB.B and B6 anti-CXB-2 responses, with indications of additional BALB.B unique T-cell responses (Vbeta2 and Vbeta11). We report here that the more severe B6 anti-BALB.B response is not due to a quantitative difference in the responding cells, because the frequency of alloreactive donor CD4(+) T cells over time was equivalent in the spleens of BALB.B versus CXB-2 recipients. The responses were also similar in the number of infiltrating B6 CD4(+) T cells in the lingual epithelium of the 2 recipients. In contrast, a significantly greater degree of infiltration and injury of BALB.B intestinal epithelium correlated with the increased level of clinical GVHD severity. Of most significance, despite the involvement of at least 11 Vbeta-associated CD4(+) T-cell families in the overall B6 anti-BALB.B response, the development of severe GVHD correlated with the presence of Vbeta2- and Vbeta11-positive donor T cells. Transplantation of donor CD4(+) T cells from Vbeta-associated families that were shared between the B6 anti-BALB.B and anti-CXB-2 responses resulted in minimal GVHD potential. These data suggest that severe GVHD across miHA barriers depends on the involvement of a restricted number of potent T-cell specificities and implies that there are

  7. Long thoracic nerve paralysis associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuchi, Y; Saitoh, S; Hosaka, M; Uchiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of long thoracic nerve palsy associated with thoracic outlet syndrome are reported. Both patients had abnormal posture, with low-set shoulders and winged scapulae. Clinically there was weakness of the serratus anterior muscle with partial denervotion on electromyography. The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was based on positive vascular tests and brachial plexus nerve compression symptoms induced by the vascular testing positions. An orthosis that held the shoulder in an elevated position was used in both cases. Complete recovery of shoulder function and relief of the symptoms was achieved in both cases at 8 and 13 months, respectively, after application of the orthosis.

  8. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  9. Feasibility of endoscopic transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Yang, Shengsheng; Chen, Long; Li, Dazhou; Zheng, Heping; Chen, Weisheng

    2013-07-01

    Thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. Current methods are associated with risks of chronic neuropathic pain and a visible chest scar. We developed a novel surgical technique for the performance of sympathectomy by embryonic natural orifice transumbilical endoscopic surgery with a flexible endoscope in a porcine model. Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies were performed in seven farm pigs (three acute and four 4-week survivals). Under general anaesthesia, animals were intubated and mechanically ventilated with a dual lumen endotracheal tube through tracheostomy. A newly developed long transabdominal trocar was placed through the umbilicus. After insertion of a gastroscope through this trocar, a small incision was created on both sides of the diaphragm by a needle-knife. Then the gastroscope was inserted into the thoracic cavity, and the sympathetic chain was identified at the desired thoracic level and ablated. Operation time, safety and feasibility were recorded in all animals. The transumbilical thoracic sympathectomies were successfully completed in all pigs with a mean operation time of 66.7 ± 9.4 min. Intraoperative bleeding occurred in one pig during the electrosurgical incision of diaphragm tissue, which was successfully controlled by hot biopsy forceps. No other acute intraoperative complications were observed in any cases. In the acute group, the length of the diaphragm incision ranged from 4 to 5 mm in three pigs. In the survival group, the animals recovered promptly from surgery. In three pigs, a small pneumothorax was found in the postoperative chest X-ray, but all of them were completely resolved with conservative treatment. Autopsy showed all bilateral T3 sympathetic chains were successfully ablated and no evidence of vital structure injury or diaphragmatic hernia. Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is technically feasible, simple and safe in a porcine model. This

  10. Feasibility of endoscopic transumbilical thoracic sympathectomy in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jixue; Zhu, Lihuan; Yang, Shengsheng; Chen, Long; Li, Dazhou; Zheng, Heping; Chen, Weisheng

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Thoracoscopic sympathectomy is an effective treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. Current methods are associated with risks of chronic neuropathic pain and a visible chest scar. We developed a novel surgical technique for the performance of sympathectomy by embryonic natural orifice transumbilical endoscopic surgery with a flexible endoscope in a porcine model. METHODS Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies were performed in seven farm pigs (three acute and four 4-week survivals). Under general anaesthesia, animals were intubated and mechanically ventilated with a dual lumen endotracheal tube through tracheostomy. A newly developed long transabdominal trocar was placed through the umbilicus. After insertion of a gastroscope through this trocar, a small incision was created on both sides of the diaphragm by a needle-knife. Then the gastroscope was inserted into the thoracic cavity, and the sympathetic chain was identified at the desired thoracic level and ablated. Operation time, safety and feasibility were recorded in all animals. RESULTS The transumbilical thoracic sympathectomies were successfully completed in all pigs with a mean operation time of 66.7 ± 9.4 min. Intraoperative bleeding occurred in one pig during the electrosurgical incision of diaphragm tissue, which was successfully controlled by hot biopsy forceps. No other acute intraoperative complications were observed in any cases. In the acute group, the length of the diaphragm incision ranged from 4 to 5 mm in three pigs. In the survival group, the animals recovered promptly from surgery. In three pigs, a small pneumothorax was found in the postoperative chest X-ray, but all of them were completely resolved with conservative treatment. Autopsy showed all bilateral T3 sympathetic chains were successfully ablated and no evidence of vital structure injury or diaphragmatic hernia. CONCLUSIONS Transumbilical flexible endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is technically feasible

  11. Silent Minority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Beth, Ed.

    Discussed in the booklet are approaches for citizens to use in helping the silent minority--mentally retarded (MR) children and adults--attain their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. The MR person is described to be one of 6 million retarded Americans, to benefit from education although his ability to learn is limited, to have…

  12. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  13. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  14. Late neurological recovery of paraplegia after endovascular repair of an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mees, Barend M E; Bastos Gonçalves, Frederico; Koudstaal, Peter J; Verhagen, Hence J M

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a potentially devastating complication after thoracic endovascular aorta repair (TEVAR). Patients with spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR often develop paraplegia, which is considered irreversible, and have significant increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a patient with unusual late complete neurologic recovery of acute-onset paraplegia after TEVAR for an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MAT2A mutations predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K; Johnson, Ralph J; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Leal, Suzanne M; Raman, C S; Swindell, Eric C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-01-08

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease.

  16. MAT2A Mutations Predispose Individuals to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Raman, C.S.; Swindell, Eric C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease. PMID:25557781

  17. Pediatric thoracic trauma: Current trends.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Erik G; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Santore, Matthew T

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric thoracic trauma is relatively uncommon but results in disproportionately high levels of morbidity and mortality when compared with other traumatic injuries. These injuries are often more devastating due to differences in children׳s anatomy and physiology relative to adult patients. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance at the time of presentation because many significant thoracic injuries will have no external signs of injury. With proper recognition and management of these injuries, there is an associated improved long-term outcome. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the initial evaluation, current management practices, and future directions in pediatric thoracic trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Database Audit in Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Magee, Mitchell J

    2017-08-01

    Administrative data are less accurate and relevant than specialty-specific, procedure-specific, risk-adjusted data collected in voluntary registries such as the Society of Thoracic Surgeons-General Thoracic Surgery Database (GTSD). Voluntary clinical databases must be proven accurate and complete before they are accepted as credible information sources. With substantial growth of the GTSD, an annual audit was initiated in 2010 to assess the completeness, accuracy, and quality of the data collected. The audit process is essential in validating data quality and adding credibility and value to volunteer clinical registries. It serves as an important tool for improvement of patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Reading the Enemy’s Playbook

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: At the Yale University Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease, we have been using our clinical experience and laboratory investigations to shed light on the pathophysiology of thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), the clinical behavior of thoracic aortic aneurysm, and the optimal clinical management. Materials and Methods: The Yale database contains information on 3,000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, with 9,000 patient-years of follow-up and 9,000 imaging studies. Advanced statistical techniques were applied to this information. Results: Analysis yielded the following Yale-generated observations: (1) TAA is a genetic disease with a predominantly autosomal dominant mode of inheritance; (2) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes are activated in the pathogenesis of TAA; (3) wall tension in TAA approaches the tensile limits of aortic tissue at a diameter of 6 cm; (4) by the time a TAA reaches a clinical diameter of 6 cm, 34 percent of affected patients have suffered dissection or rupture; (5) extreme physical exertion or severe emotion often precipitate acute dissection; and (6) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and RNA expression profile changes are being identified that predispose a patient to TAA and can serve as biomarkers for screening for this virulent disease. Conclusions: The “playbook” of TAA is gradually being read, with the help of scientific investigations, positioning practitioners to combat this lethal disease more effectively than ever before. PMID:19099048

  20. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  1. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  2. [International Relationship of Japanese General Thoracic Surgeons].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Meinoshin

    2017-01-01

    Japanese thoracic surgeons have created personal relationship with European and North American surgeons. During the last 10 years, official relation between Japanese Association for Chest Surgery(JACS) and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) has been established besides personal interaction, and communication among the thoracic surgeons in Asia was prompted through Asia Thoracoscopic Surgery Education Program( ATEP). International relationship through academic associations is expected to contribute to encouraging general thoracic surgeons.

  3. Outcomes of surgical paraclavicular thoracic outlet decompression.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Toliyat, Mohammad; Dua, Anahita; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Hossain, Monir; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2014-02-01

    supra- and infraclavicular approach for VTOS patients (40%). Functional outcomes were excellent, good, fair, and poor in 74.4%, 15.4%, 10.3%, and 0% of cases, respectively. One patient was lost to follow-up. Two patients with incomplete relief of symptoms after paraclavicular decompression for NTOS underwent pectoralis minor decompression. There were no deaths. Complications included pleural effusion requiring evacuation (n = 4), neuropraxia (n = 1), and lymph leak (n = 1) treated with tube thoracostomy. No patients experienced injury to the long thoracic or phrenic nerves. The mean duration of hospital stay was 4.4 days. The mean follow-up was 10.3 months. In our experience, surgical paraclavicular decompression can provide safe and effective relief of NTOS, VTOS, and ATOS symptoms. Functional outcomes were excellent or good in the majority of patients, with minimal complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, B. T.; Rogers, M. A.; Gotsman, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Selected radiographs from 40 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm serve to illustrate most of the radiographic features of this disease. Surgical techniques are outlined and were used to modify the natural course of the disease in 14 patients, with three postoperative deaths. The remaining 26 patients were either moribund on admission and died shortly afterwards or declined operations and died later. Images PMID:5144643

  5. [Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon].

    PubMed

    Chihara, Koji

    2017-01-01

    The Japanese Board of General Thoracic Surgery (JBGTS) consisted by Japanese Association of Chest Surgery (JACS) and The Japanese Association of Thoracic Surgery (JATS) has been certified Japanese Board Certified Thoracic Surgeon (JBCTS) since 2004. At present, JBCTS is obtained by being of Certified Surgeon by Japan Surgical Society( JSS), completion of minimum requirement of surgical experience, scientific papers, presentation at medical assembly, learning of postgraduate educational programs, and examination approximate 11 years after graduation of medical school. Thirteen hundreds JBCTS throughout Japan are engaged in operation for 77,000 cases/year, including 38,000 lung cancer patients/year. The operative volume has been growing lineally these 30 years, and operative mortality in lung cancer patients has been less than 1% these several years. Japanese Medical Specialty Board (JMSB) published a guideline of the new system of medical specialty certification system in Jury 2014, in which fundamental structure is consisted by basic specialties of 19 medical fields and following subspecialties and program based system rather than curriculum based system. According to this guideline, JBGTS has been collaborated with JSS in order to establish sequential programs of the 2 specialties, and proposed an improved certification system to accomplish the mission that it educates trainees to be thoracic surgical professionals who is able to perform safe and standalized procedures.

  6. The Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique: European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Position and Bologna Experience.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luca; Pantaleo, Antonio; Leone, Alessandro; Murana, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Pacini, Davide

    2017-02-01

    Complex lesions of the thoracic aorta are traditionally treated in 2 surgical steps with the elephant trunk technique. A relatively new approach is the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique, which potentially allows combined lesions of the thoracic aorta to be treated in a 1-stage procedure combining endovascular treatment with conventional surgery using a hybrid prosthesis. These are very complex and time-consuming operations, and good results can be obtained only if appropriate strategies for myocardial, cerebral, and visceral protection are adopted. However, the FET technique is associated with a non-negligible incidence of spinal cord injury, due to the extensive coverage of the descending aorta with the excessive sacrifice of intercostal arteries. The indications for the FET technique include chronic thoracic aortic dissection, acute or chronic type B dissection when endovascular treatment is contraindicated, chronic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and chronic aneurysm of the distal arch. The FET technique is also indicated in acute type A aortic dissection, especially when the tear is localized in the aortic arch; in cases of distal malperfusion; and in young patients. In light of the great interest in the FET technique, the Vascular Domain of the European Association for cardio-thoracic Surgery published a position paper reporting the current knowledge and the state of the art of the FET technique. Herein, we describe the surgical techniques involved in the FET technique and we report our experience with the FET technique for the treatment of complex aortic disease of the thoracic aorta.

  7. The Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique: European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Position and Bologna Experience

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Luca; Pantaleo, Antonio; Leone, Alessandro; Murana, Giacomo; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Pacini, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Complex lesions of the thoracic aorta are traditionally treated in 2 surgical steps with the elephant trunk technique. A relatively new approach is the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique, which potentially allows combined lesions of the thoracic aorta to be treated in a 1-stage procedure combining endovascular treatment with conventional surgery using a hybrid prosthesis. These are very complex and time-consuming operations, and good results can be obtained only if appropriate strategies for myocardial, cerebral, and visceral protection are adopted. However, the FET technique is associated with a non-negligible incidence of spinal cord injury, due to the extensive coverage of the descending aorta with the excessive sacrifice of intercostal arteries. The indications for the FET technique include chronic thoracic aortic dissection, acute or chronic type B dissection when endovascular treatment is contraindicated, chronic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta, and chronic aneurysm of the distal arch. The FET technique is also indicated in acute type A aortic dissection, especially when the tear is localized in the aortic arch; in cases of distal malperfusion; and in young patients. In light of the great interest in the FET technique, the Vascular Domain of the European Association for cardio-thoracic Surgery published a position paper reporting the current knowledge and the state of the art of the FET technique. Herein, we describe the surgical techniques involved in the FET technique and we report our experience with the FET technique for the treatment of complex aortic disease of the thoracic aorta. PMID:28180096

  8. Pain relief following thoracic surgical procedures: A literature review of the uncommon techniques.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures can be either thoracotomy or thoracoscopy. In thoracotomy, the incision could be either muscle-cutting or muscle-sparing incision. The posterolateral thoracotomy incision is used for most general thoracic surgical procedures. This incision, which involves division of the latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles, affords excellent exposure of the thoracic cavity. However, it is associated with significant morbidity, including impaired pulmonary function, postoperative chest pain, and restricted arm and shoulder movement. Various muscle-sparing incisions have been proposed to decrease the morbidity. Postthoracotomy pain originates from pleural and muscular damage, costovertebral joint disruption, and intercostal nerve damage during surgery. Inadequate pain relief after surgery affects the quality of patient's recovery and exposes the patients to postoperative morbidities. There is a tendency nowadays among thoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists toward the area of enhanced recovery after thoracic surgery which requires careful titration of the anesthetic drugs in awake patients undergoing thoracoscopic procedures. There is a common feeling among thoracic anesthesiologists that potthoracoscopy procedures produce less pain intensity versus thoracotomy which is partially true. However, effective management of acute pain following either thoracotomy/thoracoscopy is needed and may prevent these complications and reduce the likelihood of developing chronic pain. In this report, we are going to review the newly introduced postthoracotomy/thoracoscopy pain relief modalities with special reference to the new tendency of awake thoracic surgical procedures and its impact on enhanced recovery after surgery.

  9. Pain relief following thoracic surgical procedures: A literature review of the uncommon techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures can be either thoracotomy or thoracoscopy. In thoracotomy, the incision could be either muscle-cutting or muscle-sparing incision. The posterolateral thoracotomy incision is used for most general thoracic surgical procedures. This incision, which involves division of the latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles, affords excellent exposure of the thoracic cavity. However, it is associated with significant morbidity, including impaired pulmonary function, postoperative chest pain, and restricted arm and shoulder movement. Various muscle-sparing incisions have been proposed to decrease the morbidity. Postthoracotomy pain originates from pleural and muscular damage, costovertebral joint disruption, and intercostal nerve damage during surgery. Inadequate pain relief after surgery affects the quality of patient's recovery and exposes the patients to postoperative morbidities. There is a tendency nowadays among thoracic surgeons and anesthesiologists toward the area of enhanced recovery after thoracic surgery which requires careful titration of the anesthetic drugs in awake patients undergoing thoracoscopic procedures. There is a common feeling among thoracic anesthesiologists that potthoracoscopy procedures produce less pain intensity versus thoracotomy which is partially true. However, effective management of acute pain following either thoracotomy/thoracoscopy is needed and may prevent these complications and reduce the likelihood of developing chronic pain. In this report, we are going to review the newly introduced postthoracotomy/thoracoscopy pain relief modalities with special reference to the new tendency of awake thoracic surgical procedures and its impact on enhanced recovery after surgery. PMID:28757835

  10. Hemodynamic consequences of thoracic artificial lung attachment configuration: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Carrie E; Mockros, Lyle F

    2007-01-01

    A thoracic artificial lung (TAL) is being developed to assist treatment of acute and chronic pulmonary dysfunction. The TAL is attached directly to the pulmonary circulation. Depending on pathophysiology, the TAL may be attached in series with the natural lungs (NLs), in parallel with the NLs, or in an intermediate, hybrid configuration. We developed a computational model to study hemodynamic consequences of TAL attachment configuration under pathologic conditions. The pulmonary and systemic circulations, heart, and TAL are modeled as interconnected compliances and conductances, some valved. Time-varying cardiac compliance drives the system and generates pressures and flow rates. The model includes blood pressure feedback from the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin system, and renal volume control mechanism. We used previously published results from porcine experiments to verify model accuracy. We modeled normal physiology and four disease states. A hybrid configuration with 100% cardiac output through the TAL and 40% through the NLs would deliver maximal blood flow, 3.6 to 4.6 l/min, to the TAL and be tolerated by the right ventricle. Additionally, the model suggests that reducing the large "minor loss" resistances at the graft anastomoses to the pulmonary artery would improve the hemodynamics of all TAL attachment configurations.

  11. Electrodiagnostic confirmation of long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, P E

    1980-01-01

    Long thoracic nerve latencies were measured in 25 normal subjects. The nerve was stimulated at Erb's point. Monopolar electrodes were used to record the motor evoked response from the serratus anterior muscle. The mean long thoracic nerve latency was 3.9 +/- 0.6 ms. Four athletes with unilateral, isolated long thoracic nerve palsies were compared with the control group and with the uninvolved extremities. Long thoracic nerve latency examinations may help confirm the presence of long thoracic nerve palsy and test proximal nerve conduction. Images PMID:7354356

  12. Emergency procedures on the descending thoracic aorta in the endovascular era.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Marc E; Rushton, Fred W; Boland, A Bradley; Byrd, Taylor C; Baldwin, Zachary K

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), initially developed for the treatment of degenerative aneurysms of the descending thoracic aorta, has been applied to the entire spectrum of descending thoracic aortic pathology in both the elective and emergent settings. This single center study evaluates the effectiveness of TEVAR for the treatment of acute surgical emergencies involving the descending thoracic aorta, including traumatic aortic disruption (TAD), ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm (RDTA), and acute complicated Type B dissection (cTBD). A retrospective review of the medical records of all patients undergoing emergent TEVAR at the University of Mississippi Medical Center between August 2007 and November 2010 was undertaken. Patients were studied for 30-day survival, complications, type of device used for the repair, and technical aspects of the procedure. A total of 44 patients (59% male) with an average age of 49 years (range, 16-87 years) underwent emergent TEVAR during the study period. The technical success rate was 100%, with no patient requiring emergent open surgery for conditions involving the descending thoracic aorta at our institution during the study period. The majority (73%) of the repairs were accomplished using commercially available thoracic stent grafts. Abdominal endograft proximal extension cuffs were used in 12 (38%) of the 32 patients undergoing repair of TAD. Twenty-one patients (48%) required coverage of the left subclavian artery, two (10%) of whom subsequently required subclavian artery revascularization. Procedure-related complications included two strokes, one spinal cord ischemia, one unintentional coverage of the left carotid artery, one episode of acute renal failure, and three access site injuries. One patient undergoing repair of TAD had collapse of the stent graft in the early postoperative period. He was successfully treated by placement of an additional stent graft. Seven patients (16%) died within 30 days of surgery

  13. Anatomical variations of the second thoracic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Ramsaroop, L; Partab, P; Moodley, J; Satyapal, K S

    2005-04-01

    In recent years the second thoracic ganglion has gained anatomical significance as an important conduit for sympathetic innervation of the upper extremity. Thoracoscopic excision of the second thoracic ganglion is now widely recognized as affording the most effective treatment option for palmar hyperhidrosis. This study recorded the incidence, location and associated additional neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion. Bilateral dissection of 20 adult cadavers was undertaken, and all neural connections of the second thoracic ganglion were recorded. Nineteen cadavers (95%) demonstrated additional neural connections between the first thoracic ventral ramus and second intercostal nerve. These were classified as either type A (47.5%) or type B (45%) using the intrathoracic ramus (nerve of Kuntz) between the second intercostal nerve and the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve as a basis on both right and left sides. The second thoracic ganglion was commonly located (92.5%) in the second intercostal space at the level of the intervertebral disc between the second and third thoracic vertebrae. Fused ganglia between the second thoracic and first thoracic (5%) and stellate (5%) ganglia were noted. These findings should assist the operating surgeon with a clear knowledge of the anatomy of the second thoracic ganglion during thoracoscopic sympathectomy with a view to improving the success rate for upper limb sympathectomy.

  14. Hybrid antegrade repair of the arch and descending thoracic aorta with a new integrated stent-Dacron graft in acute type A aortic dissection: a look into the future with new devices.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Fernández, Claudio; Josa, Miguel; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A young male patient underwent supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A dissection under hypothermic circulatory arrest. After discharge, he was readmitted two weeks later due to severe aortic regurgitation and acute arch redissection. Under a second period of hypothermic circulatory arrest three weeks after the initial operation, radical treatment with aortic valve replacement, replacement of the ascending aorta and arch, together with antegrade deployment of a stent-graft in the true lumen for frozen elephant-trunk technique, were successfully performed. Computed tomography at four weeks showed complete proximal repair and thrombosis of the false lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography at eight weeks confirmed repair. The patient is currently leading an active life. A hybrid approach for complex cases of acute type A dissection with arch involvement can be considered for the future.

  15. Presenting features of thoracic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    McLatchie, G R; Young, D G

    1980-01-01

    In a retrospective study carried out at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, for the period 1952-79, 7 cases of primary thoracic neuroblastoma were identified. The average age at presentation was 2 years. Respiratory symptoms were the modes of presentation in 2 patients, neurological symptoms in 4, and urinary tract symptoms in 1 patient. Dilatation of the urinary tract was present in 2 cases, and a third had a normal urinary tract but previous infections. After a maximum of 27 years and a minimum of 20 months, 5 of the patients remain well. One child died as a direct result of her tumour, the other from an unrelated tumour 25 years after partial excision of his neuroblastoma. The better prognosis of primary thoracic neuroblastoma and the variability of presentation compared with neuroblastoma in other sites are stressed. PMID:7458396

  16. [Endoscopic thoracic sympatecomy for hyperhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Smati, Belhassen; Marghali, Adel; Abid, Mohamed; Bakhtri, Malek; Ben Youssef, Atef; Mestiri, Taher; Djilani, Habiba; Kilani, Tarek

    2007-06-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a benin affection representing a social and professional problems and occupational handicaps in young patient. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy thus provides a radical treatment for severe palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. We describe the technique used in our institut and present results From 1995 to 2002, 32 patients were operated on for hyperhidrosis. There were 17 mens and 15 women raging in age from 15 to 32 years The intervention consisting on destruction by electrocoagulation to the sympathetic trunk There was no major complication and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 2 days. The disappearance of the palmar sweating was immediately after operation. 7 patients complained of compensatory sweating Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for hyperhidrosis is a safe effect technique for treating palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis. Compensatry sweeting represent the major that necessite a preable information

  17. Robotic Surgery for Thoracic Disease.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shin-Ichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Robotic surgeries have developed in the general thoracic field over the past decade, and publications on robotic surgery outcomes have accumulated. However, controversy remains about the application of robotic surgery, with a lack of well-established evidence. Robotic surgery has several advantages such as natural movement of the surgeon's hands when manipulating the robotic arms and instruments controlled by computer-assisted systems. Most studies have reported the feasibility and safety of robotic surgery based on acceptable morbidity and mortality compared to open or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Furthermore, there are accumulated data to indicate longer operation times and shorter hospital stay in robotic surgery. However, randomized controlled trials between robotic and open or VATS procedures are needed to clarify the advantage of robotic surgery. In this review, we focused the literature about robotic surgery used to treat lung cancer and mediastinal tumor.

  18. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future.

  19. Acute neurological deficit after minor trauma in an infant with achondroplasia and cervicomedullary compression. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Benglis, David M; Sandberg, David I

    2007-08-01

    Cervicomedullary compression at the foramen magnum in patients with achondroplasia can be associated with apnea, neurological deficits, and sudden death. Decompressive operations are often performed in symptomatic patients. In asymptomatic patients, the indications for prophylactic decompression are controversial. The authors present the case of a previously neurologically intact 4-month-old girl with achondroplasia who presented with severe hemiparesis after a low-velocity motor vehicle accident. Imaging studies demonstrated osseous compression of the medulla and upper cervical spinal cord with associated parenchymal signal changes. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported case of a new neurological deficit after a minor trauma in this patient population. The authors review the relevant literature, focusing on the indications for cervicomedullary decompression in infants with achondroplasia. They propose that asymptomatic patients with achondroplasia and osseous compression at the foramen magnum should be offered prophy-lactic surgery if T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging signal changes in the spinal cord are observed. Prophylactic surgery can be considered an option in patients whose imaging studies do not show signal changes in the spinal cord but demonstrate significant osseous compression and absence of visible subarachnoid spaces.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Internal Thoracic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Presenting as a Massive Hemothorax in a Patient with Type I Neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Chang Won Kim, Suk; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Kun Il; Moon, Tae Yong; Chung, Sung Woon

    2005-12-15

    We report a case of acute hemothorax caused by a left internal thoracic artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient with neurofibromatosis type I, which was successfully treated with endovascular coil embolization.

  1. Rural Minority Student Engagement with a Healthcare Pipeline Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Karri A.

    2013-01-01

    Rural communities are underserved by the medical profession. This shortage is particularly acute for minority rural communities lacking reliable access to minority healthcare professionals. This article reports the results of a study designed to understand the attitudes and responses of rural minority students who participated in a program…

  2. Unusual course of an epidural rhabdomyosarcoma of the upper thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Tsitsopoulos, P D; Tsonidis, C A; Nanasis, K A; Tsoleka, K D; Tavridis, G N

    1995-01-01

    This report deals with a case of rhabdomyosarcoma in the upper thoracic spine. It is of particular interest, not only for the rarity of type and location of this tumour, but for its clinical course, which presented fluctuations of neurological status, included an acute demonstration of complete paraplegia followed by full recovery after conservative treatment, and gradual relapsing of neurological deficit, one year later.

  3. Analgesia for small animal thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Kyriaki; Papazoglou, Lysimachos; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    Thoracic surgery in small animals is considered a painful procedure, resulting in alterations in pulmonary function and respiratory mechanics. Modifications in surgical approach and technique and selection of the appropriate analgesic protocol may improve outcomes in dogs and cats after thoracic surgery. Systemic administration of opioids and other agents, intercostal and intrapleural blocks, and epidural analgesia are among the most common options for pain management after thoracic surgery in small animals.

  4. From "awake" to "monitored anesthesia care" thoracic surgery: A 15 year evolution.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Tommaso C; Tacconi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Although general anesthesia still represents the standard when performing thoracic surgery, the interest toward alternative methods is increasing. These have evolved from the employ of just local or regional analgesia techniques in completely alert patients (awake thoracic surgery), to more complex protocols entailing conscious sedation and spontaneous ventilation. The main rationale of these methods is to prevent serious complications related to general anesthesia and selective ventilation, such as tracheobronchial injury, acute lung injury, and cardiovascular events. Trends toward shorter hospitalization and reduced overall costs have also been indicated in preliminary reports. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery can be successfully employed to manage diverse oncologic conditions, such as malignant pleural effusion, peripheral lung nodules, and mediastinal tumors. Main non-oncologic indications include pneumothorax, emphysema, pleural infections, and interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, as the familiarity with this surgical practice has increased, major operations are now being performed this way. Despite the absence of randomized controlled trials, there is preliminary evidence that monitored anesthesia care protocols in thoracic surgery may be beneficial in high-risk patients, with non-inferior efficacy when compared to standard operations under general anesthesia. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery should enter the armamentarium of modern thoracic surgeons, and adequate training should be scheduled in accredited residency programs.

  5. From “awake” to “monitored anesthesia care” thoracic surgery: A 15 year evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, Tommaso C; Tacconi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Although general anesthesia still represents the standard when performing thoracic surgery, the interest toward alternative methods is increasing. These have evolved from the employ of just local or regional analgesia techniques in completely alert patients (awake thoracic surgery), to more complex protocols entailing conscious sedation and spontaneous ventilation. The main rationale of these methods is to prevent serious complications related to general anesthesia and selective ventilation, such as tracheobronchial injury, acute lung injury, and cardiovascular events. Trends toward shorter hospitalization and reduced overall costs have also been indicated in preliminary reports. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery can be successfully employed to manage diverse oncologic conditions, such as malignant pleural effusion, peripheral lung nodules, and mediastinal tumors. Main non-oncologic indications include pneumothorax, emphysema, pleural infections, and interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, as the familiarity with this surgical practice has increased, major operations are now being performed this way. Despite the absence of randomized controlled trials, there is preliminary evidence that monitored anesthesia care protocols in thoracic surgery may be beneficial in high-risk patients, with non-inferior efficacy when compared to standard operations under general anesthesia. Monitored anesthesia care in thoracic surgery should enter the armamentarium of modern thoracic surgeons, and adequate training should be scheduled in accredited residency programs. PMID:26766966

  6. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Reynolds, Corey L; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K; Kwartler, Callie S; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M; Majesky, Mark W; Swindell, Eric C; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-03-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3-/- mice with p53-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease.

  7. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  8. Thoracic epidural steroid injection for rib fracture pain.

    PubMed

    Rauchwerger, Jacob J; Candido, Kenneth D; Deer, Timothy R; Frogel, Jonathan K; Iadevaio, Robert; Kirschen, Neil B

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for rib fracture pain can be broadly divided into pharmacologic approaches with oral and/or parenteral medication and interventional approaches utilizing neuraxial analgesia or peripheral nerve blocks to provide pain relief. Both approaches attempt to control nociceptive and neuropathic pain secondary to osseous injury and nerve insult, respectively. Success of treatment is ultimately measured by the ability of the selected modality to decrease pain, chest splinting, and to prevent sequelae of injury, such as pneumonia. Typically, opioids and NSAIDs are the drugs of first choice for acute pain because of ease of administration, immediate onset of action, and rapid titration to effect. In contrast, neuropathic pain medications have a slower onset of action and are more difficult to titrate to therapeutic effect. Interventional approaches include interpleural catheters, intercostal nerve blocks, paravertebral nerve blocks, and thoracic and lumbar epidural catheters. Each intervention has its own inherent advantages, disadvantages, and success rates. Rib fracture pain management practice is founded on the thoracic surgical and anesthesiology literature. Articles addressing rib fracture pain are relatively scarce in the pain medicine literature. As life expectancy increases, and as healthcare system modifications are implemented, pain medicine physicians may be consulted to treat increasing number of patients suffering rib fracture pain and may need to resort to novel therapeutic measures because of financial constraints imposed by those changes. Here we present the first published case series of thoracic epidural steroid injections used for management of rib fracture pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  9. CT and MR imaging of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Barile, Antonio; Squillaci, Ettore; Di Cesare, Annamaria; Brunese, Luca; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At present time, both CT and MRI are valuable techniques in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nowadays, CT represents the most widely employed technique for the study of the thoracic aorta. The new generation CTs show sensitivities up to 100% and specificities of 98-99%. Sixteen and wider row detectors provide isotropic pixels, mandatory for the ineludible longitudinal reconstruction. The main limits are related to the X-ray dose expoure and the use of iodinated contrast media. MRI has great potential in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nevertheless, if compared to CT, acquisition times remain longer and movement artifact susceptibility higher. The main MRI disadvantages are claustrophobia, presence of ferromagnetic implants, pacemakers, longer acquisition times with respect to CT, inability to use contrast media in cases of renal insufficiency, lower spatial resolution and less availability than CT. CT is preferred in the acute aortic disease. Nevertheless, since it requires iodinated contrast media and X-ray exposure, it may be adequately replaced by MRI in the follow up of aortic diseases. The main limitation of MRI, however, is related to the scarce visibility of stents and calcifications. PMID:28352783

  10. Cytomegalovirus Immunoglobulin After Thoracic Transplantation: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Paolo; Mohacsi, Paul; Szabolcs, Zoltán; Potena, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly complex pathogen which, despite modern prophylactic regimens, continues to affect a high proportion of thoracic organ transplant recipients. The symptomatic manifestations of CMV infection are compounded by adverse indirect effects induced by the multiple immunomodulatory actions of CMV. These include a higher risk of acute rejection, cardiac allograft vasculopathy after heart transplantation, and potentially bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in lung transplant recipients, with a greater propensity for opportunistic secondary infections. Prophylaxis for CMV using antiviral agents (typically oral valganciclovir or intravenous ganciclovir) is now almost universal, at least in high-risk transplants (D+/R-). Even with extended prophylactic regimens, however, challenges remain. The CMV events can still occur despite antiviral prophylaxis, including late-onset infection or recurrent disease, and patients with ganciclovir-resistant CMV infection or who are intolerant to antiviral therapy require alternative strategies. The CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) and antiviral agents have complementary modes of action. High-titer CMVIG preparations provide passive CMV-specific immunity but also exert complex immunomodulatory properties which augment the antiviral effect of antiviral agents and offer the potential to suppress the indirect effects of CMV infection. This supplement discusses the available data concerning the immunological and clinical effects of CMVIG after heart or lung transplantation.

  11. Endovascular Management of Concomitant Thoracic and Abdominal Aortic Ruptures Resulting from Brucellosis Aortitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Fujitani, Roy M; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu

    2017-01-01

    Acute aortic symptomatology is an unusual manifestation of Brucella melitensis infection. We present a rare case of acute multifocal thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortitis managed exclusively with endovascular surgery. A 71-year-old Hispanic male with a history of atrial fibrillation and prior stroke on chronic anticoagulation presented with shortness of breath and malaise. In addition, he had been treated approximately 1 year previously in Mexico for B. melitensis bacteremia after eating fresh unpasteurized cheese. Computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated an acute rupture of the descending thoracic aorta just proximal to the celiac trunk and synchronous rupture at the abdominal aortic bifurctation. The patient was taken emergently to the hybrid operating room, where synchronous supraceliac thoracic aorta and abdominal aortoiliac stent grafts were deployed under local anesthesia. Completion angiography demonstrated total exclusion of the thoracic and abdominal extravasation with no evidence of endoleak. Twenty hours postoperatively, the patient became acutely obtunded and hypotensive. Repeat CT angiography demonstrated contrast extravasation at the level of the excluded aortic bifurcation. Emergent angiography confirmed a type II endoleak with free extraluminal rupture. Multiple coils were placed at the level of the aortic bifurcation between the left limb of the stent graft and the aortic wall to tamponade the endoleak. No further extravasation was noted on final aortography. Postoperatively, blood cultures confirmed the diagnosis of B. melitensis. The patient was treated with systemic doxycycline, gentamicin, and rifampin. Resolution of the acute event occurred without additional sequelae and he was discharged from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility. Concomitant multifocal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortic infection is a very rare event. In this case, the patient was successfully treated with

  12. Pharmacokinetic optimization of immunosuppressive therapy in thoracic transplantation: part I

    PubMed Central

    Monchaud, Caroline; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Although immunosuppressive treatments and therapeutic drug monitoring have significantly contributed to the increased success of thoracic transplantation, there is currently no consensus on the best immunosuppressive strategies. Maintenance therapy typically consists of a triple-drug regimen including corticosteroids, a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus) and either a purine synthesis antagonist (mycophenolate mofetil or azathioprine) or a mTOR inhibitor (sirolimus or everolimus). The incidence of acute and chronic rejection and of mortality after thoracic transplantation is still high compared to other types of solid organ transplantation. The high allogeneicity and immunogenicity of the lungs justify the use of higher doses of immunosuppressants, putting lung transplant recipients at a higher risk for drug-induced toxicities. All immunosuppressants are characterized by a large intra- and inter-individual variability of their pharmacokinetics and by a narrow therapeutic index. It is essential to know their pharmacokinetic properties and to use them for treatment individualization through therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in order to improve treatment outcome. Unlike the kidneys and the liver, the heart and the lungs are not directly involved in drug metabolism and elimination, which may be the cause of pharmacokinetic differences between patients from all these transplant groups. TDM is mandatory for most immunosuppressants, and has become an integral part of immunosuppressive drug therapy. It is usually based on trough concentrations (C0) monitoring, but other TDM tools include the area under the concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC0-12) or over the first 4 hours post-dose (AUC0-4), as well as other single concentration-time points, such as the concentration 2 hours after dosing (C2). Given the peculiarities of thoracic transplantation, a review of the pharmacokinetics and TDM of the main immunosuppressants used in thoracic

  13. Warm fresh whole blood and thoracic traumain iraq and afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Keneally, Ryan J; Parsons, Andrew M; Willett, Peter B

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic trauma occurred in 10% of the patients seen at US military treatment facilities in Iraq and Afghanistan and 52% of those patients were transfused. Among those transfused, 281 patients received warm fresh whole blood. A previous report documented improved survival with warm fresh whole blood in patients injured in combat without stratification by injury pattern. A later report described an increase in acute lung injuries after its administration. Survivorship and warm fresh whole blood have never been analyzed in a subpopulation at highest risk for lung injuries, such as patients with thoracic trauma. There may be a heterogeneous relationship between whole blood and survival based on likelihood of a concomitant pulmonary injury. In this report, the relationship between warm fresh whole blood and survivorship was analyzed among patients at highest risk for concomitant pulmonary injuries. Patients with thoracic trauma who received a transfusion were identified in the Joint Theater Trauma Registry. Gross mortality rates were compared between whole blood recipients and patients transfused with component therapy only. The association between each blood component and mortality was determined in a regression model. The overall mortality risk was compared between warm fresh whole blood recipients and non-recipients. Patients transfused with warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy had a higher mortality rate than patients transfused only separated blood components (21.3% vs. 12.8%, P < 0.001). When controlling for covariates, transfusion of warm fresh whole blood in addition to component therapy was not associated with increased mortality risk compared with the transfusion of component therapy only (OR 1.247 [95% CI 0.760-2.048], P = 0.382). Patients with combat related thoracic trauma transfused with warm fresh whole blood were not at increased risk for mortality compared to those who received component therapy alone when controlling for covariates.

  14. Evolution in the management of the total thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tad; Martin, Tomas D; Lee, W Anthony; Hess, Philip J; Klodell, Charles T; Tribble, Curtis G; Feezor, Robert J; Beaver, Thomas M

    2009-03-01

    Extensive aneurysms of the ascending, arch, and descending thoracic aorta traditionally have been managed with a 2-stage "elephant trunk" procedure. Single-stage transmediastinal repairs have also been used, because in some patients the entire repair is not completed owing to either complications during first-stage repair or magnitude of the second-stage operation. Since 2006, second-stage elephant trunks have been preferentially completed with endovascular stent grafts in anatomically appropriate patients. This study compares outcomes of 2-stage elephant trunk, single-stage, and hybrid endovascular repairs of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms. This is a single-institution retrospective cohort study of 103 patients (1992-2007) with extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms undergoing 2-stage elephant trunk repair with either surgical (OPEN) or endovascular (TEVAR) completion versus single-stage transmediastinal replacement (SS). Outcomes were analyzed with Statistica 8.0 software (Tulsa, Okla). Of 103 patients, 74 had elephant trunk procedures, 24 TEVAR-eligible and 50 OPEN, and 29 had SS. Completion rates were higher with TEVAR than OPEN (78% vs 47%; P = .01). Seven of 18 TEVARs were performed during the index hospitalization. TEVAR patients had shorter second-stage hospital stay (5.5 vs 16.5 days [P < .01]), required fewer transfusions (P < .01), and had less acute kidney injury (P = .04). There were no differences in mortality, paraplegia, or stroke. Six-month Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for OPEN, TEVAR, and SS were 64%, 78%, and 64% (P = .08). More patients complete the second stage when TEVAR is used after elephant trunk repair, with fewer hospital days and transfusions. TEVAR is feasible and safe in the hybrid management of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms.

  15. Effect of Thoracic Correction Exercises in Upper Body Dysfunction of 94-Year-old Male Participant – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, S.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    2016-01-01

    The case report has been presented to show the effects of thoracic correction exercises on flexed posture in older men with upper body dysfunction using posture analysis software and pectoralis minor muscle length test. The present case is that of a 94-year-old male. He was guided for a specific thoracic correction exercises for 12 weeks. The program included breathing correction, thorax mobility, scapular stability and passive stretching of Pectoralis major and minor, performed thrice a week, 30 min each session, for 12 weeks. Outcome measures included the upper body dysfunction changes by posture analysis software and pectoralis minor muscle length test. The Pre and Post–test of the patient demonstrated significantly greater improvements in hyperkyphosis (forward head posture) and pectoralis minor muscle length. This case study provides a promising exercise intervention that may improve flexed posture in older men with age-related upper body dysfunction. PMID:28208991

  16. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery: The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Keshavjee, Shaf; Spatafora, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Thoracic Surgery at Toronto General Hospital has a history of sustained excellence and commitment to patient care, research and innovation in Thoracic Surgery. Doctors of Thoracic Surgery (DOTSR) continues to be a leading thoracic division training surgeons who practice all over the world--impacting the treatment of patients with thoracic disease. Many leaders in our specialty worldwide have directly or indirectly trained in Toronto. At University Health Network and the University of Toronto, this academic division has continued to contribute and thrive in a highly supportive and productive research and clinical environment.

  17. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  18. The Thoracic Shape of Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2014-01-01

    In hominoids, the broad thorax has been assumed to contribute to their dorsal scapular position. However, the dorsoventral diameter of their cranial thorax was found in one study to be longer in hominoids. There are insufficient data on thoracic shape to explain the relationship between broad thorax and dorsal scapular position. The current study presents data on multilevel cross-sectional shape and volume distribution in a range of primates. Biplanar radiographs of intact fluid-preserved cadavers were taken to measure the cross-sectional shape of ten equally spaced levels through the sternum (called decisternal levels) and the relative volume of the nine intervening thoracic segments. It was found that the cranial thorax of hominoids is larger and broader (except in the first two decisternal levels) than that of other primates. The cranial thorax of hominoids has a longer dorsoventral diameter because the increase in dorsoventral diameter caused by the increase in the volume of the cranial thorax overcompensates for the decrease caused by the broadening of the cranial thorax. The larger and broader cranial thorax in hominoids can be explained as a locomotor adaptation for scapular gliding and as a respiratory adaptation for reducing the effects of orthograde posture on ventilation-perfusion inequality. PMID:24818026

  19. Minor planets: the discovery of minor satellites.

    PubMed

    Binzel, R P; VAN Flandern, T C

    1979-03-02

    The recent confirmation of the discovery of a satellite of the minor planet 532 Herculina indicates that other similar anomalous sightings are probably also due to satellites, which must therefore be numerous and commonplace. There are now 23 candidate satellites for eight minor planets, and no one of these minor planets occulting a star has failed to show evidence of at least one secondary event. Such companions are gravitationally stable but apparently have rapid tidal evolution rates.

  20. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Jean; Griffith Pearson, F; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. OBJECTIVE: To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. METHOD: Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. RESULTS: Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. CONCLUSIONS: Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  1. Early outcomes after left subclavian artery revascularisation in association with thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Dare; Patterson, Benjamin O; Brownrigg, Jack Rw; deBruin, Jorg L; Holt, Peter J; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matthew M

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 40-50% of patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair require left subclavian artery coverage for adequate proximal landing zone. Many of these patients undergo left subclavian artery revascularisation. However, outcomes data for left subclavian artery revascularisation in the context of thoracic endovascular aortic repair remain limited. In this study, 70 left subclavian artery revascularisation procedures, performed on thoracic endovascular aortic repair patients at a tertiary hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. Particular emphasis was placed on revascularisation-related outcomes during staging interval between revascularisation and thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Forty-six (66%) carotid-subclavian bypass, 17 (24%) carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass and 7 (10%) aorto-inominate-carotid-subclavian bypass procedures were performed. There were no strokes or mortalities following left subclavian artery revascularisation procedures alone. Three (10%) minor complications occurred including a seroma, a haematoma and a temporary neuropraxia. Separation of complications following left subclavian artery revascularisation from those of the associated thoracic endovascular aortic repair can be difficult. Early outcomes data from patients who underwent left subclavian artery revascularisation in isolation indicate that the procedure is safe with low complication rates.

  2. Thoracic osteophyte: rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, S; Makarawo, T; Norton, R; Collins, F J

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a difficult problem in thoracic surgery. Esophageal perforations can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or malignant. We report two cases of esophageal perforations caused by thoracic osteophytes and different management strategies leading to successful outcomes. An 80-year-old male presented with chest pain and dysphagia following a fall. On endoscopy, an esophageal perforation and foreign body was noted which was confirmed as a thoracic osteophyte on computed tomography scan. He was managed conservatively as he declined surgery. A 63-year-old male was admitted with dysphagia following a food bolus obstruction. Following esophagoscopy and dilatation, there was clinical and radiological evidence of perforation. During surgery, a thoracic osteophyte was identified as the cause of perforation. The perforation was closed in layers and the osteophyte was trimmed. Both patients recovered well. Thoracic osteophytes are a rare cause of esophageal perforations and a high index of suspicion is required in patients with osteoarthritis who present with esophageal perforations.

  3. Dorsal arthrodesis of thoracic spine and effects on thorax growth in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain; Volpatti, Donatella; Stebel, Marco; Daures, Jean-Pierre; Canavese, Bartolomeo; Cavalli, Fabio

    2007-07-15

    Dorsal arthrodesis of thoracic spine in a prepubertal New Zealand White rabbit model. Evaluating the consequences of dorsal arthrodesis on the growth of the spine, sternum, and thorax in prepubertal rabbits, through the study of CT scans. Vertebral arthrodesis in the treatment of progressive idiopathic scoliosis in prepubertal patients is not ideal, but is still a choice in treating major deformities of the spine. Postoperative assessment of spinal deformity is essential, feasible, and recordable through CT scans. Twelve female rabbits, 9 weeks old, were subjected to surgery for dorsal arthrodesis of the upper thoracic spine. Surgery involved the implant of 2 "C"-shaped titanium bars, which were placed beside the spinous processes of the thoracic vertebrae. Three CT scans were performed, 10 (T1), 55 (T2), and 139 (T3) days after surgery. Measures were obtained by Myrian Pro software for 3 different groups: G1 with complete fusion, G2 with incomplete fusion, and G3 sham-operated. The average of the dorsoventral/laterolateral thoracic diameter ratio at fused levels is lower than 1 in G1 as well as in G2; on the contrary, in G3 is higher than 1. The average growth of the sternum length between T1 and T2 and between T2 and T3 is minor in G1 than in G2 and G3. The dorsal and ventral lengths of thoracic vertebral bodies in the spinal segment D1-D6 is smaller in G1 and G2 than in G3, whereas no differences were observed between the 3 groups in the D7-D12 segment without arthrodesis. Dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal rabbits changes thoracic growth patterns. In operated rabbits, the dorsoventral thoracic diameter grows more slowly than the laterolateral thoracic diameter. The sternum as well as the lengths of thoracic vertebral bodies in the spinal segment D1-D6 grow less. The crankshaft phenomenon is evident at the fused vertebral levels where there is a reduction of thoracic kyphosis.

  4. Wartime thoracic injury: perspectives in modern warfare.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Gifford, Shaun M; Calhoon, John H; McNeil, Jeffrey D

    2010-04-01

    Thoracic injury represents a major source of combat morbidity and mortality. The overall killed-in-action rate has decreased, whereas the died-of-wounds rate has increased; the creation of the Joint Theater Trauma Registry allows for improved documentation. This report seeks to provide a realistic contemporary look at thoracic injury sustained by military forces and civilian casualties during the current wartime experience. The Joint Theater Trauma Registry was queried between 2002 and 2008. Patients receiving treatment for thoracic injuries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition, diagnosis and procedure codes. All US soldiers, coalition forces, and local civilians were included in the analysis. There were 33,755 casualties identified during the study period, of which 1,660 patients (4.9%) sustained thoracic injury. Blast mechanism was the most prominent mode of injury, accounting for 45.8%. The mean Injury Severity Score in this cohort of patients was 14.9. A total of 4,232 procedures were performed, resulting in an average of 2.5 thoracic procedures per patient. Fifty percent of casualties were civilian, and 34% were US troops, with the remainder occurring in coalition forces. Overall mortality was 12%. This report provides a realistic account of current wartime thoracic injury. In contrast to previous wars, the majority of thoracic injury is secondary to blast injury as opposed to penetrating trauma, and the resultant mortality rate is higher. This report breaks down thoracic injuries to both US troops and civilian personal and provides realistic expectations for thoracic injury during future combat planning. Copyright (c) 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT, include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems.

  6. Ossification of thoracic ligamenta flava

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Minoru, O.; Russell, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    Although ligamentum flavum ossification (LFO) often occurs in normal persons, there are no reports of its detection on lateral chest radiographs made during screening examinations. Review of 1,744 consecutive lateral chest radiographs identified LFO in 6.2% of males and 4.8% of females. LFO occurred mainly at the intervertebral segments from T9-T10 through T12-L1. Most prevalent was the hook-shaped LFO, protruding inferoirly from the inferior facets into the projections of the intervertabral foramina. Though LFO can cause severe neurologic symptoms, none of the affected persons in this study reported such symptoms. LFO was first visualized radiographically when the subjects were 20-40 years old, and it may be a physiologic condition. The LFO in these cases existed independent of thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and degenerative osteoarthritis.

  7. [Thoracic nocardiosis - a clinical report].

    PubMed

    Vale, Artur; Guerra, Miguel; Martins, Daniel; Lameiras, Angelina; Miranda, José; Vouga, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia genus microorganisms are ubiquitous, Gram positive aerobic bacterias, responsible for disease mainly in immunocompromised hosts, with cellular immune response commitment. Inhalation is the main form of transmition and pulmonary disease is the most frequent presentation. Dissemination may occur by contiguity and also via hematogenous. The clinical and imaging presentation is not specific, and diagnosis is obtained after identification of Nocardia bacteria in biological samples. Since there are no reliable studies that indicate the best therapeutic option, treatment should be individualized and based on antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Surgical drainage should also be considered in all patients. The authors present a clinical case of a patient with thoracic nocardiosis, and make a short literature review on the theme.

  8. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline: Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fan, Eddy; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Goligher, Ewan C; Hodgson, Carol L; Munshi, Laveena; Walkey, Allan J; Adhikari, Neill K J; Amato, Marcelo B P; Branson, Richard; Brower, Roy G; Ferguson, Niall D; Gajic, Ognjen; Gattinoni, Luciano; Hess, Dean; Mancebo, Jordi; Meade, Maureen O; McAuley, Daniel F; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Rubin, Eileen; Seckel, Maureen; Slutsky, Arthur S; Talmor, Daniel; Thompson, B Taylor; Wunsch, Hannah; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Brozek, Jan; Brochard, Laurent J

    2017-05-01

    This document provides evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of mechanical ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A multidisciplinary panel conducted systematic reviews and metaanalyses of the relevant research and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology for clinical recommendations. For all patients with ARDS, the recommendation is strong for mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volumes (4-8 ml/kg predicted body weight) and lower inspiratory pressures (plateau pressure < 30 cm H2O) (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong for prone positioning for more than 12 h/d (moderate confidence in effect estimates). For patients with moderate or severe ARDS, the recommendation is strong against routine use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (high confidence in effect estimates) and conditional for higher positive end-expiratory pressure (moderate confidence in effect estimates) and recruitment maneuvers (low confidence in effect estimates). Additional evidence is necessary to make a definitive recommendation for or against the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with severe ARDS. The panel formulated and provided the rationale for recommendations on selected ventilatory interventions for adult patients with ARDS. Clinicians managing patients with ARDS should personalize decisions for their patients, particularly regarding the conditional recommendations in this guideline.

  9. [Thoracic actinomycosis versus bronchial cancer].

    PubMed

    Brombacher-Frey, I; Wöckel, W; Kreusser, T

    1992-01-01

    We report on 4 thoracic actinomycoses; in three of these four cases a bronchial carcinoma was suspected, and in case No. 2 this carcinoma had been considered to be in a very advanced and inoperable stage. A man of 51 years of age was in a generally run-down condition. He also noticed that his sputum was tinged with blood. The x-ray film showed a large space-occupying growth at the right lung hilus. Repeated perbronchial biopsies of the focus did not yield any diagnosis. Actinomycosis was identified histologically only in the tissue samples obtained via thoracotomy. After a three-month penicillin course the hilar shadow receded. A 61-year old male patient was transferred to our Pneumological Hospital, being strongly suspected of suffering from an extensive bronchial carcinoma, and having multiple intrathoracic space-occupying growths as well as pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and an infiltration of the left thoracic wall with fistula formation; however, histological examination of skin biopsies revealed that he was suffering from actinomycosis. Antibiotic therapy cured him completely in a six-month course. In a man of 32 years of age who had been indulging for many years in a severe abuse of nicotin, we suspected a central bronchial carcinoma on the basis of his x-ray, but histology of the tissue taken from the space-occupying growth via diagnostic thoracotomy revealed that this patient, too, suffered from actinomycosis. Complete recession occurred after several months of antibiotic treatment. A woman of 82 years had been an inpatient for several months in another hospital because of relapsing pleuropneumonias on the right side. She was transferred to us as an outpatient after a renewed relapse. We conducted a transcutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the right indurating pleural effusion. A few actinomyces filaments were seen on histological examination of the purulent exudate. Hence, actinomycosis was confirmed. After antibiotic therapy the finding receded

  10. Robotic selective postganglionic thoracic sympathectomy for the treatment of hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Coveliers, Hans; Meyer, Mark; Gharagozloo, Farid; Wisselink, Willem; Rauwerda, Jan; Margolis, Marc; Tempesta, Barbara; Strother, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The surgical management of hyperhidrosis is controversial. Robotic surgical systems with their high-definition magnified 3-dimensional view and increased maneuverability in a confined space may facilitate the technique of selective sympathectomy (ramicotomy). We present a case series of patients undergoing selective postganglionic thoracic sympathectomy using robotic technology. This study is a case series analysis of patients who underwent selective postganglionic thoracic sympathectomy from July 2006 to November 2011. The operation was performed on a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) platform. The robot was used for pleural dissection and division of the postganglionic sympathetic fibers and the communicating rami. The success of sympathectomy was assessed by intraoperative temperature measurement of the ipsilateral upper extremity, patient interviews, and scoring of the symptomatic nature of hyperhidrosis based on the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There were 110 sympathectomies performed in 55 patients (25 men, 30 women). Simultaneous bilateral sympathectomy was performed in all patients. Median age was 28 years (range, 16 to 65 years). There was no conversion to thoracotomy. Complications were minor and were seen in 5 of 55 patients (9%). There were no deaths. Median hospital stay was 1 day (range, 1 to 4 days). Of the 55 patients, 53 (96%) had sustained relief of their hyperhidrosis at a median follow-up of 24 months (range, 3 to 36 months), and compensatory sweating was seen in 4 patients (7.2%). Robotic thoracoscopic selective sympathectomy is an effective, feasible, and safe procedure with excellent relief of hyperhidrosis and low rates of compensatory sweating and complications. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Beginning of a Journey. A Report on Minority Programs in Predominantly White Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Frank; And Others

    Dental schools across the country have begun to devote special attention to educating minority students in order to alleviate the acute shortage of minority dental manpower. The Workshop on Minority Education in Dentistry presented issues and approaches to answering a basic set of questions: How can qualified minority students be identified and…

  12. Thoracic trauma: when and how to intervene.

    PubMed

    Meredith, J Wayne; Hoth, J Jason

    2007-02-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in patients younger than 40 years of age. Thoracic injuries are common and often can be managed by tube thoracostomy. In many patients, however, the thoracic injuries must be repaired surgically in one of three time periods: immediate, urgent, or delayed thoracotomy. In this article, we describe the general approach to effectively managing thoracic trauma patients. We review common injuries and scenarios that may be encountered by the surgeon and discuss the considerations and variables that enter into the decision-making process for operative intervention.

  13. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  14. Thoracic ranula: an extremely rare case.

    PubMed

    Pang, Claudine Elizabeth; Lee, Tee Sin; Pang, Kenny Peter; Pang, Yoke Teen

    2005-03-01

    We present the first case of a thoracic ranula which originated from the left submandibular area extending into the subcutaneous tissue planes of the anterior chest wall. The patient had a history of surgery for a previous benign left salivary gland cyst, and presented with an enlarging mass in the anterior chest wall. This was a recurrence of a ranula, with an extension into the anterior thoracic wall. The thoracic ranula was excised, together with ipsilateral sublingual and submandibular glands, via a transcervical approach. No recurrence was detected over a 3-year post-operative follow up.

  15. Combined Thoracic Ultrasound Assessment during a Successful Weaning Trial Predicts Postextubation Distress.

    PubMed

    Silva, Stein; Ait Aissa, Dalinda; Cocquet, Pierre; Hoarau, Lucille; Ruiz, Jean; Ferre, Fabrice; Rousset, David; Mora, Michel; Mari, Arnaud; Fourcade, Olivier; Riu, Béatrice; Jaber, Samir; Bataille, Bénoît

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that isolated sonographic assessment of the respiratory, cardiac, or neuromuscular functions in mechanically ventilated patients may assist in identifying patients at risk of postextubation distress. The aim of the present study was to prospectively investigate the value of an integrated thoracic ultrasound evaluation, encompassing bedside respiratory, cardiac, and diaphragm sonographic data in predicting postextubation distress. Longitudinal ultrasound data from 136 patients who were extubated after passing a trial of pressure support ventilation were measured immediately after the start and at the end of this trial. In case of postextubation distress (31 of 136 patients), an additional combined ultrasound assessment was performed while the patient was still in acute respiratory failure. We applied machine-learning methods to improve the accuracy of the related predictive assessments. Overall, integrated thoracic ultrasound models accurately predict postextubation distress when applied to thoracic ultrasound data immediately recorded before the start and at the end of the trial of pressure support ventilation (learning sample area under the curve: start, 0.921; end, 0.951; test sample area under the curve: start, 0.972; end, 0.920). Among integrated thoracic ultrasound data, the recognition of lung interstitial edema and the increased telediastolic left ventricular pressure were the most relevant predictive factors. In addition, the use of thoracic ultrasound appeared to be highly accurate in identifying the causes of postextubation distress. The decision to attempt extubation could be significantly assisted by an integrative, dynamic, and fully bedside ultrasonographic assessment of cardiac, lung, and diaphragm functions.

  16. Minority Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Minority Women's Health This section of womenshealth.gov takes a ... Health email updates. Enter email address Submit Minority Women's Health news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link ...

  17. Higher Flexibility and Better Immediate Spontaneous Correction May Not Gain Better Results for Nonstructural Thoracic Curve in Lenke 5C AIS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanbin; Lin, Guanfeng; Wang, Shengru; Zhang, Jianguo; Shen, Jianxiong; Wang, Yipeng; Guo, Jianwei; Yang, Xinyu; Zhao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. Retrospective study. Objective. To study the behavior of the unfused thoracic curve in Lenke type 5C during the follow-up and to identify risk factors for its correction loss. Summary of Background Data. Few studies have focused on the spontaneous behaviors of the unfused thoracic curve after selective thoracolumbar or lumbar fusion during the follow-up and the risk factors for spontaneous correction loss. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 45 patients (41 females and 4 males) with AIS who underwent selective TL/L fusion from 2006 to 2012 in a single institution. The follow-up averaged 36 months (range, 24–105 months). Patients were divided into two groups. Thoracic curves in group A improved or maintained their curve magnitude after spontaneous correction, with a negative or no correction loss during the follow-up. Thoracic curves in group B deteriorated after spontaneous correction with a positive correction loss. Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were built to identify the risk factors for correction loss of the unfused thoracic curves. Results. The minor thoracic curve was 26° preoperatively. It was corrected to 13° immediately with a spontaneous correction of 48.5%. At final follow-up it was 14° with a correction loss of 1°. Thoracic curves did not deteriorate after spontaneous correction in 23 cases in group A, while 22 cases were identified with thoracic curve progressing in group B. In multivariate analysis, two risk factors were independently associated with thoracic correction loss: higher flexibility and better immediate spontaneous correction rate of thoracic curve. Conclusion. Posterior selective TL/L fusion with pedicle screw constructs is an effective treatment for Lenke 5C AIS patients. Nonstructural thoracic curves with higher flexibility or better immediate correction are more likely to progress during the follow-up and close attentions must be paid to these patients in case of decompensation. Level of Evidence: 4

  18. A Case Of Atypical Presentation of Thoracic Osteomyelitis & Paraspinal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Utkarsh

    2008-01-01

    Here presented is a case involving a 44-year-old man with a chief complaint of sharp lateral right-sided rib pain with notable radiation to the anterior portion of the thorax and minor radiation around the lateral back. The etiology of the pain and radiculopathy, which was initially attributed to a right-sided rib fracture, was later accurately credited to a paraspinal abscess discovered on a lateral X-ray of the thoracic spine. Subsequently, studies including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and bone scan all confirmed the diagnosis of a paraspinal abscess between the right lobe and its neighboring T9 and T10 vertebrae. The mass was biopsied and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Appropriate surgical and medical intervention was possible due to the early diagnosis of the abscess. PMID:19148317

  19. Office of Minority Health

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Office of Minority Health A A A En Español Newsroom Contact Us Search: About OMH What We Do Resource Center Policy and Data ... Funding and Programs History Leadership Regional Staff State Minority Health Contacts Offices of Minority Health at HHS ...

  20. Ethnic Minorities and Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Hull, Marion

    Developments in communications technology should become a major concern of minorities (native Americans and Americans of African, Asian, and Hispanic racial or ethnic origin). Although minorities are disillusioned with broadcast television because television decision makers have not been sensitive to minority needs, they have shown interest…

  1. Minorities and Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Lawrence; Petty, Reginald

    This publication explores needed changes in the career preparation and education for minorities and examines the implications of career education emphases for minorities in the U.S. Contents include: (1) "An Overview of Minorities and Career Education" by L. Davenport and R. Petty, (2) "Public Schools, Public Policy, and Public Problems: Some…

  2. Minorities and Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Lawrence; Petty, Reginald

    This publication explores needed changes in the career preparation and education for minorities and examines the implications of career education emphases for minorities in the U.S. Contents include: (1) "An Overview of Minorities and Career Education" by L. Davenport and R. Petty, (2) "Public Schools, Public Policy, and Public Problems: Some…

  3. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph H L; Ng, Calvin S H; Wong, Jasper K W; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-03-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure.

  4. Postmortem genetic testing should be recommended in sudden cardiac death cases due to thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Gago-Díaz, Marina; Ramos-Luis, Eva; Zoppis, Silvia; Zorio, Esther; Molina, Pilar; Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Giner, Juan; Sobrino, Beatriz; Amigo, Jorge; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Carracedo, Ángel; Brion, María

    2017-04-08

    Acute thoracic aortic dissections and ruptures, the main life-threatening complications of the corresponding aneurysms, are an important cause of sudden cardiac death. Despite the usefulness of the molecular diagnosis of these conditions in the clinical setting, the corresponding forensic field remains largely unexplored. The main goal of this study was to explore and validate a new massive parallel sequencing candidate gene​ assay as a diagnostic tool for acute thoracic aortic dissection autopsy cases. Massive parallel sequencing of 22 thoracic aortic disease candidate genes performed in 17 cases of thoracic aortic dissection using AmpliSeq and Ion Proton technologies. Genetic variants were filtered by location, type, and frequency at the Exome Aggregation Consortium and an internal database and further classified based on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) recommendations published in 2015. All prioritized results were confirmed by traditional sequencing. From the total of 10 potentially pathogenic genetic variants identified in 7 out of the 17 initial samples, 2 of them were further classified as pathogenic, 2 as likely pathogenic, 1 as possibly benign, and the remaining 5 as variants of uncertain significance, reaching a molecular autopsy yield of 23%, approximately. This massive parallel sequencing candidate gene approach proved useful for the molecular autopsy of aortic dissection sudden cardiac death cases and should therefore be progressively incorporated into the forensic field, being especially beneficial for the anticipated diagnosis and risk stratification of any other family member at risk of developing the same condition.

  5. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery-technical issues.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabor; Castillo, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia.

  6. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  7. Calcification of thoracic aorta - solar eclipse sign.

    PubMed

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-08-29

    Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'.

  8. Cardio-thoracic surgical experience in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Mbamendame, Sylvestre; Ngakani Offobo, Silvère; Kaba, Mory Mamadi; Mbourou, Jean Bernard; Diané, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Our experience in cardio-thoracic surgery focuses on thoracic activity. The minimum fare for traumatisms, infectious pathology and tumoral pathology requires, for its improvement, the acquisition of a technical platform and of an adequate medical infrastructure, with a rational organisation of the care sequence. Vascular surgery calls for the training of qualified human resources, and the great demand in heart surgery calls upon the public powers for the construction of infrastructures, and the formation of necessary superstructures. PMID:27904845

  9. Activities at Thoracic Aortic Research Center, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato

    PubMed Central

    Trimarchi, Santi; Kamman, Arnoud; Lomazzi, Chiara; Segreti, Sara; Cova, Marta; De Vincentiis, Carlo; Frigiola, Alessandro; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Marrocco-Trischitta, Massimiliano M.; Grassi, Viviana; Morganti, Simone; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Rampoldi, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The Thoracic Aortic Research Center (TARC) of the IRCCS Policlinico San Donato (PSD) aims to promote research on thoracic aortic diseases, to disclose the scientific knowledge and clinical experience and to develop new scientific paths within the Hospital and the aortic community, in collaboration with other national and international centres. Thoracic Aortic Research Center collaborates with many centres in both Europe (e.g. University of Utrecht, the Netherlands) and the USA (e.g. University of Michigan). This has led to multiple highly regarded publications in respected cardiovascular journals and has led to several PhD programmes resulting in doctorate degrees. Within Italy, in association with the Bioengineering School of the University of Pavia, TARC has founded the “BETA-lab” (Biomechanics for Endovascular Treatment of the Aorta laboratory), where MDs, Bioengineers, and PhD fellows conduct experimental studies using in vitro/ex vivo models of the physiologic aorta and aortic diseases. Furthermore, a database (iCardiocloud) where the medical imaging of cardiovascular patients from the PSD is structured, for in silico analysis utilizing computational fluid dynamics, and in vitro studies using also 3D printed aortic models. With the role of principal investigator or co-investigator, TARC at PSD has been participating in other several projects, including the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection, the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group, the European Registry of Endovascular Aortic Repair Complications, the ADSORB and ASSIST trials, and the GREAT registry. International collaborations have included also studies on predictors of aortic growth after dissection with the Yale University and University of Virginia, and on aortic biomarkers with the University of Tokyo. PMID:28533718

  10. Thoracic trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Keneally, Ryan; Szpisjak, Dale

    2013-05-01

    Thoracic injuries are common among civilian trauma and have a high associated mortality. The use of body armor and exposure to different mechanisms of injury in combat setting could lead to different injury patterns and incidences from those found in peacetime. Thoracic trauma incidence rates and mortality risks were calculated from data extracted from the Joint Theatre Trauma Registry. Among patients injured in military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, 10.0% sustained thoracic injuries and had a mortality rate of 10.5%. Penetrating injuries were the most common mechanism of injury. The most common thoracic injury was pulmonary contusion. The highest mortality rate was in the subset of patients with thoracic vascular injuries or flail chest. The variables most strongly associated with mortality were number of units of blood transfused, admission base deficit, international normalization ratio, pH, Abbreviated Injury Scale scores for head and neck regions, and Injury Severity Score. Blunt injuries had the same mortality risk as penetrating injuries. Combat-related thoracic trauma is common and associated with significant mortality in Iraq and Afghanistan.

  11. Clinical innovations in Philippine thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery in the Philippines followed the development of thoracic surgery in the United States and Europe. With better understanding of the physiology of the open chest and refinements in thoracic anesthetic and surgical approaches, Filipino surgeons began performing thoracoplasties, then lung resections for pulmonary tuberculosis and later for lung cancer in specialty hospitals dealing with pulmonary diseases—first at the Quezon Institute (QI) and presently at the Lung Center of the Philippines although some university and private hospitals made occasional forays into the chest. Esophageal surgery began its early attempts during the post-World War II era at the Philippine General Hospital (PGH), a university hospital affiliated with the University of the Philippines. With the introduction of minimally invasive thoracic surgical approaches, Filipino thoracic surgeons have managed to keep up with their Asian counterparts although the problems of financial reimbursement typical of a developing country remain. The need for creative innovative approaches of a focused multidisciplinary team will advance the boundaries of thoracic surgery in the Philippines. PMID:27651936

  12. Internal thoracic artery grafting in the elderly patient undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: room for process improvement?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T Bruce; Coombs, Laura P; Peterson, Eric D

    2002-05-01

    The acute and long-term benefits of internal thoracic artery grafting are clear in younger patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The elderly, however, face higher surgical risks and have shorter life expectancy, and thus the use of internal thoracic artery grafting in this age group has been debated. This study examined the use, complication risks, and operative (30-day) mortality associated with internal thoracic artery grafting in patients 75 years of age and older. Between 1996 and 1999, 522,656 patients in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Cardiac Database underwent primary, nonemergency-salvage coronary artery bypass grafting; of these, 99,942 were 75 years of age or older. The influence of internal thoracic artery use on operative mortality and 5 major complications in this elderly group was examined by means of (1) risk adjustment (adjusting for 28 baseline risk factors and site) and (2) a treatment propensity score analysis that compares patients with similar baseline likelihood for receiving an internal thoracic artery graft. In the National Cardiac Database 77.4% of patients aged 75 to 84 years received an internal thoracic artery graft compared with 93.5% for those aged 55 years or less. In this elderly group use of the internal thoracic artery was strongly associated with decreased operative mortality (unadjusted mortality, 6.20% vs. 4.05%; P <.0001) that persisted after controlling for baseline risk and provider effects (adjusted odds ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence intervals, 0.79-0.91). This mortality benefit was seen among those with low-to-high baseline propensity for receiving an internal thoracic artery graft. Use of the internal thoracic artery in elderly patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting provides an acute survival benefit. This benefit is similar to that seen in younger patients and persists after adjusting for both patient and provider selection factors. The internal thoracic artery appears to be underused

  13. Imaging of nontraumatic thoracic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Stöger, Lauran; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Geurts, Bram H J

    2017-03-01

    Acute chest symptoms form an important incentive for imaging in the emergency setting. This review discusses the radiologic features of various vascular and pulmonary diseases leading to acute respiratory distress and recent developments on important emergency radiologic examinations. Recently, triple-rule-out computed tomography protocol was introduced in diagnosis of chest pain, and advancing computed tomography technology and knowledge have led to discussion on treatment of pulmonary embolism. Diffuse pulmonary opacities remain a diagnostic dilemma in the emergency setting and although imaging findings can often be nonspecific, they help in guiding toward accurate diagnosis and timely management. Though promising, triple-rule-out is not yet justified because of low incidence of additional findings compared with conventional computed tomography angiography in chest pain, but it might be suited for clinical practice in the near future. Relevance of isolated subsegmental pulmonary embolism is unknown and research on this topic is needed and on its way. We provided some key findings in differentiating diffuse pulmonary opacities and describe the additional value of chest ultrasound in this clinical dilemma. A brief sidestep to pneumothorax is made, as this is also a frequent finding in the acute dyspneic patient, as well as in patients with acute chest pain.

  14. Thoracic Re-irradiation for Locally Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed

    Aktan, Meryem; Kanyilmaz, Gul; Koc, Mehmet; Aras, Serhat

    2016-11-01

    Background: Patients with recurrent or progressive lung cancer experience a significant symptom burden, negatively affecting quality of life and reducing life expectancy. Thoracic re-irradiation can be used for palliative treatment to relieve symptoms or as a curative treatment. Methods: Using patient charts, we identified and reviewed 28 cases that had received palliative thoracic re-irradiation for recurrent lung cancer. Results: Before re-irradiation, 32% of patients had stage III non-small cell lung cancer and six had small cell lung cancer. The median interval between treatments was 18.7 months. Median follow-up was 31.2 months from the initial radiotherapy and 5 months after re-irradiation. A better performance status before re-irradiation (<80 vs >80, p=0.09) and a lower overlap 90% isodose (<70 vs >70, p=0.09) showed trends toward improved survival. Grade 1-2 toxicity from re-irradiation was recorded in 12/28 patients, and no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity was encountered. Conclusion: The role of palliative treatment in survival is not clear but it can provide symptomatic relief in patients, with no high grade toxicity. Further studies with greater patient numbers and longer follow-up times should facilitate determination of the role of this treatment in toxicity and effects on survival. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Thoracic Re-irradiation for Locally Recurrent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aktan, Meryem; Kanyilmaz, Gul; Koc, Mehmet; Aras, Serhat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with recurrent or progressive lung cancer experience a significant symptom burden, negatively affecting quality of life and reducing life expectancy. Thoracic re-irradiation can be used for palliative treatment to relieve symptoms or as a curative treatment. Methods: Using patient charts, we identified and reviewed 28 cases that had received palliative thoracic re-irradiation for recurrent lung cancer. Results: Before re-irradiation, 32% of patients had stage III non-small cell lung cancer and six had small cell lung cancer. The median interval between treatments was 18.7 months. Median follow-up was 31.2 months from the initial radiotherapy and 5 months after re-irradiation. A better performance status before re-irradiation (<80 vs >80, p=0.09) and a lower overlap 90% isodose (<70 vs >70, p=0.09) showed trends toward improved survival. Grade 1-2 toxicity from re-irradiation was recorded in 12/28 patients, and no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity was encountered. Conclusion: The role of palliative treatment in survival is not clear but it can provide symptomatic relief in patients, with no high grade toxicity. Further studies with greater patient numbers and longer follow-up times should facilitate determination of the role of this treatment in toxicity and effects on survival. PMID:28032737

  16. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Marie; Safain, Mina G; Zerris, Vasilios A; Kryzanski, James T; Thomas, Christine B; Magge, Subu N; Riesenburger, Ron I

    2014-10-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a proliferative lesion of the synovial membranes. Knees, hips, and other large weight-bearing joints are most commonly affected. PVNS rarely presents in the spine, in particular the thoracic segments. We present a patient with PVNS in the thoracic spine and describe its clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathologic features, and treatment as well as providing the first comprehensive meta-analysis and review of the literature on this topic, to our knowledge. A total of 28 publications reporting 56 patients were found. The lumbar and cervical spine were most frequently involved (40% and 36% of patients, respectively) with infrequent involvement of the thoracic spine (24% of patients). PVNS affects a wide range of ages, but has a particular predilection for the thoracic spine in younger patients. The mean age in the thoracic group was 22.8 years and was significantly lower than the cervical and lumbar groups (42.4 and 48.6 years, respectively; p=0.0001). PVNS should be included in the differential diagnosis of osteodestructive lesions of the spine, especially because of its potential for local recurrence. The goal of treatment should be complete surgical excision. Although the pathogenesis is not clear, mechanical strain may play an important role, especially in cervical and lumbar PVNS. The association of thoracic lesions and younger age suggests that other factors, such as neoplasia, derangement of lipid metabolism, perturbations of humoral and cellular immunity, and other undefined patient factors, play a role in the development of thoracic PVNS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiple choice minority game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, F. K.; Chau, H. F.

    2003-03-01

    Minority game is a model of heterogeneous players who think inductively. In this game, each player chooses one out of two alternatives every turn and those who end up in the minority side wins. It is instructive to extend the minority game by allowing players to choose one out of many alternatives. Nevertheless, such an extension is not straight-forward due to difficulties in finding a set of reasonable, unbiased and computationally feasible strategies. Here, we propose a variation of the minority game where every player has more than two options. Results of numerical simulations agree with the expectation that our multiple choices minority game exhibits similar behavior as the original two-choice minority game.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Disarray as A Mechanism for Greater Abdominal vs. Thoracic Aortic Stiffness with Aging in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Xin; Vatner, Dorothy E; McNulty, Tara; Bishop, Sanford; Sun, Zhe; Shen, You-Tang; Chen, Li; Meininger, Gerald A; Vatner, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased vascular stiffness is central to the pathophysiology of aging, hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. However, relatively few studies have examined vascular stiffness in both the thoracic and abdominal aorta with aging, despite major differences in anatomy, embryological origin and relation to aortic aneurysm. Approach and Results The two other unique features of this study were 1) to study young (9±1 years) and old (26±1 years) male monkeys, and 2) to study direct and continuous measurements of aortic pressure and thoracic and abdominal aortic diameters in conscious monkeys. As expected, aortic stiffness, β, was increased p<0.05, 2–3 fold, in old vs. young thoracic aorta, and augmented further with superimposition of acute hypertension with phenylephrine. Surprisingly, stiffness was not greater in old thoracic aorta than young abdominal aorta. These results can be explained in part by the collagen/elastin ratio, but more importantly, by disarray of collagen and elastin, which correlated best with vascular stiffness. However, vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness, was not different in thoracic vs. abdominal aorta in either young or old monkeys. Conclusions Thus, aortic stiffness increases with aging as expected, but the most severe increases in aortic stiffness observed in the abdominal aorta is novel, where values in young monkeys equaled, or even exceeded, values of thoracic aortic stiffness in old monkeys. These results can be explained by alterations in collagen/elastin ratio, but even more importantly by collagen and elastin disarray. PMID:26891739

  19. Long thoracic nerve palsy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C E; Kenrick, M M; Blum, M V

    1975-08-01

    Twelve patients who had previously been treated for palsy of the long thoracic nerve of Bell and resultant serratus anterior paralysis were examined in a follow-up study designed to determine their extent of recovery and/or residual disability. The patients' histories were reviewed, following which they were recalled for updating of the history and reexamination. It was found that those patients whose lesions were due to acute trauma had only partial or no recovery of serratus function, while those with infectious, toxic, allergic or idiopathic etiologies had partial or complete recovery. The occurrence of a prolonged interval between onset of symptoms and institution of therapy was found to adversely affect prognosis. Among those patients with no recovery of serratus anterior function, some were able to maintain relatively good active motion in the affected shoulder by substituting with the trapezius.

  20. The Trojan minor planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Christopher E.

    1988-08-01

    There are (March, 1988) 3774 minor planets which have received a permanent number. Of these, there are some whose mean distance to the sun is very nearly equal to that of Jupiter, and whose heliocentric longitudes from that planet are about 60°, so that the three bodies concerned (sun, Jupiter, minor planet) make an approximate equilateral triangle. These minor planets, which occur in two distinct groups, one preceding Jupiter and one following, have received the names of the heroes of the Trojan war. This paper concerns the 49 numbered minor planets of this group.

  1. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients. PMID:26147725

  2. Endovascular Repair of Localized Pathological Lesions of the Descending Thoracic Aorta: Midterm Results

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Cherif; Villard, Jacques; Boussel, Loic; Farhat, Fadi; Robin, Jacques; Revel, Didier; Douek, Philippe

    2007-07-15

    The endoluminal stent-graft represents an attractive and a less invasive technique for treatment of various diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Talent endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of various localized diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. Over a 3-year period, Talent thoracic endografts were placed in 40 patients with a high surgical risk, presenting a localized lesion of the descending thoracic aorta: degenerative aneurysm (n = 13), acute traumatic rupture (n = 11), acute Stanford type B aortic dissection (n = 6), false aneurysm (n = 7), and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 3). Fifteen patients (37.5%) were treated as emergencies. The feasibility of endovascular treatment and sizing of the aorta and stent-grafts were determined preoperatively by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and intraoperative angiography. Immediate and mid-term technical and clinical success was assessed by clinical and MRA follow-up. Endovascular treatment was completed successfully in all 40 patients, with no conversion to open repair or intraoperative mortality. The mean operative time was 37.5 {+-} 7 min. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 10% (n = 4), all in emergency cases, for causes not related to the endograft. The primary technical success was 92.5%. The mean follow-up period was 15 {+-} 5 months. The survival rate was 95% (n = 35). Diminution of the aneurismal size was observed in 47.5% (n = 19). We conclude that endovascular treatment of the various localized diseases of the descending thoracic aorta is a promising, feasible, alternative technique to open surgery in well-selected patients.

  3. Exposure to 100% Oxygen Abolishes the Impairment of Fracture Healing after Thoracic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Julia; Bindl, Ronny; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Gröger, Michael; Wagner, Katja; Scheuerle, Angelika; Radermacher, Peter; Ignatius, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In polytrauma patients a thoracic trauma is one of the most critical injuries and an important trigger of post-traumatic inflammation. About 50% of patients with thoracic trauma are additionally affected by bone fractures. The risk for fracture malunion is considerably increased in such patients, the pathomechanisms being poorly understood. Thoracic trauma causes regional alveolar hypoxia and, subsequently, hypoxemia, which in turn triggers local and systemic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to unravel the role of oxygen in impaired bone regeneration after thoracic trauma. We hypothesized that short-term breathing of 100% oxygen in the early post-traumatic phase ameliorates inflammation and improves bone regeneration. Mice underwent a femur osteotomy alone or combined with blunt chest trauma 100% oxygen was administered immediately after trauma for two separate 3 hour intervals. Arterial blood gas tensions, microcirculatory perfusion and oxygenation were assessed at 3, 9 and 24 hours after injury. Inflammatory cytokines and markers of oxidative/nitrosative stress were measured in plasma, lung and fracture hematoma. Bone healing was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21. Thoracic trauma induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation and impaired bone healing. Short-term exposure to 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase significantly attenuated systemic and local inflammatory responses and improved fracture healing without provoking toxic side effects, suggesting that hyperoxia could induce anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative effects after severe injury. These results suggest that breathing of 100% oxygen in the acute post-traumatic phase might reduce the risk of poorly healing fractures in severely injured patients.

  4. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  5. Thoracic sympathectomy: a review of current indications.

    PubMed

    Hashmonai, Moshe; Cameron, Alan E P; Licht, Peter B; Hensman, Chris; Schick, Christoph H

    2016-04-01

    Thoracic sympathetic ablation was introduced over a century ago. While some of the early indications have become obsolete, new ones have emerged. Sympathetic ablation is being still performed for some odd indications thus prompting the present study, which reviews the evidence base for current practice. The literature was reviewed using the PubMed/Medline Database, and pertinent articles regarding the indications for thoracic sympathectomy were retrieved and evaluated. Old, historical articles were also reviewed as required. Currently, thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated mainly for primary hyperhidrosis, especially affecting the palm, and to a lesser degree, axilla and face, and for facial blushing. Despite modern pharmaceutical, endovascular and surgical treatments, sympathetic ablation has still a place in the treatment of very selected cases of angina, arrhythmias and cardiomyopathy. Thoracic sympathetic ablation is indicated in several painful conditions: the early stages of complex regional pain syndrome, erythromelalgia, and some pancreatic and other painful abdominal pathologies. Although ischaemia was historically the major indication for sympathetic ablation, its use has declined to a few selected cases of thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease), microemboli, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to collagen diseases, paraneoplastic syndrome, frostbite and vibration syndrome. Thoracic sympathetic ablation for hypertension is obsolete, and direct endovascular renal sympathectomy still requires adequate clinical trials. There are rare publications of sympathetic ablation for primary phobias, but there is no scientific basis to support sympathetic surgery for any psychiatric indication.

  6. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    PubMed

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Giant thoracic osteophyte: a distinct clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Neal, Jonathan B; Grottkau, Brian E; Nahed, Brian V; Shin, John H; Walcott, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Calcified lesions described within the neural axis are classified as either an ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, or ossification of the ligamentum flavum. We aim to describe a unique pathologic entity: the giant thoracic osteophyte. We identified four patients who were surgically treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2006 to 2012 with unusual calcified lesions in the ventral aspect of the spinal canal. In order to differentiate giant thoracic osteophytes from calcified extruded disc material, disc volumetrics were performed on actual and simulated disc spaces. All patients underwent operative resection of the calcific lesion as they had signs and/or symptoms of spinal cord compression. The lesions were found to be isolated, large calcific masses that originated from the posterior aspect of adjacent thoracic vertebral bodies. Pathological examination was negative for tumor. Adjacent disc volumes were not significantly different from the index disc (p=0.91). A simulated calculation hypothesizing that the calcific mass was extruded disc material demonstrated a significant difference (p=0.01), making this scenario unlikely. In conclusion, giant thoracic osteophyte is a unique and rare entity that can be found in the thoracic spine. The central tenant of surgical treatment is resection to relieve spinal cord compression.

  9. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons general thoracic surgery databases: joint standardization of variable definitions and terminology.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Felix G; Falcoz, Pierre E; Kozower, Benjamin D; Salati, Michele; Wright, Cameron D; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS) and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) general thoracic surgery databases collect thoracic surgical data from Europe and North America, respectively. Their objectives are similar: to measure processes and outcomes so as to improve the quality of thoracic surgical care. Future collaboration between the two databases and their integration could generate significant new knowledge. However, important discrepancies exist in terminology and definitions between the two databases. The objective of this collaboration between the ESTS and STS is to identify important differences between databases and harmonize terminology and definitions to facilitate future endeavors.

  10. [Modern CT diagnosis of acute thoracic and abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Rieger, M; Sparr, H; Esterhammer, R; Fink, C; Bale, R; Czermak, B; Jaschke, W

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate a modified algorithm in the diagnostic management of polytraumatized patients by using whole body multislice CT (MSCT) as primary diagnostic tool. Between June 1999 and October 2000 532 polytraumatized patients were referred to the emergency department. 336 polytraumatized patients were primarily evaluated using whole body MSCT according to the "Innsbruck Emergency Algorithm." MSCT is performed immediately after cardiovascular stabilization of the patient. During the initial stabilization period free intraabdominal fluid is excluded or demonstrated by abdominal ultrasound. Time-consuming conventional radiographs are omitted with exception of an optimal chest X-ray. In patients with suspected or obvious arterial injuries or fractures the multislice-CT-dataset is used to perform 2D and 3D reconstructions in order to optimize visualization of additional skeletal and vascular injuries. By means of whole body MSCT it was possible to detect all injuries. The diagnostic advantage of whole body MSCT as compared to conventional X-ray was analyzed in 111 consecutive polytraumatized patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of 34.77. The early use of MSCT shortened the time for diagnostic work-up substantially (approximately 50%). Whole body multislice-CT used as primary diagnostic tool in the management of polytraumatized patients allows for a fast, accurate and comprehensive diagnostic work-up.

  11. Gerontology Training for Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Pill Jay

    The Grambling State University Minority Management Internship in Aging program described in this report was designed to provide internships to social work students to aid the minority elderly. The status of the elderly in the United States and the personnel and agencies that assist them are discussed in the following chapters: (1)…

  12. Minority Leadership Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Harry, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Potential sources of resistance to minority managers include issues of perceived competence, leader-follower fit, and supervision of same-race subordinates. Awareness of these issues can guide the preprofessional preparation of minority managers and training and support once they enter the workplace. (SK)

  13. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don…

  14. Minorities in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justiz, Manuel J., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 19 papers on efforts to increase the participation of members of minority groups in higher education. The papers are: (1) "Demographic Trends and the Challenges to American Higher Education" (Manuel Justiz); (2) "Three Realities: Minority Life in the United States--The Struggle for Economic Equity (adapted by Don…

  15. Testing Linguistic Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmedo, Esteban L.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that psychological and educational testing of members of linguistic minority groups should take into account the diverse social, political, and economic realities moderated by educational opportunities, which in turn are closely linked to standardized testing. Discusses conceptual and operational issues in the area of minority group…

  16. FIESTA; Minority Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Wes; And Others

    The suggestions for planning, running, and evaluating minority television programing presented in this handbook are based on the experience and example of the FIESTA project (Tucson, Arizona). After initiating the reader into the topic of minority programing, the document disucsses the following topics: broadcast research, origins of the FIESTA…

  17. Minorities and Malnutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornegay, Francis A.

    Various aspects of the relationship between minorities and malnutrition are discussed in this brief paper. Malnutrition, one of the byproducts of low economic status, is creating a crisis-proportion health problem affecting minority citizens. Malnutrition seriously affects children, older people in poverty, and chronically unemployed or…

  18. FIESTA; Minority Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Wes; And Others

    The suggestions for planning, running, and evaluating minority television programing presented in this handbook are based on the experience and example of the FIESTA project (Tucson, Arizona). After initiating the reader into the topic of minority programing, the document disucsses the following topics: broadcast research, origins of the FIESTA…

  19. Recruiting Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bobette P.; Dandridge, William L.

    To help improve private schools' recruitment of minority students, this handbook discusses where and how to begin, recruitment strategies, applicant assessment, and the need for in-school support systems for minority students. The authors stress that each school should begin by analyzing its own objectives, attitudes, and admission program.…

  20. Women and Minority Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Betty M.

    1975-01-01

    Offers statistics on the numbers of women and members of minority groups in the sciences. Suggests if women and members of minority groups are to be encouraged to prepare for scientific careers, they must be given the same incentives as offered to men. (CP)

  1. Change of paradigm in thoracic radionecrosis management.

    PubMed

    Dast, S; Assaf, N; Dessena, L; Almousawi, H; Herlin, C; Berna, P; Sinna, R

    2016-06-01

    Classically, muscular or omental flaps are the gold standard in the management of thoracic defects following radionecrosis debridement. Their vascular supply and antibacterial property was supposed to enhance healing compared with cutaneous flaps. The evolution of reconstructive surgery allowed us to challenge this dogma. Therefore, we present five consecutive cases of thoracic radionecrosis reconstructed with cutaneous perforator flaps. In four patients, we performed a free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and one patient had a thoracodorsal perforator (TDAP) flap. Median time healing was 22.6 days with satisfactory cutaneous covering and good aesthetic results. There were no flap necrosis, no donor site complications. We believe that perforator flaps are a new alternative, reliable and elegant option that questions the dogma of muscular flaps in the management of thoracic radionecrosis.

  2. National Quality Forum Metrics for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Anthony; Burfeind, William R

    2017-08-01

    The National Quality Forum (NQF) is a multistakeholder, nonprofit, membership-based organization improving health care through preferential use of valid performance measures. NQF-endorsed measures are considered the gold standard for health care measurement in the United States. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons is the steward of the only six NQF-endorsed general thoracic surgery measures. These measures include one structure measure (participation in a national general thoracic surgery database), two process measures (recording of clinical stage and recording performance status before lung and esophageal resections), and three outcome measures (risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality after lung and esophageal resections and risk-adjusted length of stay greater than 14 days after lobectomy). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate.

    PubMed

    Tadele, Henok; Chanie, Abeje

    2017-03-01

    Ectopia Cordis is defined as complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. It is a rare congenital defect with failure of fusion of the sternum with extra thoracic location of the heart. The estimated prevalence of this case is 5.5 to 7.9 per million live births. We had a case of a 16-hour-old male neonate weighing 2.9kg with externally visible, beating heart over the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged surgical approach to this defect with the initial aim of replacement of the heart to the thoracic cavity was opted. The neonate died twenty minutes after the surgical intervention due to cardiogenic shock despite adequate resuscitative measures. This case report underscores the missed opportunity of antenatal ultra-sonographic diagnosis and the challenge of Ectopia Cordis treatment in Ethiopia.

  4. Hyperoxia, but not thoracic X-irradiation, potentiates bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced lung damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, P.J.; Whiteley, J.W.; Witschi, H.R.

    1982-08-01

    The intraperitoneal administration of cyclophosphamide or bleomycin to BALB/c mice resulted in lung cell damage followed by cellular proliferation, which was quantitated by measuring the increase in thymidine incorporation into pulmonary DNA. We have previously shown that administration of the antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene produces lung damage that can be potentiated by both hyperoxia and thoracic X-irradiation. In the present study we show that hyperoxic exposure also potentiates bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced acute lung damage. However, thoracic X-irradiation does not potentiate bleomycin- and cyclophosphamide-induced lung toxicity.

  5. MR imaging of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Derek G; Krishnam, Mayil; Saleh, Roya; Tomasian, Anderanik; Finn, J Paul

    2008-05-01

    MR imaging has been incorporated into the diagnostic algorithm for suspected thoracic aortic pathology, challenging CT and invasive catheter angiography as investigations of choice. Techniques, including spin echo, 3-D steady-state free precession, cardiac cine imaging, phase-contrast flow quantification, and high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, are poised to trump other single competitive modalities. The proliferation of 3-tesla systems has advanced the performance of magnetic resonance, aided by parallel imaging techniques, multiarray surface coils, and powerful gradient coils. This article considers the current status of MR imaging in evaluation of the thoracic aorta, with reference to common clinical indications in clinical practice.

  6. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    PubMed

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  7. The renal disease of thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Baluarte, H J; Cote, M L; Elfenbein, I B

    1974-01-01

    In those children with thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy, a genetically determined disorder, who survive infancy, the development of renal disease may be life-threatening. This report will present data obtained in six patients from three families which deals with the renal abnormalities in thoracic asphyxiant dystrophy. Both functional and anatomic abnormalities are described. Abnormalities in solute transport in the proximal tubule may be the earliest sign of renal dysfunction in this syndrome. Early glomerular changes may be more important than previously recognized. Finally, the various phenotypic expressions of this disorder are considered.

  8. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  9. Early Results of Endovascular Treatment of the Thoracic Aorta Using the Valiant Endograft

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Matt Ivaz, Stella; Cheshire, Nicholas; Fattori, Rosella; Rousseau, Herve; Heijmen, Robin; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Thony, Frederic; Horne, Gillian; Morgan, Robert; Loftus, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta has been adopted as the first-line therapy for much pathology. Initial results from the early-generation endografts have highlighted the potential of this technique. Newer-generation endografts have now been introduced into clinical practice and careful assessment of their performance should be mandatory. This study describes the initial experience with the Valiant endograft and makes comparisons with similar series documenting previous-generation endografts. Data were retrospectively collected on 180 patients treated with the Valiant endograft at seven European centers between March 2005 and October 2006. The patient cohort consisted of 66 patients with thoracic aneurysms, 22 with thoracoabdominal aneurysms, 19 with an acute aortic syndrome, 52 with aneurysmal degeneration of a chronic dissection, and 21 patients with traumatic aortic transection. The overall 30-day mortality for the series was 7.2%, with a stroke rate of 3.8% and a paraplegia rate of 3.3%. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality differed significantly between different indications; thoracic aneurysms (6.1%), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (27.3%), acute aortic syndrome (10.5%), chronic dissections (1.9%), and acute transections (0%). Adjunctive surgical procedures were required in 63 patients, and 51% of patients had grafts deployed proximal to the left subclavian artery. Comparison with a series of earlier-generation grafts demonstrated a significant increase in complexity of procedure as assessed by graft implantation site, number of grafts and patient comorbidity. The data demonstrate acceptable results for a new-generation endograft in series of patients with diverse thoracic aortic pathology. Comparison of clinical outcomes between different endografts poses considerable challenges due to differing case complexity.

  10. Role of Mechanotransduction in Vascular Biology: Focus on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Schwartz, M.A.; Tellides, G.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemo-mechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet sufficient strength. Proper sensing, in turn, necessitates both receptors that connect the extracellular matrix to intracellular actomyosin filaments and signaling molecules that transmit the related information to the nucleus. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections are associated with poorly controlled hypertension and mutations in genes for extracellular matrix constituents, membrane receptors, contractile proteins, and associated signaling molecules. This grouping of factors suggests that these thoracic diseases result, in part, from dysfunctional mechanosensing and mechanoregulation of the extracellular matrix by the intramural cells, which leads to a compromised structural integrity of the wall. Thus, improved understanding of the mechanobiology of aortic cells could lead to new therapeutic strategies for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. PMID:25858068

  11. Role of mechanotransduction in vascular biology: focus on thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Jay D; Schwartz, Martin A; Tellides, George; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-04-10

    Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemomechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet sufficient strength. Proper sensing, in turn, necessitates both receptors that connect the extracellular matrix to intracellular actomyosin filaments and signaling molecules that transmit the related information to the nucleus. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections are associated with poorly controlled hypertension and mutations in genes for extracellular matrix constituents, membrane receptors, contractile proteins, and associated signaling molecules. This grouping of factors suggests that these thoracic diseases result, in part, from dysfunctional mechanosensing and mechanoregulation of the extracellular matrix by the intramural cells, which leads to a compromised structural integrity of the wall. Thus, improved understanding of the mechanobiology of aortic cells could lead to new therapeutic strategies for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  12. Treatment of a perforating thoracic bite wound in a dog with negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Nolff, Mirja C; Pieper, Korbinian; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 4-year-old male Dachshund was examined following a bite attack that had occurred 5 days previously. The dog had acutely deteriorated despite IV antimicrobial treatment and fluid therapy. CLINICAL FINDINGS On initial examination, the patient was recumbent with signs of septic shock and a flail chest. Three penetrating wounds in the left thoracic wall with malodorous discharge were evident. The animal trauma triage score was 8 out of 18. Thoracic and abdominal radiography revealed displaced fractures of the left seventh, eighth, and ninth ribs and extensive subcutaneous emphysema. Additionally, a marked diffuse bronchointerstitial pattern, areas of alveolar pattern, and pneumothorax were present bilaterally. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Open surgical debridement with left lateral lung lobectomy and resection of portions of the left thoracic wall were performed. Extensive soft tissue loss precluded primary reconstruction. The defect was stabilized with a polypropylene mesh implant, and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) at -100 mm Hg was initiated. Microbial culture and susceptibility testing of tissue samples indicated the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. The NPWT dressing was changed 2, 5, and 7 days after surgery. Treatment was well tolerated, and the mesh was completely covered with granulation tissue 10 days after surgery. On follow-up 5, 7, 12, and 19 months after surgery, the dog was clinically normal with no apparent complications. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that NPWT may be a valuable adjunct when treating small animal patients with severe thoracic trauma.

  13. Can chronic neuropathic pain following thoracic surgery be predicted during the postoperative period?

    PubMed

    Searle, Robert D; Simpson, Matthew P; Simpson, Karen H; Milton, Richard; Bennett, Michael I

    2009-12-01

    Chronic pain following thoracic surgery is common and associated with neuropathic symptoms, however, the proportion of patients with neuropathic pain in the immediate postoperative period is unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of patients who have neuropathic symptoms and signs immediately after, and at three months following thoracic surgery. The study was designed as a prospective observational cohort study. We identified patients with pain of predominantly neuropathic origin using the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) score in the immediate postoperative period and the self-report LANSS (S-LANSS) version three months after surgery. One hundred patients undergoing video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) or thoracotomy completed LANSS scores preoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. Eighty-seven percent completed three months S-LANSS follow-up scores. Eight percent of patients had positive LANSS scores in the immediate postoperative period; 22% of patients had positive S-LANSS scores three months following surgery. There was a significant association between positive scores in the acute and chronic periods (relative risk (RR) 3.5, [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-7.2]). Identifying pain of predominantly neuropathic origin in the postoperative period with a simple pain score can help identify those at risk of developing chronic pain with these features following thoracic surgery.

  14. Needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery for reversal of thoracic sympathectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Randolph H.L.; Ng, Calvin S.H.; Wong, Jasper K.W.; Tsang, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis. However, one major complication of such a procedure is compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis. We describe an extreme case of compensatory truncal hyperhidrosis and anhidrosis over the head and neck region which led to a heatstroke. Bilateral reoperative needlescopic video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed for the reversal of thoracic sympathectomy with an interposition intercostal nerve graft. The patient's truncal hyperhidrosis resolved gradually over 1 month following the reversal procedure. PMID:22186129

  15. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  16. Minor Crashes and ‘Whiplash’ in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Adam J.; Gilbertson, Lars G.; Prakash, Vikas; Morr, Douglas R.; Wiechel, John F.

    2008-01-01

    In the United States there is currently a paucity of available real world minor rear crash data with struck vehicle delta-V, or speed change, less than or equal to 15 kilometers per hour. These data are essential as researchers attempt to define ‘whiplash’ injury risk potential in these minor crashes. This study analyzed a new set of 105 U.S. minor rear aligned crashes between passenger vehicles. Mean struck vehicle delta-V and acceleration were 6.3 km/h (s.d. = 2.1 km/h) and 1.4g (s.d. = 0.5g), respectively. A total of 113 struck vehicle occupants were diagnosed within five weeks post-crash with 761 ICD-9-CM complaints and 427 AIS injuries (99.5% AIS1) attributed to the crashes. No striking vehicle occupants reported complaints. The main ICD-9-CM diagnoses were 40.6% cervical, 22.5% lumbar/sacral and 10.2% thoracic and the main AIS1 diagnoses were 29.7% cervical, 23.2% lumbar/sacral and 14.3% thoracic. The diagnosis disparity was mainly due to coding for pre-existing degenerative diagnosis in ICD-9-CM. Degenerative spine conditions were not significant for increased AIS1 injury risk. Surprisingly, many non-‘whiplash’ diagnoses were found. The AIS injury diagnosis distribution and frequency in these minor delta-V crashes did not correspond with previous minor rear crash studies. A prospectively collected and unbiased minor rear crash databank in the model of CIREN or NASS is highly desirable to verify or refute these results for the U.S. population since the current study cohort may have been influenced by litigation. PMID:19026229

  17. Use of emergency services by unaccompanied minors.

    PubMed

    Treloar, D J; Peterson, E; Randall, J; Lucid, W

    1991-03-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the use of emergency services by minors who are unaccompanied by their parents or guardians and how they are managed in emergency departments. Self-administered survey. The ED directors of 71 emergency medicine training programs, 82 Michigan community EDs, and 56 pediatric EDs. One hundred eighteen (58%) surveys were returned. A median of five unaccompanied minors (range 0.2 to 150) were seen weekly by responding EDs. Pediatric EDs saw the most unaccompanied minors weekly (ten) compared with training programs (five) and community EDs (three) (P less than .01). Emergency medicine training programs had the greatest percentage (3.0%) of minors who were unaccompanied compared with pediatric EDs (2.2%) and community EDs (2.6%) (P less than .05). For all conditions surveyed, only 3.8% of patients would be refused medical care without parental consent. However, 36.8% of patients would have medical care delayed even for conditions that might be painful or harmful if left untreated for some time. Most EDs (85.5%) screen patients and treat those who are acutely ill, but some (11.1%) treat all regardless of severity. Protocols should be developed for unaccompanied minors to ensure that delays in obtaining consent do not jeopardize the child and that the rights of minors for confidentiality and consent are recognized.

  18. Nonintubated Transareolar Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy with a Flexible Endoscope: Experience of 58 Cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianfeng; Lin, Jianbo; Tu, Yuanrong; Lin, Min; Li, Xu; Lai, Fancai

    2016-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently become a hot spot in the field of minimally invasive surgery. But, most of the procedures are still in the early stages of development and limited to animal experiments. Transareolar endoscopic surgery could work as a viable intermediate step before thoracic NOTES. Under intravenous anesthesia without endotracheal intubation, transareolar endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) with a flexible endoscope has rarely been attempted. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this novel minimally invasive technique in managing primary palmar hyperhidrosis (PPH). From June 2012 to July 2014, a total of 58 male patients with severe PPH underwent transareolar ETS by use of a flexible endoscope. Under intravenous anesthesia without endotracheal intubation, a flexible endoscope was introduced through the incision on the edge of the areola into the thoracic cavity. The thoracic sympathetic chain was ablated at the level of the fourth rib. All procedures were successfully performed with a mean operating time of 33.6 ± 8.3 min. All patients regained consciousness rapidly and none of them complained about sore throat after surgery. There were no operative mortality and conversion to open procedure. The symptoms of all patients disappeared as soon as the sympathetic chain was cut off. Fifty six patients (96.6%) were discharged from the hospital on the first postoperative day. The postoperative complications were minor, and no patients developed Horner's syndrome. At 3 months postoperatively, there was no obvious surgical scar on the chest wall, and none of the patients complained about postoperative pain. Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) appeared in 19 patients. No recurrent symptoms were observed in our study. One year follow-up revealed an excellent cosmetic result and degree of satisfaction. Nonintubated transareolar ETS with a flexible endoscope is a safe, effective and

  19. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Lobectomy: Results in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loscertales, Jesús; Quero Valen zuela, Florencio; Congregado, Miguel; Jiménez Merchán, Rafael; Gallardo Varela, Gregorio; Trivino Ramírez, Ana; B. Moreno Merino, Sergio; Cózar Bernal, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background The application of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in major pulmonary resections is still far from routine in most hospitals, even though the safety and technical feasibility of the procedure have by now been amply demonstrated. This paper reports on the surgical technique used by the authors for VATS lobectomy, on their experience of the procedure and on the results obtained. Methods A retrospective study was performed of all patients undergoing VATS lobectomy at the our Thoracic Surgery Department ,between 1993 and 2009.The clinical records of all patients were reviewed, and the following variables were noted for purposes of analysis: patient age and sex; clinical diagnosis; staging; date of surgery; type of surgery; conversion to conventional surgery and grounds for conversion; duration of surgery; intraoperative, postoperative and long-term complications; postoperative stay, final diagnosis and staging; and death rates. Results A total of 349 VATS lobectomies were performed over the study period (292 men, 57 women; mean age 59.7) The aetiology was non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in 313 patients and benign processes in 26;four patients had carcinoid tumours, and a further six required lobectomy due to metastases. The overall conversion rate was 9.4%. Mean duration of lobectomy was 148 minutes, and median duration 92 minutes. Mean postoperative was 3.9 days. The morbidity rate was 12.89 %, mostly involving minor complications. Perioperative mortality was 1.43%. There were no intraoperative deaths. The overall five-year survival rate for patients with NSCLC was 80.1%. Conclusions VATS lobectomy is a safe and technically-viable procedure that meets oncological criteria for lung-cancer surgery. Major pulmonary resection using VATS should be considered the procedure of choice for a number of benign processes and for early-stage bronchogenic carcinoma (T1-T2 N0 M0). PMID:22263014

  20. Mayo Clinic: An Institutional History of General Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gillaspie, Erin A; Nichols, Francis C; Allen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic was started in Rochester, MN after a 1883 tornado disaster. The Mayo brothers, William and Charles began thoracic surgical procedures early in their career. Dr. Samuel Robinson is recognized as the first thoracic surgeon at Mayo. He was followed by Drs. Harrington and Claret who became famous surgeons. Many other notable surgeons have help to build the thoracic surgical practice into what is today a world renown center of excellence in thoracic surgery.

  1. A "conservative" method of thoracic wall dissection: a proposal for teaching human anatomy.

    PubMed

    Barberini, Fabrizio; Brunone, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    The common methods of dissection exposing the thoracic organs include crossing of the wall together with wide resection of its muscular planes. In order to preserve these structures, a little demolishing technique of the thoracic wall is proposed, entering the thoracic cavity without extensive resection of the pectoral muscles. This method is based on the fact that these muscles rise up from the wall, like a bridge connecting the costal plane with the upper limb, and that the pectoralis major shows a segmental constitution. SUPERIOR LIMIT: Resect the sternal manubrium transversely between the 1st and the 2nd rib. The incision is prolonged along the 1st intercostal space, separating the first sterno-costal segment of the pectoralis major from the second one, and involving the intercostal muscles as far as the medial margin of the pectoralis minor. This muscle must be raised up, and the transverse resection continued below its medial margin latero-medially along the 1st intercostal space, to rejoin the cut performed before. Then, the incision of the 1st intercostal space is prolonged below the lateral margin of the pectoralis minor, which must be kept raised up, medio-laterally as far as the anterior axillary line. INFERIOR LIMIT: It corresponds to the inferior border of the thoracic cage, resected from the xiphoid process to the anterior axillary line, together with the sterno-costal insertions of the diaphragm. Then, an incision of the sterno-pericardial ligaments and a median sternotomy from the xiphoid process to the transverse resection of the manubrium should be performed. LATERAL LIMIT: From the point of crossing of the anterior axillary line with the inferior limit, resect the ribs from the 10th to the 2nd one. The lateral part of the pectoralis major must be raised up, so that the costal resection may be continued below it. Then, at the lateral extremity of the superior incision, the first and the second sternocostal segment of the pectoralis major must be

  2. Management of thoracic trauma and chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, C J; Caywood, D D

    1987-03-01

    This article reviews common causes and types of thoracic trauma in the dog. A triage approach for the diagnosis and immediate treatment of thoracic trauma is presented. Reconstructive procedures of the thoracic wall, which may be necessary following trauma or surgical resection of diseased tissue, are described.

  3. Effect of a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise on the thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for thoracic kyphosis angle and intercostal muscle pain. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 41-year-old man who complained of upper thoracic and intercostal pain. He performed the combined thoracic and backward lifting exercise for 15 days. [Results] The initial VAS score for the intercostal area was 4/10. The VAS score decreased to 1/10 after the thoracic exercise combined with backward lifting. The initial thoracic kyphosis angle was 38° and it decreased to 32° after the exercise period. [Conclusion] Therefore, backward lifting and thoracic extension is a good posture for activating the different layers of muscle that are attached to the ribs. The kyphosis angle is also reduced by providing sufficient resistance during the thoracic exercise.

  4. Minor Planet Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the activities of the Minor Planet Center for the year of 1998. The main product of this center is the Minor Planet Circulars, augmented by the Minor Planet Circulars Supplement which is a new series introduced in 1997 to include the actual observations, which are now only summarized MPC. The introduction of the Daily Orbit Update (DOU) lists all the orbits computed and identification found since the previous issue. There has been a fivefold increase in the reported Near Earth Objects, which includes the addition of 55 potentially hazardous asteroids.

  5. Stroke in Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Brian; Morgenstern, Lewis B.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Minorities in the United States have higher stroke risks, stroke occurrence at an earlier age, and for some groups, more severe strokes than non-Hispanic whites. Factors contributing to this disparity are explored. Characteristics of African American, Hispanic, and Native American stroke risk and incidence are reviewed. We mention recent interventions to raise the awareness of stroke risk factors and symptoms in minorities. The importance of the problem is discussed, and we suggest ways stroke in minorities may be reduced. PMID:19026907

  6. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  7. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical treatment. Fracture-dislocations of the thoracic and lumbar spine are caused by very high-energy trauma. They can be extremely unstable injuries that often result in serious spinal cord or nerve damage. These injuries require stabilization through surgery. The ...

  8. Aesthetic breast augmentation and thoracic deformities.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T P; Lorenz, S; Neuhann-Lorenz, C

    2010-10-01

    To ensure the best results from aesthetic breast augmentation, preoperative evaluation and adequate patient information are essential. However, assessment of the underlying thoracic shape often is neglected. Patients with obvious deformities are aware of the problematic reconstruction, whereas patients with mild or moderate deformities often are not aware of their condition and fail to see that standard breast augmentation will lead to unsatisfying results. The authors reviewed their charts for patients with breast augmentation and mild to moderate thoracic deformities, then compiled the therapeutic possibilities and the outcome. Of the 548 patients who underwent breast augmentation, 7.1% (n = 39) exhibited low- or midgrade thoracic wall deformities. Almost none of the patients were aware of their deformity. The patients were augmented with silicone-filled, textured round implants. Placement and volume were adapted to the anatomic situation. A reoperation was not performed in any case, and both patient and physician satisfaction was high. The percentage of patients with thoracic deformity in this group was high compared with an overall incidence of less than 2%. This emphasizes the need for cautious physical examination and preoperative documentation. By individualized surgical planning and diligent implant selection, optimal results and patient satisfaction can be achieved.

  9. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection.

  10. Thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones.

    PubMed

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín

    2013-01-01

    Hepatobiliary conditions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right pleural effusion. Here we present the illustrative images of thoracic empyema due to migrated gallstones in a woman who was treated for laparoscopic cholecystectomy one year before. The gallstones were obtained unexpectedly during a thoracentesis with aid of an Abrams needle. This rare complication is discussed under current literature review.

  11. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  12. NIH Minority Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This publication contains brief descriptions of National Institutes of Health programs for underrepresented minorities, including fellowships, programs for high school students, graduate research assistantships, postdoctoral training, and programs for college students. The publication provides a description of each program, eligibility…

  13. Thoracic Endoscopic-Assisted Mini-Open Surgery for Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yuan, Qiu-Ming; Liu, Yue; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Hong-Feng; Wang, Dong-Bin; Ji, Ning; Ma, Xin-Long; Zhang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a common cause of spinal cord compression, especially for the thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal cord, which has limited buffer space in the spinal canal. Spinal cord compression usually causes decreased sensation and paralysis of limbs below the level of compression, urinary and fecal incontinence, and/or urinary retention, which brings great suffering to the patients and usually requires surgical intervention. Thoracotomy or abdominothoracic surgery is usually performed for the thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation. However, there is high risk of trauma and complications with this surgery. To reduce the surgical trauma and obtain good visibility, we designed athoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery for thoracic and thoracolumbar disc herniation, and performed this procedure on 10 patients who suffered from hard thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord compression. During the procedure, the thoracic endoscopy provided clear vision of the surgical field with a good light source. The compression could be fully exposed and completely removed, and no nerve root injury or spinal cord damage occurred. All patients achieved obvious recovery of neurological function after this procedure. This technique possesses the merits of minimal trauma, increased safety, and good clinical results. The aim of this study is to introduce this thoracic endoscopic-assisted mini-open surgery technique, and we believe that this technique will be a good choice for the thoracic and thoracolumbar cord compression caused by hard intervertebral disc herniation.

  14. Neptune: Minor Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    All but one of Neptune's minor satellites orbit within or just outside its ringsystem; the exception is the distant object Nereid. Some of them are betterdescribed as `mid-sized' rather than `minor', but are included under thisheading as little is known of them. The inner four, with approximatediameters, are Naiad (60 km), Thalassa (80 km), Despina (150 km) and Galatea(160 km). The first three lie...

  15. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  16. Thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hoexum, Frank; Coveliers, Hans M; Lu, Joyce J; Jongkind, Vincent; Yeung, Kakkhee K; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is performed in the management of a variety of disorders of the upper extremity. To evaluate the contemporary results of thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia a systematic review of the literature was conducted. We performed a PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane search of the literature written in the English language from January 1975 to December 2015. All articles presenting original patient data regarding the effect of treatment on symptoms or on the healing of ulcers were eligible for inclusion. Individual analyses for Primary Raynaud's Disease (PRD) and Secondary Raynaud's Phenomenon (SRP) were performed. We included 6 prospective and 23 retrospective series with a total of 753 patients and 1026 affected limbs. Early beneficial effects of thoracic sympathectomy were noticed in 63-100% (median 94%) of all patients, in 73-100% (median 98%) of PRD patients and in 63-100% (median 94%) of SRP patients. The beneficial effect was noted to lessen over time. Long-term beneficial effects were reported in 13-100% (median 75%) of all patients, in 22-100% (median 58%) of PRD patients, and in 13-100% (median 79%) of SRD patients. Complete or improved ulcer healing was achieved in 33-100% and 25-67% respectively, of all patients. Thoracic sympathectomy can be beneficial in the treatment of upper extremity ischemia in select patients. Although the effect in patients with PRD will lessen over time, it may still reduce the severity of symptoms. In SRD, effects are more often long-lasting. In addition, thoracic sympathectomy may maximize tissue preservation or prevent amputation in cases of digital ulceration.

  17. Thoracic outlet syndromes and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Moore, N; Gibson, R; Rushworth, G; Donaghy, M

    1993-08-01

    The thoracic outlet syndromes encompass the diverse clinical entities affecting the branchial plexus or subclavian artery including cervical ribs or bands. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to diagnose on existing clinical and electrophysiological criteria and new diagnostic methods are necessary. This study reports our experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus in 20 patients with suspected thoracic outlet syndrome. The distribution of pain and sensory disturbance varied widely, weakness and wasting usually affected C8/T1 innervated muscles, and electrophysiology showed combinations of reduced sensory nerve action potentials from the fourth and fifth digits, and prolonged F-responses or tendon reflex latencies. The MRI study was interpreted blind. Deviation of the brachial plexus was recorded in 19 out of the 24 symptomatic sides (sensitivity 79%). Absence of distortion was correctly identified in 14 out of 16 asymptomatic sides (specificity 87.5%). The false positive rate was 9.5%. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated all seven cervical ribs visible on plain cervical spine radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed a band-like structure extending from the C7 transverse process in 25 out of 33 sides; similar structures were detected in three out of 18 sides in control subjects. These MRI bands often underlay the brachial plexus distortion observed in our patients. We also observed instances of plexus distortion by post-traumatic callus of the first rib, and by a hypertrophied serratus anterior muscle. If they did not demonstrate a cervical rib, plain cervical spine radiographs had no value in predicting brachial plexus distortion. We believe MRI to be of potential value in the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome by: (i) demonstrating deviation or distortion of nerves or blood vessels; (ii) suggesting the presence of radiographically invisible bands; (iii) disclosing other causes of thoracic outlet syndrome

  18. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  19. Non-intubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery—technical issues

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Performing awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is technically more challenging than thoracic surgery under general anesthesia (GA), but it can result in a greater benefit for the patient. Local wound infiltration and lidocaine administration in the pleural space can be considered for ATS. More invasive techniques are local wound infiltration with wound catheter insertion, thoracic wall blocks, selective intercostal nerve blockade, thoracic paravertebral blockade and thoracic epidural analgesia, offering the advantage of a catheter placement which can also be continued for postoperative analgesia. PMID:26046050

  20. The Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Rusch, Valerie W

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Thoracic Surgery Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center paralleled the emergence of Thoracic Surgery as a specialty, but with the unique focus on oncology and multidisciplinary cancer care characteristic of the institution. From the early post-war years treating lung cancer with new surgical techniques, through early definitive work in malignant mesothelioma, to today's translational research in cancer biology, the Thoracic Surgery Service continues to be an international leader in educating surgeons in thoracic surgical oncology, conducting clinical trials, and developing innovative therapies to treat thoracic cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of genetics for personalized management of heritable thoracic aortic disease: how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Regalado, Ellen S

    2015-02-01

    The major diseases affecting the thoracic aorta are aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections. Medical treatments can slow the enlargement of aneurysms, but the mainstay of treatment to prevent premature death resulting from dissection is surgical repair of the thoracic aortic aneurysm, which is typically recommended when the aortic diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Studies of patients with acute aortic dissections, however, indicate that as many as 60% of dissections occur at aortic diameters smaller than 5.5 cm. Clinical predictors are therefore needed to distinguish those at risk for dissection at an aortic diameter smaller than 5.0 cm and to determine the aortic diameter that justifies the risk of surgical repair to prevent an acute aortic dissection. Data from genetic studies during the past decade have established that mutations in specific genes can distinguish patients at risk for the disease and predict the risk of early dissection at diameters smaller than 5.0 cm. This information has the potential to optimize the timing of aortic surgery to prevent acute dissections.

  2. Diaphragmatic Dysfunction after Thoracic Operations.

    PubMed

    Gaissert, Henning; Wilcox, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    The perioperative management of diaphragmatic weakness and phrenic nerve dysfunction is complex, due to varied etiologies and clinical presentations. The factors leading to diaphragmatic weakness may culminate after the operation with transient or persistent respiratory failure. This review discusses diaphragmatic disorders and postoperative respiratory failure caused by unilateral or bilateral diaphragmatic impairment. The origins of neuromuscular weakness involving the diaphragm are diverse, and often lie within the domains of different medical specialties, with only a portion of the condition related to surgical intervention. Consideration of underlying etiologies for any individual patient requires thorough multidisciplinary review. The most important clinical scenarios compounding diaphragmatic weakness, including acute myasthenic states, persistent neuromuscular blockade, and surgical injury to the phrenic nerve or diaphragm, are accessible to attentive surgeons. Awareness of the signs and symptoms of undiagnosed weakness, preoperative pursuit of its diagnosis, knowledge of surgical alternatives to phrenic nerve resection, and cooperative skills in the multidisciplinary management of myasthenia all are crucial to improve patient outcomes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Thoracic Aortic Disease in Two Patients with Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome and SMAD4 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Teekakirikul, Polakit; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Miller, David T.; Lacro, Ronald V.; Regalado, Ellen S.; Rosales, Ana Maria; Ryan, Daniel P.; Toler, Tomi L.; Lin, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Dilation or aneurysm of the ascending aorta can progress to acute aortic dissection (Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Dissections, TAAD). Mutations in genes encoding TGF-β related proteins (TGFBR1, TGFBR2, FBN1, and SMAD3) cause syndromic and inherited TAAD. SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis (JPS) and a combined JPS-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) known as JPS-HHT. A family with JPS-HHT was reported to have aortic root dilation and mitral valve abnormalities. We report on two patients with JPS-HHT with SMAD4 mutations associated with thoracic aortic disease. The first patient, an 11-year-old boy without Marfan syndrome features, had JPS and an apparently de novo SMAD4 mutation (c.1340_1367dup28). Echocardiography showed mild dilation of the aortic annulus and aortic root, and mild dilation of the sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Computed tomography confirmed aortic dilation and showed small pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). The second patient, a 34-year-old woman with colonic polyposis, HHT, and Marfan syndrome, had a SMAD4 mutation (c.1245_1248delCAGA). Echocardiography showed mild aortic root dilation. She also had PAVM and hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia. Her family history was significant for polyposis, HHT, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and dissection and skeletal features of Marfan syndrome in her father. These two cases confirm the association of thoracic aortic disease with JPS-HHT resulting from SMAD4 mutations. We propose that the thoracic aorta should be screened in patients with SMAD4 mutations to prevent untimely death from dissection. This report also confirms that SMAD4 mutations predispose to TAAD. PMID:23239472

  4. Posterior Intercostal Nerve Block With Liposomal Bupivacaine: An Alternative to Thoracic Epidural Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rice, David C; Cata, Juan P; Mena, Gabriel E; Rodriguez-Restrepo, Andrea; Correa, Arlene M; Mehran, Reza J

    2015-06-01

    Pain relief using regional neuroaxial blockade is standard care for patients undergoing major thoracic surgery. Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) provides effective postoperative analgesia but has unwanted side effects, including hypotension, urinary retention, nausea, and vomiting, and is highly operator dependent. Single-shot intercostal nerve and paravertebral blockade have not been widely used because of the short duration of action of most local anesthetics; however, the recent availability of liposomal bupivacaine (LipoB) offers the potential to provide prolonged blockade of intercostal nerves (72 to 96 hours). We hypothesized that a five-level unilateral posterior intercostal nerve block using LipoB would provide effective analgesia for patients undergoing thoracic surgery. We identified patients who underwent lung resection using intraoperative LipoB posterior intercostal nerve blockade and retrospectively compared them with a group of patients who had TEA and who were matched for age, sex, type of surgery, and surgical approach. We analyzed perioperative morbidity, pain scores and narcotic requirements. There were 54 patients in each group. Mean hospital stay was 3.5 days and 4.5 days (p = 0.004) for LipoB group and TEA group, respectively. There were no significant differences in perioperative complications, postoperative pain scores, or in narcotic utilization between LipoB group and TEA group. No acute toxicity related to LipoB was observed. Posterior intercostal nerve blockade using LipoB is safe and provides effective analgesia for patients undergoing thoracic surgery. It may be considered as a suitable alternative to TEA. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Subclavian artery resection and reconstruction for thoracic inlet neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Olaf; Su, Xiao-Dong; Lahon, Benoit; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Delemos, Alexandra; Le Chevalier, Thierry; Dartevelle, Philippe G; Fadel, Elie

    2015-12-01

    To update the long-term outcomes after subclavian artery (SA) resection and reconstruction during surgery for thoracic inlet (TI) cancer through the anterior transclavicular approach. Between 1985 and 2014, 85 patients (60 men and 25 women; mean age, 52 years) underwent en bloc resection of thoracic-inlet non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (n=69), sarcoma (n=11), breast carcinoma (n=3) or thyroid carcinoma (n=2) involving the SA. L-shaped transclavicular cervicothoracotomy was performed, with posterolateral thoracotomy in 18 patients or a posterior midline approach in 15 patients. Resection extended to the chest wall (>2 ribs, n=60), lung (n=76), and spine (n=15). Revascularization was by end-to-end anastomosis (n=48), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft interposition (n=28), subclavian-to-common carotid artery transposition (n=8), or grafting of the autologous superficial femoral artery in an anterolateral thigh free flap (n=1). Complete R0 resection was achieved in 75 patients and microscopic R1 resection in 10 patients. Postoperative radiation therapy was given to 51 patients. There were no cases of postoperative death, neurological sequelae, graft infection or occlusion, or limb ischemia. Postoperative morbidity consisted of pneumonia (n=16), phrenic nerve palsy (n=2), recurrent nerve palsy (n=4), bleeding (n=4), acute pulmonary embolism (n=1), cerebrospinal fluid leakage (n=1), chylothorax (n=1), and wound infection (n=2). Five-year survival and disease-free survival rates were 32% and 22%, respectively. Long-term survival was not observed after R1 resection. Subclavian arteries invaded by TI malignancies can be safely resected and reconstructed through the anterior transclavicular approach, with good long-term survival provided complete R0 resection is achieved.

  6. Oesophagus side effects related to the treatment of oesophageal cancer or radiotherapy of other thoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Brunner, Thomas B

    2016-08-01

    The oesophagus as a serial organ located in the central chest is frequent subject to "incidental" dose application in radiotherapy for several thoracic malignancies including oesophageal cancer itself. Especially due to the radiosensitive mucosa severe radiotherapy induced sequelae can occur, acute oesophagitis and strictures as late toxicity being the most frequent side-effects. In this review we focus on oesophageal side effects derived from treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and secondly provide an overview on oesophageal toxicity from conventional and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the thoracic area in general. Available data on pathogenesis, frequency, onset, and severity of oesophageal side effects are summarized. Whereas for conventional radiotherapy the associations of applied doses to certain volumes of the oesophagus are well described, the tolerance dose to the mediastinal structures for hypofractionated therapy is unknown. The review provides available attempts to predict the risk of oesophageal side effects from dosimetric parameters of SBRT.

  7. Delayed neurological deficits induced by an epidural hematoma associated with a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Soo; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman developed neurological deficits 6 weeks after the onset of a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic spine revealed an epidural hematoma at the T10-L2 levels. Acute decompressive laminectomy and percutaneous vertebroplasty were performed. Following the surgery, the patient's neurologic deficits improved and follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the hematoma. Spinal epidural hematomas are rare and associated delayed neurological deficits are extremely rare. Conservative treatment may be effective for epidural hematomas in neurologically intact patients, but epidural hematomas can be a cause of neural compression and symptomatic deterioration resulting in delayed neurological deficits during the follow-up period.

  8. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  9. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  10. Short series of emergency stent-graft repair of symptomatic penetrating thoracic aortic ulcers (PTAU).

    PubMed

    Girn, H R S; McPherson, S; Nicholson, T; Mavor, A I D; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S; Gough, M J

    2009-05-01

    Acute penetrating thoracic aortic ulcers (PTAU) are associated with vessel rupture, particularly when intramural haematoma (IMH) is present. Although surgical repair is the treatment of choice for PTAU in the aortic arch, definitive treatment of PTAU in other locations of the thoracic aorta remains controversial, particularly in this frail cohort of patients. Recent series of elective and semi-elective endovascular stent-graft repair of PTAU of the descending thoracic aorta show comparable results with the previously advocated best medical management. We report our results from a retrospective, observational study of acute stent-graft repair of symptomatic PTAU. Between 2000 and 2005, 11 patients (seven male, four female; median age 71 years) presented with acute PTAU. CT scans demonstrated an associated IMH in six, a contained leak in three or rupture in four unstable patients. All were covered by a single endovascular stent [Gore (5), Talent (5), Zenith (1); 10 inserted via the groin and one via iliac conduit within 1 week of presentation (five < 24 h). Technical success was 90.90% (10/11) and 3/11 (27%) died within 30 days (two ARDS, one a persistent leak and rupture at 48 h). One patient developed transient paraplegia; three haemothoraces required chest drains, one of which subsequently required empyema drainage. In survivors, CT scans were satisfactory, with no further intervention required at 32.5 (6-66) months of median follow-up. In conclusion, endovascular management of acute PTAU appears effective and durable with mortality rates that are likely to be better than for open surgery. However, haemodynamic compromise at presentation remains a robust denominator of over-all survival.

  11. Spontaneous Thoracic Curve Correction After Selective Posterior Fusion of Thoracolumbar/Lumbar Curves in Lenke 5C Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-ming; Wei, Xian-zhao; Zhu, Xiao-dong; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Selective fusion of the thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curve is an effective method for the treatment of Lenke type 5C curves. Several studies have demonstrated that spontaneous correction of the thoracic curve does indeed occur. However, how this correction occurs after isolated posterior segmental instrumentation of the structural lumbar curve has not been well described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of the thoracic curve to selective TL/L curve fusion in patients with Lenke type 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and assess the correlative clinical outcomes. Thirty-four consecutive patients with Lenke type 5C AIS were included in this study. All patients underwent selective TL/L curve instrumentation and fusion via the posterior approach. Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery and at least 2 years after surgery. The preoperative coronal Cobb angle of the major TL/L curve was 45.4° ± 7.0°, and that of the minor thoracic curve was 25.4° ± 8.8°. The major TL/L and minor thoracic curves were corrected to postoperative angles of 9.5° ± 5.0° and 11.2° ± 5.2°, respectively, and measured 10.5° ± 6.0° and 13.4° ± 7.5° at the follow-up, respectively. The supine side-bending average Cobb angle of the thoracic curve was 9.9°. These results demonstrate satisfactory improvements because of coronal and sagittal restoration. Significant correlations were found between the preoperative and early postoperative conditions and the Cobb angle changes of the minor thoracic curve and the major TL/L curves (r = 0.42, P = 0.01). Significant correlations were also observed between the early and final follow-up postoperative conditions and the Cobb angle changes of the minor thoracic curve and the major TL/L curves (r = 0.57, P < 0.001). Significant correlations were observed between increased thoracic kyphosis (TK) and increased lumbar lordosis (LL

  12. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  13. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-01-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows’ leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks

  14. Disproportionate Minority Contact.

    PubMed

    Fix, Rebecca L; Cyperski, Melissa A; Burkhart, Barry R

    2017-04-01

    The overrepresentation of racial/ethnic minorities within the criminal justice system relative to their population percentage, a phenomenon termed disproportionate minority contact, has been examined within general adult and adolescent offender populations; yet few studies have tested whether this phenomenon extends to juvenile sexual offenders (JSOs). In addition, few studies have examined whether offender race/ethnicity influences registration and notification requirements, which JSOs are subject to in some U.S. states. The present study assessed for disproportionate minority contact among general delinquent offenders and JSOs, meaning it aimed to test whether the criminal justice system treats those accused of sexual and non-sexual offenses differently by racial/ethnic group. Furthermore, racial/ethnic group differences in risk, legal classification, and sexual offending were examined for JSOs. Results indicated disproportionate minority contact was present among juveniles with non-sexual offenses and JSOs in Alabama. In addition, offense category and risk scores differed between African American and European American JSOs. Finally, registration classifications were predicted by offending characteristics, but not race/ethnicity. Implications and future directions regarding disproportionate minority contact among JSOs and social and legal policy affecting JSOs are discussed.

  15. Volumetric modulated arc therapy for thoracic node metastases: a safe and effective treatment for a neglected disease

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Davide; De Rose, Fiorenza; Fogliata, Antonella; Navarria, Piera; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Franzese, Ciro; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Iftode, Cristina; Brina, Lucia Di; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Clerici, Elena; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcome of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for thoracic node metastases. Results 18 out of 29 patients presented with isolated thoracic node metastases with no other sites of disease. Median prescribed dose was 45Gy (range 30–60Gy). Acute toxicity was recorded as G0 in 28 patients, while one patient was scored as G1. Late toxicity was G0 in 26 patients, one patient was scored G1, one as G2, and one as G4 presented acute myocardial infarction. During follow up, the best local response was complete remission in 14 patients and partial remission in 11 patients. With a median follow up of 12 months (range 2–35) 9 patients died from disease progression, 10 were still alive with distant metastases, 5 had a locally controlled disease and 5 patients were disease free. The median OS estimated was 18 months (76%, 49% at one, two years). The median PFS was 9 months (28%, 17% at one, two years). Materials and Methods Twenty-nine patients with 32 thoracic nodes metastases were treated with SBRT in our institution. Toxicities and response were assessed. Overall Survival (OS) and Progression Free Survival (PFS) were evaluated. Conclusions SBRT is an efficient treatment for thoracic node metastases. PMID:27462869

  16. [Thoracic drainage in trauma emergencies].

    PubMed

    Bergaminelli, C; De Angelis, P; Gauthier, P; Salzano, A; Vecchio, G

    1999-10-01

    A group of 191 cases of emergency tube thoracostomy for acute trauma reviewed retrospectively from March 1993 to March 1998 is reported. Of this group 169 were men and 22 were women. Their ages ranged from 16 to 73 years. The causes were as follows: 89 cases (46%) road accident; 33 cases (17%) accidental trauma; 33 cases (17%) someone else violence (assault, gunshot or stab wound); 15 cases (8%) work accident; 11 cases (6%) domestic accident and 5 cases (3%) iatrogenic trauma. In 32 patients a diagnosis of pneumothorax was made (2 tension, 11 for penetrating chest injuries, 19 after blunt trauma). In 2 cases of tension pneumothorax and in 3 cases of open pneumothorax a chest tube (24-28 Fr) in the third space in the mid-clavicular line was introduced. In the other patients it was decided to place a chest tube in the mid-axillary line in the fifth intercostal space to drain pneumothorax. Only in 7 cases suction was necessary. Fifty-four hemothorax (3 bilateral) were treated in 11 cases using thoracentesis, while the remaining cases were treated using the insertion of multiple drainage holes in the intercostal space (fifth in the mid-axillary line directed inferiorly and posteriorly). One hundred and three were the cases of hemopneumothorax: 24 of them received 2 chest tubes, the first (20-26 Fr) apically in the second intercostal space in the mid-clavicular line, the second (32-38 Fr) in the fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line. All the other cases were treated using a single thoracostomy. In 14 cases suction was applied. Two cases of chylothorax resolved by a large tube positioned in the chest (fifth intercostal space in the mid-axillary line) with a constant negative pressure were also observed. Duration of tube drainage ranged from 4 and 18 days, with an average of 11 days. Five infections of thoracostomy site and 1 empyema resolved by rethoracotomy were observed. Moreover, there were 3 complications: 2 subcutaneous placements and 1 little laceration

  17. Disparity for the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 is associated with an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but it does not affect chronic GvHD incidence, disease-free survival or overall survival after allogeneic human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, D; Aróstegui, J I; Balas, A; Torres, A; Caballero, D; Carreras, E; Brunet, S; Jiménez, A; Mataix, R; Serrano, D; Vallejo, C; Sanz, G; Solano, C; Rodríguez-Luaces, M; Marín, J; Baro, J; Sanz, C; Román, J; González, M; Martorell, J; Sierra, J; Martín, C; de la Cámara, R; Grañena, A

    2001-09-01

    Disparity for the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 between patient and donor has been associated with an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, no data concerning the impact of such disparity on chronic GvHD, relapse or overall survival are available. A retrospective multicentre study was performed on 215 HLA-A2-positive patients who received an HLA-identical sibling SCT, in order to determine the differences in acute and chronic GvHD incidence on the basis of the presence or absence of the HA-1 antigen mismatch. Disease-free survival and overall survival were also analysed. We detected 34 patient-donor pairs mismatched for HA-1 antigen (15.8%). Grades II-IV acute GvHD occurred in 51.6% of the HA-1-mismatched pairs compared with 37.1% of the non-mismatched. The multivariate logistic regression model showed statistical significance (P: 0.035, OR: 2.96, 95% CI: 1.07-8.14). No differences were observed between the two groups for grades III-IV acute GvHD, chronic GvHD, disease-free survival or overall survival. These results confirmed the association between HA-1 mismatch and risk of mild acute GvHD, but HA-1 mismatch was not associated with an increased incidence of chronic GvHD and did not affect relapse or overall survival.

  18. [Applications for bronchial blockers in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Guasch, R; Campos, J H; Granell, M; Peña, J J

    2007-11-01

    One-lung ventilation is commonly used to facilitate visualization of the field during thoracic surgery. New devices for performing this technique that have become available over the past 2 decades include the Univent bronchial blocker incorporated in a single-lumen tube, the Arndt endobronchial blocker, and the Cohen endobronchial blocker. Although insertion of a double-lumen tube is still the method used most often to isolate the lung, bronchial blockade is an increasingly common technique and, in certain clinical settings, provides advantages over the double-lumen tube. This review provides an update on new concepts in the use of bronchial blockers as a technique for lung isolation and one-lung ventilation. The literature search was performed on MEDLINE through PubMed using the keywords bronchial blockers and thoracic surgery. The search span started with 1982-the year the first modern bronchial blocker was described - and ended with February 2006.

  19. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  20. Thoracic radiology in kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Joel E; Rabkin, John M

    2002-04-01

    Renal transplantation accounts for more than half of all solid organ transplants performed in the U.S., and the liver is the second most commonly transplanted solid organ. Although abdominal imaging procedures are commonplace in these patients, there has been relatively little attention paid to thoracic imaging applications. Preoperative imaging is crucial to aid in the exclusion of infectious or malignant disease. In the perioperative time period, thoracic imaging focuses both on standard intensive care unit care, including monitoring devices and their complications, and on the early infections that can occur. Postoperative management is divided into three time periods, and the principles governing the occurrence of infections and malignancies are reviewed. Anatomic and pathologic aspects unique to kidney and liver transplantation patients are also discussed.

  1. Myelopathy with syringomyelia following thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Ferrari, H

    2004-02-01

    Under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation, a thoracic epidural catheter was inserted at the T8-T9 level in a 7-year-old boy scheduled to have a Nissen fundoplication to provide postoperative analgesia. After 4 ml of lignocaine 1.5% was injected through the catheter, hypotension resulted. Fifty-five minutes later 5 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% produced the same effect. In the recovery room a similar injection resulted in lower blood pressure and temporary apnoea. Sensory and motor deficits were noted the next day and four days later magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord syringomyelia extending from T5 to T10. Four years later, dysaesthesia from T6 to T10 weakness of the left lower extremity and bladder and bowel dysfunction persist. The risks of inserting thoracic epidural catheters in patients under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are discussed, emphasising the possibility of spinal cord injury with disastrous consequences.

  2. [Thoracic ectopia cordis with tetralogy of fallot].

    PubMed

    Ben Khalfallah, A; Annabi, N; Ousji, M; Hadrich, M; Najai, A

    2003-01-01

    Ectopia cordis; very rare congenital malformation, characterized by an evisceration of the heart through a parietal defect. The thoracic localization is most frequent. We report the case of a full term baby girl without follow-up of the pregnancy, presenting a beating mass in thoracic position, expansive to the effort, covered by a translucent membrane corresponding to an ectopique position of the heart. Transthoracic echocardiography shows cardiac malformation: Fallot tetralogy. The precocious diagnosis is possible by prenatal ultrasound examination after 12th week of pregnancy. The surgical treatment remain the only hope for these neonates. It's results depends on the associated malformations and the neonatal complications especially the infections. The prognosis remains poor in spite of the progress of surgical techniques.

  3. Thoracic Idiopathic Scoliosis Severity Is Highly Correlated with 3D Measures of Thoracic Kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T Barrett; Reighard, Fredrick G; Osborn, Emily J; Parvaresh, Kevin C; Newton, Peter O

    2017-06-07

    Loss of thoracic kyphosis has been associated with thoracic idiopathic scoliosis. Modern 3-dimensional (3D) imaging systems allow more accurate characterization of the scoliotic deformity than traditional radiographs. In this study, we utilized 3D calculations to characterize the association between increasing scoliosis severity and changes in the sagittal and axial planes. Patients evaluated in a scoliosis clinic and determined to have either a normal spine or idiopathic scoliosis were included in the analysis. All underwent upright, biplanar radiography with 3D reconstructions. Two-dimensional (2D) measurements of the magnitude of the thoracic major curve and the thoracic kyphosis were recorded. Image processing and MATLAB analysis were utilized to produce a 3D calculation of thoracic kyphosis and apical vertebral axial rotation. Regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation of 2D kyphosis, 3D kyphosis, and apical axial rotation with the magnitude of the thoracic major curve. The 442 patients for whom 2D and 3D data were collected had a main thoracic curve magnitude ranging from 1° to 118°. Linear regression analysis of the 2D and 3D T5-T12 kyphosis versus main thoracic curve magnitude yielded significant models (p < 0.05). The 2D model had a minimally negative slope (-0.07), a small R value (0.02), and a poor correlation coefficient (-0.14). In contrast, the 3D model had a strongly negative slope (-0.54), a high R value (0.56), and a strong correlation coefficient (-0.75). Curve magnitude also had a strong correlation with loss of 3D T1-T12 kyphosis and increasing apical axial rotation. Segmentally calculated 3D thoracic kyphosis had a strongly negative correlation with the magnitude of the main thoracic curve. With near uniformity, 3D thoracic kyphosis progressively decreased as scoliosis magnitude increased, at a rate of more than half the increase in the main thoracic curve magnitude. Analysis confirmed a surprisingly strong correlation

  4. Thoracic Spine Manipulation in Individuals With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Does Not Immediately Alter Thoracic Spine Kinematics, Thoracic Excursion, or Scapular Kinematics: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kardouni, Joseph R; Pidcoe, Peter E; Shaffer, Scott W; Finucane, Sheryl D; Cheatham, Seth A; Sousa, Catarina O; Michener, Lori A

    2015-07-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To determine if thoracic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) alters thoracic kinematics, thoracic excursion, and scapular kinematics compared to a sham SMT in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome, and also to compare changes in patient-reported outcomes between treatment groups. Prior studies indicate that thoracic SMT can improve pain and disability in individuals with subacromial impingment syndrome. However, the mechanisms underlying these benefits are not well understood. Participants with shoulder impingement symptoms (n = 52) were randomly assigned to receive a single session of thoracic SMT or sham SMT. Thoracic and scapular kinematics during active arm elevation and overall thoracic excursion were measured before and after the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes measured were pain (numeric pain-rating scale), function (Penn Shoulder Score), and global rating of change. Following the intervention, there were no significant differences in changes between groups for thoracic kinematics or excursion, scapular kinematics, and patient-reported outcomes (P>.05). Both groups showed an increase in scapular internal rotation during arm raising (mean, 0.9°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3°, 1.6°; P = .003) and lowering (0.8°; 95% CI: 0.0°, 1.5°; P = .041), as well as improved pain reported on the numeric pain-rating scale (1.2 points; 95% CI: 0.3, 1.8; P<.001) and function on the Penn Shoulder Score (9.1 points; 95% CI: 6.5, 11.7; P<.001). Thoracic spine extension and excursion did not change significantly following thoracic SMT. There were small but likely not clinically meaningful changes in scapular internal rotation in both groups. Patient-reported pain and function improved in both groups; however, there were no significant differences in the changes between the SMT and the sham SMT groups. Overall, patient-reported outcomes improved in both groups without meaningful changes to thoracic or scapular motion

  5. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jadon, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated that the advantages of TPVB could be helpful for early mobilization and discharge of minor breast surgery in male patients. However, to our knowledge, there is no such report suggestive of TPVB for exclusive male breast surgery. We used nerve stimulator-guided TPVB for gynecomastia surgery in two patients where general anaesthesia was not feasible. Both patients had successful block and showed good post-operative recovery and were discharged on the same day. They had long post-operative pain relief without any block-related complication. A case report of two such cases of gynecomastia surgery (male breast surgery) done under TPVB is presented. PMID:22923833

  6. Nerve stimulator-guided thoracic paravertebral block for gynecomastia surgery.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Ashok

    2012-05-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) is gaining popularity for female breast surgeries due to various advantages like less nausea and vomiting and better post-operative pain relief, which helps in early ambulation and discharge from the hospital. Use of nerve stimulator during this block has further enhanced its success and safety profile. Male breast surgery is usually done either under general anaesthesia or local infiltrative anaesthesia combining with intravenous sedation. We postulated that the advantages of TPVB could be helpful for early mobilization and discharge of minor breast surgery in male patients. However, to our knowledge, there is no such report suggestive of TPVB for exclusive male breast surgery. We used nerve stimulator-guided TPVB for gynecomastia surgery in two patients where general anaesthesia was not feasible. Both patients had successful block and showed good post-operative recovery and were discharged on the same day. They had long post-operative pain relief without any block-related complication. A case report of two such cases of gynecomastia surgery (male breast surgery) done under TPVB is presented.

  7. Sex Trafficking of Minors.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jessica L; Kaplan, Dana M; Barron, Christine E

    2017-04-01

    Sex trafficking is an increasingly recognized global health crisis affecting every country and region in the world. Domestic minor sex trafficking is a subset of commercial sexual exploitation of children, defined as engagement of minors (<18 years of age) in sexual acts for items of value (eg, food, shelter, drugs, money) involving children victimized within US borders. These involved youth are at risk for serious immediate and long-term physical and mental health consequences. Continued efforts are needed to improve preventive efforts, identification, screening, appropriate interventions, and subsequent resource provision for victimized and high-risk youth.

  8. Thoracic kidney associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Kamal N; Rohilla, Seema; Narang, Rajat; Rattan, Simmi K; Maggu, Sarita; Dhaulakhandi, Dhara B

    2009-09-01

    We report three cases of ectopic thoracic (or superior ectopic) kidney; one in a neonate and two in 6-month-old children, associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. In all cases the diagnosis was made during surgery and confirmed by intravenous pyelography, sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the postoperative period. Because of the rarity of this condition we report these cases together with a wide review of the published reports.

  9. Thoracic surgery in India: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    India has the dubitable honor of being ranked first in the world with regards to lung disease burden. A good proportion of this disease burden is amenable to surgical treatment. However, patients have limited access to quality thoracic surgical care due to a number of obstacles. This review article summarizes these obstacles and the implied opportunities that exist in this nascent surgical discipline in the world’s second most populous country. PMID:27651933

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Arantes, M; Honavar, M; Vaz, A R; Resende, M; Pereira, J R

    2009-12-01

    Intraspinal solitary fibrous tumors are rare: to our knowledge, the literature reports only 27 cases. We present a histologically and immunohistochemically confirmed solitary fibrous tumor involving the intradural extramedullary compartment of the thoracic spine. Microsurgical gross-total resection was achieved. A definitive role for adjuvant treatments in this type of tumor has not been established and therefore, they were not used. The patient was well, without clinical or radiological recurrence, 18 months after surgery.

  11. Clinical Guideline for Treatment of Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-qiang; Sun, Chui-guo

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic spinal stenosis is a relatively common disorder causing paraplegia in the population of China. Until nowadays, the clinical management of thoracic spinal stenosis is still demanding and challenging with lots of questions remaining to be answered. A clinical guideline for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis has been created by reaching the consensus of Chinese specialists using the best available evidence as a tool to aid practitioners involved with the care of this disease. In this guideline, many fundamental questions about thoracic spinal stenosis which were controversial have been explained clearly, including the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the standard procedure for diagnosing symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis, indications for surgery, and so on. According to the consensus on the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the soft herniation of thoracic discs has been excluded from the pathological factors causing thoracic spinal stenosis. The procedure for diagnosing thoracic spinal stenosis has been quite mature, while the principles for selecting operative procedures remain to be improved. This guideline will be updated on a timely schedule and adhering to its recommendations should not be mandatory because it does not have the force of law. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masashi; Takahashi, Jun; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Kitahara, Jun; Kamijyo, Tetsuyoshi; Ebara, Sohei; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Hodgkin's disease rarely occurs in the spine, which is usually a setting for the advanced form of the disease. To describe an unusual case of isolated, primary spinal Hodgkin's disease and to draw attention to this disease as a possible diagnosis in patients with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate lesions located in the thoracic spine. A case report of a 28-year-old woman who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in the lower extremities as a result of spinal cord compression from Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae. We report a new case of spinal cord compression resulting from Hodgkin's disease of the thoracic vertebrae. Decompression surgery was performed in the patient, followed by antibiotic treatment. Antibiotic therapy temporarily improved inflammation and fever. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation showed that the inflammatory reaction in the lesion was not completely resolved. The disease progressed and later investigations revealed Hodgkin's disease, which improved with a course of chemotherapy and radiation. Hodgkin's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal neoplastic lesions with clinical features similar to spondylitis. Because MRI evaluation showed that the vertebral disc was maintained in this case, the presence of a tumor rather than inflammation should have been suspected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Thoracic sympathectomy in primary hyperhidrosis: patient satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Galbis-Caravajal, José Marcelo; Sales-Badía, J Gabriel; Cuenca-Torres, María; Miquel-Miquel, Javier; Esturi-Navarro, Rafael; Ortega-Monzó, Carmen

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate satisfaction among patients who underwent thoracic sympathectomy for primary hyperhidrosis and the possible complications after a minimum of 14 months after surgery. We performed a retrospective study in 108 patients who underwent thoracic sympathectomy and who responded to all the questions asked in a telephone interview. The sample was composed of 21 men and 87 women, with a mean age of 29.73 years. In all patients, surgery was performed with general anesthesia in a single intervention. Special emphasis was placed on the degree of satisfaction (whether patients would recommend this type of surgery) and the possible negative effects or complications experienced by patients or attributed by them to the procedure. Patients were contacted a minimum of 14 months after the intervention. The most frequent complication was compensatory sweating (81.5%). Pain at the site of trocar insertion was reported by 6.5%. There were few immediate and long-term complications. The degree of satisfaction reached 90.7%. Video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy is safe and effective. Despite compensatory sweating, overall satisfaction was very high. However, satisfaction gradually decreased in the months after the intervention. Patients with hyperhidrosis with significant or principal axillary involvement could benefit from botulinic toxin administration as the first-line therapy.

  14. [Endovascular treatment of descending thoracic aorta aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mertens, Renato; Valdés, Francisco; Krämer, Albrecht; Mariné, Leopoldo; Irarrázaval, Manuel; Morán, Sergio; Zalaquet, Ricardo; Schwartz, Eitan; Vergara, Jeannette; Valdebenito, Magaly

    2003-06-01

    The natural history of aneurysms ends in rupture and death. In 1990 the first endovascular exclusion of an aneurysm, using an endoluminal graft implanted through the femoral arteries was performed. More recently, the same procedure has been used for aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. To report our experience with endovascular treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms. Analysis of 14 patients (nine male), aged 30 to 79 years, treated between May 2001 and August 2002. The mean diameter of the aneurysms was 6.9 cm. The etiology was atherosclerotic in nine patients. The Excluder device (Gore) was preferentially used. There was no operative mortality or paraplegia. One patient had a transient leg monoparesis that reverted completely. No patient had type I endoleaks. Two patients had type II endoleaks on discharge, that sealed spontaneously. In a follow up, ranging from 2 to 17 months, one patient died of a bronchopneumonia and no aneurysm rupture has been detected. The short term results of endoluminal treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms are excellent. This treatment is less invasive and has less complications than conventional surgery.

  15. The European general thoracic surgery database project.

    PubMed

    Falcoz, Pierre Emmanuel; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Database is a free registry created by ESTS in 2001. The current online version was launched in 2007. It runs currently on a Dendrite platform with extensive data security and frequent backups. The main features are a specialty-specific, procedure-specific, prospectively maintained, periodically audited and web-based electronic database, designed for quality control and performance monitoring, which allows for the collection of all general thoracic procedures. Data collection is the "backbone" of the ESTS database. It includes many risk factors, processes of care and outcomes, which are specially designed for quality control and performance audit. The user can download and export their own data and use them for internal analyses and quality control audits. The ESTS database represents the gold standard of clinical data collection for European General Thoracic Surgery. Over the past years, the ESTS database has achieved many accomplishments. In particular, the database hit two major milestones: it now includes more than 235 participating centers and 70,000 surgical procedures. The ESTS database is a snapshot of surgical practice that aims at improving patient care. In other words, data capture should become integral to routine patient care, with the final objective of improving quality of care within Europe.

  16. [Videothoracospy in thoracic trauma and penetrating injuries].

    PubMed

    Lang-Lazdunski, L; Chapuis, O; Pons, F; Jancovici, R

    2003-03-01

    Videothoracoscopy represents a valid and useful approach in some patients with blunt chest trauma or penetrating thoracic injury. This technique has been validated for the treatment of clotted hemothorax or posttraumatic empyema, traumatic chylothorax, traumatic pneumothorax, in patients with hemodynamic stability. Moreover, it is probably the most reliable technique for the diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury. It is also useful for the extraction of intrathoracic projectiles and foreign bodies. This technique might be useful in hemodynamically stable patients with continued bleeding or for the exploration of patients with penetrating injury in the cardiac area, although straightforward data are lacking to confirm those indications. Thoracotomy or median sternotomy remain indicated in patients with hemodynamic instability or those that cannot tolerate lateral decubitus position or one-lung ventilation. Performing video-surgery in the trauma setting require expertise in both video-assisted thoracic surgery and chest trauma management. The contra-indications to videothoracoscopy and indications for converting the procedure to an open thoracotomy should be perfectly known by surgeons performing video-assisted thoracic surgery in the trauma setting. Conversion to thoracotomy or median sternotomy should be performed without delay whenever needed to avoid blood loss and achieve an adequate procedure.

  17. Nurturing the Innovative Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the innovative minority. Gifted students differ from the average students. There are those who argue that the differences are a matter merely of quantitative degree reference studies of IQ scores, or SAT scores, which are clearly quantitative scales, and point out that gifted students appear at the top level of these scales…

  18. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  19. Minority Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East-West Gateway Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

    This report covers a work-study program in the East-West Gateway area to provide employment and training for minority and economically disadvantaged graduate and upper-division undergraduate students enrolled in planning and related curricula. The program has aided students in continuing their education who might otherwise be financially unable to…

  20. Minority Work Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East-West Gateway Coordinating Council, St. Louis, MO.

    This report covers a work-study program in the East-West Gateway area to provide employment and training for minority and economically disadvantaged graduate and upper-division undergraduate students enrolled in planning and related curricula. The program has aided students in continuing their education who might otherwise be financially unable to…

  1. Assessing Minority Group Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Beeman N., Ed.

    Contents of this book include the following collection of articles: "Assessing Minority Group Children: Challenges for School Psychologists," Thomas Oakland; "The NEA Testing Moratorium," Boyd Bosma; "Cultural Myopia: The Need for a Corrective Lens," Martin H. Gerry; "Assumptions Underlying Psychological Testing," T. Ernest Newland;…

  2. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  3. PATTERNS OF MINORITY RELATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUSTER, TROY S.; MACK, RAYMOND W.

    ACCORDING TO SOCIAL SCIENTISTS AND BIOLOGISTS, ALL RACES ARE EQUAL IN ABILITY, NEVERTHELESS, RACIAL DISCRIMINATION EXISTS WHEN THE CULTURE OF A SOCIETY ALLOWS PEOPLE TO EXPRESS THEIR AGRESSIONS IN A SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE WAY. ONE WAY TO DEFINE GROUP BOUNDARIES IS TO SINGLE OUT A CHARACTERISTIC OF A MINORITY GROUP AND TO INSTITUTIONALIZE THIS…

  4. PATTERNS OF MINORITY RELATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUSTER, TROY S.; MACK, RAYMOND W.

    ACCORDING TO SOCIAL SCIENTISTS AND BIOLOGISTS, ALL RACES ARE EQUAL IN ABILITY, NEVERTHELESS, RACIAL DISCRIMINATION EXISTS WHEN THE CULTURE OF A SOCIETY ALLOWS PEOPLE TO EXPRESS THEIR AGRESSIONS IN A SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE WAY. ONE WAY TO DEFINE GROUP BOUNDARIES IS TO SINGLE OUT A CHARACTERISTIC OF A MINORITY GROUP AND TO INSTITUTIONALIZE THIS…

  5. How Immigration Harms Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matloff, Norman

    1996-01-01

    The negative impacts of immigration are felt most strongly by nonwhite Americans. The significant problems with today's immigration policies can only be solved by reducing immigration levels, something many minority groups support. Immigration is not the root of social problems, but in its present form, it exacerbates them. (SLD)

  6. Minority Male Afterschool Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Herbert F., Jr.

    Through a program called the Minority Male Afterschool Program (MMAP), college students at Mississippi Valley State University in Itta Bena (Mississippi) are working one-on-one with high school students. The MMAP is an enrichment program that encourages at-risk African American students aged 12 to 19 to complete high school and pursue…

  7. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  8. Housing Problems of Minorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Robert

    1975-01-01

    This testimony, before a public hearing of the New York City Commission on Human Rights in May 1974, reviews the status of minority group housing and the effects of federal programs upon it, advocating an approach which recognizes the intrinsic locational and real estate value of many black ghettos. (Author/JM)

  9. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  10. Psychological Tests and Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Brenda Johnson; Isenstein, Vivian R.

    The problems with traditional testing, particularly as they relate to minorities, are discussed; and psychological tests designed specifically for Blacks are reviewed. Considered are general problems, problems with testing at the higher education level and for employment, and moral and legal implications of the testing controversy. The rationale…

  11. Nurturing the Innovative Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the innovative minority. Gifted students differ from the average students. There are those who argue that the differences are a matter merely of quantitative degree reference studies of IQ scores, or SAT scores, which are clearly quantitative scales, and point out that gifted students appear at the top level of these scales…

  12. Alcoholism and Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Briefly discusses some aspects of the role of the state and the position of minorities in respect to alcoholism policies and services. Includes case study of a Black alcoholic. Refers readers to studies on Black alcoholism, Native American alcoholism, Hispanic alcoholism, and Asian-American alcoholism. (Author/NB)

  13. Differences in Thoracic Injury Causation Patterns Between Seat Belt Restrained Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Locey, Caitlin M.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to delineate age-based differences in specific thoracic injury diagnoses for seat belt restrained rear seat occupants and describe the associated injury causation in order to provide insight into how the load of the seat belt is transferred to occupants of various sizes. Using data from the Crash Investigation Research and Engineering Network (CIREN), 20 cases of rear seated, lap and shoulder belt restrained occupants with AIS2+ thoracic injuries in frontal crashes were reviewed. Seven were children and adolescents age 8–15 years, 5 were 16–24 years, 3 were 25–54 years, and 5 were 55+ years. Six of the seven 8–15 year olds sustained injuries to the lung in the form of pulmonary contusion or pneumothorax. Only three of the seven sustained a skeletal (sternum or rib) fracture; only one of these three involved multiple ribs bilaterally. In contrast, four of the five 16–24 year olds sustained at least one rib fracture - often multiple and bilateral. The adult cohort (25+ years) was involved in predominantly more minor crashes; however they all sustained complex rib fractures – seven of the eight involved multiple ribs, four of the eight were also bilateral. Belt compression – either from the shoulder belt or the lap belt – was identified as the primary cause of the thoracic injuries. Often, there was clear evidence of the location of belt loading from AIS 1 chest contusions or abrasions. These findings have implications for age-based thoracic injury criteria suggesting that that different metrics may be needed for different age groups. PMID:23169131

  14. [The internal thoracic blood vessels (internal thoracic arteries and veins) and their practical significance].

    PubMed

    Jelicić, N; Djordjević, Lj; Stosić, T

    1996-01-01

    Internal thoracic blood vessels (A. et Vv. thoracicae internae) are parietal vessels of the thoracic anterior wall. Because of their position, they are often exposed to injuries during the fracture of the ribs and the sternal bone. These facts require a general knowledge about the anatomical variations of these vessels, specifically the knowledge concerning their mutual relationship, their anastomoses and their distance from the lateral margins of the sternal bone. Due to the poor and different data in the available literature, we directed our investigations towards the study and confirmation of the described anatomical variations of the internal thoracic blood vessels. In this study we investigated the distance between the internal thoracic artery and the lateral margins of the sternal bone, the level of its bifurcation, the number of the internal thoracic veins and anastomoses between them. The investigation was carried out on 300 formalin specimens consisting of the anterior wall of the thorax (persons of different ages and sexes) by using the method of dissection and the method of contrast injection. In adults (200 specimens), the distance between the arterial trunk and the lateral margin of the sternal bone was not equal in the first fifth or sixth intercostal spaces, but in children up to five years of age (100 specimens), the distance was almost the same. In adults, the internal thoracic artery was nearest to the sternal bone in the first intercostal space, but going downward the artery was gradually more and more distant from the sternum and in the sixth intercostal space the distance measured approximately from 11 mm to 13 mm. In children, the distance of the artery from the lateral margin of the sternal bone, just in the above mentioned intercostal spaces, was from 5 mm to 10 mm. There was no difference according to sex in any of the two groups. Most frequently, the internal thoracic artery gave off its terminal branches at the level of the sixth costal

  15. Sexual minorities seeking services.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Tracey L; Emanuel, Kristen; Bradford, Judith

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mental health needs of lesbian and bisexual (sexual minority) women is an integral part of designing and providing appropriate mental health services and treatment for them. In an effort to understand the mental health needs of sexual minority women who seek community treatment, a chart review was conducted of the 223 lesbian and bisexual women who presented for services between July 1, 1997 and December 31, 2000 at Fenway Community Health in Boston, MA. Data are based on clients' self-reports and clinician assessments of clients' presenting problem, relevant developmental history, prior mental health and substance abuse treatment, current reports of emotional/psychological symptoms, and areas of impaired functioning. Although substance abuse and suicidal ideation were commonly reported problems, other concerns were more frequently reported. High percentages of lesbians and bisexual women reported relationship concerns and lack of adequate social networks; rates of depression and anxiety based on clinicians' assessments were also high. Overall, lesbians and bisexual women did not differ in the issues they brought to treatment or level or types of impairment. Compared with previous community survey samples, however, study participants appeared to be healthier than general, non-clinical samples of self-identified lesbians, possibly reflecting the special characteristics of sexual minority women who seek treatment in specialized community sites such as the Fenway. Although patients who come to these sites may not represent the more general population of sexual minority women, community health centers known to serve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals may be fruitful access points for studying the mental health status and treatment needs of sexual minority women.

  16. Thoracic surgery associations, societies, and clubs: which organizations are right for you?

    PubMed

    Schieman, Colin; Grondin, Sean C; Gelfand, Gary A J

    2011-08-01

    Determining which organizations to join can be challenging given the wide selection of associations, societies, and clubs available to practicing thoracic surgeons. This article briefly reviews 7 important North American thoracic surgery organizations (the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, the Canadian Association of Thoracic Surgeons, the General Thoracic Surgical Club, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Southern Thoracic Surgical Association, the Western Thoracic Surgical Association, and Women in Thoracic Surgery). The authors also review the criteria that may assist in deciding which organizations best meet a surgeon's career goals and personal expectations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional MRI of the thoracic spinal cord during vibration sensation.

    PubMed

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Smith, Stephen D; McIver, Theresa A; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Latta, Peter; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to acquire accurate functional magnetic resonance images from thoracic spinal cord neurons. The lower thoracic spinal dermatomes (T7-T11) on the right side of the body were mechanically stimulated by vibration for 15 participants. Neuronal responses to vibration sensation were measured in the thoracic spinal cord using a HASTE sequence on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Signal increases were observed in the corresponding lower thoracic spinal cord segments ipsilateral to the side of stimulation in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. This is the first study to provide proof of principle that functional imaging of the entire thoracic spinal cord is possible, by detecting neuronal activity in the thoracic spinal cord during sensory stimulation using spinal fMRI. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [An exceptional cause of a penetrating thoracic trauma : High-pressure injection injury of the left upper lung lobe].

    PubMed

    Schaaf, S; Willms, A G; Richardsen, I; Schreyer, C; Schwab, R

    2016-10-01

    We report a thoracic high-pressure injection injury caused by hydraulic fluid. Immediate surgical intervention without resection of lung tissue ensured an uneventful postoperative course. High-pressure injection injuries often affect the hands, face, and eyes. Acute tissue damage and chronic late-onset complications may be observed. The unimpressive entry wound conceals the underlying tissue damage. Hence, prompt surgical inspection, basic wound debridement, and drainage or open wound therapy determine the outcome.

  19. THORACIC REGION SELF-MOBILIZATION: A CLINICAL SUGGESTION

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in thoracic spine motion may be due to restrictions in contractile or non-contractile tissues. Joint mobilizations are indicated when hypomobility of a joint (non-contractile tissue) is identified. The ability for a patient to perform self-mobilizations of the thoracic spine and ribs may help maximize intervention outcomes. The purpose of this article is to describe a low cost, portable device which can be used for thoracic spine self-mobilization techniques. PMID:22530198

  20. Chronic contained rupture of aortic aneurysm with thoracic vertebral erosion.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Iwao; Nogami, Eijiro; Higuchi, Shinya; Okazaki, Yukio; Itou, Tsuyoshi

    2015-06-01

    A 66-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of a large thoracoabdominal aneurysm. Computed tomography showed thoracic vertebral erosion, suggesting a chronic contained rupture. He was hemodynamically stable with no neurological complication preoperatively. He underwent successful surgical replacement of the descending aorta. During surgery, the 6th and 7th thoracic vertebral bones adjacent to the thoracic aneurysm were found to be eroded. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  1. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  2. [Thoracic involvement in Behçet's vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Zidi, A; Ben Miled Mrad, K; Hantous, S; Nouira, K; Mestiri, I; Mrad, S

    2006-03-01

    Thoracic involvement of Behcet's disease is unusual but serious. It is related to the well known vascular tropism of the disease. It may involve the superior vena cava, pulmonary arteries, aorta and subclavian vessels. Imaging is useful for diagnosis and assess the degree of thoracic involvement. CT scan and MRI are obviously more accurate than angiography. The spectrum of thoracic manifestations of the disease is presented based on a review of 22 cases.

  3. Prevention and management of perioperative arrhythmias in the thoracic surgical population.

    PubMed

    Amar, David

    2008-06-01

    Although bradyarrhythmias or malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias have been reported in less than 1% of patients following noncardiac surgery, rapid atrial arrhythmias more frequently affect the elderly who undergo thoracic operations. This article focuses on new issues leading to the improved understanding of the pathophysiology and mechanisms of postoperative atrial arrhythmias. It discusses new risk factors and a prediction rule for postthoracotomy atrial fibrillation (AF), reviews prophylaxis and acute therapeutic interventions for postthoracotomy AF, and highlights the most recent recommendations of the American Heart Association Task Force on the management of patients who have AF with emphasis on preventing thromboembolic events.

  4. The use of endovascular stents in the treatment of penetrating ulcers of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Brittenden, J; McBride, K; McInnes, G; Gillespie, I N; Bradbury, A W

    1999-11-01

    Penetrating atheromatous ulcers of the aorta are increasingly recognized as a distinct entity. Although their natural history remains ill-defined, such ulcers may lead to pseudoaneurysmal formation, dissection, rupture, or embolization. Given the morbidity associated with open repair, endovascular repair of penetrating atheromatous ulcers may be the treatment of choice. Although stent-graft replacement of acute aortic dissections has recently been described, endovascular repair of penetrating thoracic aortic ulcers has not previously been reported. We report two cases of successful endovascular repair of penetrating atheromatous ulcers that previously ruptured.

  5. Congenital dermal sinus with an infected dermoid cyst in the cervico-thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Jeelani, Yasser; McComb, J Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses (CDS) are epithelium-lined tracts that result from incomplete separation of cutaneous ectoderm from the underlying neuroectoderm. CDS may be associated with dermoid cysts and can cause complications by mass effect and by functioning as a pathway for infection. Cervical and thoracic tracts are rare, making up 1 and 10% of all CDS, respectively. We present an unusual case of a cervico-thoracic CDS with concomitant infected dermoid leading to neurological dysfunction. A 1-year-old male with a normal developmental history presented with a several-week history of progressive weakness. Previous visits to two outside emergency departments diagnosed the patient with acute otitis media. After another episode of fever and worsening of neurological symptoms, the patient was correctly diagnosed as having CDS with an infected dermoid cyst. Antibiotics were initiated, the lesion was resected, and the patient improved neurologically. Although cervical and thoracic CDS with infected dermoids are rare, one should have a high index of suspicion when cutaneous stigmata of spinal dysraphism are identified. Due to the risk of neurological deterioration, the recommended treatment of CDS with or without a concomitant intraspinal dermoid is prompt administration of antibiotics and definitive surgical intervention.

  6. Sternal metastasis - the forgotten column and its effect on thoracic spine stability.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Robert Pearse; Curtin, Mark; Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; Jadaan, Mutaz; McCabe, John Patrick; Devitt, Aiden

    2017-06-18

    Sternal metastases are not studied extensively in the literature. There is a paucity of information on their role in metastatic disease. The concept of the fourth column was described by Berg in 1993, and has been proven in case report, clinically and biomechanical studies. The role of the sternum as a support to the thoracic spine is well documented in the trauma patients, but not much is known about its role in cancer patients. This review examines what is known on the role of the fourth column. Following this we have identified two likely scenarios that sternal metastases may impact management: (1) sternal pathological fracture increases the mobility of the semi-rigid thorax with the loss of the biomechanical support of the sternum-rib-thoracic spine complex; and (2) a sternal metastasis increases the risk of fracture, and while being medical treated the thoracic spine should be monitored for acute kyphosis and neurological injury secondarily to the insufficiency of the fourth column.

  7. Sternal metastasis - the forgotten column and its effect on thoracic spine stability

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Robert Pearse; Curtin, Mark; Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; Jadaan, Mutaz; McCabe, John Patrick; Devitt, Aiden

    2017-01-01

    Sternal metastases are not studied extensively in the literature. There is a paucity of information on their role in metastatic disease. The concept of the fourth column was described by Berg in 1993, and has been proven in case report, clinically and biomechanical studies. The role of the sternum as a support to the thoracic spine is well documented in the trauma patients, but not much is known about its role in cancer patients. This review examines what is known on the role of the fourth column. Following this we have identified two likely scenarios that sternal metastases may impact management: (1) sternal pathological fracture increases the mobility of the semi-rigid thorax with the loss of the biomechanical support of the sternum-rib-thoracic spine complex; and (2) a sternal metastasis increases the risk of fracture, and while being medical treated the thoracic spine should be monitored for acute kyphosis and neurological injury secondarily to the insufficiency of the fourth column. PMID:28660136

  8. Open stent grafting for complex diseases of the thoracic aorta: clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2013-03-01

    Open stent grafting is an alternative treatment for extensive thoracic aortic replacement. However, this procedure is associated with a high incidence of spinal cord injury, which has limited its application. Multiple factors have been suggested to explain the risk of spinal cord injury, including deep delivery of the stent graft, history of operation of the downstream aorta, and postoperative low blood pressure. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage or a hybrid operation in combination with trans-femoral thoracic stent grafting is useful for preventing spinal cord injury. Open stent grafting remains an alternative treatment for atherosclerotic aneurysms with dilatation of the ascending aorta. Open stent grafting for acute aortic dissection is effective for remodeling of the false lumen. The graft diameter for aortic dissection should be 90 % of the total diameter of the aorta, and the distal landing zone should be limited to the T7 vertebral level to prevent new intimal tears or spinal cord injury. Open stent grafting seems a feasible bailout strategy for the treatment of retrograde aortic dissection after TEVAR for type B aortic dissection. Newly designed devices for open stent grafts include the Matsui-Kitamura stent graft or branched open stent graft, which is produced in Japan. The effectiveness of open stent grafting in the treatment of Marfan syndrome remains unclear. A commercially available device for open stent grafting would be desired in Japan. In conclusion, an open stent graft remains an alternative treatment for complex thoracic aortic pathologies.

  9. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Rana A; Darling, Gail E

    2007-11-01

    A thorough knowledge of thoracic anatomy is of fundamental importance to the thoracic surgeon. Surface anatomy is an often-neglected component of traditional topographic anatomic teaching, but a proper understanding of the relationship of surface features to deeper structures is invaluable in the clinical assessment of a patient and in the interpretation of radiologic imaging. Familiarity with thoracic surgical landmarks is a prerequisite for the successful placing of a thoracic incision. Knowledge of the intrathoracic anatomy and level of the diaphragm based on surface landmarks is useful for interventional procedures, such as tube thoracostomy. Knowledge of the chest wall musculature is essential in the use of muscle flaps for reconstruction.

  10. Thoracic duct cyst of posterior mediastinum: a "challenging" differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Electra, Michalopoulou-Manoloutsiou; Evangelia, Athanasiou; Mattheos, Bobos; Dimitris, Hatzibougias I; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsavlis, Drosos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Charalampidis, Chralampos; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Mparmpetakis, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Andreas, Mpakas; Stamatis, Arikas; Alexandros, Kolettas; Kosmas, Tsakiridis

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic duct cysts of the mediastinum are extremely rare entities and their pathogenesis still remains unknown. Imaging methods are not specific and show a cystic mass, however the real nature of the lesion is confirmed only with the help of histopathological examination after surgical excision. Here, we present a case of thoracic cyst in a 28-year-old female, lining in posterior lower mediastinum. The cyst was removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and the histopathological findings were that of thoracic duct cyst. Through this case, we propose an ideal surgical approach and diagnostic procedure.

  11. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Identification of a Novel Locus for Stable Aneurysms with a Low Risk for Progression to Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Regalado, Ellen S.; Minn, Charles; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Coney, Joshua; Cao, Jiumei; Wang, Min; Yu, Robert K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Shete, Sanjay S.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) are the major diseases that affect the thoracic aorta. Approximately 20% of patients with TAAD have a family history of TAAD, and these patients present younger with more rapidly enlarging aneurysms than patients without a family history of aortic disease. Methods and Results A large family with multiple members with TAAD inherited in an autosomal dominant manner was identified. The ascending aortic aneurysms were associated with slow enlargement, a low risk of dissection, and decreased penetrance in women. Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed and a novel locus on chromosome 12 was identified for the mutant gene causing disease in this family. Of the 12 male members who carry the disease-linked microsatellite haplotype, nine had ascending aortic aneurysms with an average diameter of 4.7 cm and average age of 55 years (age range, 32-76) at the time of diagnosis; only one individual had progressed to acute aortic dissection and no other members with aortic dissections were identified. Women harboring the disease-linked haplotype did not have thoracic aortic disease, including an 84 year old woman. Sequencing of 9 genes within the critical interval at the chromosome 12 locus did not identify the mutant gene. Conclusion Mapping a locus for ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms associated with a low risk of aortic dissection supports our hypothesis that genes leading to familial disease can be associated with less aggressive thoracic aortic disease. PMID:21163914

  12. Chiropractic Management of a Patient With Thoracic Pain and a Stable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Neff, Shawn M; Okamoto, Casey S

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe chiropractic management of thoracic pain in a patient with a stable thoracic aortic aneurysm. An 89-year-old man presented with axial mid- and upper back pain localized predominantly at the T8 and T1 spinal segmental levels. A review of available imaging revealed a stable aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta, which measured 4.3 cm. Because the thoracic pain was musculoskeletal in nature and the thoracic aortic aneurysm was stable, mechanical manipulation was provided using the Impulse adjusting instrument. The patient's pain was measured utilizing a numeric rating scale. The patient's thoracic pain improved over the course of treatment. This patient was successfully treated for thoracic spine pain with a course of chiropractic care using a mechanical adjusting instrument.

  13. Prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after the selective anterior fusion of thoracolumbar/lumbar (Lenke 5C) curves in idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Senkoylu, Alpaslan; Luk, Keith D K; Wong, Yat W; Cheung, Kenneth M C

    2014-07-01

    Prognosis of minor lumbar curve correction after selective thoracic fusion in idiopathic scoliosis is well defined. However, the prognosis of minor thoracic curve after isolated anterior fusion of the major lumbar curve has not been well described. To define the prognosis of spontaneous thoracic curve correction after selective anterior fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. A retrospective cohort study on the prognosis of the minor curve after selective anterior correction and fusion of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curve in idiopathic scoliosis. Idiopathic lumbar scoliosis patients treated with anterior spinal fusion. The Scoliosis Research Society 22 questionnaire was used as an outcome measure at the final follow-up. Twenty-eight patients were included in this study. Four patients were male, 24 patients were female, and average age at the time of surgery was 16 years. Mean follow-up was 48 months. According to the Lenke Classification, 22 patients were 5CN, 5 were 5C-, and 1 was 5C+. All operations were performed in the same institution. Standing long posterior-anterior and lateral radiographs were taken just before surgery, 1 week after surgery, and at final follow-up. The mean preoperative Cobb angle of the lumbar (major) curve was 53° (standard deviation [SD]=8.6) and that of the thoracic (minor) curve was 38.4° (SD=6.24). The lumbar and thoracic curves were corrected to 10° (SD=7.6) and 25° (SD=8.3) postoperatively and measured 17° (SD=10.6) and 27° (SD=7.7), respectively, at the last follow-up. There was a significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative measurements of the minor curves (p<.05). However, there was no significant difference between the early postoperative and the final follow-up measurements (p>.05). Regarding the overall sagittal balance, there was no significant difference between preoperative, early, and late postoperative measurements (p>.05). Selective anterior fusion of the major

  14. Changes of upper thoracic curve and shoulder balance in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by anterior selective thoracic fusion using VATS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Park, Sung-Jun; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-10-01

    A retrospective radiographic analysis. To evaluate changes of upper thoracic curve and shoulder balance in thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients treated by anterior selective thoracic fusion using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and to identify adequacy of earlier criteria of double thoracic (DT) curve for anterior correction. Although anterior and posterior scoliosis correction show many differences in correction mechanisms, fusion levels, loss of correction etc., the criteria of DT curve was applied without differences. There are no reports about these differences. Forty patients were followed for a minimum of 3 years (range, 3-8 y). The magnitude and flexibility of upper thoracic, lower thoracic, and the superior portion of the lower thoracic curve were measured using full length standing and side-bending radiographs before surgery, at 1 week postoperatively, and at last follow-up. The correction rate and loss of correction of these curves were calculated and preoperative and postoperative radiographic shoulder heights (RSHs) were measured. RSH was defined as balanced (shoulder height difference <10 mm), mildly imbalanced (10-20 mm), or moderately imbalanced (>20 mm). T1 tilt and coronal balance were also evaluated. Patients were divided into groups based on these factors and postoperative RSH was compared. Flexibility of the upper thoracic curve was 46% and magnitude of the upper thoracic curve was corrected spontaneously from 28.6±7.8 degrees to 17.9±7.0 degrees with a 37.4% correction rate that did not change during follow-up. On average, preoperative left shoulder was 6.3±10.5 mm lower than right shoulder and this changed to 10.4±11.8 mm and 6.0±8.2 mm higher than right shoulder at 1 week postoperatively and at last follow-up, respectively. The group with an upper thoracic curve of ≥30 degrees or a superior portion of the lower thoracic curve of ≥30 degrees preoperatively had a higher left shoulder postoperatively (P=0.016, 0

  15. Minority attitudes toward contraception.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J O

    1974-12-01

    The training division of the Los Angeles Regional Family Planning Council conducted a seminar for minority members to discover attitudes toward birth control. Indian-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Black-Americans participated. Some fears and misunderstandings relative to birth control were voiced. The timidity of recent Chinese immigrants was mentioned. Male reluctance to use birth control out of a sense of machismo was mentioned in relation to Black- and Mexican-Americans. The conclusion was that, when birth control methods are adequately explained, women of all ethnic groups are willing to use them. To allay fears, suspicions, and concerns, family planning should be presented to minority communities as a health service and not a social service. Family planning clinics would be more accepted in these communities if they expanded their work into other health areas.

  16. Minority energy assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.; Lampley, L.; Anderson, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to project household energy consumption, energy expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income for five population groups from 1991 to 2009. The approach uses the Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy's Office of Minority Economic Impact. The MEAM provides a framework that can be used to forecast regional energy consumption and energy expenditure for majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. The forecasts of key macroeconomic and energy variables used as exogenous variables in the MEAM were obtained from the Data Resources, Inc., Macromodel and Energy Model. Generally, the projections of household energy consumption, expenditure, and energy expenditure as share of income vary across population groups and census regions.

  17. Minor planet databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykhlova, L.; Bakanas, E.

    We cast a retrospective look at the mankind's acquaintance with minor bodies of the Solar System, at the explosive growth in their discoveries resulting from the technological progress, and at gradual understanding of the danger to our very existence that some of them might actually pose. Then, we review current effort, of the astronomical community in general and of its Russian part in particular, to integrate our rapidly expanding knowledge of the potential Earth impactors and to make it readily available online.

  18. [Treatment of thoracic disc herniation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Picado-Baca, Mauricio Leonardo; Mireles-Cano, José Nicolás; León-Meza, Víctor Manuel; García-González, Oscar Guillermo; Ramos-Trujillo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Herniated thoracic intervertebral disc is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. Its frequency varies from 0.15% to 1.7% of all disc herniations, and produces symptoms in 0.5% to 0.8%. Case 1. A 50-year-old woman, with pain and burning sensation in left hemithorax of four months of onset. It was treated as a herpetic syndrome, with no improvement. She was seen after thirteen days of exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The physical examination showed asymmetric paraparesis, lower left pelvic limb 1/5, and right pelvic limb 3/5¸ sensory level T8, with left Babinski positive. A thoracic disc herniation in space T8-T9 was diagnosed. A 55-year-old patient with a history of presenting pain in lumbar area of 5 years onset. She also had radicular pain that radiated to the right pelvic limb, with intensity 10/10 on a Visual Analogue Scale. Her physical examination showed muscle strength 5/5, with normal sensitivity in all dermatomes and tendon reflexes, and a positive right Babinski. Thoracic disc herniation T7-T8 level was diagnosed. Due to anatomical conditions that define this type of hernia, the extracavitary posterolateral approach should be the recommended surgical procedure when the simultaneously performed anterior decompression and fixation with posterior instrumentation are the treatments proposed. Despite the different anatomical structures of this special area, it was possible to obtain satisfactory results for both clinical cases. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Iatrogenic Injury to the Long Thoracic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Federico; Davoli, Giuseppe; Bouklas, Dimitri; Oricchio, Luca; Frati, Giacomo; Neri, Eugenio

    2001-01-01

    After heart surgery, complications affecting the brachial plexus have been reported in 2% to 38% of cases. The long thoracic nerve is vulnerable to damage at various levels, due to its long and superficial course. This nerve supplies the serratus anterior muscle, which has an important role in the abduction and elevation of the superior limb; paralysis of the serratus anterior causes “winged scapula,” a condition in which the arm cannot be lifted higher than 90° from the side. Unfortunately, the long thoracic nerve can be damaged by a wide variety of traumatic and nontraumatic occurrences, ranging from viral or nonviral disease to improper surgical technique, to the position of the patient during transfer to a hospital bed. Our patient, a 62-year-old man with triple-vessel disease, underwent myocardial revascularization in which right and left internal thoracic arteries and the left radial artery were grafted to the right coronary, descending anterior, and obtuse marginal arteries, respectively. Despite strong recovery and an apparently good postoperative course, the patient sued for damages due to subsequent winging of the left scapula. In this instance, the legal case has less to do with the cause of the lesion (which remains unclear) than with failure to adequately inform the patient of possible complications at the expense of the nervous system. The lesson is that each patient must receive detailed written and oral explanation of the potential benefits and all conceivable risks of a procedure. (Tex Heart Inst J 2001;28:315–7) PMID:11777160

  20. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary palmar hyperidrosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Arun; Ali, Mudasir; Kaul, Sunil

    2010-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is a disorder that is characterized by excessive sweating in disproportion to that required for thermoregulation. In most cases, this is aggravated by emotional factors and by heat. Hyperhidrosis can be seen in the palms of the hands, armpits, soles of the feet and face. The principal characteristic of this disease is the intense discomfort of patients, which affects their social and professional life. Treatment modalities include topical application of aluminum chloride, iontophoresis, anticholinergics, botulinum toxin injection, liposuction, excision of sweat glands, and thoracic sympathectomy. Between January 1998 and August 2007, a prospective study of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies for palmar hyperhidrosis was undertaken based on case histories and a prospective pre- and postoperative questionnaire survey. The sample comprised of 322 patients with a mean age of 24 years. At Apollo Hospital, New Delhi, India, bilateral video-assisted thoracoscopic T3 level sympathectomies were performed in all cases. All patients had immediate cessation of palmar hyperhidrosis. The mean postoperative stay was 1.1 days. A questionnaire was completed based on their response to a telephone conversation or e-mail. A paired t test and Wilcoxon test was performed on these data and it showed significant improvement in quality of life. Compensatory sweating was found to be the most troublesome side effect for all patients. It was seen in 63% of the patients. This is similar to other reports of compensatory sweating; however, the figure decreases to 29% if we disregard the percentage of patients who reported only mild compensatory sweating. In view of the low morbidity and zero mortality rate of this surgical technique, we recommend it as a method of treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. Thoracic sympathectomy eliminates palmar hyperhidrosis with minimal recurrence (1% in our series) and produces a high rate of patient satisfaction.

  1. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield. PMID:21087529

  2. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Apostolaki, Georgia; Apostolaki, Mary; Chorti, Maria

    2010-11-19

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield.

  3. Thoracic paraplegia due to missed thoracic compressive lesions after lumbar spinal decompression surgery. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Akihiko; Miyamoto, Kei; Hosoe, Hideo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2004-01-01

    The authors discuss the cases of three patients in whom thoracic paraplegia developed after lumbar spinal decompressive surgery for slight lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Careful computerized tomography myelography and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the thoracic spine revealed another compressive lesion (spinal cord tumor, disc herniation, osteophyte of vertebral body, and ossification of the ligamentum flavum). Additional thoracic decompressive surgery provided partial amelioration of each patient's neurological condition. The authors suggest that to avoid such a complication physical and radiographic examination of the thoracic spine should be performed preoperatively if the lumbar imaging is inconclusive.

  4. [Clamshell thoracotomy after thoracic knife wounds].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Marcus; Schneider, Niko R E; Popp, Erik

    2017-01-04

    Resuscitation in the event of traumatic cardiac arrest was for a long time considered to be a less than promising technique to employ; however, current data indicate that the prospects of success need not be any poorer than for resuscitation due to cardiac distress. The targeted and rapid remedying of reversible causes can re-establish the circulatory function and the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) algorithm for traumatic cardiac arrest is a helpful guide in this respect. This case report illustrates the resolute implementation of this algorithm in the prehospital environment in the case of an attempted suicide by a thoracic knife wound.

  5. Video-Assisted Thoracic Sympathectomy for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Milanez de Campos, Jose Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Gomes, Oswaldo; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-08-01

    By the 1980s, endoscopy was in use by some groups in sympathetic denervation of the upper limbs with vascular indications. Low morbidity, cosmetic results, reduction in the incidence of Horner syndrome, and the shortened time in hospital made video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy (VATS) better accepted by those undergoing treatment for hyperhidrosis. Over the last 25 years, this surgical procedure has become routine in the treatment of hyperhidrosis, leading to a significant increase in the number of papers on the subject in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multidetector CT of blunt thoracic trauma.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Avery, Laura L; Asrani, Ashwin V; Novelline, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Thoracic injuries are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. These injuries account for approximately 25% of trauma-related deaths in the United States, second only to head injuries. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of blunt chest trauma. In addition to conventional radiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used, since it can quickly and accurately help diagnose a wide variety of injuries in trauma patients. Furthermore, multiplanar and volumetric reformatted CT images provide improved visualization of injuries, increased understanding of trauma-related diseases, and enhanced communication between the radiologist and the referring clinician. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  7. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  8. Reducing complications of thoracic gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Martin, K

    1989-01-01

    With the persistent presence of violence in our urban areas and the availability of guns, penetrating injuries as a result of firearm use continue to be a challenge for the emergency, surgery, and operating room nurse. Because gunshot wounds may be rapidly fatal, an understanding of firearms and the injuries they produce, as well as their possible complications, can assist the critical care nurse in caring for patients with gunshot wounds to the chest. Thoracic trauma is present in 50% of all trauma patients and is the cause of death in 25% of these victims. Penetrating trauma from violent episodes accounts for approximately 50% of cases of chest trauma in the urban setting.

  9. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Keen, G.; Bradbrook, R. A.; McGinn, F.

    1969-01-01

    Seven patients who had traumatic ruptures of the thoracic aorta are reported. Four of these died within a few hours of admission, allowing no opportunity for diagnosis or treatment. However, three survived long enough for elective surgery to be undertaken. A diagnosis of ruptured aorta was missed in one patient (case 2), and the difficulties of diagnosing this condition, even during thoracotomy, are emphasized. The value of serial chest radiography and forward aortography is discussed. Two of these patients underwent successful aortic repair, using left atrio-femoral bypass. Images PMID:5763507

  10. Thoracic ectopia cordis with anatomically normal heart.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Flávio Donizete; Novaes, Fernando Rotatori; Maia, Marcelo Alves; Barros, Francisco de Assis

    2007-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital malformation, which is commonly associated with other intracardiac defects. At two-day-old full-term baby girl was admitted to Santa Casade Misericórdia Hospital Montes Claros, NG, Brazil, with thoracic ectopia cordis. A transthoracic echocardiographic study did not identify any associated congenital heart diseases. The infant underwent surgical treatment using a rib graft to create a neo-sternum. She was discharged after presenting a good outcome on the 20th postoperative day.

  11. Thoracic Manifestations of Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Miller, Wallace T

    2017-05-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) is a congenital disorder characterized by venous malformations and a predisposition to pulmonary embolism. We reviewed the imaging findings of 7 adult patients with KTS who underwent thoracic CT. While the superficial manifestations of KTS predominantly affect the extremities, patients frequently develop abnormalities of the pulmonary arterial system, particularly chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Additionally, some patients are seen to develop pulmonary arteriolar aneurysms; the physiologic significance of this finding is unknown at this time. Radiologists should be aware of these potential findings and have a high index of suspicion for chronic PE in patients with KTS.

  12. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Following Breast Implant Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Caplash, Yugesh; Giri, Pratyush; Kearney, Daniel; Wagstaff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present a patient with bilateral breast implant rupture who developed severe locoregional silicone granulomatous lymphadenopathy. Poly Implant Prothese silicone implants had been used for bilateral breast augmentation 5 years prior. Extracapsular implant rupture and bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy indicated explantation, capsulectomy, and selective lymph node excision. Histology demonstrated silicone lymphadenopathy with no evidence of malignancy. Over the subsequent 12 months, she developed progressive locoregional lymphadenopathy involving bilateral cervical, axillary, and internal mammary groups, resulting in bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome. We report the unusual presentation, progression, and the ultimate surgical management of this patient. PMID:25878942

  13. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  14. Compressive Myelopathy in Congenital Kyphosis of the Upper Thoracic Spine: A Retrospective Study of 6 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Zheng, Wenjie

    2016-07-14

    A retrospective study. The goal of this retrospective study was to describe the uncommon presentation of neurological deficits in patients with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine (T1-T4). Congenital kyphosis is an uncommon deformity but can potentially lead to spinal cord compression and paraplegia, particularly in type I (failure of formation) deformities. Few reports have described compressive myelopathy associated with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine. Six patients with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine, including 2 adults and 4 pediatric patients, developed progressive or sudden onset of paraplegia. Angles of kyphosis ranged from 75 to 120 degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord thinning and compression at the kyphotic apex in all patients. All patients underwent decompressive and correctional surgery by single-stage posterior vertebral column resection or 2-stage anterior corpectomy fusion and posterior fixation. Neurological status was evaluated using the ASIA impairment classification and the motor score. Postoperatively, all patients had 25%-80% correction of kyphosis. All patients improved neurologically between 0 and 2 ASIA scales after surgery. Among them, an adolescent patient presenting as acute ASIA A improved to ASIA E within 1 year after surgery. Another adolescent patient deteriorated from preoperative ASIA C to ASIA A in the immediate postoperative period but improved to ASIA D within 1 year after surgery. Congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine has a high incidence of compressive myelopathy. Duration from onset of paraplegia to surgical intervention and severity of preoperative paraplegia are 2 key factors in determining neurological prognosis after surgery.

  15. Compressive Myelopathy in Congenital Kyphosis of the Upper Thoracic Spine: A Retrospective Study of 6 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Wang, Honggang; Zheng, Wenjie

    2017-10-01

    A retrospective study. The goal of this retrospective study was to describe the uncommon presentation of neurological deficits in patients with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine (T1-T4). Congenital kyphosis is an uncommon deformity but can potentially lead to spinal cord compression and paraplegia, particularly in type I (failure of formation) deformities. Few reports have described compressive myelopathy associated with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine. Six patients with congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine, including 2 adults and 4 pediatric patients, developed progressive or sudden onset of paraplegia. Angles of kyphosis ranged from 75 to 120 degrees. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord thinning and compression at the kyphotic apex in all patients. All patients underwent decompressive and correctional surgery by single-stage posterior vertebral column resection or 2-stage anterior corpectomy fusion and posterior fixation. Neurological status was evaluated using the ASIA impairment classification and the motor score. Postoperatively, all patients had 25%-80% correction of kyphosis. All patients improved neurologically between 0 and 2 ASIA scales after surgery. Among them, an adolescent patient presenting as acute ASIA A improved to ASIA E within 1 year after surgery. Another adolescent patient deteriorated from preoperative ASIA C to ASIA A in the immediate postoperative period but improved to ASIA D within 1 year after surgery. Congenital kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine has a high incidence of compressive myelopathy. Duration from onset of paraplegia to surgical intervention and severity of preoperative paraplegia are 2 key factors in determining neurological prognosis after surgery.

  16. Cannulation of the extrathoracic left common carotid artery for thoracic aorta operations through left posterolateral thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Veron, Sebastien; Neri, Eugenio; Buklas, Dimitrios; Pula, Giorgio; Benvenuti, Antonio; Massetti, Massimo; Bizzarri, Federico; Sassi, Carlo

    2004-11-01

    The femoral artery is the usual site of arterial cannulation in thoracic aorta operations through left posterolateral thoracotomy that require cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). The advantage of this perfusion route is in limiting the duration of circulatory arrest. It is associated, however, with the risk of retrograde embolization or, in cases involving aortic dissection, malperfusion of vital organs. To prevent these risks, we have used the extrathoracic left common carotid artery as the perfusion route. From December 1999 to January 2003, we used cannulation of the left extrathoracic common carotid artery in 42 thoracic aorta operations through posterolateral thoracotomy with an open proximal anastomosis technique during DHCA. The indication for thoracic aortic repair was atherosclerotic ulcer in 7 cases, chronic aortic aneurysm in 18, acute type B dissection in 5, and chronic type B dissection in 12. Cannulation of the extrathoracic left common carotid artery was successful in all patients. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, with no cerebrovascular events in all cases. No cannulation-related complications were observed. One patient died from cardiac insufficiency on postoperative day 5. No peripheral neurological deficits (paraplegia or paraparesis) were observed. Postoperative complications included atrial fibrillation in five patients, reoperation to control hemorrhage in six, respiratory insufficiency in nine, and renal insufficiency in six. These results indicate that cannulation of the left extrathoracic common carotid artery is a useful, reliable method for proximal perfusion during CPB in patients undergoing repair of the descending thoracic aorta through left posterolateral thoracotomy. By providing effective perfusion of the brain, this technique can prolong safe DHCA time. Another advantage is the prevention of cerebral emboli, ensuring retrograde flow to the aortic arch.

  17. Aortic Arch and Thoracic Aorta Curvature Remodeling after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gaspar; Garcia, Marvin E; Yugueros, Xavier; Urrea, Rodrigo; Tripodi, Paolo; Gomez, Fernando; Maeso, Jordi; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the original curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, and how it is modified after the placement of a thoracic endograft. We retrospectively analyzed all patients primarily treated for thoracic aortic aneurysms and blunt traumatic aortic injuries by means of an endograft sealed into the aortic arch (zones, Z1-Z3) in 2 different centers (Vascular Surgery Division, Hospital Clinic, UB; and Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, UAB; Barcelona, Spain), between 2010 and 2015. The last preoperative and early (1-month) postoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) was obtained for all cases, and an accurate 3-dimensional (3D) center lumen line was created, from the aortic valve to the renal arteries. Angles in 2-dimensional (2D; XY-plane) and 3D (referred to cranial-caudal Z-axis) were analyzed in: the distal ascending aorta, aortic arch, and thoracic aorta (at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm from the brachiocephalic trunk [BCT]) and celiac trunk (CT). Changes in preoperative-postoperative CTA were compared independently for both diseases. Thirty-six cases were included (20 aneurysms, 16 blunt traumatic injuries; mean age, 69.5 and 42.5 years). After placement of an aortic endograft (sealed in Z1-Z2 in 30% of aneurysms and 75% of traumatic injuries; mean endograft length: 22.6 cm and 11.3 cm, respectively), a global left anterior displacement of the ascending aorta was observed (2D examination: -13.1° and -7.5°, P = 0.049 and 0.041, respectively). The 3D examination showed an average increase of the aortic angle at 5 and 10 cm from the BCT in the whole sample (+4.0°, +4.9° in reference to the vertical; P = 0.017, 0.001), softening the curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In addition, in traumatic injuries, a decrease in the aortic arch angle was observed (-3.5°, P = 0.030). Placement of an endograft into the aortic arch and proximal thoracic aorta engenders a

  18. Surgical efficacy of minimally invasive thoracic discectomy.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Zehri, Aqib H; Zaidi, Hasan A; Almefty, Kaith K; Preul, Mark C; Theodore, Nicholas; Dickman, Curtis A

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to determine the clinical indications and surgical outcomes for thoracoscopic discectomy. Thoracic disc disease is a rare degenerative process. Thoracoscopic approaches serve to minimize tissue injury during the approach, but critics argue that this comes at the cost of surgical efficacy. Current reports in the literature are limited to small institutional patient series. We systematically identified all English language articles on thoracoscopic discectomy with at least two patients, published from 1994 to 2013 on MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. We analyzed 12 articles that met the inclusion criteria, five prospective and seven retrospective studies comprising 545 surgical patients. The overall complication rate was 24% (n=129), with reported complications ranging from intercostal neuralgia (6.1%), atelectasis (2.8%), and pleural effusion (2.6%), to more severe complications such as pneumonia (0.8%), pneumothorax (1.3%), and venous thrombosis (0.2%). The average reported postoperative follow-up was 20.5 months. Complete resolution of symptoms was reported in 79% of patients, improvement with residual symptoms in 10.2%, no change in 9.6%, and worsening in 1.2%. The minimally invasive endoscopic approaches to the thoracic spine among selected patients demonstrate excellent clinical efficacy and acceptable complication rates, comparable to the open approaches. Disc herniations confined to a single level, with small or no calcifications, are ideal for such an approach, whereas patients with calcified discs adherent to the dura would benefit from an open approach.

  19. Thoracic splenosis: History is the key.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Marrero, Tirsa M; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Jaffe, Howard A

    2017-01-01

    Splenosis is an acquired ectopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue; that occurs after traumatic splenic rupture and splenectomy [1]. Splenosis is a rare but benign disease, and the diagnosis can be challenging as the multiple incidentally found nodules could mimic malignancy [2]. Abdominopelvic Splenosis is thought to occur in as many as 65% of cases of splenic rupture [1]. However, Thoracic Splenosis is rare and usually involve the left parietal and visceral pleura [1,2]. Intraparenchymal lesions are less common but have been reported in cases of parenchymal and diaphragm laceration [1,2]. Taking a thorough history is of utmost importance, as these patients usually present more than two decades after the splenic traumatic rupture. The use of commonly available nuclear studies will further confirm the diagnosis [3]. This will help to avoid unnecessary procedures, like biopsies; and prevent the potential complications. We present a case of Thoracic Splenosis that highlights the importance of taking a detailed history; and the importance of using nuclear studies for the diagnosis. Further adding to its uniqueness, this case showed with multiple intraparenchymal nodules which is a less common presentation of Splenosis.

  20. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  1. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group.

    PubMed

    LoCicero, J

    1993-09-01

    Both patients and the medical profession are quick to embrace new technology, particularly when it may replace an existing surgical procedure. Unfortunately, the rapidity of acceptance is rarely associated with careful evaluation. Laparoscopy is a recent example of such widely embraced technology. Studies of laparoscopy that yielded good comparative data to more traditional methods were slow to accrue. This led to the exposure of its shortcomings through governmental reports and the lay press. To prevent this from happening in thoracoscopy, two types of studies are required so that valid conclusions about the new technology can be drawn. The first is an accounting of the new technology as procedures evolve around it. The data collected in such a study should contain basic information, including the indications for the procedure, how it was performed, procedure length, associated complications, and patient outcome. Such information provides a broad profile of the technology, emphasizing from the outset its potential strengths and weaknesses. The second type of study involves a more detailed concurrent comparison of the specific procedures utilizing this technology to the established traditional methods. Such randomized studies help to firmly establish through scientific process the place of the new technology. The Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery Study Group was organized in early 1992 to address these concerns. From an initial four surgeons the group has grown to include more than 41 institutions. Currently the group is collecting data in a registry and has established three clinical trials to evaluate video-assisted thoracic surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A Portrait of Older Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Emily M.

    This booklet presents facts and statistics describing minority elderly persons in the United States. First general information is presented about minority elderly as a whole, noting that minority groups have increased risks of poor education, substandard housing, poverty, malnutrition, and generally poor health. Next, facts are presented about…

  3. Career Education: Implications for Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, N. Alan; Witherspoon, Everette L.

    In general, minorities, especially blacks, approach career education warily, fearing it might turn out to be a new name for an old game. Statistics indicate the minority dilemma; for example, unemployment among minorities 16 and older is nearly twice the white unemployment rate. A number of critical questions about career education as related to…

  4. A Portrait of Older Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Emily M.

    This booklet presents facts and statistics describing minority elderly persons in the United States. First general information is presented about minority elderly as a whole, noting that minority groups have increased risks of poor education, substandard housing, poverty, malnutrition, and generally poor health. Next, facts are presented about…

  5. Institutional Climate and Minority Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Richard C.

    This paper discusses ways that institutions can change the higher education system and environment to accommodate more minority students. The first section, "Institutional Climate and Minority Achievement," presents an overview of the problems facing colleges and universities with respect to recruiting and retaining minority students. In the…

  6. Thoracic surgery in the real world: does surgical specialty affect outcomes in patients having general thoracic operations?

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P; Davenport, Daniel L; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2012-04-01

    Most general thoracic operations in the United States are performed by general surgeons. Results obtained by those identified as general surgeons are often compared with those identified as thoracic surgeons. We interrogated the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database over a 5-year period to compare outcomes in patients who underwent similar operations by surgeons identified as either thoracic surgeons or general surgeons. We employed propensity-score matching to minimize confounding when estimating the effect of surgeon identity on postoperative outcomes. During the study period, thoracic surgeons performed 3,263 major pulmonary or esophageal operations, and general surgeons performed 15,057 similar operations. Compared with patients operated on by general surgeons, patients operated on by thoracic surgeons had significant excess multivariate comorbidities, including insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, concurrent pneumonia, congestive heart failure, previous cardiac surgery, dialysis-dependent renal failure, disseminated cancer, prior sepsis, and previous operation within 30 days. Likewise, patients in highest risk categories had operations performed by thoracic surgeons more commonly than by general surgeons. Unadjusted comparisons for mortality and serious morbidity showed significantly worse mortality and pulmonary complications in patients operated on by thoracic surgeons. However, with propensity matching according to surgeon type, thoracic surgeons had significantly fewer serious adverse outcomes compared with general surgeons, and this decreased morbidity occurred in a higher risk cohort. Our results show that patients operated on by thoracic surgeons have higher acuity compared with patients operated on by general surgeons. When patients are matched for comorbidities and serious preoperative risk factors, thoracic surgeons have improved outcomes, especially with regard to

  7. TGFB2 mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections associated with mild systemic features of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth K; Li, Alexander H; d'Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-07-08

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease followed by whole-exome sequencing of affected relatives identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations-a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4-segregated with disease with a combined logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified 2 additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2; however, aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency for TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting that the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta.

  8. Surface anatomy and surface landmarks for thoracic surgery: Part II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shona E; Darling, Gail E

    2011-05-01

    Surface anatomy is an integral part of a thoracic surgeon's armamentarium to assist with the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of thoracic pathology. As reviewed in this article, the surface landmarks of the lungs, heart, great vessels, and mediastinum are critical for appropriate patient care and should be learned in conjunction with classic anatomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves in humans.

    PubMed

    Kraan, G A; Hoogland, P V J M; Wuisman, P I J M

    2009-04-01

    An anatomical study of the extraforaminal attachments of the thoracic spinal nerves was performed using human spinal columns. The objectives of the study are to identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each thoracic level that attach spinal nerves to structures at the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms have been described to protect the spinal nerve against traction. All the described structures were located inside the spinal canal proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Ligaments with a comparable function just outside the intervertebral foramen are mentioned ephemerally. No studies are available about ligamentous attachments of thoracic spinal nerves to the spine. Five embalmed human thoracic spines (Th2-Th11) were dissected. Bilaterally, the extraforaminal region was dissected to describe and measure anatomical structures and their relationships with the thoracic spinal nerves. Histology was done at the sites of attachment of the ligaments to the nerves and along the ligaments. The thoracic spinal nerves are attached to the transverse process of the vertebrae cranial and caudal to the intervertebral foramen. The ligaments consist mainly of collagenous fibers. In conclusion, at the thoracic level, direct ligamentous connections exist between extraforaminal thoracic spinal nerves and nearby structures. They may serve as a protective mechanism against traction and compression of the nerves by positioning the nerve in the intervertebral foramen.

  10. Noteworthy Literature Published in 2016 for Thoracic Organ Transplantation Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kathirvel; Nazarnia, Soheyla

    2017-03-01

    This article is first in the series to review the published literature on perioperative issues in patients undergoing thoracic solid organ transplantations. We present recent literature from 2016 on preoperative considerations, organ preservation, intraoperative anesthesia management, surgical techniques, postoperative complications, and the impact of perioperative management on short- and long-term outcomes that are pertinent to thoracic transplantation anesthesiologists.

  11. Nonintubated Transareolar Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy with a Flexible Endoscope: Experience of 58 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianfeng; Lin, Jianbo; Lin, Min; Li, Xu; Lai, Fancai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently become a hot spot in the field of minimally invasive surgery. But, most of the procedures are still in the early stages of development and limited to animal experiments. Transareolar endoscopic surgery could work as a viable intermediate step before thoracic NOTES. Under intravenous anesthesia without endotracheal intubation, transareolar endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) with a flexible endoscope has rarely been attempted. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this novel minimally invasive technique in managing primary palmar hyperhidrosis (PPH). Methods: From June 2012 to July 2014, a total of 58 male patients with severe PPH underwent transareolar ETS by use of a flexible endoscope. Under intravenous anesthesia without endotracheal intubation, a flexible endoscope was introduced through the incision on the edge of the areola into the thoracic cavity. The thoracic sympathetic chain was ablated at the level of the fourth rib. Results: All procedures were successfully performed with a mean operating time of 33.6 ± 8.3 min. All patients regained consciousness rapidly and none of them complained about sore throat after surgery. There were no operative mortality and conversion to open procedure. The symptoms of all patients disappeared as soon as the sympathetic chain was cut off. Fifty six patients (96.6%) were discharged from the hospital on the first postoperative day. The postoperative complications were minor, and no patients developed Horner’s syndrome. At 3 months postoperatively, there was no obvious surgical scar on the chest wall, and none of the patients complained about postoperative pain. Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) appeared in 19 patients. No recurrent symptoms were observed in our study. One year follow-up revealed an excellent cosmetic result and degree of satisfaction. Conclusion: Nonintubated transareolar ETS with a flexible

  12. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  13. Operative neurological complications resulting from thoracic and lumbar spine internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, P R; Cotler, H B; Gireesan, G T

    1988-12-01

    Of 2023 patients treated for acute spinal injuries, 729 sustained acute injuries in thoracic and lumbar regions; 295 surgically treated patients were reviewed for evidence of postoperative neurological complications. Of the 295 patients, 150 were intraoperatively monitored using somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP). Six patients (4%) revealed intraoperative deterioration of the SSEP; however, only one of the six revealed a new postoperative neurological deficit (0.7%). The remaining 145 patients were included in the unmonitored or wake-up test group in which ten (6.9%) demonstrated new postoperative deficits. Of the 11 patients with new postoperative neurological deficits, eight patients demonstrated motor weakness, two had radiculopathy, and one had bowel-bladder incontinence. The intraoperative use of SSEP was not able to identify subtle alterations in neurological function; however, due to early warning, SSEP appears capable of preventing profound surgically induced neurological alterations. A new protocol is designed for the management of intraoperative neurological deterioration as detected by SSEP.

  14. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  15. Thoracic ultrasound recognition of competence: A position paper of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jonathan P; Twaddell, Scott H; Lee, Y C Gary; Salamonsen, Matthew; Hew, Mark; Fielding, David; Nguyen, Phan; Steinfort, Daniel; Hopkins, Peter; Smith, Nicola; Grainge, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    The ability to perform bedside thoracic ultrasound is increasingly recognized as an essential skill for thoracic clinicians, extending the clinical examination and aiding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Thoracic ultrasound reduces complications and increases success rates when used prior to thoracentesis or intercostal chest tube insertion. It is increasingly difficult to defend performing these procedures without real or near-real time image guidance. To assist thoracic physicians and others achieve and demonstrate thoracic ultrasound competence, the Interventional Pulmonology Special Interest Group (IP-SIG) of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand (TSANZ) has developed a new pathway with four components: (i) completion of an approved thoracic ultrasound theory and hands-on teaching course. (ii) A log of at least 40 relevant scans. (iii) Two formative assessments (following 5-10 scans and again after 20 scans) using the Ultrasound-Guided Thoracentesis Skills and Tasks Assessment Tool (UG-STAT). (iv) A barrier assessment (UG-STAT, pass score of 90%) by an accredited assessor not directly involved in the candidate's training. Upon completion of these requirements a candidate may apply to the TSANZ for recognition of competence. This pathway is intended to provide a regional standard for thoracic ultrasound training.

  16. Thoracic surgery training in Canada according to the residents: the thoracic surgery resident survey, of the Canadian thoracic manpower and education study (T-Med).

    PubMed

    Schieman, Colin; Kelly, Elizabeth; Gelfand, Gary; Graham, Andrew; McFadden, Sean P; Edwards, Janet; Grondin, Sean C

    2010-01-01

    The resident component of the Canadian Thoracic Manpower and Education Study (T-MED) was conducted to understand the basic demographic of Canadian thoracic surgery residents, the factors influencing their selection of training programs, current work conditions, training and competencies, and opinions in regard to the manpower needs for the specialty. A modified Delphi process was used to develop a survey applicable to thoracic surgery residents. In May and June 2009, residents completed the voluntary anonymous Internet-based survey. All Canadian residents participated in the survey, providing a 100% response rate. Most respondents were male (11/12), and the average age was 34 years old with an anticipated debt greater than $50,000 on graduation. All residents worked more than 70 hours per week, with most doing 1 : 3 or 1 : 4 on-call. Two-thirds of respondents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with their training program. Rates of anticipated competence in performing various thoracic surgeries on graduation differed between residents and program directors. Two-thirds (8/12) of residents planned to practice thoracic surgery exclusively, and hoped to practice in an academic setting. Most residents (10/12) agreed or strongly agreed that not enough jobs are available in Canada for graduating trainees and that the number of residency positions should reflect the predicted availability of jobs. This study has provided detailed information on thoracic surgery resident demographics and training programs. Most thoracic surgery residents are satisfied with their current training program but have concerns about their job prospects on graduation, and they believe that the number of training positions should reflect potential job opportunities. This survey represents the first attempt to characterize the current state of thoracic surgery training in Canada from the resident's perspective and may help in directing educational and manpower planning. Copyright © 2010

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Minority Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.

    2005-02-01

    New branches of scientific disciplines often have a few paradigmatic models that serve as a testing ground for theories and a starting point for new inquiries. In the late 1990s, one of these models found fertile ground in the growing field of econophysics: the Minority Game (MG), a model for speculative markets that combined conceptual simplicity with interesting emergent behaviour and challenging mathematics. The two basic ingredients were the minority mechanism (a large number of players have to choose one of two alternatives in each round, and the minority wins) and limited rationality (each player has a small set of decision rules, and chooses the more successful ones). Combining these, one observes a phase transition between a crowded and an inefficient market phase, fat-tailed price distributions at the transition, and many other nontrivial effects. Now, seven years after the first paper, three of the key players—Damien Challet, Matteo Marsili and Yi-Cheng Zhang—have published a monograph that summarizes the current state of the science. The book consists of two parts: a 100-page overview of the various aspects of the MG, and reprints of many essential papers. The first chapters of Part I give a well-written description of the motivation and the history behind the MG, and then go into the phenomenology and the mathematical treatment of the model. The authors emphasize the `physics' underlying the behaviour and give coherent, intuitive explanations that are difficult to extract from the original papers. The mathematics is outlined, but calculations are not carried out in great detail (maybe they could have been included in an appendix). Chapter 4 then discusses how and why the MG is a model for speculative markets, how it can be modified to give a closer fit to observed market statistics (in particular, reproducing the `stylized facts' of fat-tailed distributions and volatility clustering), and what conclusions one can draw from the behaviour of the MG

  18. Endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy for Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Ueyama, Takeshi; Endo, Masamitsu; Sasaki, Hisao; Kasashima, Fuminori; Abe, Yoshinobu; Kosugi, Ikuko

    2002-07-01

    For many years, thoracic sympathectomy via open surgery was not used to treat Raynaud's phenomenon because of the invasiveness of this procedure and the poor long-term outcomes associated with it. However, with the introduction of endoscopic surgery, thoracic sympathectomy (or sympathicotomy) has been performed by some surgeons as a less invasive surgical option for patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. The less invasive procedure has the possibility of emphasizing merits of sympathectomy. The purpose of this study was to reevaluate the efficacy of sympathicotomy for Raynaud's phenomenon with endoscopic technique and its range of applicability. Between December 1992 and August 2001, endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy (ETS) was performed in 28 patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (of a total of 502 patients with autonomic disorders who underwent ETS) at National Kanazawa Hospital. We considered indications for surgical treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon to include severe chronic symptoms or nonhealing digital ulceration refractory to intensive medical therapy. All patients were mailed a self-assessment questionnaire after surgery to determine the immediate and long-term results of the procedure. Data from both initial and long-term follow-up examinations were obtained. Fifty-four ETS procedures were performed in 28 patients. No operative mortality was seen, and no occurrence of major complications necessitated open surgery. Initial resolution or improvement of symptoms was achieved in 26 of 28 patients (92.9%). However, later in the postoperative period, symptoms recurred in 23 of 28 patients (82.1%), although no recurrence of digital ulceration was seen throughout our observation. At the final follow-up examination (median follow-up period, 62.5 months), 25 patients (89.3%) reported overall improvement of the frequency and severity of their symptoms. Despite the high rate of recurrence, ETS clearly produced a high rate of initial relief. ETS did indeed promote healing

  19. Reflecting the thoracic fellowship in Canada as a Japanese thoracic surgeon: is there anything we should follow?

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Teruya

    2011-01-01

    In Japanese surgical society, there have been urgent discussions as to the decrease in the number of junior doctors who want to be surgical specialists. This problem seems to have originated from the loss of attractiveness of surgery. One of the counter-measures to regain the attractiveness of surgical specialties might be a well-organized training system, for which the Japanese Board of General Thoracic Surgery (JBGTS), as well as those of other surgical subspecialties, has struggled. Fortunately, I had an opportunity of general thoracic surgery training in Canada, and had a chance to reflect on the thoracic training programs of both countries. Based on my experience as a thoracic fellow in Canada, I would like to introduce the Canadian way of thoracic surgery training, referring to the differences between each program.

  20. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic fistulas.

    PubMed

    Léobon, Bertrand; Roux, Daniel; Mugniot, Antoine; Rousseau, Hervé; Cérene, Alain; Glock, Yves; Fournial, Gérard

    2002-07-01

    Aortoesophageal and aortobronchial fistulas constitute a problem in therapy because of the high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with operation. From May 1996 to March 2000, we treated by an endovascular procedure one aortoesophageal and three aortobronchial fistulas. There was no postoperative death. We noted one peripheral vascular complication that required a surgical procedure, one postoperative confusion, and one inflammatory syndrome. In one case, because of a persistent leakage after 21 months, we had to implant a second endovascular stent graft. A few weeks later the reopening of this patient's esophageal fistula led to his death by mediastinitis 25 months after the first procedure. The few cases published seem to bear out the interest, observed in our 4 patients, of an endovascular approach to treat complex lesions such as fistulas of the thoracic aorta especially in emergency or palliative cases.

  2. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Surgical treatment of superior thoracic outlet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gaibov, A D; Kakhorov, A Z; Sadriev, O N; Yunusov, Kh A

    2015-01-01

    The authors present immediate and long-term results of treatment of 117 patients with superior thoracic outlet syndrome (STOS). There were different reasons for compression of neu- rovascular fascicle in outlet of the thorax. The costaclavicular syndrome was a reason in 48 patients, additional cervical ribs had 36 patients. Skalenus syndrome was noted in 26 cases, rudimentary cervical ribs or hypertrophy of cervical vertebrae C7 had 7 patients. Raynaud's syndrome took place in 19 cases. The required volume of diagnostic procedures and surgical treatment of STOS were determined according to the cause of the syndrome. Differentiated approach to the different forms of STOS was used in relation to dominant symptoms of the disease and reasons for compression of neurovascular fascicle. This allowed getting positive results in majority of patients (90,4%) in long- term period.

  4. Thoracic duct drainage in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, J H; Fox, R I; Abresch, R J; Tsoukas, C D; Curd, J G; Carson, D A

    1984-01-01

    Thoracic duct drainage (TDD) led to major improvement of disease in two of five patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis and lesser improvement in two others. This improvement was maintained as long as 10 months, but reassertion of disease activity was seen despite use of azathioprine in standard immunosuppressive doses. A consistent fall in the mitogen-induced proliferative responses of blood lymphocytes occurred during TDD, along with a shift in the ratio of OKT4/T8 to a higher proportion of OKT8. However, there was minimal effect on B cell function and no demonstrable influence on complement activating events in the disease, and there was an inverse relationship between responsiveness to TDD and the degree to which in vivo complement activation was occurring. We suggest that it may be important to assess the candidacy of RA patients for given apheresis procedures by sensitive measures of the degree of activation of complement proteins. PMID:6334581

  5. [Thoracic kidney: congenital or traumatic origin?].

    PubMed

    Esquis, P; Osmak, L; Ognois, P; Goudet, P; Cougard, P

    2006-04-01

    The discovery of a thoracic kidney in adult patients can lead to three diagnoses, yielding different prognoses and treatment. It can either mean traumatic or congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or a congenital ectopic kidney. Intrathoracic herniation of the left kidney trough a left diaphragmatic rupture is an exceptional discovery. We report the case of a 44 year-old man who met with a car accident 20 years ago, and presented abdominal pain. CT-scan showed an intrathoracic herniation of the left kidney trough a left posterior diaphragmatic rupture. Laparoscopic approach in lateral position showed a traumatic hernia of the left costo-diaphragmatic hiatus only containing the left kidney and its pedicle. After reduction of herniated left kidney into the abdomen, the hiatus was closed by non-resorbable prosthetic mesh. Postoperative course was uneventful.

  6. Video assisted thoracic surgery in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rasik; Reddy, A Suyodhan; Dhende, Nitin P

    2007-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery, i.e., video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been in use in children for last 98 years. Its use initially was restricted to the diagnostic purposes. However, with the improvement in the optics, better understanding of the physiology with CO2 insufflation, better capabilities in achieving the single lung ventilation and newer vessel sealing devices have rapidly expanded the spectrum of the indication of VATS. At present many complex lung resections, excision of mediastinal tumors are performed by VATS in the experienced centre. The VATS has become the standard of care in empyema, lung biopsy, Mediastinal Lymphnode biopsy, repair of diaphragmatic hernia, etc. The article discusses the indications of VATS, techniques to achieve the selective ventilation and surgical steps in the different surgical conditions in children. PMID:19789677

  7. Respiratory Displacement of the Thoracic Aorta: Physiological Phenomenon With Potential Implications for Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Tim Frederik; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Rengier, Fabian; Geisbuesch, Philipp; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Boeckler, Dittmar; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude and direction of respiratory displacement of the ascending and descending thoracic aorta during breathing maneuvers. In 11 healthy nonsmokers, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging was performed in transverse orientation at the tracheal bifurcation during maximum expiration and inspiration as well as tidal breathing. The magnitude and direction of aortic displacement was determined relatively to resting respiratory position for the ascending (AA) and descending (DA) aorta. To estimate a respiratory threshold for occurrence of distinct respiratory aortic motion, the latter was related to the underlying change in anterior-posterior thorax diameter. Compound displacement between maximum expiration and inspiration was 24.3 {+-} 6.0 mm for the AA in the left anterior direction and 18.2 {+-} 5.5 mm for the DA in the right anterior direction. The mean respiratory thorax excursion during tidal breathing was 8.9 {+-} 2.8 mm. The respiratory threshold, i.e., the increase in thorax diameter necessary to result in respiratory aortic displacement, was estimated to be 15.7 mm. The data suggest that after a threshold of respiratory thorax excursion is exceeded, respiration is accompanied by significant displacement of the thoracic aorta. Although this threshold may not be reached during tidal breathing in the majority of individuals, segmental differences during forced respiration impact on aortic geometry, may result in additional extrinsic forces on the aortic wall, and may be of significance for aortic prostheses designed for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  8. A reappraisal of adult thoracic surface anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S Ali; Hale, Samuel J M; Buckenham, Tim; Wilson, Ben; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. Numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings exist between and within anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic surface anatomical landmarks in vivo using computed tomographic (CT) imaging. High-resolution thoracic CT scans from 153 supine adults (mean age 63, range 19-89 years; 53% female) taken at end tidal inspiration were analyzed by dual consensus reporting to determine the surface anatomy of the sternal angle, central veins, heart, lungs, and diaphragm. Patients with kyphosis/scoliosis, distorting space-occupying lesions, or visceromegaly were excluded. The position of the cardiac apex, formation of the brachiocephalic veins, and vertebral levels of the sternal angle, xiphisternal joint, and aortic hiatus were consistent with commonly accepted surface markings although there was a wide range of normal variation. In contrast, common surface markings were markedly inaccurate for the following: the position of the tracheal bifurcation, aortic arch, and azygos vein termination (below the plane of the sternal angle at T5-T6 vertebral level in most individuals); the superior vena cava/right atrial junction (most often behind the fourth costal cartilage); the lower border of the lung (adjacent to T12 vertebra posteriorly); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T11 in most). Surface anatomy must be reappraised using modern imaging in vivo if it is to be evidence based and fit for purpose. The effects of gender, age, posture, respiration, build, and ethnicity also deserve greater emphasis.

  9. Thoracic sympathectomy and cardiopulmonary responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Omri; Leviel, D; Shwartz, I; Paran, H; Whipp, B J

    2008-09-01

    The purpose was to study the effect of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) for palmar and/or axillary hyperhidrosis on physiological responses at rest, and during sub-maximal and maximal exercise in ten healthy patients (7 females and 3 males 18-40 years old) with idiopathic palmar and/or axillary hyperhidrosis. T2-T3 thoracoscopic sympathectomy was performed using a simplified one stage bilateral procedure. Physiological variables were recorded at rest and during sub-maximal (steady-state) and maximal treadmill exercise immediately prior to and 70 days (+/-7.5, SD) after bilateral ETS. Exercise performance capacity and peak VO(2) were not found to be different following bilateral ETS than prior to the ETS. However, heart rate was significantly reduced at rest (14%), at sub-maximal exercise (12.3%), and at peak exercise (5.7%), together with a significant increase in oxygen pulse (11.8, 12.7, and 7.8%, respectively). The rate pressure product (RPP) was also significantly reduced following the surgical procedure at all three study stages, while all other physiological variables measured remained unchanged. It is suggested that thoracic-sympathetic denervation affects the heart, sweating, and circulation of the respective denervated region but does not affect exercise performance or mechanical/physiologic efficiency, despite a significant reduction in heart rate (both at rest and during exercise). The latter was, most likely, fully compensated by an increase in stroke volume and less likely by an improved muscle O(2) extraction due to more efficient blood distribution, keeping the work-rate and oxygen uptake unaffected.

  10. Benchmarking in Thoracic Surgery. Third Edition.

    PubMed

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Varela Simó, Gonzalo; Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro; Embún Flor, Raúl; Rivas de Andrés, Juan José; de la Torre Bravos, Mercedes; Molins López-Rodó, Laureano; Pac Ferrer, Joaquín; Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel; Baschwitz, Benno; López de Castro, Pedro E; Fibla Alfara, Juan José; Hernando Trancho, Florentino; Carvajal Carrasco, Ángel; Canalís Arrayás, Emili; Salvatierra Velázquez, Ángel; Canela Cardona, Mercedes; Torres Lanzas, Juan; Moreno Mata, Nicolás

    2016-04-01

    Benchmarking entails continuous comparison of efficacy and quality among products and activities, with the primary objective of achieving excellence. To analyze the results of benchmarking performed in 2013 on clinical practices undertaken in 2012 in 17 Spanish thoracic surgery units. Study data were obtained from the basic minimum data set for hospitalization, registered in 2012. Data from hospital discharge reports were submitted by the participating groups, but staff from the corresponding departments did not intervene in data collection. Study cases all involved hospital discharges recorded in the participating sites. Episodes included were respiratory surgery (Major Diagnostic Category 04, Surgery), and those of the thoracic surgery unit. Cases were labelled using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification. The refined diagnosis-related groups classification was used to evaluate differences in severity and complexity of cases. General parameters (number of cases, mean stay, complications, readmissions, mortality, and activity) varied widely among the participating groups. Specific interventions (lobectomy, pneumonectomy, atypical resections, and treatment of pneumothorax) also varied widely. As in previous editions, practices among participating groups varied considerably. Some areas for improvement emerge: admission processes need to be standardized to avoid urgent admissions and to improve pre-operative care; hospital discharges should be streamlined and discharge reports improved by including all procedures and complications. Some units have parameters which deviate excessively from the norm, and these sites need to review their processes in depth. Coding of diagnoses and comorbidities is another area where improvement is needed. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Minor surgery in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Krupa, Debra T.; Stonestreet, Robert; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate and demonstrate equipment and techniques proposed for minor surgery on Space Station Freedom (SSF). The objectives are: (1) to test and evaluate methods of surgical instrument packaging and deployment; (2) to test and evaluate methods of surgical site preparation and draping; (3) to evaluate techniques of sterile procedure and maintaining sterile field; (4) to evaluate methods of trash management during medical/surgical procedures; and (4) to gain experience in techniques for performing surgery in microgravity. A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed on March 30, 1990 with the goal of investigating and demonstrating surgical equipment and techniques under consideration for use on SSF. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola.

  12. Binary Minor Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2006-05-01

    A review of observations and theories regarding binary asteroids and binary trans-Neptunian objects [collectively, binary minor planets (BMPs)] is presented. To date, these objects have been discovered using a combination of direct imaging, lightcurve analysis, and radar. They are found throughout the Solar System, and present a challenge for theorists modeling their formation in the context of Solar System evolution. The most promising models invoke rotational disruption for the smallest, shortest-lived objects (the asteroids nearest to Earth), consistent with the observed fast rotation of these bodies; impacts for the larger, longer-lived asteroids in the main belt, consistent with the range of size ratios of their components and slower rotation rates; and mutual capture for the distant, icy, trans-Neptunian objects, consistent with their large component separations and near-equal sizes. Numerical simulations have successfully reproduced key features of the binaries in the first two categories; the third remains to be investigated in detail.

  13. Antegrade delivery of stent grafts to treat complex thoracic aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Eric E; Soltesz, Edward G; Mastracci, Tara; Svensson, Lars G; Lytle, Bruce W

    2010-08-01

    Thoracic aortic disease involving the aortic arch presents a challenge to cardiovascular surgeons. The purpose of this study was to establish the safety and efficacy of antegrade delivery techniques of aortic stent grafting for the treatment of high-risk, complex thoracic aortic disease. From April 2007 to December 2009, 38 patients underwent stent graft repair of complex thoracic aortic diseases not otherwise amenable to standard retrograde delivery. Chart review, query of the Social Security Death Index, and three-dimensional analysis of computed tomography was performed. Indications were elective (n = 17), urgent (n = 11), or emergent (n = 10). Causes included coarctation (n = 1), acute aortic dissection (n = 4), traumatic transection (n = 2), and aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm (n = 31), of which 6 were ruptured. Sites of delivery included axillary (n = 4), ascending aorta (n = 18), and direct aortic placement (frozen elephant trunk, n = 16). Eleven were performed off-pump, 4 were performed on pump with a beating heart, 3 with cardiac arrest, and 20 under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Delivery was facilitated by transesophageal echocardiography alone (n = 14), or with fluoroscopy (n = 24). All devices used were commercially available (TAG, 18; Talent, 1; TX2, 19). Concomitant procedures were performed in 26 patients including 17 ascending repairs, 16 coronary artery bypass graftings, and 4 aortic valve replacements. Technical success was achieved in 97% (37 of 38 patients). Hospital mortality was 10% (n = 4), and serious complications included stroke (n = 4), paraparesis (transient n = 3, persistent n = 1), renal failure (n = 4), and respiratory failure (n = 12). Mean length of hospital stay was 14.7 days (range, 4 to 36 days), and 6.7 days (range, 1 to 20 days) in the intensive care unit. Overall survival was 74% at median follow-up of 1.2 + or - 0.8 years. Ten endoleaks in 9 patients (8 type II, 2 type I) required 3 late reinterventions. Antegrade delivery

  14. Is there a role for Gabapentin in preventing or treating pain following thoracic surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Frazer, Stephanie; Hunt, Ian

    2013-01-01

    there is no evidence to support the role of a single preoperative oral dose of gabapentin in reducing pain scores or opioid consumption following thoracic surgery. Multiple dosing regimens may be beneficial in reducing acute and chronic pain; however, more robust randomized control studies are needed. PMID:23832920

  15. [Flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery: CITES or cVATS?].

    PubMed

    Assouad, J; Fénane, H; Masmoudi, H; Giol, M; Karsenti, A; Gounant, V; Grunenwald, D

    2013-10-01

    Early pain and persistent parietal disorders remains a major unresolved problem in thoracic surgery. Thoracotomy and the use of multiple ports in most Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) procedures are the major cause of this persistent pain. For the last decade, a few publications describing the use of either single incision VATS and cervical thoracic approaches have been reported without significant results in comparison with current used techniques. Intercostals compression during surgery and early after by intercostals chest tube placement, are probably the major cause of postoperative pain. Flexible endoscope is currently used in several surgeries and will take more and more importance in our daily use in thoracic surgery. Instrument flexibility allows its use through minimally invasive approaches and offers a very interesting intra-thoracic navigation. We describe here the first use in France of a flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery through a single cervical incision to perform simultaneous exploration and biopsies of the mediastinum and right pleura using the original approach of Cervical Incision Thoracic Endoscopic Surgery (CITES).

  16. Congenital thoracic lordosis and scoliosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Lee, Maris S; Taylor, Jim; Lefbom, Bonnie

    2014-08-01

    A 10-week-old domestic shorthair kitten was referred for intermittent episodes of dyspnea, cyanosis and a suspected congenital thoracic anomaly. Physical examination showed an obvious palpable concavity in the caudal thoracic spine. Thoracic radiographs showed severe caudal thoracic lordosis from T5 to T13 with a Cobb angle of -77°, a centroid lordosis angle of -68°, a vertebral index of 6.3 and a flattened sternum. Severe loss of vital capacity was suspected and surgical correction of the thoracic deformity was to be performed in two separate stages, the first being surgical ventral distraction on the sternum to increase thoracic volume and rigid fixation with an external splint. The second stage, if required, would be surgical correction of the spinal deformity to also increase thoracic volume. The initial stage of surgery was performed and postoperative radiographs showed a vertebral index of 10.3. The kitten suffered a left sided pneumothorax in recovery and died from cardiorespiratory arrest despite immediate pleural drainage and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Treatment recommendations that may benefit future case management are discussed. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  17. Selective conservatism in the management of thoracic trauma remains appropriate in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, GV; Clarke, DL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Selective conservatism for thoracic trauma is well established but the emergence of new technologies may cause management strategies to continue to evolve. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on thoracic trauma patients managed in a single institution in South Africa over a 4-year period to determine the appropriateness of our current policy of selective conservatism. Results A total of 1,239 patients were included in the study; 112 required an emergency thoracotomy, 125 were admitted for observation and 1,002 required a tube thoracostomy (TT). Ninety-one per cent of the patients were male and the median age was 24 years. Seventy-five per cent of the cases were penetrating trauma and the remaining were blunt trauma. The indications for TT were pneumothorax (PTX) (n=382, 38%), haemothorax (HTX) (n=300, 30%) and haemopneumothorax (HPTX) (n=320, 32%). A total of 13% (127/1,002) of all chest x-rays (CXR) following tube removal demonstrated residual pathologies that precluded immediate discharge: 32 (8%) in Group A (PTX), 44 (15%) in Group B (HTX) and 51 (16%) in Group C (HPTX). All 32 patients in Group A were simply observed and did not require further intervention. In Group B, 17 patients required repeat TTs and 27 required video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for clearance of residual HTX. Twenty-nine patients in Group C required repeat TTs and twenty-two required VATS. Conclusions The vast majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed conservatively with TT alone. Residual pathology appeared to be lowest in patients with a PTX, which seldom requires treatment, while only a minority of patients required repeat TTs or VATS for a retained HTX. Selective conservatism is still appropriate in the current era in a developing world setting. PMID:26263809

  18. Thoracic needle decompression for tension pneumothorax: clinical correlation with catheter length

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Wyrzykowski, Amy D.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Dente, Christopher J.; Nicholas, Jeffrey M.; Salomone, Jeffrey P.; Rozycki, Grace S.; Kortbeek, John B.; Feliciano, David V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tension pneumothorax requires emergent decompression. Unfortunately, some needle thoracostomies (NTs) are unsuccessful because of insufficient catheter length. All previous studies have used thickness of the chest wall (based on cadaver studies, ultrasonography or computed tomography [CT]) to extrapolate probable catheter effectiveness. The objective of this clinical study was to identify the frequency of NT failure with various catheter lengths. Methods We evaluated the records of all patients with severe blunt injury who had a prehospital NT before arrival at a level-1 trauma centre over a 48-month period. Patients were divided into 2 groups: helicopter (4.5-cm catheter sheath) and ground ambulance (3.2 cm) transport. Success of the NT was confirmed by the absence of a large pneumothorax on subsequent thoracic ultrasonography and CT. Results Needle thoracostomy decompression was attempted in 1.5% (142/9689) of patients. Among patients with blunt injuries, the incidence was 1.4% (101/7073). Patients transported by helicopter (74%) received a 4.5-cm sheath. The remainder (26% ground transport) received a 3.2-cm catheter. A minority in each group (helicopter 15%, ground 28%) underwent immediate chest tube insertion (before thoracic ultrasound) because of ongoing hemodynamic instability. Failure to decompress the pleural space by NT was observed via ultrasound and/or CT in 65% (17/26) of attempts with a 3.2-cm catheter, compared with only 4% (3/75) of attempts with a 4.5-cm catheter (p < 0.001). Conclusion Tension pneumothorax decompression using a 3.2-cm catheter was unsuccessful in up to 65% of cases. When a larger 4.5-cm catheter was used, fewer procedures (4%) failed. Thoracic ultrasonography can be used to confirm NT placement. PMID:20507791

  19. Breast size, thoracic kyphosis & thoracic spine pain - association & relevance of bra fitting in post-menopausal women: a correlational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Menopause would seem to exist as a period of accelerated changes for women and their upper torso mechanics. Whether these anthropometric changes reflect changes in pain states remains unclear. Plausible mechanisms of pain exist for the independent and combined effect of increasing breast size and thoracic kyphosis. Bra fit has the potential to change when the anthropometric measures (chest circumference and bust circumference) used to determine bra size change, such as postmenopausally. Identifying an association between breast size, thoracic kyphosis and thoracic spine pain in postmenopausal women and identifying the relevance of bra fit to this association may be of importance to the future management and education of post-menopausal women presenting clinically with thoracic spine pain. Methods A cross-sectional study design. Fifty-one postmenopausal bra-wearing women were recruited. Measures included breast size (Triumph International), thoracic kyphosis (flexible curve), bra fitted (Y/N) and pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire) and tenderness on palpation (posteroanterior pressure testing). These measures were collected in one session at a physiotherapy clinic. Results The majority of the women in this study were overweight or obese and wearing an incorrect sized bra. Pain was significantly related to breast size, body weight and BMI at mid thoracic levels (T7-8). In contrast self-reported thoracic pain was not correlated with age or index of kyphosis (thoracic kyphosis). Women with thoracic pain were no more likely to have their bra professionally fitted whereas women with a higher BMI and larger breasts were more likely to have their bra professionally fitted. Conclusion The findings of this study show that larger breasts and increased BMI are associated with thoracic pain in postmenopausal women. This is unrelated to thoracic kyphosis. Increasing breast size and how a bra is worn may have biomechanical implications for the loaded thoracic

  20. Hybrid Coronary Artery Revascularization for Takayasu Arteritis with Major Visceral Collateral Circulation from the Left Internal Thoracic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Hyung Tae; Kim, Jeong-Won; Yoo, Jae Suk; Cho, Kwang Ree

    2017-01-01

    Coronary arterial involvement in Takayasu arteritis (TA) is not uncommon. Herein, we describe a case of TA with celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery occlusion combined with coronary artery disease. Bilateral huge internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) and the inferior mesenteric artery provided the major visceral collateral circulation. After percutaneous intervention to the right coronary artery, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for the left coronary territory was done using a right ITA graft and its large side branch because of its relatively minor contribution to the visceral collateral circulation. PMID:28382269

  1. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  2. Surgical thoracic sympathectomy induces structural and biomechanical remodeling of the thoracic aorta in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Angouras, Dimitrios C; Dosios, Theodosios J; Dimitriou, Constantinos A; Chamogeorgakis, Themistocles P; Rokkas, Chris K; Manos, Themistoklis A; Sokolis, Dimitrios P

    2012-01-01

    Sympathetic innervation exerts marked effects on vascular smooth muscle cells, including a short-term homeostatic (vasoconstrictor) and a direct trophic action promoting differentiation. However, the role of sympathetic nervous system in long-term structural and functional modulation of the aortic wall is yet undefined. Six Landrace pigs underwent bilateral thoracic sympathectomy from the stellate to T8 ganglion, whereas 10 pigs underwent sham operation. Animals were sacrificed 3 mo postoperatively. Histometrical examination was performed on specimens from the thoracic (TA) and abdominal aorta (AA) utilizing an image-processing system. A uniaxial tensile tester was utilized for biomechanical evaluation; parameters of extensibility, strength, and stiffness of aortic tissue were calculated. Structural aortic remodeling of sympathectomized animals was observed, including increased inner aortic diameter in TA (15.3 ± 0.4 versus 10.4 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.001) and AA (6.7 ± 0.3 versus 5.3 ± 0.2 mm, P = 0.002), and increased wall thickness in TA (2.0 ± 0.1 versus 1.6 ± 0.1 mm, P < 0.001) but not AA. Microscopic image analysis revealed increased elastin (TA: 50.1 ± 1.1 versus 29.7% ± 0.6%, P < 0.001; AA: 20.4 ± 2.1 versus 16.3% ± 0.6%, P = 0.03) and collagen density (only in TA: 22.0 ± 0.9 versus 15.4% ± 0.5%, P < 0.001), and decreased smooth muscle density (TA: 27.6 ± 1.3 versus 54.9% ± 0.7%, P < 0.001; AA: 57.2 ± 1.5 versus 63.4% ± 0.8%, P < 0.001). Sophisticated biomechanical analysis demonstrated that following sympathectomy, TA was equally extensible but manifested augmented strength (1344 ± 73 versus 1071 ± 52 kPa, P = 0.004) and stiffness (6738 ± 478 versus 5026 ± 273 kPa, P = 0.003), in accordance with extracellular matrix protein accumulation in that region. Differences in the AA were non-significant. Chronic thoracic sympathetic denervation causes significant structural and biomechanical remodeling of the thoracic aorta. Possible clinical

  3. Role of volume rendered 3-D computed tomography in conservative management of trauma-related thoracic injuries.

    PubMed

    OʼLeary, Donal Peter; Soo, Alan; McLaughlin, Patrick; Aherne, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are a tool used commonly in the construction industry and are widely available. Accidental injuries from nail guns are common, and several cases of suicide using a nail gun have been reported. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging, together with echocardiography, has been shown to be the gold standard for investigation of these cases. We present a case of a 55-year-old man who presented to the accident and emergency unit of a community hospital following an accidental pneumatic nail gun injury to his thorax. Volume-rendered CT of the thorax allowed an accurate assessment of the thoracic injuries sustained by this patient. As there was no evidence of any acute life-threatening injury, a sternotomy was avoided and the patient was observed closely until discharge. In conclusion, volume-rendered 3-dimensional CT can greatly help in the decision to avoid an unnecessary sternotomy in patients with a thoracic nail gun injury.

  4. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  5. Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome as a Cause of Intractable Migraines.

    PubMed

    Chahwala, Veer; Tashiro, Jun; Li, Xiaoyi; Baqai, Atif; Rey, Jorge; Robinson, Handel R

    2017-02-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to the compression of the neurovascular bundle within the thoracic outlet. Cases are classified by primary etiology-arterial, neurogenic, or venous. In addition to the typical symptoms of arm swelling and paresthesias, headaches have been reported as a potential symptom of TOS. In this report, we describe a patient with debilitating migraines, which were consistently preceded by unilateral arm swelling. Resolution of symptoms occurred only after thoracic outlet decompression. Patients with migraines and concomitant swelling and/or paresthesias, especially related to provocative arm maneuvers, should be considered a possible atypical presentation of TOS and evaluated in more detail.

  6. Surgical treatment of a long thoracic nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Novak, Christine B; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2002-05-01

    A 17-year-old patient presented with a long thoracic nerve palsy following an idiopathic onset of weakness to the serratus anterior muscle. With no evidence of recovery 3.5 months following onset of serratus anterior weakness, the patient underwent a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer to reinnervate the serratus anterior muscle. Follow-up examination 6.5 years following the nerve transfer revealed no scapular winging, full range of motion of the shoulder and no reported functional shoulder restriction. We conclude that a thoracodorsal to long thoracic nerve transfer results in good functional recovery of the serratus anterior muscle.

  7. Trans-arterial Onyx Embolization of a Functional Thoracic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Quesada, Tatiana; Maud, Alberto; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Torabi, Alireza; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Akle, Nassim; Cruz Flores, Salvador; Trier, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare tumors of the endocrine system. They are highly vascular and in some cases hormonally active, making their management challenging. Although there is strong evidence of the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization in the management of spinal tumors, only five cases have been reported in the setting of thoracic paragangliomas. We present the case of a 19-year-old man with a large, primary, functional, malignant paraganglioma of the thoracic spine causing a vertebral fracture and spinal cord compression. To our knowledge this is the first report of preoperative trans-arterial balloon augmented Onyx embolization of a thoracic paraganglioma. PMID:25763296

  8. Chronic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Presenting 29 Years following Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant; Van den Bosch, Rene; Khanafer, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Blunt, nonpenetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are uncommon and associated with a high mortality rate within the first hour. Aortic injury is missed in 1-2% of patients that survive to hospital, and a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm may subsequently form. We present a case in which a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed 29 years following a significant motor vehicle accident. We discuss the epidemiology, presentation, and management of this uncommon consequence of blunt, nonpenetrating aortic injury. Our case illustrates an important clinical lesson; a past medical history of trauma should not be overlooked at any patient assessment. PMID:26351610

  9. Rare case of thoracic kidney detected by renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Aravintho; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Intrathoracic kidney is a rare congenital abnormality with lowest frequency among all renal ectopias. Patients with thoracic kidneys are usually asymptomatic, and the condition is usually discovered incidentally during radiological evaluation for other conditions or during thoracic surgery. We report a case of a 62-year-old male who was referred to our department for renal scintigraphy for a nonvisualized left kidney on ultrasonography report. Both Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans revealed a left thoracic kidney which was confirmed by CT scan of the thorax and abdomen. PMID:27385896

  10. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Richard K.; Krasna, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed. PMID:26380186

  11. The effectiveness of selective thoracic fusion for treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Eardley-Harris, Nathan; Munn, Zachary; Cundy, Peter J; Gieroba, Tom J

    2015-11-01

    balance.For many years spinal surgeons have been debating whether a more rigid and straighter spine or a mobile and less straight spine provides better outcomes. The treatment for AIS can include both an operative and non-operative approach. However when the Cobb angle is above 40, the likelihood of curve progression is high and surgical treatment is warranted.Although technology has advanced, the primary goals for operative management have remained constant. The primary goals of surgical treatment in AIS should be to optimize coronal and sagittal correction and avoid further curve progression. This involves not only correction of the major primary curve but also any minor (secondary) curves, while maintaining adequate thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. Ideally, a balance should be struck between fusing the lowest number of mobile segments and properly correcting the existing deformity. This is where selective spinal fusion has a role to play.The premise of selective thoracic fusion is that after fixation of the primary thoracic curve, there is spontaneous coronal correction of the unfused lumbar curve. Thus the thoracic curve can be exclusively fused to allow for a more mobile lumbar spine. This has been described in studies since the 1950s. However since then, results have varied greatly in the extent of spontaneous lumbar correction. Studies have shown that the degree of spontaneous correction of the lumbar spine is somewhat close to the correction of the thoracic curve; however the extent of optimal correction that can be achieved is uncertain.The alternative to selective thoracic infusion involves complete fusion of both the primary thoracic and secondary lumbar curve in a consecutive series. This can be done via either an anterior or a posterior approach. Complete fusion gives better correction of both curves. It also diminishes the risk of coronal decompensation, adding on phenomenon, junctional kyphosis and eventual revision surgery. However this needs to be

  12. Food addiction among sexual minorities.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Jacob C; Furman, Celina R; Gearhardt, Ashley N

    2017-08-19

    Although sexual minorities represent a small proportion of the general population, this group has been observed to be at an increased risk of developing various pathologies, including substance use and eating disorders. Research suggests that foods high in added fat and refined carbohydrates may trigger an addictive response, especially in at-risk individuals. Consequently, food addiction is associated with elevated risk for obesity, diet-related disease, and psychological distress. However, there is limited research on whether food addiction, like substance use, may be elevated among sexual minorities, and whether self-compassion may be a protective factor. Thus, the current study aims to test whether food addiction is elevated in sexual minorities (relative to heterosexuals) and if discrimination and self-compassion may be related to food addiction among sexual minorities. In a community sample of 356 participants (43.3% sexual minority), sexual minorities had almost twice the prevalence of food addiction (16.9%) as heterosexuals (8.9%). Also, sexual minorities on average experienced more food addiction symptoms (M = 2.73, SD = 1.76) than heterosexuals (M = 1.95, SD = 1.59). For sexual minorities, heterosexist harassment was associated with increased food addiction, while self-compassion appeared to be a protective factor. Further research needs to examine between-group differences among sexual minorities for better treatment and interventions for food addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Concurrent venography during first rib resection and scalenectomy for venous thoracic outlet syndrome is safe and efficient

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alexander T.; Schaumeier, Maria J.; Smith, Ann D.; de Vos, Marit S.; Ho, Karen J.; Semel, Marcus E.; Nguyen, Louis L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical treatment of acute axillosubclavian vein thrombosis from venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS) traditionally involves first rib resection and scalenectomy (FRRS) followed by interval venography and balloon angioplasty. This approach can lead to an extended need for anticoagulation and a separate anesthesia session. We present outcomes for FRRS with concurrent venography. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for consecutive patients undergoing FRRS with concurrent venography for VTOS from February 2007 to April 2014. Venography was performed immediately after FRRS with the arm in neutral and provocative positions. The primary outcomes of this study were primary and primary-assisted patency. Secondary outcomes included whether concurrent venography resulted in modification of the procedure, postoperative anticoagulation use, and postoperative complications. Results Thirty patients underwent first rib resection with venography with a mean follow-up time of 24.4 months. The mean age was 29.5 years (range, 17–52 years), and 17 (56.7%) were female. All were maintained on anticoagulation before the procedure. Concurrent venography resulted in modification of the procedure in 28 patients (93.3%). Of these, 27 patients (96.4%) underwent balloon angioplasty and two patients (7.1%) underwent further rib resection. Twenty patients (66.7%) were discharged after the procedure with no anticoagulation. For those receiving postoperative anticoagulation for persistent minor thrombus, median time for anticoagulation duration was 5.0 months (range, 0.8 and 16.7 months). Two patients (6.7%) had postoperative bleeding requiring thoracentesis or video-assisted thoracoscopic evacuation of hemothorax. One patient (3.3%) suffered rethrombosis and was successfully lysed open, resulting in a 2-year subclavian vein (SCV) primary patency of 96.7% and primary-assisted patency of 100%. No patients required reoperation for VTOS, and all reported improvements in

  14. Using Genetics for Personalized Management of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Disease: How Do We Get There?

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2015-01-01

    The major diseases affecting the thoracic aorta are aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAAD). Medical treatments can slow the enlargement of aneurysms, but the mainstay of treatment to prevent premature deaths due to dissections is surgical repair of the TAA, typically recommended when the aortic diameter reaches 5.0 – 5.5 cm. Studies on patients with acute aortic dissections indicate that up to 60% occur at aortic diameters less than 5.5 cm. Clinical predictors are thus needed to identify those at risk for dissection at aortic diameter less than 5.0 cm, and to determine the aortic diameter that justifies the risk of surgical repair to prevent an acute aortic dissection. Data from genetic studies over the past decade have established that mutations in specific genes can identify patients at risk for the disease and predict the risk of early dissection at diameters less than 5.0 cm. This information has the potential to optimize the timing of aortic surgery to prevent acute dissections. PMID:25218541

  15. Thoracic spinal cord impingement by an arachnoid web at the level of a hemivertebra: case report.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Molly E; Hunt, Matthew A; Jones, Kristen E; Polly, David W

    2017-09-08

    Congenital scoliosis due to a hemivertebra requires surgical stabilization prior to skeletal maturity if rapidly progressive curve growth occurs. Here the authors present the unique case of a man who, at the age of 12 years, had undergone Harrington rod placement for stabilization of progressive congenital scoliosis due to a T-11 hemivertebra and then, at the age of 53 years, presented with acutely progressive myelopathy due to spinal cord compression from an arachnoid web at T-11 despite a solid fusion mass at the prior surgical site. The patient underwent a posterior midline approach for resection of the T-11 pedicle at the level of the hemivertebra, intradural spinal cord detethering with resection of the arachnoid web at T-11, and T2-L2 instrumented fusion with deformity correction, leading to subsequent resolution of his acute myelopathic symptoms. In conclusion, arachnoid web formation superimposed on preexisting tension on the thoracic spinal cord from congenital scoliosis due to a T-11 hemivertebra caused acute myelopathy in an adult with a previously solid fusion mass from childhood. The resolution of acute myelopathy and halting of further progression occurred with pedicle resection, arachnoid web fenestration, and spinal deformity correction.

  16. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  17. Thoracic and respirable particle definitions for human health risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provides estimates of the thoracic and respirable fractions, for adults and children during typical activities during both nasal and oral inhalation, that may be used in the design of experimental studies and interpretation of evidence of health effects.

  18. Thoracic radiographic anatomy in vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus).

    PubMed

    Young, Aisha N; du Plessis, Wencke M; Rodriguez, Daniel; Beierschmitt, Amy

    2013-12-01

    The vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus) is used commonly in cardiorespiratory biomedical research. This study was performed to establish reference values for thoracic structures and to describe the normal radiographic appearance of the vervet monkey thorax. Right lateral and dorsoventral thoracic radiographs of ten mature vervet monkeys were evaluated. Anatomic structures were characterized using descriptive statistics. Normal measurements of skeletal, pulmonary, mediastinal, and cardiovascular structures are reported herein. Several ratios were calculated to assess the cardiac silhouette, caudal vena cava, and pulmonary arteries and veins. Consistent measurements could be made on the majority of the thoracic structures evaluated. The aorta on lateral radiographs and the pulmonary veins on dorsoventral radiographs were obscured by a mild bronchointerstitial pattern and body conformation. Caudal vena cava-tapering was occasionally noted and attributed to general anesthesia. Species-specific thoracic radiographic reference values should prove useful in vervet monkey disease diagnosis and management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Minimally invasive thoracic surgery: new trends in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In Italy there exists quite a long and rich history in minimally invasive thoracic surgery. Pioneer Italian surgeons have been amongst those who first adopted video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to perform procedures such as lobectomy and esophagectomy, respectively and quite many others have provided important contributions related to minimally invasive thoracic surgery and have proposed innovative ideas and creative technical refinements. According to a web search on recent studies published in Italy on minimally invasive thoracic surgery along the last 3 years, uniportal, nonintubated, and robotic VATS as well as VATS lobectomy have been found to represent the most frequently investigated issues. An ongoing active investigation in each of these sub-topics is contributing to a better definition of indications advantages and disadvantages of the various surgical strategies. In addition it is likely that combination strategies including adoption of uniportal and nonintubated approaches will lead to define novel ultra-minimally invasive treatment options. PMID:26605315

  20. GelMan Thoracic Surrogate for Underwater Threat Neutralization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    GelMan Thoracic Surrogate for Underwater Threat Neutralization Peter Matic Code 6350 – Multifunctional Materials Branch Naval Research...alternative concept is to add an Underwater Threat Neutralization (UTN) system, based on directed low frequency underwater ensonification for swimmer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE GelMan Thoracic Surrogate For Underwater Threat Neutralization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Increased incidence of thoracic wall deformities in related Bengal kittens.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Timothy M; Sturgess, Christopher P

    2012-06-01

    Clinical records made during routine vaccinations were compared between populations of domestic shorthair cats and Bengal kittens. An increased incidence (12/244) of thoracic wall deformity was detected amongst the Bengal kittens. Deformities detected were: pectus excavatum (five), unilateral thoracic wall concavity (six) and scoliosis (one). Five-generation pedigrees were analysed for the affected kittens that showed a high degree of common ancestry indicating the likelihood of a familial cause.

  2. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  3. Postoperative internal thoracic artery spasm after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Harskamp, Ralf E; McNeil, Jeffrey D; van Ginkel, Margreet W; Bastos, Renata B; Baisden, Clinton E; Calhoon, John H

    2008-02-01

    Spasm of the left internal thoracic artery in the perioperative period represents a life-threatening complication after coronary artery bypass grafting. We present a case in which graft spasm was treated with the administration of intra-arterial nitroglycerin and verapamil. Although vasospasm is more often seen in radial artery grafts, this case demonstrates that left internal thoracic artery grafts are also prone to spasm.

  4. Calcification of thoracic aorta – solar eclipse sign

    PubMed Central

    Dhoble, Abhijeet; Puttarajappa, Chethan

    2008-01-01

    Background Calcification of thoracic aorta is very common in old people, especially ones with hypertension. This can sometime be visible on plain chest radiograph. Case Presentation We present a case of a male patient who had extensive deposition of calcium in the thoracic aorta. Conclusion The relationship between aortic calcification and coronary atherosclerosis remains contentious. Computed tomography of the thorax can display this calcification which appears like 'solar eclipse'. PMID:18759981

  5. Fleischner Society: glossary of terms for thoracic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hansell, David M; Bankier, Alexander A; MacMahon, Heber; McLoud, Theresa C; Müller, Nestor L; Remy, Jacques

    2008-03-01

    Members of the Fleischner Society compiled a glossary of terms for thoracic imaging that replaces previous glossaries published in 1984 and 1996 for thoracic radiography and computed tomography (CT), respectively. The need to update the previous versions came from the recognition that new words have emerged, others have become obsolete, and the meaning of some terms has changed. Brief descriptions of some diseases are included, and pictorial examples (chest radiographs and CT scans) are provided for the majority of terms. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  6. Ethnic Minority Dropout in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Ivo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the first-year study success of minority students in the bachelor program in economics at Erasmus University Rotterdam. We find that the gap in study success between minority and majority students can be attributed to differences in high school education. Students from similar high school tracks show no significant…

  7. A Seminar for Minority Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhiot, Grete; Ninan, Mary

    1979-01-01

    Describes a seminar for minority, particularly Black, students entering the junior year at the School of Nursing, Loyola University of Chicago. Seminar objective was to give academic, emotional, and social support. Notes changing minority student attitudes, the need for earlier tutoring for academic weakness, and the value of group discussion. (MF)

  8. Supporting Women and Minority Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, JoAnn

    2004-01-01

    Good departmental practices can help women and minority faculty thrive and make the greatest possible contribution to the academic enterprise. Several recent books have explored what is wrong with the current way of doing business. In this article, the author outlines steps to bring U.S. minority and European American women faculty--at both the…

  9. Education Rights and Minorities. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyani, Chaloka; And Others

    This report not only examines the role of mass education in the integration of minorities into the society, but also examines the importance to minorities of the cultural transmission of their values and world view recognized by international standards. The general human right to education implies certain duties of the state under the 1948…

  10. Supporting Women and Minority Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, JoAnn

    2004-01-01

    Good departmental practices can help women and minority faculty thrive and make the greatest possible contribution to the academic enterprise. Several recent books have explored what is wrong with the current way of doing business. In this article, the author outlines steps to bring U.S. minority and European American women faculty--at both the…

  11. Minority Education in Global Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Patricia A., Ed.; Stone, Frank A., Ed.

    These papers from the World Education Workshop on minority education present the question of minority education in its many guises around the world. Basic objectives of the workshop include bringing together people concerned with the polycultural and international dimensions in the preparation of professional educators, promoting recognition of a…

  12. Introducing Literature of the Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Elizabeth

    This paper discusses a thematic approach to introduce high school or college students to fiction that deals with minority groups. The author discusses how this thematic arrangement of novels may be a useful method for organizing a study of minority groups as represented in major works of American fiction. She discusses the initiation motif as a…

  13. College and the Minority Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Robert L.

    1974-01-01

    The crusade to recruit "minority" students has now progressed far enough to draw some conclusions from the results. This article summarizes the minority student recruitment program in general and outlines some of the areas most in need of revision. (Author/PC)

  14. Minorities Access to Research Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    The Minorities Access to Research Careers (MARC) program at Hunter College, New York is designed to provide an in-depth 2-year research training experience for minority students in order to prepare them for graduate school and eventual research careers in alcohol, drug abuse, and mental health fields. The target groups include Blacks, Hispanics,…

  15. Finding Respondents from Minority Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Nelda; Medina, Alvaro A.; Bocanegra-Alonso, Anabel; Castillo-Ruiz, Octelina; Acosta-Gonzalez, Rosa I.; Ramirez, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    The recruitment of respondents belonging to ethnic minorities poses important challenges in social and health research. This paper reflects on the enablers and barriers to recruitment that we encountered in our research work with persons belonging to ethnic minorities. Additionally, we applied the Matching Model of Recruitment, a theoretical…

  16. Linguistic Landscape and Minority Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the linguistic landscape of two streets in two multilingual cities in Friesland (Netherlands) and the Basque Country (Spain) where a minority language is spoken, Basque or Frisian. The paper analyses the use of the minority language (Basque or Frisian), the state language (Spanish or Dutch) and English as an international…

  17. Minority Participation in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Reginald

    While the largest growth in the college-age population (i.e., 18 to 24 year olds) is among minority group members, the largest decline in college-going rates is among minorities. Because of poor academic preparation, rising tuition rates, and declining financial aid resources, the community college has become the college of necessity, rather than…

  18. Labor Policy, Minorities, and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln Inst. for Research and Education, Washington, DC.

    The central theme of the papers presented in this symposium is that the labor market for minorities and youth does not appear to function properly because of structural impediments (often caused by government regulations meant to help minorities) and that these impediments must be identified and effective remedies proposed. Following an…

  19. Labor Policy, Minorities, and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln Inst. for Research and Education, Washington, DC.

    The central theme of the papers presented in this symposium is that the labor market for minorities and youth does not appear to function properly because of structural impediments (often caused by government regulations meant to help minorities) and that these impediments must be identified and effective remedies proposed. Following an…

  20. Minorities in the Armed Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Anthony

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the Congressional Black Caucus and the specially formed task force; reports that high ranking officers have pledged to attack racial discrimination; and describes an association of minority officers whose purpose is to enhance the image of the armed forces within the minority community. (Author/JM)

  1. State of the art thoracic ultrasound: intervention and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, John P; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Maldonado, Fabien; Yarmus, Lonny B; Annema, Jouke T; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N; St Noble, Victoria; Rahman, Najib M

    2017-09-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound outside the radiology department and in everyday clinical practice is becoming increasingly common, having been incorporated into standards of care for many specialties. For the majority of practitioners, their experience of, and exposure to, thoracic ultrasound will be in its use as an adjunct to pleural and thoracic interventions, owing to the widely recognised benefits for patient safety and risk reduction. However, as clinicians become increasingly familiar with the capabilities of thoracic ultrasound, new directions for its use are being sought which might enhance practice and patient care. This article reviews the ways in which the advent of thoracic ultrasound is changing the approach to the investigation and treatment of respiratory disease from an interventional perspective. This will include the impact of thoracic ultrasound on areas including patient safety, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and outcome prediction; and will also consider potential future research and clinical directions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. [Risk factors of suppurative complications in case of thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Danielian, Sh N; Abakumov, M M; Vil'k, A P; Saprin, A A; Tatarinova, E V

    2015-01-01

    It was performed retrospective analysis of 463 cases of suppurative thoracic complications after injury (232) and closed thoracic trauma (231) for 20-year period. Incidence of purulent complications was 3.2% and 1.6% in case of injury and closed thoracic trauma respectively including pleural empyema in 1.5 and 1.3%, pulmonary abscess in 0.3 and 0.4%, mediastinitis in 0.35 and 0.12%, pericarditis in 1.5 and 0.26%, osteomyelitis in 0.4 and 0.18% respectively. Factors preceding suppurative complications in case of injuries and closed trauma have been considered as predictors. Multivariant regression analysis established significant risk factors of suppurative thoracic complications. Clotted hemothorax, mediastinal hemorrhage, heart injury, late appeal for medical assistance and mechanical ventilation over 5 days were identified irrespective of character of trauma. In case of thoracic injury there were damage of osteochondrous frame, hollow thoracic and abdominal organs, gunshot wound of lung, delirium and injuries severity over 20 scores according to ISS scale. Pulmonary bleeding, sternal fracture and Glasgow Coma Scale rate<12 scores were identified as risk factors in case of closed trauma.

  3. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation.

  4. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  5. Endothoracic papaverine application for internal thoracic artery harvest.

    PubMed

    Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Kolbakir, Fersat; Karamustafa, Hakan; Keceligil, H Tahsin

    2007-06-01

    This study compared the effects of different methods of papaverine application on free blood flow and harvesting time of the internal thoracic artery for coronary bypass grafting. Patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of 25 each: group 1 had papaverine injected into the endothoracic tissue around the internal thoracic artery before dissection, group 2 had papaverine injected into the periarterial tissues of the internal thoracic artery pedicle, and group 3 had intraluminal papaverine applied retrogradely into the internal thoracic artery. Mean blood flow was 56.3 +/- 21.3, 21.1 +/- 13.2, and 20.9 +/- 9.1 mL x min(-1) in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, immediately after harvesting. Flow in group 1 was significantly better than that in groups 2 and 3. Immediately before anastomosis, mean flow was 89.8 +/- 19.1, 97.6 +/- 35.4, and 95.9 +/- 19.9 mL x min(-1) in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, with no significant difference among groups. Internal thoracic artery harvesting times were shorter in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Administering papaverine into the endothoracic fascia of the internal thoracic artery bed prior to dissection is a reliable method that facilitates rapid harvesting of the graft without causing trauma and consequent spasm.

  6. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation. PMID:27683683

  7. [Study on the feasibility of posterior thoracic transarticular screw fixation].

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong-ming; Liu, Guan-yi; Zhao, Hong-yong; Ma, Wei-hu; Sun, Shao-hua; Zhu, Yan-zhao; Xu, Nan-jian; Lin, Hua-jie

    2011-03-01

    To study the feasibility and technical parameters of posterior transarticular screw fixation in the thoracic spine. Since September 2009 to December 2009, 20 thoracic cadaveric spines (12 males and 8 females) were dissected. The lateral masses and pedicles were exposed carefully. After the entrance point of transarticular screws was determined, posterior transarticular screws implantation was performed under direct visualization into T(1,2), T(5,6) and T(9,10). Then CT scan was performed. On the CT scan,the angle and length of the transarticular screw trajectory were measured. The thoracic transarticular screw trajectory were caudal tilting in the sagittal plane and lateral tilting in the coronal plane with successful placement. There was little differences between different segmental of thoracic vertebrae of the angle, but without significance (P > 0.5). The average angles of the screws were (52.6 +/- 5.9) degrees caudal tilting in the sagittal plane and (12.4 +/- 2.9)0 lateral tilting in the coronal plane. The average trajectory lengths were (22.5 +/- 1.9) mm. There was significant differences statistically among T(1,2), T(5,6) and T(9,10) (P < 0.01). Posterior transarticular screw fixation is feasible. Transarticular screw fixation in the thoracic spine affords an alternative to standard pedicle screw placement for thoracic stabilization.

  8. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  9. Minimally invasive excision of thoracic arachnoid web.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Pierluigi; Barone, Damiano Giuseppe

    2017-09-23

    Arachnoid webs are rare intradural lesions which can cause direct spinal cord compression and/or alteration of the CSF flow with syringomielia. Surgery has been historically performed via wide open laminectomies. The aim of this study is to prove the feasibility of minimally invasive techniques for the excision of arachnoid webs. A retrospective review of two cases of minimally invasive excision of thoracic arachnoid webs was performed. Surgery was carried out through expandable tubular retractors. Complete excision was achieved through the described approach, with minimal bony removal and soft tissue disruption. There were no intra- or peri- operative complications. Both patients were mobilised early and discharged home within 24hrs post-surgery. Postoperative imaging showed good re-expansion of the spinal cord, with no evidence of residual compression or tethering. For symptomatic arachnoid webs, surgery remains the only definitive treatment. In expert hands, the excision of arachnoid webs can be successfully achieved with tubular retractors and minimally invasive techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of cyclosporine in thoracic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zuckermann, A; Klepetko, W

    2004-03-01

    The use of cyclosporine (CyA) in clinical thoracic transplantation has markedly improved the survival and quality of life of patients in the past 2 decades. In the mid-1990s a significant advance in formulation design took place with the introduction of Neoral. This new microemulsion formulation of CyA demonstrates reduced intersubject and intrasubject variability in absorption and improved oral bioavailability compared with the oil-based CyA formulation. Moreover, C2 measurements of CyA could result in an even better method to avoid overimmunosuppression. On the other hand, generic alternatives of CyA could potentially reduce costs to transplant recipients as well as to the general community. Since the initiation of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and rapamycin, slow but expanding variations of immunosuppressive protocols have taken place. Transplantation medicine is thus becoming an increasingly exciting and innovative field, in which CyA continues to play a central role as the core immunosuppressant of choice for the majority of patients.

  11. Intrapleural analgesia after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Gomes da; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Leite, Fernanda; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Barros, Guilherme Antonio Moreira de

    2011-12-01

    To compare analgesia traditionally used for thoracic sympathectomy to intrapleural ropivacaine injection in two different doses. Twenty-four patients were divided into three similar groups, and all of them received intravenous dipyrone. Group A received intravenous tramadol and intrapleural injection of saline solution. Group B received intrapleural injection of 0.33% ropivacaine, and Group C 0.5% ropivacaine. The following aspects were analyzed: inspiratory capacity, respiratory rate and pain. Pain was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period by means of the visual analog scale and over a one-week period. In Groups A and B, reduced inspiratory capacity was observed in the postoperative period. In the first postoperative 12 hours, only 12.5% of the patients in Groups B and C showed intense pain as compared to 25% in Group A. In the subsequent week, only one patient in Group A showed mild pain while the remainder reported intense pain. In Group B, half of the patients showed intense pain, and in Group C, only one presented intense pain. Intrapleural analgesia with ropivacaine resulted in less pain in the late postoperative period with better analgesic outcomes in higher doses, providing a better ventilatory pattern.

  12. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  13. [Thoracic manifestations of AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, A; Zompatori, M; Chiodo, F; Costigliola, P; Ricchi, E; Colangeli, V; Canini, R; Gavelli, G

    1989-11-01

    AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) seems to be related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is characterized by severe T-helpers lymphocyte dysfunction. Many of the AIDS patients (47-70%) develop pulmonary manifestations, both infectious and neoplastic, in the course of their disease. In the Department of Infectious Diseases of our Hospital are studied many patients HIV+. Every year 246 seropositive new patients have been discovered. Among them we have studied 25 subjects with respiratory disease, by chest radiographs; successively, according to clinical picture, we have performed thoracic computed tomography, Gallium scintigraphy, fiberoptic bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy (TBB), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); the majority of these patients (68%) had AIDS, only 28% had ARC and 4% had PGL. In our experience, the diagnosed diseases were mainly infections (92%), and most frequently (52%) due to Pneumocystis carinii, alone or in association with other etiologic agents. We have not found pathognomonic radiographic abnormalities, but chest X-ray evaluated with clinical and laboratory data, may often be useful to obtain diagnostic indications and in order to determine a more specific and aggressive diagnostic approach.

  14. Necropsy findings in neonatal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Turkel, S B; Diehl, E J; Richmond, J A

    1985-01-01

    Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by an abnormally small thorax, variable shortening of the extremities, and pelvic anomalies. Renal and pancreatic symptoms are found in longer survivors, although most cases die in infancy of respiratory failure. Seven neonatal cases were studied at necropsy. These cases ranged in gestational age from 32 to 40 weeks. One was stillborn and the other six survived from 1 hour to 10 days. Two were sibs born to consanguineous parents. Dwarfing was not pronounced and the extremities were shortened in only one infant who also had polydactyly. All seven showed visceral changes in addition to abnormalities of bone. Endochondral ossification was irregular in sections of femur, vertebra, and rib. Pulmonary hypoplasia was associated with the small thorax typical of this disorder. Periportal fibrosis and bile duct proliferation were seen in sections of liver, and in one case cirrhosis was found. Pancreatic fibrosis was variable. These necropsy findings correlate with later clinical manifestations of the disease and emphasise the multisystem nature of this disorder. Images PMID:3989824

  15. Thoracic and cardiovascular surgery in Japan during 2003: annual report by The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Teruhisa; Wada, Hiromi; Fujita, Hiromasa

    2005-09-01

    The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery has conducted annual surveys of thoracic surgery to reveal the statistics of the number of procedures according to the operative category throughout the country since 1986. Here we have summarized the results from our annual survey of thoracic surgery performed during 2003. The incidence of hospital mortality was added to this survey to determine the nationwide status that could be useful not only for surgeons to compare their work with that of others, but also for the association to gain a better understanding of present problems as well as future prospects. Thirty-day mortality (sometimes termed operative mortality) is death within 30 days of operation regardless of the patient's geographic location. Thirty-day mortality includes death within 30 days of operation even though the patient is discharged from the hospital within 30 days of operation. Hospital mortality is death within any time interval after operation if the patient is not discharged from the hospital. Hospital-to-hospital transfer is not considered discharge; transfer to a nursing home or a rehabilitation unit is considered hospital discharge unless the patient subsequently dies of complications of the operation (the definitions of terms are based on the published guidelines of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery (Edmunds LH, et al. Ann Thorac Surg 1996; 62: 932-5)). Thoracic surgery was classified into three categories as cardiovascular, general thoracic and esophageal surgery, and the pertinent data were examined and analyzed in each group. Access to the computerized data is offered to all members of this association. We honor and value your continued kind support.

  16. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  17. COMPARISON BETWEEN THORACIC RADIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS AND POSTMORTEM DIAGNOSIS OF THORACIC DISEASES IN DYSPNEIC COMPANION RATS (RATTUS NORVEGICUS).

    PubMed

    Fouriez-Lablée, Virginie; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Kass, Philip H; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2017-03-01

    Companion rats are often presented to veterinarians for respiratory difficulties. Dyspnea in rats is most commonly due to infectious pneumonia, and thoracic neoplasia can go undiagnosed ante mortem due to a mistaken interpretation of pneumonia. In domestic carnivores, pulmonary nodular patterns have been shown to correlate with lung neoplastic diseases and infectious diseases. The main objective of this retrospective case series study was to determine whether certain radiographic criteria could be correlated with the presence of thoracic infectious disease and neoplastic disease in companion rats. A secondary objective was to determine whether the patient's sex and age were different between rats diagnosed with infectious versus neoplastic disease. Medical records and thoracic radiographs of dyspneic companion rats presented to the University of California at Davis, William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital during the time period from January 2000 to December 2014 were reviewed. Rats with postmortem confirmation of thoracic lesions were included in the study. Thoracic radiographs were evaluated for positioning, lesion distribution, lung lobe involved, pulmonary pattern, mediastinal and pleural lesions by three observers blinded to diagnosis. Thirty rats were included in the study, including 23 rats with an infectious disease and seven with neoplasia. Mediastinal lesions were significantly more prevalent in the group diagnosed with thoracic neoplasia (P = 0.031), in particular cranially (P = 0.048). Although there was an overlap between the two groups, findings indicated that the presence of cranial mediastinal lesions may be helpful for differentiating neoplastic from infectious disease in rats. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Role of the femorofemoral crossover graft in acute lower limb ischemia due to acute type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Lorraine; McCormack, David J; Bell, Rachel; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John

    2014-04-01

    Acute limb ischemia due to type B aortic dissection is rare and continues to be a management challenge. A case series is presented here with the aim of assessing the outcomes of treatment with a femorofemoral crossover graft with or without thoracic stent graft insertion. This is a combined retrospective and prospective review of nine cases of acute lower limb ischemia secondary to acute type B aortic dissection. The presenting features, radiological findings, treatment and outcomes were reviewed. Five patients had a femorofemoral crossover graft (FFXO) alone, two an FFXO with a thoracic stent graft and the eighth a thoracic and iliac stent. The other case was initially treated conservatively but subsequently required an FFXO. The mean follow-up was 16 (3-51) months. A further two thoracic stents were placed during the follow-up period. Thus five out of nine patients (56%) required aortic stenting. This series suggests that an FFXO is a reliable treatment for acute limb ischemia due to type B aortic dissection. However, these patients are often complex with ischemia in other vascular beds and are at risk of subsequent aneurysmal dilation.

  19. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design Case report. Methods A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH.

  20. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542