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  1. Apoptosis of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons Is Virus Independent in a Mouse Model of Acute Neurovirulent Picornavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Buenz, Eric J.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L.; Howe, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non–cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  2. Apoptosis of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is virus independent in a mouse model of acute neurovirulent picornavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Buenz, Eric J; Sauer, Brian M; Lafrance-Corey, Reghann G; Deb, Chandra; Denic, Aleksandar; German, Christopher L; Howe, Charles L

    2009-08-01

    Many viruses, including picornaviruses, have the potential to infect the central nervous system (CNS) and stimulate a neuroinflammatory immune response, especially in infants and young children. Cognitive deficits associated with CNS picornavirus infection result from injury and death of neurons that may occur due to direct viral infection or during the immune responses to virus in the brain. Previous studies have concluded that apoptosis of hippocampal neurons during picornavirus infection is a cell-autonomous event triggered by direct neuronal infection. However, these studies assessed neuron death at time points late in infection and during infections that lead to either death of the host or persistent viral infection. In contrast, many neurovirulent picornavirus infections are acute and transient, with rapid clearance of virus from the host. We provide evidence of hippocampal pathology in mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis picornavirus. We found that CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited several hallmarks of apoptotic death, including caspase-3 activation, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation within 72 hours of infection. Critically, we also found that many of the CA1 pyramidal neurons undergoing apoptosis were not infected with virus, indicating that neuronal cell death during acute picornavirus infection of the CNS occurs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These observations suggest that therapeutic strategies other than antiviral interventions may be useful for neuroprotection during acute CNS picornavirus infection. PMID:19608874

  3. Ultrafast endocytosis at mouse hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Davis, M. Wayne; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    To sustain neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles and their associated proteins must be recycled locally at synapses. Synaptic vesicles are thought to be regenerated ~20 s after fusion by the assembly of clathrin scaffolds or in ~1 s by the reversal of fusion pores via ‘kiss-and-run’ endocytosis. Here we use optogenetics to stimulate cultured hippocampal neurons with a single stimulus, rapidly freeze them after fixed intervals and examine the ultrastructure using electron microscopy – ‘flash-and-freeze’ electron microscopy. Docked vesicles fuse and collapse into the membrane within 30 ms of the stimulus. Compensatory endocytosis occurs with 50-100 ms at sites flanking the active zone. Invagination is blocked by inhibition of actin polymerization, and scission is blocked by inhibiting dynamin. Because intact synaptic vesicles are not recovered, this form of recycling is not compatible with kiss-and-run endocytosis; moreover it is 200-fold faster than clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It is likely that ‘ultrafast endocytosis’ is specialized to rapidly restore the surface area of the membrane. PMID:24305055

  4. Ultrafast endocytosis at mouse hippocampal synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Rost, Benjamin R.; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Davis, M. Wayne; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2013-12-01

    To sustain neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles and their associated proteins must be recycled locally at synapses. Synaptic vesicles are thought to be regenerated approximately 20s after fusion by the assembly of clathrin scaffolds or in approximately 1s by the reversal of fusion pores via `kiss-and-run' endocytosis. Here we use optogenetics to stimulate cultured hippocampal neurons with a single stimulus, rapidly freeze them after fixed intervals and examine the ultrastructure using electron microscopy--`flash-and-freeze' electron microscopy. Docked vesicles fuse and collapse into the membrane within 30ms of the stimulus. Compensatory endocytosis occurs within 50 to 100ms at sites flanking the active zone. Invagination is blocked by inhibition of actin polymerization, and scission is blocked by inhibiting dynamin. Because intact synaptic vesicles are not recovered, this form of recycling is not compatible with kiss-and-run endocytosis; moreover, it is 200-fold faster than clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It is likely that `ultrafast endocytosis' is specialized to restore the surface area of the membrane rapidly.

  5. Effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Seolhwa; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Insub; Kim, Jin Kyu; Roh, Changhyun

    2012-08-08

    Ionizing radiation has become an inevitable health concern emanating from natural sources like space travel and from artificial sources like medical therapies. In general, exposure to ionizing radiation such as γ-rays is one of the methods currently used to stress specific model systems. In this study, we elucidated the long-term effect of acute and fractionated irradiation on DCX-positive cells in hippocampal neurogenesis. Groups of two-month-old C57BL/6 female mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at acute dose (5 Gy) or fractional doses (1 Gy × 5 times and 0.5 Gy × 10 times). Six months after exposure to γ-irradiation, the hippocampus was analyzed. Doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry was used to measure changes of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The number of DCX-positive cells was significantly decreased in all acute and fractionally irradiation groups. The long-term changes in DCX-positive cells triggered by radiation exposure showed a very different pattern to the short-term changes which tended to return to the control level in previous studies. Furthermore, the number of DCX-positive cells was relatively lower in the acute irradiation group than the fractional irradiation groups (approximately 3.6-fold), suggesting the biological change on hippocampal neurogenesis was more susceptible to being damaged by acute than fractional irradiation. These results suggest that the exposure to γ-irradiation as a long-term effect can trigger biological responses resulting in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis.

  6. Dysfunctional hippocampal inhibition in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Best, Tyler K; Cramer, Nathan P; Chakrabarti, Lina; Haydar, Tarik F; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2012-02-01

    GABAergic dysfunction is implicated in hippocampal deficits of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome (DS). Since Ts65Dn mice overexpress G-protein coupled inward-rectifying potassium (GIRK2) containing channels, we sought to evaluate whether increased GABAergic function disrupts the functioning of hippocampal circuitry. After confirming that GABA(B)/GIRK current density is significantly elevated in Ts65Dn CA1 pyramidal neurons, we compared monosynaptic inhibitory inputs in CA1 pyramidal neurons in response to proximal (stratum radiatum; SR) and distal (stratum lacunosum moleculare; SLM) stimulation of diploid and Ts65Dn acute hippocampal slices. Synaptic GABA(B) and GABA(A) mediated currents evoked by SR stimulation were generally unaffected in Ts65Dn CA1 neurons. However, the GABA(B)/GABA(A) ratios evoked by stimulation within the SLM of Ts65Dn hippocampus were significantly larger in magnitude, consistent with increased GABA(B)/GIRK currents after SLM stimulation. These results indicate that GIRK overexpression in Ts65Dn has functional consequences which affect the balance between GABA(B) and GABA(A) inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons, most likely in a pathway specific manner, and may contribute to cognitive deficits reported in these mice.

  7. Cholinergic Plasticity of Oscillating Neuronal Assemblies in Mouse Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Zylla, Maura M.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Reichinnek, Susanne; Draguhn, Andreas; Both, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian hippocampus expresses several types of network oscillations which entrain neurons into transiently stable assemblies. These groups of co-active neurons are believed to support the formation, consolidation and recall of context-dependent memories. Formation of new assemblies occurs during theta- and gamma-oscillations under conditions of high cholinergic activity. Memory consolidation is linked to sharp wave-ripple oscillations (SPW-R) during decreased cholinergic tone. We hypothesized that increased cholinergic tone supports plastic changes of assemblies while low cholinergic tone favors their stability. Coherent spatiotemporal network patterns were measured during SPW-R activity in mouse hippocampal slices. We compared neuronal activity within the oscillating assemblies before and after a transient phase of carbachol-induced gamma oscillations. Single units maintained their coupling to SPW-R throughout the experiment and could be re-identified after the transient phase of gamma oscillations. However, the frequency of SPW-R-related unit firing was enhanced after muscarinic stimulation. At the network level, these changes resulted in altered patterns of extracellularly recorded SPW-R waveforms. In contrast, recording of ongoing SPW-R activity without intermittent cholinergic stimulation revealed remarkably stable repetitive activation of assemblies. These results show that activation of cholinergic receptors induces plasticity at the level of oscillating hippocampal assemblies, in line with the different role of gamma- and SPW-R network activity for memory formation and –consolidation, respectively. PMID:24260462

  8. The inhibitor of I kappa B alpha phosphorylation BAY 11-7082 prevents NMDA neurotoxicity in mouse hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Goffi, F; Boroni, F; Benarese, M; Sarnico, I; Benetti, A; Spano, P F; Pizzi, M

    2005-04-01

    NF-kappaB is a nuclear transcription factor involved in the control of fundamental cellular functions including cell survival. Among the many target genes of this factor, both pro- and anti-apoptotic genes have been described. To evaluate the contribution of NF-kappaB activation to excitotoxic insult, we analysed the effect of IkappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) phosphorylation blockade on glutamate-induced toxicity in adult mouse hippocampal slices. By using immunocytochemical and EMSA techniques, we found that (i) acute exposure of hippocampal slices to NMDA induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, (ii) NMDA-mediated activation of NF-kappaB was prevented by BAY 11-7082, an inhibitor of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and degradation, and (iii) BAY 11-7082-mediated inhibition of NF-kappaB activation was associated with neuroprotection.

  9. Holographic Photolysis for Multiple Cell Stimulation in Mouse Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Ventalon, Cathie; Angulo, María Cecilia; Emiliani, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Background Advanced light microscopy offers sensitive and non-invasive means to image neural activity and to control signaling with photolysable molecules and, recently, light-gated channels. These approaches require precise and yet flexible light excitation patterns. For synchronous stimulation of subsets of cells, they also require large excitation areas with millisecond and micrometric resolution. We have recently developed a new method for such optical control using a phase holographic modulation of optical wave-fronts, which minimizes power loss, enables rapid switching between excitation patterns, and allows a true 3D sculpting of the excitation volumes. In previous studies we have used holographic photololysis to control glutamate uncaging on single neuronal cells. Here, we extend the use of holographic photolysis for the excitation of multiple neurons and of glial cells. Methods/Principal Findings The system combines a liquid crystal device for holographic patterned photostimulation, high-resolution optical imaging, the HiLo microscopy, to define the stimulated regions and a conventional Ca2+ imaging system to detect neural activity. By means of electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in acute hippocampal slices, we show that the use of excitation patterns precisely tailored to the shape of multiple neuronal somata represents a very efficient way for the simultaneous excitation of a group of neurons. In addition, we demonstrate that fast shaped illumination patterns also induce reliable responses in single glial cells. Conclusions/Significance We show that the main advantage of holographic illumination is that it allows for an efficient excitation of multiple cells with a spatiotemporal resolution unachievable with other existing approaches. Although this paper focuses on the photoactivation of caged molecules, our approach will surely prove very efficient for other probes, such as light-gated channels, genetically encoded photoactivatable

  10. Acute pharmacokinetics of memantine in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Saab, Bechara J; Roder, John C

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of memantine, a widely prescribed medication in the United States and the European Union for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD), have not been well explored in the mouse. Memantine is a highly unspecific blocker of many channels and how memantine may be of benefit in AD remains a mystery. Therefore, the investigation of memantine in the mouse, the most commonly chosen subject for modeling AD, has strong potential to lead to better therapies. Here, we present an acute pharmacokinetic analysis of memantine in mouse brain tissue and blood serum for a variety of experimentally relevant doses. The data help shed light on the mechanism of memantine action in vivo, and demonstrate that subcutaneous doses above 10 mg/kg in the mouse are most likely not therapeutically relevant to the human.

  11. Selective degeneration of septal and hippocampal GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Loreth, Desirée; Ozmen, Laurence; Revel, Florent G; Knoflach, Frédéric; Wetzel, Philine; Frotscher, Michael; Metzger, Friedrich; Kretz, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain accumulation of amyloid-β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles, which are believed to initiate a pathological cascade that results in progressive impairment of cognitive functions and eventual neuronal death. To obtain a mouse model displaying the typical AD histopathology of amyloidosis and tauopathy, we generated a triple-transgenic mouse line (TauPS2APP) by overexpressing human mutations of the amyloid precursor protein, presenilin2 and tau genes. Stereological analysis of TauPS2APP mice revealed significant neurodegeneration of GABAergic septo-hippocampal projection neurons as well as their target cells, the GABAergic hippocampal interneurons. In contrast, the cholinergic medial septum neurons remained unaffected. Moreover, the degeneration of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons was dependent on the hippocampal subfield and interneuronal subtype investigated, whereby the dentate gyrus and the NPY-positive interneurons, respectively, were most strongly affected. Neurodegeneration was also accompanied by a change in the mRNA expression of markers for inhibitory interneurons. In line with the loss of inhibitory neurons, we observed functional changes in TauPS2APP mice relative to WT mice, with strongly enhanced long-term potentiation in the medial-perforant pathway input to the dentate gyrus, and stereotypic hyperactivity. Our data indicate that inhibitory neurons are the targets of neurodegeneration in a mouse model of amyloidosis and tauopathy, thus pointing to a possible role of the inhibitory network in the pathophysiological and functional cascade of Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Regeneration and characterization of adult mouse hippocampal neurons in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Kucku; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; Kindy, Mark S; Hickman, James J

    2009-02-15

    Although the majority of human illnesses occur during adulthood, most of the available in vitro disease models are based upon cells obtained from embryonic/fetal tissues because of the difficulties involved with culturing adult cells. Development of adult mouse neuronal cultures has a special significance because of the abundance of transgenic disease models that use this species. In this study a novel cell culture method has been developed that supports the long-term survival and physiological regeneration of adult mouse hippocampal cells in a serum-free defined environment. In this well-defined, controlled system, adult mouse hippocampal cells survived for up to 21 days in culture. The cultured cells exhibited typical hippocampal neuronal morphology and electrophysiological properties after recovery from the trauma of dissociation, and stained positive for the expected neuronal markers. This system has great potential as an investigative tool for in vitro studies of adult diseases, the aging brain or transgenic models of age-associated disorders. PMID:18955083

  13. Hippocampal hyperexcitability underlies enhanced fear memories in TgNTRK3, a panic disorder mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mónica; D'Amico, Davide; Spadoni, Ornella; Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Stork, Oliver; Dierssen, Mara

    2013-09-18

    Panic attacks are a hallmark in panic disorder (PAND). During the panic attack, a strong association with the surrounding context is established suggesting that the hippocampus may be critically involved in the pathophysiology of PAND, given its role in contextual processing. We previously showed that variation in the expression of the neurotrophin tyrosine kinase receptor type 3 (NTRK3) in both PAND patients and a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3) may have a role in PAND pathophysiology. Our study examines hippocampal function and activation of the brain fear network in TgNTRK3 mice. TgNTRK3 mice showed increased fear memories accompanied by impaired extinction, congruent with an altered activation pattern of the amygdala-hippocampus-medial prefrontal cortex fear circuit. Moreover, TgNTRK3 mice also showed an unbalanced excitation-to-inhibition ratio in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 (CA3)-CA1 subcircuit toward hyperexcitability. The resulting hippocampal hyperexcitability underlies the enhanced fear memories, as supported by the efficacy of tiagabine, a GABA reuptake inhibitor, to rescue fear response. The fearful phenotype appears to be the result of hippocampal hyperexcitability and aberrant fear circuit activation. We conclude that NTRK3 plays a role in PAND by regulating hippocampus-dependent fear memories. PMID:24048855

  14. Hippocampal adaptive response following extensive neuronal loss in an inducible transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Myczek, Kristoffer; Yeung, Stephen T; Castello, Nicholas; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal loss is a common component of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease) and brain traumas (stroke, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury). One brain region that commonly exhibits neuronal loss in several neurodegenerative disorders is the hippocampus, an area of the brain critical for the formation and retrieval of memories. Long-lasting and sometimes unrecoverable deficits caused by neuronal loss present a unique challenge for clinicians and for researchers who attempt to model these traumas in animals. Can these deficits be recovered, and if so, is the brain capable of regeneration following neuronal loss? To address this significant question, we utilized the innovative CaM/Tet-DT(A) mouse model that selectively induces neuronal ablation. We found that we are able to inflict a consistent and significant lesion to the hippocampus, resulting in hippocampally-dependent behavioral deficits and a long-lasting upregulation in neurogenesis, suggesting that this process might be a critical part of hippocampal recovery. In addition, we provide novel evidence of angiogenic and vasculature changes following hippocampal neuronal loss in CaM/Tet-DTA mice. We posit that angiogenesis may be an important factor that promotes neurogenic upregulation following hippocampal neuronal loss, and both factors, angiogenesis and neurogenesis, can contribute to the adaptive response of the brain for behavioral recovery. PMID:25184527

  15. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  16. Hippocampal circuit dysfunction in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witton, Jonathan; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Zinyuk, Larissa E; Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor; Line, Samantha J; Jensen, Thomas P; Tedoldi, Angelo; Cummings, Damian M; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C; Bannerman, David M; Randall, Andrew D; Brown, Jonathan T; Edwards, Frances A; Rusakov, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G; Jones, Matt W

    2015-09-01

    Hippocampal pathology is likely to contribute to cognitive disability in Down syndrome, yet the neural network basis of this pathology and its contributions to different facets of cognitive impairment remain unclear. Here we report dysfunctional connectivity between dentate gyrus and CA3 networks in the transchromosomic Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome, demonstrating that ultrastructural abnormalities and impaired short-term plasticity at dentate gyrus-CA3 excitatory synapses culminate in impaired coding of new spatial information in CA3 and CA1 and disrupted behavior in vivo. These results highlight the vulnerability of dentate gyrus-CA3 networks to aberrant human chromosome 21 gene expression and delineate hippocampal circuit abnormalities likely to contribute to distinct cognitive phenotypes in Down syndrome.

  17. Hippocampal circuit dysfunction in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Popov, V.I.; Kraev, I.; Line, S.J.; Jensen, T.P.; Tedoldi, A.; Cummings, D.M.; Tybulewicz, V.L.J.; Fisher, E.M.C.; Bannerman, D.M.; Randall, A.D.; Brown, J.T.; Edwards, F.A.; Rusakov, D.A.; Stewart, M.G.; Jones, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pathology is likely to contribute to cognitive disability in Down syndrome (DS), yet the neural network basis of this pathology and its contributions to different facets of cognitive impairment remain unclear. Here, we report dysfunctional connectivity between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 networks in the transchromosomic Tc1 mouse model of DS, demonstrating that ultrastructural abnormalities and impaired short-term plasticity at DG-CA3 excitatory synapses culminate in impaired coding of novel spatial information in CA3 and CA1 and disrupted behaviour in vivo. These results highlight the vulnerability of DG-CA3 networks to aberrant human chromosome 21 gene expression, and delineate hippocampal circuit abnormalities likely to contribute to distinct cognitive phenotypes in DS. PMID:26237367

  18. Phase synchronization of neuronal noise in mouse hippocampal epileptiform dynamics.

    PubMed

    Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L; Valiante, Taufik A; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2013-02-01

    Organized brain activity is the result of dynamical, segregated neuronal signals that may be used to investigate synchronization effects using sophisticated neuroengineering techniques. Phase synchrony analysis, in particular, has emerged as a promising methodology to study transient and frequency-specific coupling effects across multi-site signals. In this study, we investigated phase synchronization in intracellular recordings of interictal and ictal epileptiform events recorded from pairs of cells in the whole (intact) mouse hippocampus. In particular, we focused our analysis on the background noise-like activity (NLA), previously reported to exhibit complex neurodynamical properties. Our results show evidence for increased linear and nonlinear phase coupling in NLA across three frequency bands [theta (4-10 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz)] in the ictal compared to interictal state dynamics. We also present qualitative and statistical evidence for increased phase synchronization in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands from paired recordings of ictal NLA. Overall, our results validate the use of background NLA in the neurodynamical study of epileptiform transitions and suggest that what is considered "neuronal noise" is amenable to synchronization effects in the spatiotemporal domain. PMID:23273129

  19. Hippocampal Damage in Mouse and Human Forms of Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.; Woulfe, John; Sur, Monalisa; Cyr, Michael; Sakic, Boris

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is frequently accompanied by neuropsychiatric (NP) and cognitive deficits of unknown etiology. By using autoimmune MRL-lpr mice as an animal model of NP-SLE, we examine the relationship between autoimmunity, hippocampal damage, and behavioral dysfunction. Fluoro Jade B (FJB) staining and anti-ubiquitin (anti-Ub) immunocytochemistry were used to assess neuronal damage in young (asymptomatic) and aged (diseased) mice, while spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) was used to estimate the severity of hippocampal dysfunction. The causal relationship between autoimmunity and neuropathology was tested by prolonged administration of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide (CY). In comparison to congenic MRL +/+ controls, SAB acquisition rates and performance in the “reversal” trial were impaired in diseased MRL-lpr mice, suggesting limited use of the spatial learning strategy. FJB-positive neurons and anti-Ub particles were frequent in the CA3 region. Conversely, CY treatment attenuated the SAB deficit and overall FJB staining. Similarly to mouse brain, the hippocampus from a patient who died from NP-SLE showed reduced neuronal density in the CA3 region and dentate gyrus, as well as increased FJB positivity in these regions. Gliosis and neuronal loss were observed in the gray matter, and T lymphocytes and stromal calcifications were common in the choroid plexus. Taken together, these results suggest that systemic autoimmunity induces significant hippocampal damage, which may underlie affective and cognitive deficits in NP-SLE. PMID:15301441

  20. Hippocampal damage in mouse and human forms of systemic autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Ballok, David A; Woulfe, John; Sur, Monalisa; Cyr, Michael; Sakic, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is frequently accompanied by neuropsychiatric (NP) and cognitive deficits of unknown etiology. By using autoimmune MRL-lpr mice as an animal model of NP-SLE, we examine the relationship between autoimmunity, hippocampal damage, and behavioral dysfunction. Fluoro Jade B (FJB) staining and anti-ubiquitin (anti-Ub) immunocytochemistry were used to assess neuronal damage in young (asymptomatic) and aged (diseased) mice, while spontaneous alternation behavior (SAB) was used to estimate the severity of hippocampal dysfunction. The causal relationship between autoimmunity and neuropathology was tested by prolonged administration of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide (CY). In comparison to congenic MRL +/+ controls, SAB acquisition rates and performance in the "reversal" trial were impaired in diseased MRL-lpr mice, suggesting limited use of the spatial learning strategy. FJB-positive neurons and anti-Ub particles were frequent in the CA3 region. Conversely, CY treatment attenuated the SAB deficit and overall FJB staining. Similarly to mouse brain, the hippocampus from a patient who died from NP-SLE showed reduced neuronal density in the CA3 region and dentate gyrus, as well as increased FJB positivity in these regions. Gliosis and neuronal loss were observed in the gray matter, and T lymphocytes and stromal calcifications were common in the choroid plexus. Taken together, these results suggest that systemic autoimmunity induces significant hippocampal damage, which may underlie affective and cognitive deficits in NP-SLE. PMID:15301441

  1. Acute Restraint Stress Enhances Hippocampal Endocannabinoid Function via Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meina; Hill, Matthew N.; Zhang, Longhua; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Alger, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to behavioral stress normally triggers a complex, multi-level response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that helps maintain homeostatic balance. Although the endocannabinoid (eCB) system (ECS) is sensitive to chronic stress, few studies have directly addressed its response to acute stress. Here we show that acute restraint stress enhances eCB-dependent modulation of GABA release measured by whole-cell voltage clamp of inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro. Both Ca2+-dependent, eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) mediated eCB mobilization are enhanced following acute stress exposure. DSI enhancement is dependent on the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and is mimicked by both in vivo and in vitro corticosterone treatment. This effect does not appear to involve cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that can degrade eCBs; however, treatment of hippocampal slices with the L-type calcium (Ca2+) channel inhibitor, nifedipine, reverses while an agonist of these channels mimics the effect of in vivo stress. Finally, we find that acute stress produces a delayed (by 30 min) increase in the hippocampal content of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the eCB responsible for DSI. These results support the hypothesis that the ECS is a biochemical effector of glucocorticoids in the brain, linking stress with changes in synaptic strength. PMID:21890595

  2. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models.

  3. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models. PMID:26265370

  4. Novel anticonvulsive effects of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal electrical kindling.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, M; Lang, M; Gane, J; Chow, E; Wu, C; Zhang, L

    2014-01-17

    Progesterone is a known anticonvulsant, with its inhibitory effects generally attributed to its secondary metabolite, 5α,3α-tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), and THP's enhancement of GABAA receptor activity. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that progesterone may have non-genomic actions independent of the GABAA receptor. In this study, we explored THP/GABAA-independent anticonvulsive actions of progesterone in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling and in mouse entorhinal slices in vitro. Specifically, we examined the effects of progesterone in kindled mice with or without pretreatments with finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor known to block the metabolism of progesterone to THP. In addition, we examined the effects of progesterone on entorhinal epileptiform potentials in the presence of a GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin and finasteride. Adult male mice were kindled via a daily stimulation protocol. Electroencephalographic (EEG) discharges were recorded from the hippocampus or cortex to assess "focal" or "generalized" seizure activity. Kindled mice were treated with intra-peritoneal injections of progesterone (10, 35, 100 and 160mg/kg) with or without finasteride pretreatment (50 or 100mg/kg), THP (1, 3.5, 10 and 30mg/kg), midazolam (2mg/kg) and carbamazepine (50mg/kg). Entorhinal cortical slices were prepared from naïve young mice, and repetitive epileptiform potentials were induced by 4-aminopyridine (100μM), picrotoxin (100μM) and finasteride (1μM). Pretreatment with finasteride did not abolish the anticonvulsant effects of progesterone. In finasteride-pretreated mice, progesterone at 100 and 160mg/kg decreased cortical but not hippocampal afterdischarges (ADs). Carbamazepine mimicked the effects of progesterone with finasteride pretreatments in decreasing cortical discharges and motor seizures, whereas midazolam produced effects similar to progesterone alone or THP in decreasing hippocampal ADs and motor seizures. In brain slices, progesterone

  5. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  6. Neuroprotective effects of constituents of the root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus in mouse hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Byun, Erisa; Li, Bin; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Youn-Chul; An, Ren-Bo

    2010-08-01

    Glutamate-induced oxidative injury causes neuronal degeneration related to many central nervous system diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy and ischemia. The bioassay-guided fractionation of the EtOH extract of the root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus Trucz. provided one neuroprotective limonoid, obacunone, together with a degraded limonoid, fraxinellone and two alkaloids, dictamine and haplopine. At concentrations of 100-150 microM, obacunone showed the potent neuroprotective effects on glutamateinduced neurotoxicity and induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. In addition, we found that obacunone increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and induced HO-1 expression via p38 MAPK pathway. These results suggest that obacunone isolated from the root bark of D. dasycarpus increases cellular resistance to glutamate-induced oxidative injury in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells, presumably through the p38 MAPK pathway-dependent HO-1 expression. These results suggest that obacunone could be the effective candidates for the treatment of ROS-related neurological diseases.

  7. Specific Disruption of Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses in a Mouse Model of Familial Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Scott A.; Raam, Tara; Antonios, Joseph K.; Bushong, Eric A.; Koo, Edward H.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    The earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by deficits in memory and cognition indicating hippocampal pathology. While it is now recognized that synapse dysfunction precedes the hallmark pathological findings of AD, it is unclear if specific hippocampal synapses are particularly vulnerable. Since the mossy fiber (MF) synapse between dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 regions underlies critical functions disrupted in AD, we utilized serial block-face electron microscopy (SBEM) to analyze MF microcircuitry in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). FAD mutant MF terminal complexes were severely disrupted compared to control – they were smaller, contacted fewer postsynaptic spines and had greater numbers of presynaptic filopodial processes. Multi-headed CA3 dendritic spines in the FAD mutant condition were reduced in complexity and had significantly smaller sites of synaptic contact. Significantly, there was no change in the volume of classical dendritic spines at neighboring inputs to CA3 neurons suggesting input-specific defects in the early course of AD related pathology. These data indicate a specific vulnerability of the DG-CA3 network in AD pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of SBEM to assess circuit specific alterations in mouse models of human disease. PMID:24454724

  8. Physical activity delays hippocampal neurodegeneration and rescues memory deficits in an Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hüttenrauch, M; Brauß, A; Kurdakova, A; Borgers, H; Klinker, F; Liebetanz, D; Salinas-Riester, G; Wiltfang, J; Klafki, H W; Wirths, O

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for a protective role of physical activity on the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been growing in the last years. Here we studied the influence of a prolonged physical and cognitive stimulation on neurodegeneration, with special emphasis on hippocampal neuron loss and associated behavioral impairment in the Tg4-42 mouse model of AD. Tg4-42 mice overexpress Aβ4-42 without any mutations, and develop an age-dependent hippocampal neuron loss associated with a severe memory decline. We demonstrate that long-term voluntary exercise diminishes CA1 neuron loss and completely rescues spatial memory deficits in different experimental settings. This was accompanied by changes in the gene expression profile of Tg4-42 mice. Deep sequencing analysis revealed an upregulation of chaperones involved in endoplasmatic reticulum protein processing, which might be intimately linked to the beneficial effects seen upon long-term exercise. We believe that we provide evidence for the first time that enhanced physical activity counteracts neuron loss and behavioral deficits in a transgenic AD mouse model. The present findings underscore the relevance of increased physical activity as a potential strategy in the prevention of dementia. PMID:27138799

  9. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  10. Neurobehavioral and Imaging Correlates of Hippocampal Atrophy in a Mouse Model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Yeiser, Lauren A.; Stewart, Blair; Kukino, Ayaka; Nie, Xiao; Roese, Natalie E.; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Pike, Martin M.; Raber, Jacob; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is the second most common cause of dementia. Reduced cerebral blood flow is thought to play a major role in the etiology of VCI. Therefore, chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been used to model VCI in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the histopathological and neuroimaging substrates of neurocognitive impairments in a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion induced by unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Mice were subjected to sham or right UCCAO (VCI) surgeries. Three months later, neurocognitive function was evaluated using the novel object recognition task, Morris water maze, and contextual and cued fear conditioning tests. Next, cerebral perfusion was evaluated with dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ultra-high fieild (11.75 Tesla) animal MRI system. Finally, brain pathology was evaluated using histology and T2 weighted MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). VCI, but not sham, mice had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the right vs. left cerebral cortex. VCI mice showed deficits in object recognition. T2 weighted MRI of VCI brains revealed enlargement of lateral ventricles, which corresponded to areas of hippocampal atrophy upon histological analysis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the UCCAO model of chronic hypoperfusion induces hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement, resulting in neurocognitive deficits characteristic of VCI. PMID:26040424

  11. Neurogenic and neurotrophic effects of BDNF peptides in mouse hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is down regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), depression, stress, and anxiety; conversely the level of this neurotrophin is increased in autism spectrum disorders. Thus, modulating the level of BDNF can be a potential therapeutic approach for nervous system pathologies. In the present study, we designed five different tetra peptides (peptides B-1 to B-5) corresponding to different active regions of BDNF. These tetra peptides were found to be non-toxic, and they induced the expression of neuronal markers in mouse embryonic day 18 (E18) primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. Additionally, peptide B-5 induced the expression of BDNF and its receptor, TrkB, suggesting a positive feedback mechanism. The BDNF peptides induced only a moderate activation (phosphorylation at Tyr 706) of the TrkB receptor, which could be blocked by the Trk's inhibitor, K252a. Peptide B-3, when combined with BDNF, potentiated the survival effect of this neurotrophin on H(2)O(2)-treated E18 hippocampal cells. Peptides B-3 and B-5 were found to work as partial agonists and as partial antagonists competing with BDNF to activate the TrkB receptor in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the described BDNF tetra peptides are neurotrophic, can modulate BDNF signaling in a partial agonist/antagonist way, and offer a novel therapeutic approach to neural pathologies where BDNF levels are dysregulated. PMID:23320097

  12. The Chemokine MIP-1α/CCL3 impairs mouse hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Elodie; Faivre, Emilie; Dutar, Patrick; Alves Pires, Claire; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laloux, Charlotte; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Humez, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are signaling molecules playing an important role in immune regulations. They are also thought to regulate brain development, neurogenesis and neuroendocrine functions. While chemokine upsurge has been associated with conditions characterized with cognitive impairments, their ability to modulate synaptic plasticity remains ill-defined. In the present study, we specifically evaluated the effects of MIP1-α/CCL3 towards hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and spatial memory. We found that CCL3 (50 ng/ml) significantly reduced basal synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse without affecting NMDAR-mediated field potentials. This effect was ascribed to post-synaptic regulations, as CCL3 did not impact paired-pulse facilitation. While CCL3 did not modulate long-term depression (LTD), it significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), an effect abolished by Maraviroc, a CCR5 specific antagonist. In addition, sub-chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of CCL3 also impair LTP. In accordance with these electrophysiological findings, we demonstrated that the icv injection of CCL3 in mouse significantly impaired spatial memory abilities and long-term memory measured using the two-step Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These effects of CCL3 on memory were inhibited by Maraviroc. Altogether, these data suggest that the chemokine CCL3 is an hippocampal neuromodulator able to regulate synaptic plasticity mechanisms involved in learning and memory functions. PMID:26511387

  13. MOUSE MODEL OF OPRM1 (A118G) POLYMORPHISM HAS ALTERED HIPPOCAMPAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Mague, Stephen D.; Port, Russell G; McMullen, Michael E.; Carlson, Greg C.; Turner, Jill R.

    2015-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human µ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been widely studied for its association in a variety of drug addiction and pain sensitivity phenotypes; however, the extent of these adaptations and the mechanisms underlying these associations remain elusive. To clarify the functional mechanisms linking the OPRM1 A118G SNP to altered phenotypes, we used a mouse model possessing the equivalent nucleotide/amino acid substitution in the Oprm1 gene. In order to investigate the impact of this SNP on circuit function, we used voltage-sensitive dye imaging in hippocampal slices and in vivo electroencephalogram recordings of the hippocampus following MOPR activation. As the hippocampus contains excitatory pyramidal cells whose activity is highly regulated by a dense network of inhibitory neurons, it serves as an ideal structure to evaluate how putative receptor function abnormalities may influence circuit activity. We found that MOPR activation increased excitatory responses in wild-type animals, an effect that was significantly reduced in animals possessing the Oprm1 SNP. Furthermore, in order to assess the in vivo effects of this SNP during MOPR activation, EEG recordings of hippocampal activity following morphine administration corroborated a loss-of-function phenotype. In conclusion, as these mice have been shown to have similar MOPR expression in the hippocampus between genotypes, these data suggest that the MOPR A118G SNP results in a loss of receptor function. PMID:25986698

  14. A mouse model replicating hippocampal sparing cranial irradiation in humans: A tool for identifying new strategies to limit neurocognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Wolfgang A; Gökhan, Şölen; Brodin, N Patrik; Gulinello, Maria E; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing cranial irradiation are at risk of developing neurocognitive impairments. Recent evidence suggests that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampi could play an important role in this cognitive decline. As a tool for studying the mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent cognitive decline, we developed a mouse model replicating the results of the recent clinical RTOG 0933 study of hippocampal sparing whole-brain irradiation. We irradiated 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice to a single dose of 10 Gy using either whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) or hippocampal sparing irradiation (HSI). These animals, as well as sham-irradiated controls, were subjected to behavioral/cognitive assessments distinguishing between hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent functions. Irradiation was well tolerated by all animals and only limited cell death of proliferating cells was found within the generative zones. Animals exposed to WBRT showed significant deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls in the hippocampal-dependent behavioral task. In contrast, HSI mice did not perform significantly different from sham-irradiated mice (control group) and performed significantly better when compared to WBRT mice. This is consistent with the results from the RTOG 0933 clinical trial, and as such this animal model could prove a helpful tool for exploring new strategies for mitigating cognitive decline in cancer patients receiving cranial irradiation. PMID:26399509

  15. A mouse model replicating hippocampal sparing cranial irradiation in humans: A tool for identifying new strategies to limit neurocognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Gökhan, Şölen; Brodin, N. Patrik; Gulinello, Maria E.; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F.; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing cranial irradiation are at risk of developing neurocognitive impairments. Recent evidence suggests that radiation-induced injury to the hippocampi could play an important role in this cognitive decline. As a tool for studying the mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent cognitive decline, we developed a mouse model replicating the results of the recent clinical RTOG 0933 study of hippocampal sparing whole-brain irradiation. We irradiated 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice to a single dose of 10 Gy using either whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) or hippocampal sparing irradiation (HSI). These animals, as well as sham-irradiated controls, were subjected to behavioral/cognitive assessments distinguishing between hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent functions. Irradiation was well tolerated by all animals and only limited cell death of proliferating cells was found within the generative zones. Animals exposed to WBRT showed significant deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls in the hippocampal-dependent behavioral task. In contrast, HSI mice did not perform significantly different from sham-irradiated mice (control group) and performed significantly better when compared to WBRT mice. This is consistent with the results from the RTOG 0933 clinical trial, and as such this animal model could prove a helpful tool for exploring new strategies for mitigating cognitive decline in cancer patients receiving cranial irradiation. PMID:26399509

  16. Immobility responses between mouse strains correlate with distinct hippocampal serotonin transporter protein expression and function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Man; He, Tao; Meng, Qing-yan; Broussard, John Isaac; Yao, Lan; Diao, Yao; Sang, Xiu-bo; Liu, Qing-peng; Liao, Ying-jun; Li, Yuge; Zhao, Shulei

    2014-11-01

    Mouse strain differences in immobility and in sensitivity to antidepressants have been observed in the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST). However, the neurotransmitter systems and neural substrates that contribute to these differences remain unknown. To investigate the role of the hippocampal serotonin transporter (5-HTT), we measured baseline immobility and the immobility responses to fluoxetine (FLX) in the FST and the TST in male CD-1, C57BL/6, DBA and BALB/c mice. We observed strain differences in baseline immobility time, with CD-1 mice showing the longest and DBA mice showing the shortest. In contrast, DBA and BALB/c mice showed the highest sensitivity to FLX, whereas CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice showed the lowest sensitivity. Also we found strain differences in both the total 5-HTT protein level and the membrane-bound 5-HTT level (estimated by V max) as follows: DBA>BALB/c>CD-1=C57BL/6. The uptake efficiency of the membrane-bound 5-HTT (estimated by 1/K m) was highest in DBA and BALB/c mice and lowest in CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice. A correlation analysis of subregions within the hippocampus revealed that immobility time was negatively correlated with V max and positively correlated with K m in the hippocampus. Therefore a higher uptake capacity of the membrane-bound 5-HTT in the hippocampus was associated with lower baseline immobility and greater sensitivity to FLX. These results suggest that alterations in hippocampal 5-HTT activity may contribute to mouse strain differences in the FST and the TST.

  17. Acute Exercise Improves Prefrontal Cortex but not Hippocampal Function in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Basso, Julia C; Shang, Andrea; Elman, Meredith; Karmouta, Ryan; Suzuki, Wendy A

    2015-11-01

    The effects of acute aerobic exercise on cognitive functions in humans have been the subject of much investigation; however, these studies are limited by several factors, including a lack of randomized controlled designs, focus on only a single cognitive function, and testing during or shortly after exercise. Using a randomized controlled design, the present study asked how a single bout of aerobic exercise affects a range of frontal- and medial temporal lobe-dependent cognitive functions and how long these effects last. We randomly assigned 85 subjects to either a vigorous intensity acute aerobic exercise group or a video watching control group. All subjects completed a battery of cognitive tasks both before and 30, 60, 90, or 120 min after the intervention. This battery included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, the Modified Benton Visual Retention Test, the Stroop Color and Word Test, the Symbol Digit Modalities Test, the Digit Span Test, the Trail Making Test, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test. Based on these measures, composite scores were formed to independently assess prefrontal cortex- and hippocampal-dependent cognition. A three-way mixed Analysis of Variance was used to determine whether differences existed between groups in the change in cognitive function from pre- to post-intervention testing. Acute exercise improved prefrontal cortex- but not hippocampal-dependent functioning, with no differences found between delay groups. Vigorous acute aerobic exercise has beneficial effects on prefrontal cortex-dependent cognition and these effects can last for up to 2 hr after exercise.

  18. Effect of acute fentanyl treatment on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hai; Xu, Yueming; Liu, Fucun; Wang, Guowei; Hu, Sanjue

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), mainly characterized by short-term decline of learning and memory, occurs after operations under anesthesia. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are highly expressed in interneurons of hippocampus, and is believed to be critical for the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity between hippocampal neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fentanyl, a strong agonist of MOR and often used for anesthesia and analgesia in clinical settings, on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway during acute exposure and washout in vitro. Our results revealed that acute fentanyl exposure (0.01, 0.1, 1 μM) dose-dependently increased the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), which was prevented by pre-administration of picrotoxin (50 μM) or MOR antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Phe-Thr-NH2 (CTOP, 10 μM). While fentanyl exposure-increased fEPSPs amplitude was prevented by picrotoxin [an inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR)] treatment or fentanyl washout, pretreatment of picrotoxin failed to prevent the fentanyl-impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength as well as the fentanyl-enhanced long-term depression (LTD). These results demonstrated that fentanyl acute exposure and washout increases hippocampal excitability in the Schaffer-collateral CA1 pathway, depending on disinhibiting interneurons after MOR activation. In addition, fentanyl acute exposure and washout modulated synaptic plasticity, but the inhibitory activation was not critical. Elucidating the detailed mechanisms for synaptic dysfunction after fentanyl exposure and washout may provide insights into POCD generation after fentanyl anesthesia. PMID:26578961

  19. Acute stress and hippocampal output: exploring dorsal CA1 and subicular synaptic plasticity simultaneously in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Matthew J; Howland, John G

    2013-01-01

    The Cornu Ammonis-1 (CA1) subfield and subiculum (SUB) serve as major output structures of the hippocampal formation. Exploring forms of synaptic plasticity simultaneously within these two output regions may improve understanding of the dynamics of hippocampal circuitry and information transfer between hippocampal and cortical brain regions. Using a novel dual-channel electrophysiological preparation in urethane-anesthetized adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in vivo, we examined the effects of acute restraint stress (30 min) on short- and long-term forms of synaptic plasticity in both CA1 and SUB by stimulating the CA3 region. Paired-pulse facilitation was disrupted in SUB but not CA1 in the dual-channel experiments following exposure to acute stress. Disruptions in CA1 PPF were evident in subsequent single-channel experiments with a more anterior recording site. Acute stress disrupted long-term potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation (10 bursts of 20 pulses at 200 Hz) in both CA1 and SUB. Low-frequency stimulation (900 pulses at 1 Hz) did not alter CA1 plasticity while a late-developing potentiation was evident in SUB that was disrupted following exposure to acute stress. These findings highlight differences in the sensitivity to acute stress for distinct forms of synaptic plasticity within synapses in hippocampal output regions. The findings are discussed in relation to normal and aberrant forms of hippocampal-cortical information processing. PMID:24303119

  20. Mouse chromosome 11 harbors genetic determinants of hippocampal strain-specific nicotinic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Scott W; Weis, Janis J; Ma, Ying; Teuscher, Cory; Gahring, Lorise C

    2008-01-01

    Differences between isogenic mouse strains in cellular expression of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subunit alpha 4 (nAChR alpha 4) by the dorsal hippocampus are well known. To investigate further the genetic basis of these variations, expression of the nAChR alpha 4 subunit was measured in congenic mouse lines derived from two strains exhibiting notable divergence in the expression of this subunit: C3H and C57BL/6. Congenic lines carrying reciprocally introgressed regions (quantitative trait loci; QTL) from chromosomes 4, 5, and 12 each retained the phenotype most closely associated with the parental strain. However, in congenic lines harboring the reciprocal transfer of a chromosome 11 QTL, a characteristic difference in the ratio of interneurons versus astrocytes expressing nAChR alpha 4 in the CA1 region is reversed relative to the parental strain. These finding suggest that this chromosomal segment harbors genes that regulate strain distinct hippocampal morphology that is revealed by nAChR alpha 4 expression.

  1. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M.; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H.; Juszczak, Grzegorz R.

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples. PMID:26556046

  2. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples.

  3. The Effect of Acute and Chronic Social Stress on the Hippocampal Transcriptome in Mice.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Adrian M; Goscik, Joanna; Majewska, Alicja; Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic stress contributes to the formation of brain pathology. Using gene expression microarrays, we analyzed the hippocampal transcriptome of mice subjected to acute and chronic social stress of different duration. The longest period of social stress altered the expression of the highest number of genes and most of the stress-induced changes in transcription were reversible after 5 days of rest. Chronic stress affected genes involved in the functioning of the vascular system (Alas2, Hbb-b1, Hba-a2, Hba-a1), injury response (Vwf, Mgp, Cfh, Fbln5, Col3a1, Ctgf) and inflammation (S100a8, S100a9, Ctla2a, Ctla2b, Lcn2, Lrg1, Rsad2, Isg20). The results suggest that stress may affect brain functions through the stress-induced dysfunction of the vascular system. An important issue raised in our work is also the risk of the contamination of brain tissue samples with choroid plexus. Such contamination would result in a consistent up- or down-regulation of genes, such as Ttr, Igf2, Igfbp2, Prlr, Enpp2, Sostdc1, 1500015O10RIK (Ecrg4), Kl, Clic6, Kcne2, F5, Slc4a5, and Aqp1. Our study suggests that some of the previously reported, supposedly specific changes in hippocampal gene expression, may be a result of the inclusion of choroid plexus in the hippocampal samples. PMID:26556046

  4. Ontogeny of hippocampal corticosteroid receptors: effects of antenatal glucocorticoids in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Noorlander, C W; De Graan, P N E; Middeldorp, J; Van Beers, J J B C; Visser, G H A

    2006-12-20

    Women at risk for preterm delivery are treated with synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) to enhance fetal lung maturation. GCs can bind to two intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which function as transcription factors. Both are highly expressed in the hippocampus. Several studies have focused on adverse side effects of antenatal GC treatment. However, relatively little is known about the ontogeny of GR and MR, especially in human. Therefore, we studied the ontogeny of both receptors in the human and mouse hippocampus and investigated the effects of antenatal dexamethasone (dex) treatment, a synthetic glucocorticoid, on MR and GR mRNA levels during hippocampal development. The results demonstrate that MR mRNA was first expressed in mouse hippocampus at embryonic day (E)15.5, at the timepoint when dex was administered. In contrast, GR mRNA expression was first observed after birth at postnatal day (P)5. However, in the human hippocampus both receptors are expressed at 24 weeks of gestation, when antenatal GCs are administered in clinical practice. Quantitative in situ hybridization demonstrated that MR mRNA levels were reduced only shortly after dex treatment at E16, but were unaffected from E18 onwards. These findings indicate that a single antenatal dex administration at E15.5 transiently affects MR mRNA levels in the mouse hippocampus. No effect of antenatal dex treatment was found on the human hippocampus at the third trimester of pregnancy. These data on the prenatal ontogeny of both corticosteroid receptors in the human hippocampus is important for understanding the significance of fetal glucocorticoid or stress exposure and its potential effects on health and disease.

  5. Genetic influences on exercise-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis across 12 divergent mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Kohman, Rachel A.; Miller, Daniel S.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are continuously born in the hippocampus of several mammalian species throughout adulthood. Adult neurogenesis represents a natural model for understanding how to grow and incorporate new nerve cells into pre-existing circuits in the brain. Finding molecules or biological pathways that increase neurogenesis has broad potential for regenerative medicine. One strategy is to identify mouse strains that display large versus small increases in neurogenesis in response to wheel running so the strains can be contrasted to find common genes or biological pathways associated with enhanced neuron formation. Therefore, mice from 12 different isogenic strains were housed with or without running wheels for 43 days to measure the genetic regulation of exercise-induced neurogenesis. The first 10 days mice received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. Neurogenesis was measured as the total number of BrdU cells co-expressing NeuN mature neuronal marker in the hippocampal granule cell layer by immunohistochemistry. Exercise increased neurogenesis in all strains, but the magnitude significantly depended on genotype. Strain means for distance run on wheels, but not distance traveled in cages without wheels, were significantly correlated with strain mean level of neurogenesis. Further, certain strains displayed greater neurogenesis than others for a fixed level of running. Strain means for neurogenesis under sedentary conditions were not correlated with neurogenesis under runner conditions suggesting that different genes influence baseline versus exercise-induced neurogenesis. Genetic contributions to exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis suggest that it may be possible to identify genes and pathways associated with enhanced neuroplastic responses to exercise. PMID:21223504

  6. Increase in synaptic hippocampal zinc concentration following chronic but not acute zinc treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa, Magdalena; Czupryn, Artur; Wierońska, Joanna M; Brański, Piotr; Sadlik, Krystyna; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Smiałowska, Maria; Skangiel-Kramska, Jolanta; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2006-05-23

    Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), one of the most effective treatments of depression, induce mossy fiber sprouting (when assayed by means of synaptic zinc method), and this indicates an increase in the synaptic zinc level in the hippocampus following such therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of acute and chronic zinc hydroaspartate administration on the synaptic and total zinc level in the rat hippocampus. We used two methods of zinc determination: (1) zinc-selenium method, which images the pool of synaptic zinc, and (2) flame atomic absorption spectrometry, which assays the total concentration of zinc. Our results indicate that chronic (14 x 65 mg/kg), but not acute, zinc hydroaspartate administration intraperitoneally (i.p.) increases the pool of synaptic zinc in the majority of rat hippocampal layers (by 72-190%), except for the stratum moleculare and stratum radiatum CA, and perforant path DG. On the other hand, no changes were found in total hippocampal zinc level, measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. These data suggest that chronic zinc treatment increases the pool of synaptic zinc in the hippocampus, and this effect is similar to that observed following chronic ECS treatment. The measurement of zinc concentration in the whole hippocampus by the flame atomic absorption spectrometry method is not sensitive enough to detect such subtle alteration. PMID:16674928

  7. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Li; Zhang, Yan-Lin; Li, Zong-Yang; Zhu, Ming-Xia; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zhao, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP) occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA) on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct), plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in red blood cells (RBCs). These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning. PMID:25705671

  8. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al. 2008 and 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knockout mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 hr), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 hr) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 hrs estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 hours after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription. PMID:23933204

  9. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  10. Complexity and multifractality of neuronal noise in mouse and human hippocampal epileptiform dynamics.

    PubMed

    Serletis, Demitre; Bardakjian, Berj L; Valiante, Taufik A; Carlen, Peter L

    2012-10-01

    Fractal methods offer an invaluable means of investigating turbulent nonlinearity in non-stationary biomedical recordings from the brain. Here, we investigate properties of complexity (i.e. the correlation dimension, maximum Lyapunov exponent, 1/f(γ) noise and approximate entropy) and multifractality in background neuronal noise-like activity underlying epileptiform transitions recorded at the intracellular and local network scales from two in vitro models: the whole-intact mouse hippocampus and lesional human hippocampal slices. Our results show evidence for reduced dynamical complexity and multifractal signal features following transition to the ictal epileptiform state. These findings suggest that pathological breakdown in multifractal complexity coincides with loss of signal variability or heterogeneity, consistent with an unhealthy ictal state that is far from the equilibrium of turbulent yet healthy fractal dynamics in the brain. Thus, it appears that background noise-like activity successfully captures complex and multifractal signal features that may, at least in part, be used to classify and identify brain state transitions in the healthy and epileptic brain, offering potential promise for therapeutic neuromodulatory strategies for afflicted patients suffering from epilepsy and other related neurological disorders. PMID:22929878

  11. Lithium prevents acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingjuan; Qin, Jian; Chen, Meihui; Chao, Xiaojuan; Chen, Ziwei; Ramassamy, Charles; Pi, Rongbiao; Jin, Minghua

    2014-04-01

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde to which humans are exposed in many situations and has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Lithium is demonstrated to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects in brain ischemia, trauma, neurodegenerative disorders, and psychiatric disorders. Previously we have found that acrolein induced neuronal death in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. In this study, the effects of lithium on the acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells as well as its mechanism(s) were investigated. We found that lithium protected HT22 cells against acrolein-induced damage by the attenuation of reactive oxygen species and the enhancement of the glutathione level. Lithium also attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by acrolein. Furthermore, lithium significantly increased the level of phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β), the non-activated GSK-3β. Taken together, our findings suggest that lithium is a protective agent for acrolein-related neurotoxicity.

  12. Axonal regeneration of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons studied by an optical nano-surgery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, F.; Tsushima, H.; Pesce, M.; Guiggiani, A.; Benfenati, F.; Blau, A.; Basso, M.; Vassalli, M.; Chieregatti, E.

    2012-02-01

    During development, the axons of neurons in the mammalian central nervous system lose their ability to regenerate after injury. In order to study the regeneration process, we developed a system integrating an optical tweezers and a laser dissector to manipulate the sample. A sub-nanosecond pulsed UVA laser was used to inflict a partial damage to the axon of mouse hippocampal neurons at early days in vitro. Partial axonal transections were performed in a highly controlled and reproducible way without affecting the regeneration process. Force spectroscopy measurements, during and after the ablation of the axon, were performed by optical tweezers with a bead attached to the neuronal membrane. Thus, the release of tension in the neurite could be analyzed in order to quantify the inflicted damage. After dissection, we monitored the viscoelastic properties of the axonal membrane, the cytoskeleton reorganization, and the dynamics of the newly formed growth cones during regeneration. In order to follow cytoskeleton dynamics in a long time window by tracking a bead attached to the neuron, we developed a real-time control of the microscope stage position with sub-millisecond and nanometer resolution. Axonal regeneration was documented by long-term (24-48 hours) bright-field live imaging using an optical microscope equipped with a custom-built cell culture incubator.

  13. Neuroprotective mechanisms of cerium oxide nanoparticles in a mouse hippocampal brain slice model of ischemia.

    PubMed

    Estevez, A Y; Pritchard, S; Harper, K; Aston, J W; Lynch, A; Lucky, J J; Ludington, J S; Chatani, P; Mosenthal, W P; Leiter, J C; Andreescu, S; Erlichman, J S

    2011-09-15

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are widely used as catalysts in industrial applications because of their potent free radical-scavenging properties. Given that free radicals play a prominent role in the pathology of many neurological diseases, we explored the use of nanoceria as a potential therapeutic agent for stroke. Using a mouse hippocampal brain slice model of cerebral ischemia, we show here that ceria nanoparticles reduce ischemic cell death by approximately 50%. The neuroprotective effects of nanoceria were due to a modest reduction in reactive oxygen species, in general, and ~15% reductions in the concentrations of superoxide (O(2)(•-)) and nitric oxide, specifically. Moreover, treatment with nanoceria markedly decreased (~70% reduction) the levels of ischemia-induced 3-nitrotyrosine, a modification to tyrosine residues in proteins induced by the peroxynitrite radical. These findings suggest that scavenging of peroxynitrite may be an important mechanism by which cerium oxide nanoparticles mitigate ischemic brain injury. Peroxynitrite plays a pivotal role in the dissemination of oxidative injury in biological tissues. Therefore, nanoceria may be useful as a therapeutic intervention to reduce oxidative and nitrosative damage after a stroke. PMID:21704154

  14. Long-Term Potentiation by Theta-Burst Stimulation Using Extracellular Field Potential Recordings in Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Therese; Lalanne, Txomin; Watt, Alanna J; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to carry out theta-burst long-term potentiation (LTP) with extracellular field recordings in acute rodent hippocampal slices. This method is relatively simple and noninvasive and provides a way to sample many neurons simultaneously, making it suitable for applications requiring higher throughput than whole-cell recording. PMID:27250947

  15. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  16. Investigation of Synaptic Tagging/Capture and Cross-capture using Acute Hippocampal Slices from Rodents.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sharma, Mahima; Hui, Neo Sin; Dasgupta, Ananya; Gopinadhan, Suma; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic tagging and capture (STC) and cross-tagging are two important mechanisms at cellular level that explain how synapse-specificity and associativity is achieved in neurons within a specific time frame. These long-term plasticity-related processes are the leading candidate models to study the basis of memory formation and persistence at the cellular level. Both STC and cross-tagging involve two serial processes: (1) setting of the synaptic tag as triggered by a specific pattern of stimulation, and (2) synaptic capture, whereby the synaptic tag interacts with newly synthesized plasticity-related proteins (PRPs). Much of the understanding about the concepts of STC and cross-tagging arises from the studies done in CA1 region of the hippocampus and because of the technical complexity many of the laboratories are still unable to study these processes. Experimental conditions for the preparation of hippocampal slices and the recording of stable late-LTP/LTD are extremely important to study synaptic tagging/cross-tagging. This video article describes the experimental procedures to study long-term plasticity processes such as STC and cross-tagging in the CA1 pyramidal neurons using stable, long-term field-potential recordings from acute hippocampal slices of rats. PMID:26381286

  17. Voluntary running and environmental enrichment restores impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J J; Noristani, H N; Olabarria, M; Fletcher, J; Somerville, T D D; Yeh, C Y; Verkhratsky, A

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects memory and neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis plays an important role in memory function and impaired neurogenesis contributes to cognitive deficits associated with AD. Increased physical/ cognitive activity is associated with both reduced risk of dementia and increased neurogenesis. Previous attempts to restore hippocampal neurogenesis in transgenic mice by voluntary running (RUN) and environmental enrichment (ENR) provided controversial results due to lack of non-transgenic (non-Tg) control and inclusion of social isolation as "standard" housing environment. Here, we determine the effect of RUN and ENR upon hippocampal neurogenesis in a triple transgenic (3xTg-AD) mouse model of AD, which mimics AD pathology in humans. We used single and double immunohistochemistry to determine the area density of hippocampal proliferating cells, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3), and their potential neuronal and glial phenotype by co-localizing the proliferating cells with the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX), mature neuronal marker (NeuN) and specific astroglial marker (GFAP). Our results show that 3xTg-AD mice in control environment exhibit impaired hippocampal neurogenesis compared to non-Tg animals at 9 months of age. Exposure to RUN and ENR housing restores hippocampal neurogenesis in 3xTg-AD animals to non-Tg control levels. Differentiation into neurones and glial cells is affected neither by transgenic status nor by housing environment. These results suggest that hippocampus of 3xTg-AD animals maintains the potential for cellular plasticity. Increase in physical activity and/or cognitive experience enhances neurogenesis and provides a potential for stimulation of cognitive function in AD.

  18. Acute stress and hippocampal histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation, a retrotransposon silencing response

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Richard G.; Murakami, Gen; Dewell, Scott; Seligsohn, Ma’ayan; Baker, Miriam E. R.; Datson, Nicole A.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus is a highly plastic brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of environmental stress; it also shows dynamic changes in epigenetic marks in response to stress and learning. We have previously shown that, in the rat, acute (30 min) restraint stress induces a substantial, regionally specific, increase in hippocampal levels of the repressive histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3). Because of the large magnitude of this effect and the fact that stress can induce the expression of endogenous retroviruses and transposable elements in many systems, we hypothesized that the H3K9me3 response was targeted to these elements as a means of containing potential genomic instability. We used ChIP coupled with next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to determine the genomic localization of the H3K9me3 response. Although there was a general increase in this response across the genome, our results validated this hypothesis by demonstrating that stress increases H3K9me3 enrichment at transposable element loci and, using RT-PCR, we demonstrate that this effect represses expression of intracisternal-A particle endogenous retrovirus elements and B2 short interspersed elements, but it does not appear to have a repressive effect on long interspersed element RNA. In addition, we present data showing that the histone H3K9-specific methyltransferases Suv39h2 is up-regulated by acute stress in the hippocampus, and that this may explain the hippocampal specificity we observe. These results are a unique demonstration of the regulatory effect of environmental stress, via an epigenetic mark, on the vast genomic terra incognita represented by transposable elements. PMID:23043114

  19. Effects of tetrahydrohyperforin in mouse hippocampal slices: neuroprotection, long-term potentiation and TRPC channels.

    PubMed

    Montecinos-Oliva, C; Schuller, A; Parodi, J; Melo, F; Inestrosa, N C

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahydrohyperforin (IDN5706) is a semi-synthetic compound derived from hyperforin (IDN5522) and is the main active principle of St. John's Wort. IDN5706 has shown numerous beneficial effects when administered to wild-type and double transgenic (APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9) mice that model Alzheimer's disease. However, its mechanism of action is currently unknown. Toward this end, we analysed field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in mouse hippocampal slices incubated with IDN5706 and in the presence of the TRPC3/6/7 activator 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365, and neurotoxic amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers. To study spatial memory, Morris water maze (MWM) behavioural tests were conducted on wild-type mice treated with IDN5706 and SKF96365. In silico studies were conducted to predict a potential pharmacophore. IDN5706 and OAG had a similar stimulating effect on fEPSPs, which was inhibited by SKF96365. IDN5706 protected from reduced fEPSPs induced by Aβ oligomers. IDN5706 improved spatial memory in wild-type mice, an effect that was counteracted by co-administration of SKF96365. Our in silico studies suggest strong pharmacophore similarity of IDN5706 and other reported TRPC6 activators (IDN5522, OAG and Hyp9). We propose that the effect of IDN5706 is mediated through activation of the TRPC3/6/7 channel subfamily. The unveiling of the drug's mechanism of action is a necessary step toward the clinical use of IDN5706 in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25039785

  20. Ischemic Preconditioning Mediates Neuroprotection against Ischemia in Mouse Hippocampal CA1 Neurons by Inducing Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Huang, Huiling; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yajing; Tong, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jinhuan; Wu, Jialing

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA1 region is sensitive to hypoxic and ischemic injury but can be protected by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). However, the mechanism through which IPC protects hippocampal CA1 neurons is still under investigation. Additionally, the role of autophagy in determining the fate of hippocampal neurons is unclear. Here, we examined whether IPC induced autophagy to alleviate hippocampal CA1 neuronal death in vitro and in vivo with oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and bilateral carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) models. Survival of hippocampal neurons increased from 51.5% ± 6.3% in the non-IPC group (55 min of OGD) to 77.3% ± 7.9% in the IPC group (15 min of OGD, followed by 55 min of OGD 24 h later). The number of hippocampal CA1 layer neurons increased from 182 ± 26 cells/mm2 in the non-IPC group (20 min of BCCAO) to 278 ± 55 cells/mm2 in the IPC group (1 min × 3 BCCAO, followed by 20 min of BCCAO 24 h later). Akt phosphorylation and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II/LC3-I expression were increased in the preconditioning group. Moreover, the protective effects of IPC were abolished only by inhibiting the activity of autophagy, but not by blocking the activation of Akt in vitro. Using in vivo experiments, we found that LC3 expression was upregulated, accompanied by an increase in neuronal survival in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the preconditioning group. The neuroprotective effects of IPC on hippocampal CA1 neurons were completely inhibited by treatment with 3-MA. In contrast, hippocampal CA3 neurons did not show changes in autophagic activity or beneficial effects of IPC. These data suggested that IPC may attenuate ischemic injury in hippocampal CA1 neurons through induction of Akt-independent autophagy. PMID:26325184

  1. Evidence for altered hippocampal function in a mouse model of the human 22q11.2 microdeletion

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Liam J; Stark, Kimberly L; Fénelon, Karine; Karayiorgou, Maria; MacDermott, Amy B; Gogos, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    22q11.2 chromosomal deletions are recurrent copy number mutations that increase the risk of schizophrenia around thirty-fold. Deletion of the orthologous chromosomal region in mice offers an opportunity to characterize changes to neuronal structure and function that may account for the development of this disease. The hippocampus has been implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis, is reduced in volume in 22q11.2 deletion carriers and displays altered neuronal structure in a mouse model of the mutation (Df(16)A+/− mice). Here we investigate hippocampal CA1 physiology, hippocampal-dependent spatial memory and novelty-induced hippocampal activation in Df(16) A+/− mice. We found normal spatial reference memory (as assayed by the Morris water maze test) as well as modest but potentially important deficits in physiology. In particular, a reduction in the level of inhibition of CA1 pyramidal neurons was observed, implying a decrease in interneuron activity. Additionally, deficits in LTP were observed using certain induction protocols. Induction of c-Fos expression by exploration of a novel environment suggested a relative sparing of CA1 and dentate gyrus function but showed a robust decrease in the number of activated CA3 pyramidal neurons in Df(16) A+/− mice. Overall, experiments performed in this 22q11.2 deletion model demonstrated deficits of various degrees across different regions of the hippocampus, which together may contribute to the increased risk of developing schizophrenia. PMID:21635953

  2. Decreased hippocampal volume and increased anxiety in a transgenic mouse model expressing the human CYP2C19 gene

    PubMed Central

    Persson, A; Sim, S C; Virding, S; Onishchenko, N; Schulte, G; Ingelman-Sundberg, M

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, various psychoactive drugs, as well as endogenous steroids and cannabinoid-like compounds are metabolized by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19). Absence of this enzyme has been recently shown to associate with lower levels of depressive symptoms in human subjects. To investigate endogenous functions of CYP2C19 and its potential role in brain function, we have used a transgenic mouse model carrying the human CYP2C19 gene. Here, CYP2C19 was expressed in the developing fetal, but not adult brain and was associated with altered fetal brain morphology, where mice homozygous for the CYP2C19 transgenic insert had severely underdeveloped hippocampus and complete callosal agenesis and high neonatal lethality. CYP2C19 expression was also found in human fetal brain. In adult hemizygous mice we observed besides decreased hippocampal volume, an altered neuronal composition in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Reduced hippocampal volumes have been reported in several psychiatric disorders, supporting the relevance of this model. Here we found that adult hemizygous CYP2C19 transgenic mice demonstrate behavior indicative of increased stress and anxiety based on four different tests. We hypothesize that expression of the CYP2C19 enzyme prenatally may affect brain development by metabolizing endogenous compounds influencing this development. Furthermore, CYP2C19 polymorphism may have a role in interindividual susceptibility for psychiatric disorders. PMID:23877834

  3. Acute restraint stress induces rapid and prolonged changes in erythrocyte and hippocampal redox status.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Jereme G; Chen, Hsiao-Jou; Bradley, Adrian J; Anderson, Stephen T; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2013-11-01

    The onset and consequential changes in reduction-oxidation (redox) status that take place in response to short-term stress have not been well defined. This study utilized erythrocytes and neural tissue from male Wistar rats to demonstrate the rapid redox alterations that occur following an acute restraining stress. Serial blood samples collected from catheterized animals were used to measure prolactin, corticosterone, glucose, general oxidative status, and glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratios. Restraint increased prolactin concentration by approximately 300% at 30 min and rapidly returned to baseline values by 120 min of stress. Baseline blood glucose and corticosterone increased during stress exposure by approximately 25% and 150% respectively. Over the experimental period, the erythrocytic oxidative status of restrained animals increased by approximately 10% per hour which persisted after stress exposure, while changes in the glutathione redox couple were not observed until 120 min following the onset of stress. Application of restraint stress increased hippocampal oxidative status by approximately 17% while no change was observed in the amygdala. It was concluded that while endocrine and metabolic markers of stress rapidly increase and habituate to stress exposure, redox status continues to change following stress in both peripheral and neural tissue. Studies with longer post-restraint times and the inclusion of several brain regions should further elucidate the consequential redox changes induced by acute restraint stress.

  4. Characteristics of GABA release induced by free radicals in mouse hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Saransaari, Pirjo; Oja, Simo S

    2008-03-01

    The release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is generally enhanced under potentially cell-damaging conditions. The properties and regulation of preloaded [3H]GABA release from mouse hippocampal slices were now studied in free radical-containing medium in a superfusion system. Free radical production was induced by 0.01% of H2O2 in the medium. H2O2 markedly potentiated GABA release, which was further enhanced about 1.5-fold by K+ stimulation (50 mM). In Ca2+-free media this stimulation was not altered, indicating that the release was mostly Ca2+-independent. Moreover, omission of Na+ increased the release, suggesting that it is mediated by Na+-dependent transporters operating outwards, a conception confirmed by the enhancement with GABA homoexchange. Inhibition of the release with the ion channel inhibitors diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate and 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonate indicates that Cl(-) channels also participate in the process. This release was not modified by the adenosine receptor (A1 and A2a) agonists and ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists kainate, N-methy-D: -aspartate and 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate, whereas the agonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors of group I [(S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] and of group II [(2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate] enhanced it by receptor-mediated mechanisms, the effects being abolished by their respective antagonists. The group III agonist L+-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate reduced the evoked GABA release, but this was not affected by the antagonist. Furthermore, the release was reduced by activation of protein kinase C by 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and by inhibition of tyrosine kinase by genistein and of phoshoplipase by quinacrine. On the other hand, increasing cGMP levels with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast, selective for PDE5, 6 and 9, and NO production with the NO-generating compounds hydroxylamine, sodium nitroprusside

  5. Hippocampal Neuron Loss Exceeds Amyloid Plaque Load in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Christoph; Rutten, Bart P. F.; Pielen, Andrea; Schäfer, Stephanie; Wirths, Oliver; Tremp, Günter; Czech, Christian; Blanchard, Veronique; Multhaup, Gerd; Rezaie, Payam; Korr, Hubert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Pradier, Laurent; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    According to the “amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease,” β-amyloid is the primary driving force in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Despite the development of many transgenic mouse lines developing abundant β-amyloid-containing plaques in the brain, the actual link between amyloid plaques and neuron loss has not been clearly established, as reports on neuron loss in these models have remained controversial. We investigated transgenic mice expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein APP751 (KM670/671NL and V717I) and human mutant presenilin-1 (PS-1 M146L). Stereologic and image analyses revealed substantial age-related neuron loss in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer of APP/PS-1 double-transgenic mice. The loss of neurons was observed at sites of Aβ aggregation and surrounding astrocytes but, most importantly, was also clearly observed in areas of the parenchyma distant from plaques. These findings point to the potential involvement of more than one mechanism in hippocampal neuron loss in this APP/PS-1 double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:15039236

  6. Proteomics, ultrastructure, and physiology of hippocampal synapses in a fragile X syndrome mouse model reveal presynaptic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klemmer, Patricia; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Holmgren, Carl D; Klychnikov, Oleg I; Stahl-Zeng, Jianru; Loos, Maarten; van der Schors, Roel C; Wortel, Joke; de Wit, Heidi; Spijker, Sabine; Rotaru, Diana C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Li, Ka Wan

    2011-07-22

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the Fmr1 gene, which encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP affects dendritic protein synthesis, thereby causing synaptic abnormalities. Here, we used a quantitative proteomics approach in an FXS mouse model to reveal changes in levels of hippocampal synapse proteins. Sixteen independent pools of Fmr1 knock-out mice and wild type mice were analyzed using two sets of 8-plex iTRAQ experiments. Of 205 proteins quantified with at least three distinct peptides in both iTRAQ series, the abundance of 23 proteins differed between Fmr1 knock-out and wild type synapses with a false discovery rate (q-value) <5%. Significant differences were confirmed by quantitative immunoblotting. A group of proteins that are known to be involved in cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth was regulated; they included Basp1 and Gap43, known PKC substrates, and Cend1. Basp1 and Gap43 are predominantly expressed in growth cones and presynaptic terminals. In line with this, ultrastructural analysis in developing hippocampal FXS synapses revealed smaller active zones with corresponding postsynaptic densities and smaller pools of clustered vesicles, indicative of immature presynaptic maturation. A second group of proteins involved in synaptic vesicle release was up-regulated in the FXS mouse model. In accordance, paired-pulse and short-term facilitation were significantly affected in these hippocampal synapses. Together, the altered regulation of presynaptically expressed proteins, immature synaptic ultrastructure, and compromised short-term plasticity points to presynaptic changes underlying glutamatergic transmission in FXS at this stage of development.

  7. Progressive functional impairments of hippocampal neurons in a tauopathy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ciupek, Sarah M; Cheng, Jingheng; Ali, Yousuf O; Lu, Hui-Chen; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-05-27

    The age-dependent progression of tau pathology is a major characteristic of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and plays an important role in the behavioral phenotypes of AD, including memory deficits. Despite extensive molecular and cellular studies on tau pathology, it remains to be determined how it alters the neural circuit functions underlying learning and memory in vivo. In rTg4510 mice, a Tau-P301L tauopathy model, hippocampal place fields that support spatial memories are abnormal at old age (7-9 months) when tau tangles and neurodegeneration are extensive. However, it is unclear how the abnormality in the hippocampal circuit function arises and progresses with the age-dependent progression of tau pathology. Here we show that in young (2-4 months of age) rTg4510 mice, place fields of hippocampal CA1 cells are largely normal, with only subtle differences from those of age-matched wild-type control mice. Second, high-frequency ripple oscillations of local field potentials in the hippocampal CA1 area are significantly reduced in young rTg4510 mice, and even further deteriorated in old rTg4510 mice. The ripple reduction is associated with less bursty firing and altered synchrony of CA1 cells. Together, the data indicate that deficits in ripples and neuronal synchronization occur before overt deficits in place fields in these mice. The results reveal a tau-pathology-induced progression of hippocampal functional changes in vivo.

  8. Baicalin promotes hippocampal neurogenesis via SGK1- and FKBP5-mediated glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuo; Pan, Xing; Wang, Fang; Ma, Jie; Su, Guangyue; Dong, Yingxu; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants increase hippocampal neurogenesis by activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), but excessive GR activation impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that normal GR function is crucial for hippocampal neurogenesis. Baicalin was reported to regulate the expression of GR and facilitate hippocampal neurogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we used the chronic corticosterone (CORT)-induced mouse model of anxiety/depression to assess antidepressant-like effects of baicalin and illuminate possible molecular mechanisms by which baicalin affects GR-mediated hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that oral administration of baicalin (40, 80 or 160 mg/kg) for 4 weeks alleviated several chronic CORT-induced anxiety/depression-like behaviors. Baicalin also increased Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells to restore chronic CORT-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, baicalin normalized the chronic CORT-induced decrease in GR protein levels, the increase in GR nuclear translocation and the increase in GR phosphorylation at Ser203 and Ser211. Finally, chronic CORT exposure increased the level of FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5) and of phosphorylated serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) at Ser422 and Thr256, whereas baicalin normalized these changes. Together, our findings suggest that baicalin improves anxiety/depression-like behaviors and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis. We propose that baicalin may normalize GR function through SGK1- and FKBP5-mediated GR phosphorylation. PMID:27502757

  9. Baicalin promotes hippocampal neurogenesis via SGK1- and FKBP5-mediated glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuo; Pan, Xing; Wang, Fang; Ma, Jie; Su, Guangyue; Dong, Yingxu; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants increase hippocampal neurogenesis by activating the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), but excessive GR activation impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, suggesting that normal GR function is crucial for hippocampal neurogenesis. Baicalin was reported to regulate the expression of GR and facilitate hippocampal neurogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we used the chronic corticosterone (CORT)-induced mouse model of anxiety/depression to assess antidepressant-like effects of baicalin and illuminate possible molecular mechanisms by which baicalin affects GR-mediated hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that oral administration of baicalin (40, 80 or 160 mg/kg) for 4 weeks alleviated several chronic CORT-induced anxiety/depression-like behaviors. Baicalin also increased Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells to restore chronic CORT-induced suppression of hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, baicalin normalized the chronic CORT-induced decrease in GR protein levels, the increase in GR nuclear translocation and the increase in GR phosphorylation at Ser203 and Ser211. Finally, chronic CORT exposure increased the level of FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5) and of phosphorylated serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) at Ser422 and Thr256, whereas baicalin normalized these changes. Together, our findings suggest that baicalin improves anxiety/depression-like behaviors and promotes hippocampal neurogenesis. We propose that baicalin may normalize GR function through SGK1- and FKBP5-mediated GR phosphorylation. PMID:27502757

  10. Increased Hippocampal Excitability in the 3xTgAD Mouse Model for Alzheimer's Disease In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine E.; Fox, Sarah; Gigg, John

    2014-01-01

    Mouse Alzheimer's disease (AD) models develop age- and region-specific pathology throughout the hippocampal formation. One recently established pathological correlate is an increase in hippocampal excitability in vivo. Hippocampal pathology also produces episodic memory decline in human AD and we have shown a similar episodic deficit in 3xTg AD model mice aged 3–6 months. Here, we tested whether hippocampal synaptic dysfunction accompanies this cognitive deficit by probing dorsal CA1 and DG synaptic responses in anaesthetized, 4–6 month-old 3xTgAD mice. As our previous reports highlighted a decline in episodic performance in aged control mice, we included aged cohorts for comparison. CA1 and DG responses to low-frequency perforant path stimulation were comparable between 3xTgAD and controls at both age ranges. As expected, DG recordings in controls showed paired-pulse depression; however, paired-pulse facilitation was observed in DG and CA1 of young and old 3xTgAD mice. During stimulus trains both short-latency (presumably monosynaptic: ‘direct’) and long-latency (presumably polysynaptic: ‘re-entrant’) responses were observed. Facilitation of direct responses was modest in 3xTgAD animals. However, re-entrant responses in DG and CA1 of young 3xTgAD mice developed earlier in the stimulus train and with larger amplitude when compared to controls. Old mice showed less DG paired-pulse depression and no evidence for re-entrance. In summary, DG and CA1 responses to low-frequency stimulation in all groups were comparable, suggesting no loss of synaptic connectivity in 3xTgAD mice. However, higher-frequency activation revealed complex change in synaptic excitability in DG and CA1 of 3xTgAD mice. In particular, short-term plasticity in DG and CA1 was facilitated in 3xTgAD mice, most evidently in younger animals. In addition, re-entrance was facilitated in young 3xTgAD mice. Overall, these data suggest that the episodic-like memory deficit in 3xTgAD mice could be

  11. Peripherally restricted acute phase response to a viral mimic alters hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Konat, Gregory W

    2014-03-01

    We have previously shown that peripherally restricted acute phase response (APR) elicited by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a viral mimic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC), renders the brain hypersusceptible to excitotoxic insult as seen from profoundly exacerbated kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. In the present study, we found that this hypersusceptibility was protracted for up to 72 h. RT-PCR profiling of hippocampal gene expression revealed rapid upregulation of 23 genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and chemokine receptors generally within 6 h after PIC challenge. The expression of most of these genes decreased by 24 h. However, two chemokine genes, i.e., Ccl19 and Cxcl13 genes, as well as two chemokine receptor genes, Ccr1 and Ccr7, remained upregulated for 72 h suggesting their possible involvement in the induction and sustenance of seizure hypersusceptibility. Also, 12 genes encoding proteins related to glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission featured initial upregulation or downregulation followed by gradual normalization. The upregulation of the Gabrr3 gene remained upregulated at 72 h, congruent with its plausible role in the hypersusceptible phenotype. Moreover, the expression of ten microRNAs (miRs) was rapidly affected by PIC challenge, but their levels generally exhibited oscillating profiles over the time course of seizure hypersusceptibility. These results indicate that protracted seizure susceptibility following peripheral APR is associated with a robust polygenic response in the hippocampus. PMID:24363211

  12. Modulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by group IIB metal cations in cultured mouse hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, M L; Vyklicky, L; Westbrook, G L

    1989-01-01

    1. Responses to the excitatory amino acids kainate, quisqualate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), L-glutamate and L-aspartate were recorded in mouse hippocampal neurones in cell culture, using the whole-cell configuration of the patch clamp technique. Agonists were applied rapidly from an array of flow pipes each of 250 microns diameter, positioned within 100 microns of the nerve cell body. 2. Responses to NMDA, L-aspartate and to low concentrations of L-glutamate, recorded with glycine in the extracellular fluid, were strongly antagonized by 50 microM-zinc. Responses to kainate, quisqualate, and in glycine-free solution, responses to L-glutamate, were potentiated by 50 microM-zinc, but partially antagonized by 1 mM-zinc. On average, with 50 microM-zinc, responses to NMDA were reduced to 0.19 times control, while responses to kainate and quisqualate were increased to 1.09 and 1.14 times control. With 1 mM-zinc responses to kainate and quisqualate were reduced to 0.54 and 0.42 times control. 3. Cadmium had a similar, though less potent action, and at 50 microM antagonized responses to NMDA but potentiated responses to kainate and quisqualate. On average, with 50 microM-cadmium, responses to NMDA were reduced to 0.39 times control, while responses to kainate and quisqualate were increased to 1.08 and 1.15 times control. With 1 mM-cadmium responses to NMDA were reduced to 0.04 times control while responses to kainate and quisqualate were reduced to 0.79 and 0.60 times control. Mercury was neurotoxic and increased the leakage current; however, no reduction of the response to NMDA was produced by 5 microM-mercury. 4. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for zinc antagonism of responses to NMDA, estimated from fit of a single binding site adsorption isotherm, was 13 microM; cadmium was about 4 times less potent than zinc. These effects of zinc and cadmium were nearly voltage independent. In contrast the antagonism of responses to NMDA by 150 microM-magnesium was highly

  13. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-01

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences.

  14. Amygdala-Hippocampal Connectivity Changes During Acute Psychosocial Stress: Joint Effect of Early Life Stress and Oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Pestke, Karin; Feeser, Melanie; Aust, Sabine; Pruessner, Jens C; Böker, Heinz; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2015-11-01

    Previous evidence shows that acute stress changes both amygdala activity and its connectivity with a distributed brain network. Early life stress (ELS), especially emotional abuse (EA), is associated with altered reactivity to psychosocial stress in adulthood and moderates or even reverses the stress-attenuating effect of oxytocin (OXT). The neural underpinnings of the interaction between ELS and OXT remain unclear, though. Therefore, we here investigate the joint effect of ELS and OXT on transient changes in amygdala-centered functional connectivity induced by acute psychosocial stress, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subject crossover design. Psychophysiological interaction analysis in the placebo session revealed stress-induced increases in functional connectivity between amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Regression analysis showed that EA was positively associated with stress-induced changes in connectivity between amygdala and hippocampus. Moreover, hierarchical linear regression showed that this positive association between EA and stress-induced amygdala-hippocampal connectivity was moderated after the administration of intranasal OXT. Amygdala-hippocampal connectivity in the OXT session correlated negatively with cortisol stress responses. Our findings suggest that altered amygdala-hippocampal functional connectivity during psychosocial stress may have a crucial role in the altered sensitivity to OXT effects in individuals who have experienced EA in their childhood.

  15. Amygdala-Hippocampal Connectivity Changes During Acute Psychosocial Stress: Joint Effect of Early Life Stress and Oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Pestke, Karin; Feeser, Melanie; Aust, Sabine; Pruessner, Jens C; Böker, Heinz; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2015-11-01

    Previous evidence shows that acute stress changes both amygdala activity and its connectivity with a distributed brain network. Early life stress (ELS), especially emotional abuse (EA), is associated with altered reactivity to psychosocial stress in adulthood and moderates or even reverses the stress-attenuating effect of oxytocin (OXT). The neural underpinnings of the interaction between ELS and OXT remain unclear, though. Therefore, we here investigate the joint effect of ELS and OXT on transient changes in amygdala-centered functional connectivity induced by acute psychosocial stress, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subject crossover design. Psychophysiological interaction analysis in the placebo session revealed stress-induced increases in functional connectivity between amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Regression analysis showed that EA was positively associated with stress-induced changes in connectivity between amygdala and hippocampus. Moreover, hierarchical linear regression showed that this positive association between EA and stress-induced amygdala-hippocampal connectivity was moderated after the administration of intranasal OXT. Amygdala-hippocampal connectivity in the OXT session correlated negatively with cortisol stress responses. Our findings suggest that altered amygdala-hippocampal functional connectivity during psychosocial stress may have a crucial role in the altered sensitivity to OXT effects in individuals who have experienced EA in their childhood. PMID:25924202

  16. Deep-brain magnetic stimulation promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis and alleviates stress-related behaviors in mouse models for neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)/ Deep-brain Magnetic Stimulation (DMS) is an effective therapy for various neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression disorder. The molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the impacts of rTMS/DMS on the brain are not yet fully understood. Results Here we studied the effects of deep-brain magnetic stimulation to brain on the molecular and cellular level. We examined the adult hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal synaptic plasticity of rodent under stress conditions with deep-brain magnetic stimulation treatment. We found that DMS promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis significantly and facilitates the development of adult new-born neurons. Remarkably, DMS exerts anti-depression effects in the learned helplessness mouse model and rescues hippocampal long-term plasticity impaired by restraint stress in rats. Moreover, DMS alleviates the stress response in a mouse model for Rett syndrome and prolongs the life span of these animals dramatically. Conclusions Deep-brain magnetic stimulation greatly facilitates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and maturation, also alleviates depression and stress-related responses in animal models. PMID:24512669

  17. Increased hippocampal CA1 density of serotonergic terminals in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: an ultrastructural study

    PubMed Central

    Noristani, H N; Meadows, R S; Olabarria, M; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology that deteriorates mnesic functions and associated brain regions including the hippocampus. Serotonin (5-HT) has an important role in cognition. We recently demonstrated an increase in 5-HT transporter (SERT) fibre density in the hippocampal CA1 in an AD triple transgenic mouse model (3xTg-AD). Here, we analyse the ultrastructural localisation, distribution and numerical density (Nv) of hippocampal SERT axons (SERT-Ax) and terminals (SERT-Te) and their relationship with SERT fibre sprouting and altered synaptic Nv in 3xTg-AD compared with non-transgenic control mice. 3xTg-AD animals showed a significant increase in SERT-Te Nv in CA1 at both, 3 (95%) and 18 months of age (144%), being restricted to the CA1 stratum moleculare (S. Mol; 227% at 3 and 180% at 18 months). 3xTg-AD animals also exhibit reduced Nv of perforated axospinous synapses (PS) in CA1 S. Mol (56% at 3 and 52% at 18 months). No changes were observed in the Nv of symmetric and asymmetrical synapses or SERT-Ax. Our results suggest that concomitant SERT-Te Nv increase and PS reduction in 3xTg-AD mice may act as a compensatory mechanism maintaining synaptic efficacy as a response to the AD cognitive impairment. PMID:21918544

  18. Differences in hippocampal CREB phosphorylation in trace fear conditioning of two inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yoo Kyeong; Song, Jae-Chun; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Jeiwon; Smith, Dani R; Gallagher, Michela; Han, Jung-Soo

    2010-07-23

    The effects of genetic background on fear trace conditioning were evaluated in relation to phosphorylated levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus using two different inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and DBA/2. The male mice received a trace fear conditioning protocol and unpaired control groups were included to assess nonassociative effects on test performance. Both C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice with paired training displayed higher freezing responses during testing than those with unpaired training, respectively. The C57BL/6 mice with paired training also displayed higher freezing responses to the tone-CS during testing than the DBA/2 mice with paired training. Because much evidence implicates the hippocampus as an important neural substrate for trace fear conditioning, the engagement of the hippocampus was examined after testing by measuring levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB). The results revealed that hippocampal CREB levels in both strains of mice were not significantly altered according to the type of training (unpaired vs. paired). However, the hippocampal pCREB levels were significantly higher in the paired training group than the unpaired control group in C57BL/6 mice, but not in DBA/2 mice. These findings indicate that hippocampal pCREB is closely tied to this form of associative conditioning only in C57BL/6 mice and that different neural substrates may support trace conditioning in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. PMID:20501325

  19. Temporal dynamics of mouse hippocampal clock gene expression support memory processing.

    PubMed

    Jilg, Antje; Lesny, Sandra; Peruzki, Natalie; Schwegler, Herbert; Selbach, Oliver; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stehle, Jörg H

    2010-03-01

    Hippocampal plasticity and mnemonic processing exhibit a striking time-of-day dependence and likely implicate a temporally structured replay of memory traces. Molecular mechanisms fulfilling the requirements of sensing time and capturing time-related information are coded in dynamics of so-called clock genes and their protein products, first discovered and described in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Using real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analyses, we show that in wildtype mice core clock components (mPer1/PER1, mPer2/PER2, mCry1/CRY1, mCry2/CRY2, mClock/CLOCK, mBmal1/BMAL1) are expressed in neurons of all subregions of the hippocampus in a time-locked fashion over a 24-h (diurnal) day/night cycle. Temporal profiling of these transcriptional regulators reveals distinct and parallel peaks, at times when memory traces are usually formed and/or consolidated. The coordinated rhythmic expression of hippocampal clock gene expression is greatly disordered in mice deficient for the clock gene mPer1, a key player implicated in both, maintenance and adaptative plasticity of circadian clocks. Moreover, Per1-knockout animals are severely handicapped in a hippocampus-dependent long-term spatial learning paradigm. We propose that the dynamics of hippocampal clock gene expression imprint a temporal structure on memory processing and shape at the same time the efficacy of behavioral learning. PMID:19437502

  20. Increased fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the Prrxl1 knockout mouse model of congenital hypoalgesia.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Clara; Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Matos, Mariana; Dourado, Margarida; Lima, Deolinda; Galhardo, Vasco

    2016-09-01

    Despite the large number of studies addressing how prolonged painful stimulation affects brain functioning, there are only a handful of studies aimed at uncovering if persistent conditions of reduced pain perception would also result in brain plasticity. Permanent hypoalgesia induced by neonatal injection of capsaicin or carrageenan has already been shown to affect learning and memory and to induce alterations in brain gene expression. In this study, we used the Prrxl1 model of congenital mild hypoalgesia to conduct a detailed study of the neurophysiological and behavioral consequences of reduced pain experience. Prrxl1 knockout animals are characterized by selective depletion of small diameter primary afferents and abnormal development of the superficial dorsal laminae of the spinal cord, resulting in diminished pain perception but normal tactile and motor behaviour. Behavioral testing of Prrxl1 mice revealed that these animals have reduced anxiety levels, enhanced memory performance, and improved fear extinction. Neurophysiological recordings from awake behaving Prrxl1 mice show enhanced altered fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the theta- and gamma-bands. Importantly, although inflammatory pain by Complete Freund Adjuvant injection caused a decrease in fronto-hippocampal connectivity in the wild-type animals, Prrxl1 mice maintained the baseline levels. The onset of inflammatory pain also reverted the differences in forebrain expression of stress- and monoamine-related genes in Prrxl1 mice. Altogether our results suggest that congenital hypoalgesia may have an effect on brain plasticity that is the inverse of what is usually observed in animal models of chronic pain. PMID:27168359

  1. Mouse hippocampal phosphorylation footprint induced by generalized seizures: Focus on ERK, mTORC1 and Akt/GSK-3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Sakkaki, Sophie; Lory, Philippe; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2015-12-17

    Exacerbated hippocampal activity has been associated to critical modifications of the intracellular signaling pathways. We have investigated rapid hippocampal adaptive responses induced by maximal electroshock seizure (MES). Here, we demonstrate that abnormal and exacerbated hippocampal activity induced by MES triggers specific and temporally distinct patterns of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) and Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 (Akt/GSK-3) pathways in the mouse hippocampus. While the ERK pathway is transiently activated, the mTORC1 cascade follows a rapid inhibition followed by a transient activation. This rebound of mTORC1 activity leads to the selective phosphorylation of p70S6K, which is accompanied by an enhanced phosphorylation of the ribosomal subunit S6. In contrast, the Akt/GSK-3 pathway is weakly altered. Finally, MES triggers a rapid upregulation of several plasticity-associated genes as a consequence exacerbated hippocampal activity. The results reported in the present study are reminiscent of the one observed in other models of generalized seizures, thus defining a common molecular footprint induced by intense and aberrant hippocampal activities.

  2. Hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP/PS1/nestin-GFP triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Zheng, M; Zhang, T; He, G

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia. Although the exact mechanisms of AD are not entirely clear, the impairment in adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been reported to play a role in AD. To assess the relationship between AD and neurogenesis, we studied APP/PS1/nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) triple transgenic mice, a well-characterized mouse model of AD, which express GFP under the control of the nestin promoter. Different ages of AD mice and their wild-type littermates (WT) were used in our study. Immunofluorescent staining showed that neurogenesis occurred mainly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LVs). The expression of neural stem cells (NSCs) (nestin) and neural precursors such as doublecortin (DCX) and GFAP in AD mice were decreased with age, as well as there being a reduction in 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, when compared to WT. However, the number of maturate neurons (NeuN) was not significantly different between AD mice and wild-type controls, and NeuN changed only slightly with age. By Golgi-Cox staining, the morphologies of dendrites were observed, and significant differences existed between AD mice and wild-type controls. These results suggest that AD has a far-reaching influence on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, leading to a gradual decrease in the generation of neural progenitors (NPCs), and inhibition of the differentiation and maturation of neurons.

  3. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulation of beta‐amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ‐overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2–5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1–42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ‐(500 nM) and vehicle‐(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub‐threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated “sag”. Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra‐threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after‐hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients. © 2014 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25515596

  4. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients.

  5. HIPPOCAMPAL MOSSY FIBER LEU-ENKEPHALIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN FEMALE RATS IS SIGNIFICANTLY ALTERED FOLLOWING BOTH ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Joseph P.; Kelter, David T.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that responses to stress are sexually dimorphic, particularly in regard to learning and memory processes: while males display impaired cognitive performance and hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell dendritic remodeling following chronic stress, females exhibit enhanced performance and no remodeling. Leu-enkephalin, an endogenous opioid peptide found in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway, plays a critical role in mediating synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. Estrogen is known to influence the expression of leu-enkephalin in the mossy fibers of females, with leu-enkephalin levels being highest at proestrus and estrus, when estrogen levels are elevated. Since stress is also known to alter the expression of leu-enkephalin in various brain regions, this study was designed to determine whether acute or chronic stress had an effect on mossy fiber leu-enkephalin levels in females or males, through the application of correlated quantitative light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. Both acute and chronic stress eliminated the estrogen-dependence of leu-enkephalin levels across the estrous cycle in females, but had no effect on male levels. However, following acute stress leu-enkephalin levels in females were consistently lowered to values comparable to the lowest control values, while following chronic stress they were consistently elevated to values comparable to the highest control values. Ultrastructural changes in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles paralleled light microscopic observations, with acute stress inducing a decrease in leu-enkephalin labeled dense core vesicles, and chronic stress inducing an increase in leu-enkephalin labeled dense-core vesicles in females. These findings suggest that alterations in leu-enkephalin levels following stress could play an important role in the sex-specific responses that females display in learning processes, including those important in addiction. PMID:24275289

  6. p38 MAP kinase-mediated NMDA receptor-dependent suppression of hippocampal hypersynchronicity in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ittner, Arne A; Gladbach, Amadeus; Bertz, Josefine; Suh, Lisa S; Ittner, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Hypersynchronicity of neuronal brain circuits is a feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mouse models of AD expressing mutated forms of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a central protein involved in AD pathology, show cortical hypersynchronicity. We studied hippocampal circuitry in APP23 transgenic mice using telemetric electroencephalography (EEG), at the age of onset of memory deficits. APP23 mice display spontaneous hypersynchronicity in the hippocampus including epileptiform spike trains. Furthermore, spectral contributions of hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations are compromised in APP23 mice, compared to non-transgenic controls. Using cross-frequency coupling analysis, we show that hippocampal gamma amplitude modulation by theta phase is markedly impaired in APP23 mice. Hippocampal hypersynchronicity and waveforms are differentially modulated by injection of riluzole and the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitor MK801, suggesting specific involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels and NMDA receptors in hypersynchronicity thresholds in APP23 mice. Furthermore, APP23 mice show marked activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in hippocampus, and injection of MK801 but not riluzole reduces activation of p38 in the hippocampus. A p38 inhibitor induces hypersynchronicity in APP23 mice to a similar extent as MK801, thus supporting suppression of hypersynchronicity involves NMDA receptors-mediated p38 activity. In summary, we characterize components of hippocampal hypersynchronicity, waveform patterns and cross-frequency coupling in the APP23 mouse model by pharmacological modulation, furthering the understanding of epileptiform brain activity in AD.

  7. Evaluation of Mitochondrial Function in the CNS of Rodent Models of Alzheimer's Disease - High Resolution Respirometry Applied to Acute Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Dias, Candida; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, Joao; Ledo, Ana

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disease characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. These hallmark alterations are preceded by synaptic deterioration, changes in neuromolecular plasticity phenomena, mitochondrial dysfunction, increase in oxidative damage to cellular constituents and decreased energy metabolism. The hippocampus is a structure of the temporal medial lobe implicated in specific forms of memory processes. It is also one of the first and most affected regions of the CNS in AD. Here we present a novel approach to the study if mitochondrial function/disfunction in 2 rodent models of AD: an acute rat model obtained by intracerebroventricular injection of the toxin streptozotocin (STZ) and a progressive triple transgenic mouse model (3TgAD) harboring PS1M146V, APPSwe, and tauP301L transgenes. Mitochondrial dysfunction has classically been assessed in such models by isolating mitochondria, synaptossoms or working with cell cultures. Anyone of these approaches destroys the intricate intercellular connectivity and cytoarchitecture of neuronal tissue. We used acute hippocampal slices obtained from the 2 models of AD and evaluated changes in mitochondrial function as a function of disease and/or age. Mitochondrial stress test were performed on the high resolution respirometry (Oroboros 2K Oxymeter). Upon analysis of oxygen consumption rates (OCR) we observed significant decreases in basal OCR, maximal respiratory capacity, ATP turnover and a tendency for decrease in sparing capacity in the STZ rat model compared to shame injected animals. Regarding the 3TgAD model we observed an age-dependent decrease in all parameters evaluated in the mitochondrial stress test, in both 3TgAD and NTg animals. However, although a tendency towards decreased OCR was observed when comparing 3TgAD and age-matched NTg animals, no statistically significant difference was observed. PMID:26461355

  8. Effects of treadmill exercise on hippocampal neurogenesis in an MPTP /probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of treadmill exercise on non-motor function, specifically long-term memory, in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model. [Methods] A mouse model of Parkinson's disease was developed by injecting 20 mg/kg of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 250 mg/kg of probenecid (P). We divided in into four groups: probenecid group, probenecid-exercise group, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group, and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group. Mice in the exercise groups ran on treadmill for 30 min/day, five times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] Latency in the passive avoidance test increased in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group compared with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. In addition, the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/NeuN-positive cells and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid-exercise group than that in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid group. These changes were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that treadmill exercise may improve long-term memory in Parkinson's disease mice by facilitating neurogenesis via increased expression of neurotrophic factors.

  9. Acute stress enhances adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of newborn neurons via secreted astrocytic FGF2.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Muroy, Sandra E; Sun, Wayne G; Covarrubias, David; Leong, Megan J; Barchas, Laurel A; Kaufer, Daniela

    2013-04-16

    Stress is a potent modulator of the mammalian brain. The highly conserved stress hormone response influences many brain regions, particularly the hippocampus, a region important for memory function. The effect of acute stress on the unique population of adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) that resides in the adult hippocampus is unclear. We found that acute stress increased hippocampal cell proliferation and astrocytic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression. The effect of acute stress occurred independent of basolateral amygdala neural input and was mimicked by treating isolated NPCs with conditioned media from corticosterone-treated primary astrocytes. Neutralization of FGF2 revealed that astrocyte-secreted FGF2 mediated stress-hormone-induced NPC proliferation. 2 weeks, but not 2 days, after acute stress, rats also showed enhanced fear extinction memory coincident with enhanced activation of newborn neurons. Our findings suggest a beneficial role for brief stress on the hippocampus and improve understanding of the adaptive capacity of the brain. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00362.001.

  10. Rosiglitazone reverses memory decline and hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, Luis; Simon, Ana-Maria; Perez-Mediavilla, Alberto; Salazar-Colocho, Pablo; Rio, Joaquin Del; Frechilla, Diana

    2009-02-06

    Clinical trials with rosiglitazone, a potent agonist at peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) suggest an improvement of cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The mechanisms mediating this potential beneficial effect remain to be fully elucidated. In mice overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP), a model of AD, we found that memory impairment in the object recognition test was prevented and also reversed by chronic rosiglitazone treatment. Given the possible involvement of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the actions of PPAR{gamma}-ligands, we studied the effect of chronic rosiglitazone treatment on GR levels in the hippocampus of hAPP mice. An early down-regulation of GR, not related to elevated plasma corticosterone levels, was found in different hippocampal subfields of the transgenic mice and this decrease was prevented by rosiglitazone. In parallel with behavioural studies, rosiglitazone also normalized GR levels in older animals. This effect may contribute to explain the attenuation of memory decline by PPAR{gamma} activation in an AD mouse model.

  11. Environmental enrichment reveals effects of genotype on hippocampal spine morphologies in the mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauterborn, Julie C; Jafari, Matiar; Babayan, Alex H; Gall, Christine M

    2015-02-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model of this disorder exhibit abnormal dendritic spines in neocortex, but the degree of spine disturbances in hippocampus is not clear. The present studies tested if the mutation influences dendritic branching and spine measures for CA1 pyramidal cells in Fmr1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice provided standard or enriched environment (EE) housing. Automated measures from 3D reconstructions of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled cells showed that spine head volumes were ∼ 40% lower in KOs when compared with WTs in both housing conditions. With standard housing, average spine length was greater in KOs versus WTs but there was no genotype difference in dendritic branching, numbers of spines, or spine length distribution. However, with EE rearing, significant effects of genotype emerged including greater dendritic branching in WTs, greater spine density in KOs, and greater numbers of short thin spines in KOs when compared with WTs. Thus, EE rearing revealed greater effects of the Fmr1 mutation on hippocampal pyramidal cell morphology than was evident with standard housing, suggesting that environmental enrichment allows for fuller appreciation of the impact of the mutation and better representation of abnormalities likely to be present in human FXS.

  12. Early Alterations in Hippocampal Circuitry and Theta Rhythm Generation in a Mouse Model of Prenatal Infection: Implications for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Guillaume; Lowe, Germaine C.; Goutagny, Romain; Williams, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Post-mortem studies suggest that GABAergic neurotransmission is impaired in schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear if these changes occur early during development and how they impact overall network activity. To investigate this, we used a mouse model of prenatal infection with the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic–polyribocytidilic acid (poly I∶C), a model based on epidemiological evidence that an immune challenge during pregnancy increases the prevalence of schizophrenia in the offspring. We found that prenatal infection reduced the density of parvalbumin- but not somatostatin-positive interneurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and strongly reduced the strength of inhibition early during postnatal development. Furthermore, using an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro, we found reduced theta oscillation generated in the CA1 area. Taken together, these results suggest that redistribution in excitatory and inhibitory transmission locally in the CA1 is associated with a significant alteration in network function. Furthermore, given the role of theta rhythm in memory, our results demonstrate how a risk factor for schizophrenia can affect network function early in development that could contribute to cognitive deficits observed later in the disease. PMID:22238649

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  15. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal’s learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  16. Use of bipolar parallel electrodes for well-controlled microstimulation in a mouse hippocampal brain slice.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Bogdan; Strominger, Norman L; Carpenter, David O

    2005-06-15

    In a hippocampal brain slice two types of stimulating electrodes [single (SE) or monopolar and parallel bipolar (PE)] were used to determine the optimal protocol for single pulse microstimulation. We show that even for a constant-current power source the amplitude of stimulating current (SC) is not constant, especially for short pulse widths (PW) (<200 micros). Recording the stimulating current and computing the amount of electric charge that is passed through the microelectrode gives the best estimate of the strength of electrical stimulation. For SE the evoked response is obstructed for a time interval larger than three times the PW. The stimulus artifact (SA) substantially decreases when a PE is used. The orientation of the stimulating current relative to the position of the targeted fibers (Schaffer collaterals) was controlled when using a PE. The use of PEs allowed the accurate recording of the physiological response that contains three clearly defined peaks. Stimulation can be elicited at PW as short as 30 micros when the main current is capacitive. The charge needed to elicit physiological responses was in the range of 1-40 nC (the lower values for the PE) suggesting that use of PEs is most advantageous for well-controlled microstimulation studies in brain slices.

  17. Impaired development of hippocampal mossy fibre synapses in mouse mutants for the presynaptic scaffold protein Bassoon.

    PubMed

    Lanore, Frederic; Blanchet, Christophe; Fejtova, Anna; Pinheiro, Paulo; Richter, Karin; Balschun, Detlef; Gundelfinger, Eckart; Mulle, Christophe

    2010-06-15

    Bassoon, a protein highly concentrated at the synaptic active zone, is thought to participate in the organization of the cytomatrix at the site of neurotransmitter release. Bassoon is amongst the first proteins to accumulate at newly formed synaptic junctions, raising the question of the functional role of this protein in the early stages of synaptic development. Here we show that the course of synaptic maturation of hippocampal mossy fibre (MF) synapses (glutamatergic synapses with multiple release sites) is markedly altered during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development in mutant mice lacking the central region of Bassoon (Bsn(-/-) mice). At postnatal day 7 (P7), Bsn(-/-) mice display large amplitude MF-EPSCs with decreased paired pulse ratios, an abnormality which may be linked to deficits in the organization of the presynaptic active zone. Surprisingly, 1 week later, decreased MF-EPSCs amplitude is observed in Bsn(-/-) mice, consistent with the inactivation of a subset of synaptic release sites. Finally, at more mature states a decreased posttetanic potentiation is observed at MF-synapses. These results support the notion that Bassoon is important for organizing the presynaptic active zone during the postnatal maturation of glutamatergic synapses.

  18. Gongjin-Dan Enhances Hippocampal Memory in a Mouse Model of Scopolamine-Induced Amnesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Hong, Sung-Shin; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Sam-Keun; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of Gongjin-Dan (GJD) on the memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection. BALB/c mice were orally treated with GJD (100, 200, or 400 mg/kg, daily) or tacrine (THA, 10 mg/kg) for 10 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. The radial arm maze and passive avoidance tests were performed to evaluate the animal's learning and memory. Scopolamine increased the task completing time, the number of total errors (reference and working memory error) in the radial arm maze task, and the latency time in the passive avoidance test, which were significantly ameliorated by treatment with GJD. The GJD treatment also attenuated the scopolamine-induced hyperactivation of acetylcholinesterase activity, and suppression of the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and their receptors in the hippocampus. These effects of GJD were supported by both the doublecortin (DCX)-positive staining and Nissl staining, which were used to measure hippocampal neurogenesis and atrophy, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that GJD exerts a potent anti-amnesic effect, and its underlying mechanism might involve the modulation of cholinergic activity. PMID:27483466

  19. Hippocampal Transcriptomic and Proteomic Alterations in the BTBR Mouse Model of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Caitlin M.; Jasien, Joan M.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Silverman, Jill L.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders of an unclear etiology, and no cure currently exists. Prior studies have demonstrated that the black and tan, brachyury (BTBR) T+ Itpr3tf/J mouse strain displays a behavioral phenotype with ASD-like features. BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (referred to simply as BTBR) display deficits in social functioning, lack of communication ability, and engagement in stereotyped behavior. Despite extensive behavioral phenotypic characterization, little is known about the genes and proteins responsible for the presentation of the ASD-like phenotype in the BTBR mouse model. In this study, we employed bioinformatics techniques to gain a wide-scale understanding of the transcriptomic and proteomic changes associated with the ASD-like phenotype in BTBR mice. We found a number of genes and proteins to be significantly altered in BTBR mice compared to C57BL/6J (B6) control mice controls such as BDNF, Shank3, and ERK1, which are highly relevant to prior investigations of ASD. Furthermore, we identified distinct functional pathways altered in BTBR mice compared to B6 controls that have been previously shown to be altered in both mouse models of ASD, some human clinical populations, and have been suggested as a possible etiological mechanism of ASD, including “axon guidance” and “regulation of actin cytoskeleton.” In addition, our wide-scale bioinformatics approach also discovered several previously unidentified genes and proteins associated with the ASD phenotype in BTBR mice, such as Caskin1, suggesting that bioinformatics could be an avenue by which novel therapeutic targets for ASD are uncovered. As a result, we believe that informed use of synergistic bioinformatics applications represents an invaluable tool for elucidating the etiology of complex disorders like ASD. PMID:26635614

  20. Learning Discloses Abnormal Structural and Functional Plasticity at Hippocampal Synapses in the APP23 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Roberto, Anna; Berretta, Nicola; Panico, Maria Beatrice; Lista, Simone; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Nistico, Robert

    2010-01-01

    B6-Tg/Thy1APP23Sdz (APP23) mutant mice exhibit neurohistological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease but show intact basal hippocampal neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Here, we examine whether spatial learning differently modifies the structural and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal synapses in APP23 and wild-type mice. While…

  1. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology

  2. Short- and long-term effects of neonatal pharmacotherapy with epigallocatechin-3-gallate on hippocampal development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Emili, Marco; Trazzi, Stefania; Guidi, Sandra; Sassi, Martina; Ciani, Elisabetta; Rimondini, Roberto; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive disability is an unavoidable feature of Down syndrome (DS), a genetic disorder due to the triplication of human chromosome 21. DS is associated with alterations of neurogenesis, neuron maturation and connectivity that are already present at prenatal life stages. Recent evidence shows that pharmacotherapies can have a large impact on the trisomic brain provided that they are administered perinatally. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea, performs many actions in the brain, including inhibition of DYRK1A, a kinase that is over-expressed in the DS brain and contributes to the DS phenotype. Young adults with DS treated with EGCG exhibit some cognitive benefits, although these effects disappear with time. We deemed it extremely important, however, to establish whether treatment with EGCG at the initial stages of brain development leads to plastic changes that outlast treatment cessation. In the current study, we exploited the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS in order to establish whether pharmacotherapy with EGCG during peak of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) enduringly restores hippocampal development and memory performance. Euploid and Ts65Dn mice were treated with EGCG from postnatal day 3 (P3) to P15. The effects of treatment were examined at its cessation (at P15) or after one month (at P45). We found that at P15 treated trisomic pups exhibited restoration of neurogenesis, total hippocampal granule cell number and levels of pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the DG, hippocampus and neocortex. However, at P45 none of these effects were still present, nor did treated Ts65Dn mice exhibit any improvement in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings show that treatment with EGCG carried out in the neonatal period rescues numerous trisomy-linked brain alterations. However, even during this, the most critical time window for hippocampal development, EGCG does not elicit enduring effects on the hippocampal physiology.

  3. A Transgenic Mouse Model Reveals Fast Nicotinic Transmission in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grybko, Michael J.; Hahm, Eu-teum; Perrine, Wesley; Parnes, Jason A.; Chick, Wallace S.; Sharma, Geeta; Finger, Thomas E.; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution, to brain cholinergic signaling, by synaptic- and diffusion-based mechanisms remains to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the prevalence of fast nicotinic signaling in the hippocampus. We describe a mouse model where cholinergic axons are labeled with the tauGFP fusion protein driven by the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) promoter. The model provides for the visualization of individual cholinergic axons at greater resolution than other available models and techniques, even in thick, live, slices. Combining calcium imaging and electrophysiology, we demonstrate that local stimulation of visualized cholinergic fibers results in rapid EPSCs mediated by the activation of α7-subunit containing nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChRs) on CA3 pyramidal neurons. These responses were blocked by the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and potentiated by the receptor specific allosteric modulator 1-(5-chloro-2,4- dimethoxy-phenyl)-3-(5-methyl-isoxanol-3-yl)-urea (PNU-120596). Our results suggest, for the first time, that synaptic nAChRs can modulate pyramidal cell plasticity and development. Fast nicotinic transmission might play a greater role in cholinergic signaling than previously assumed. We provide a model for the examination of synaptic properties of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation in the brain. PMID:21501254

  4. Effects of Acute and Repeated Administration of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A On Morris Water Maze Learning, Corticosterone and Hippocampal IL-1β and TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Randall T.; Schorpp, Kristen M.; Lawrenczyk, Agniesczka J.; Chakraborty, Trisha; Kusnecov, Alexander W.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is a bacterial superantigen that induces pronounced T cell expansion and cytokine production. In addition, SEA activates the HPA axis and forebrain regions relevant to cognitive functions. Since learning-related cognitive changes have not been assessed in response to SEA, spatial learning in the morris water maze (MWM) was determined in male C57BL/6J mice subjected to acute or repeated injections of 5 μg SEA or Saline. Injections were given 2 hrs prior to 4–5 days of hidden platform sessions. Animals were then rested for 1 month and given retraining without further injections. In addition, splenic IL-1β, IL-2 and TNFα, plasma corticosterone, and hippocampal IL-1β and TNFα were measured after the regimen of treatment used in the behavioral experiments. The results showed no learning impairment following acute or repeated SEA challenge. Moreover, when retested one month later, and without further injections, the SEA group showed more rapid relearning of the MWM. This suggested that coincidental superantigenic T cell activation and training served to promote long-term improvement in recovery of learning. Furthermore, repeated SEA challenge continued to drive increases in plasma corticosterone, but with a compensatory reduction in hippocampal IL-1β. However, while hippocampal TNFα was reduced after acute and repeated SEA treatment, this was not statistically significant. In view of the importance of modest glucocorticoid elevations and hippocampal IL-1β in promoting contextual learning, the data point to the hypothesis that SEA promotes long-term plasticity by restraining disruptive increases in hippocampal IL-1β, and possibly TNFα, during learning. PMID:20946950

  5. Estradiol acts via estrogen receptors alpha and beta on pathways important for synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampal formation

    PubMed Central

    Spencer-Segal, Joanna L.; Tsuda, Mumeko C.; Mattei, Larissa; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Romeo, Russell D.; Milner, Teresa A.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Ogawa, Sonoko

    2012-01-01

    Estradiol affects hippocampal-dependent spatial memory and underlying structural and electrical synaptic plasticity in female mice and rats. Using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knockout mice and wild-type littermates, we investigated the role of ERs in estradiol effects on multiple pathways important for hippocampal plasticity and learning. Six hours of estradiol administration increased immunoreactivity for phosphorylated Akt throughout the hippocampal formation, while 48 hours of estradiol increased immunoreactivity for phosphorylated TrkB receptor. Estradiol effects on phosphorylated Akt and TrkB immunoreactivities were abolished in ER alpha and ER beta knockout mice. Estradiol also had distinct effects on immunoreactivity for PSD-95 and BDNF mRNA in ER alpha and beta knockout mice. Thus, estradiol acts through both ERs alpha and beta in several subregions of the hippocampal formation. The different effects of estradiol at 6 and 48 hours indicate that several mechanisms of estrogen receptor signaling contribute to this female hormone’s influence on hippocampal synaptic plasticity. By further delineating these mechanisms, we will better understand and predict the effects of endogenous and exogenous ovarian steroids on mood, cognition, and other hippocampal-dependent behaviors. PMID:22133892

  6. Quantifying biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction and neuronal network hyperexcitability in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease: depletion of calcium-dependent proteins and inhibitory hippocampal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Palop, Jorge J; Mucke, Lennart; Roberson, Erik D

    2011-01-01

    High levels of Aβ impair neuronal function at least in part by disrupting normal synaptic transmission and causing dysfunction of neural networks. This network dysfunction includes abnormal synchronization of neuronal activity resulting in epileptiform activity. Over time, this aberrant network activity can lead to the depletion of calcium-dependent proteins, such as calbindin, Fos, and Arc, and compensatory inhibitory remodeling of hippocampal circuits, including GABAergic sprouting and ectopic expression of the inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) in dentate granule cells. Here we present detailed protocols for detecting and quantifying these alterations in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by immunohistochemistry. These methods are useful as surrogate measures for detecting chronic aberrant network activity in models of AD and epilepsy. In addition, since we have found that the severity of these changes relates to the degree of Aβ-dependent cognitive impairments, the protocols are useful for quantifying biomarkers of cognitive impairment in mouse models of AD.

  7. Effects on hippocampus of lifelong absence of glucocorticoids in the pro-opiomelanocortin null mutant mouse reveal complex relationship between glucocorticoids and hippocampal structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ostwald, Dirk; Karpac, Jason; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2006-01-01

    In humans changes in serum cortisol levels have been observed with aging, stress, and with affective disorders such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Corticosteroids are known to influence hippocampal structure and function; specifically, plasma corticosteroid levels have been inversely correlated with hippocampal cell proliferation, cell death, and impaired memory function. The relationship between corticosteroids and structure and function of the hippocampus has been studied in experimental systems in adult animals by increasing or decreasing corticosterone levels through pharmacological supplementation and through surgical removal of the adrenal gland. Here, we utilized the genetically engineered pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) null mutant mouse, which because of the lack of all POMC peptides has no corticosterone from birth throughout life. The effect of this lifelong absence of corticosterone on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a decrease in granule cell density, which correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation but not an increase in cell degeneration. Fine morphology of granule cells was unaltered. Analyses of gene expression revealed no changes in POMC null mutant vs wild-type hippocampus with respect to levels of expression of corticoid receptor genes or genes known to be regulated by corticosterone. Spatial learning as tested by the Morris water maze was not altered in the POMC null mutant mouse. Taken together with findings from other studies of the effects of altered levels of corticosteroids on the hippocampus, our results argue for a complex homeostasis in which disturbances of any one factor can offset the system in varying ways.

  8. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Jennifer R; Rhodes, Justin S

    2015-03-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2- to 5-fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6 J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2 J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2 J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running.

  9. Mouse genetic differences in voluntary wheel running, adult hippocampal neurogenesis and learning on the multi-strain-adapted plus water maze

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Jennifer; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate levels of aerobic exercise broadly enhance cognition throughout the lifespan. One hypothesized contributing mechanism is increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Recently, we measured the effects of voluntary wheel running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in 12 different mouse strains, and found increased neurogenesis in all strains, ranging from 2 to 5 fold depending on the strain. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which increased neurogenesis from wheel running is associated with enhanced performance on the water maze for 5 of the 12 strains, chosen based on their levels of neurogenesis observed in the previous study (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, B6129SF1/J, DBA/2J, and B6D2F1/J). Mice were housed with or without a running wheels for 30 days then tested for learning and memory on the plus water maze, adapted for multiple strains, and rotarod test of motor performance. The first 10 days, animals were injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. After behavioral testing animals were euthanized to measure adult hippocampal neurogenesis using standard methods. Levels of neurogenesis depended on strain but all mice had a similar increase in neurogenesis in response to exercise. All mice acquired the water maze but performance depended on strain. Exercise improved water maze performance in all strains to a similar degree. Rotarod performance depended on strain. Exercise improved rotarod performance only in DBA/2J and B6D2F1/J mice. Taken together, results demonstrate that despite different levels of neurogenesis, memory performance and motor coordination in these mouse strains, all strains have the capacity to increase neurogenesis and improve learning on the water maze through voluntary wheel running. PMID:25435316

  10. Effect of Yi Gong San Decoction on Iron Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qin; Guan, Yu; Xia, Lemin; Wang, Zhicheng; Jiang, Yiling; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianying; Wang, Guohua; Pu, Yiqiong; Xia, Jing; Luo, Meihong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Yi Gong San (YGS) decoction on iron homeostasis and the possible underlying mechanisms in a mouse model of acute inflammation in this study. Our findings suggest that YGS regulates iron homeostasis by downregulating the level of HAMP mRNA, which may depend on regulation of the IL-6/STAT3 or BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway during acute inflammation. PMID:27143982

  11. Chronic treatment with valproic acid or sodium butyrate attenuates novel object recognition deficits and hippocampal dendritic spine loss in a mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Takuma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Yuta; Kataoka, Shunsuke; Kawanai, Takuya; Maeda, Yuko; Watanabe, Ryo; Takano, Erika; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Ago, Yukio; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We recently showed that prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA) in mice causes autism-like behavioral abnormalities, including social interaction deficits, anxiety-like behavior and spatial learning disability, in male offspring. In the present study, we examined the effect of prenatal VPA on cognitive function and whether the effect is improved by chronic treatment with VPA and sodium butyrate, histone deacetylase inhibitors. In addition, we examined whether the cognitive dysfunction is associated with hippocampal dendritic morphological changes. Mice given prenatal exposure to VPA exhibited novel object recognition deficits at 9 weeks of age, and that the impairment was blocked by chronic (5-week) treatment with VPA (30 mg/kg/d, i.p.) or sodium butyrate (1.2g/kg/d, i.p.) starting at 4 weeks of age. In agreement with the behavioral findings, the mice prenatally exposed to VPA showed a decrease in dendritic spine density in the hippocampal CA1 region, and the spine loss was attenuated by chronic treatment with sodium butyrate or VPA. Furthermore, acute treatment with sodium butyrate, but not VPA, significantly increased acetylation of histone H3 in the hippocampus at 30 min, suggesting the difference in the mechanism for the effects of chronic VPA and sodium butyrate. These findings suggest that prenatal VPA-induced cognitive dysfunction is associated with changes in hippocampal dendritic spine morphology.

  12. Impact of Treadmill Running and Sex on Hippocampal Neurogenesis in the Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoxing; Hamadeh, Mazen J.; Christie, Brain R.; Foster, Jane A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of dentate gyrus (DG) occurs throughout life and is regulated by pathological and physiological processes. The role of oxidative stress in hippocampal neurogenesis and its response to exercise or neurodegenerative diseases remains controversial. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of oxidative stress, treadmill exercise and sex on hippocampal neurogenesis in a murine model of heightened oxidative stress (G93A mice). G93A and wild type (WT) mice were randomized to a treadmill running (EX) or a sedentary (SED) group for 1 or 4 wk. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled proliferating cells, surviving cells, and their phenotype, as well as for determination of oxidative stress (3-NT; 8-OHdG). BDNF and IGF1 mRNA expression was assessed by in situ hybridization. Results showed that: (1) G93A-SED mice had greater hippocampal neurogenesis, BDNF mRNA, and 3-NT, as compared to WT-SED mice. (2) Treadmill running promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF mRNA content and lowered DNA oxidative damage (8-OHdG) in WT mice. (3) Male G93A mice showed significantly higher cell proliferation but a lower level of survival vs. female G93A mice. We conclude that G93A mice show higher hippocampal neurogenesis, in association with higher BDNF expression, yet running did not further enhance these phenomena in G93A mice, probably due to a ‘ceiling effect’ of an already heightened basal levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF expression. PMID:22558322

  13. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  14. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression. PMID:27435420

  15. TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE DISPOSITION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID IN THE MOUSE
    AFTER ACUTE ORAL ADMINISTRATION

    Michael F. Hughes, Ph.D., Brenda C. Edwards, Carol T. Mitchell and Elaina M. Kenyon, Ph.D. United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Nation...

  16. Acute and fractionated exposure to high-LET (56)Fe HZE-particle radiation both result in similar long-term deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Phillip D; Shih, Hung-Ying; Leblanc, Junie A; Cole, Mara G; Amaral, Wellington Z; Mukherjee, Shibani; Zhang, Shichuan; Lucero, Melanie J; Decarolis, Nathan A; Chen, Benjamin P C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2013-12-01

    Astronauts on multi-year interplanetary missions will be exposed to a low, chronic dose of high-energy, high-charge particles. Studies in rodents show acute, nonfractionated exposure to these particles causes brain changes such as fewer adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells that may be detrimental to cognition and mood regulation and thus compromise mission success. However, the influence of a low, chronic dose of these particles on neurogenesis and stem cells is unknown. To examine the influence of galactic cosmic radiation on neurogenesis, adult-generated stem and progenitor cells in Nestin-CreER(T2)/R26R-YFP transgenic mice were inducibly labeled to allow fate tracking. Mice were then sham exposed or given one acute 100 cGy (56)Fe-particle exposure or five fractionated 20 cGy (56)Fe-particle exposures. Adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells were quantified 24 h or 3 months later. Both acute and fractionated exposure decreased the amount of proliferating cells and immature neurons relative to sham exposure. Unexpectedly, neither acute nor fractionated exposure decreased the number of adult neural stem cells relative to sham expsoure. Our findings show that single and fractionated exposures of (56)Fe-particle irradiation are similarly detrimental to adult-generated neurons. Implications for future missions and ground-based studies in space radiation are discussed. PMID:24320054

  17. Acute and Fractionated Exposure to High-LET 56Fe HZE-Particle Radiation Both Result in Similar Long-Term Deficits in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Phillip D.; Shih, Hung-Ying; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Cole, Mara G.; Amaral, Wellington Z.; Mukherjee, Shibani; Zhang, Shichuan; Lucero, Melanie J.; DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts on multi-year interplanetary missions will be exposed to a low, chronic dose of high-energy, high-charge particles. Studies in rodents show acute, nonfractionated exposure to these particles causes brain changes such as fewer adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells that may be detrimental to cognition and mood regulation and thus compromise mission success. However, the influence of a low, chronic dose of these particles on neurogenesis and stem cells is unknown. To examine the influence of galactic cosmic radiation on neurogenesis, adult-generated stem and progenitor cells in Nestin-CreERT2/R26R-YFP transgenic mice were inducibly labeled to allow fate tracking. Mice were then sham exposed or given one acute 100 cGy 56Fe-particle exposure or five fractionated 20 cGy 56Fe-particle exposures. Adult-generated hippocampal neurons and stem cells were quantified 24 h or 3 months later. Both acute and fractionated exposure decreased the amount of proliferating cells and immature neurons relative to sham exposure. Unexpectedly, neither acute nor fractionated exposure decreased the number of adult neural stem cells relative to sham expsoure. Our findings show that single and fractionated exposures of 56Fe-particle irradiation are similarly detrimental to adult-generated neurons. Implications for future missions and ground-based studies in space radiation are discussed. PMID:24320054

  18. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice.

  19. Impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its partial reversal by chronic treatment of fluoxetine in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Dey, Parthanarayan; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits, caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited Ube3a. Ube3a-maternal deficient mice (AS model mice) recapitulate many essential features of AS, but how the deficiency of Ube3a lead to such behavioural abnormalities is poorly understood. Here we have demonstrated significant impairment of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice brain. Although, the number of BrdU and Ki67-positive cell in the hippocampal DG region was nearly equal at early postnatal days among wild type and AS mice, they were significantly reduced in adult AS mice compared to wild type controls. Reduced number of doublecortin-positive immature neurons in this region of AS mice further indicated impaired neurogenesis. Unaltered BrdU and Ki67-positive cells number in the sub ventricular zone of adult AS mice brain along with the absence of imprinted expression of Ube3a in the neural progenitor cell suggesting that Ube3a may not be directly linked with altered neurogenesis. Finally, we show that the impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in these mice can be partially rescued by the chronic treatment of antidepressant fluoxetine. These results suggest that the chronic stress may lead to reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in AS mice and that impaired neurogenesis could contribute to cognitive disturbances observed in these mice. PMID:26231800

  20. Loss and Gain of MeCP2 Cause Similar Hippocampal Circuit Dysfunction that Is Rescued by Deep Brain Stimulation in a Rett Syndrome Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Ash, Ryan T; He, Lingjie; Kee, Sara E; Wang, Wei; Yu, Dinghui; Hao, Shuang; Meng, Xiangling; Ure, Kerstin; Ito-Ishida, Aya; Tang, Bin; Sun, Yaling; Ji, Daoyun; Tang, Jianrong; Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-08-17

    Loss- and gain-of-function mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) underlie two distinct neurological syndromes with strikingly similar features, but the synaptic and circuit-level changes mediating these shared features are undefined. Here we report three novel signs of neural circuit dysfunction in three mouse models of MECP2 disorders (constitutive Mecp2 null, mosaic Mecp2(+/-), and MECP2 duplication): abnormally elevated synchrony in the firing activity of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, an impaired homeostatic response to perturbations of excitatory-inhibitory balance, and decreased excitatory synaptic response in inhibitory neurons. Conditional mutagenesis studies revealed that MeCP2 dysfunction in excitatory neurons mediated elevated synchrony at baseline, while MeCP2 dysfunction in inhibitory neurons increased susceptibility to hypersynchronization in response to perturbations. Chronic forniceal deep brain stimulation (DBS), recently shown to rescue hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in Mecp2(+/-) (Rett) mice, also rescued all three features of hippocampal circuit dysfunction in these mice. PMID:27499081

  1. Impairments in experience-dependent scaling and stability of hippocampal place fields limit spatial learning in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong; Fowler, Stephanie W; Chiang, Angie C A; Ji, Daoyun; Jankowsky, Joanna L

    2014-08-01

    Impaired spatial memory characterizes many mouse models for Alzheimer's disease, but we understand little about how this trait arises. Here, we use a transgenic model of amyloidosis to examine the relationship between behavioral performance in tests of spatial navigation and the function of hippocampal place cells. We find that amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice require considerably more training than controls to reach the same level of performance in a water maze task, and recall the trained location less well 24 h later. At a single cell level, place fields from control mice become more stable and spatially restricted with repeated exposure to a new environment, while those in APP mice improve less over time, ultimately producing a spatial code of lower resolution, accuracy, and reliability than controls. The limited refinement of place fields in APP mice likely contributes to their delayed water maze acquisition, and provides evidence for circuit dysfunction underlying cognitive impairment.

  2. Deficits in hippocampal CA1 LTP induced by TBS but not HFS in the Ts65Dn mouse: a model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto C S; Grybko, Michael J

    2005-07-15

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetically defined cause of intellectual disabilities. Both hippocampal function and volume seem to be disproportionally reduced in individuals with DS and in at least one aneuploid murine model of DS, the Ts65Dn mouse. Two previous studies by one research group have reported deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by in vitro high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of hippocampal CA1 synapses of adult Ts65Dn mice. Here, we report on the results of our own investigation on LTP in Ts65Dn mice. This study was designed to confirm the previous findings and possibly shed some light onto potential mechanisms underlying the reported deficit in this important form of long-term synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DS. LTP was induced in area CA1 with either theta burst stimulation (TBS) or HFS. Contrary to the previous reports, our results showed no significant difference in HFS-induced LTP between Ts65Dn and euploid littermate mice. We have found, however, a significant reduction of the amount of TBS-induced LTP in Ts65Dn mice compared to euploid controls. Because this specific LTP deficit can be rescued by bath application of picrotoxin (10 microM), we hypothesize that an increase in GABA(A)-mediated inhibition or in plasticity of the inhibitory circuitry in Ts65Dn mice may underlie the observed deficits. However, future experiments to examine the state of hippocampus CA1 GABAergic inhibition in Ts65Dn mice will be necessary to further explore these hypotheses.

  3. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD.

  4. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Liraglutide Improves Memory Function and Increases Hippocampal CA1 Neuronal Numbers in a Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Henrik H.; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Farr, Susan A.; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies indicate that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, currently used in the management of type 2 diabetes, exhibit neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in amyloid-β (Aβ) toxicity models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We investigated the potential pro-cognitive and neuroprotective effects of the once-daily GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, a model of age-related sporadic AD not dominated by amyloid plaques. Six-month-old SAMP8 mice received liraglutide (100 or 500 μg/kg/day, s.c.) or vehicle once daily for 4 months. Vehicle-dosed age-matched 50% back-crossed as well as untreated young (4-month-old) SAMP8 mice were used as control groups for normal memory function. Vehicle-dosed 10-month-old SAMP8 mice showed significant learning and memory retention deficits in an active-avoidance T-maze, as compared to both control groups. Also, 10-month-old SAMP8 mice displayed no immunohistological signatures of amyloid-β plaques or hyperphosphorylated tau, indicating the onset of cognitive deficits prior to deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in this AD model. Liraglutide significantly increased memory retention and total hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron numbers in SAMP8 mice, as compared to age-matched vehicle-dosed SAMP8 mice. In conclusion, liraglutide delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with hippocampal neuronal loss in a mouse model of pathological aging with characteristics of neurobehavioral and neuropathological impairments observed in early-stage sporadic AD. PMID:25869785

  5. Impaired hippocampal plasticity and altered neurogenesis in adult Ube3a maternal deficient mouse model for Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Sandrine; Rampon, Claire; Salvert, Denise; Fort, Patrice; Sarda, Nicole

    2009-12-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures and sleep disturbances. It results from lack of the functional maternal allele of UBE3A gene. Ube3a maternal-deficient mice (Ube3a m-/p+), animal models for AS, are impaired in hippocampal-dependent learning tasks as compared with control (Ube3a m+/p+) mice. We first examined the basal expression of immediate early genes which expression is required for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. We found that basal expression of c-fos and Arc genes is reduced in the DG of Ube3a maternal deficient mice compared to their non-transgenic littermates. We then examined whether adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which likely serves as a mechanism toward brain plasticity, is altered in these transgenic mice. Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in mammalian dentate gyrus (DG) and recent findings suggest that newborn granule cells are involved in some forms of learning and memory. Whether maternal Ube3a deletion is detrimental on hippocampal neurogenesis is unclear. Herein, we show, using the mitotic marker Ki67, the birthdating marker 5-bromo-2'-dexoyuridine (BrdU) and the marker doublecortin (DCX) to respectively label cell proliferation, cell survival or young neuron production, that the Ube3a maternal deletion does not affect the proliferation nor the survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus. In contrast, using the postmitotic neuronal marker (NeuN), we show that Ube3a maternal deletion is associated with a lower fraction of BrdU+/NeuN+ newborn neurons among the population of surviving new cells in the hippocampus. Collectively, these findings suggest that some aspects of adult neurogenesis and plasticity are affected by Ube3a deletion and may contribute to the hippocampal dysfunction observed in AS mice.

  6. Imaging Acute Neuromuscular Explants from Thy1 Mouse Lines.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Petar; Godinho, Leanne; Misgeld, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Because core facilities that generate transgenic founder mice for a reasonable fee are now available at most major research institutions, generating new Thy1-XFP transgenic animals (in which XFP stands for any fluorescent protein) is an option even for relatively small laboratories. Here, we provide a protocol for screening offspring of Thy1 transgenic founders. Acute neuromuscular explants are obtained from 3-wk-old F1 mice that have been produced by crossing Thy1 transgenic founders and commercially obtained inbred mice. Thy1-driven expression is detected by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26330628

  7. Modification of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity by memantine in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress: implications for memory and behavior.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shaimaa Nasr; El-Aidi, Ahmed Amro; Ali, Mohamed Mostafa; Attia, Yasser Mahmoud; Rashed, Laila Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Stress is any condition that impairs the balance of the organism physiologically or psychologically. The response to stress involves several neurohormonal consequences. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and its release is increased by stress that predisposes to excitotoxicity in the brain. Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl D-aspartate glutamatergic receptors antagonist and has shown beneficial effect on cognitive function especially in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the work was to investigate memantine effect on memory and behavior in animal models of acute and repeated restraint stress with the evaluation of serum markers of stress and the expression of hippocampal markers of synaptic plasticity. Forty-two male rats were divided into seven groups (six rats/group): control, acute restraint stress, acute restraint stress with Memantine, repeated restraint stress, repeated restraint stress with Memantine and Memantine groups (two subgroups as positive control). Spatial working memory and behavior were assessed by performance in Y-maze. We evaluated serum cortisol, tumor necrotic factor, interleukin-6 and hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, synaptophysin and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our results revealed that Memantine improved spatial working memory in repeated stress, decreased serum level of stress markers and modified the hippocampal synaptic plasticity markers in both patterns of stress exposure; in ARS, Memantine upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and downregulated the expression of calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and in repeated restraint stress, it upregulated the expression of synaptophysin and downregulated calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression.

  8. Combinatorial expression of Lef1, Lhx2, Lhx5, Lhx9, Lmo3, Lmo4, and Prox1 helps to identify comparable subdivisions in the developing hippocampal formation of mouse and chicken

    PubMed Central

    Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a study of the expression patterns of seven developmental regulatory genes (Lef1, Lhx2, Lhx9, Lhx5, Lmo3, Lmo4, and Prox1), in combination with topological position, to identify the medial pallial derivatives, define its major subdivisions, and compare them between mouse and chicken. In both species, the medial pallium is defined as a pallial sector adjacent to the cortical hem and roof plate/choroid tela, showing moderate to strong ventricular zone expression of Lef1, Lhx2, and Lhx9, but not Lhx5. Based on this, the hippocampal formation (indusium griseum, dentate gyrus, Ammon's horn fields, and subiculum), the medial entorhinal cortex, and part of the amygdalo-hippocampal transition area of mouse appeared to derive from the medial pallium. In the chicken, based on the same position and gene expression profile, we propose that the hippocampus (including the V-shaped area), the parahippocampal area (including its caudolateral part), the entorhinal cortex, and the amygdalo-hippocampal transition area are medial pallial derivatives. Moreover, the combinatorial expression of Lef1, Prox1, Lmo4, and Lmo3 allowed the identification of dentate gyrus/CA3-like, CA1/subicular-like, and medial entorhinal-like comparable sectors in mouse and chicken, and point to the existence of mostly conserved molecular networks involved in hippocampal complex development. Notably, while the mouse medial entorhinal cortex derives from the medial pallium (similarly to the hippocampal formation, both being involved in spatial navigation and spatial memory), the lateral entorhinal cortex (involved in processing non-spatial, contextual information) appears to derive from a distinct dorsolateral caudal pallial sector. PMID:25071464

  9. Acute phase serum proteins in syngeneic and allogeneic mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Waites, G T; Bell, A M; Bell, S C

    1983-01-01

    The levels of two murine acute phase proteins, serum amyloid P component (SAP) and haptoglobin, have been measured in the serum of C57BL/10 female mice during syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy. Both syngeneic and allogeneic pregnancy resulted in alterations in the levels of these proteins as compared to those observed in virgin females. Syngeneic mating resulted in an increase in concentration of both proteins during the final 3 days of pregnancy. During allogeneic pregnancy, SAP levels, after a transient increase on day 4, rose from days 6-8 and, after remaining relatively stable, increased from day 12 to reach maximum levels on day 18 of pregnancy. Levels fell dramatically during the immediate post-partum period. In contrast, although levels of haptoglobin also increased from days 6-8, for the remainder of pregnancy these increased levels remained stable. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the mechanisms of regulation of acute phase reactants and the immunological relationship between the mother and fetus. PMID:6409477

  10. Spontaneous acute tumor lysis syndrome in a DBA/1J mouse: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Karen; vanGessel, Yvonne; Asher, Ludmila V; Vogel, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous acute tumor lysis syndrome (ATLS) was diagnosed in a 10-month-old female DBA/1J sentinel mouse with leukemic lymphoma. The mouse was unable to maintain balance and died shortly after being observed rolling around in its cage. Disseminated neoplastic disease, including a large cranial mediastinal mass, enlarged lymph nodes and splenomegaly, was present at necropsy. Histopathologic examination revealed widespread massive necrosis of lymphoblastic tumor cells, and widely disseminated microemboli composed of nuclear and cytoplasmic cell debris. Although ATLS is widely recognized as an oncologic emergency in humans, acute lesions of ATLS have not been described. The mechanical obstruction of capillary beds by microemboli originating from disintegrating necrotic tumor cells was the likely cause of clinical signs and death in this mouse. We propose that similar microemboli may contribute to the pathogenesis of the acute renal failure and other clinical signs associated with ATLS in humans. Recognition of spontaneous ATLS in laboratory animals is especially important in studies that assess the efficacy and/or toxicity of anticancer treatments, where early deaths due to ATLS might mistakenly be attributed to a direct test article effect.

  11. Acute inflammation stimulates a regenerative response in the neonatal mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyong; Nie, Yu; Lian, Hong; Liu, Rui; He, Feng; Huang, Huihui; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac injury in neonatal 1-day-old mice stimulates a regenerative response characterized by reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation, which is distinguished from the fibrotic repair process in adults. Acute inflammation occurs immediately after heart injury and has generally been believed to exert a negative effect on heart regeneration by promoting scar formation in adults; however, little is known about the role of acute inflammation in the cardiac regenerative response in neonatal mice. Here, we show that acute inflammation induced cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical intramyocardial microinjection of immunogenic zymosan A particles into the neonatal mouse heart. We also found that cardiac injury-induced regenerative response was suspended after immunosuppression in neonatal mice, and that cardiomyocytes could not be reactivated to proliferate after neonatal heart injury in the absence of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the major downstream effector of IL-6 signaling, decreased reactive cardiomyocyte proliferation after apical resection. Our results indicate that acute inflammation stimulates the regenerative response in neonatal mouse heart, and suggest that modulation of inflammatory signals might have important implications in cardiac regenerative medicine.

  12. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models.

  13. Altered Intrinsic Pyramidal Neuron Properties and Pathway-Specific Synaptic Dysfunction Underlie Aberrant Hippocampal Network Function in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Clair A.; Witton, Jonathan; Nowacki, Jakub; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Jones, Matthew W.; Randall, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and deposition of tau protein aggregates is proposed to contribute to cognitive impairments in dementia by disrupting neuronal function in brain regions, including the hippocampus. We used a battery of in vivo and in vitro electrophysiological recordings in the rTg4510 transgenic mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau protein, to investigate the effects of tau pathology on hippocampal neuronal function in area CA1 of 7- to 8-month-old mice, an age point at which rTg4510 animals exhibit advanced tau pathology and progressive neurodegeneration. In vitro recordings revealed shifted theta-frequency resonance properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons, deficits in synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral synapses, and blunted plasticity and imbalanced inhibition at temporoammonic synapses. These changes were associated with aberrant CA1 network oscillations, pyramidal neuron bursting, and spatial information coding in vivo. Our findings relate tauopathy-associated changes in cellular neurophysiology to altered behavior-dependent network function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dementia is characterized by the loss of learning and memory ability. The deposition of tau protein aggregates in the brain is a pathological hallmark of dementia; and the hippocampus, a brain structure known to be critical in processing learning and memory, is one of the first and most heavily affected regions. Our results show that, in area CA1 of hippocampus, a region involved in spatial learning and memory, tau pathology is associated with specific disturbances in synaptic, cellular, and network-level function, culminating in the aberrant encoding of spatial information and spatial memory impairment. These studies identify several novel ways in which hippocampal information processing may be disrupted in dementia, which may provide targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26758828

  14. Differential Hippocampal Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis in an Etiology-Based Mouse Model of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zubenko, George S.; Hughes, Hugh B.; Jordan, Rick M.; Lyons-Weiler, James; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported the creation and initial characterization of an etiology-based recombinant mouse model of a severe and inherited form of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). This was achieved by replacing the corresponding mouse DNA sequence witha6-base DNA sequence from the human CREB1promoterthat is associated with MDD in individuals from families with recurrent, early-onset MDD (RE-MDD). In the current study, we explored the effect of the pathogenic Creb1 allele on gene expression in the mouse hippocampus, a brain region that is altered in structure and function in MDD. Mouse whole-genome profiling was performed using the Illumina MouseWG-6 v2.0 Expression BeadChip microarray. Univariate analysis identified 269 differentially-expressed genes in the hippocampus of the mutant mouse. Pathway analyses highlighted 11 KEGG pathways: the phosphatidylinositol signaling system, which has been widely implicated in MDD, Bipolar Disorder, and the action of mood stabilizers; gap junction and long-term potentiation, which mediate cognition and memory functions often impaired in MDD; cardiac muscle contraction, insulin signaling pathway, and three neurodegenerative brain disorders (Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s Diseases) that are associated with MDD; ribosome and proteasome pathways affecting protein synthesis/degradation; and the oxidative phosphorylation pathway that is key to energy production. These findings illustrate the merit of this congenic C57BL/6 recombinant mouse as a model of RE-MDD, and demonstrate its potential for highlighting molecular and cellular pathways that contribute to the biology of MDD. The results also inform our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the comorbidity of MDD with other disorders. PMID:25059218

  15. Copper Inhibits NMDA Receptor-Independent LTP and Modulates the Paired-Pulse Ratio after LTP in Mouse Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Weber, Nina L; Smith, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Copper misregulation has been implicated in the pathological processes underlying deterioration of learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Supporting this, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) by copper (II) has been well established, but the exact mechanism is poorly characterized. It is thought that an interaction between copper and postsynaptic NMDA receptors is a major part of the mechanism; however, in this study, we found that copper (II) inhibited NMDA receptor-independent LTP in the CA3 region of hippocampal slices. In addition, in the CA3 and CA1 regions, copper modulated the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) in an LTP-dependent manner. Combined, this suggests the involvement of a presynaptic mechanism in the modulation of synaptic plasticity by copper. Inhibition of the copper-dependent changes in the PPR with cyclothiazide suggested that this may involve an interaction with the presynaptic AMPA receptors that regulate neurotransmitter release.

  16. Changes in mouse cognition and hippocampal gene expression observed in a mild physical- and blast-traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, David; Rachmany, Lital; Rubovitch, Vardit; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Perez, Evelyn; Hoffer, Barry J.; Pick, Chaim G.; Greig, Nigel H.

    2013-01-01

    Warfare has long been associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in militarized zones. Common forms of TBI can be caused by a physical insult to the head-brain or by the effects of a high velocity blast shock wave generated by the detonation of an explosive device. While both forms of trauma are distinctly different regarding the mechanism of trauma induction, there are striking similarities in the cognitive and emotional status of survivors. Presently, proven effective therapeutics for the treatment of either form of TBI are unavailable. To be able to develop efficacious therapies, studies involving animal models of physical- and blast-TBI are required to identify possible novel or existing medicines that may be of value in the management of clinical events. We examined indices of cognition and anxiety-like behavior and the hippocampal gene transcriptome of mice subjected to both forms of TBI. We identified common behavioral deficits and gene expression regulations, in addition to unique injury-specific forms of gene regulation. Molecular pathways presented a pattern similar to that seen in gene expression. Interestingly, pathways connected to Alzheimer’s disease displayed a markedly different form of regulation depending on the type of TBI. While these data highlight similarities in behavioral outcomes after trauma, the divergence in hippocampal transcriptome observed between models suggests that, at the molecular level, the TBIs are quite different. These models may provide tools to help define therapeutic approaches for the treatment of physical- and blast-TBIs. Based upon observations of increasing numbers of personnel displaying TBI related emotional and behavioral changes in militarized zones, the development of efficacious therapies will become a national if not a global priority. PMID:23454194

  17. Acute stress increases neuropsin mRNA expression in the mouse hippocampus through the glucocorticoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Komai, Shoji

    2008-05-01

    Stress affects synaptic plasticity and may alter various types of behaviour, including anxiety or memory formation. In the present study, we examined the effects of acute stress (1 h restraint with or without tail-shock) on mRNA levels of a plasticity-related serine protease neuropsin (NP) in the hippocampus using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that NP mRNA expression was dramatically increased shortly after exposure to the acute restraint tail-shock stress and remained at high level for at least 24 h. The level of NP mRNA would be correlated to the elevated plasma concentration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) and to the stress intensity. Application of CORT either onto primary cultured hippocampal neurons (5 nM) or in vivo to adrenalectomized (ADX) mice (10 mg/kg B.W., s.c.) mimicked the effect of stress and significantly elevated NP mRNA. These results suggest that the upregulation of NP mRNA after stress is CORT-dependent and point to a role for neuropsin in stress-induced neuronal plasticity.

  18. Impaired long-term memory retention: common denominator for acutely or genetically reduced hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Nada M-B; Filipkowski, Robert K; Pruschy, Martin; Jaholkowski, Piotr; Winkler, Juergen; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2013-09-01

    In adult rodents, decreasing hippocampal neurogenesis experimentally using different approaches often impairs performance in hippocampus-dependent processes. Nonetheless, functional relevance of adult neurogenesis is far from being unraveled, and deficits so far described in animal models often lack reproducibility. One hypothesis is that such differences might be the consequence of the extent of the methodological specificity used to alter neurogenesis rather than the extent to which adult neurogenesis is altered. To address this, we focused on cranial irradiation, the most widely used technique to impair hippocampal neurogenesis and consequentially induce hippocampus-dependent behavioral deficits. To investigate the specificity of the technique, we thus exposed 4-5 months old female cyclin D2 knockout mice, a model lacking physiological levels of olfactory and hippocampal neurogenesis, to an X-ray dose of 10 Gy, reported to specifically affect transiently amplifying precursors. After a recovery period of 1.5 months, behavioral tests were performed and probed for locomotor activity, habituation, anxiety, and spatial learning and memory. Spatial learning in the Morris water maze was intact in all experimental groups. Although spatial memory retention assessed 24h following acquisition was also intact in all mice, irradiated wild type and cyclin D2 knockout mice displayed memory deficits one week after acquisition. In addition, we observed significant differences in tests addressing anxiety and locomotor activity dependent on the technique used to alter neurogenesis. Whereas irradiated mice were hyperactive regardless of their genotype, cyclin D2 knockout mice were hypoactive in most of the tests and displayed altered habituation. The present study emphasizes that different approaches aimed at decreasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis may result in distinct behavioral impairments related to locomotion and anxiety. In contrast, spatial long-term memory retention is

  19. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  20. Polyozellin, a key constituent of the edible mushroom Polyozellus multiplex, attenuates glutamate-induced mouse hippocampal neuronal HT22 cell death.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun-Ju; Song, Kyung-Sik

    2015-12-01

    Polyozellus multiplex (PM), a Korean edible mushroom, has biological activities such as chemoprevention of stomach cancer, inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and reduction of prolyl endopeptidase activity. However, there are little reports on the protective effects of PM or its constituents against glutamate-induced mouse hippocampal neuronal cell (HT22) death. In this study, polyozellin (PZ), a key constituent of PM, was applied to glutamate-treated HT22 cells to evaluate its neuroprotective mechanisms. PZ (25 μM) dramatically increased the HT22 cell viability when the cell death was induced by 5 mM glutamate for 12 h, which was mediated by inhibition of Ca(2+) influx, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation. PZ also regulated expression of Bid, Bcl-2, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), as well as phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These data suggest that PM and its constituent PZ might be useful for prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Tonic inhibition in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is mediated by alpha5 subunit-containing gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    PubMed

    Caraiscos, Valerie B; Elliott, Erin M; You-Ten, Kong E; Cheng, Victor Y; Belelli, Delia; Newell, J Glen; Jackson, Michael F; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rosahl, Thomas W; Wafford, Keith A; MacDonald, John F; Orser, Beverley A

    2004-03-01

    The principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is thought to regulate memory processes by activating transient inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Here we describe a nonsynaptic, tonic form of inhibition in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons that is generated by a distinct subpopulation of GABA type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs). This tonic inhibitory conductance is predominantly mediated by alpha5 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (alpha5GABA(A)Rs) that have different pharmacological and kinetic properties compared to postsynaptic receptors. GABA(A)Rs that mediate the tonic conductance are well suited to detect low, persistent, ambient concentrations of GABA in the extracellular space because they are highly sensitive to GABA and desensitize slowly. Moreover, the tonic current is highly sensitive to enhancement by amnestic drugs. Given the restricted expression of alpha5GABA(A)Rs to the hippocampus and the association between reduced alpha5GABA(A)R function and improved memory performance in behavioral studies, our results suggest that tonic inhibition mediated by alpha5GABA(A)Rs in hippocampal pyramidal neurons plays a key role in cognitive processes.

  2. Protective effects of caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester against acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingjuan; Jin, Minghua; Pi, Rongbiao; Zhang, Junjie; Chen, Meihui; Ouyang, Ying; Liu, Anmin; Chao, Xiaojuan; Liu, Peiqing; Liu, Jun; Ramassamy, Charles; Qin, Jian

    2013-02-22

    Acrolein-induced oxidative stress is hypothesized to involve in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeic acid (CA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) have antioxidative and neuroprotective properties. The present study investigated the protective effects of CA/CAPE on acrolein-induced oxidative neuronal toxicity. HT22 mouse hippocampal cells were pretreated with CA/CAPE and then exposed to acrolein. Cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) level were measured. MAPKs and Akt/GSK3β signaling proteins as well as α/β-secretase of amyloid protein precursor were assayed by Western blotting. Pretreatment with CA/CAPE significantly attenuated acrolein-induced neurotoxicity, ROS accumulation, and GSH depletion. Further study suggested that CA/CAPE showed protective effects against acrolein by modulating MAPKs and Akt/GSK3β signaling pathways. Moreover, CA/CAPE restored the changes of β-secretase (BACE-1) and/or activation of α-secretase (ADAM-10) induced by acrolein. These findings suggest that CA/CAPE may provide a promising approach for the treatment of acrolein-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as AD.

  3. Electron spin resonance assay of ascorbyl radical generation in mouse hippocampal slices during and after kainate-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Masumizu, Toshiki; Noda, Yasuko; Mori, Akitane; Packer, Lester

    2005-12-01

    As an index of oxidative status, we analyzed ascorbyl radical generation during and after kainate-induced seizures in mouse hippocampus, using an ESR spectrometer equipped with a special tissue-type quartz cell. A specific doublet ESR spectrum was observed after seizures, and the g value and the hyperfine coupling constant (hfcc) of the spectrum were identical with those of ascorbyl radical itself. Antiepileptic zonisamide inhibited the generation of ascorbyl radical accompanying the seizures.

  4. Neurovascular changes in acute, sub-acute and chronic mouse models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Mann, Dushyant; Bowyer, John F; Hanig, Joseph P; Schmued, Larry C; Paule, Merle G; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu

    2014-02-01

    Although selective neurodegeneration of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons is widely accepted as a cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), the role of vascular components in the brain in PD pathology is not well understood. However, the neurodegeneration seen in PD is known to be associated with neuroinflammatory-like changes that can affect or be associated with brain vascular function. Thus, dysfunction of the capillary endothelial cell component of neurovascular units present in the brain may contribute to the damage to dopaminergic neurons that occurs in PD. An animal model of PD employing acute, sub-acute and chronic exposures of mice to methyl-phenyl-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was used to determine the extent to which brain vasculature may be damaged in PD. Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin labeling of microvessels and endothelial cells was used to determine the extent of vascular damage produced by MPTP. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NeuN were employed to detect and quantify dopaminergic neuron damage in the striatum (CPu) and substantia nigra (SNc). Gliosis was evaluated through GFAP immunohistochemistry. MPTP treatment drastically reduced TH immunoreactive neurons in the SNc (20.68 ± 2.83 in acute; 22.98 ± 2.14 in sub-acute; 10.20 ± 2.24 in chronic vs 34.88 ± 2.91 in controls; p<0.001). Similarly, TH immunoreactive terminals were dramatically reduced in the CPu of MPTP treated mice. Additionally, all three MPTP exposures resulted in a decrease in the intensity, length, and number of vessels in both CPu and SNc. Degenerative vascular changes such as endothelial cell 'clusters' were also observed after MPTP suggesting that vasculature damage may be modifying the availability of nutrients and exposing blood cells and/or toxic substances to neurons and glia. In summary, vascular damage and degeneration could be an additional exacerbating factor in the progression of PD, and therapeutics that protect and insure vascular integrity may be novel treatments for

  5. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  6. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  7. No effect of running and laboratory housing on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in wild caught long-tailed wood mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Thomas; Klaus, Fabienne; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Amrein, Irmgard

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) in laboratory rodents have raised hopes for therapeutic interventions in neurodegenerative diseases and mood disorders, as AHN can be modulated by physical exercise, stress and environmental changes in these animals. Since it is not known whether cell proliferation and neurogenesis in wild living mice can be experimentally changed, this study investigates the responsiveness of AHN to voluntary running and to environmental change in wild caught long-tailed wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus). Results Statistical analyses show that running had no impact on cell proliferation (p = 0.44), neurogenesis (p = 0.94) or survival of newly born neurons (p = 0.58). Likewise, housing in the laboratory has no effect on AHN. In addition, interindividual differences in the level of neurogenesis are not related to interindividual differences of running wheel performance (rs = -0.09, p = 0.79). There is a correlation between the number of proliferating cells and the number of cells of neuronal lineage (rs = 0.63, p < 0.001) and the number of pyknotic cells (rs = 0.5, p = 0.009), respectively. Conclusion Plasticity of adult neurogenesis is an established feature in strains of house mice and brown rats. Here, we demonstrate that voluntary running and environmental changes which are effective in house mice and brown rats cannot influence AHN in long-tailed wood mice. This indicates that in wild long-tailed wood mice different regulatory mechanisms act on cell proliferation and neurogenesis. If this difference reflects a species-specific adaptation or a broader adaptive strategy to a natural vs. domestic environment is unknown. PMID:19419549

  8. Characterization of altered intrinsic excitability in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells of the Aβ-overproducing PDAPP mouse.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, T L; Brown, J T; Randall, A D

    2014-04-01

    Transgenic mice that accumulate Aβ peptides in the CNS are commonly used to interrogate functional consequences of Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloidopathy. In addition to changes to synaptic function, there is also growing evidence that changes to intrinsic excitability of neurones can arise in these models of amyloidopathy. Furthermore, some of these alterations to intrinsic properties may occur relatively early within the age-related progression of experimental amyloidopathy. Here we report a detailed comparison between the intrinsic excitability properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones in wild-type (WT) and PDAPP mice. The latter is a well-established model of Aβ accumulation which expresses human APP harbouring the Indiana (V717F) mutation. At the age employed in this study (9-10 months) CNS Abeta was elevated in PDAPP mice but significant plaque pathology was absent. PDAPP mice exhibited no differences in subthreshold intrinsic properties including resting potential, input resistance, membrane time constant and sag. When CA1 cells of PDAPP mice were given depolarizing stimuli of various amplitudes they initially fired at a higher frequency than WT cells. Commensurate with this, PDAPP cells exhibited a larger fast afterdepolarizing potential. PDAPP mice had narrower spikes but action potential threshold, rate of rise and peak were not different. Thus not all changes seen in our previous studies of amyloidopathy models were present in PDAPP mice; however, narrower spikes, larger ADPs and the propensity to fire at higher frequencies were consistent with our prior work and thus may represent robust, cross-model, indices of amyloidopathy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neurodevelopment Disorder'.

  9. In vivo two-photon imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons in dentate gyrus using a light source based on a high-peak power gain-switched laser diode.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ryosuke; Sawada, Kazuaki; Kusama, Yuta; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Kanazawa, Shinya; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    In vivo two-photon microscopy is an advantageous technique for observing the mouse brain at high resolution. In this study, we developed a two-photon microscopy method that uses a 1064-nm gain-switched laser diode-based light source with average power above 4 W, pulse width of 7.5-picosecond, repetition rate of 10-MHz, and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube. Using this newly developed two-photon microscope for in vivo imaging, we were able to successfully image hippocampal neurons in the dentate gyrus and obtain panoramic views of CA1 pyramidal neurons and cerebral cortex, regardless of age of the mouse. Fine dendrites in hippocampal CA1 could be imaged with a high peak-signal-to-background ratio that could not be achieved by titanium sapphire laser excitation. Finally, our system achieved multicolor imaging with neurons and blood vessels in the hippocampal region in vivo. These results indicate that our two-photon microscopy system is suitable for investigations of various neural functions, including the morphological changes undergone by neurons during physiological phenomena. PMID:25798313

  10. In vivo two-photon imaging of mouse hippocampal neurons in dentate gyrus using a light source based on a high-peak power gain-switched laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Ryosuke; Sawada, Kazuaki; Kusama, Yuta; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Kanazawa, Shinya; Kozawa, Yuichi; Sato, Shunichi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon microscopy is an advantageous technique for observing the mouse brain at high resolution. In this study, we developed a two-photon microscopy method that uses a 1064-nm gain-switched laser diode-based light source with average power above 4 W, pulse width of 7.5-picosecond, repetition rate of 10-MHz, and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube. Using this newly developed two-photon microscope for in vivo imaging, we were able to successfully image hippocampal neurons in the dentate gyrus and obtain panoramic views of CA1 pyramidal neurons and cerebral cortex, regardless of age of the mouse. Fine dendrites in hippocampal CA1 could be imaged with a high peak-signal-to-background ratio that could not be achieved by titanium sapphire laser excitation. Finally, our system achieved multicolor imaging with neurons and blood vessels in the hippocampal region in vivo. These results indicate that our two-photon microscopy system is suitable for investigations of various neural functions, including the morphological changes undergone by neurons during physiological phenomena. PMID:25798313

  11. Variations in elemental compositions of rat hippocampal formation between acute and latent phases of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy: an X-ray fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Chwiej, J; Dulinska, J; Janeczko, K; Appel, K; Setkowicz, Z

    2012-06-01

    There is growing experimental evidence that tracing the elements involved in brain hyperexcitability, excitotoxicity, and/or subsequent neurodegeneration could be a valuable source of data on the molecular mechanisms triggering or promoting further development of epilepsy. The most frequently used experimental model of the temporal lobe epilepsy observed in clinical practice is the one based on pilocarpine-induced seizures. In the frame of this study, the elemental anomalies occurring for the rat hippocampal tissue in acute and silent periods after injection of pilocarpine in rats were compared. X-ray fluorescence microscopy was applied for the topographic and quantitative elemental analysis. The differences in the levels of elements such as P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn between the rats 3 days (SE72) and 6 h (SE6) after pilocarpine injection as well as naive controls were examined. Comparison of SE72 and control groups showed, for specific areas of the hippocampal formation, lower levels of P, K, Cu, and Zn, and an increase in Ca accumulation. These results as well as further analysis of the differences between the SE72 and SE6 groups confirmed that seizure-induced excitotoxicity as well as mossy fiber sprouting are the mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative processes which may finally lead to spontaneous seizures in the chronic period of the pilocarpine model. Moreover, in the light of the results obtained, Cu seems to play a very important role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy in this animal model. For all areas analyzed, the levels of this element recorded in the latent period were not only lower than those for controls but were even lower than the levels found in the acute period. The decreased hippocampal accumulation of Cu in the phase of behavior and EEG stabilization, a possible inhibitory effect of this element on excitatory amino acid receptors, and enhanced seizure susceptibility in Menkes disease (an inherited Cu transport disorder leading to Cu

  12. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  13. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  14. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  15. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Peter J.; Tarasenko, Tatiana N.; Wang, Tony; Levy, Ezra; Zerfas, Patricia M.; Moran, Thomas; Lee, Hye Seung; Bequette, Brian J.; Diaz, George A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA). A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza) using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT) and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other types

  16. A genetic mouse model to investigate hyperoxic acute lung injury survival.

    PubMed

    Prows, Daniel R; Hafertepen, Amanda P; Gibbons, William J; Winterberg, Abby V; Nick, Todd G

    2007-08-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a devastating disease that maintains a high mortality rate, despite decades of research. Hyperoxia, a universal treatment for ALI and other critically ill patients, can itself cause pulmonary damage, which drastically restricts its therapeutic potential. We stipulate that having the ability to use higher levels of supplemental O2 for longer periods would improve recovery rates. Toward this goal, a mouse model was sought to identify genes contributing to hyperoxic ALI (HALI) mortality. Eighteen inbred mouse strains were screened in continuous >95% O2. A significant survival difference was identified between sensitive C57BL/6J and resistant 129X1/SvJ strains. Although resistant, only one-fourth of 129X1/SvJ mice survived longer than any C57BL/6J mouse, demonstrating decreased penetrance of resistance. A survival time difference between reciprocal F1 mice implicated a parent-of-origin (imprinting) effect. To further evaluate imprinting and begin to delineate the genetic components of HALI survival, we generated and phenotyped offspring from all four possible intercrosses. Segregation analysis supported maternal inheritance of one or more genes but paternal inheritance of one or more contributor genes. A significant sex effect was demonstrated, with males more resistant than females for all F2 crosses. Survival time ranges and sensitive-to-resistant ratios of the different F2 crosses also supported imprinting and predicted that increased survival is due to dominant resistance alleles contributed by both the resistant and sensitive parental strains. HALI survival is multigenic with a complex mode of inheritance, which should be amenable to genetic dissection with this mouse model.

  17. Parkin overexpression ameliorates hippocampal long-term potentiation and β-amyloid load in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoqi; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Guoqi; Zhuang, YingHan; Suo, Haiyun; Wang, Pan; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Huang, Yufang; Yu, Mei; Bian, MinJuan; Sheng, Zhejin; Fei, Jian; Song, Houyan; Behnisch, Thomas; Huang, Fang

    2014-02-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a severe decline of memory performance. A widely studied AD mouse model is the APPswe/PSEN1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) strain, as mice exhibit amyloid plaques as well as impaired memory capacities. To test whether restoring synaptic plasticity and decreasing β-amyloid load by Parkin could represent a potential therapeutic target for AD, we crossed APP/PS1 transgenic mice with transgenic mice overexpressing the ubiquitin ligase Parkin and analyzed offspring properties. Overexpression of Parkin in APP/PS1 transgenic mice restored activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and rescued behavioral abnormalities. Moreover, overexpression of Parkin was associated with down-regulation of APP protein expression, decreased β-amyloid load and reduced inflammation. Our data suggest that Parkin could be a promising target for AD therapy.

  18. ACUTE ETHANOL DISRUPTS PHOTIC AND SEROTONERGIC CIRCADIAN CLOCK PHASE-RESETTING IN THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Allison J.; Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse is associated with impaired circadian rhythms and sleep. Ethanol administration disrupts circadian clock phase-resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on the circadian timing system. In this study, we extend previous work in C57BL/6J mice to: 1) characterize the SCN pharmacokinetics of acute systemic ethanol administration; 2) explore the effects of acute ethanol on photic and non-photic phase-resetting; and 2) determine if the SCN is a direct target for photic effects. Methods First, microdialysis was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of acute i.p. injections of 3 doses of ethanol (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg) in the mouse suprachiasmatic (SCN) circadian clock. Second, the effects of acute i.p. ethanol administration on photic phase-delays and serotonergic ([+]8-OH-DPAT-induced) phase-advances of the circadian activity rhythm were assessed. Third, the effects of reverse-microdialysis ethanol perfusion of the SCN on photic phase-resetting were characterized. Results Peak ethanol levels from the 3 doses of ethanol in the SCN occurred within 20–40 min post-injection with half-lives for clearance ranging from 0.6–1.8 hr. Systemic ethanol treatment dose-dependently attenuated photic and serotonergic phase-resetting. This treatment also did not affect basal SCN neuronal activity as assessed by Fos expression. Intra-SCN perfusion with ethanol markedly reduced photic phase-delays. Conclusions These results confirm that acute ethanol attenuates photic phase-delay shifts and serotonergic phase-advance shifts in the mouse. This dual effect could disrupt photic and non-photic entrainment mechanisms governing circadian clock timing. It is also significant that the SCN clock is a direct target for disruptive effects of ethanol on photic shifting. Such actions by ethanol could underlie the disruptive effects of alcohol abuse on behavioral, physiological, and endocrine rhythms associated with alcoholism. PMID:21463340

  19. Ethanol inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated current in mouse hippocampal neurones: whole-cell patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, Robert W; White, Geoffrey; Lovinger, David M; Weight, Forrest F

    1997-01-01

    The action of ethanol on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated ion current was studied in mouse hippocampal neurones in culture using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Ethanol inhibited NMDA-activated current in a voltage-independent manner, and did not alter the reversal potential of NMDA-activated current. Concentration–response analysis of NMDA- and glycine-activated current revealed that ethanol decreased the maximal response to both agonists without affecting their EC50 values. The polyamine spermine (1 μM) increased amplitude of NMDA-activated current but did not alter the percentage inhibition of ethanol. Compared to an extracellular pH of 7.0, pH 6.0 decreased and pH 8.0 increased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but these changes in pH did not significantly alter the percentage inhibition by ethanol. The sulphydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol (2 mM) increased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but did not affect the percentage inhibition by ethanol. Mg2+ (10, 100, 500 μM), Zn2+ (5, 20 μM) or ketamine (2, 10 μM) decreased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but did not affect the percentage inhibition by ethanol. The observations are consistent with ethanol inhibiting the function of NMDA receptors by a non-competitive mechanism that does not involve several modulatory sites on the NMDA receptor–ionophore complex. PMID:9401766

  20. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome. PMID:27356057

  1. Quantitative Evaluation and Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative RT-PCR in Mouse Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhaoping; Gao, Jinhang; Lv, Xiuhe; Yang, Wenjuan; Wen, Shilei; Tong, Huan; Tang, Chengwei

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of differences in gene expression is dependent on normalization using reference genes. However, the expression of many of these reference genes, as evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR, is upregulated in acute pancreatitis, so they cannot be used as the standard for gene expression in this condition. For this reason, we sought to identify a stable reference gene, or a suitable combination, for expression analysis in acute pancreatitis. The expression stability of 10 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18sRNA, TUBB, B2M, HPRT1, UBC, YWHAZ, EF-1α, and RPL-13A) was analyzed using geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software and evaluated according to variations in the raw Ct values. These reference genes were evaluated using a comprehensive method, which ranked the expression stability of these genes as follows (from most stable to least stable): RPL-13A, YWHAZ > HPRT1 > GAPDH > UBC > EF-1α > 18sRNA > B2M > TUBB > ACTB. RPL-13A was the most suitable reference gene, and the combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ was the most stable group of reference genes in our experiments. The expression levels of ACTB, TUBB, and B2M were found to be significantly upregulated during acute pancreatitis, whereas the expression level of 18sRNA was downregulated. Thus, we recommend the use of RPL-13A or a combination of RPL-13A and YWHAZ for normalization in qRT-PCR analyses of gene expression in mouse models of acute pancreatitis. PMID:27069927

  2. Acute Radiation Syndrome Severity Score System in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Ossetrova, Natalia I; Ney, Patrick H; Condliffe, Donald P; Krasnopolsky, Katya; Hieber, Kevin P

    2016-08-01

    Radiation accidents or terrorist attacks can result in serious consequences for the civilian population and for military personnel responding to such emergencies. The early medical management situation requires quantitative indications for early initiation of cytokine therapy in individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and effective triage tools for first responders in mass-casualty radiological incidents. Previously established animal (Mus musculus, Macaca mulatta) total-body irradiation (γ-exposure) models have evaluated a panel of radiation-responsive proteins that, together with peripheral blood cell counts, create a multiparametic dose-predictive algorithm with a threshold for detection of ~1 Gy from 1 to 7 d after exposure as well as demonstrate the acute radiation syndrome severity score systems created similar to the Medical Treatment Protocols for Radiation Accident Victims developed by Fliedner and colleagues. The authors present a further demonstration of the acute radiation sickness severity score system in a mouse (CD2F1, males) TBI model (1-14 Gy, Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min) based on multiple biodosimetric endpoints. This includes the acute radiation sickness severity Observational Grading System, survival rate, weight changes, temperature, peripheral blood cell counts and radiation-responsive protein expression profile: Flt-3 ligand, interleukin 6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, thrombopoietin, erythropoietin, and serum amyloid A. Results show that use of the multiple-parameter severity score system facilitates identification of animals requiring enhanced monitoring after irradiation and that proteomics are a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposure, enhancing accuracy and discrimination index for acute radiation sickness response categories and early prediction of outcome.

  3. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Negative Feedback Inhibition: Enhanced Hippocampal Glucocorticoid Signaling despite Lower Cytoplasmic GR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Füchsl, Andrea M.; Reber, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated mouse model for chronic psychosocial stress, results in increased basal and acute stress-induced plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. We assessed CSC effects on hippocampal glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and FK506 binding protein (FKBP51) expression, acute heterotypic stressor-induced GR translocation, as well as GC effects on gene expression and cell viability in isolated hippocampal cells. CSC mice showed decreased GR mRNA and cytoplasmic protein levels compared with single-housed control (SHC) mice. Basal and acute stress-induced nuclear GR protein expression were comparable between CSC and SHC mice, as were MR and FKBP51 mRNA and/or cytoplasmic protein levels. In vitro the effect of corticosterone (CORT) on hippocampal cell viability and gene transcription was more pronounced in CSC versus SHC mice. In summary, CSC mice show an, if at all, increased hippocampal GC signaling capacity despite lower cytoplasmic GR protein expression, making negative feedback deficits in the hippocampus unlikely to contribute to the increased ACTH drive following CSC. PMID:27057751

  4. BIM mediates oncogene inactivation-induced apoptosis in multiple transgenic mouse models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yulin; Deutzmann, Anja; Choi, Peter S.; Fan, Alice C.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene inactivation in both clinical targeted therapies and conditional transgenic mouse cancer models can induce significant tumor regression associated with the robust induction of apoptosis. Here we report that in MYC-, RAS-, and BCR-ABL-induced acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation is mediated by the same pro-apoptotic protein, BIM. The induction of BIMin the MYC- and RAS-driven leukemia is mediated by the downregulation of miR-17-92. Overexpression of miR-17-92 blocked the induction of apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation in the MYC and RAS-driven but not in the BCR-ABL-driven ALL leukemia. Hence, our results provide novel insight into the mechanism of apoptosis upon oncogene inactivation and suggest that induction of BIM-mediated apoptosis may be an important therapeutic approach for ALL. PMID:27095570

  5. Opposing actions of environmental enrichment and Alzheimer's disease on the expression of hippocampal microRNAs in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Barak, B; Shvarts-Serebro, I; Modai, S; Gilam, A; Okun, E; Michaelson, D M; Mattson, M P; Shomron, N; Ashery, U

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Although there are no drugs that modify the disease process, exposure to an enriched environment (EE) can slow the disease progression. Here, we characterize the effects of AD and EE on the post-transcriptional regulators, microRNAs (miRNAs), which may contribute to the detrimental and beneficial effects of AD and EE, respectively, on synaptic plasticity-related proteins and AD pathology. We found for the first time miRNAs that were inversely regulated in AD and EE, and may affect synaptic proteins and modulators, molecular factors associated with AD pathology, and survival and neuroprotective factors. MiRNAs that were upregulated only in 3xTgAD mice model of AD compared with their control mice were localized to synapses, predicted to downregulate essential synaptic proteins and are highly associated with regulating apoptosis, AD-associated processes and axon guidance. Studying the progressive change in miRNAs modulation during aging of 3xTgAD mice, we identified miRNAs that were regulated in earlier stages of AD, suggesting them as potential AD biomarkers. Last, we characterized AD- and EE-related effects in the mouse hippocampus on tomosyn protein levels, an inhibitor of the synaptic transmission machinery. While EE reduced tomosyn levels, tomosyn levels were increased in old 3xTgAD mice, suggesting a role for tomosyn in the impairment of synaptic transmission in AD. Interestingly, we found that miR-325 regulates the expression levels of tomosyn as demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay, and that miR-325 was downregulated in AD and upregulated following EE. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular and cellular processes in AD pathology, following EE, and the interplay between the two processes, and open new avenues for the studies of understanding and controlling AD. PMID:24022509

  6. Glucose-Stimulated Calcium Dynamics in Islets of Langerhans in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Stožer, Andraž; Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2013-01-01

    In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future. PMID:23358454

  7. Normothermic Mouse Functional MRI of Acute Focal Thermostimulation for Probing Nociception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Henning Matthias; Hentschel, Jan; Marek, Jaroslav; Huelnhagen, Till; Todiras, Mihail; Kox, Stefanie; Waiczies, Sonia; Hodge, Russ; Bader, Michael; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Combining mouse genomics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a promising tool to unravel the molecular mechanisms of chronic pain. Probing murine nociception via the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is still challenging due to methodological constraints. Here we report on the reproducible application of acute noxious heat stimuli to examine the feasibility and limitations of functional brain mapping for central pain processing in mice. Recent technical and procedural advances were applied for enhanced BOLD signal detection and a tight control of physiological parameters. The latter includes the development of a novel mouse cradle designed to maintain whole-body normothermia in anesthetized mice during fMRI in a way that reflects the thermal status of awake, resting mice. Applying mild noxious heat stimuli to wildtype mice resulted in highly significant BOLD patterns in anatomical brain structures forming the pain matrix, which comprise temporal signal intensity changes of up to 6% magnitude. We also observed sub-threshold correlation patterns in large areas of the brain, as well as alterations in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in response to the applied stimulus.

  8. Normothermic Mouse Functional MRI of Acute Focal Thermostimulation for Probing Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Henning Matthias; Hentschel, Jan; Marek, Jaroslav; Huelnhagen, Till; Todiras, Mihail; Kox, Stefanie; Waiczies, Sonia; Hodge, Russ; Bader, Michael; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Combining mouse genomics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a promising tool to unravel the molecular mechanisms of chronic pain. Probing murine nociception via the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is still challenging due to methodological constraints. Here we report on the reproducible application of acute noxious heat stimuli to examine the feasibility and limitations of functional brain mapping for central pain processing in mice. Recent technical and procedural advances were applied for enhanced BOLD signal detection and a tight control of physiological parameters. The latter includes the development of a novel mouse cradle designed to maintain whole-body normothermia in anesthetized mice during fMRI in a way that reflects the thermal status of awake, resting mice. Applying mild noxious heat stimuli to wildtype mice resulted in highly significant BOLD patterns in anatomical brain structures forming the pain matrix, which comprise temporal signal intensity changes of up to 6% magnitude. We also observed sub-threshold correlation patterns in large areas of the brain, as well as alterations in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in response to the applied stimulus. PMID:26821826

  9. Homeostasis alteration within small intestinal mucosa after acute enteral refeeding in total parenteral nutrition mouse model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongjia; Barrett, Meredith; Hou, Yue; Yoon, Hong Keun; Ochi, Takanori; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2016-02-15

    Feeding strategies to care for patients who transition from enteral nutrient deprivation while on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to enteral feedings generally proceed to full enteral nutrition once the gastrointestinal tract recovers; however, an increasing body of literature suggests that a subgroup of patients may actually develop an increased incidence of adverse events, including death. To examine this further, we studied the effects of acute refeeding in a mouse model of TPN. Interestingly, refeeding led to some beneficial effects, including prevention in the decline in intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation. However, refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as an upregulation in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). Refeeding also failed to prevent TPN-associated increases in IEC apoptosis, loss of epithelial barrier function, and failure of the leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5-positive stem cell expression. Transitioning from TPN to enteral feedings led to a partial restoration of the small bowel microbial population. In conclusion, while acute refeeding led to some restoration of normal gastrointestinal physiology, enteral refeeding led to a significant increase in mucosal inflammatory markers and may suggest alternative strategies to enteral refeeding should be considered.

  10. Isocitrate treatment of acute anemia of inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Airie; Fung, Eileen; Parikh, Sona G; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and severe anemia of inflammation (AI) is a common complication of various clinical syndromes, including fulminant infections, critical illness with multiorgan failure, and exacerbations of autoimmune diseases. Building on recent data showing beneficial results with isocitrate treatment for chronic low-grade AI in a rat model, we used a mouse model of acute and severe AI induced by intraperitoneal heat-killed Brucella abortus to determine if isocitrate would be effective in this more stringent application. Inflamed mice treated with isocitrate developed an early but transient improvement in hemoglobin compared to solvent-treated controls, with a robust improvement on day 7, and only a trend towards improvement by day 14. Reticulocyte counts were increased in treated mice transiently, with no significant difference by day 21. Serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels were similar in treated versus control mice, indicating that isocitrate increased sensitivity to EPO. Serum and tissue iron levels showed no significant differences between the treated and control mice, ruling out improved iron availability as the cause of the increased response to endogenous EPO. Compared to the milder rat model, much higher doses of isocitrate were required for a relatively modest benefit.

  11. Selective depletion of mouse kidney proximal straight tubule cells causes acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Michiko; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Morizane, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Kunie; Taya, Choji; Akita, Yoshiko; Joh, Kensuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Kohno, Kenji; Suzuki, Akemi; Yonekawa, Hiromichi

    2012-02-01

    The proximal straight tubule (S3 segment) of the kidney is highly susceptible to ischemia and toxic insults but has a remarkable capacity to repair its structure and function. In response to such injuries, complex processes take place to regenerate the epithelial cells of the S3 segment; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this regeneration are still being investigated. By applying the "toxin receptor mediated cell knockout" method under the control of the S3 segment-specific promoter/enhancer, Gsl5, which drives core 2 β-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase gene expression, we established a transgenic mouse line expressing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor only in the S3 segment. The administration of DT to these transgenic mice caused the selective ablation of S3 segment cells in a dose-dependent manner, and transgenic mice exhibited polyuria containing serum albumin and subsequently developed oliguria. An increase in the concentration of blood urea nitrogen was also observed, and the peak BUN levels occurred 3-7 days after DT administration. Histological analysis revealed that the most severe injury occurred in the S3 segments of the proximal tubule, in which tubular cells were exfoliated into the tubular lumen. In addition, aquaporin 7, which is localized exclusively to the S3 segment, was diminished. These results indicate that this transgenic mouse can suffer acute kidney injury (AKI) caused by S3 segment-specific damage after DT administration. This transgenic line offers an excellent model to uncover the mechanisms of AKI and its rapid recovery.

  12. Influence of radiation quality on mouse chromosome 2 deletions in radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Manning, Grainne; Bouffler, Simon; Badie, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Leukaemia is the prevailing neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic system. Epidemiological analyses of the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombings show that exposure to ionising radiation (IR) can cause leukaemia. Although a clear association between radiation exposure and leukaemia development is acknowledged, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A hemizygous deletion on mouse chromosome 2 (del2) is a common feature in several mouse strains susceptible to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). The deletion is an early event detectable 24h after exposure in bone marrow cells. Ultimately, 15-25% of exposed animals develop AML with 80-90% of cases carrying del2. Molecular mapping of leukaemic cell genomes identified a minimal deleted region (MDR) on chromosome 2 (chr2) in which a tumour suppressor gene, Sfpi1 is located, encoding the transcription factor PU.1, essential in haematopoiesis. The remaining copy of Sfpi1 has a point mutation in the coding sequence for the DNA-binding domain of the protein in 70% of rAML, which alters a single CpG sequence in the codon for arginine residue R235. In order to identify chr2 deletions and Sfpi.1/PU.1 loss, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a unique panel of 79rAMLs. Using a custom made CGH array specifically designed for mouse chr2, we analysed at unprecedentedly high resolution (1.4M array- 148bp resolution) the size of the MDR in low LET and high-LET induced rAMLs (32 X-ray- and 47 neutron-induced). Sequencing of Sfpi1/PU.1DNA binding domain identified the presence of R235 point mutations, showing no influence of radiation quality on R235 type or frequency. We identified for the first time rAML cases with complex del2 in a subset of neutron-induced AMLs. This study allowed us to re-define the MDR to a much smaller 5.5Mb region (still including Sfpi1/PU.1), identical regardless of radiation quality.

  13. MEK1/2 inhibitors reverse acute vascular occlusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulin; Schwartz, Evan A; Palmer, Gregory M; Zennadi, Rahima

    2016-03-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), treatment of recurrent vasoocclusive episodes, leading to pain crises and organ damage, is still a therapeutic challenge. Vasoocclusion is caused primarily by adherence of homozygous for hemoglobin S (SS) red blood cells (SSRBCs) and leukocytes to the endothelium. We tested the therapeutic benefits of MEK1/2 inhibitors in reversing vasoocclusion in nude and humanized SCD mouse models of acute vasoocclusive episodes using intravital microscopy. Administration of 0.2, 0.3, 1, or 2 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice before human SSRBC infusion inhibited SSRBC adhesion in inflamed vessels, prevented the progression of vasoocclusion, and reduced SSRBC organ sequestration. By use of a more clinically relevant protocol, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor given to TNF-α-pretreated nude mice after human SSRBC infusion and onset of vasoocclusion reversed SSRBC adhesion and vasoocclusion and restored blood flow. In SCD mice, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.1 mg/kg MEK1/2 inhibitor also reversed leukocyte and erythrocyte adhesion after the inflammatory trigger of vasoocclusion and improved microcirculatory blood flow. Cell adhesion was reversed by shedding of endothelial E-selectin, P-selectin, and αvβ3 integrin, and leukocyte CD44 and β2 integrin. Thus, MEK1/2 inhibitors, by targeting the adhesive function of SSRBCs and leukocytes, could represent a valuable therapeutic intervention for acute sickle cell vasoocclusive crises.

  14. Differential effects of acute morphine administrations on polymorphonuclear cell metabolism in various mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, P; Tavazzi, B; Gaziano, R; Lazzarino, G; Casalinuovo, I A; Di Pierro, D; Garaci, E

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that an acute morphine treatment dose-dependently alters the energetic and oxidative metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from BALB/c and DBA/2 mice, while phagocytic cells from C57BL/6 were not affected. In sensitive mouse strains, i.e. BALB/c and DBA/2, morphine decreased both ATP concentration and energy charge potential. At the same time, ATP catabolic products, i.e. nucleosides (inosine+adenosine) and oxypurines (hypoxanthine+xanthine+uric acid), significantly increased, indicating an imbalance between energy production and consumption. Morphine treatment also induced malondialdehyde and superoxide anions production in leukocyte cells from sensitive mice. The opiate antagonist naloxone blocked morphine-induced modifications by the lower morphine dose. The same parameters in cells from C57BL/6 mice were not affected. These findings confirm that: i) the phagocytic cells are an important target for the in vivo effects of morphine, and ii) the genotype-dependent variation influences the immunological responsiveness to opiates.

  15. Mouse models of human PIK3CA-related brain overgrowth have acutely treatable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Achira; Skibo, Jonathan; Kalume, Franck; Ni, Jing; Rankin, Sherri; Lu, Yiling; Dobyns, William B; Mills, Gordon B; Zhao, Jean J; Baker, Suzanne J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PIK3CA) and other PI3K-AKT pathway components have been associated with cancer and a wide spectrum of brain and body overgrowth. In the brain, the phenotypic spectrum of PIK3CA-related segmental overgrowth includes bilateral dysplastic megalencephaly, hemimegalencephaly and focal cortical dysplasia, the most common cause of intractable pediatric epilepsy. We generated mouse models expressing the most common activating Pik3ca mutations (H1047R and E545K) in developing neural progenitors. These accurately recapitulate all the key human pathological features including brain enlargement, cortical malformation, hydrocephalus and epilepsy, with phenotypic severity dependent on the mutant allele and its time of activation. Underlying mechanisms include increased proliferation, cell size and altered white matter. Notably, we demonstrate that acute 1 hr-suppression of PI3K signaling despite the ongoing presence of dysplasia has dramatic anti-epileptic benefit. Thus PI3K inhibitors offer a promising new avenue for effective anti-epileptic therapy for intractable pediatric epilepsy patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12703.001 PMID:26633882

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of Acute Endurance Exercise-Induced Translational Regulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Hiroaki; Yada, Koichi; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Exercise dynamically changes skeletal muscle protein synthesis to respond and adapt to the external and internal stimuli. Many studies have focused on overall protein synthesis to understand how exercise regulates the muscular adaptation. However, despite the probability that each gene transcript may have its own unique translational characteristics and would be differentially regulated at translational level, little attention has been paid to how exercise affects translational regulation of individual genes at a genome-wide scale. Here, we conducted a genome-wide translational analysis using ribosome profiling to investigate the effect of a single bout of treadmill running (20 m/min for 60 min) on mouse gastrocnemius. Global translational profiles largely differed from those in transcription even at a basal resting condition as well as immediately after exercise. As for individual gene, Slc25a25 (Solute carrier family 25, member 25), localized in mitochondrial inner membrane and maintaining ATP homeostasis and endurance performance, showed significant up-regulation at translational level. However, multiple regression analysis suggests that Slc25a25 protein degradation may also have a role in mediating Slc25a25 protein abundance in the basal and early stages after acute endurance exercise. PMID:26845575

  17. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  18. Metabolomic Analysis of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells in Response to Autophagy Induced by Acute Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Sensen; Weng, Rui; Li, Linnan; Xu, Xinyuan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) is essential in the formation of the autophagophore and is indispensable for autophagy induction. Autophagy will exist in lower level or even be blocked in cells without Atg7. Even though the possible signaling pathways of Atg7 have been proposed, the metabolomic responses under acute starvation in cells with and without Atg7 have not been elucidated. This study therefore was designed and aimed to reveal the metabolomics of Atg7-dependent autophagy through metabolomic analysis of Atg7−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) and wild-type MEFs along with the starvation time. 30 significantly altered metabolites were identified in response to nutrient stress, which were mainly associated with amino acid, energy, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism. For the wild-type MEFs, the induction of autophagy protected cell survival with some up-regulated lipids during the first two hours’ starvation, while the subsequent apoptosis resulted in the decrease of cell viability after four hours’ starvation. For the Atg7−/− MEFs, apoptosis perhaps led to the deactivation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle due to the lack of autophagy, which resulted in the immediate drop of cellular viability under starvation. These results contributed to the metabolomic study and provided new insights into the mechanism associated with Atg7-dependent autophagy. PMID:27703171

  19. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms.

  20. Modulation of Hippocampal Neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 Regulatory Protein 2 (Faim2) in the Course of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B.; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis. PMID:24335530

  1. Modulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 regulatory protein 2 (Faim2) in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis.

  2. Imaging pheromone sensing in a mouse vomeronasal acute tissue slice preparation.

    PubMed

    Brechbühl, Julien; Luyet, Gaëlle; Moine, Fabian; Rodriguez, Ivan; Broillet, Marie-Christine

    2011-01-01

    . Here, we present an acute tissue slice preparation of the mouse VNO for performing calcium imaging investigations. This physiological approach allows observations, in the natural environment of a living tissue, of general or individual subpopulations of VSNs previously loaded with Fura-2AM, a calcium dye. This method is also convenient for studying any GFP-tagged pheromone receptor and is adaptable for the use of other fluorescent calcium probes. As an example, we use here a VG mouse line, in which the translation of the pheromone V1rb2 receptor is linked to the expression of GFP by a polycistronic strategy.

  3. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jun; Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan; Fan, Xiaotang; Xu, Haiwei; Bai, Yun

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  4. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  5. Mitochondrial Alterations and Oxidative Stress in an Acute Transient Mouse Model of Muscle Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  6. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide.

  7. The impact of aging, hearing loss, and body weight on mouse hippocampal redox state, measured in brain slices using fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Kevin A; Choi, Hyun W; Ravindra, Aditya; Llano, Daniel Adolfo

    2016-06-01

    The relationships between oxidative stress in the hippocampus and other aging-related changes such as hearing loss, cortical thinning, or changes in body weight are not yet known. We measured the redox ratio in a number of neural structures in brain slices taken from young and aged mice. Hearing thresholds, body weight, and cortical thickness were also measured. We found striking aging-related increases in the redox ratio that were isolated to the stratum pyramidale, while such changes were not observed in thalamus or cortex. These changes were driven primarily by changes in flavin adenine dinucleotide, not nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride. Multiple regression analysis suggested that neither hearing threshold nor cortical thickness independently contributed to this change in hippocampal redox ratio. However, body weight did independently contribute to predicted changes in hippocampal redox ratio. These data suggest that aging-related changes in hippocampal redox ratio are not a general reflection of overall brain oxidative state but are highly localized, while still being related to at least one marker of late aging, weight loss at the end of life.

  8. Agmatine abolishes restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior and hippocampal antioxidant imbalance in mice.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Andiara E; Bettio, Luis E B; Neis, Vivian B; Santos, Danúbia B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila B; Farina, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2014-04-01

    Agmatine has been recently emerged as a novel candidate to assist the conventional pharmacotherapy of depression. The acute restraint stress (ARS) is an unavoidable stress situation that may cause depressive-like behavior in rodents. In this study, we investigated the potential antidepressant-like effect of agmatine (10mg/kg, administered acutely by oral route) in the forced swimming test (FST) in non-stressed mice, as well as its ability to abolish the depressive-like behavior and hippocampal antioxidant imbalance induced by ARS. Agmatine reduced the immobility time in the mouse FST (1-100mg/kg) in non-stressed mice. ARS caused an increase in the immobility time in the FST, indicative of a depressive-like behavior, as well as hippocampal lipid peroxidation, and an increase in the activity of hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities, reduced catalase (CAT) activity and increased SOD/CAT ratio, an index of pro-oxidative conditions. Agmatine was effective to abolish the depressive-like behavior induced by ARS and to prevent the ARS-induced lipid peroxidation and changes in SOD, GR and CAT activities and in SOD/CAT activity ratio. Hippocampal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were not altered by any experimental condition. In conclusion, the present study shows that agmatine was able to abrogate the ARS-induced depressive-like behavior and the associated redox hippocampal imbalance observed in stressed restraint mice, suggesting that its antidepressant-like effect may be dependent on its ability to maintain the pro-/anti-oxidative homeostasis in the hippocampus.

  9. Generation and characterization of bioluminescent xenograft mouse models of MLL-related acute leukemias and in vivo evaluation of luciferase-targeting siRNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fazzina, Raffaella; Lombardini, Lorenza; Mezzanotte, Laura; Roda, Aldo; Hrelia, Patrizia; Pession, Andrea; Tonelli, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 present frequent abnormalities in pediatric, adult and therapy-related acute leukemias, and are generally associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Here, we report bioluminescent acute leukemia xenograft mouse models of the most frequent and aggressive MLL-related acute leukemias (infant and adult MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, MLL-AF4). Four acute leukemia cell lines carrying MLL-related translocations were stably transduced with a firefly luciferase transgene and injected intravenously into NOD/SCID mice. Leukemia progression was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). All mice developed MLL-related acute leukemia. The four MLL-related acute leukemia models showed a different course of infant and adult MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia, and a rapid aggressiveness of MLL-ENL acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL-AF4 acute biphenotypic leukemia. Tissue analysis and RT-PCR of bone marrow, spleen and liver from the mice confirmed the BL results. To validate BLI for the detection of a therapeutic response, systemic treatment with an anti-luciferase-targeting siRNA (siLuc) complexed with cationic nanoparticles was administered to mice with MLL-AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The BLI signal showed a reduction following treatment with siLuc compared to the control mice. These mouse models present MLL-related acute leukemia evolution similar to the human counterparts. Moreover, they are non-invasive, rapid and sensitive models, suitable for the in vivo study of MLL-related acute leukemias. Finally, BLI showed in vivo luminescence down modulation obtained by systemic treatment with luciferase-targeting siRNA nanoparticle complexes, confirming that these MLL-related leukemia mouse models are optimal for the evaluation and selection of delivery systems for siRNA and other new biotechnological pharmaceuticals.

  10. Modified Extracorporeal Photopheresis with Cells from a Healthy Donor for Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Holger; Kolb, Susanne; Salinas Tejedor, Laura; Wulf, Gerald; Reichardt, Holger M.; Riggert, Joachim; Legler, Tobias J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major challenge after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but treatment options for patients are still limited. In many cases first-line treatment with glucocorticoids is not successful. Among second-line therapies the extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is frequently performed, due to induction of selective tolerance instead of general immunosuppression. However, for some patients with severe acute GvHD the leukapheresis step of the ECP procedure is physically exhausting and limits the number of ECP cycles. Methods We hypothesized that leukocytes from healthy cell donors could be used as a replacement for ECP leukocytes gained from the GvHD patient. For this purpose we used a well established mouse model of acute GvHD. The ECP therapy was based on cells with the genetic background of the initial donor of the stem cell transplantation. As a precondition we developed a protocol representing conventional ECP in mice equivalent to clinical used ECP setup. Results We could demonstrate that conventional, clinically derived ECP setup is able to alleviate acute GvHD. By using leukocytes obtained from healthy mice with the bone marrow donor’s genetic background we could not observe a statistically significant therapeutic effect. Conclusions Conventional human ECP setup is effective in the mouse model of severe acute GvHD. In addition we could not prove that ECP cells from healthy mice with bone marrow donor’s genetic background are as effective as ECP cells derived from GvHD mice. Based on our findings, new questions arise for further studies, in which the cellular characteristics for ECP mediated immune tolerance are a matter of investigation. PMID:25148404

  11. IL-33 Aggravates DSS-Induced Acute Colitis in Mouse Colon Lamina Propria by Enhancing Th2 Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Yang, Fangli; Sang, Lixuan; Zhai, Jingbo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Yue, Dan; Li, Shengjun; Li, Yan; Lu, Changlong; Sun, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin- (IL-) 33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, is an important modulator of the immune system associated with several immune-mediated diseases. IL-33 was expressed in high level on epithelial cells of intestinal tract. It suggested that IL-33 plays a potential role in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We investigated the role of interleukin- (IL-) 33 in dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced acute colitis in mice using recombinant mouse IL-33 protein (rIL-33). We found that DSS-induced acute colitis was aggravated by rIL-33 treatment. rIL-33-treated DSS mice showed markedly reduced levels of interferon- (IFN-)γ and IL-17A in their colon lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL), but the levels of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-5 and IL-13, in these cells were significantly increased, compared to DSS mice treated with PBS. Our results suggested that IL-33 stimulated CD4(+)T cells and caused the cell to adopt a Th2-type response but at the same time suppressed Th17 and Th1 cell responses. Therefore, IL-33 may be involved in pathogenesis of DSS-induced acute colitis by promoting Th2 cell response in intestinal mucosa of mice. Modulation of IL-33/ST2 signaling by monoclonal antibody (mAb) could be a novel biological therapy in DSS-induced acute colitis.

  12. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  13. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  14. Silibinin suppresses astroglial activation in a mouse model of acute Parkinson's disease by modulating the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Kyung Moon; Jung, Young-Suk; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-11-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, and is characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss in midbrain. The MPTP-induced PD model has been well characterized by motor deficits and selective dopaminergic neuronal death accompanied by glial activation. Silibinin is a constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and has been proposed to have hepatoprotective, anti-cancer, anti-oxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, the authors studied the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in an acute MPTP model of PD. Silibinin was administered for 2 weeks, and then MPTP was administered to mice over 1 day (acute MPTP induced PD). Silibinin pretreatment effectively ameliorated motor dysfunction, dopaminergic neuronal loss, and glial activations caused by MPTP. In addition, an in vitro study demonstrated that silibinin suppressed astroglial activation and ERK and JNK phosphorylation in primary astrocytes in response to MPP(+) treatment. These findings show silibinin protected dopaminergic neurons in an acute MPTP-induced mouse model of PD, and suggest its neuroprotective effects might be mediated by the suppression of astrocyte activation via the inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the study indicates silibinin should be viewed as a potential treatment for PD and other neurodegenerative diseases associated with neuroinflammation. PMID:26434409

  15. [Hippocampal stroke].

    PubMed

    Rollnik, J D; Traitel, B; Dietrich, B; Lenz, O

    2015-02-01

    Unilateral cerebral ischemia of the hippocampus is very rare. This paper reviews the literature and presents the case of a 59-year-old woman with an amnestic syndrome due to a left hippocampal stroke. The patient suffered from retrograde amnesia which was most severe over the 2 days prior to presenting and a slight anterograde amnesia. In addition, a verbal memory disorder was confirmed 1 week after admission by neurological tests. As risk factors, arterial hypertension and a relative hyper-beta lipoproteinemia were found. This case shows that unilateral amnestic stroke, e.g. in the hippocampus region, may be the cause of an amnestic syndrome and should be included in the differential diagnostics.

  16. The small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel SK3 is localized in nerve terminals of excitatory synapses of cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Obermair, Gerald J; Kaufmann, Walter A; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2003-02-01

    In the central nervous system small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels are important for generating the medium/slow afterhyperpolarization seen after single or trains of action potentials. Three SK channel isoforms (SK1,-2,-3) are differentially distributed throughout the brain, but little is known about their specific expression in particular neuronal compartments. In the hippocampus SK3 was found in the neuropil, predominantly in the terminal field of the mossy fibres and in fine varicose fibres, but excluded from the pyramidal and granule cell layers. Because this expression pattern suggested a presynaptic localization, we examined the subcellular distribution of SK3 in cultured hippocampal neurons using high-resolution immunofluorescence analysis. SK3 was localized in a punctate, synaptic pattern. The SK3 clusters were precisely colocalized with the presynaptic marker synapsin and at close range (0.4-0.5 microm) from NMDA-receptors and PSD-95. This arrangement is consistent with a localization of SK3 in the presynaptic nerve terminal, but not restricted to the synaptic membrane proper. In agreement with the increasing expression of SK3 during early postnatal development in vivo, the fraction of synapses containing SK3 increased from 14% to 57% over a six-week culture period. SK3-containing synapses were equally observed on spiny, glutamatergic and smooth GABAergic neurons. In contrast to its close association with NMDA-receptors and PSD-95, SK3 was rarely associated with GABAA-receptor clusters. Thus, SK3 is a presynaptic channel in excitatory hippocampal synapses, with no preference for glutamatergic or GABAergic postsynaptic neurons, and is probably involved in regulating neurotransmitter release.

  17. Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and mRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression.

    PubMed

    Cline, Brandon H; Costa-Nunes, Joao P; Cespuglio, Raymond; Markova, Natalyia; Santos, Ana I; Bukhman, Yury V; Kubatiev, Aslan; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naïve DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naïve animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies. PMID:25767439

  18. Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and mRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Brandon H.; Costa-Nunes, Joao P.; Cespuglio, Raymond; Markova, Natalyia; Santos, Ana I.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Kubatiev, Aslan; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naïve DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naïve animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies. PMID:25767439

  19. Conditioned response suppression in the IntelliCage: assessment of mouse strain differences and effects of hippocampal and striatal lesions on acquisition and retention of memory.

    PubMed

    Voikar, Vootele; Colacicco, Giovanni; Gruber, Oliver; Vannoni, Elisabetta; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Wolfer, David P

    2010-12-01

    The IntelliCage allows fully automated continuous testing of various behaviours in the home cage environment without handling the mice. Here we tested whether conditioned avoidance is retained after a time period delay spent outside the IntelliCage. During the training, nosepokes in one of the four learning corners were punished with an air-puff. After 24h of training, the mice were placed in regular cages for 24h. During the last 18h of this interval, the mice were water deprived and then returned to the IntelliCage for a probe trial where drinking was allowed in all corners. The C57BL/6 mice developed a significant suppression of nosepoking in the punished corner during training, and the avoidance was carried over to the following probe trial. Repetition of the experiment by delivering punishment in a different corner assigned to individual mice revealed a similar performance pattern. Comparison between the different strains revealed a reduced nosepoke suppression in DBA/2 and B6D2F1 mice as compared to C57BL/6 mice in the probe trial, despite similar error rates during the training with short (1-s) air-puffs. However, the performance of the three strains in the probe trial were equalised when the air-puffs were prolonged until the end of the corner visit. Significant extinction of the nosepoke suppression occurred after 6 days. A prolonged interval (7 days) between the training and the probe trial resulted in a loss of suppression in DBA/2 mice, but not in C57BL/6 and B6D2F1 mice. Additional experiments revealed that performance in the probe trial was dependent on a complex set of intramaze cues. Testing of mice with bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the hippocampus or dorso-lateral striatum revealed that learning this task was dependent on an intact hippocampus, but not on an intact striatum. In summary, the conditioned nosepoke suppression test presented here is sensitive to both genetic differences and hippocampal lesions. This test could be applied to the

  20. The acute phase response in parasite infection. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, L R; Gauldie, J; Befus, A D; McAdam, K P; Baltz, M L; Pepys, M B

    1984-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory reactions are a prominent feature of many parasitic infections and the cellular and humoral components of the acute phase reaction may have an impact on the host-parasite relationship. We examined serum changes of four acute phase reactants: alpha 1-proteinase inhibition (alpha 1Pi); complement C3; serum amyloid A protein (SAA); and serum amyloid P component (SAP), in mice undergoing a primary infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. SAA and SAP showed changes within the first 2 days of infection indicating the presence of an acute phase response associated with inflammation in the lung. Alpha 1Pi and C3 serum levels were not altered. However, all four acute phase reactants were synthesized in greater amounts by primary cultures of hepatocytes taken from infected animals at this time. Subsequently, as parasite-mediated inflammatory changes occur in the gut, both serum and hepatocyte cultures demonstrate an acute inflammatory response in all four reactants. It is proposed that the early reaction between parasites and macrophage/monocyte lead to the release of a mediator of inflammation which initiates the hepatocyte response. In this infection, at least one of the APR is shown to localize to the site of inflammation influencing the host-parasite relationship. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6204934

  1. Acerogenin A from Acer nikoense Maxim Prevents Oxidative Stress-Induced Neuronal Cell Death through Nrf2-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mouse Hippocampal HT22 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Woo, Je-Tae; Kim, Youn-Chul; Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative cell damage contributes to neuronal degeneration in many central nervous system (CNS) diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and ischemia. Inducible heme oxygenase (HO)-1 acts against oxidants that are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases. The stem bark of Acer nikoense Maxim (Aceraceae) is indigenous to Japan; it has been used in folk medicine as a treatment of hepatic disorders and eye diseases. Acerogenin A, a natural compound isolated from Japanese folk medicine A. nikoense, showed neuroprotective effects and reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity by inducing the expression of HO-1 in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Furthermore, acerogenin A caused the nuclear accumulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrated that acerogenin A effectively prevents glutamate-induced oxidative damage, and HO-1 induction via PI3K/Akt and Nrf2 pathways appears to play a key role in the protection of HT22 cells. Therefore, this study implies that the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway represents a biological target and that acerogenin A might be a candidate for the prevention of neurodegeneration.

  2. Entrainment of the mouse circadian clock by sub-acute physical and psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yu; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuriki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Motohashi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Tomoko; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of acute stress on the peripheral circadian system are not well understood in vivo. Here, we show that sub-acute stress caused by restraint or social defeat potently altered clock gene expression in the peripheral tissues of mice. In these peripheral tissues, as well as the hippocampus and cortex, stressful stimuli induced time-of-day-dependent phase-advances or -delays in rhythmic clock gene expression patterns; however, such changes were not observed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, i.e. the central circadian clock. Moreover, several days of stress exposure at the beginning of the light period abolished circadian oscillations and caused internal desynchronisation of peripheral clocks. Stress-induced changes in circadian rhythmicity showed habituation and disappeared with long-term exposure to repeated stress. These findings suggest that sub-acute physical/psychological stress potently entrains peripheral clocks and causes transient dysregulation of circadian clocks in vivo.

  3. Left–right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shipton, Olivia A.; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M.; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Left–right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3–CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left–right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left–right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory. PMID:25246561

  4. Left-right dissociation of hippocampal memory processes in mice.

    PubMed

    Shipton, Olivia A; El-Gaby, Mohamady; Apergis-Schoute, John; Deisseroth, Karl; Bannerman, David M; Paulsen, Ole; Kohl, Michael M

    2014-10-21

    Left-right asymmetries have likely evolved to make optimal use of bilaterian nervous systems; however, little is known about the synaptic and circuit mechanisms that support divergence of function between equivalent structures in each hemisphere. Here we examined whether lateralized hippocampal memory processing is present in mice, where hemispheric asymmetry at the CA3-CA1 pyramidal neuron synapse has recently been demonstrated, with different spine morphology, glutamate receptor content, and synaptic plasticity, depending on whether afferents originate in the left or right CA3. To address this question, we used optogenetics to acutely silence CA3 pyramidal neurons in either the left or right dorsal hippocampus while mice performed hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. We found that unilateral silencing of either the left or right CA3 was sufficient to impair short-term memory. However, a striking asymmetry emerged in long-term memory, wherein only left CA3 silencing impaired performance on an associative spatial long-term memory task, whereas right CA3 silencing had no effect. To explore whether synaptic properties intrinsic to the hippocampus might contribute to this left-right behavioral asymmetry, we investigated the expression of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Following the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency electrical stimulation, synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons were strengthened only when presynaptic input originated in the left CA3, confirming an asymmetry in synaptic properties. The dissociation of hippocampal long-term memory function between hemispheres suggests that memory is routed via distinct left-right pathways within the mouse hippocampus, and provides a promising approach to help elucidate the synaptic basis of long-term memory.

  5. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  6. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kanako; Hirano, Takashi; Noda, Kenji; Kodama, Satoru; Ichimiya, Issei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesized that low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) increases vessel permeability and antibacterial drug activity in the mouse middle ear. We determined appropriate settings by applying LIFU to mouse ears with the external auditory canal filled with normal saline and performed histologic and immunohistologic examination. Acute otitis media was induced in mice with nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, and they were given ampicillin (50, 10, or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days with or without LIFU (1.0 W/cm(2), 20% duty cycle, 30 s). In the LIFU(+) groups receiving the 2- and 10-mg/kg doses, viable bacteria counts, number of inflammatory cells and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in middle ear effusion were significantly lower than in the LIFU(-) groups on the same doses. Severity of AOM also tended to be reduced more in the LIFU(+) groups than in the LIFU(-) groups. LIFU application with antibiotics may be effective for middle ear infection. PMID:23312959

  7. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Noda, Kanako; Hirano, Takashi; Noda, Kenji; Kodama, Satoru; Ichimiya, Issei; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    We hypothesized that low-intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU) increases vessel permeability and antibacterial drug activity in the mouse middle ear. We determined appropriate settings by applying LIFU to mouse ears with the external auditory canal filled with normal saline and performed histologic and immunohistologic examination. Acute otitis media was induced in mice with nontypable Haemophilus influenzae, and they were given ampicillin (50, 10, or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days with or without LIFU (1.0 W/cm(2), 20% duty cycle, 30 s). In the LIFU(+) groups receiving the 2- and 10-mg/kg doses, viable bacteria counts, number of inflammatory cells and IL-1β and TNF-α levels in middle ear effusion were significantly lower than in the LIFU(-) groups on the same doses. Severity of AOM also tended to be reduced more in the LIFU(+) groups than in the LIFU(-) groups. LIFU application with antibiotics may be effective for middle ear infection.

  8. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid enhances steroidogenesis and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression in mouse Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Yin, Xiangling; Schiffer, Randolph B; Chen, Jau-Jiin; Pandey, Akhilesh K; Stocco, Douglas M; Grammas, Paula; Wang, Xingjia

    2008-05-01

    During the aging process of males, testosterone biosynthesis declines in testicular Leydig cells resulting in decreases in various physiological functions. To explore the possibility of delaying the decline using food supplements, we have studied steroidogenic effects of a natural flavonoid, chrysin, in mouse Leydig cells. Chrysin dramatically increased cyclic AMP (cAMP)-induced steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. This result was confirmed using Leydig cells isolated from mouse testes. The steroidogenic effect of chrysin is not associated with an increase in expression of the P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, required for the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone. In addition, when 22(R)hydroxylcholesterol was used as a substrate, chrysin induced a non-significant increase in steroid hormone, suggesting that the majority of the observed increase in steroidogenesis was due to the increased supply of substrate cholesterol. These observations were corroborated by showing that chrysin induced a marked increase in the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, the factor that controls mitochondrial cholesterol transfer. Also, chrysin significantly increased StAR promoter activity and StAR mRNA level. Further studies indicated that this compound depressed expression of DAX-1, a repressor in StAR gene transcription. In the absence of cAMP, chrysin did not increase steroidogenesis. However, when a sub-threshold level of cAMP was used, StAR protein and steroid hormone were increased by chrysin to the levels seen with maximal stimulation of cAMP. These results suggest that while chrysin itself is unable to induce StAR gene expression and steroidogenesis, it appears to function by increasing the sensitivity of Leydig cells to cAMP stimulation. PMID:18434361

  9. A Specific Nutrient Combination Attenuates the Reduced Expression of PSD-95 in the Proximal Dendrites of Hippocampal Cell Body Layers in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; van Vliet, Danique; Attali, Amos; de Wilde, Martijn C.; Kuhn, Mirjam; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; van der Zee, Eddy A.

    2016-01-01

    The inherited metabolic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) is characterized by increased concentrations of phenylalanine in the blood and brain, and as a consequence neurotransmitter metabolism, white matter, and synapse functioning are affected. A specific nutrient combination (SNC) has been shown to improve synapse formation, morphology and function. This could become an interesting new nutritional approach for PKU. To assess whether treatment with SNC can affect synapses, we treated PKU mice with SNC or an isocaloric control diet and wild-type (WT) mice with an isocaloric control for 12 weeks, starting at postnatal day 31. Immunostaining for post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), a post-synaptic density marker, was carried out in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex. Compared to WT mice on normal chow without SNC, PKU mice on the isocaloric control showed a significant reduction in PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus, specifically in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, with a similar trend seen in the cornus ammonis 1 (CA1) and cornus ammonis 3 (CA3) pyramidal cell layer. No differences were found in the striatum or prefrontal cortex. PKU mice on a diet supplemented with SNC showed improved expression of PSD-95 in the hippocampus. This study gives the first indication that SNC supplementation has a positive effect on hippocampal synaptic deficits in PKU mice. PMID:27102170

  10. A Specific Nutrient Combination Attenuates the Reduced Expression of PSD-95 in the Proximal Dendrites of Hippocampal Cell Body Layers in a Mouse Model of Phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M; van Vliet, Danique; Attali, Amos; de Wilde, Martijn C; Kuhn, Mirjam; van Spronsen, Francjan J; van der Zee, Eddy A

    2016-01-01

    The inherited metabolic disease phenylketonuria (PKU) is characterized by increased concentrations of phenylalanine in the blood and brain, and as a consequence neurotransmitter metabolism, white matter, and synapse functioning are affected. A specific nutrient combination (SNC) has been shown to improve synapse formation, morphology and function. This could become an interesting new nutritional approach for PKU. To assess whether treatment with SNC can affect synapses, we treated PKU mice with SNC or an isocaloric control diet and wild-type (WT) mice with an isocaloric control for 12 weeks, starting at postnatal day 31. Immunostaining for post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), a post-synaptic density marker, was carried out in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex. Compared to WT mice on normal chow without SNC, PKU mice on the isocaloric control showed a significant reduction in PSD-95 expression in the hippocampus, specifically in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, with a similar trend seen in the cornus ammonis 1 (CA1) and cornus ammonis 3 (CA3) pyramidal cell layer. No differences were found in the striatum or prefrontal cortex. PKU mice on a diet supplemented with SNC showed improved expression of PSD-95 in the hippocampus. This study gives the first indication that SNC supplementation has a positive effect on hippocampal synaptic deficits in PKU mice. PMID:27102170

  11. Hippocampal Gene Expression of Deiodinases 2 and 3 and Effects of 3,5-Diiodo-L-Thyronine T2 in Mouse Depression Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Natalyia; Chernopiatko, Anton; Schroeter, Careen A.; Malin, Dmitry; Kubatiev, Aslan; Bachurin, Sergey; Costa-Nunes, João; Steinbusch, Harry M. W.; Strekalova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    Central thyroid hormone signaling is important in brain function/dysfunction, including affective disorders and depression. In contrast to 3,3′,5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), the role of 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2), which until recently was considered an inactive metabolite of T3, has not been studied in these pathologies. However, both T3 and T2 stimulate mitochondrial respiration, a factor counteracting the pathogenesis of depressive disorder, but the cellular origins in the CNS, mechanisms, and kinetics of the cellular action for these two hormones are distinct and independent of each other. Here, Illumina and RT PCR assays showed that hippocampal gene expression of deiodinases 2 and 3, enzymes involved in thyroid hormone regulation, is increased in resilience to stress-induced depressive syndrome and after antidepressant treatment in mice that might suggest elevated T2 and T3 turnover in these phenotypes. In a separate experiment, bolus administration of T2 at the doses 750 and 1500 mcg/kg but not 250 mcg/kg in naive mice reduced immobility in a two-day tail suspension test in various settings without changing locomotion or anxiety. This demonstrates an antidepressant-like effect of T2 that could be exploited clinically. In a wider context, the current study suggests important central functions of T2, whose biological role only lately is becoming to be elucidated. PMID:24386638

  12. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  13. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 and 4 gene deficiency attenuates nociceptive behaviors in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Rahman, Md Habibur; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinases (PDKs) 1-4, expressed in peripheral and central tissues, regulate the activity of the PDH complex (PDC). The PDC is an important mitochondrial gatekeeping enzyme that controls cellular metabolism. The role of PDKs in diverse neurological disorders, including neurometabolic aberrations and neurodegeneration, has been described. Implications for a role of PDKs in inflammation and neurometabolic coupling led us to investigate the effect of genetic ablation of PDK2/4 on nociception in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain. Deficiency in Pdk2 and/or Pdk4 in mice led to attenuation of formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors (flinching, licking, biting, or lifting of the injected paw). Likewise, the pharmacological inhibition of PDKs substantially diminished the nociceptive responses in the second phase of the formalin test. Furthermore, formalin-provoked paw edema formation and mechanical and thermal hypersensitivities were significantly reduced in Pdk2/4-deficient mice. Formalin-driven neutrophil recruitment at the site of inflammation, spinal glial activation, and neuronal sensitization were substantially lessened in the second or late phase of the formalin test in Pdk2/4-deficient animals. Overall, our results suggest that PDK2/4 can be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of acute inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26931482

  15. Non-viral delivery of the porphobilinogen deaminase cDNA into a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Annika; Nowak, Grzegorz; Möller, Christer; Harper, Pauline

    2004-05-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inborn error of metabolism, results from the deficient activity of the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). Clinical symptoms of this autosomal dominant hepatic porphyria include episodic acute attacks of abdominal pain, neuropathy, and psychiatric disturbances. Current therapy based on intravenous heme administration is palliative and there is no way to prevent the attacks. Thus, efforts are focused on methods to replace the deficient activity in the liver to prevent the acute attacks of this hepatic porphyria. Here we explore the efficiency of a non-viral gene delivery to obtain PBGD expression in the liver of AIP transgenic mice. Four vectors were evaluated: naked DNA and DNA complexed to liposomes, polyethylenimine (PEI), and PEI-galactose, using a luciferase construct as reporter gene. The vectors were administered intravenously or directly into the portal vein with transient blood flow blockage. After tail vein injection of the DNA complexes, the liposome vector had the highest luciferase expression in lung and less in liver. When injected into the portal vein, the naked DNA had considerably higher hepatic reporter gene expression; 100 microg of naked DNA had the highest hepatic luciferase expression 24h after portal vein injection. When these vectors were used to deliver the PBGD gene into the AIP mouse model no enhancement of the endogenous PBGD activity in liver was detectable, despite the presence of the PBGD-plasmids as verified by PCR. Thus, more efficient non-viral vectors are needed to express sufficient PBGD activity over the endogenous hepatic level (approximately 30% of normal) in this murine system.

  16. Correlative mRNA and protein expression of middle and inner ear inflammatory cytokines during mouse acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Trune, Dennis R; Kempton, Beth; Hausman, Frances A; Larrain, Barbara E; MacArthur, Carol J

    2015-08-01

    Although the inner ear has long been reported to be susceptible to middle ear disease, little is known of the inflammatory mechanisms that might cause permanent sensorineural hearing loss. Recent studies have shown inner ear tissues are capable of expressing inflammatory cytokines during otitis media. However, little quantitative information is available concerning cytokine gene expression in the inner ear and the protein products that result. Therefore, this study was conducted of mouse middle and inner ear during acute otitis media to measure the relationship between inflammatory cytokine genes and their protein products with quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Balb/c mice were inoculated transtympanically with heat-killed Haemophilus influenzae and middle and inner ear tissues collected for either quantitative RT-PCR microarrays or ELISA multiplex arrays. mRNA for several cytokine genes was significantly increased in both the middle and inner ear at 6 h. In the inner ear, these included MIP-2 (448 fold), IL-6 (126 fold), IL-1β (7.8 fold), IL-10 (10.7 fold), TNFα (1.8 fold), and IL-1α (1.5 fold). The 24 h samples showed a similar pattern of gene expression, although generally at lower levels. In parallel, the ELISA showed the related cytokines were present in the inner ear at concentrations higher by 2-122 fold higher at 18 h, declining slightly from there at 24 h. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies to a number of these cytokines demonstrated they occurred in greater amounts in the inner ear tissues. These findings demonstrate considerable inflammatory gene expression and gene products in the inner ear following acute otitis media. These higher cytokine levels suggest one potential mechanism for the permanent hearing loss seen in some cases of acute and chronic otitis media.

  17. Characterisation of Signalling by the Endogenous GPER1 (GPR30) Receptor in an Embryonic Mouse Hippocampal Cell Line (mHippoE-18)

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nicholas J.; Bayliss, Asha L.; Reale, Vincenzina; Evans, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen can modulate neuronal development and signalling by both genomic and non-genomic pathways. Many of its rapid, non-genomic effects on nervous tissue have been suggested to be mediated via the activation of the estrogen sensitive G-protein coupled receptor (GPER1 or GPR30). There has been much controversy over the cellular location, signalling properties and endogenous activators of GPER1. Here we describe the pharmacology and signalling properties of GPER1 in an immortalized embryonic hippocampal cell line, mHippoE-18. This cell line does not suffer from the inherent problems associated with the study of this receptor in native tissue or the problems associated with heterologously expression in clonal cell lines. In mHippoE-18 cells, 17β-Estradiol can mediate a dose-dependent rapid potentiation of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels but does not appear to activate the ERK1/2 pathway. The effect of 17β-Estradiol can be mimicked by the GPER1 agonist, G1, and also by tamoxifen and ICI 182,780 which activate GPER1 in a variety of other preparations. The response is not mimicked by the application of the classical estrogen receptor agonists, PPT, (an ERα agonist) or DPN, (an ERβ agonist), further suggesting that this effect of 17β-Estradiol is mediated through the activation of GPER1. However, after exposure of the cells to the GPER1 specific antagonists, G15 and G36, the stimulatory effects of the above agonists are replaced by dose-dependent inhibitions of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels. This inhibitory effect is mimicked by aldosterone in a dose-dependent way even in the absence of the GPER1 antagonists. The results are discussed in terms of possible “Biased Antagonism” whereby the antagonists change the conformation of the receptor resulting in changes in the agonist induced coupling of the receptor to different second messenger pathways. PMID:26998610

  18. Mouse hippocampal GABAB1 but not GABAB2 subunit-containing receptor complex levels are paralleling retrieval in the multiple-T-maze.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil K; Ghafari, Maryam; Miklósi, András G; Engidawork, Ephrem; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors known to be involved in learning and memory. Although a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive processes is evident, there is no information on hippocampal GABAB receptor complexes in a multiple T maze (MTM) task, a robust paradigm for evaluation of spatial learning. Trained or untrained (yoked control) C57BL/6J male mice (n = 10/group) were subjected to the MTM task and sacrificed 6 h following their performance. Hippocampi were taken, membrane proteins extracted and run on blue native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with specific antibodies against GABAB1, GABAB1a, and GABAB2. Immunoprecipitation with subsequent mass spectrometric identification of co-precipitates was carried out to show if GABAB1 and GABAB2 as well as other interacting proteins co-precipitate. An antibody shift assay (ASA) and a proximity ligation assay (PLA) were also used to see if the two GABAB subunits are present in the receptor complex. Single bands were observed on Western blots, each representing GABAB1, GABAB1a, or GABAB2 at an apparent molecular weight of approximately 100 kDa. Subsequently, densitometric analysis revealed that levels of GABAB1 and GABAB1a but not GABAB2- containing receptor complexes were significantly higher in trained than untrained groups. Immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric studies confirmed the presence of GABAB1, GABAB2, calcium calmodulin kinases I and II, GluA1 and GluA2 as constituents of the complex. ASA and PLA also showed the presence of the two subunits of GABAB receptor within the complex. It is shown that increased levels of GABAB1 subunit-containing complexes are paralleling performance in a land maze.

  19. The polyphenols resveratrol and epigallocatechin-3-gallate restore the severe impairment of mitochondria in hippocampal progenitor cells from a Down syndrome mouse model.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; de Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Contestabile, Andrea; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions critically impair nervous system development and are potentially involved in the pathogenesis of various neurodevelopmental disorders, including Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. Previous studies from our group demonstrated impaired mitochondrial activity in peripheral cells from DS subjects and the efficacy of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) - a natural polyphenol major component of green tea - to counteract the mitochondrial energy deficit. In this study, to gain insight into the possible role of mitochondria in DS intellectual disability, mitochondrial functions were analyzed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) isolated from the hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice, a widely used model of DS which recapitulates many major brain structural and functional phenotypes of the syndrome, including impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. We found that, during NPC proliferation, mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial biogenic program were strongly compromised in Ts65Dn cells, but not associated with free radical accumulation. These data point to a central role of mitochondrial dysfunction as an inherent feature of DS and not as a consequence of cell oxidative stress. Further, we disclose that, besides EGCG, also the natural polyphenol resveratrol, which displays a neuroprotective action in various human diseases but never tested in DS, restores oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and mitochondrial biogenesis, and improves proliferation of NPCs. These effects were associated with the activation of PGC-1α/Sirt1/AMPK axis by both polyphenols. This research paves the way for using nutraceuticals as a potential therapeutic tool in preventing or managing some energy deficit-associated DS clinical manifestations. PMID:26964795

  20. Multiplex immunoassay characterization and species comparison of inflammation in acute and non-acute ischemic infarcts in human and mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy-Vi V; Frye, Jennifer B; Zbesko, Jacob C; Stepanovic, Kristina; Hayes, Megan; Urzua, Alex; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Doyle, Kristian P

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a parallel characterization of the cytokine and chemokine response to stroke in the human and mouse brain at different stages of infarct resolution. The study goal was to address the hypothesis that chronic inflammation may contribute to stroke-related dementia. We used C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice to control for strain related differences in the mouse immune response. Our data indicate that in both mouse strains, and humans, there is increased granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-12 p70 (IL-12p70), interferon gamma-induced protein-10 (IP-10), keratinocyte chemoattractant/interleukin-8 (KC/IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β), regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the infarct core during the acute time period. Nevertheless, correlation and two-way ANOVA analyses reveal that despite this substantial overlap between species, there are still significant differences, particularly in the regulation of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which is increased in mice but not in humans. In the weeks after stroke, during the stage of liquefactive necrosis, there is significant resolution of the inflammatory response to stroke within the infarct. However, CD68+ macrophages remain present, and levels of IL-6 and MCP-1 remain chronically elevated in infarcts from both mice and humans. Furthermore, there is a chronic T cell response within the infarct in both species. This response is differentially polarized towards a T helper 1 (Th1) response in C57BL/6 mice, and a T helper 2 (Th2) response in BALB/c mice, suggesting that the chronic inflammatory response to stroke may follow a different trajectory in different patients. To control for the fact that the average age of the patients used in this study was 80 years, they

  1. ACUTE ETHANOL MODULATES GLUTAMATERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC PHASE SHIFTS OF THE MOUSE CIRCADIAN LOCK IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Rebecca A.; Mangrum, Charles A.; Glass, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with sleep problems, which are often linked to circadian rhythm disturbances. However, there is no information on the direct effects of ethanol on the mammalian circadian clock. Acute ethanol inhibits glutamate signaling, which is the primary mechanism through which light resets the mammalian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Glutamate and light also inhibit circadian clock resetting induced by non-photic signals, including serotonin. Thus, we investigated the effects of acute ethanol on both glutamatergic and serotoninergic resetting of the SCN clock in vitro. We show that ethanol dose-dependently inhibits glutamate-induced phase shifts and enhances serotonergic phase shifts. The inhibition of glutamate-induced phase shifts is not affected by excess glutamate, glycine or D-serine, but is prevented by excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is known to augment glutamate signaling in the SCN and to be necessary for glutamate/light-induced phase shifts. Thus, ethanol may inhibit glutamate-induced clock resetting at least in part by blocking BDNF enhancement of glutamate signaling. Ethanol enhancement of serotonergic phase shifts is mimicked by treatments that suppress glutamate signaling in the SCN, including antagonists of glutamate receptors, BDNF signaling and nitric oxide synthase. The combined effect of ethanol with these treatments is not additive, suggesting they act through a common pathway. Our data indicate further that the interaction between serotonin and glutamate in the SCN may occur downstream from nitric oxide synthase activation. Thus, acute ethanol disrupts normal circadian clock phase regulation, which could contribute to the physiological and psychological problems associated with alcohol abuse. PMID:18313227

  2. Acute Dietary Tryptophan Manipulation Differentially Alters Social Behavior, Brain Serotonin and Plasma Corticosterone in Three Inbred Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wynne Q.; Smolik, Corey M.; Barba-Escobedo, Priscilla A.; Gamez, Monica; Sanchez, Jesus J.; Javors, Martin A.; Daws, Lynette C.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates brain serotonin (5-HT) stores and neurotransmission may be inadequate in subpopulations of individuals with autism, and this may contribute to characteristically impaired social behaviors. Findings that depletion of the 5-HT precursor tryptophan (TRP) worsens autism symptoms support this hypothesis. Yet dietetic studies show and parents report that many children with autism consume less TRP than peers. To measure the impact of dietary TRP content on social behavior, we administered either diets devoid of TRP, with standard TRP (0.2 gm%), or with 1% added TRP (1.2 gm%) overnight to three mouse strains. Of these, BTBRT+Itpr3tf/J and 129S1/SvImJ consistently exhibit low preference for social interaction relative to C57BL/6. We found that TRP depletion reduced C57BL/6 and 129S social interaction preference, while TRP enhancement improved BTBR sociability (p < 0.05; N= 8–10). Subsequent marble burying was similar regardless of grouping. After behavior tests, brain TRP levels and plasma corticosterone were higher in TRP enhanced C57BL/6 and BTBR, while 5-HT levels were reduced in all strains by TRP depletion (p <0.05; N= 4 −10). Relative hyperactivity of BTBR and hypoactivity of 129S, evident in self-grooming and chamber entries during sociability tests, were uninfluenced by dietary TRP. Our findings demonstrate mouse sociability and brain 5-HT turnover are reduced by acute TRP depletion, and can be enhanced by TRP supplementation. This outcome warrants further basic and/or clinical studies employing biomarker combinations such as TRP metabolism and 5-HT regulated hormones to characterize the conditions wherein TRP supplementation can best ameliorate sociability deficits. PMID:25445490

  3. Edaravone attenuates hippocampal damage in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis by reducing HMGB1 and iNOS expression via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Qian-qian; Yan, Yan; Xu, Feng-dan; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Wei-qin; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) is a free radical scavenger that has shown potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in variety of disease models. In this study, we investigated whether edaravone produced neuroprotective actions in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were infected on postnatal d 11 by intracisternal injection of a certain inoculum of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mice received intracisternal injection of 10 μL of saline containing edaravone (3 mg/kg) once a day for 7 d. The severity of pneumococcal meningitis was assessed with a clinical score. In mice with severe meningitis, the survival rate from the time of infection to d 8 after infection was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. In mice with mild meningitis, the CSF inflammation and cytokine levels in the hippocampus were analyzed d 7 after infection, and the clinical neurological deficit score was evaluated using a neurological scoring system d 14 after infection. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice and heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1 KO) mice were used to confirm the involvement of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in the neuroprotective actions of edaravone. Results: In mice with severe meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly increased the survival rate (76.4%) compared with the meningitis model group (32.2%). In mice with mild meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly decreased the number of leukocytes and TNF- levels in CSF, as well as the neuronal apoptosis and protein levels of HMGB1 and iNOS in the hippocampus, but did not affect the high levels of IL-10 and IL-6 in the hippocampus. Moreover, edaravone treatment significantly improved the neurological function of mice with mild meningitis. In Nrf2 KO or HO-1 KO mice with the meningitis, edaravone treatment was no longer effective in improving the survival rate of the mice with severe meningitis (20.2% and 53.6%, respectively

  4. Pathogenesis of acute arthritis due to viable Chlamydia trachomatis (mouse pneumonitis agent) in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, A. J.; Rank, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the natural history and pathogenesis of the acute arthritis induced by inoculation of a viable Chlamydia trachomatis biovar (mouse pneumonitis agent or MoPn) in C57Bl/6 mice. Immunologically naive (previously unsensitized) mice as well as mice immunized against Chlamydia (MoPn) by vaginal infection were employed. Both intravenous and intraarticular inoculations were employed. No arthritis developed after intravenous injections of MoPn although statistically significant antibody titers and splenic enlargement ensued. Intra-articular inoculation into knee joints produced a definite arthritis of 7 to 10 days duration marked by granulocyte and mononuclear cell infiltration of the joint and vacuolated synovial macrophages that stained heavily for chlamydial antigen by immunoperoxidase technique. Statistically significant increases in articular acute and chronic inflammation (P less than 0.02 were observed in previously sensitized, but not unsensitized, female mice at 2 but not 7 days after intra-articular chlamydial challenge. Chlamydiae were isolated from injected joints up to day 5, but not at day 10, after challenge. Chlamydial antigen disappeared rapidly from knee joints between day 10 and 15 after challenge. Electron micrographs demonstrated vacuolated synovial cells of the macrophage type, many of which contained degenerating chlamydial elementary bodies. Reticulate and intermediate bodies also were seen but were far less frequent than degenerating elementary bodies. Unaltered elementary bodies were difficult to identify beyond day 2 after articular inoculation. Thus, it appears likely that intra-articular chlamydial survival is shorter than the duration of the arthropathy. This may have important implications in attempts to identify chlamydiae in human joints in Reiter's Disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:2705510

  5. Protection of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Retinal Vasculature by Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in a Mouse Model of Acute Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Feng, Qian; Lo, Amy Cheuk Yin; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Bin; Chung, Sookja Kim; So, Kwok-Fai

    2012-01-01

    Acute ocular hypertension (AOH) is a condition found in acute glaucoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) and its protective mechanisms in the AOH insult. LBP has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective effect in the chronic ocular hypertension (COH) experiments. AOH mouse model was induced in unilateral eye for one hour by introducing 90 mmHg ocular pressure. The animal was fed with LBP solution (1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily from 7 days before the AOH insult till sacrifice at either day 4 or day 7 post insult. The neuroprotective effects of LBP on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) were evaluated. In control AOH retina, loss of RGCs, thinning of IRL thickness, increased IgG leakage, broken tight junctions, and decreased density of retinal blood vessels were observed. However, in LBP-treated AOH retina, there was less loss of RGCs with thinning of IRL thickness, IgG leakage, more continued structure of tight junctions associated with higher level of occludin protein and the recovery of the blood vessel density when compared with vehicle-treated AOH retina. Moreover, we found that LBP provides neuroprotection by down-regulating RAGE, ET-1, Aβ and AGE in the retina, as well as their related signaling pathways, which was related to inhibiting vascular damages and the neuronal degeneration in AOH insults. The present study suggests that LBP could prevent damage to RGCs from AOH-induced ischemic injury; furthermore, through its effects on blood vessel protection, LBP would also be a potential treatment for vascular-related retinopathy. PMID:23094016

  6. Hippocampal Transcriptome Profile of Persistent Memory Rescue in a Mouse Model of THRA1 Mutation-Mediated Resistance to Thyroid Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqiao; Fisahn, André; Sinha, Indranil; Nguyen, Dinh Phong; Sterzenbach, Ulrich; Lallemend, Francois; Hadjab, Saїda

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism due to THRA1 (gene coding for thyroid hormone receptor α1) mutation-mediated Resistance to Thyroid Hormone (RTH) has been recently reported in human and is associated with memory deficits similar to those found in a mouse model for Thra1 mutation mediated RTH (Thra1+/m mice). Here, we show that a short-term treatment of Thra1+/m mice with GABAA receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) completely and durably rescues their memory performance. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, improvement of memory is associated with increased in long-term potentiation (LTP) and an augmentation of density of dendritic spines (DDS) onto the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells reflecting an increase in the local excitatory drive. Unbiased gene profiling analysis of hippocampi of treated Thra1+/+ and Thra1+/m mice were performed two weeks and three months post treatment and identified co-expression modules that include differentially expressed genes related with and predicting higher memory, LTP and DDS in the hippocampi of PTZ-treated animals. We observed that PTZ treatment changed similar sets of genes in both Thra1+/+ and Thra1+/m mice, which are known to be involved in memory consolidation and neurotransmission dynamics and could participate in the persistent effects of PTZ on memory recovery. PMID:26743578

  7. Hippocampal Transcriptome Profile of Persistent Memory Rescue in a Mouse Model of THRA1 Mutation-Mediated Resistance to Thyroid Hormone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqiao; Fisahn, André; Sinha, Indranil; Nguyen, Dinh Phong; Sterzenbach, Ulrich; Lallemend, Francois; Hadjab, Saїda

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism due to THRA1 (gene coding for thyroid hormone receptor α1) mutation-mediated Resistance to Thyroid Hormone (RTH) has been recently reported in human and is associated with memory deficits similar to those found in a mouse model for Thra1 mutation mediated RTH (Thra1(+/m) mice). Here, we show that a short-term treatment of Thra1(+/m) mice with GABAA receptor antagonist pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) completely and durably rescues their memory performance. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, improvement of memory is associated with increased in long-term potentiation (LTP) and an augmentation of density of dendritic spines (DDS) onto the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells reflecting an increase in the local excitatory drive. Unbiased gene profiling analysis of hippocampi of treated Thra1(+/+) and Thra1(+/m) mice were performed two weeks and three months post treatment and identified co-expression modules that include differentially expressed genes related with and predicting higher memory, LTP and DDS in the hippocampi of PTZ-treated animals. We observed that PTZ treatment changed similar sets of genes in both Thra1(+/+) and Thra1(+/m) mice, which are known to be involved in memory consolidation and neurotransmission dynamics and could participate in the persistent effects of PTZ on memory recovery. PMID:26743578

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of the Newborn Mouse Lung Response to Acute Ozone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Loader, Joan E.; White, Carl W.; Dakhama, Azzeddine

    2014-01-01

    Ozone pollution is associated with adverse effects on respiratory health in adults and children but its effects on the neonatal lung remain unknown. This study was carried out to define the effect of acute ozone exposure on the neonatal lung and to profile the transcriptome response. Newborn mice were exposed to ozone or filtered air for 3h. Total RNA was isolated from lung tissues at 6 and 24h after exposure and was subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Compared to filtered air-exposed littermates, ozone-exposed newborn mice developed a small but significant neutrophilic airway response associated with increased CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression in the lung. Transcriptome analysis indicated that 455 genes were down-regulated and 166 genes were up-regulated by at least 1.5-fold at 6h post-ozone exposure (t-test, p < .05). At 24h, 543 genes were down-regulated and 323 genes were up-regulated in the lungs of ozone-exposed, compared to filtered air-exposed, newborn mice (t-test, p < .05). After controlling for false discovery rate, 50 genes were identified as significantly down-regulated and only a few (RORC, GRP, VREB3, and CYP2B6) were up-regulated at 24h post-ozone exposure (q < .05). Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that cell cycle-associated functions including cell division/proliferation were the most impacted pathways, which were negatively regulated by ozone exposure, an adverse effect that was associated with reduced bromo-deoxyuridine incorporation. These results demonstrate that acute ozone exposure alters cell proliferation in the developing neonatal lung through a global suppression of cell cycle function. PMID:24336422

  9. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  10. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  11. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  12. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy for the Quantitative Assessment of Acute Ionizing Radiation Induced Skin Toxicity Using a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Lee; Korpela, Elina; Kim, Anthony; Yohan, Darren; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Liu, Stanley K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin toxicities from ionizing radiation (IR) are a common side effect from therapeutic courses of external beam radiation therapy (RT) and negatively impact patient quality of life and long term survival. Advances in the understanding of the biological pathways associated with normal tissue toxicities have allowed for the development of interventional drugs, however, current response studies are limited by a lack of quantitative metrics for assessing the severity of skin reactions. Here we present a diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) approach that provides quantitative optical biomarkers of skin response to radiation. We describe the instrumentation design of the DOS system as well as the inversion algorithm for extracting the optical parameters. Finally, to demonstrate clinical utility, we present representative data from a pre-clinical mouse model of radiation induced erythema and compare the results with a commonly employed visual scoring. The described DOS method offers an objective, high through-put evaluation of skin toxicity via functional response that is translatable to the clinical setting. PMID:27284926

  13. Ischemic tissue injury in the dorsal skinfold chamber of the mouse: a skin flap model to investigate acute persistent ischemia.

    PubMed

    Harder, Yves; Schmauss, Daniel; Wettstein, Reto; Egaña, José T; Weiss, Fabian; Weinzierl, Andrea; Schuldt, Anna; Machens, Hans-Günther; Menger, Michael D; Rezaeian, Farid

    2014-11-17

    Despite profound expertise and advanced surgical techniques, ischemia-induced complications ranging from wound breakdown to extensive tissue necrosis are still occurring, particularly in reconstructive flap surgery. Multiple experimental flap models have been developed to analyze underlying causes and mechanisms and to investigate treatment strategies to prevent ischemic complications. The limiting factor of most models is the lacking possibility to directly and repetitively visualize microvascular architecture and hemodynamics. The goal of the protocol was to present a well-established mouse model affiliating these before mentioned lacking elements. Harder et al. have developed a model of a musculocutaneous flap with a random perfusion pattern that undergoes acute persistent ischemia and results in ~50% necrosis after 10 days if kept untreated. With the aid of intravital epi-fluorescence microscopy, this chamber model allows repetitive visualization of morphology and hemodynamics in different regions of interest over time. Associated processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, microvascular leakage and angiogenesis can be investigated and correlated to immunohistochemical and molecular protein assays. To date, the model has proven feasibility and reproducibility in several published experimental studies investigating the effect of pre-, peri- and postconditioning of ischemically challenged tissue.

  14. 15-Deoxy-delta 12,14-prostaglandin J2 biphasically regulates the proliferation of mouse hippocampal neural progenitor cells by modulating the redox state.

    PubMed

    Katura, Takashi; Moriya, Takahiro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2010-04-01

    The activity of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by various humoral factors. Although prostaglandin (PG) D(2) is known to mediate various physiological brain functions such as sleep, its actions on NPCs have not been fully understood. In the process of investigating the effects of PGD(2) on NPCs, we found that 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), an endogenous metabolite of PGD(2), exhibits a novel regulation of the proliferation of NPCs derived from mouse hippocampus. 15d-PGJ(2) showed biphasic effects on epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation of NPCs; facilitation at low concentrations ( approximately 0.3 muM) and suppression at higher concentrations (0.5-10 microM) in vitro. 2-Chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide (GW9662), an inhibitor of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, known to be a molecular target for 15d-PGJ(2), failed to abolish the effects of 15d-PGJ(2). 9,10-dihydro-15d-PGJ(2) (CAY10410), a structural analog of 15d-PGJ(2) lacking the electrophilic carbon in the cyclopentenone ring, did not show 15d-PGJ(2)-like actions. Treatment with 15d-PGJ(2) increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and decreased endogenous GSH levels. Furthermore, supplementation with a membrane-permeable analog of glutathione, GSH ethyl ester (2 mM), diminished the biphasic effects of 15d-PGJ(2). Finally, cell division in the dentate gyrus of postnatal mice was increased by injection of low-dose (1 ng i.c.v.) 15d-PGJ(2) and suppressed by high-dose (30 ng) 15d-PGJ(2). These results suggest that 15d-PGJ(2) regulates the proliferation of NPCs via its electrophilic nature, which enables covalent binding to molecules such as GSH. PMID:20086036

  15. Active sulforhodamine 101 uptake into hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Christian; Hagos, Yohannes; Hülsmann, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes.

  16. An acute dose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alters gene expression in multiple mouse brain regions.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, B J; Saini, U T; Robinson, B L; Ali, S F; Patterson, T A

    2010-10-13

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is normally found in the brain in low concentrations and may function as a neurotransmitter, although the mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. GHB has been used as a general anesthetic and is currently used to treat narcolepsy and alcoholism. Recreational use of GHB is primarily as a "club drug" and a "date rape drug," due to its amnesic effects. For this study, the hypothesis was that behavioral and neurochemical alterations may parallel gene expression changes in the brain after GHB administration. Adult male C57/B6N mice (n=5/group) were administered a single dose of 500 mg/kg GHB (i.p.) and were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Control mice were administered saline. Brains were removed and regionally dissected on ice. Total RNA from the hippocampus, cortex and striatum was extracted, amplified and labeled. Gene expression was evaluated using Agilent whole mouse genome 4x44K oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray data were analyzed by ArrayTrack and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using P < or = 0.01 and a fold change > or = 1.7 as the criteria for significance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) showed that samples from each time point clustered into distinct treatment groups with respect to sacrifice time. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was used to identify involved pathways. The results show that GHB induces gene expression alterations in hundreds of genes in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum, and the number of affected genes increases throughout a 4-h time course. Many of these DEGs are involved in neurological disease, apoptosis, and oxidative stress.

  17. Fast effects of glucocorticoids on memory-related network oscillations in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Weiss, E K; Krupka, N; Bähner, F; Both, M; Draguhn, A

    2008-05-01

    Transient or lasting increases in glucocorticoids accompany deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Recent data indicate that the formation and consolidation of declarative and spatial memory are mechanistically related to different patterns of hippocampal network oscillations. These include gamma oscillations during memory acquisition and the faster ripple oscillations (approximately 200 Hz) during subsequent memory consolidation. We therefore analysed the effects of acutely applied glucocorticoids on network activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Evoked field population spikes and paired-pulse responses were largely unaltered by corticosterone or cortisol, respectively, despite a slight increase in maximal population spike amplitude by 10 microm corticosterone. Several characteristics of sharp waves and superimposed ripple oscillations were affected by glucocorticoids, most prominently the frequency of spontaneously occurring sharp waves. At 0.1 microm, corticosterone increased this frequency, whereas maximal (10 microm) concentrations led to a reduction. In addition, gamma oscillations became slightly faster and less regular in the presence of high doses of corticosteroids. The present study describes acute effects of glucocorticoids on sharp wave-ripple complexes and gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices, revealing a potential background for memory deficits in the presence of elevated levels of these hormones.

  18. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  19. Protective effect of Jolkinolide B on LPS-induced mouse acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailing; Li, Yan; Huo, Pengfei; Li, Xiao-Ou; Kong, Daliang; Mu, Wei; Fang, Wei; Li, Lingxia; Liu, Ning; Fang, Ling; Li, Hongjun; He, Chengyan

    2015-05-01

    Jolkinolide B (JB), an ent-abietane diterpenoid, isolated from the dried root of Euphorbia fischeriana, has been reported to have potent anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of JB on acute lung injury (ALI) and underlying molecular mechanisms have not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of JB on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or JB 1h before intranasal instillation of LPS. The results showed that JB markedly attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations, lung edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Furthermore, JB also significantly inhibited LPS-induced the degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and MAPK. Therefore, our study provides the first line of evidence that pretreatment of JB has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of JB may be attributed to its suppression of NF-κB and MAPK activation.

  20. Changes in Gene Expression and Estrogen Receptor Cistrome in Mouse Liver Upon Acute E2 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palierne, Gaëlle; Fabre, Aurélie; Solinhac, Romain; Le Péron, Christine; Avner, Stéphane; Lenfant, Françoise; Fontaine, Coralie; Salbert, Gilles; Flouriot, Gilles; Arnal, Jean-François; Métivier, Raphaël

    2016-07-01

    Transcriptional regulation by the estrogen receptor-α (ER) has been investigated mainly in breast cancer cell lines, but estrogens such as 17β-estradiol (E2) exert numerous extrareproductive effects, particularly in the liver, where E2 exhibits both protective metabolic and deleterious thrombotic actions. To analyze the direct and early transcriptional effects of estrogens in the liver, we determined the E2-sensitive transcriptome and ER cistrome in mice after acute administration of E2 or placebo. These analyses revealed the early induction of genes involved in lipid metabolism, which fits with the crucial role of ER in the prevention of liver steatosis. Characterization of the chromatin state of ER binding sites (BSs) in mice expressing or not ER demonstrated that ER is not required per se for the establishment and/or maintenance of chromatin modifications at the majority of its BSs. This is presumably a consequence of a strong overlap between ER and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α BSs. In contrast, 40% of the BSs of the pioneer factor forkhead box protein a (Foxa2) were dependent upon ER expression, and ER expression also affected the distribution of nucleosomes harboring dimethylated lysine 4 of Histone H3 around Foxa2 BSs. We finally show that, in addition to a network of liver-specific transcription factors including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, ER might be required for proper Foxa2 function in this tissue.

  1. PAX5 is a tumor suppressor in mouse mutagenesis models of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jinjun; Wei, Lei; de Ridder, Jeroen; Su, Xiaoping; Rust, Alistair G.; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Cheng, Jinjun; Ma, Jing; Qu, Chunxu; Wu, Gang; Song, Guangchun; Huether, Robert G.; Schulman, Brenda; Janke, Laura; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R.; van der Weyden, Louise; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of genes encoding transcriptional regulators of lymphoid development are a hallmark of B-progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and most commonly involve PAX5, encoding the DNA-binding transcription factor paired-box 5. The majority of PAX5 alterations in ALL are heterozygous, and key PAX5 target genes are expressed in leukemic cells, suggesting that PAX5 may be a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. To examine the role of PAX5 alterations in leukemogenesis, we performed mutagenesis screens of mice heterozygous for a loss-of-function Pax5 allele. Both chemical and retroviral mutagenesis resulted in a significantly increased penetrance and reduced latency of leukemia, with a shift to B-lymphoid lineage. Genomic profiling identified a high frequency of secondary genomic mutations, deletions, and retroviral insertions targeting B-lymphoid development, including Pax5, and additional genes and pathways mutated in ALL, including tumor suppressors, Ras, and Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling. These results show that in contrast to simple Pax5 haploinsufficiency, multiple sequential alterations targeting lymphoid development are central to leukemogenesis and contribute to the arrest in lymphoid maturation characteristic of ALL. This cross-species analysis also validates the importance of concomitant alterations of multiple cellular growth, signaling, and tumor suppression pathways in the pathogenesis of B-ALL. PMID:25855603

  2. Acute effects of Helicobacter pylori extracts on gastric mucosal blood flow in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Henriksnäs, Johanna; Atuma, Christer; Phillipson, Mia; Sandler, Stellan; Engstrand, Lars; Holm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the reduction in gastric blood flow induced by a luminal water extract of Helicobacter pylori (HPE). METHODS: The stomachs of isoflurane-anesthetized mice were exteriorized, and the mucosal surface exposed. Blood flow was measured with the laser-Doppler technique, and systemic arterial blood pressure monitored. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to water extract produced from H pylori strain 88-23. To investigate the role of a nerve- or iNOS-mediated pathway, we used intraluminal lidocaine and iNOS-/- mice. Blood flow response to the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) was also assessed. RESULTS: In wild-type mice, HPE decreased mucosal blood flow by approximately 30%. This reduction was abolished in iNOS-deficient mice, and by pre-treatment with lidocaine. Luminally applied ADMA resulted in reduction in blood flow similar to that observed in wild-type mice exposed to HPE. CONCLUSION: A H pylori water extract reduces gastric mucosal blood flow acutely through iNOS- and nerve-mediated pathways. PMID:19132773

  3. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  4. Exogenous Lipocalin 2 Ameliorates Acute Rejection in a Mouse Model of Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, M. I.; Schwelberger, H. G.; Brendel, K. A.; Feurle, J.; Andrassy, J.; Kotsch, K.; Regele, H.; Pratschke, J.; Maier, H. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) is rapidly produced by damaged nephron epithelia and is one of the most promising new markers of renal injury, delayed graft function and acute allograft rejection (AR); however, the functional importance of Lcn2 in renal transplantation is largely unknown. To understand the role of Lcn2 in renal AR, kidneys from Balb/c mice were transplanted into C57Bl/6 mice and vice versa and analyzed for morphological and physiological outcomes of AR at posttransplantation days 3, 5, and 7. The allografts showed a steady increase in intensity of interstitial infiltration, tubulitis and periarterial aggregation of lymphocytes associated with a substantial elevation in serum levels of creatinine, urea and Lcn2. Perioperative administration of recombinant Lcn2:siderophore:Fe complex (rLcn2) to recipients resulted in functional and morphological amelioration of the allograft at day 7 almost as efficiently as daily immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). No significant differences were observed in various donor–recipient combinations (C57Bl/6 wild‐type and Lcn2−/−, Balb/c donors and recipients). Histochemical analyses of the allografts showed reduced cell death in recipients treated with rLcn2 or CsA. These results demonstrate that Lcn2 plays an important role in reducing the extent of kidney AR and indicate the therapeutic potential of Lcn2 in transplantation. PMID:26595644

  5. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT. PMID:26507167

  6. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT.

  7. An Intradermal Inoculation Mouse Model for Immunological Investigations of Acute Scrub Typhus and Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Xu, Guang; Goez-Rivillas, Yenny; Drom, Claire; Shelite, Thomas R.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H.; Bouyer, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a neglected tropical disease, caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, a Gram-negative bacterium that is transmitted to mammalian hosts during feeding by Leptotrombidium mites and replicates predominantly within endothelial cells. Most studies of scrub typhus in animal models have utilized either intraperitoneal or intravenous inoculation; however, there is limited information on infection by the natural route in murine model skin or its related early host responses. Here, we developed an intradermal (i.d.) inoculation model of scrub typhus and focused on the kinetics of the host responses in the blood and major infected organs. Following ear inoculation with 6 x 104 O. tsutsugamushi, mice developed fever at 11–12 days post-infection (dpi), followed by marked hypothermia and body weight loss at 14–19 dpi. Bacteria in blood and tissues and histopathological changes were detected around 9 dpi and peaked around 14 dpi. Serum cytokine analyses revealed a mixed Th1/Th2 response, with marked elevations of MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1α/CCL3 and IL-10 at 9 dpi, followed by increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, G-CSF, RANTES/CCL5, KC/CCL11, IL-1α/β, IL-2, TNF-α, GM-CSF), as well as modulatory cytokines (IL-9, IL-13). Cytokine levels in lungs had similar elevation patterns, except for a marked reduction of IL-9. The Orientia 47-kDa gene and infectious bacteria were detected in several organs for up to 84 dpi, indicating persistent infection. This is the first comprehensive report of acute scrub typhus and persistent infection in i.d.-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. This is a significant improvement over current murine models for Orientia infection and will permit detailed studies of host immune responses and infection control interventions. PMID:27479584

  8. Protective effects of luteolin against acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure in mouse.

    PubMed

    Tai, Minghui; Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Miao, RunChen; Liu, Sushun; Pang, Qing; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-07-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is widely used as a safety analgesic and antipyretic agent. Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdose of APAP can cause acute liver injury that is sometimes fatal, requiring efficient pharmacological intervention. Luteolin is a naturally occurring flavonoid which is abundant in plants. The objective of this study was to investigate corresponding anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities of luteolin, using acetaminophen-treated mice as a model system. Male C57BL/C mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=6 each). The control group was given phosphate buffered saline (PBS) orally. The APAP group was given APAP by intraperitoneal injection (i.p) at 300 mg/kg suspended in PBS. The luteolin-treated group was given APAP and luteolin (0-100 mg/kg/day, 1 or 3 days before APAP administration) suspended in PBS orally. 16 h after APAP administration, the liver and serum were collected to determine the liver injury. Luteolin administration significantly decreased acetaminophen-induced serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, as well as glutathione (GSH) depletion and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Luteolin restored SOD, GSH and GSH-px activities and depressed the expression of pro-inflammatory factors, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS), TNF-α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and IL-6, respectively. Moreover, luteolin down-regulated acetaminophen-induced nitrotyrosine (NT) formation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. These results suggest the presence of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-ER stress properties of luteolin in response to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice.

  9. Acute inhibition of myostatin-family proteins preserves skeletal muscle in mouse models of cancer cachexia

    SciTech Connect

    Benny Klimek, Margaret E.; Aydogdu, Tufan; Link, Majik J.; Pons, Marianne; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Zimmers, Teresa A.

    2010-01-15

    Cachexia, progressive loss of fat and muscle mass despite adequate nutrition, is a devastating complication of cancer associated with poor quality of life and increased mortality. Myostatin is a potent tonic muscle growth inhibitor. We tested how myostatin inhibition might influence cancer cachexia using genetic and pharmacological approaches. First, hypermuscular myostatin null mice were injected with Lewis lung carcinoma or B16F10 melanoma cells. Myostatin null mice were more sensitive to tumor-induced cachexia, losing more absolute mass and proportionately more muscle mass than wild-type mice. Because myostatin null mice lack expression from development, however, we also sought to manipulate myostatin acutely. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A has been shown to increase muscle mass in normal and dystrophic mice by inducing the myostatin inhibitor, follistatin. Although Trichostatin A administration induced muscle growth in normal mice, it failed to preserve muscle in colon-26 cancer cachexia. Finally we sought to inhibit myostatin and related ligands by administration of the Activin receptor extracellular domain/Fc fusion protein, ACVR2B-Fc. Systemic administration of ACVR2B-Fc potently inhibited muscle wasting and protected adipose stores in both colon-26 and Lewis lung carcinoma cachexia, without affecting tumor growth. Enhanced cachexia in myostatin knockouts indicates that host-derived myostatin is not the sole mediator of muscle wasting in cancer. More importantly, skeletal muscle preservation with ACVR2B-Fc establishes that targeting myostatin-family ligands using ACVR2B-Fc or related molecules is an important and potent therapeutic avenue in cancer cachexia.

  10. Flaxseed Mitigates Acute Oxidative Lung Damage in a Mouse Model of Repeated Radiation and Hyperoxia Exposure Associated with Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Background Spaceflight missions may require crewmembers to conduct extravehicular activities (EVA). Pre-breathe protocols in preparation for an EVA entail 100% hyperoxia exposure that may last for a few hours and be repeated 2-3 times weekly. Each EVA is associated with additional challenges such as low levels of total body cosmic/galactic radiation exposure that may present a threat to crewmember health. We have developed a mouse model of total body radiation and hyperoxia exposure and identified acute damage of lung tissues. In the current study we evaluated the usefulness of dietary flaxseed (FS) as a countermeasure agent for such double-hit exposures. Methods We evaluated lung tissue changes 2 weeks post-initiation of exposure challenges. Mouse cohorts (n=5/group) were pre-fed diets containing either 0% FS or 10% FS for 3 weeks and exposed to: a) normoxia (Untreated); b) >95% O2 (O2); c) 0.25Gy single fraction gamma radiation (IR); or d) a combination of O2 and IR (O2+IR) 3 times per week for 2 consecutive weeks, where 8-hour hyperoxia treatments were spanned by normoxic intervals. Results At 2 weeks post challenge, while control-diet fed mice developed significant lung injury and inflammation across all challenges, FS protected lung tissues by decreasing bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils (p<0.003) and protein levels, oxidative tissue damage, as determined by levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) (p<0.008) and nitrosative stress as determined by nitrite levels. Lung hydroxyproline levels, a measure of lung fibrosis, were significantly elevated in mice fed 0% FS (p<0.01) and exposed to hyperoxia/radiation or the combination treatment, but not in FS-fed mice. FS also decreased levels of a pro-inflammatory, pro-fibrogenic cytokine (TGF-β1) gene expression levels in lung. Conclusion Flaxseed mitigated adverse effects in lung of repeat exposures to radiation/hyperoxia. This data will provide useful information in the design of countermeasures to early

  11. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  12. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively.

  13. Ventilation defects observed with hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abe C; Nouls, John C; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Voltz, James W; Fubara, Boma; Foley, Julie; Bradbury, J Alyce; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-05-01

    Regions of diminished ventilation are often evident during functional pulmonary imaging studies, including hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, and computed tomography (CT). The objective of this study was to characterize the hypointense regions observed via (3)He MRI in a murine model of acute lung injury. LPS at doses ranging from 15-50 μg was intratracheally administered to C57BL/6 mice under anesthesia. Four hours after exposure to either LPS or saline vehicle, mice were imaged via hyperpolarized (3)He MRI. All images were evaluated to identify regions of hypointense signals. Lungs were then characterized by conventional histology, or used to obtain tissue samples from regions of normal and hypointense (3)He signals and analyzed for cytokine content. The characterization of (3)He MRI images identified three distinct types of hypointense patterns: persistent defects, atelectatic defects, and dorsal lucencies. Persistent defects were associated with the administration of LPS. The number of persistent defects depended on the dose of LPS, with a significant increase in mean number of defects in 30-50-μg LPS-dosed mice versus saline-treated control mice. Atelectatic defects predominated in LPS-dosed mice under conditions of low-volume ventilation, and could be reversed with deep inspiration. Dorsal lucencies were present in nearly all mice studied, regardless of the experimental conditions, including control animals that did not receive LPS. A comparison of (3)He MRI with histopathology did not identify tissue abnormalities in regions of low (3)He signal, with the exception of a single region of atelectasis in one mouse. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were evident in concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (KC), TNFα, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 between hypointense and normally ventilated lung regions in LPS

  14. Prepubertal mouse testis growth and maturation and androgen production are acutely sensitive to di-n-butyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Moody, Sarah; Goh, Hoey; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Rippon, Paul; Loveland, Kate L; Itman, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Phthalates are plasticizers with widespread industrial, domestic, and medical applications. Epidemiological data indicating increased incidence of testicular dysgenesis in boys exposed to phthalates in utero are reinforced by studies demonstrating that phthalates impair fetal rodent testis development. Because humans are exposed to phthalates continuously from gestation through adulthood, it is imperative to understand what threat phthalates pose at other life stages. To determine the impact during prepuberty, we assessed the consequences of oral administration of 1 to 500 mg di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP)/kg/d in corn oil to wild-type (C57BL/6J) male mice from 4 to 14 days of age. Dose-dependent effects on testis growth correlated with reduced Sertoli cell proliferation. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses identified delayed spermatogenesis and impaired Sertoli cell maturation after exposure to 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was indicated in mice fed 500 mg DBP/kg/d, which had elevated circulating inhibin but no change in serum FSH. Increased immunohistochemical staining for inhibin-α was apparent at doses of 10 to 500 mg DBP/kg/d. Serum testosterone and testicular androgen activity were lower in the 500 mg DBP/kg/d group; however, reduced anogenital distance in all DBP-treated mice suggested impaired androgen action at earlier time points. Long-term effects were evident, with smaller anogenital distance and indications of disrupted spermatogenesis in adult mice exposed prepubertally to doses from 1 mg DBP/kg/d. These data demonstrate the acute sensitivity of the prepubertal mouse testis to DBP at doses 50- to 500-fold lower than those used in rat and identify the upregulation of inhibin as a potential mechanism of DBP action.

  15. Increase in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in specific areas of the mouse brain by acute caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Hyo Young; Cha, Seung Ha; Ryu, Hyun; Jang, Wooyoung; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine produces a variety of behavioral effects including increased alertness, reduced food intake, anxiogenic effects, and dependence upon repeated exposure. Although many of the effects of caffeine are mediated by its ability to block adenosine receptors, it is possible that other neural substrates, such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), may be involved in the effects of caffeine. Indeed, a recent study demonstrated that repeated caffeine administration increases CART in the mouse striatum. However, it is not clear whether acute caffeine administration alters CART in other areas of the brain. To explore this possibility, we investigated the dose- and time-dependent changes in CART immunoreactivity (CART-IR) after a single dose of caffeine in mice. We found that a high dose of caffeine (100 mg/kg) significantly increased CART-IR 2 h after administration in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc), and locus coeruleus (LC), and returned to control levels after 8 h. But this increase was not observed in other brain areas. In addition, caffeine administration at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg appears to produce dose-dependent increases in CART-IR in these brain areas; however, the magnitude of increase in CART-IR observed at a dose of 50 mg/kg was similar or greater than that observed at a dose of 100 mg/kg. This result suggests that CART-IR in AcbSh, dBNST, CeA, PVN, Arc, and LC is selectively affected by caffeine administration.

  16. Acute TrkB inhibition rescues phenobarbital-resistant seizures in a mouse model of neonatal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kang, S K; Johnston, M V; Kadam, S D

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Phenobarbital (PB) resistance is common and poses a serious challenge in clinical management. Using a newly characterized neonatal mouse model of ischemic seizures, this study investigated a novel strategy for rescuing PB resistance. A small-molecule TrkB antagonist, ANA12, used to selectively and transiently block post-ischemic BDNF-TrkB signaling in vivo, determined whether rescuing TrkB-mediated post-ischemic degradation of the K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2) rescued PB-resistant seizures. The anti-seizure efficacy of ANA12 + PB was quantified by (i) electrographic seizure burden using acute continuous video-electroencephalograms and (ii) post-treatment expression levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 using Western blot analysis in postnatal day (P)7 and P10 CD1 pups with unilateral carotid ligation. ANA12 significantly rescued PB-resistant seizures at P7 and improved PB efficacy at P10. A single dose of ANA12 + PB prevented the post-ischemic degradation of KCC2 for up to 24 h. As anticipated, ANA12 by itself had no anti-seizure properties and was unable to prevent KCC2 degradation at 24 h without follow-on PB. This indicates that unsubdued seizures can independently lead to KCC2 degradation via non-TrkB-dependent pathways. This study, for the first time as a proof-of-concept, reports the potential therapeutic value of KCC2 modulation for the management of PB-resistant seizures in neonates. Future investigations are required to establish the mechanistic link between ANA12 and the prevention of KCC2 degradation. PMID:26452067

  17. Increase in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in specific areas of the mouse brain by acute caffeine administration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Hyo Young; Cha, Seung Ha; Ryu, Hyun; Jang, Wooyoung; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Caffeine produces a variety of behavioral effects including increased alertness, reduced food intake, anxiogenic effects, and dependence upon repeated exposure. Although many of the effects of caffeine are mediated by its ability to block adenosine receptors, it is possible that other neural substrates, such as cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), may be involved in the effects of caffeine. Indeed, a recent study demonstrated that repeated caffeine administration increases CART in the mouse striatum. However, it is not clear whether acute caffeine administration alters CART in other areas of the brain. To explore this possibility, we investigated the dose- and time-dependent changes in CART immunoreactivity (CART-IR) after a single dose of caffeine in mice. We found that a high dose of caffeine (100 mg/kg) significantly increased CART-IR 2 h after administration in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), arcuate hypothalamic nucleus (Arc), and locus coeruleus (LC), and returned to control levels after 8 h. But this increase was not observed in other brain areas. In addition, caffeine administration at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg appears to produce dose-dependent increases in CART-IR in these brain areas; however, the magnitude of increase in CART-IR observed at a dose of 50 mg/kg was similar or greater than that observed at a dose of 100 mg/kg. This result suggests that CART-IR in AcbSh, dBNST, CeA, PVN, Arc, and LC is selectively affected by caffeine administration. PMID:25820086

  18. Vulnerability of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in a transgenic/knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease together with disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Ester; Brox, Susana; Petrov, Dmitry; Olloquequi, Jordi; Romero, Rafael; de Lemos, M Luisa; Camins, Antoni; Auladell, Carme

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid protein in the brain (in both soluble and insoluble forms) and by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), leading to neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms whereby Aβ triggers brain alterations are unclear. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a deregulation of Ca(2+) signaling may play a major role in disease progression. Calcium-buffering proteins, including calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), may offer neuroprotection by maintaining calcium homeostasis. Although marked reductions in these proteins have been observed in the brains of mice and humans with AD, their contribution to AD pathology remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to analyze distribution patterns of CB(+,) CR(+) and PV(+) interneurons in different areas of the hippocampus, a brain region that is severely affected in AD. A transgenic knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of familial AD was used. The data were obtained from the brains of 3- and 12-month-old animals. These ages roughly correspond to an early mature adult (prior to clinical manifestations) and a late middle-age (clinical symptoms readily detectable) phase in human AD patients. Immunostaining revealed increases in CB and PV immunoreactivity (IR) in the hippocampus of 3-month-old transgenic mice, compared to wild-type animals. Possibly, these proteins are upregulated in an attempt to control cellular homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. However, the pattern of CB-IR was reversed in 12-month-old animals, potentially indicating a loss of cellular capacity to respond to pathophysiological processes. In addition, at this age, a noticeable increase in PV-IR was observed, suggesting the presence of hippocampal network hyperactivity in older AD-like mice. Our results indicate that CaBP(+) neuronal subpopulations play a role in adult neurogenesis and in AD pathology, particularly at early disease

  19. Integrative Metabolome and Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Discordant Energetic Stress between Mouse Strains with Differential Sensitivity to Acrolein-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.; Medvedovic, Mario; Alexander, Danny C.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Concel, Vincent J.; Bein, Kiflai; Jang, An Soo; Brendt, Annerose; Vuga, Louis J.; Brant, Kelly A.; Pope-Varsalona, Hannah; Dopico, Richard A.; Ganguly, Koustav; Upadhyay, Swapna; Li, Qian; Hu, Zhen; Kaminski, Naftali; Leikauf, George D.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory irritant, acrolein is generated by overheating cooking oils or by domestic cooking using biomass fuels, and is in tobacco smoke, an occupational health hazard in the restaurant workplace. To better understand the metabolic role of the lung and to generate insights into the pathogenesis of acrolein-induced acute lung injury, SM/J (sensitive) and 129×1/SvJ (resistant) inbred mouse strains were exposed and the lung metabolome was integrated with the transcriptome profile. A total of 280 small molecules were identified and mean values (log 2 >0.58 or <−0.58, .p<0.05) were considered different for between-strain comparisons or within-strain responses to acrolein treatment. At baseline, 24 small molecules increased and 33 small molecules decreased in the SM/J mouse lung as compared to 129×1/SvJ mouse lung. Notable among the increased compounds was malonyl carnitine. Following acrolein exposure, several compounds indicative of glycolysis and branched chain amino acid metabolism increased similarly in both strains, whereas SM/J mice were less effective in generating metabolites related to fatty acid β-oxidation. These findings suggest management of energetic stress varies between these strains, and that the ability to evoke auxiliary energy generating pathways rapidly and effectively may be critical in enhancing survival during acute lung injury in mice. PMID:21823223

  20. K(v) 7 (KCNQ) channel openers normalize central 2-deoxyglucose uptake in a mouse model of mania and increase prefrontal cortical and hippocampal serine-9 phosphorylation levels of GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Line V; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Hansen, Henrik H

    2012-05-01

    Several metabolic neuroimaging studies have indicated that bipolar patients with mania exhibit alterations in metabolic activity, suggesting that perturbations in corticolimbic function contribute to the functional deficits associated with the disease. Because pharmacological stimulation of K(v)7 channel function has shown anti-manic like efficacy in the D-amphetamine and chlordiazepoxide (AMPH+CDP) induced hyperactivity mouse model of mania, we addressed whether this effect of K(v)7 channels could be associated with changes in cerebral [¹⁴C]2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, a surrogate marker of brain metabolic activity. Acute administration of the Kv7 channel modulators, retigabine (pan K(v)7.2-K(v)7.5 channel opener) and ICA-27243 (K(v)7.2/K(v)7.3 channel-preferring opener) reduced 2-DG uptake in several mouse forebrain structures with a brain regional signature similar to the mood stabilizers, lithium and valproate. Combined administration of AMPH+CDP enhanced 2-DG uptake in the striatum, cortex and thalamus, and both retigabine and ICA-27243 fully prevented this stimulatory effect of AMPH+CDP. In addition, both K(v)7 channel openers dose-dependently increased phospho-serine-9 levels of GSK3β in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, a common molecular mechanism shared by anti-manic drugs. In combination, these data emphasize the potential of K(v)7 channel openers in the treatment of bipolar disorder, and suggest that heteromeric K(v)7.2/K(v)7.3 channels may present a novel anti-manic therapeutic target. PMID:22356228

  1. Acute effects of wheel running on adult hippocampal precursor cells in mice are not caused by changes in cell cycle length or S phase length

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tim J.; Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Brandt, Moritz D.; Kempermann, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Exercise stimulates cellular brain plasticity by extending the pool of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus. This effect has been investigated extensively, but the most immediate cellular effect induced by exercise that results in this acute increase in the number of cycling cells remained unclear. In the developing brain as well as adult pathological models, cell cycle alterations have a major influence on the balance between proliferative and neurogenic divisions. In this study we investigated whether this might also apply to the acute physiological pro-neurogenic stimulus of physical exercise in adulthood. Do changes in cell cycle precede the measurable increase in proliferation? After 5 days of voluntary wheel running, however, we measured only a very small, statistically not significant acceleration in cell cycle, which could not quantitatively explain the observed increase in proliferating cells after exercise. Thus, at this acute stage, changes at the level of cell cycle control is not the primary causal mechanism for the expansion of the precursor cell population, although with time after the stimulus changes in cell cycle of the entire population of labeled cells might be the result of the expanded pool of cells that have progressed to the advanced neurogenic stages with shorter cell cycle length. PMID:25339861

  2. Effects of different concentration and duration time of isoflurane on acute and long-term neurocognitve function of young adult C57BL/6 mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianhui; Wang, Peijun; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a decline in cognitive performance after a surgery with anaesthesia. The exact reasons of surgery and/or anaesthesia resulting in POCD are unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different concentration and duration time of isoflurane anaesthesia on cognitive performance and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory function. In present work, young adult male C57BL/6 mice (age: 8 weeks) were anaesthetized by different concentration isoflurane in 100% oxygen for different duration time (Mice in group I1 received 0.7% isoflurane 0.5 h, mice in I2 received 0.7% isoflurane 2 h, mice in I3 received 1.4% isoflurane 2 h, and mice in I4 received 1.4% isoflurane 4 h). Non-anaesthetized mice served as control group (I0). Spatial learning was assessed at 10 days post-anesthesia in Morris water maze (MWM). Hippocampal protein expressions of activated caspase 3, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B, and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were evaluated 24 hours and 2 weeks post anesthesia. Protein expression of activated caspase3 was detected acute elevated in I3 (24 h post-anesthesia) and acute and long-term elevated in I4 (24 hours and 2 weeks post-anesthesia). There was no significant difference between I1, I2 and control group. Protein expressions of NR2B showed an acute and long-term increasement in I1 and I2, decreasement in I4, and an acute decline, then returned to normal in I3 compared to control group. The ratio of phosopho-ERK1/2 to total-ERK showed an acute increasement in I1 and I2, then came to normal 2 weeks post anesthesia compared to control group, meanwhile, we detected an acute and long-term decline in I3 and I4. In MWM test, mice in I1 and I2 showed cognitive improvement, mice in I3 showed similar to control group, while mice in I4 demonstrated cognitive impairment, which were approximately corresponding to the changes of protein expression of NR2B and activation of ERK1

  3. Bestrophin-1 encodes for the Ca2+-activated anion channel in hippocampal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungju; Oh, Soo-Jin; Han, Kyung-Seok; Woo, Dong Ho; Park, Hyekyung; Mannaioni, Guido; Traynelis, Stephen F; Lee, C Justin

    2009-10-14

    In mammalian brain, neurons and astrocytes are reported to express various chloride and anion channels, but the evidence for functional expression of Ca(2+)-activated anion channel (CAAC) and its molecular identity have been lacking. Here we report electrophysiological evidence for the CAAC expression and its molecular identity by mouse Bestrophin 1 (mBest1) in astrocytes of the mouse brain. Using Ca(2+) imaging and perforated-patch-clamp analysis, we demonstrate that astrocytes displayed an inward current at holding potential of -70 mV that was dependent on an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) after G(alphaq)-coupled receptor activation. This current was mediated mostly by anions and was sensitive to well known anion channel blockers such as niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, and flufenamic acid. To find the molecular identity of the anion channel responsible for the CAAC current, we analyzed the expression of candidate genes and found that the mRNA for mouse mBest1 is predominantly expressed in acutely dissociated or cultured astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp analysis using HEK293T cells heterologously expressing full-length mBest1 showed a Ca(2+)-dependent current mediated by mBest1, with a complete impairment of the current by a putative pore mutation, W93C. Furthermore, mBest1-mediated CAAC from cultured astrocytes was significantly reduced by expression of mBest1-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA), suggesting that the CAAC is mediated by a channel encoded by mBest1. Finally, hippocampal CA1 astrocytes in hippocampal slice also showed mBest1-mediated CAAC because it was inhibited by mBest1-specific shRNA. Collectively, these data provide molecular evidence that the mBest1 channel is responsible for CAAC function in astrocytes.

  4. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed.

  5. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  6. Acute and Chronic Plasma Metabolomic and Liver Transcriptomic Stress Effects in a Mouse Model with Features of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; D’Arpa, Peter; Donohue, Duncan E.; Muhie, Seid; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Luke, Brian T.; Grapov, Dmitry; Carroll, Erica E.; Meyerhoff, James L.; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2015-01-01

    Acute responses to intense stressors can give rise to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD diagnostic criteria include trauma exposure history and self-reported symptoms. Individuals who meet PTSD diagnostic criteria often meet criteria for additional psychiatric diagnoses. Biomarkers promise to contribute to reliable phenotypes of PTSD and comorbidities by linking biological system alterations to behavioral symptoms. Here we have analyzed unbiased plasma metabolomics and other stress effects in a mouse model with behavioral features of PTSD. In this model, C57BL/6 mice are repeatedly exposed to a trained aggressor mouse (albino SJL) using a modified, resident-intruder, social defeat paradigm. Our recent studies using this model found that aggressor-exposed mice exhibited acute stress effects including changed behaviors, body weight gain, increased body temperature, as well as inflammatory and fibrotic histopathologies and transcriptomic changes of heart tissue. Some of these acute stress effects persisted, reminiscent of PTSD. Here we report elevated proteins in plasma that function in inflammation and responses to oxidative stress and damaged tissue at 24 hrs post-stressor. Additionally at this acute time point, transcriptomic analysis indicated liver inflammation. The unbiased metabolomics analysis showed altered metabolites in plasma at 24 hrs that only partially normalized toward control levels after stress-withdrawal for 1.5 or 4 wks. In particular, gut-derived metabolites were altered at 24 hrs post-stressor and remained altered up to 4 wks after stress-withdrawal. Also at the 4 wk time point, hyperlipidemia and suppressed metabolites of amino acids and carbohydrates in plasma coincided with transcriptomic indicators of altered liver metabolism (activated xenobiotic and lipid metabolism). Collectively, these system-wide sequelae to repeated intense stress suggest that the simultaneous perturbed functioning of multiple organ systems (e.g., brain, heart

  7. Memantine acts as a cholinergic stimulant in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Drever, Benjamin D; Anderson, William G L; Johnson, Helena; O'Callaghan, Matthew; Seo, Sangwon; Choi, Deog-Young; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2007-12-01

    The non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, currently prescribed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, is assumed to prevent the excitotoxicity implicated in neurodegenerative processes. Here, we investigated the actions of memantine on hippocampal function and signalling. In behavioural experiments using the water maze, we observed that memantine (at 2 mg/kg) reversed scopolamine-induced learning deficits in mice. When acutely applied to mouse hippocampal slices, memantine caused a significant upward shift in the population spike input-output relationship at 10 and 100 microM, and a corresponding downward shift in latency, indicative of overall enhanced synaptic transmission. This action was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (10 microM) but not by the NMDA antagonist MK-801 (10 microM) or the GABA antagonist bicuculline (20 microM). Further, memantine occluded potentiation induced by 50 nM carbachol (CCh), while enhancing inhibitory actions of CCh at 1 microM, suggesting additive actions. As anticipated for an NMDA antagonist, 100 microM (but not 10 microM) memantine also inhibited tetanus-induced long-term potentiation (LTP), and NMDA-induced Ca;{2+} signals were blocked in cultured hippocampal neurones at 10 microM (by 88%). Overall, our data suggest actions of memantine beyond NMDA receptor antagonism, including stimulating effects on cholinergic signalling via muscarinic receptors. These interactions with the cholinergic system are likely to contribute to memantine's therapeutic potential.

  8. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans.

  9. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. PMID:26341542

  10. Behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of Crohn's disease: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Heydarpour, Pouria; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Khoshkish, Shayan; Fakhraei, Nahid; Salehi-Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Wang, Hongxing; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased psychiatric co-morbidities. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation and tissue injury in CD, and it may also play a central role in pathogenesis of the accompanying behavioral despair. This study investigated the role of the NO pathway in behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of CD. Colitis was induced by intrarectal (i.r.) injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (10mg TNBS in 50% ethanol). Forced swimming test (FST), pharmacological studies and tissues collection were performed 72 h following TNBS administration. To address a possible inflammatory origin for the behavioral despair following colitis induction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level was measured in both the hippocampal and colonic tissue samples. In parallel, hippocampal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrite level were evaluated. Pharmacological studies targeting the NO pathway were performed 30-60 min before behavioral test. Colitis was confirmed by increased colonic TNF-α level and microscopic score. Colitic mice demonstrated a significantly higher immobility time in the FST associated to a significant increase of hippocampal TNF-α, iNOS expression and nitrite content. Acute NOS inhibition using either Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) or aminoguanidine hydrochloride (a specific iNOS inhibitor) decreased the immobility time in colitic groups. Moreover, acute treatment with both NOS inhibitors decreased the TNF-α level and nitrite content in the hippocampal samples. This study suggests that the NO pathway may be involved in the behavioral effects in the mouse TNBS model of CD. These findings endow new insights into the gut-brain communication during the development of colonic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat behavior changes associated with gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of Crohn's disease: Role of nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Heydarpour, Pouria; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Khoshkish, Shayan; Fakhraei, Nahid; Salehi-Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Wang, Hongxing; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with increased psychiatric co-morbidities. Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation and tissue injury in CD, and it may also play a central role in pathogenesis of the accompanying behavioral despair. This study investigated the role of the NO pathway in behavioral despair associated with a mouse model of CD. Colitis was induced by intrarectal (i.r.) injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (10mg TNBS in 50% ethanol). Forced swimming test (FST), pharmacological studies and tissues collection were performed 72 h following TNBS administration. To address a possible inflammatory origin for the behavioral despair following colitis induction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level was measured in both the hippocampal and colonic tissue samples. In parallel, hippocampal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrite level were evaluated. Pharmacological studies targeting the NO pathway were performed 30-60 min before behavioral test. Colitis was confirmed by increased colonic TNF-α level and microscopic score. Colitic mice demonstrated a significantly higher immobility time in the FST associated to a significant increase of hippocampal TNF-α, iNOS expression and nitrite content. Acute NOS inhibition using either Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) or aminoguanidine hydrochloride (a specific iNOS inhibitor) decreased the immobility time in colitic groups. Moreover, acute treatment with both NOS inhibitors decreased the TNF-α level and nitrite content in the hippocampal samples. This study suggests that the NO pathway may be involved in the behavioral effects in the mouse TNBS model of CD. These findings endow new insights into the gut-brain communication during the development of colonic inflammation, which may ultimately lead to improved therapeutic strategies to combat behavior changes associated with gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26268932

  12. Empathy in hippocampal amnesia.

    PubMed

    Beadle, J N; Tranel, D; Cohen, N J; Duff, M C

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy.

  13. Empathy in Hippocampal Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Beadle, J. N.; Tranel, D.; Cohen, N. J.; Duff, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy. PMID:23526601

  14. Normalization of Dyrk1A expression by AAV2/1-shDyrk1A attenuates hippocampal-dependent defects in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Altafaj, Xavier; Martín, Eduardo D; Ortiz-Abalia, Jon; Valderrama, Aitana; Lao-Peregrín, Cristina; Dierssen, Mara; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    The cognitive dysfunctions of Down Syndrome (DS) individuals are the most disabling alterations caused by the trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). In trisomic Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model for DS, the overexpression of HSA21 homologous genes has been associated with strong visuo-spatial cognitive alterations, ascribed to hippocampal dysfunction. In the present study, we evaluated whether the normalization of the expression levels of Dyrk1A (Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A), a candidate gene for DS, might correct hippocampal defects in Ts65Dn mice. In the hippocampus of 2 month-old Ts65Dn mice, such normalization was achieved through the stereotaxical injection of adeno-associated viruses containing a short hairpin RNA against Dyrk1A (AAV2/1-shDyrk1A) and a luciferase reporter gene. The injected hippocampi were efficiently transduced, as shown by bioluminescence in vivo imaging, luciferase activity quantification and immunohistochemical analysis. At the molecular level, viral infusion allowed the normalization of the targeted Dyrk1A expression, as well as of the key players of the MAPK/CREB pathway. The electrophysiological recordings of hippocampal slices from Ts65Dn mice injected with AAV2/1-shDyrk1A displayed attenuation of the synaptic plasticity defects of trisomic mice. In contrast, contralateral hippocampal injection with an AAV2/1 control virus containing a scrambled sequence, showed neither the normalization of Dyrk1A levels nor changes of synaptic plasticity. In the Morris water maze task, although long-term consolidation of the task was not achieved, treated Ts65Dn mice displayed initially a normalized thigmotactic behavior, similar to euploid littermates, indicating the partial improvement in their hippocampal-dependent search strategy. Taken together, these results show Dyrk1A as a critical player in the pathophysiology of DS and define Dyrk1A as a therapeutic target in adult trisomic mice. PMID:23220201

  15. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  16. Acute administration of a small molecule p75NTR ligand does not prevent hippocampal neuron loss nor development of spontaneous seizures after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Grabenstatter, H.L.; Carlsen, J.; Raol, Y.H.; Yang, T.; Hund, D.; Del Angel, Y. Cruz; White, A.M.; Gonzalez, M.I.; Longo, F.M.; Russek, S.J.; Brooks-Kayal, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are initially expressed in a precursor form (e.g., proBDNF) and cleaved to form mature BDNF (mBDNF). Following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), increases in neurotrophins regulate a wide variety of cell signaling pathways including pro-survival and cell-death machinery in a receptor-specific manner. ProBDNF preferentially binds to the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), while mBDNF is the major ligand of the tropomyosin related kinase receptor (TrkB). To elucidate a potential role of p75NTR in acute stages of epileptogenesis, rats were injected prior to and at onset of SE with LM11A-31, a small molecule ligand that binds to p75NTR to promote survival signaling and inhibit neuronal cell death. Modulation of early p75NTR signaling and its effects on (1) electrographic SE, (2) SE-induced neurodegeneration, and (3) subsequent spontaneous seizures were examined following LM11A-31 administration. Despite an established neuroprotective effect of LM11A-31 in several animal models of neurodegenerative disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury), high-dose LM11A-31 administration prior to and at onset of SE did not reduce the intensity of electrographic SE, prevent SE-induced neuronal cell injury, nor inhibit the progression of epileptogenesis. Further studies are required to understand the role of p75NTR activation during epileptogenesis and in seizure-induced cell injury in the hippocampus among other potential cellular pathologies contributing to the onset of spontaneous seizures. Additional studies utilizing more prolonged treatment with LM11A-31 are required to reach a definite conclusion on its potential neuroprotective role in epilepsy. PMID:24801281

  17. Priming of long-term potentiation in mouse hippocampus by corticotropin-releasing factor and acute stress: implications for hippocampus-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas; Nijholt, Ingrid; Eckart, Klaus; Spiess, Joachim

    2002-05-01

    In the present experiments, we characterized the action of human/rat corticotropin-releasing factor (h/rCRF) and acute stress (1 hr of immobilization) on hippocampus-dependent learning and on synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus. We first showed that h/rCRF application and acute stress facilitated (primed) long-term potentiation of population spikes (PS-LTP) in the mouse hippocampus and enhanced context-dependent fear conditioning. Both the priming of PS-LTP and the improvement of context-dependent fear conditioning were prevented by the CRF receptor antagonist [Glu(11,16)]astressin. PS-LTP priming and improved learning were also reduced by the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I. Acute stress induced the activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) 2 hr after the end of the stress session. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-62 antagonized the stress-mediated learning enhancement, however, with no effect on PS-LTP persistence. Thus, long-lasting increased neuronal excitability as reflected in PS-LTP priming appeared to be essential for the enhancement of learning in view of the observation that inhibition of PS-LTP priming was associated with impaired learning. Conversely, it was demonstrated that inhibition of CaMKII activity reduced contextual fear conditioning without affecting PS-LTP priming. This observation suggests that priming of PS-LTP and activation of CaMKII represent two essential mechanisms that may contribute independently to long-term memory.

  18. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Jackye; Flaws, Jodi A

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10μg/mL and 100μg/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18h and 72h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10μg/mL and 100μg/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72h and 96h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48h and 72h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure.

  19. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  20. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Jackye; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10μg/mL and 100μg/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18h and 72h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10μg/mL and 100μg/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72h and 96h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48h and 72h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. PMID:23707772

  1. Neuropeptides and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zaben, M J; Gray, W P

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is important for modulating the behavioural responses to stress and for certain forms of learning and memory. The mechanisms underlying the necessary coupling of neuronal activity to neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) function remain poorly understood. Within the dentate subgranular stem cell niche, local interneurons appear to play an important part in this excitation-neurogenesis coupling via GABAergic transmission, which promotes neuronal differentiation and integration. Neuropeptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and galanin have emerged as important mediators for signalling local and extrinsic interneuronal activity to subgranular zone precursors. Here we review the distribution of these neuropeptides and their receptors in the neurogenic area of the hippocampus and their precise effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. We also discuss neuropeptides' potential involvement in functional aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis particularly their involvement in the modulation of learning and memory and behavior responses.

  2. A mouse model of Townes-Brocks syndrome expressing a truncated mutant Sall1 protein is protected from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Sara; El-Achkar, Tarek; Robbins, Lynn; Basta, Jeannine; Heitmeier, Monique; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Rauchman, Michael

    2015-11-15

    It has been postulated that developmental pathways are reutilized during repair and regeneration after injury, but functional analysis of many genes required for kidney formation has not been performed in the adult organ. Mutations in SALL1 cause Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) and nonsyndromic congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, both of which lead to childhood kidney failure. Sall1 is a transcriptional regulator that is expressed in renal progenitor cells and developing nephrons in the embryo. However, its role in the adult kidney has not been investigated. Using a mouse model of TBS (Sall1TBS), we investigated the role of Sall1 in response to acute kidney injury. Our studies revealed that Sall1 is expressed in terminally differentiated renal epithelia, including the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, in the mature kidney. Sall1TBS mice exhibited significant protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury and aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. This protection from acute injury is seen despite the presence of slowly progressive chronic kidney disease in Sall1TBS mice. Mice containing null alleles of Sall1 are not protected from acute kidney injury, indicating that expression of a truncated mutant protein from the Sall1TBS allele, while causative of congenital anomalies, protects the adult kidney from injury. Our studies further revealed that basal levels of the preconditioning factor heme oxygenase-1 are elevated in Sall1TBS kidneys, suggesting a mechanism for the relative resistance to injury in this model. Together, these studies establish a functional role for Sall1 in the response of the adult kidney to acute injury. PMID:26311113

  3. [Study of the Effect of Cholecystokinin-Induced Acute Pancreatitis on the Free-Running Rhythm of Mouse].

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghong; Yang, Xiaoping; Guo, Panpan; Liu, Yanyou; Yan, Hongli; Li, Shuaizhen; Guan, Junwen

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports the effect of pancreatitis induced by cholecystokinin (CCK) on free-running rhythm of locomotor activity of the ICR mice, and analyzes the interaction of inflammatory diseases and acute pancreatitis with circadian rhythm system. In the study, the mice were modeled under different phases of acute pancreatitis in DD status (Double Dark, constant dark condition). By comparing of the inflammatory status and the indicators of rhythm before and after modeling of the running wheel activity group and the rest group, it was observed that the rest group showed more possibility of inflammation than the activity group did in ICR mice model of acute pancreatitis. In the rest phase model, the extension of the period is particularly longer. The results presented indicated that CCK-induced acute pancreatitis impacted free activity rhythm of ICR mice. Also in a free running model under different phase, the inflammation severity was proved significantly different. This study provides possible clues for the research of the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis severe tendency.

  4. Oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse brain; the effect of LPS-induced inflammatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kazunori; Furube, Eriko; Muneoka, Shiori; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Miyata, Seiji

    2015-11-19

    Evidence have been accumulated that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian brain. The fornix, projection and commissure pathway of hippocampal neurons, carries signals from the hippocampus to other parts of the brain and has critical role in memory and learning. However, basic characterization of adult oligodendrogenesis in this brain region is not well understood. In the present study, therefore, we aimed to examine the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and the effect of acute inflammatory stimulation on oligodendrogenesis in the fornix of adult mouse. We demonstrated the proliferation of OPCs and a new generation of mature oligodendrocytes by using bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Oligodendrogenesis of adult fornix was also demonstrated by using oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 transgenic mouse. A single systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) attenuated proliferation of OPCs in the fornix together with reduced proliferation of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells. Time course analysis showed that a single administration of LPS attenuated the proliferation of OPCs during 24-48 h. On the other hand, consecutive administration of LPS did not suppress proliferation of OPCs. The treatment of LPS did not affect differentiation of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes. Treatment of a microglia inhibitor minocycline significantly attenuated basal proliferation of OPCs under normal condition. In conclusion, the present study indicates that continuous oligodendrogenesis occurs and a single administration of LPS transiently attenuates proliferation of OPCs without changing differentiation in the fornix of the adult mouse brains.

  5. Live cell detection of chromosome 2 deletion and Sfpi1/PU1 loss in radiation-induced mouse acute myeloid leukaemia☆

    PubMed Central

    Olme, C.-H.; Finnon, R.; Brown, N.; Kabacik, S.; Bouffler, S.D.; Badie, C.

    2013-01-01

    The CBA/H mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML) has been studied for decades to bring to light the molecular mechanisms associated with multistage carcinogenesis. A specific interstitial deletion of chromosome 2 found in a high proportion of rAML is recognised as the initiating event. The deletion leads to the loss of Sfpi, a gene essential for haematopoietic development. Its product, the transcription factor PU.1 acts as a tumour suppressor in this model. Although the deletion can be detected early following ionising radiation exposure by cytogenetic techniques, precise characterisation of the haematopoietic cells carrying the deletion and the study of their fate in vivo cannot be achieved. Here, using a genetically engineered C57BL/6 mouse model expressing the GFP fluorescent molecule under the control of the Sfpi1 promoter, which we have bred onto the rAML-susceptible CBA/H strain, we demonstrate that GFP expression did not interfere with X-ray induced leukaemia incidence and that GFP fluorescence in live leukaemic cells is a surrogate marker of radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletions with or without point mutations on the remaining allele of the Sfpi1 gene. This study presents the first experimental evidence for the detection of this leukaemia initiating event in live leukemic cells. PMID:23806234

  6. An advanced preclinical mouse model for acute myeloid leukemia using patients' cells of various genetic subgroups and in vivo bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Vick, Binje; Rothenberg, Maja; Sandhöfer, Nadine; Carlet, Michela; Finkenzeller, Cornelia; Krupka, Christina; Grunert, Michaela; Trumpp, Andreas; Corbacioglu, Selim; Ebinger, Martin; André, Maya C; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Schneider, Stephanie; Subklewe, Marion; Metzeler, Klaus H; Spiekermann, Karsten; Jeremias, Irmela

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous disease with poor outcome. Adequate model systems are required for preclinical studies to improve understanding of AML biology and to develop novel, rational treatment approaches. Xenografts in immunodeficient mice allow performing functional studies on patient-derived AML cells. We have established an improved model system that integrates serial retransplantation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cells in mice, genetic manipulation by lentiviral transduction, and essential quality controls by immunophenotyping and targeted resequencing of driver genes. 17/29 samples showed primary engraftment, 10/17 samples could be retransplanted and some of them allowed virtually indefinite serial transplantation. 5/6 samples were successfully transduced using lentiviruses. Neither serial transplantation nor genetic engineering markedly altered sample characteristics analyzed. Transgene expression was stable in PDX AML cells. Example given, recombinant luciferase enabled bioluminescence in vivo imaging and highly sensitive and reliable disease monitoring; imaging visualized minimal disease at 1 PDX cell in 10000 mouse bone marrow cells and facilitated quantifying leukemia initiating cells. We conclude that serial expansion, genetic engineering and imaging represent valuable tools to improve the individualized xenograft mouse model of AML. Prospectively, these advancements enable repetitive, clinically relevant studies on AML biology and preclinical treatment trials on genetically defined and heterogeneous subgroups. PMID:25793878

  7. Effect of acute imipramine administration on the pattern of forced swim-induced c-Fos expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Satoru; Motomura, Keisuke; Ohashi, Ayako; Hiraoka, Kentaro; Miura, Tomofumi; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2016-08-26

    The forced swim test (FST) has been widely used for the preclinical evaluation of antidepressant drugs. Despite considerable differences in the protocol, equivalence of the FST for rats and mice has been rarely questioned. Previous research on the FST for rats revealed that repeated administration of antidepressant drugs attenuates the c-Fos response to swim stress in the hypothalamus and limbic regions. However, few studies have made similar investigations using the FST for mice. In the present study, we explored the mouse brain through immunohistochemistry staining for c-Fos after acute administration of imipramine or saline with or without a subsequent swim session. Imipramine enhanced the c-Fos density in regions of the central extended amygdala, while forced swim stress increased c-Fos expression in some hypothalamic (the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus and dorsomedial nucleus) and brain stem regions, which is consistent with previous reports. In contrast to previous literature with rats, swim stress brought a significant increase in c-Fos expression in the lateral septal nucleus and some other regions in the hypothalamus (the intermediate hypothalamic area, the paraventricular and arcuate nucleus) only in the imipramine-pretreated group, which has not been observed previously. In the arcuate nucleus, double immunostaining revealed that c-Fos was rarely co-expressed with proopiomelanocortin or tyrosine hydroxylase regardless of imipramine treatment. The present results suggest that the activation of several regions in the lateral septum and the hypothalamus underlies antidepressant-like effect in the mouse FST. PMID:27373591

  8. Recombinant expression of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin components of Indian isolate in Escherichia coli and determination of its acute toxicity level in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, Suryanarayana; Vanlalhmuaka; Verma, Sarika; Tuteja, Urmil; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LeTx) is the principle factor responsible for toxaemia and anthrax related death. Lethal toxin consist of two proteins viz protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor which combines in a typical fashion similar to other toxins belonging to A-B toxin super family. The amount of LeTx required to kill a particular organism generally differs among strains owing to their geographical distributions and genetic variation. In the present study, we have cloned PA and LF genes from B. anthracis clinical isolate of Indian origin and expressed them in soluble form employing Escherichia coli expression system. Both the proteins were purified to near homogeneity level using Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further we have used equal ratio of both the proteins to form LeTx and determined its acute toxicity level in Balb/c mice by graphical method of Miller and Tainter. The LD50 value of LeTx by intravenous (i.v) route was found to be 0.97 ± 0.634 mg kg(-1) Balb/c mice. This study highlights the expression of recombinant LeTx from E. coli and assessing its acute toxicity level in experimental mouse model.

  9. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  10. New mouse model of acute adult T-cell leukemia generated by transplantation of AKT, BCLxL, and HBZ-transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Kasugai, Yumiko; Yoshida, Noriaki; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carriers. Although the HTLV-1-encoded HBZ gene is critically involved, HBZ alone is insufficient and additional, cooperative "hits" are required for the development of ATL. Candidate cooperative hits are being defined, but methods to rapidly explore their roles in ATL development in collaboration with HBZ are lacking. Here, we present a new mouse model of acute type ATL that can be generated rapidly by transplanting in vitro-induced T cells that have been retrovirally transduced with HBZ and two cooperative genes, BCLxL and AKT, into mice. Co-transduction of HBZ and BCLxL/AKT allowed these T cells to grow in vitro in the absence of cytokines (Flt3-ligand and interleukin-7), which did not occur with any two-gene combination. Although transplanted T cells were a mixture of cells transduced with different combinations of the genes, tumors that developed in mice were composed of HBZ/BCLxL/AKT triply transduced T cells, showing the synergistic effect of the three genes. The genetic/epigenetic landscape of ATL has only recently been elucidated, and the roles of additional "hits" in ATL pathogenesis remain to be explored. Our model provides a versatile tool to examine the roles of these hits, in collaboration with HBZ, in the development of acute ATL. PMID:27223899

  11. Effects of chronic and acute methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) administration on locomotor activity, ultrasonic vocalizations, and neuromotor development in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; McFadyen, M P; Carrey, N; Brown, R E

    2001-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic and acute treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) on isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations, spontaneous locomotor activity, and neuromotor coordination in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups. In Experiment 1, 3- to 11-day-old pups received daily injections of saline, 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, or no injection and were tested on postnatal Days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Both doses of methylphenidate resulted in significant increases in locomotor activity at all ages, but had no significant effect on body weight, neuromotor development, or emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. In Experiment 2, pups were given a single dose of methylphenidate (5 or 20 mg/kg), saline, or no injection on one of postnatal Days 5, 7, 9, or 11. This acute methylphenidate treatment increased locomotor activity, but had no significant effects on ultrasonic vocalizations or neuromotor coordination. These results indicate that short-term, chronic methylphenidate treatment elevates locomotor responses, but has no immediate effects on anxietylike responses or on the development of neuromotor behavior of CD-1 mice in the first 11 days of life.

  12. Altered Hippocampal Transcript Profile Accompanies an Age-Related Spatial Memory Deficit in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbitsky, Miguel; Yonan, Amanda L.; Malleret, Gael; Kandel, Eric R.; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Pavlidis, Paul

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out a global survey of age-related changes in mRNA levels in the 57BL/6NIA mouse hippocampus and found a difference in the hippocampal gene expression profile between 2-month-old young mice and 15-month-old middle-aged mice correlated with an age-related cognitive deficit in hippocampal-based explicit memory formation. Middle-aged…

  13. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G; Birnbaum, Shari G; Scharfman, Helen E; Eisch, Amelia J; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-03-26

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult.

  14. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis contributes to epilepsy and associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ok; Lybrand, Zane R; Ito, Naoki; Brulet, Rebecca; Tafacory, Farrah; Zhang, Ling; Good, Levi; Ure, Kerstin; Kernie, Steven G; Birnbaum, Shari G; Scharfman, Helen E; Eisch, Amelia J; Hsieh, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Acute seizures after a severe brain insult can often lead to epilepsy and cognitive impairment. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis follows the insult but the role of adult-generated neurons in the development of chronic seizures or associated cognitive deficits remains to be determined. Here we show that the ablation of adult neurogenesis before pilocarpine-induced acute seizures in mice leads to a reduction in chronic seizure frequency. We also show that ablation of neurogenesis normalizes epilepsy-associated cognitive deficits. Remarkably, the effect of ablating adult neurogenesis before acute seizures is long lasting as it suppresses chronic seizure frequency for nearly 1 year. These findings establish a key role of neurogenesis in chronic seizure development and associated memory impairment and suggest that targeting aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis may reduce recurrent seizures and restore cognitive function following a pro-epileptic brain insult. PMID:25808087

  15. Bisphenol A down-regulates rate-limiting Cyp11a1 to acutely inhibit steroidogenesis in cultured mouse antral follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, Jackye; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2013-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is the backbone of polycarbonate plastic products and the epoxy resin lining of aluminum cans. Previous studies have shown that exposure to BPA decreases sex steroid hormone production in mouse antral follicles. The current study tests the hypothesis that BPA first decreases the expression levels of the steroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse antral follicles, leading to a decrease in sex steroid hormone production in vitro. Further, the current study tests the hypothesis that these effects are acute and reversible after removal of BPA. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased expression of Cyp11a1 and StAR beginning at 18 h and 72 h, respectively, compared to controls. Exposure to BPA (10 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL) significantly decreased progesterone levels beginning at 24 h and decreased androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol levels at 72 h and 96 h compared to controls. Further, after removing BPA from the culture media at 20 h, expression of Cyp11a1 and progesterone levels were restored to control levels by 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Additionally, expression of StAR and levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol never decreased compared to controls. These data suggest that BPA acutely decreases expression of Cyp11a1 as early as 18 h and this reduction in Cyp11a1 may lead to a decrease in progesterone production by 24 h, followed by a decrease in androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol production and expression of StAR at 72 h. Therefore, BPA exposure likely targets Cyp11a1 and steroidogenesis, but these effects are reversible with removal of BPA exposure. - Highlights: • BPA may target Cyp11a1 to inhibit steroidogenesis in antral follicles. • BPA may decrease the expression of Cyp11a1 prior to inhibiting steroidogenesis. • The adverse effects of BPA on steroidogenesis in antral follicles are reversible.

  16. Acute allergic skin response as a new tool to evaluate the allergenicity of whey hydrolysates in a mouse model of orally induced cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Betty C A M; Schouten, Bastiaan; Hofman, Gerard A; van Baalen, Ton; Nijkamp, Frans P; Knippels, Léon M J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Garssen, Johan

    2010-06-01

    Hypoallergenic milk formulae are used for cow's milk allergic infants and may be a good option for infants at risk. Clinical studies have shown that the protein source or the hydrolysis methodology used may influence the effectiveness in infants stressing the importance of adequate pre-clinical testing of hypoallergenic formulae in an in vivo model of orally induced cow's milk allergy. This study was undertaken to introduce a new read-out system to measure the residual allergenicity of whey hydrolysates on both the sensitization and challenge phase of orally induced cow's milk allergy in mice. Mice were sensitized orally to whey or a partial whey hydrolysate (pWH) to measure the residual sensitizing capacity. To predict the residual allergenicity of hydrolysates, whey allergic mice were challenged in the ear with pWH, extensive whey hydrolysate or an amino acid-based formula. An acute allergic skin response (ear swelling at 1 h), whey-specific serum antibodies, and local MCP-1 concentrations were measured. In contrast to whey, oral sensitization with pWH did not result in the induction of whey-specific antibodies, although a minor residual skin response to whey was observed after challenge. Skin exposure to whey hydrolysates showed a hydrolysation dependent reduction of the acute allergic skin response in whey allergic mice. In contrast to whey, skin exposure to pWH did not enhance tissue MCP-1 levels. The acute allergic skin response in mice orally sensitized to cow's milk proteins reveals a new pre-clinical tool which might provide information about the residual sensitizing capacity of hydrolysates supporting the discussion on the use of hypoallergenic formulae in high risk children. This mouse model might be a relevant model for the screening of new hypoallergenic formulae aimed to prevent or treat cow's milk allergy.

  17. Expression of genes involved in mouse lung cell differentiation/regulation after acute exposure to photons and protons with or without low-dose preirradiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Zhao, WeiLing; Tian, Sisi; Slater, James M; Deng, Zhiyong; Gridley, Daila S

    2011-11-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the effects of acute 2 Gy irradiation with photons (0.8 Gy/min) or protons (0.9 Gy/min), both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays (0.01 Gy at 0.03 cGy/h), on 84 genes involved in stem cell differentiation or regulation in mouse lungs on days 21 and 56. Genes with a ≥1.5-fold difference in expression and P < 0.05 compared to 0 Gy controls are emphasized. Two proteins specific for lung stem cells/progenitors responsible for local tissue repair were also compared. Overall, striking differences were present between protons and photons in modulating the genes. More genes were affected by protons than by photons (22 compared to 2 and 6 compared to 2 on day 21 and day 56, respectively) compared to 0 Gy. Preirradiation with low-dose-rate γ rays enhanced the acute photon-induced gene modulation on day 21 (11 compared to 2), and all 11 genes were significantly downregulated on day 56. On day 21, seven genes (aldh2, bmp2, cdc2a, col1a1, dll1, foxa2 and notch1) were upregulated in response to most of the radiation regimens. Immunoreactivity of Clara cell secretory protein was enhanced by all radiation regimens. The number of alveolar type 2 cells positive for prosurfactant protein C in irradiated groups was higher on day 56 (12.4-14.6 cells/100) than on day 21 (8.5-11.2 cells/100) (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results showed that acute photons and protons induced different gene expression profiles in the lungs and that pre-exposure to low-dose-rate γ rays sometimes had modulatory effects. In addition, proteins associated with lung-specific stem cells/progenitors were highly sensitive to radiation.

  18. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  19. Hippocampal MR volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Botteron, K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Walkup, Ronald K.; Black, Kevin J.; Gado, Mokhtar; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    Goal: To estimate hippocampal volumes from in vivo 3D magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and determine inter-rater and intra- rater repeatability. Objective: The precision and repeatability of hippocampal volume estimates using stereologic measurement methods is sought. Design: Five normal control and five schizophrenic subjects were MR scanned using a MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate hippocampal volumes on a graphics workstation. The images were preprocessed using histogram analysis to standardize 3D MR image scaling from 16 to 8 bits and image volumes were interpolated to 0.5 mm3 isotropic voxels. The following variables were constant for the repeated stereologic measures: grid size, inter-slice distance (1.5 mm), voxel dimensions (0.5 mm3), number of hippocampi measured (10), total number of measurements per rater (40), and number of raters (5). Two grid sizes were tested to determine the coefficient of error associated with the number of sampled 'hits' (approximately 140 and 280) on the hippocampus. Starting slice and grid position were randomly varied to assure unbiased volume estimates. Raters were blind to subject identity, diagnosis, and side of the brain from which the image volumes were extracted and the order of subject presentation was randomized for each of the raters. Inter- and intra-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined. Results: The data indicate excellent repeatability of fixed grid stereologic hippocampal volume measures when using an inter-slice distance of 1.5 mm and a 6.25 mm2 grid (inter-rater ICCs equals 0.86 - 0.97, intra- rater ICCs equals 0.85 - 0.97). One major advantage of the current study was the use of 3D MR data which significantly improved visualization of hippocampal boundaries by providing the ability to access simultaneous orthogonal views while counting stereological marks within the hippocampus. Conclusion: Stereological estimates of 3D volumes from 2D MR

  20. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  1. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease.

  2. Group X secretory phospholipase A2 regulates the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in mouse adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Boyanovsky, Boris B; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Webb, Nancy R

    2010-06-25

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A(2) (GX KO). These mice have approximately 80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA(2), significantly reduced steroid production 30-40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA(2) inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA(2)-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA(2) receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was approximately 2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA(2). Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA(2) antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA(2) is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression.

  3. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Regulates the Expression of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) in Mouse Adrenal Glands*

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M.; Boyanovsky, Boris B.; Oslund, Rob C.; Gelb, Michael H.; Webb, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed C57BL/6 mice with targeted deletion of group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX KO). These mice have ∼80% higher plasma corticosterone concentrations compared with wild-type (WT) mice under both basal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-induced stress conditions. This increased corticosterone level was not associated with increased circulating ACTH or a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis as evidenced by a normal response to dexamethasone challenge. Primary cultures of adrenal cells from GX KO mice exhibited significantly increased corticosteroid secretion compared with WT cells. Conversely, overexpression of GX secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), but not a catalytically inactive mutant form of GX sPLA2, significantly reduced steroid production 30–40% in Y1 mouse adrenal cell line. This effect was reversed by the sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam. Silencing of endogenous M-type receptor expression did not restore steroid production in GX sPLA2-overexpressing Y1 cells, ruling out a role for this sPLA2 receptor in this regulatory process. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), the rate-limiting protein in corticosteroid production, was ∼2-fold higher in adrenal glands of GX KO mice compared with WT mice, whereas StAR expression was suppressed in Y1 cells overexpressing GX sPLA2. Results from StAR-promoter luciferase reporter gene assays indicated that GX sPLA2 antagonizes StAR promoter activity and liver X receptor-mediated StAR promoter activation. In summary, GX sPLA2 is expressed in mouse adrenal glands and functions to negatively regulate corticosteroid synthesis, most likely by negatively regulating StAR expression. PMID:20421306

  4. Mechanisms of action of hormone-sensitive lipase in mouse Leydig cells: its role in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Counis, Raymond; Garner, Charles W; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Kraemer, Fredric B; Stocco, Douglas M

    2013-03-22

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters in steroidogenic tissues and, thus, facilitates cholesterol availability for steroidogenesis. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) controls the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis. However, the modes of action of HSL in the regulation of StAR expression remain obscure. We demonstrate in MA-10 mouse Leydig cells that activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, by a cAMP analog Bt2cAMP, enhanced expression of HSL and its phosphorylation (P) at Ser-660 and Ser-563, but not at Ser-565, concomitant with increased HSL activity. Phosphorylation and activation of HSL coincided with increases in StAR, P-StAR (Ser-194), and progesterone levels. Inhibition of HSL activity by CAY10499 effectively suppressed Bt2cAMP-induced StAR expression and progesterone synthesis. Targeted silencing of endogenous HSL, with siRNAs, resulted in increased cholesteryl ester levels and decreased cholesterol content in MA-10 cells. Depletion of HSL affected lipoprotein-derived cellular cholesterol influx, diminished the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria, and resulted in the repression of StAR and P-StAR levels. Cells overexpressing HSL increased the efficacy of liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR expression and steroid synthesis, suggesting HSL-mediated steroidogenesis entails enhanced oxysterol production. Conversely, cells deficient in LXRs exhibited decreased HSL responsiveness. Furthermore, an increase in HSL was correlated with the LXR target genes, steroid receptor element-binding protein 1c and ATP binding cassette transporter A1, demonstrating HSL-dependent regulation of steroidogenesis predominantly involves LXR signaling. LXRs interact/cooperate with RXRs and result in the activation of StAR gene transcription. These findings provide novel insight and demonstrate the molecular events by which HSL acts to drive cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of StAR expression and

  5. Acute effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) on mouse behaviour in forced swimming and open field tests.

    PubMed

    Campos, A R; Barros, A I S; Albuquerque, F A A; M Leal, L K A; Rao, V S N

    2005-05-01

    Guarana, a herbal extract from the seeds of Paullinia cupana Mart. has been evaluated in comparison with caffeine on mouse behaviour in forced swimming and open field tests. Guarana (25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) and caffeine (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) each significantly reduced the duration of immobility in the forced swimming test suggesting an antidepressant-like effect in mice. At these doses, neither substance affected ambulation in the open field test. However, a high dose of guarana (100 mg/kg) and caffeine (30 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the locomotor activity in the open field test. Caffeine, but not guarana, could effectively block an adenosine agonist, cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA)-induced increase in swimming immobility suggesting that mechanism(s) other than the adenosinergic mechanism are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of guarana.

  6. A key role for EZH2 and associated genes in mouse and human adult T-cell acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Camille; Chagraoui, Jalila; Krosl, Jana; Gendron, Patrick; Wilhelm, Brian; Lemieux, Sébastien; Boucher, Geneviève; Chagnon, Pierre; Drouin, Simon; Lambert, Raphaëlle; Rondeau, Claude; Bilodeau, Annie; Lavallée, Sylvie; Sauvageau, Martin; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we show the high frequency of spontaneous γδ T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) occurrence in mice with biallelic deletion of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2). Tumor cells show little residual H3K27 trimethylation marks compared with controls. EZH2 is a component of the PRC2 Polycomb group protein complex, which is associated with DNA methyltransferases. Using next-generation sequencing, we identify alteration in gene expression levels of EZH2 and acquired mutations in PRC2-associated genes (DNMT3A and JARID2) in human adult T-ALL. Together, these studies document that deregulation of EZH2 and associated genes leads to the development of mouse, and likely human, T-ALL.

  7. Stimulation of estradiol biosynthesis by tributyltin in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Munetsuna, Eiji; Hattori, Minoru; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal functions are influenced by steroid hormones, such as testosterone and estradiol. It has been demonstrated that hippocampus-derived steroid hormones play important roles in neuronal protection and synapse formation. Our research groups have demonstrated that estradiol is de novo synthesized in the rat hippocampus. However, the mechanism(s) regulating this synthesis remains unclear. It has been reported that tributyltin, an environmental pollutant, binds to the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and modifies estrogen synthesis in human granulosa-like tumor cells. This compound can penetrate the blood brain barrier, and tends to accumulate in the brain. Based on these facts, we hypothesized that tributyltin could influence the hippocampal estradiol synthesis. A concentration of 0.1 μM tributyltin induced an increase in the mRNA content of P450(17α) and P450arom in hippocampal slices, as determined using real-time PCR. The transcript levels of other steroidogenic enzymes and a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein were not affected. The estradiol level in rat hippocampal slices was subsequently determined using a radioimmunoassay. We found that the estradiol synthesis was stimulated by ∼2-fold following a 48-h treatment with 0.1 μM tributyltin, and this was accompanied by transcriptional activation of P450(17α) and P450arom. Tributyltin stimulated de novo hippocampal estradiol synthesis by modifying the transcription of specific steroidogenic enzymes. PMID:24679120

  8. Editor's Highlight: Neonatal Activation of the Xenobiotic-Sensors PXR and CAR Results in Acute and Persistent Down-regulation of PPARα-Signaling in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have emerged regarding the potential long-lasting effects due to developmental exposure to xenobiotics. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are critical xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors that are highly expressed in liver. The goal of this study was to test our hypothesis that neonatal exposure to PXR- or CAR-activators not only acutely but also persistently regulates the expression of drug-processing genes (DPGs). A single dose of the PXR-ligand PCN (75 mg/kg), CAR-ligand TCPOBOP (3 mg/kg), or vehicle (corn oil) was administered intraperitoneally to 3-day-old neonatal wild-type mice. Livers were collected 24 h post-dose or from adult mice at 60 days of age, and global gene expression of these mice was determined using Affymetrix Mouse Transcriptome Assay 1.0. In neonatal liver, PCN up-regulated 464 and down-regulated 449 genes, whereas TCPOBOP up-regulated 308 and down-regulated 112 genes. In adult liver, there were 15 persistently up-regulated and 22 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to PCN, as well as 130 persistently up-regulated and 18 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to TCPOBOP. Neonatal exposure to both PCN and TCPOBOP persistently down-regulated multiple Cyp4a members, which are prototypical-target genes of the lipid-sensor PPARα, and this correlated with decreased PPARα-binding to the Cyp4a gene loci. RT-qPCR, western blotting, and enzyme activity assays in livers of wild-type, PXR-null, and CAR-null mice confirmed that the persistent down-regulation of Cyp4a was PXR and CAR dependent. In conclusion, neonatal exposure to PXR- and CAR-activators both acutely and persistently regulates critical genes involved in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism in liver. PMID:27413110

  9. Editor's Highlight: Neonatal Activation of the Xenobiotic-Sensors PXR and CAR Results in Acute and Persistent Down-regulation of PPARα-Signaling in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Cindy Yanfei; Cheng, Sunny Lihua; Bammler, Theo K; Cui, Julia Yue

    2016-10-01

    Safety concerns have emerged regarding the potential long-lasting effects due to developmental exposure to xenobiotics. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are critical xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors that are highly expressed in liver. The goal of this study was to test our hypothesis that neonatal exposure to PXR- or CAR-activators not only acutely but also persistently regulates the expression of drug-processing genes (DPGs). A single dose of the PXR-ligand PCN (75 mg/kg), CAR-ligand TCPOBOP (3 mg/kg), or vehicle (corn oil) was administered intraperitoneally to 3-day-old neonatal wild-type mice. Livers were collected 24 h post-dose or from adult mice at 60 days of age, and global gene expression of these mice was determined using Affymetrix Mouse Transcriptome Assay 1.0. In neonatal liver, PCN up-regulated 464 and down-regulated 449 genes, whereas TCPOBOP up-regulated 308 and down-regulated 112 genes. In adult liver, there were 15 persistently up-regulated and 22 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to PCN, as well as 130 persistently up-regulated and 18 persistently down-regulated genes following neonatal exposure to TCPOBOP. Neonatal exposure to both PCN and TCPOBOP persistently down-regulated multiple Cyp4a members, which are prototypical-target genes of the lipid-sensor PPARα, and this correlated with decreased PPARα-binding to the Cyp4a gene loci. RT-qPCR, western blotting, and enzyme activity assays in livers of wild-type, PXR-null, and CAR-null mice confirmed that the persistent down-regulation of Cyp4a was PXR and CAR dependent. In conclusion, neonatal exposure to PXR- and CAR-activators both acutely and persistently regulates critical genes involved in xenobiotic and lipid metabolism in liver.

  10. Renal progenitors derived from human iPSCs engraft and restore function in a mouse model of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Tomasoni, Susanna; Ciampi, Osele; Pezzotta, Anna; Derosas, Manuela; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Rizzo, Paola; Papadimou, Evangelia; Novelli, Rubina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most relevant health issues, leading to millions of deaths. The magnitude of the phenomenon remarks the urgent need for innovative and effective therapeutic approaches. Cell-based therapy with renal progenitor cells (RPCs) has been proposed as a possible strategy. Studies have shown the feasibility of directing embryonic stem cells or induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) towards nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm and metanephric mesenchyme (MM). However, the functional activity of iPSC-derived RPCs has not been tested in animal models of kidney disease. Here, through an efficient inductive protocol, we directed human iPSCs towards RPCs that robustly engrafted into damaged tubuli and restored renal function and structure in cisplatin-mice with AKI. These results demonstrate that iPSCs are a valuable source of engraftable cells with regenerative activity for kidney disease and create the basis for future applications in stem cell-based therapy. PMID:25744951

  11. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS.

  12. Downstream signaling pathways in mouse adipose tissues following acute in vivo administration of fibroblast growth factor 21.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eric S; Souza, Sandra; Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Thompson, John R; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation.

  13. Downstream Signaling Pathways in Mouse Adipose Tissues Following Acute In Vivo Administration of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21

    PubMed Central

    Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Thompson, John R.; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P.; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation. PMID:24039848

  14. N-acetyl cysteine improves the effects of corticosteroids in a mouse model of chlorine-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2015-02-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) causes tissue damage and a neutrophilic inflammatory response in the airways manifested by pronounced airway hyperreactivity (AHR). The importance of early anti-inflammatory treatment has previously been addressed. In the previous study, both high-dose and low-dose of dexamethasone (DEX) decreased the risk of developing delayed effects, such as persistent lung injuries, while only high-dose treatment could significantly counteract acute-phase effects. One aim of this study was to evaluate whether a low-dose of DEX in combination with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and if different treatments (Triptolide, Reparixin and Rolipram) administered 1h after Cl2-exposure could improve protection against acute lung injury in Cl2-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed to 300 ppm Cl2 during 15 min. Assessment of AHR and inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage was analyzed 24h post exposure. Neither of DEX nor NAC reduced the AHR and displayed only minor effects on inflammatory cell influx when given as separate treatments. When given in combination, a protective effect on AHR and a significant reduction in inflammatory cells (neutrophils) was observed. Neither of triptolide, Reparixin nor Rolipram had an effect on AHR but Triptolide had major effect on the inflammatory cell influx. Treatments did not reduce the concentration of either fibrinogen or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in serum, thereby supporting the theory that the inflammatory response is not solely limited to the lung. These results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at identifying new concepts for treatment of chemical-induced lung injury. Studies addressing combination of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant treatment are highly motivated.

  15. In-depth Physiological Analysis of Defined Cell Populations in Acute Tissue Slices of the Mouse Vomeronasal Organ.

    PubMed

    Ackels, Tobias; Drose, Daniela R; Spehr, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In most mammals, the vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) express a specific type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) from at least three different chemoreceptor gene families allowing sensitive and specific detection of chemosensory cues. These families comprise the V1r and V2r gene families as well as the formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-related sequence (Fpr-rs) family of putative chemoreceptor genes. In order to understand the physiology of vomeronasal receptor-ligand interactions and downstream signaling, it is essential to identify the biophysical properties inherent to each specific class of VSNs. The physiological approach described here allows identification and in-depth analysis of a defined population of sensory neurons using a transgenic mouse line (Fpr-rs3-i-Venus). The use of this protocol, however, is not restricted to this specific line and thus can easily be extended to other genetically modified lines or wild type animals. PMID:27684435

  16. Novel Inhibitors of Neurotropic Alphavirus Replication That Improve Host Survival in a Mouse Model of Acute Viral Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sindac, Janice; Yestrepsky, Bryan D.; Barraza, Scott J.; Bolduc, Kyle L.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Keep, Richard F.; Irani, David N.; Miller, David J.; Larsen, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Arboviral encephalitis is a potentially devastating human disease with no approved therapies that target virus replication. We previously discovered a novel class of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-based inhibitors active against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) in cultured cells. In this report we describe initial development of these novel antiviral compounds, including bioisosteric replacement of the 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole core with indole to improve metabolic stability and the introduction of chirality to assess target enantioselectivity. Selected modifications enhanced antiviral activity while maintaining low cytotoxicity, increased stability to microsomal metabolism, and also revealed striking enantiospecific activity in cultured cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate improved outcomes (both symptoms and survival) following treatment with indole analog 9h (CCG-203926) in an in vivo mouse model of alphaviral encephalitis that closely correlate with the enantiospecific in vitro antiviral activity. These results represent a substantial advancement in the early preclinical development of a promising class of novel antiviral drugs against virulent neurotropic alphaviruses. PMID:22428985

  17. Atg5-dependent autophagy contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Longgui; Atkinson, Jennifer M; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hierarchical hematopoietic malignancy originating from leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of AML as well as contribute to chemotherapy response. Here we employ a mouse model of AML expressing the fusion oncogene MLL-AF9 and explore the effects of Atg5 deletion, a key autophagy protein, on the malignant transformation and progression of AML. Consistent with a transient decrease in colony-forming potential in vitro, the in vivo deletion of Atg5 in MLL-AF9-transduced bone marrow cells during primary transplantation prolonged the survival of recipient mice, suggesting that autophagy has a role in MLL-AF9-driven leukemia initiation. In contrast, deletion of Atg5 in malignant AML cells during secondary transplantation did not influence the survival or chemotherapeutic response of leukemic mice. Interestingly, autophagy was found to be involved in the survival of differentiated myeloid cells originating from MLL-AF9-driven LSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Atg5-dependent autophagy may contribute to the development but not chemotherapy sensitivity of murine AML induced by MLL-AF9. PMID:27607576

  18. The Polycomb complex PRC2 supports aberrant self-renewal in a mouse model of MLL-AF9;NrasG12D acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Zuber, Johannes; Rappaport, Amy; Taylor, Meredith; Johns, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Trithorax and Polycomb groups of chromatin regulators are critical for cell-lineage specification during normal development; functions that often become deregulated during tumorigenesis. As an example, oncogenic fusions of the Trithorax-related protein MLL can initiate aggressive leukemias by altering the transcriptional circuitry governing hematopoietic cell differentiation, a process that is known to require additional epigenetic pathways to implement. Here we used shRNA screening to identify chromatin regulators uniquely required in a mouse model of MLL-fusion acute myeloid leukemia, which revealed a role for the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) in maintenance of this disease. shRNA-mediated suppression of PRC2 subunits Eed, Suz12, or Ezh1/Ezh2 led to proliferation-arrest and differentiation of leukemia cells, with a minimal impact on growth of several non-transformed hematopoietic cell lines. The requirement for PRC2 in leukemia is partly due to its role in direct transcriptional repression of genes that limit the self-renewal potential of hematopoietic cells, including Cdkn2a. In addition to implicating a role for PRC2 in the pathogenesis of MLL-fusion leukemia, our results suggest, more generally, that Trithorax and Polycomb group proteins can cooperate with one another to maintain aberrant lineage programs in cancer. PMID:22469984

  19. CAMKII-conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 2 potentiates acute methamphetamine-induced expression of immediate early genes in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Torres, Oscar V; McCoy, Michael T; Ladenheim, Bruce; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Brannock, Christie; Tulloch, Ingrid; Krasnova, Irina N; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-08-24

    Methamphetamine (METH) produces increases in the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) and of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we tested whether HDAC2 deletion influenced the effects of METH on IEG expression in the NAc. Microarray analyses showed no baseline differences in IEG expression between wild-type (WT) and HDAC2 knockout (KO) mice. Quantitative-PCR analysis shows that an acute METH injection produced time-dependent increases in mRNA levels of several IEGs in both genotypes. Interestingly, HDAC2KO mice displayed greater METH-induced increases in Egr1 and Egr2 mRNA levels measured at one hour post-injection. The levels of Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNAs stayed elevated in the HDAC2KO mice 2 hours after the METH injection whereas these mRNAs had normalized in the WT mice. In WT mice, METH caused increased HDAC2 recruitment to the promoters some IEGs at 2 hours post injection. METH-induced prolonged increases in Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNA levels in HDAC2KO mice were associated with increased enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) on the promoters of these genes. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that HDAC2 may regulate the expression of these genes, in part, by prolonging the actions of pCREB in the mouse NAc.

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1)-dependent recruitment of bone marrow-derived renal endothelium-like cells in a mouse model of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    OHNISHI, Hiroyuki; MIZUNO, Shinya; MIZUNO-HORIKAWA, Yoko; KATO, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most key pathological event for accelerating progression to chronic kidney disease through vascular endothelial injury or dysfunction. Thus, it is critical to elucidate the molecular mechanism of endothelial protection and regeneration. Emerging evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) contribute to tissue reconstitution in several types of organs post-injury, but little is known whether and how BMCs contribute to renal endothelial reconstitution, especially in an early-stage of AKI. Using a mouse model of ischemic AKI, we provide evidence that incorporation of BMCs in vascular components (such as endothelial and smooth muscle cells) becomes evident within four days after renal ischemia and reperfusion, associated with an increase in stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) in endothelium and that in CXCR4/SDF1-receptor in BMCs. Notably, anti-CXCR4 antibody decreased the numbers of infiltrated BMCs and BMC-derived endothelium-like cells, but not of BMC-derived smooth muscle cell-like cells. These results suggest that reconstitution of renal endothelium post-ischemia partially depends on a paracrine loop of SDF1-CXCR4 between resident endothelium and BMCs. Such a chemokine ligand-receptor system may be attributable for selecting a cellular lineage (s), required for renal vascular protection, repair and homeostasis, even in an earlier phase of AKI. PMID:25833353

  1. CAMKII-conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 2 potentiates acute methamphetamine-induced expression of immediate early genes in the mouse nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Oscar V.; McCoy, Michael T.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Brannock, Christie; Tulloch, Ingrid; Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) produces increases in the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) and of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we tested whether HDAC2 deletion influenced the effects of METH on IEG expression in the NAc. Microarray analyses showed no baseline differences in IEG expression between wild-type (WT) and HDAC2 knockout (KO) mice. Quantitative-PCR analysis shows that an acute METH injection produced time-dependent increases in mRNA levels of several IEGs in both genotypes. Interestingly, HDAC2KO mice displayed greater METH-induced increases in Egr1 and Egr2 mRNA levels measured at one hour post-injection. The levels of Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNAs stayed elevated in the HDAC2KO mice 2 hours after the METH injection whereas these mRNAs had normalized in the WT mice. In WT mice, METH caused increased HDAC2 recruitment to the promoters some IEGs at 2 hours post injection. METH-induced prolonged increases in Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNA levels in HDAC2KO mice were associated with increased enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) on the promoters of these genes. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that HDAC2 may regulate the expression of these genes, in part, by prolonging the actions of pCREB in the mouse NAc. PMID:26300473

  2. Survival, Differentiation, and Migration of High-Purity Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Progenitor Motor Neurons in Fibrin Scaffolds after Sub-Acute Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    McCreedy, D A; Wilems, T S; Xu, H; Butts, J C; Brown, C R; Smith, A W; Sakiyama-Elbert, S E

    2014-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can be differentiated into many neural cell types that hold great potential as cell replacement therapies following spinal cord injury (SCI). Coupling stem cell transplantation with biomaterial scaffolds can produce a unified combination therapy with several potential advantages including enhanced cell survival, greater transplant retention, reduced scarring, and improved integration at the transplant/host interface. Undesired cell types, however, are commonly present in ES-cell derived cultures due to the limited efficiency of most ES cell induction protocols. Heterogeneous cell populations can confound the interaction between the biomaterial and specific neural populations leading to undesired outcomes. In particular, biomaterials scaffolds may enhance tumor formation by promoting survival and proliferation of undifferentiated ES cells that can persist after induction. Methods for purification of specific ES cell-derived neural populations are necessary to recognize the full potential of combination therapies involving biomaterials and ES cell-derived neural populations. We previously developed a method for enriching ES cell-derived progenitor motor neurons (pMNs) induced from mouse ES cells via antibiotic selection and showed that the enriched cell populations are depleted of pluripotent stem cells. In this study, we demonstrate the survival and differentiation of enriched pMNs within three dimensional (3D) fibrin scaffolds in vitro and when transplanted into a sub-acute dorsal hemisection model of SCI into neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. PMID:25346848

  3. Atg5-dependent autophagy contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Longgui; Atkinson, Jennifer M; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hierarchical hematopoietic malignancy originating from leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of AML as well as contribute to chemotherapy response. Here we employ a mouse model of AML expressing the fusion oncogene MLL-AF9 and explore the effects of Atg5 deletion, a key autophagy protein, on the malignant transformation and progression of AML. Consistent with a transient decrease in colony-forming potential in vitro, the in vivo deletion of Atg5 in MLL-AF9-transduced bone marrow cells during primary transplantation prolonged the survival of recipient mice, suggesting that autophagy has a role in MLL-AF9-driven leukemia initiation. In contrast, deletion of Atg5 in malignant AML cells during secondary transplantation did not influence the survival or chemotherapeutic response of leukemic mice. Interestingly, autophagy was found to be involved in the survival of differentiated myeloid cells originating from MLL-AF9-driven LSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Atg5-dependent autophagy may contribute to the development but not chemotherapy sensitivity of murine AML induced by MLL-AF9. PMID:27607576

  4. Anesthetic Sevoflurane Causes Rho-Dependent Filopodial Shortening in Mouse Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Yuanlin; Fang, Fang; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Early postnatal anesthesia causes long-lasting learning and memory impairment in rodents, however, evidence for a specific neurotoxic effect on early synaptogenesis has not been demonstrated. Drebrin A is an actin binding protein whose localization in dendritic protrusions serves an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis, and is a marker for early synaptogenesis. We therefore set out to investigate whether clinically-relevant concentrations of anesthetic sevoflurane, widely- used in infants and children, alters dendritic morphology in cultured fetal day 16 mouse hippocampal neurons. After 7 days in vitro, mouse hippocampal neurons were exposed to four hours of 3% sevoflurane in 95% air/5% CO2 or control condition (95% air/5% CO2). Neurons were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with Alexa Fluor555-Phalloidin, and/or rabbit anti-mouse drebrin A/E antibodies which permitted subcellular localization of filamentous (F)-actin and/or drebrin immunoreactivity, respectively. Sevoflurane caused acute significant length-shortening in filopodia and thin dendritic spines in days-in-vitro 7 neurons, an effect which was completely rescued by co-incubating neurons with ten micromolar concentrations of the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Filopodia and thin spine recovered in length two days after sevoflurane exposure. Yet cluster-type filopodia (a precursor to synaptic filopodia) were persistently significantly decreased in number on day-in-vitro 9, in part owing to preferential localization of drebrin immunoreactivity to dendritic shafts versus filopodial stalks. These data suggest that sevoflurane induces F-actin depolymerization leading to acute, reversible length-shortening in dendritic protrusions through a mechanism involving (in part) activation of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and impairs localization of drebrin A to filopodia required for early excitatory synapse formation. PMID:27441369

  5. Staining protocol for organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; DePaola, Vincenzo; Caroni, Pico

    2006-01-01

    This protocol details a method to immunostain organotypic slice cultures from mouse hippocampus. The cultures are based on the interface method, which does not require special equipment, is easy to execute and yields slice cultures that can be imaged repeatedly, from the time of isolation at postnatal day 6-9 up to 6 months in vitro. The preserved tissue architecture facilitates the analysis of defined hippocampal synapses, cells and entire projections. Time-lapse imaging is based on transgenes expressed in the mice or on constructs introduced through transfection or viral vectors; it can reveal processes that develop over periods ranging from seconds to months. Subsequent to imaging, the slices can be processed for immunocytochemistry to collect further information about the imaged structures. This protocol can be completed in 3 d.

  6. Mouse Models of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Review of Analytical Approaches, Pathologic Features, and Common Measurements.

    PubMed

    Aeffner, Famke; Bolon, Brad; Davis, Ian C

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe pulmonary reaction requiring hospitalization, which is incited by many causes, including bacterial and viral pneumonia as well as near drowning, aspiration of gastric contents, pancreatitis, intravenous drug use, and abdominal trauma. In humans, ARDS is very well defined by a list of clinical parameters. However, until recently no consensus was available regarding the criteria of ARDS that should be evident in an experimental animal model. This lack was rectified by a 2011 workshop report by the American Thoracic Society, which defined the main features proposed to delineate the presence of ARDS in laboratory animals. These should include histological changes in parenchymal tissue, altered integrity of the alveolar capillary barrier, inflammation, and abnormal pulmonary function. Murine ARDS models typically are defined by such features as pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in cytological preparations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or lung sections. Common pathophysiological indicators of ARDS in mice include impaired pulmonary gas exchange and histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates into the lung. Thus, morphological endpoints remain a vital component of data sets assembled from animal ARDS models.

  7. Hormone-dependent expression of a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein natural antisense transcript in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol transport is essential for many physiological processes, including steroidogenesis. In steroidogenic cells hormone-induced cholesterol transport is controlled by a protein complex that includes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Star is expressed as 3.5-, 2.8-, and 1.6-kb transcripts that differ only in their 3'-untranslated regions. Because these transcripts share the same promoter, mRNA stability may be involved in their differential regulation and expression. Recently, the identification of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has added another level of regulation to eukaryotic gene expression. Here we identified a new NAT that is complementary to the spliced Star mRNA sequence. Using 5' and 3' RACE, strand-specific RT-PCR, and ribonuclease protection assays, we demonstrated that Star NAT is expressed in MA-10 Leydig cells and steroidogenic murine tissues. Furthermore, we established that human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates Star NAT expression via cAMP. Our results show that sense-antisense Star RNAs may be coordinately regulated since they are co-expressed in MA-10 cells. Overexpression of Star NAT had a differential effect on the expression of the different Star sense transcripts following cAMP stimulation. Meanwhile, the levels of StAR protein and progesterone production were downregulated in the presence of Star NAT. Our data identify antisense transcription as an additional mechanism involved in the regulation of steroid biosynthesis.

  8. Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK.

    PubMed

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Jilg, Antje; Maronde, Erik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Stehle, Jörg H

    2016-09-01

    Memory performance varies over a 24-h day/night cycle. While the detailed underlying mechanisms are yet unknown, recent evidence suggests that in the mouse hippocampus, rhythmic phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) are central to the circadian (~ 24 h) regulation of learning and memory. We recently identified the clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1) as a vehicle that translates information encoding time of day to hippocampal plasticity. We here elaborate how PER1 may gate the sensitivity of memory-relevant hippocampal signaling pathways. We found that in wild-type mice (WT), spatial learning triggers CREB phosphorylation only during the daytime, and that this effect depends on the presence of PER1. The time-of-day-dependent induction of CREB phosphorylation can be reproduced pharmacologically in acute hippocampal slices prepared from WT mice, but is absent in preparations made from Per1-knockout (Per1(-/-) ) mice. We showed that the PER1-dependent CREB phosphorylation is regulated downstream of MAPK. Stimulation of WT hippocampal neurons triggered the co-translocation of PER1 and the CREB kinase pP90RSK (pMAPK-activated ribosomal S6 kinase) into the nucleus. In hippocampal neurons from Per1(-/-) mice, however, pP90RSK remained perinuclear. A co-immunoprecipitation assay confirmed a high-affinity interaction between PER1 and pP90RSK. Knocking down endogenous PER1 in hippocampal cells inhibited adenylyl cyclase-dependent CREB activation. Taken together, the PER1-dependent modulation of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear signaling in the murine hippocampus provides a molecular explanation for how the circadian system potentially shapes a temporal framework for daytime-dependent memory performance, and adds a novel facet to the versatility of the clock gene protein PER1. We provide evidence that the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus

  9. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Caron, K M; Soo, S C; Wetsel, W C; Stocco, D M; Clark, B J; Parker, K L

    1997-10-14

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids-with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic-pituitary levels-whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR's essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis.

  10. Optimizing Mouse Surgery with Online Rectal Temperature Monitoring and Preoperative Heat Supply. Effects on Post-Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Julian A; Schäfer, Hannah; Holderied, Alexander; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Body temperature affects outcomes of tissue injury. We hypothesized that online body core temperature recording and selective interventions help to standardize peri-interventional temperature control and the reliability of outcomes in experimental renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). We recorded core temperature in up to seven mice in parallel using a Thermes USB recorder and ret-3-iso rectal probes with three different protocols. Setup A: Heating pad during ischemia time; Setup B: Heating pad from incision to wound closure; Setup C: A ventilated heating chamber before surgery and during ischemia time with surgeries performed on a heating pad. Temperature profile recording displayed significant declines upon installing anesthesia. The profile of the baseline experimental setup A revealed that <1% of the temperature readings were within the target range of 36.5 to 38.5°C. Setup B and C increased the target range readings to 34.6 ± 28.0% and 99.3 ± 1.5%, respectively. Setup C significantly increased S3 tubular necrosis, neutrophil influx, and mRNA expression of kidney injury markers. In addition, using setup C different ischemia times generated a linear correlation with acute tubular necrosis parameters at a low variability, which further correlated with the degree of kidney atrophy 5 weeks after surgery. Changing temperature control setup A to C was equivalent to 10 minutes more ischemia time. We conclude that body temperature drops quickly in mice upon initiating anesthesia. Immediate heat supply, e.g. in a ventilated heating chamber, and online core temperature monitoring can help to standardize and optimize experimental outcomes.

  11. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Volk, Andreas; Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre; Koscielniak, Ewa; Fulda, Simone; Wels, Winfried S.; Boenig, Halvard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc−, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity against AML

  12. Hippocampal levels and activity of the sodium/potassium transporting ATPase subunit α-3 (AT1A3) are paralleling memory training in the multiple T-maze in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok; Csaszar, Edina; Jung, Gangsoo; Beuk, Tamara; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Although the sodium/potassium transporting ATPase subunit alpha-3 (AT1A3) has been linked to memory mechanisms in rodents, regulation of this ATPase in terms of activity and complex levels by memory performance in a land maze has not been shown so far. It was therefore the aim of the study to link memory retrieval in the multiple T-Maze (MTM) to AT1A3 protein levels and activity. C57BL/6J mice were trained in the MTM and euthanized 6h following memory retrieval. Hippocampal membrane proteins were prepared by ultracentrifugation and run on blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Enzyme activity was evaluated using an in-gel method. AT1A3 protein was characterized using mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). On BN-PAGE a single band was observed at 240 kDa, which corresponds to the dimeric form of the enzyme. Higher levels of AT1A3 complex were seen in trained mice. Also ATPase activity was higher in trained mice, and was observed both at 110 and at 240 kDa. Mass spectrometry unambiguously identified AT1A3 with 98.91% sequence coverage. A series of novel AT1A3 phosphorylation sites were detected. Taken together, it was shown that increased AT1A3 protein levels for the dimer as well as AT1A3 activity represented by the monomer and the dimer were paralleling memory training in the MTM. This may be relevant for understanding the role of the catalytic hydrolysis of ATP coupled with the exchange of sodium and potassium ions across the plasma membrane that generates the electrochemical gradient of sodium and potassium ions. Herein, we provide evidence for a possible role of AT1A3 in memory mechanisms and support previous findings using different animal models for memory formation.

  13. Alzheimer's Disease and Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis; Exploring Shared Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Carolyn; Bartolotti, Nancy; Lazarov, Orly

    2016-01-01

    New neurons incorporate into the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus throughout life. Neurogenesis is modulated by behavior and plays a major role in hippocampal plasticity. Along with older mature neurons, new neurons structure the dentate gyrus, and determine its function. Recent data suggest that the level of hippocampal neurogenesis is substantial in the human brain, suggesting that neurogenesis may have important implications for human cognition. In support of that, impaired neurogenesis compromises hippocampal function and plays a role in cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease mouse models. We review current work suggesting that neuronal differentiation is defective in Alzheimer's disease, leading to dysfunction of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, alterations in critical signals regulating neurogenesis, such as presenilin-1, Notch 1, soluble amyloid precursor protein, CREB, and β-catenin underlie dysfunctional neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we discuss the detectability of neurogenesis in the live mouse and human brain, as well as the therapeutic implications of enhancing neurogenesis for the treatment of cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27199641

  14. The Role of Hippocampal 5HT3 Receptors in Harmaline-Induced Memory Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Nasehi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The plethora of studies indicated that there is a cross talk relationship between harmaline and serotonergic (5-HT) system on cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess the effects of hippocampal 5-HT4 receptor on memory acquisition deficit induced by harmaline. Methods: Harmaline was injected peritoneally, while 5-HT4 receptor agonist (RS67333) and antagonist (RS23597-190) were injected intra-hippocampal. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance, open field and tail flick tasks were used for measurement of memory, locomotor activity and pain responses, respectively. Results: The data revealed that pre-training injection of higher dose of harmaline (1 mg/kg), RS67333 (0.5 ng/mouse) and RS23597-190 (0.5 ng/mouse) decreased memory acquisition process in the adult mice. Moreover, concurrent pre-training administration of subthreshold dose of RS67333 (0.005 ng/mouse) or RS23597-190 (0.005 ng/mouse) with subthreshold dose of harmaline (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) intensify impairment of memory acquisition. All above interventions did not change locomotion and tail flick behaviors. Discussion: The results demonstrated that the synergistic effect between both hippocampal 5-HT4 receptor agonist and antagonist with impairment of memory acquisition induced by harmaline, indicating a modulatory effect for hippocampal 5HT4 receptor on Harmaline induced amnesia. PMID:26904173

  15. No influence of acute RF exposure (GSM-900, GSM-1800, and UMTS) on mouse retinal ganglion cell responses under constant temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, Malte T; Ammermüller, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Possible non-thermal effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on retinal ganglion cells were studied in vitro under conditions of constant temperature. Isolated mouse retinae were exposed to GSM-900, GSM-1800, and universal mobile telecommunication system (UMTS) RF-EMF applying specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0 (sham), 0.02, 0.2, 2, and 20 W/kg. Temperature was kept constant within ±0.5 to 1 °C for GSM-900 and ±0.5 °C for GSM-1800 and UMTS. Responses of retinal ganglion cells to light stimuli of three intensities (0.5, 16, and 445 lx) were recorded before, during, and up to 35 min after exposure. Experiments were performed under double-blind conditions. Changes in light responses during and after exposure were determined for each condition (RF-EMF; SAR value; light intensity) with respect to the responses before exposure, respectively. Changes were calculated using the Euclidian distance of the n-dimensional response vectors, respectively. Some changes already occurred during sham (0 W/kg) exposure, reflecting the intrinsic variability in retinal ganglion cell responses. Comparison of the distance values from sham exposure with those from actual exposure yielded no significant differences. In addition, linear regression analysis of the distance values versus SAR values yielded no consistent dependence of light response changes. From these results we conclude that RF-EMF exposure at three mobile phone frequencies (GSM-900, GSM-1800, UMTS) and SARs up to 20 W/kg has no acute effects on retinal ganglion cell responses under constant temperature conditions.

  16. Cocaine depresses GABAA current of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, J H; Liu, P L; Wu, W H; McArdle, J J

    1997-10-01

    Although blockade of dopamine re-uptake and the resulting elevation of excitatory agonists is commonly thought the primary mechanism of cocaine-induced seizures, it is possible that other neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are involved. To examine this possibility, the effects of cocaine on the whole cell GABA current (IGABA) of freshly isolated rat hippocampal neurons were investigated with the patch-clamp technique. Preincubation or acute application of cocaine reversibly suppressed IGABA. The IC50 was 127 microM when cocaine was applied before the application of GABA. The concentration-response relations of cocaine in various GABA concentrations revealed that cocaine inhibited IGABA non-competitively. This effect of cocaine appeared to be independent of voltage. The present study suggests that the GABA receptor/channel complex is also a target for cocaine's action. The suppression of IGABA may contribute to cocaine-induced seizures.

  17. Induction of the Wnt Antagonist Dickkopf-1 Is Involved in Stress-Induced Hippocampal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Domenico; Orlando, Rosamaria; Caruso, Alessandra; Molinaro, Gemma; Cappuccio, Irene; Riozzi, Barbara; Gradini, Roberto; Motolese, Marta; Caraci, Filippo; Copani, Agata; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Melchiorri, Daniela; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    The identification of mechanisms that mediate stress-induced hippocampal damage may shed new light into the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. We focused on the secreted glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway, involved in neurodegeneration. Mice exposed to mild restraint stress showed increased hippocampal levels of Dkk-1 and reduced expression of β-catenin, an intracellular protein positively regulated by the canonical Wnt signalling pathway. In adrenalectomized mice, Dkk-1 was induced by corticosterone injection, but not by exposure to stress. Corticosterone also induced Dkk-1 in mouse organotypic hippocampal cultures and primary cultures of hippocampal neurons and, at least in the latter model, the action of corticosterone was reversed by the type-2 glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. To examine whether induction of Dkk-1 was causally related to stress-induced hippocampal damage, we used doubleridge mice, which are characterized by a defective induction of Dkk-1. As compared to control mice, doubleridge mice showed a paradoxical increase in basal hippocampal Dkk-1 levels, but no Dkk-1 induction in response to stress. In contrast, stress reduced Dkk-1 levels in doubleridge mice. In control mice, chronic stress induced a reduction in hippocampal volume associated with neuronal loss and dendritic atrophy in the CA1 region, and a reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Doubleridge mice were resistant to the detrimental effect of chronic stress and, instead, responded to stress with increases in dendritic arborisation and neurogenesis. Thus, the outcome of chronic stress was tightly related to changes in Dkk-1 expression in the hippocampus. These data indicate that induction of Dkk-1 is causally related to stress-induced hippocampal damage and provide the first evidence that Dkk-1 expression is regulated by corticosteroids in the central nervous system

  18. Common hippocampal structural and functional changes in migraine

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Becerra, Lino; Brawn, Jennifer; McEwen, Bruce; Burstein, Rami; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is classically involved in memory consolidation, spatial navigation and is involved in the stress response. Migraine is an episodic disorder characterized by intermittent attacks with a number of physiological and emotional stressors associated with or provoking each attack. Given that migraine attacks can be viewed as repeated stressors, alterations in hippocampal function and structure may play an important role in migraine pathophysiology. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, hippocampal morphometric and functional differences (in response to noxious heat stimulation) were compared in age and gender-matched acute episodic migraineurs with high (HF) versus low (LF) frequency of migraine attacks. Morphometric results were compared with age and gender-matched healthy control (HC) cohort. Significant larger bilateral hippocampal volume was found in LF group relative to the HF and HC groups suggestive of an initial adaptive plasticity that may then become dysfunctional with increased frequency. Functional correlates of greater deactivation (LF > HF) in the same hippocampal regions in response to noxious stimulation was also accompanied by overall reduction in functional connectivity of the hippocampus with other brain regions involved in pain processing in the HF group. The results implicate involvement of hippocampus in the pathophysiology of the migraine. PMID:22760159

  19. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in natural populations of mammals.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Irmgard

    2015-05-01

    This review will discuss adult hippocampal neurogenesis in wild mammals of different taxa and outline similarities with and differences from laboratory animals. It begins with a review of evidence for hippocampal neurogenesis in various mammals, and shows the similar patterns of age-dependent decline in cell proliferation in wild and domesticated mammals. In contrast, the pool of immature neurons that originate from proliferative activity varies between species, implying a selective advantage for mammals that can make use of a large number of these functionally special neurons. Furthermore, rapid adaptation of hippocampal neurogenesis to experimental challenges appears to be a characteristic of laboratory rodents. Wild mammals show species-specific, rather stable hippocampal neurogenesis, which appears related to demands that characterize the niche exploited by a species rather than to acute events in the life of its members. Studies that investigate adult neurogenesis in wild mammals are not numerous, but the findings of neurogenesis under natural conditions can provide new insights, and thereby also address the question to which cognitive demands neurogenesis may respond during selection.

  20. Heroin inhalation-induced unilateral complete hippocampal stroke.

    PubMed

    Benoilid, Aurélien; Collongues, Nicolas; de Seze, Jérôme; Blanc, Fréderic

    2013-08-01

    A 33-year-old man presented to our clinic with amnesia 48 hours after his first heroin inhalation. Examination showed lateral tongue biting and anterograde amnesia demonstrated by impaired performance on verbal and visual Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised tests carried out 10 days after onset, suggesting hippocampal involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed 48 hours after heroin snorting and evoked cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) of the left hippocampus without vascular abnormality. This is the first description of complete hippocampal CLN as a complication subsequent to acute intranasal heroine abuse. While the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain, our case provides a very specific MRI lesion pattern and highlights the risk of intranasal heroin uptake-induced neurological complication.

  1. Transient global amnesia: hippocampal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Alberici, Elisa; Pichiecchio, Anna; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Farina, Lisa Maria; Persico, Alessandra; Cavallini, Anna; Bastianello, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is an episodic dysfunction of declarative memory that usually resolves within 12 hours and whose underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are still unclear. Recent studies, on the basis of transient focal high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), suggest involvement of memory circuits in the temporo-mesial region. Out of a total of 65 patients presenting with acute or subacute TGA between May 2004 and May 2008, we retrospectively analysed 21 in whom a DWI sequence was performed. Five patients showed a focal hippocampal signal alteration both on DWI and on conventional T2; this alteration was no longer detectable on follow-up MRI two months later. The presence of transient DWI and T2 alterations in the hippocampal formation suggests that TGA could have a multifactorial, non-vascular aetiology. The presence of local susceptibility to neuronal metabolic stress emerges as a likely hypothesis.

  2. Mistargeting hippocampal axons by expression of a truncated Eph receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yong; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Gale, Nick W.; Blair-Flynn, Jan; Hu, Tian-Jing; Yue, Xin; Cooper, Margaret; Crockett, David P.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Tessarollo, Lino; Zhou, Renping

    2002-01-01

    Topographic mapping of axon terminals is a general principle of neural architecture that underlies the interconnections among many neural structures. The Eph family tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, have been implicated in the formation of topographic projection maps. We show that multiple Eph receptors and ligands are expressed in the hippocampus and its major subcortical projection target, the lateral septum, and that expression of a truncated Eph receptor in the mouse brain results in a pronounced alteration of the hippocamposeptal topographic map. Our observations provide strong support for a critical role of Eph family guidance factors in regulating ontogeny of hippocampal projections. PMID:12124402

  3. Effects of voluntary running on plasma levels of neurotrophins, hippocampal cell proliferation and learning and memory in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Yau, S-Y; Lau, B W-M; Zhang, E-D; Lee, J C-D; Li, A; Lee, T M C; Ching, Y-P; Xu, A-M; So, K-F

    2012-10-11

    Previous studies have shown that a 2-week treatment with 40 mg/kg corticosterone (CORT) in rats suppresses hippocampal neurogenesis and decreases hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and impairs spatial learning, all of which could be counteracted by voluntary wheel running. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) have been suggested to mediate physical exercise-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition. Here we examined whether such running-elicited benefits were accompanied by corresponding changes of peripheral BDNF and IGF-1 levels in a rat model of stress. We examined the effects of acute (5 days) and chronic (4 weeks) treatment with CORT and/or wheel running on (1) hippocampal cell proliferation, (2) spatial learning and memory and (3) plasma levels of BDNF and IGF-1. Acute CORT treatment improved spatial learning without altered cell proliferation compared to vehicle treatment. Acute CORT-treated non-runners showed an increased trend in plasma BDNF levels together with a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. Acute running showed no effect on cognition, cell proliferation and peripheral BDNF and IGF-1 levels. Conversely, chronic CORT treatment in non-runners significantly impaired spatial learning and suppressed cell proliferation in association with a decreased trend in plasma BDNF level and a significant increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. Running counteracted cognitive deficit and restored hippocampal cell proliferation following chronic CORT treatment; but without corresponding changes in plasma BDNF and IGF-1 levels. The results suggest that the beneficial effects of acute stress on cognitive improvement may be mediated by BDNF-enhanced synaptic plasticity that is hippocampal cell proliferation-independent, whereas chronic stress may impair cognition by decreasing hippocampal cell proliferation and BDNF levels. Furthermore, the results indicate a trend in changes of plasma BDNF levels associated with a

  4. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    PubMed

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept. PMID:27265136

  5. New molecules for hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Skutella, T; Nitsch, R

    2001-02-01

    Pathfinding by developing axons towards their proper targets is an essential step in establishing appropriate neuronal connections. Recent work involving cell culture assays and molecular biology strategies, including knockout animals, strongly indicates that a complex network of guidance signals regulates the formation of hippocampal connections during development. Outgrowing axons are routed towards the hippocampal formation by specific expression of long-range cues, which include secreted class 3 semaphorins, netrin 1 and Slit proteins. Local membrane- or substrate-anchored molecules, such as ligands of the ephrin A subclass, provide layer-specific positional information. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie axonal guidance during hippocampal development might be of importance in making therapeutic use of sprouting fibers, which are produced following the loss of afferents in CNS lesion. PMID:11164941

  6. Detrimental effects of postnatal exposure to propofol on memory and hippocampal LTP in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Lin; Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Acute effects of propofol on memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in adult animals were reported. However, long-term effect of early postnatal application of propofol on memory was not totally disclosed. In this study, experiments were designed to verify the mechanisms underlying the long-term detrimental effects of propofol on memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. A consecutive propofol protocol from postnatal day 7 was applied to model anesthesia, long term memory and hippocampal synaptic plasticity were detected 2 months later. Our results showed that repeated propofol exposure in early phase affect the memory in the adult phase. Through recording the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) at Schaffer colletaral-CA1 synapses, both of basal synaptic transmission and hippocampal LTP were decreased after propofol application. While LTD induced by low frequency stimulation and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (3,5-DHPG) were not affected. Through analyzing the ultrastructure of dendrite in CA1 region, we found that propofol application decreased the spine density, which was consistent with the decrease of PSD-95 expression. In addition, p-AKT level was reduced after first propofol application. Intracerebroventricular injection of Akt inhibitor could mimic the propofol effects on basal synaptic transmission, hippocampal LTP and memory. Taken together, these results suggested that propofol possibly decreased AKT signaling pathway to restrict the spine development, finally leading to hippocampal LTP impairment and memory deficit.

  7. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  8. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-09-11

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example.

  9. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  10. PDE-4 inhibition rescues aberrant synaptic plasticity in Drosophila and mouse models of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Weisz, Eliana D; Bell, Aaron J; Chambers, Daniel B; Hinchey, Joseph; Choi, Richard J; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Gertner, Michael J; Ferrick, Neal J; Terlizzi, Allison M; Yohn, Nicole; Koenigsberg, Eric; Liebelt, David A; Zukin, R Suzanne; Woo, Newton H; Tranfaglia, Michael R; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E; Siegel, Steven J; Bolduc, Francois V; McDonald, Thomas V; Jongens, Thomas A; McBride, Sean M J

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of both intellectual disability and autism resulting from a single gene mutation. Previously, we characterized cognitive impairments and brain structural defects in a Drosophila model of FXS and demonstrated that these impairments were rescued by treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium. A well-documented biochemical defect observed in fly and mouse FXS models and FXS patients is low cAMP levels. cAMP levels can be regulated by mGluR signaling. Herein, we demonstrate PDE-4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate memory impairments and brain structural defects in the Drosophila model of fragile X. Furthermore, we examine the effects of PDE-4 inhibition by pharmacologic treatment in the fragile X mouse model. We demonstrate that acute inhibition of PDE-4 by pharmacologic treatment in hippocampal slices rescues the enhanced mGluR-dependent LTD phenotype observed in FXS mice. Additionally, we find that chronic treatment of FXS model mice, in adulthood, also restores the level of mGluR-dependent LTD to that observed in wild-type animals. Translating the findings of successful pharmacologic intervention from the Drosophila model into the mouse model of FXS is an important advance, in that this identifies and validates PDE-4 inhibition as potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of individuals afflicted with FXS.

  11. Corticosterone protects against memory impairments and reduced hippocampal BDNF levels induced by a chronic low dose of ethanol in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Mohamed Elsaed; Latif, Liaque M; Kendall, David A; Pardon, Marie Christine

    2014-01-01

    Acute low doses of ethanol can produce reversible memory deficits, but it is unknown whether they persist upon chronic use. We investigated whether the chronic intake of a low dose of ethanol induces memory impairments in the ethanol-preferring C57BL/6J mouse strain. Because stress precipitates alcohol abuse and the stress hormone corticosterone contributes to memory processes, ethanol consumption and toxic effects, we also determined the impact of co-treatment with corticosterone on these effects. BDNF contributes to memory function and toxic effects of ethanol, therefore its levels were quantified in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Ethanol (1% in drinking water) and corticosterone (250 μg/mL) were administered using the two-bottle choice test to monitor their appetitive properties. Spatial and non-spatial memory performance was assessed using the spontaneous alternation, object recognition and object location tests. The chronic exposure to a low dose of ethanol caused spatial and non-spatial memory deficits after withdrawal associated with a reduction in hippocampal BDNF levels, which were prevented by co-treatment with corticosterone (~21 mg/kg/day). The protective effect of corticosterone on memory was no longer observed at higher doses (~41 mg/kg/day), but persisted for hippocampal BDNF levels. C57BL/6J mice did not develop an appetence for 1% ethanol, but the addition of corticosterone increased voluntary consumption of and preference for the ethanol+corticosterone solutions. Although acute low doses of corticosterone (1 mg/kg) were found to rescue established memory impairments, this is the first report of a protective effect of chronic doses of corticosterone in the range of 20-32 mg/kg, and particularly against memory deficits induced by alcohol. PMID:25611260

  12. Hippocampal Sclerosis: Causes and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew Charles

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis is the commonest cause of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults, and is associated with alterations to structures and networks beyond the hippocampus.In addition to being a cause of epilepsy, the hippocampus is vulnerable to damage from seizure activity. In particular, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can result in hippocampal sclerosis. The hippocampus is also vulnerable to other insults including traumatic brain injury, and inflammation. Hippocampal sclerosis can occur in association with other brain lesions; the prevailing view is that it is probably a secondary consequence. In such instances, successful surgical treatment usually involves the resection of both the lesion and the involved hippocampus. Experimental data have pointed to numerous neuroprotective strategies to prevent hippocampal sclerosis. Initial neuroprotective strategies aimed at glutamate receptors may be effective, but later, metabolic pathways, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation are involved, perhaps necessitating the use of interventions aimed at multiple targets. Some of the therapies that we use to treat status epilepticus may neuroprotect. However, prevention of neuronal death does not necessarily prevent the later development of epilepsy or cognitive deficits. Perhaps, the most important intervention is the early, aggressive treatment of seizure activity, and the prevention of prolonged seizures. PMID:26060898

  13. Genetic and behavioral determinants of hippocampal volume recovery during abstinence from alcohol.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Michael E; Pennington, David L; Durazzo, Timothy C; Mon, Anderson; Abé, Christoph; Truran, Diana; Hutchison, Kent E; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC) have smaller hippocampi and poorer neurocognition than healthy controls. Results from studies on the association between alcohol consumption and hippocampal volume have been mixed, suggesting that comorbid or premorbid factors (i.e., those present prior to the initiation of alcohol dependence) determine hippocampal volume in ALC. We aimed to characterize the effects of select comorbid (i.e., cigarette smoking) and premorbid factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] genotype [Val66Met rs6265]) on hippocampal volume in an ALC cohort followed longitudinally into extended abstinence. One hundred twenty-one adult ALC in treatment (76 smokers, 45 non-smokers) and 35 non-smoking light-drinking controls underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging, BDNF genotyping, and neurocognitive assessments. Representative subgroups were studied at 1 week, 1 month, and at an average of 7 months of abstinence. ALC had smaller hippocampi than healthy controls at all time points. Hippocampal volume at 1 month of abstinence correlated with lower visuospatial function. Smoking status did not influence hippocampal volume or hippocampal volume recovery during abstinence. However, only BDNF Val homozygotes tended to have hippocampal volume increases over 7 months of abstinence, and Val homozygotes had significantly larger hippocampi than Met carriers at 7 months of abstinence. These findings suggest that BDNF genotype, but not smoking status or measures of drinking severity, regulate functionally relevant hippocampal volume recovery in abstinent ALC. Future studies aimed at exploring genetic determinants of brain morphometry in ALC may need to evaluate individuals during extended abstinence after the acute environmental effects of chronic alcohol consumption have waned.

  14. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Tao; Niu, Jian-guo; He, Zhen-quan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures. PMID:26330838

  15. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis in hippocampal synaptosomes correlates directly with total mitochondrial volume

    PubMed Central

    Ivannikov, Maxim V.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in many regions of the central nervous system leads to the continuous adjustment of synaptic strength, which is essential for learning and memory. In this study, we show by visualizing synaptic vesicle release in mouse hippocampal synaptosomes that presynaptic mitochondria and specifically, their capacities for ATP production are essential determinants of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and its magnitude. Total internal reflection microscopy of FM1-43 loaded hippocampal synaptosomes showed that inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation reduces evoked synaptic release. This reduction was accompanied by a substantial drop in synaptosomal ATP levels. However, cytosolic calcium influx was not affected. Structural characterization of stimulated hippocampal synaptosomes revealed that higher total presynaptic mitochondrial volumes were consistently associated with higher levels of exocytosis. Thus, synaptic vesicle release is linked to the presynaptic ability to regenerate ATP, which itself is a utility of mitochondrial density and activity. PMID:22772899

  16. Decoding Hippocampal Signaling Deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Coleen M.

    2012-01-01

    There are more than 3.17 million people coping with long-term disabilities due to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States. The majority of TBI research is focused on developing acute neuroprotective treatments to prevent or minimize these long-term disabilities. Therefore, chronic TBI survivors represent a large, underserved population that could significantly benefit from a therapy that capitalizes on the endogenous recovery mechanisms occurring during the weeks to months following brain trauma. Previous studies have found that the hippocampus is highly vulnerable to brain injury, in both experimental models of TBI and during human TBI. Although often not directly mechanically injured by the head injury, in the weeks to months following TBI, the hippocampus undergoes atrophy and exhibits deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP), a persistent increase in synaptic strength that is considered to be a model of learning and memory. Decoding the chronic hippocampal LTP and cell signaling deficits after brain trauma will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of hippocampal-dependent learning impairments caused by TBI and facilitate the development of effective therapeutic strategies to improve hippocampal-dependent learning for chronic survivors of TBI. PMID:23227133

  17. TRH modulates glutamatergic synaptic inputs on CA1 neurons of the mouse hippocampus in a biphasic manner.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Hadi; Petit-Paitel, Agnès; Heurteaux, Catherine; Chabry, Joëlle; Guyon, Alice

    2016-11-01

    Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) is a tripeptide that induces the release of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in the blood. Besides its role in the thyroid system, TRH has been shown to regulate several neuronal systems in the brain however its role in hippocampus remains controversial. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute mouse brain slices, we show that TRH depresses glutamate responses at the CA3-CA1 synapse through an action on NMDA receptors, which, as a consequence, decreases the ability of the synapse to establish a long term potentiation (LTP). TRH also induces a late increase in AMPA/kainate responses. Together, these results suggest that TRH plays an important role in the modulation of hippocampal neuronal activities, and they contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which TRH impacts synaptic function underlying emotional states, learning and memory processes.

  18. Ventral hippocampal alpha 7 nicotinic receptor blockade and chronic nicotine effects on memory performance in the radial-arm maze.

    PubMed

    Bettany, J H; Levin, E D

    2001-12-01

    Chronic nicotine administration has been shown to significantly improve working memory. Nicotinic involvement in memory function critically involves the ventral hippocampus. Local ventral hippocampal infusions of the nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine, dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DH beta E) and methyllycaconitine (MLA) significantly impair working memory. The impairment caused by hippocampal infusion of the alpha 4 beta 2 antagonist DH beta E is reversed by chronic systemic nicotine. This study determined the interaction of chronic systemic nicotine with acute ventral hippocampal infusions of the alpha 7 antagonist MLA. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an 8-arm radial maze working memory task. Then they underwent ventral hippocampal cannulation and received sc implants of minipumps delivering nicotine (0 or 5 mg/kg/day for 28 days). Acute ventral hippocampal infusions of MLA (0, 4.88, 14.64 and 43.92 microg/side) were given during 3-4 weeks of chronic nicotine. MLA caused a significant dose-related memory impairment. In the rats not receiving nicotine, the 14.64 and 43.92 microg/side MLA doses caused significant memory impairment. Chronic systemic nicotine exposure did not block the MLA-induced memory impairment. Comparing the current results with MLA with previous results with DH beta E, equimolar ventral hippocampal DH beta E more effectively impaired memory than MLA, but the DH beta E-induced impairment was more effectively reversed by chronic systemic nicotine administration.

  19. Chronic stress impairs learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in senescence-accelerated prone mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weihong; Zhang, Ting; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Xiaojiang; Liu, Xueyuan

    2011-02-25

    Chronic stress can induce cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether a higher susceptibility to chronic stress is associated with the progression of pathological brain aging. Senescence-accelerated prone mouse 8 (SAMP8) is a naturally occurring animal model of accelerated brain aging. Senescence-accelerated resistant mouse 1 (SAMR1) is usually used as the normal control. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS) on learning in the Y-maze, hippocampal cell proliferation, and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of 4-month-old SAMP8 and SAMR1. The results showed that exposure to CRS impaired learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in SAMP8 and SAMR1 but to a much greater extent in SAMP8. Furthermore, CRS significantly decreased the expression of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and SAMR1. These data indicated that SAMP8 is more sensitive to the deleterious effects of CRS on learning than SAMR1. A greater decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation caused by chronic stress may be part of the underlying mechanism for the more severe learning deficit observed in SAMP8. In addition, our findings suggested a role of BDNF in the stress-induced impairment of learning and hippocampal cell proliferation in both strains.

  20. Hippocampal structure and function are maintained despite severe innate peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Süß, Patrick; Kalinichenko, Liubov; Baum, Wolfgang; Reichel, Martin; Kornhuber, Johannes; Loskarn, Sandra; Ettle, Benjamin; Distler, Jörg H W; Schett, Georg; Winkler, Jürgen; Müller, Christian P; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M

    2015-10-01

    Chronic peripheral inflammation mediated by cytokines such as TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 is associated with psychiatric disorders like depression and anxiety. However, it remains elusive which distinct type of peripheral inflammation triggers neuroinflammation and affects hippocampal plasticity resulting in depressive-like behavior. We hypothesized that chronic peripheral inflammation in the human TNF-α transgenic (TNFtg) mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis spreads into the central nervous system and induces depressive state manifested in specific behavioral pattern and impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis. TNFtg mice showed severe erosive arthritis with increased IL-1β and IL-6 expression in tarsal joints with highly elevated human TNF-α levels in the serum. Intriguingly, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels were not altered in the hippocampus of TNFtg mice. In contrast to the pronounced monocytosis in joints and spleen of TNFtg mice, signs of hippocampal microgliosis or astrocytosis were lacking. Furthermore, locomotion was impaired, but there was no locomotion-independent depressive behavior in TNFtg mice. Proliferation and maturation of hippocampal neural precursor cells as well as survival of newly generated neurons were preserved in the dentate gyrus of TNFtg mice despite reduced motor activity and peripheral inflammatory signature. We conclude that peripheral inflammation in TNFtg mice is mediated by chronic activation of the innate immune system. However, severe peripheral inflammation, though impairing locomotor activity, does not elicit depressive-like behavior. These structural and functional findings indicate the maintenance of hippocampal immunity, cellular plasticity, and behavior despite peripheral innate inflammation.

  1. Trim9 Deletion Alters the Morphogenesis of Developing and Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons and Impairs Spatial Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Cortney C.; Olsen, Reid H. J.; Kim, Hyojin; Moy, Sheryl S.

    2016-01-01

    During hippocampal development, newly born neurons migrate to appropriate destinations, extend axons, and ramify dendritic arbors to establish functional circuitry. These developmental stages are recapitulated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus, where neurons are continuously generated and subsequently incorporate into existing, local circuitry. Here we demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 regulates these developmental stages in embryonic and adult-born mouse hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. Embryonic hippocampal and adult-born dentate granule neurons lacking Trim9 exhibit several morphological defects, including excessive dendritic arborization. Although gross anatomy of the hippocampus was not detectably altered by Trim9 deletion, a significant number of Trim9−/− adult-born dentate neurons localized inappropriately. These morphological and localization defects of hippocampal neurons in Trim9−/− mice were associated with extreme deficits in spatial learning and memory, suggesting that TRIM9-directed neuronal morphogenesis may be involved in hippocampal-dependent behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Appropriate generation and incorporation of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus are critical for spatial learning and memory and other hippocampal functions. Here we identify the brain-enriched E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM9 as a novel regulator of embryonic and adult hippocampal neuron shape acquisition and hippocampal-dependent behaviors. Genetic deletion of Trim9 elevated dendritic arborization of hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. Adult-born dentate granule cells lacking Trim9 similarly exhibited excessive dendritic arborization and mislocalization of cell bodies in vivo. These cellular defects were associated with severe deficits in spatial learning and memory. PMID:27147649

  2. Decreased expression of hippocampal Na⁺/Ca²⁺ exchanger isoform-1 by pentylenetetrazole kindling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kawanai, Takuya; Taruta, Atsuki; Inoue, Aya; Watanabe, Ryo; Ago, Yukio; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hasebe, Shigeru; Ooi, Yasuhiro; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that inhibitors of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) attenuate seizure activity in drug-induced epilepsy models, but the role of NCX in epilepsy is not fully understood. The present study examined the effects of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling on the mRNA expression of NCX isoforms (NCX1, NCX2 and NCX3) in mouse brain. Chronic administration of PTZ at 40mg/kg resulted in kindling seizure development. It caused decreases in the mRNA levels of NCX1 and NCX2, but not NCX3, in the hippocampus. Changes in NCX isoform expression levels were not observed in the prefrontal cortex or striatum. Acute PTZ at 40mg/kg, which caused little seizure activity, also decreased NCX2, but not NCX1 mRNA levels in the hippocampus. These results suggest that down-regulation of hippocampal NCX1 expression is associated with PTZ-induced kindling seizure development.

  3. Proteomic profiling in incubation medium of mouse, rat and human precision-cut liver slices for biomarker detection regarding acute drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Hadi, Mackenzie; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Groothuis, Geny M M; Russel, Frans G M

    2014-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is one of the leading causes of drug withdrawal from the market. In this study, we investigated the applicability of protein profiling of the incubation medium of human, mouse and rat precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) exposed to liver injury-inducing drugs for biomarker identification, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PCLS were incubated with acetaminophen (APAP), 3-acetamidophenol, diclofenac and lipopolysaccharide for 24-48 h. PCLS medium from all species treated with APAP demonstrated similar changes in protein profiles, as previously found in mouse urine after APAP-induced liver injury, including the same key proteins: superoxide dismutase 1, carbonic anhydrase 3 and calmodulin. Further analysis showed that the concentration of hepcidin, a hepatic iron-regulating hormone peptide, was reduced in PCLS medium after APAP treatment, resembling the decreased mouse plasma concentrations of hepcidin observed after APAP treatment. Interestingly, comparable results were obtained after 3-acetamidophenol incubation in rat and human, but not mouse PCLS. Incubation with diclofenac, but not with lipopolysaccharide, resulted in the same toxicity parameters as observed for APAP, albeit to a lesser extent. In conclusion, proteomics can be applied to identify potential translational biomarkers using the PCLS system.

  4. Cerebellum shapes hippocampal spatial code.

    PubMed

    Rochefort, Christelle; Arabo, Arnaud; André, Marion; Poucet, Bruno; Save, Etienne; Rondi-Reig, Laure

    2011-10-21

    Spatial representation is an active process that requires complex multimodal integration from a large interacting network of cortical and subcortical structures. We sought to determine the role of cerebellar protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent plasticity in spatial navigation by recording the activity of hippocampal place cells in transgenic L7PKCI mice with selective disruption of PKC-dependent plasticity at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. Place cell properties were exclusively impaired when L7PKCI mice had to rely on self-motion cues. The behavioral consequence of such a deficit is evidenced here by selectively impaired navigation capabilities during a path integration task. Together, these results suggest that cerebellar PKC-dependent mechanisms are involved in processing self-motion signals essential to the shaping of hippocampal spatial representation.

  5. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  6. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking.

    PubMed

    Duff, Melissa C; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the torrance tests of creative thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition.

  7. Hippocampal amnesia disrupts creative thinking

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Melissa C.; Kurczek, Jake; Rubin, Rachael; Cohen, Neal J.; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Creativity requires the rapid combination and recombination of existing mental representations to create novel ideas and ways of thinking. The hippocampal system, through its interaction with neocortical storage sites, provides a relational database necessary for the creation, updating, maintenance, and juxtaposition of mental representations used in service of declarative memory. Given this functionality, we hypothesized that hippocampus would play a critical role in creative thinking. We examined creative thinking, as measured by verbal and figural forms of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT), in a group of participants with hippocampal damage and severe declarative memory impairment as well as in a group of demographically matched healthy comparison participants. The patients with bilateral hippocampal damage performed significantly worse than comparison participants on both the verbal and figural portions of the TTCT. These findings suggest that hippocampus plays a role critical in creative thinking, adding to a growing body of work pointing to the diverse ways the hallmark processing features of hippocampus serve a variety of behaviors that require flexible cognition. PMID:24123555

  8. Estradiol replacement extends the window of opportunity for hippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Vedder, Lindsey C; Bredemann, Teruko M; McMahon, Lori L

    2014-10-01

    We previously reported that treating aged female rats, ovariectomized (OVX) as young adults, with acute proestrous levels of 17β estradiol (E2) increases CA1 spine density, NMDAR to AMPAR ratio, GluN2B-mediated NMDAR current, and long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 synapses if administered by 15, but not at 19-month post-OVX, defining the critical window of opportunity. Importantly, when rats are aged with ovaries intact until OVX at 20 months, hippocampal E2 responsiveness is maintained, indicating the deficit at 19-month post-OVX is a consequence of the duration of hormone deprivation and not chronological age. Here, we find the beneficial effect of E2 on novel object recognition in OVX rats was constrained by the same critical window. Furthermore, chronic low-level E2 replacement, commenced by 11-month post-OVX using subcutaneous capsules removed 2 weeks before acute proestrous E2 treatment, prevents the loss of hippocampal responsiveness at 19-month post-OVX. These data define the dynamic nature of the critical window showing that chronic replacement with physiological E2 levels within a certain period post-OVX can lengthen the window.

  9. Hippocampal transcriptional dysregulation after renal ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chou, An-Hsun; Lee, Chiou-Mei; Chen, Chun-Yu; Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Liu, Fu-Chao; Chen, Ying-Ling; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2014-09-25

    Neurological complications contribute largely to the morbidity and mortality in patients with acute renal failure. In order to study pathophysiological complications of renal failure, a murine model of renal ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) was generated by 60min bilateral ischemia, and followed by 2h or 24h reperfusion (B-60'IRI). Compared to the sham-operated mice, B-60'IRI mice exhibited a significant inflammatory injury to remote brain. We found that serum and brain levels of KC, G-CSF and MCP-1 were significantly increased in B-60'IRI mice after 2h and 24h reperfusion when compared with sham-operated mice. Moreover, B-60'IRI mice exhibited increased numbers of activated microglial cells in the brain, and severe blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability when compared with the control sham mice. The technology of cDNA microarray and quantitated RT-PCR are used to identify hippocampal genes whose expression is altered in response to AKI in B-60' IRI mice. The initiation of transcriptional abnormality was indicated by the finding that B-60' IRI mice exhibited upregulated mRNA levels of genes involved in inflammation, cell signaling, extracellular matrix and cell-cycle regulation and downregulated mRNA levels of genes involved in transporters, G protein-coupled receptor signaling, cell survival and chaperone. Our data suggest that renal IR contributes to a complicated hippocampal gene irregulation in inflammation and physiological homeostasis. PMID:25101948

  10. Neonatal Hypoxia, Hippocampal Atrophy, and Memory Impairment: Evidence of a Causal Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Janine M.; Gadian, David G.; Jentschke, Sebastian; Goldman, Allan; Munoz, Monica; Pitts, Georgia; Banks, Tina; Chong, W. Kling; Hoskote, Aparna; Deanfield, John; Baldeweg, Torsten; de Haan, Michelle; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    Neonates treated for acute respiratory failure experience episodes of hypoxia. The hippocampus, a structure essential for memory, is particularly vulnerable to such insults. Hence, some neonates undergoing treatment for acute respiratory failure might sustain bilateral hippocampal pathology early in life and memory problems later in childhood. We investigated this possibility in a cohort of 40 children who had been treated neonatally for acute respiratory failure but were free of overt neurological impairment. The cohort had mean hippocampal volumes (HVs) significantly below normal control values, memory scores significantly below the standard population means, and memory quotients significantly below those predicted by their full scale IQs. Brain white matter volume also fell below the volume of the controls, but brain gray matter volumes and scores on nonmnemonic neuropsychological tests were within the normal range. Stepwise linear regression models revealed that the cohort's HVs were predictive of degree of memory impairment, and gestational age at treatment was predictive of HVs: the younger the age, the greater the atrophy. We conclude that many neonates treated for acute respiratory failure sustain significant hippocampal atrophy as a result of the associated hypoxia and, consequently, show deficient memory later in life. PMID:24343890

  11. Acute effects of AMPA-type glutamate receptor antagonists on intermale social behavior in two mouse lines bidirectionally selected for offensive aggression.

    PubMed

    Vekovischeva, O Yu; Aitta-aho, T; Verbitskaya, E; Sandnabba, K; Korpi, E R

    2007-01-01

    Involvement of AMPA-type glutamate receptors in the regulation of social behavior has been suggested by experiments with mice deficient for the GluR-A subunit-containing AMPA receptors showing reduced intermale aggression. In the present study, effects of AMPA receptor antagonists on mouse social behavior towards unfamiliar Swiss-Webster males on a neutral territory were tested using male subjects from the Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA) mouse lines bidirectionally selected for high and low levels of offensive aggression. The drugs were the competitive antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), and the non-competitive antagonist 4-(8-methyl-9H-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-5-yl)-benzenamine (GYKI 52466). In TA mice, CNQX and NBQX decreased the biting component of aggressive structure, while GYKI 52466 suppressed all aggressive manifestations. All drugs increased anxiety-like behavior towards the partner. In TNA mice, NBQX activated mouse social behavior and ambivalent aggression, while CNQX and GYKI 52466 only increased anxiety. Thus, AMPA receptor antagonists affect aggressive behaviors in TA mice supporting the idea that AMPA receptors are involved in the modulation of agonistic impulsive behavioral pattern. GYKI 52466 appeared to be the most selective and efficacious in suppressing the aggression.

  12. GENETIC MAPPING OF VOCALIZATION TO A SERIES OF INCREASING ACUTE FOOTSHOCKS USING B6.A CONSOMIC AND B6.D2 CONGENIC MOUSE STRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Douglas B; Chesler, Elissa J; Cook, Melloni N.; Cockroft, Judy; Philip, Vivek M; Goldowitz, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Footshock response is used to study biological functions in mammals. However, the genetics underlying variability in footshock sensitivity are not well understood. In the current studies, a panel of B6.A consomic mouse strains, two B6.D2 congenic mouse strains and the progenitor strains were screened for footshock sensitivity as measured by audible vocalization. It was found that A/J (A) mice and C57BL/6J (B6) mice with an A Chromosome 1 (Chr 1) were less sensitive to footshock compared to B6 animals. Furthermore, the offspring of Chr 1 consomic mice crossed with B6 mice had vocalization levels that were intermediate to A/J and B6 animals. A F2 mapping panel revealed two significant QTLs for footshock vocalization centered around D1Mit490 and D1Mit206 on Chr 1. The role of these Chr 1 loci in footshock sensitivity was confirmed in B6.D2 congenic mice. These data identify genetic regions involved in footshock sensitivity and establish additional mouse resources for use in investigating complex behaviors.

  13. Resveratrol given intraperitoneally does not inhibit growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in NOD/SCID mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the phytochemical resveratrol as a preventive agent against the growth of t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) ALL line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by ...

  14. ROLE OF THE MATERNAL ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE AND TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR ALPHA IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE IN THE CD-1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The acute phase response (APR) functions to reset metabolic homeostasis following infectious, toxic or traumatic insult. TNF- , a putative mediator of the APR, has been associated with fetal death in rodents and preterm labor and delivery in humans. We hypothesized...

  15. Opposing Actions of Chronic[Deta][superscript 9] Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabinoid Antagonists on Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Oz, Murat; Yang, Ruiqin; Lichtman, Aron H.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2007-01-01

    Memory deficits produced by marijuana arise partly via interaction of the psychoactive component, [Deta][superscript 9]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([Deta][superscript 9]-THC), with cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. Although cannabinoids acutely reduce glutamate release and block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a potential substrate for…

  16. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Y I; Wang, P W; Gado, M H; Csernansky, J G; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal volumes of subjects with a history of major depressive episodes but currently in remission and with no known medical comorbidity were compared to matched normal controls by using volumetric magnetic resonance images. Subjects with a history of major depression had significantly smaller left and right hippocampal volumes with no differences in total cerebral volumes. The degree of hippocampal volume reduction correlated with total duration of major depression. In addition, large (diameter > or = 4.5 mm)-hippocampal low signal foci (LSF) were found within the hippocampus, and their number also correlated with the total number of days depressed. These results suggest that depression is associated with hippocampal atrophy, perhaps due to a progressive process mediated by glucocorticoid neurotoxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8632988

  17. Antenatal glucocorticoid treatment affects hippocampal development in mice.

    PubMed

    Noorlander, Cornelle W; Tijsseling, Deodata; Hessel, Ellen V S; de Vries, Willem B; Derks, Jan B; Visser, Gerard H A; de Graan, Pierre N E

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are administered to pregnant women at risk for preterm delivery, to enhance fetal lung maturation. The benefit of this treatment is well established, however caution is necessary because of possible unwanted side effects on development of different organ systems, including the brain. Actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by corticosteroid receptors, which are highly expressed in the hippocampus, a brain structure involved in cognitive functions. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of a single antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the development of the mouse hippocampus. A clinically relevant dose of dexamethasone (0.4 mg/kg) was administered to pregnant mice at embryonic day 15.5 and the hippocampus was analyzed from embryonic day 16 until adulthood. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone treatment on anatomical changes, apoptosis and proliferation in the hippocampus, hippocampal volume and on total body weight. Our results show that dexamethasone treatment reduced body weight and hippocampal volume transiently during development, but these effects were no longer detected at adulthood. Dexamethasone treatment increased the number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus until birth, but postnatally no effects of dexamethasone treatment on apoptosis were found. During the phase with increased apoptosis, dexamethasone treatment reduced the number of proliferating cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. The number of proliferative cells was increased at postnatal day 5 and 10, but was decreased again at the adult stage. This latter long-term and negative effect of antenatal dexamethasone treatment on the number of proliferative cells in the hippocampus may have important implications for hippocampal network function.

  18. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    PubMed

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  19. Enhancement of morphological plasticity in hippocampal neurons by a physically modified saline via phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias.

  20. Enhancement of Morphological Plasticity in Hippocampal Neurons by a Physically Modified Saline via Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K.; Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2014-01-01

    Increase of the density of dendritic spines and enhancement of synaptic transmission through ionotropic glutamate receptors are important events, leading to synaptic plasticity and eventually hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory formation. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate hippocampal plasticity. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanobubbles that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), PNS60 (saline containing a comparable level of oxygen without the TCP modification), or RNS10.3 (TCP-modified normal saline without excess oxygen), stimulated morphological plasticity and synaptic transmission via NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive calcium influx in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. Using mRNA-based targeted gene array, real-time PCR, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses, we further demonstrate that RNS60 stimulated the expression of many plasticity-associated genes in cultured hippocampal neurons. Activation of type IA, but not type IB, phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase by RNS60 together with abrogation of RNS60-mediated upregulation of plasticity-related proteins (NR2A and GluR1) and increase in spine density, neuronal size, and calcium influx by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3 kinase, suggest that RNS60 upregulates hippocampal plasticity via activation of PI-3 kinase. Finally, in the 5XFAD transgenic model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), RNS60 treatment upregulated expression of plasticity-related proteins PSD95 and NR2A and increased AMPA- and NMDA-dependent hippocampal calcium influx. These results describe a novel property of RNS60 in stimulating hippocampal plasticity, which may help AD and other dementias. PMID:25007337

  1. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  2. Regulation of action potential delays via voltage-gated potassium Kv1.1 channels in dentate granule cells during hippocampal epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kirchheim, Florian; Tinnes, Stefanie; Haas, Carola A.; Stegen, Michael; Wolfart, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Action potential (AP) responses of dentate gyrus granule (DG) cells have to be tightly regulated to maintain hippocampal function. However, which ion channels control the response delay of DG cells is not known. In some neuron types, spike latency is influenced by a dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive delay current (ID) mediated by unidentified combinations of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels of the Kv1 family Kv1.1–6. In DG cells, the ID has not been characterized and its molecular basis is unknown. The response phenotype of mature DG cells is usually considered homogenous but intrinsic plasticity likely occurs in particular in conditions of hyperexcitability, for example during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In this study, we examined response delays of DG cells and underlying ion channel molecules by employing a combination of gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings in acute brain slices and single-cell reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SC RT-qPCR) experiments. An in vivo mouse model of TLE consisting of intrahippocampal kainate (KA) injection was used to examine epilepsy-related plasticity. Response delays of DG cells were DTX-sensitive and strongly increased in KA-injected hippocampi; Kv1.1 mRNA was elevated 10-fold, and the response delays correlated with Kv1.1 mRNA abundance on the single cell level. Other Kv1 subunits did not show overt changes in mRNA levels. Kv1.1 immunolabeling was enhanced in KA DG cells. The biophysical properties of ID and a delay heterogeneity within the DG cell population was characterized. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs), where KA incubation also induced ID upregulation, the homeostatic reversibility and neuroprotective potential for DG cells were tested. In summary, the AP timing of DG cells is effectively controlled via scaling of Kv1.1 subunit transcription. With this antiepileptic mechanism, DG cells delay their responses during hyperexcitation. PMID:24367293

  3. Amyloid-β-induced action potential desynchronization and degradation of hippocampal gamma oscillations is prevented by interference with peptide conformation change and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kurudenkandy, Firoz Roshan; Zilberter, Misha; Biverstål, Henrik; Presto, Jenny; Honcharenko, Dmytro; Strömberg, Roger; Johansson, Jan; Winblad, Bengt; Fisahn, André

    2014-08-20

    The amyloid-β hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) focuses on accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) as the main culprit for the myriad physiological changes seen during development and progression of AD including desynchronization of neuronal action potentials, consequent development of aberrant brain rhythms relevant for cognition, and final emergence of cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying the Aβ-induced degradation of gamma oscillations in AD, to identify aggregation state(s) of Aβ that mediate the peptides neurotoxicity, and to test ways to prevent the neurotoxic Aβ effect. We show that Aβ(1-42) in physiological concentrations acutely degrades mouse hippocampal gamma oscillations in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The underlying cause is an Aβ-induced desynchronization of action potential generation in pyramidal cells and a shift of the excitatory/inhibitory equilibrium in the hippocampal network. Using purified preparations containing different aggregation states of Aβ, as well as a designed ligand and a BRICHOS chaperone domain, we provide evidence that the severity of Aβ neurotoxicity increases with increasing concentration of fibrillar over monomeric Aβ forms, and that Aβ-induced degradation of gamma oscillations and excitatory/inhibitory equilibrium is prevented by compounds that interfere with Aβ aggregation. Our study provides correlative evidence for a link between Aβ-induced effects on synaptic currents and AD-relevant neuronal network oscillations, identifies the responsible aggregation state of Aβ and proofs that strategies preventing peptide aggregation are able to prevent the deleterious action of Aβ on the excitatory/inhibitory equilibrium and on the gamma rhythm. PMID:25143621

  4. Early synaptic deficits in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease involve neuronal adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viana da Silva, Silvia; Haberl, Matthias Georg; Zhang, Pei; Bethge, Philipp; Lemos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gorlewicz, Adam; Malezieux, Meryl; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Grosjean, Noëlle; Blanchet, Christophe; Frick, Andreas; Nägerl, U Valentin; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the autoassociative network of recurrent connections among hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells is thought to enable the storage of episodic memory. Impaired episodic memory is an early manifestation of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the APP/PS1 mouse model of AD amyloidosis, we show that associative long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is abolished in CA3 pyramidal cells at an early stage. This is caused by activation of upregulated neuronal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) rather than by dysregulation of NMDAR signalling or altered dendritic spine morphology. Neutralization of A2AR by acute pharmacological inhibition, or downregulation driven by shRNA interference in a single postsynaptic neuron restore associative CA3 LTP. Accordingly, treatment with A2AR antagonists reverts one-trial memory deficits. These results provide mechanistic support to encourage testing the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR antagonists in early AD patients. PMID:27312972

  5. Acute relaxation of mouse duodenum [correction of duodenun] by estrogens. Evidence for an estrogen receptor-independent modulation of muscle excitability.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Mario; Ramírez, Cristina M; Marin, Raquel; Marrero-Alonso, Jorge; Gómez, Tomás; Alonso, Rafael

    2004-10-01

    17-beta-Estradiol, the stereoisomer 17-alpha-estradiol and the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), all caused a rapid (<3 min) dose-dependent reversible relaxation of mouse duodenal spontaneous activity, reduced basal tone and depressed the responses to CaCl(2) and KCl. The steroidal antiestrogen 7alpha-[9-[(4,4,5,5,5,-pentafluoropenty)sulphinyl]nonyl]-estra-1,3,5(19)-triene-3,17beta-diol (ICI182,780) failed to either mimic or prevent the effect of 17-beta-estradiol. The effect of estrogens was unrelated to activation of nitric oxide (NO), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase G (PKG) or protein kinase C (PKC). Estrogen-induced relaxation was partially reversed by 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-pyridine-3-carboxilic acid methyl ester (BAY-K8644), depolarization, or by application of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine, but not by glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, paxilline or verruculogen. The effects of BAY-K8644 and K(+) channel blockers were synergistic, and allowed relaxed tissues to recover spontaneous activity and basal tone. We hypothesize that the rapid non-genomic spasmolytic effect of estrogens on mouse duodenal muscle might be triggered by an estrogen-receptor-independent mechanism likely involving activation of tetraethylamonium- and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels and inhibition of L-type Ca2(+) channels on the smooth muscle cells. PMID:15464075

  6. Topical Application of a Platelet Activating Factor Receptor Agonist Suppresses Phorbol Ester-Induced Acute and Chronic Inflammation and Has Cancer Chemopreventive Activity in Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ocana, Jesus A.; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C.; Bradish, Joshua R.; Richey, Justin D.; Warren, Simon J.; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Konger, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development. PMID:25375862

  7. Prenatal immune activation causes hippocampal synaptic deficits in the absence of overt microglia anomalies.

    PubMed

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Weber-Stadlbauer, Ulrike; Schedlowski, Manfred; Meyer, Urs; Engler, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to infectious or inflammatory insults can increase the risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorder in later life, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. These brain disorders are also characterized by pre- and postsynaptic deficits. Using a well-established mouse model of maternal exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid [poly(I:C)], we examined whether prenatal immune activation might cause synaptic deficits in the hippocampal formation of pubescent and adult offspring. Based on the widely appreciated role of microglia in synaptic pruning, we further explored possible associations between synaptic deficits and microglia anomalies in offspring of poly(I:C)-exposed and control mothers. We found that prenatal immune activation induced an adult onset of presynaptic hippocampal deficits (as evaluated by synaptophysin and bassoon density). The early-life insult further caused postsynaptic hippocampal deficits in pubescence (as evaluated by PSD95 and SynGAP density), some of which persisted into adulthood. In contrast, prenatal immune activation did not change microglia (or astrocyte) density, nor did it alter their activation phenotypes. The prenatal manipulation did also not cause signs of persistent systemic inflammation. Despite the absence of overt glial anomalies or systemic inflammation, adult offspring exposed to prenatal immune activation displayed increased hippocampal IL-1β levels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that age-dependent synaptic deficits and abnormal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression can occur during postnatal brain maturation in the absence of microglial anomalies or systemic inflammation.

  8. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism.

  9. Identification of the miRNA targetome in hippocampal neurons using RIP-seq.

    PubMed

    Malmevik, Josephine; Petri, Rebecca; Klussendorf, Thies; Knauff, Pina; Åkerblom, Malin; Johansson, Jenny; Soneji, Shamit; Jakobsson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in the regulation of neuronal processes by targeting a large network of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). However, the identity and function of mRNAs targeted by miRNAs in specific cells of the brain are largely unknown. Here, we established an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-based neuron-specific Argonaute2:GFP-RNA immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to analyse the regulatory role of miRNAs in mouse hippocampal neurons. Using this approach, we identified more than two thousand miRNA targets in hippocampal neurons, regulating essential neuronal features such as cell signalling, transcription and axon guidance. Furthermore, we found that stable inhibition of the highly expressed miR-124 and miR-125 in hippocampal neurons led to significant but distinct changes in the AGO2 binding of target mRNAs, resulting in subsequent upregulation of numerous miRNA target genes. These findings greatly enhance our understanding of the miRNA targetome in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26219083

  10. Mouse model of human RPE65 P25L hypomorph resembles wild type under normal light rearing but is fully resistant to acute light damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yu, Shirley; Duncan, Todd; Li, Yichao; Liu, Pinghu; Gene, Erelda; Cortes-Pena, Yoel; Qian, Haohua; Dong, Lijin; Redmond, T Michael

    2015-08-01

    Human RPE65 mutations cause a spectrum of blinding retinal dystrophies from severe early-onset disease to milder manifestations. The RPE65 P25L missense mutation, though having <10% of wild-type (WT) activity, causes relatively mild retinal degeneration. To better understand these mild forms of RPE65-related retinal degeneration, and their effect on cone photoreceptor survival, we generated an Rpe65/P25L knock-in (KI/KI) mouse model. We found that, when subject to the low-light regime (∼100 lux) of regular mouse housing, homozygous Rpe65/P25L KI/KI mice are morphologically and functionally very similar to WT siblings. While mutant protein expression is decreased by over 80%, KI/KI mice retinae retain comparable 11-cis-retinal levels with WT. Consistently, the scotopic and photopic electroretinographic (ERG) responses to single-flash stimuli also show no difference between KI/KI and WT mice. However, the recovery of a-wave response following moderate visual pigment bleach is delayed in KI/KI mice. Importantly, KI/KI mice show significantly increased resistance to high-intensity (20 000 lux for 30 min) light-induced retinal damage (LIRD) as compared with WT, indicating impaired rhodopsin regeneration in KI/KI. Taken together, the Rpe65/P25L mutant produces sufficient chromophore under normal conditions to keep opsins replete and thus manifests a minimal phenotype. Only when exposed to intensive light is this hypomorphic mutation manifested physiologically, as its reduced expression and catalytic activity protects against the successive cycles of opsin regeneration underlying LIRD. These data also help define minimal requirements of chromophore for photoreceptor survival in vivo and may be useful in assessing a beneficial therapeutic dose for RPE65 gene therapy in humans.

  11. The Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Is Effective Against A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) Influenza Virus in a Mouse Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Burnham, Andrew J.; Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Armstrong, Jianling; Guan, Yi; Shu, Yuelong; Peiris, Joseph Malik Sriyal; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. High mortality and uncertainty about the effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) in humans infected with influenza A(H7N9) viruses are public health concerns. Methods. Susceptibility of N9 viruses to NAIs was determined in a fluorescence-based assay. The NAI oseltamivir (5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day) was administered to BALB/c mice twice daily starting 24, 48, or 72 hours after A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) virus challenge. Results. All 12 avian N9 and 3 human H7N9 influenza viruses tested were susceptible to NAIs. Without prior adaptation, A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) caused lethal infection in mice that was restricted to the respiratory tract and resulted in pulmonary edema and acute lung injury with hyaline membrane formation, leading to decreased oxygenation, all characteristics of human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Oseltamivir at 20 and 80 mg/kg protected 80% and 88% of mice when initiated after 24 hours, and the efficacy decreased to 70% and 60%, respectively, when treatment was delayed by 48 hours. Emergence of oseltamivir-resistant variants was not detected. Conclusions. H7N9 viruses are comparable to currently circulating influenza A viruses in susceptibility to NAIs. Based on these animal studies, early treatment is associated with improved outcomes. PMID:24133191

  12. Knock-in of a FLT3/ITD mutation cooperates with a NUP98-HOXD13 fusion to generate acute myeloid leukemia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, Sarah; Li, Li; Slape, Christopher; Nguyen, Bao; Novak, Rachel; Duffield, Amy; Huso, David; Desiderio, Stephen; Borowitz, Michael J.; Aplan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of FLT3 by internal tandem duplication (ITD) is one of the most common molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FLT3/ITD mutations have also been observed in myelodysplastic syndrome patients both before and during progression to AML. Previous work has shown that insertion of an FLT3/ITD mutation into the murine Flt3 gene induces a myeloproliferative neoplasm, but not progression to acute leukemia, suggesting that additional cooperating events are required. We therefore combined the FLT3/ITD mutation with a model of myelodysplastic syndrome involving transgenic expression of the Nup98-HoxD13 (NHD13) fusion gene. Mice expressing both the FLT3/ITD and NHD13 transgene developed AML with 100% penetrance and short latency. These leukemias were driven by mutant FLT3 expression and were susceptible to treatment with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We also observed a spontaneous loss of the wild-type Flt3 allele in these AMLs, further modeling the loss of the heterozygosity phenomenon that is seen in human AML with FLT3-activating mutations. Because resistance to FLT3 inhibitors remains an important clinical issue, this model may help identify new molecular targets in collaborative signaling pathways. PMID:22323452

  13. Elevated blood interleukin-10 levels and undiminished systemic interleukin-10 production rate prevail throughout acute protein-energy malnutrition in the weanling mouse.

    PubMed

    Monk, Jennifer M; Woodward, Bill

    2009-08-01

    The objectives were to determine if blood IL-10 levels rise during the early stages of acute (wasting) pre-pubescent malnutrition in metabolically distinct murine models known to depress inflammatory immune competence and whether systemic IL-10 production is affected in these pathologies. Weanling C57BL/6J mice were assigned to dietary protocols that elicited wasting pathologies mimicking the human diseases of marasmus (restricted-intake group) or incipient kwashiorkor (low-protein group). An age-matched control group also was included. Serum IL-10 bioactivities were assessed in the early (day 3) and advanced (day 14) stages of weight loss, and net systemic IL-10 production was assessed at the same stages of pathology by in vivo cytokine capture. Blood IL-10 levels were elevated in both malnourished groups relative to controls at days 3 and 14 (range of P values: 0.03-0.0001). Further, despite a limited supply of energy and nitrogenous substrates, the systemic IL-10 production rate was at least sustained in the malnourished groups and, in fact, was elevated in the marasmic group (P=0.05) throughout the progression of weight loss. IL-10 emerges as an anti-inflammatory mediator positioned to participate in initiating and upholding the depressed immune competence that accompanies acute pre-pubescent deficits of protein and energy.

  14. Hippocampal PER1: a circadian sentinel controlling RSKy activity during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated a pronounced dependence of memory formation on circadian time; however, the numerous mechanisms underlying this reliance are only beginning to be understood. While the 24-h cellular clock controls various aspects of hippocampal memory formation, its consolidation in particular (i.e., its conversion from short-term to long-term memory), appears to be heavily dependent on circadian activity in hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal memory consolidation requires phosphorylation of the cAMP Response Element-Binding protein, CREB, which upon phosphorylation promotes the transcription of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. Rhythmic cAMP/ERK-MAPK activity upstream of CREB is a necessary component. This Editorial highlights a study by Rawashdeh and coworkers, in which the authors establish the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) as a regulator of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus, and thus reveal a functional link between circadian rhythms and learning efficiency. Read the highlighted article 'Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK' on page 731. PMID:27554418

  15. Increasing Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis is Sufficient to Reduce Anxiety and Depression-Like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alexis S; Sahay, Amar; Hen, René

    2015-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is increased by antidepressants, and is required for some of their behavioral effects. However, it remains unclear whether expanding the population of adult-born neurons is sufficient to affect anxiety and depression-related behavior. Here, we use an inducible transgenic mouse model in which the pro-apoptotic gene Bax is deleted from neural stem cells and their progeny in the adult brain, and thereby increases adult neurogenesis. We find no effects on baseline anxiety and depression-related behavior; however, we find that increasing adult neurogenesis is sufficient to reduce anxiety and depression-related behaviors in mice treated chronically with corticosterone (CORT), a mouse model of stress. Thus, neurogenesis differentially affects behavior under baseline conditions and in a model of chronic stress. Moreover, we find no effect of increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation, either at baseline or following chronic CORT administration, suggesting that increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis can affect anxiety and depression-related behavior through a mechanism independent of the HPA axis. The use of future techniques to specifically inhibit BAX in the hippocampus could be used to augment adult neurogenesis, and may therefore represent a novel strategy to promote antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

  16. Increasing Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis is Sufficient to Reduce Anxiety and Depression-Like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hill, Alexis S; Sahay, Amar; Hen, René

    2015-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is increased by antidepressants, and is required for some of their behavioral effects. However, it remains unclear whether expanding the population of adult-born neurons is sufficient to affect anxiety and depression-related behavior. Here, we use an inducible transgenic mouse model in which the pro-apoptotic gene Bax is deleted from neural stem cells and their progeny in the adult brain, and thereby increases adult neurogenesis. We find no effects on baseline anxiety and depression-related behavior; however, we find that increasing adult neurogenesis is sufficient to reduce anxiety and depression-related behaviors in mice treated chronically with corticosterone (CORT), a mouse model of stress. Thus, neurogenesis differentially affects behavior under baseline conditions and in a model of chronic stress. Moreover, we find no effect of increased adult hippocampal neurogenesis on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation, either at baseline or following chronic CORT administration, suggesting that increasing adult hippocampal neurogenesis can affect anxiety and depression-related behavior through a mechanism independent of the HPA axis. The use of future techniques to specifically inhibit BAX in the hippocampus could be used to augment adult neurogenesis, and may therefore represent a novel strategy to promote antidepressant-like behavioral effects. PMID:25833129

  17. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  18. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis buffers stress responses and depressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jason S; Soumier, Amélie; Brewer, Michelle; Pickel, James; Cameron, Heather A

    2011-08-03

    Glucocorticoids are released in response to stressful experiences and serve many beneficial homeostatic functions. However, dysregulation of glucocorticoids is associated with cognitive impairments and depressive illness. In the hippocampus, a brain region densely populated with receptors for stress hormones, stress and glucocorticoids strongly inhibit adult neurogenesis. Decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression, but direct evidence for this role is lacking. Here we show that adult-born hippocampal neurons are required for normal expression of the endocrine and behavioural components of the stress response. Using either transgenic or radiation methods to inhibit adult neurogenesis specifically, we find that glucocorticoid levels are slower to recover after moderate stress and are less suppressed by dexamethasone in neurogenesis-deficient mice than intact mice, consistent with a role for the hippocampus in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Relative to controls, neurogenesis-deficient mice also showed increased food avoidance in a novel environment after acute stress, increased behavioural despair in the forced swim test, and decreased sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia. These findings identify a small subset of neurons within the dentate gyrus that are critical for hippocampal negative control of the HPA axis and support a direct role for adult neurogenesis in depressive illness.

  19. Androgen Modulation of Hippocampal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Atwi, Sarah; McMahon, Dallan; Scharfman, Helen; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Androgens have profound effects on hippocampal structure and function, including induction of spines and spine synapses on the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as alterations in long-term synaptic plasticity (LTP) and hippocampally dependent cognitive behaviors. How these effects occur remains largely unknown. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that one of the key elements in the response mechanism may be modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mossy fiber (MF) system. In male rats, orchidectomy increases synaptic transmission and excitability in the MF pathway. Testosterone reverses these effects, suggesting that testosterone exerts tonic suppression on MF BDNF levels. These findings suggest that changes in hippocampal function resulting from declining androgen levels may reflect the outcome of responses mediated through normally balanced, but opposing, mechanisms: loss of androgen effects on the hippocampal circuitry may be compensated, at least in part, by an increase in BDNF-dependent MF plasticity. PMID:25416742

  20. Restoration of glucose metabolism in leptin-resistant mouse hearts after acute myocardial infarction through the activation of survival kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Witham, William; Yester, Keith; O'Donnell, Christopher P; McGaffin, Kenneth R

    2012-07-01

    In the normal heart, leptin modulates cardiac metabolism. It is unknown, however, what effect leptin has on cardiac metabolism and outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (MI). This study was performed to test the hypothesis that leptin signaling increases glucose metabolism and attenuates injury in the acutely infarcted heart. Mice with (ObR(+/+)) and without (ObR(-/-)) cardiomyocyte specific expression of leptin receptor (ObR) were randomly assigned to experimental MI or sham procedure, and studied 3 days later. ObR(+/+) and ObR(-/-) sham mice were not significantly different in any measured outcome. However, after MI, ObR(-/-) mice had greater cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular dilation, and levels of oxidative stress. These worse indices of cardiac injury in ObR(-/-) mice were associated with attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt signaling, decreased malonyl CoA content, and reduced mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase and electron transport Complex I, II and IV activities. Furthermore, ObR(-/-) mice maintained high rates of cardiac fatty acid oxidation after MI, whereas ObR(+/+) mice demonstrated a switch away from fatty acid oxidation to glucose metabolism. Restoration of cardiac STAT3, PI3K and Akt activity and mitochondrial function in ObR(-/-) mice post-MI was accomplished by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), an established STAT3 activator, administered immediately after MI. Moreover, CNTF therapy resulted in mitigation of cardiac structural and functional injury, attenuated levels of oxidative stress, and rescued glucose metabolism in the infarcted ObR(-/-) heart. These data demonstrate that impaired cardiac leptin signaling results in metabolic inflexibility for glucose utilization in the face of cardiac stress, and greater morbidity after MI. Further, these studies show that cardiac glucose metabolism can be restored in leptin-resistant hearts by CNTF-mediated activation

  1. An in vitro iron superoxide dismutase inhibitor decreases the parasitemia levels of Trypanosoma cruzi in BALB/c mouse model during acute phase

    PubMed Central

    Olmo, Francisco; Urbanová, Kristína; Rosales, Maria Jose; Martín-Escolano, Ruben; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel; Marín, Clotilde

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify new compounds to treat Chagas disease during the acute phase with higher activity and lower toxicity than the reference drug benznidazole (Bz), two hydroxyphthalazine derivative compounds were prepared and their trypanocidal effects against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated by light microscopy through the determination of IC50 values. Cytotoxicity was determined by flow cytometry assays against Vero cells. In vivo assays were performed in BALB/c mice, in which the parasitemia levels were quantified by fresh blood examination; the assignment of a cure was determined by reactivation of blood parasitemia levels after immunosuppression. The mechanism of action was elucidated at metabolic and ultra-structural levels, by 1H NMR and TEM studies. Finally, as these compounds are potentially capable of causing oxidative damage in the parasites, the study was completed, by assessing their activity as potential iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) inhibitors. High-selectivity indices observed in vitro were the basis of promoting one of the tested compounds to in vivo assays. The tests on the murine model for the acute phase of Chagas disease showed better parasitemia inhibition values than those found for Bz. Compound 2 induced a remarkable decrease in the reactivation of parasitemia after immunosuppression. Compound 2 turned out to be a great inhibitor of Fe-SOD. The high antiparasitic activity and low toxicity together with the modest costs for the starting materials render this compound an appropriate molecule for the development of an affordable anti-Chagas agent. PMID:26236582

  2. An in vitro iron superoxide dismutase inhibitor decreases the parasitemia levels of Trypanosoma cruzi in BALB/c mouse model during acute phase.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Francisco; Urbanová, Kristína; Rosales, Maria Jose; Martín-Escolano, Ruben; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel; Marín, Clotilde

    2015-12-01

    In order to identify new compounds to treat Chagas disease during the acute phase with higher activity and lower toxicity than the reference drug benznidazole (Bz), two hydroxyphthalazine derivative compounds were prepared and their trypanocidal effects against Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated by light microscopy through the determination of IC50 values. Cytotoxicity was determined by flow cytometry assays against Vero cells. In vivo assays were performed in BALB/c mice, in which the parasitemia levels were quantified by fresh blood examination; the assignment of a cure was determined by reactivation of blood parasitemia levels after immunosuppression. The mechanism of action was elucidated at metabolic and ultra-structural levels, by (1)H NMR and TEM studies. Finally, as these compounds are potentially capable of causing oxidative damage in the parasites, the study was completed, by assessing their activity as potential iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) inhibitors. High-selectivity indices observed in vitro were the basis of promoting one of the tested compounds to in vivo assays. The tests on the murine model for the acute phase of Chagas disease showed better parasitemia inhibition values than those found for Bz. Compound 2 induced a remarkable decrease in the reactivation of parasitemia after immunosuppression. Compound 2 turned out to be a great inhibitor of Fe-SOD. The high antiparasitic activity and low toxicity together with the modest costs for the starting materials render this compound an appropriate molecule for the development of an affordable anti-Chagas agent. PMID:26236582

  3. MRL/lpr-->severe combined immunodeficiency mouse allografts produce autoantibodies, acute graft-versus-host disease or a wasting syndrome depending on the source of cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ashany, D; Hines, J J; Gharavi, A E; Mouradian, J; Drappa, J; Elkon, K B

    1992-01-01

    MRL/lpr (lpr) mice spontaneously develop a lupus-like illness as well as massive lymphadenopathy. Attempts to transfer autoimmunity by adoptive transfer or radiation bone marrow chimeras have been unsuccessful. Since severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have been engrafted with human and rat xenografts without apparent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we subjected SCID mice to low-dose irradiation and reconstituted the mice with spleen cells from young or old lpr mice or with lpr bone marrow. Fourteen out of twenty (70%) of SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from old lpr mice produced autoantibodies (anti-DNA and anti-Sm) without evidence of the severe lymphoid atrophy previously described for lpr spleen-->+/+ chimeras. SCID mice engrafted with spleen cells from young lpr mice developed acute GVHD and 5/6 (83%) died within 4 weeks post-transfer. Although 8/11 (73%) of lpr-->SCID bone marrow allografts survived for at least 4 months, these mice developed a wasting disease characterized by lymphoid atrophy and fibrosis without the production of autoantibodies. None of the lpr-->SCID grafts resulted in the transfer of double negative T cells or the lymphoproliferative syndrome characteristic of MRL/lpr mice. These findings indicate that SCID mice can be engrafted with splenocytes from old MRL/lpr mice and that B cells continue to secrete autoantibodies for several months in the SCID recipients. This study also demonstrates that, unlike i.p. transplant of xenogeneic cells, acute GVHD is a consistent feature of i.p. transplants of normal allogeneic mononuclear cells into SCID mice. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 7 PMID:1458684

  4. Effects of particle size and coating on toxicologic parameters, fecal elimination kinetics and tissue distribution of acutely ingested silver nanoparticles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bergin, Ingrid L; Wilding, Laura A; Morishita, Masako; Walacavage, Kim; Ault, Andrew P; Axson, Jessica L; Stark, Diana I; Hashway, Sara A; Capracotta, Sonja S; Leroueil, Pascale R; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP) via ingestion can occur due to incorporation of AgNP into products such as food containers and dietary supplements. AgNP variations in size and coating may affect toxicity, elimination kinetics or tissue distribution. Here, we directly compared acute administration of AgNP of two differing coatings and sizes to mice, using doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day administered by oral gavage for 3 days. The maximal dose is equivalent to 2000× the EPA oral reference dose. Silver acetate at the same doses was used as ionic silver control. We found no toxicity and no significant tissue accumulation. Additionally, no toxicity was seen when AgNP were dosed concurrently with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. Between 70.5% and 98.6% of the administered silver dose was recovered in feces and particle size and coating differences did not significantly influence fecal silver. Peak fecal silver was detected between 6- and 9-h post-administration and <0.5% of the administered dose was cumulatively detected in liver, spleen, intestines or urine at 48 h. Although particle size and coating did not affect tissue accumulation, silver was detected in liver, spleen and kidney of mice administered ionic silver at marginally higher levels than those administered AgNP, suggesting that silver ion may be more bioavailable. Our results suggest that, irrespective of particle size and coating, acute oral exposure to AgNP at doses relevant to potential human exposure is associated with predominantly fecal elimination and is not associated with accumulation in tissue or toxicity. PMID:26305411

  5. Sustained Na+/H+ exchanger activation promotes gliotransmitter release from reactive hippocampal astrocytes following oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Pelin; Kintner, Douglas B; Chanana, Vishal; Yuan, Hui; Akture, Erinc; Kendigelen, Pinar; Begum, Gulnaz; Fidan, Emin; Uluc, Kutluay; Ferrazzano, Peter; Sun, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia ischemia (HI)-related brain injury is the major cause of long-term morbidity in neonates. One characteristic hallmark of neonatal HI is the development of reactive astrogliosis in the hippocampus. However, the impact of reactive astrogliosis in hippocampal damage after neonatal HI is not fully understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) protein in mouse reactive hippocampal astrocyte function in an in vitro ischemia model (oxygen/glucose deprivation and reoxygenation, OGD/REOX). 2 h OGD significantly increased NHE1 protein expression and NHE1-mediated H(+) efflux in hippocampal astrocytes. NHE1 activity remained stimulated during 1-5 h REOX and returned to the basal level at 24 h REOX. NHE1 activation in hippocampal astrocytes resulted in intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) overload. The latter was mediated by reversal of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. Hippocampal astrocytes also exhibited a robust release of gliotransmitters (glutamate and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNFα) during 1-24 h REOX. Interestingly, inhibition of NHE1 activity with its potent inhibitor HOE 642 not only reduced Na(+) overload but also gliotransmitter release from hippocampal astrocytes. The noncompetitive excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor TBOA showed a similar effect on blocking the glutamate release. Taken together, we concluded that NHE1 plays an essential role in maintaining H(+) homeostasis in hippocampal astrocytes. Over-stimulation of NHE1 activity following in vitro ischemia disrupts Na(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis, which reduces Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake and promotes release of glutamate and cytokines from reactive astrocytes. Therefore, blocking sustained NHE1 activation in reactive astrocytes may provide neuroprotection following HI.

  6. p19ARF is a critical mediator of both cellular senescence and an innate immune response associated with MYC inactivation in mouse model of acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yetil, Alper; Anchang, Benedict; Gouw, Arvin M.; Adam, Stacey J.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Parameswaran, Ramya; van Riggelen, Jan; Plevritis, Sylvia; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    MYC-induced T-ALL exhibit oncogene addiction. Addiction to MYC is a consequence of both cell-autonomous mechanisms, such as proliferative arrest, cellular senescence, and apoptosis, as well as non-cell autonomous mechanisms, such as shutdown of angiogenesis, and recruitment of immune effectors. Here, we show, using transgenic mouse models of MYC-induced T-ALL, that the loss of either p19ARF or p53 abrogates the ability of MYC inactivation to induce sustained tumor regression. Loss of p53 or p19ARF, influenced the ability of MYC inactivation to elicit the shutdown of angiogenesis; however the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded cellular senescence, as measured by SA-beta-galactosidase staining, increased expression of p16INK4A, and specific histone modifications. Moreover, comparative gene expression analysis suggested that a multitude of genes involved in the innate immune response were expressed in p19ARF wild-type, but not null, tumors upon MYC inactivation. Indeed, the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded the in situ recruitment of macrophages to the tumor microenvironment. Finally, p19ARF null-associated gene signature prognosticated relapse-free survival in human patients with ALL. Therefore, p19ARF appears to be important to regulating cellular senescence and innate immune response that may contribute to the therapeutic response of ALL. PMID:25784651

  7. IL-17 contributes to neutrophil recruitment but not to control of viral replication during acute mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Mary K; Zhu, Lingqiao; Procario, Megan C; Weinberg, Jason B

    2014-05-01

    IL-17-producing CD4(+) helper T cells (Th17 cells) promote inflammatory responses to many pathogens. We used mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) to determine contributions of IL-17 to adenovirus pathogenesis. MAV-1 infection of C57BL/6 mice upregulated lung expression of IL-17 and the Th17-associated factors IL-23 and RORγt. Only CD4(+)T cells were associated with virus-specific IL-17 production. Fewer neutrophils were recruited to airways of IL-17(-/-) mice following MAV-1 infection, but there were no other differences in pulmonary inflammation between IL-17(+/+) and IL-17(-/-) mice. Mice depleted of neutrophils using anti-Gr-1 antibody had greater lung viral loads than controls. Despite impaired neutrophil recruitment, there were no differences between IL-17(+/+) and IL-17(-/-) mice in peak lung viral loads, clearance of virus from the lungs, or establishment of protective immunity. We demonstrate robust Th17 responses during MAV-1 respiratory infection, but these responses are not essential for control of virus infection or for virus-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24889245

  8. Effects of reproductive status on behavioral and endocrine responses to acute stress in a biparental rodent, the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus)

    PubMed Central

    Chauke, Miyetani; Malisch, Jessica L.; Robinson, Cymphonee; de Jong, Trynke R.; Saltzman, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In several mammalian species, lactating females show blunted neural, hormonal, and behavioral responses to stressors. It is not known whether new fathers also show stress hyporesponsiveness in species in which males provide infant care. To test this possibility, we determined the effects of male and female reproductive status on stress responsiveness in the biparental, monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus).Breeding (N=8 females, 8 males), nonbreeding (N=10 females, 10 males) and virgin mice (N=12 females, 9 males) were exposed to a 5-min predator-urine stressor at two time points, corresponding to the early postpartum (5–7 days postpartum) and mid/late postpartum (19–21 days postpartum) phases, and blood samples were collected immediately afterwards. Baseline blood samples were obtained 2 days prior to each stress test. Baseline plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations did not differ among male or female groups. CORT responses to the stressor did not differ among female reproductive groups, and all three groups showed distinct behavioral responses to predator urine. Virgin males tended to increase their CORT response from the first to the second stress test, while breeding and nonbreeding males did not. Moreover, virgin and nonbreeding males showed significant behavioral changes in response to predator urine, whereas breeding males did not. These results suggest that adrenocortical responses to a repeated stressor in male California mice may be modulated by cohabitation with a female, whereas behavioral responses to stress may be blunted by parental status. PMID:21557946

  9. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution.

  10. The amyloid precursor protein controls adult hippocampal neurogenesis through GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baiping; Wang, Zilai; Sun, Lu; Yang, Li; Li, Hongmei; Cole, Allysa L; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jennifer; Lu, Hui-Chen; Zheng, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Impaired neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has been implicated in AD pathogenesis. Here we reveal that the APP plays an important role in the neural progenitor proliferation and newborn neuron maturation in the mouse dentate gyrus. APP controls adult neurogenesis through a non cell-autonomous mechanism by GABAergic neurons, as selective deletion of GABAergic, but not glutamatergic, APP disrupts adult hippocampal neurogenesis. APP, highly expressed in the majority of GABAergic neurons in the dentate gyrus, enhances the inhibitory tone to granule cells. By regulating both tonic and phasic GABAergic inputs to dentate granule cells, APP maintains excitatory-inhibitory balance and preserves cognitive functions. Our studies uncover an indispensable role of APP in the GABAergic system for controlling adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and our findings indicate that APP dysfunction may contribute to impaired neurogenesis and cognitive decline associated with AD.

  11. Environmental enrichment restores CA1 hippocampal LTP and reduces severity of seizures in epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Emanuela; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Pendolino, Valentina; Bagetta, Vincenza; Pignataro, Annabella; Fejtova, Anna; Costa, Cinzia; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    We have analyzed the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) in a seizure-prone mouse model in which the genetic disruption of the presynaptic protein Bassoon leads to structural and functional alterations in the hippocampus and causes early spontaneous seizures mimicking human neurodevelopmental disorders. One-month EE starting at P21 reduced seizure severity, preserved long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse synaptic responses in the hippocampal CA1 neuronal population and prevented the reduction of spine density and dendrite branching of pyramidal neurons. These data demonstrate that EE exerts its therapeutic effect by normalizing multiple aspects of hippocampal function and provide experimental support for its use in the optimization of existent treatments.

  12. Topographic specificity of functional connections from hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivanlou, Iman H.; Dantzker, Jami L. M.; Stevens, Charles F.; Callaway, Edward M.

    2004-02-01

    The hippocampus is a cortical region thought to play an important role in learning and memory. Most of our knowledge about the detailed organization of hippocampal circuitry responsible for these functions is derived from anatomical studies. These studies present an incomplete picture, however, because the functional character and importance of connections are often not revealed by anatomy. Here, we used a physiological method (photostimulation with caged glutamate) to probe the fine pattern of functional connectivity between the CA3 and CA1 subfields in the mouse hippocampal slice preparation. We recorded intracellularly from CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons while scanning with photostimulation across the entire CA3 subfield with high spatial resolution. Our results show that, at a given septotemporal level, nearby CA1 neurons receive synaptic inputs from neighboring CA3 neurons. Thus, the CA3 to CA1 mapping preserves neighbor relations.

  13. Hippocampal neuroplasticity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, N V; Coupland, N J

    2015-11-19

    One of the most replicated findings has been that hippocampus volume is decreased in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that localized differences in hippocampal volume may be more prominent than global differences. Preclinical and post-mortem studies in MDD indicated that different subfields of the hippocampus may respond differently to stress and may also have differential levels of plasticity in response to antidepressant treatment. Advances in high-field MRI allowed researchers to visualize and measure hippocampal subfield volumes in MDD patients in vivo. The results of these studies provide the first in vivo evidence that hippocampal volume reductions in MDD are specific to the cornu ammonis and dentate gyrus hippocampal subfields, findings that appear, on the surface, consistent with preclinical evidence for localized mechanisms of hippocampal neuroplasticity. In this review we discuss how recent advances in neuroimaging allow researchers to further understand hippocampal neuroplasticity in MDD and how it is related to antidepressant treatment, memory function, and disease progression.

  14. Intranasal Insulin Enhanced Resting-State Functional Connectivity of Hippocampal Regions in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Hao, Ying; Manor, Bradley; Novak, Peter; Milberg, William; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) alters brain function and manifests as brain atrophy. Intranasal insulin has emerged as a promising intervention for treatment of cognitive impairment. We evaluated the acute effects of intranasal insulin on resting-state brain functional connectivity in older adults with T2DM. This proof-of-concept, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the effects of a single 40 IU dose of insulin or saline in 14 diabetic and 14 control subjects. Resting-state functional connectivity between the hippocampal region and default mode network (DMN) was quantified using functional MRI (fMRI) at 3Tesla. Following insulin administration, diabetic patients demonstrated increased resting-state connectivity between the hippocampal regions and the medial frontal cortex (MFC) as compared with placebo (cluster size: right, P = 0.03) and other DMN regions. On placebo, the diabetes group had lower connectivity between the hippocampal region and the MFC as compared with control subjects (cluster size: right, P = 0.02), but on insulin, MFC connectivity was similar to control subjects. Resting-state connectivity correlated with cognitive performance. A single dose of intranasal insulin increases resting-state functional connectivity between the hippocampal regions and multiple DMN regions in older adults with T2DM. Intranasal insulin administration may modify functional connectivity among brain regions regulating memory and complex cognitive behaviors. PMID:25249577

  15. Excitation/inhibition imbalance and impaired synaptic inhibition in hippocampal area CA3 of Mecp2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multiunit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2(-/y) ). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2(-/y) slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAA Rs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2(-/y) mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2(-/y) mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2(-/y) mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2(-/y) mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a

  16. Excitation/Inhibition Imbalance and Impaired Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampal Area CA3 of Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multi-unit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2-/y). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2-/y slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAARs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2-/y mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2-/y mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2-/y mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2-/y mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a hyperactive

  17. Metaplastic Effects of Subanesthetic Ketamine on CA1 Hippocampal Function

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist of interest in neuropsychiatry. In the present studies, we examined the effects of subanesthetic, low micromolar ketamine on excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), population spikes (PSs) and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Ketamine acutely inhibited NMDAR-mediated synaptic responses with half-maximal effects near 10 µM. When administered for 15–30 min at 1–10 µM, ketamine had no effect on baseline dendritic AMPA receptor-mediated EPSPs, but persistently enhanced somatic EPSPs in the pyramidal cell body layer and augmented PS firing. Acute low micromolar ketamine also had no effect on the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) but blocked long-term depression (LTD). Following 30 min administration of 1–10 µM ketamine, however, a slowly developing and persistent form of LTP inhibition was observed that took two hours following ketamine washout to become manifest. This LTP inhibition did not result from prolonged or enhanced NMDAR inhibition during drug washout. Effects of low ketamine on somatic EPSPs and LTP were not mimicked by a high ketamine concentration that completely inhibited NMDARs, and both of these effects were blocked by co-administration of low ketamine with a low concentration of the competitive NMDAR antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase. These results indicate that concentrations of ketamine relevant to psychotropic and psychotomimetic effects have complex metaplastic effects on hippocampal function that involve activation of unblocked NMDARs during ketamine exposure. PMID:25128848

  18. Cutting edge: retrobulbar inflammation, adipogenesis, and acute orbital congestion in a preclinical female mouse model of Graves' orbitopathy induced by thyrotropin receptor plasmid-in vivo electroporation.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Deasy, Neil; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2013-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is a complication in Graves' disease (GD) but mechanistic insights into pathogenesis remain unresolved, hampered by lack of animal model. The TSH receptor (TSHR) and perhaps IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) are considered relevant antigens. We show that genetic immunization of human TSHR (hTSHR) A-subunit plasmid leads to extensive remodeling of orbital tissue, recapitulating GO. Female BALB/c mice immunized with hTSHR A-subunit or control plasmids by in vivo muscle electroporation were evaluated for orbital remodeling by histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibodies to TSHR and IGF-1R were present in animals challenged with hTSHR A-subunit plasmid, with predominantly TSH blocking antibodies and were profoundly hypothyroid. Orbital pathology was characterized by interstitial inflammation of extraocular muscles with CD3+ T cells, F4/80+ macrophages, and mast cells, accompanied by glycosaminoglycan deposition with resultant separation of individual muscle fibers. Some animals showed heterogeneity in orbital pathology with 1) large infiltrate surrounding the optic nerve or 2) extensive adipogenesis with expansion of retrobulbar adipose tissue. A striking finding that underpins the new model were the in vivo MRI scans of mouse orbital region that provided clear and quantifiable evidence of orbital muscle hypertrophy with protrusion (proptosis) of the eye. Additionally, eyelid manifestations of chemosis, including dilated and congested orbital blood vessels, were visually apparent. Immunization with control plasmids failed to show any orbital pathology. Overall, these findings support TSHR as the pathogenic antigen in GO. Development of a new preclinical model will facilitate molecular investigations on GO and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  19. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  20. Autophagy-Modulated Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Accelerate Liver Restoration in Mouse Models of Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Molaei, Sedigheh; Bahadori, Marzie; Nasiri, Fatemeh; Deyhim, Mohammad Reza; Jalili, Mohammad Ali; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recently received increasing attention for cell-based therapy, especially in regenerative medicine. However, the low survival rate of these cells restricts their therapeutic applications. It is hypothesized that autophagy might play an important role in cellular homeostasis and survival. This study aims to investigate the regenerative potentials of autophagy-modulated MSCs for the treatment of acute liver failure (ALF) in mice. Methods: ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 ml/kg carbon tetrachloride. Mice were intravenously infused with MSCs, which were suppressed in their autophagy pathway. Blood and liver samples were collected at different intervals (24, 48 and 72 h) after the transplantation of MSCs. Both the liver enzymes and tissue necrosis levels were evaluated using biochemical and histopathological assessments. The survival rate of the transplanted mice was also recorded during one week. Results: Biochemical and pathological results indicated that 1.5 ml/kg carbon tetrachloride induces ALF in mice. A significant reduction of liver enzymes and necrosis score were observed in autophagy-modulated MSC-transplanted mice compared to sham (with no cell therapy) after 24 h. After 72 h, liver enzymes reached their normal levels in mice transplanted with autophagy-suppressed MSCs. Interestingly, normal histology without necrosis was also observed. Conclusion: Autophagy suppression in MSCs ameliorates their liver regeneration potentials due to paracrine effects and might be suggested as a new strategy for the improvement of cell therapy in ALF. PMID:26899739

  1. The Relationship between Membrane Potential and Calcium Dynamics in Glucose-Stimulated Beta Cell Syncytium in Acute Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Slak Rupnik, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Oscillatory electrical activity is regarded as a hallmark of the pancreatic beta cell glucose-dependent excitability pattern. Electrophysiologically recorded membrane potential oscillations in beta cells are associated with in-phase oscillatory cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) measured with fluorescent probes. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution confocal imaging revealed that glucose stimulation of beta cells in intact islets within acute tissue slices produces a [Ca2+]i change with initial transient phase followed by a plateau phase with highly synchronized [Ca2+]i oscillations. Here, we aimed to correlate the plateau [Ca2+]i oscillations with the oscillations of membrane potential using patch-clamp and for the first time high resolution voltage-sensitive dye based confocal imaging. Our results demonstrated that the glucose-evoked membrane potential oscillations spread over the islet in a wave-like manner, their durations and wave velocities being comparable to the ones for [Ca2+]i oscillations and waves. High temporal resolution simultaneous records of membrane potential and [Ca2+]i confirmed tight but nevertheless limited coupling of the two processes, with membrane depolarization preceding the [Ca2+]i increase. The potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium increased the velocity at which oscillations advanced over the islet by several-fold while, at the same time, emphasized differences in kinetics of the membrane potential and the [Ca2+]i. The combination of both imaging techniques provides a powerful tool that will help us attain deeper knowledge of the beta cell network. PMID:24324777

  2. Pili play an important role in enhancing the bacterial clearance from the middle ear in a mouse model of acute otitis media with Moraxella catarrhalis.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Toshiaki; Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Mitsui, Marcelo Takahiro; Ahmed, Kamruddin; Nishizono, Akira; Suzuki, Masashi

    2013-03-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative aerobic diplococcus that is currently the third most frequent cause of bacterial acute otitis media (AOM) in children. In this study, we developed an experimental murine AOM model by inoculating M. catarrhalis in the middle ear bulla and studied the local response to this inoculation, and modulation of its course by the pili of M. catarrhalis. The pili-positive and pili-negative M. catarrhalis showed differences in bacterial clearance and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the middle ear. Pili-negative M. catarrhalis induced a more delayed and prolonged immune response in the middle ear than that of pili-positive M. catarrhalis. TLR2, -4, -5 and -9 mRNA expression was upregulated in neutrophils that infiltrated the middle ear cavity during AOM caused by both pili-positive and pili-negative bacteria. TLR5 mRNA expression and TLR5 protein in the neutrophils were induced more robustly by pili-positive M. catarrhalis. This immune response is likely to be related to neutrophil function such as toll-like 5-dependent phagocytosis. Our results show that mice may provide a useful AOM model for studying the role of M. catarrhalis. Furthermore, we show that pili play an important role in enhancing M. catarrhalis clearance from the middle ear that is probably mediated through neutrophil-dependent TLR5 signaling.

  3. Acute blockage of voltage-gated K⁺ currents by 17β-estradiol in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqing; Hao, Xuran; Cheng, Bo; Li, Xiantao

    2014-05-28

    In this study, whole-cell recording was carried out to explore the effects of 17β-estradiol on voltage-gated K⁺ (Kv) currents in N2A cells. The acute exposure to 17β-estradiol, in a concentration-dependent manner, significantly inhibited the peak and steady-state currents through Kv channels, showing IC50 values of 3.6 and 3.8 μM, respectively. The reduction in both the amplitude and the decay rate of Kv currents, with an increase in depolarization, suggested that it was a voltage-dependent block. The activation and inactivation experiments were conducted to determine the exact causes of the inhibitory effects. The half-maximum activation potential (V₁/₂) was +8.1 mV in control and remained stable after exposure to 10 μM 17β-estradiol. For steady-state inactivation, the half-maximum inactivation potential (V₁/₂) was -45.0 mV and shifted right to -39.7 mV without a statistical difference, and the time constants of recovery from inactivation were not altered by 17β-estradiol, suggesting that the depression was not correlated with the inactivation gate. PMID:24784585

  4. Ventral hippocampal α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptor blockade and clozapine effects on memory in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Pocivavsek, Ana; Icenogle, Laura; Levin, Edward D.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Nicotinic systems in the hippocampus play important roles in memory function. Decreased hippocampal nicotinic receptor concentration is associated with cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Methods We modeled in rats the cognitive effects of chronic decrease in hippocampal α7 or α4β2 receptors with 4-week continuous bilateral local infusions of the α7 nicotinic antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the α4β2 antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE). The working memory effects of these infusions were assessed by performance on the radial-arm maze. To test the effect of antipsychotic medication, we gave acute injections of clozapine and to determine the impact of nicotine, which is widely used by people with schizophrenia approximately half of the rats received chronic systemic infusions of nicotine. Results Chronic ventral hippocampal DHβE infusion caused a significant (p<0.001) working memory impairment. Acute systemic clozapine (2.5 mg/kg) caused a significant (p<0.005) working memory impairment in rats given control aCSF hippocampal infusions. Clozapine significantly (p<0.025) attenuated the memory deficit caused by chronic hippocampal DHβE infusions. Chronic ventral hippocampal infusions with MLA did not significantly affect the working memory performance in the radial-arm maze, but it did significantly (p<0.05) potentiate the memory impairment caused by 1.25 mg/kg of clozapine. Chronic systemic nicotine did not significantly interact with these effects. Conclusions The state of nicotinic receptor activation in the ventral hippocampus significantly affected the impact of clozapine on working memory with blockade of α7 nicotinic receptors potentiating clozapine-induced memory impairment and blockade of α4β2 receptors reversing the clozapine effect from impairing to improving memory. PMID:16715255

  5. Temporal profiles of synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult mouse hippocampus with methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Joong-Sun; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2012-07-25

    Methotrexate, which is used to treat many malignancies and autoimmune diseases, affects brain functions including hippocampal-dependent memory function. However, the precise mechanisms underlying methotrexate-induced hippocampal dysfunction are poorly understood. To evaluate temporal changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals, the expression and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, cAMP responsive element-binding protein, glutamate receptor 1, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor were examined in the hippocampi of adult C57BL/6 mice after methotrexate (40 mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Western blot analysis showed biphasic changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals in adult hippocampi following methotrexate treatment. N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor 1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and glutamate receptor 1 were acutely activated during the early phase (1 day post-injection), while extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and cAMP responsive element-binding protein activation showed biphasic increases during the early (1 day post-injection) and late phases (7-14 days post-injection). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression increased significantly during the late phase (7-14 days post-injection). Therefore, methotrexate treatment affects synaptic plasticity-related signals in the adult mouse hippocampus, suggesting that changes in synaptic plasticity-related signals may be associated with neuronal survival and plasticity-related cellular remodeling.

  6. Sex differences in the acute in vivo effects of different human SP-A variants on the mouse alveolar macrophage proteome

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, David S.; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is involved in lung innate immunity. Humans have two SP-A genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2, each with several variants. We examined the in vivo effects of treatment with specific SP-A variants on the alveolar macrophage (AM) proteome from SP-A knockout (KO) mice. KO mice received either SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. AM were collected and their proteomes examined with 2D-DIGE. We identified 90 proteins and categorized them as related to actin/cytoskeleton, oxidative stress, protease balance/chaperones, regulation of inflammation, and regulatory/developmental processes. SP-A1 and SP-A2 had different effects on the AM proteome and these effects differed between sexes. In males more changes occurred in the oxidative stress, protease/chaperones, and inflammation groups with SP-A2 treatment than with SP-A1. In females most SP-A1-induced changes were in the actin/cytoskeletal and oxidative stress groups. We conclude that after acute SP-A1 and SP-A2 treatment, sex-specific differences were observed in the AM proteomes from KO mice, and that these sex differences differ in response to SP-A1 and SP-A2. Females are more responsive to SP-A1, whereas the gene-specific differences in males were minimal. These observations not only demonstrate the therapeutic potential of exogenous SP-A, but also illustrate sex- and gene-specific differences in the response to it. PMID:24954098

  7. Roles of ASIC3, TRPV1, and NaV1.8 in the transition from acute to chronic pain in a mouse model of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tissue acidosis is effective in causing chronic muscle pain. However, how muscle nociceptors contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain is largely unknown. Results Here we showed that a single intramuscular acid injection induced a priming effect on muscle nociceptors of mice. The primed muscle nociceptors were plastic and permitted the development of long-lasting chronic hyperalgesia induced by a second acid insult. The plastic changes of muscle nociceptors were modality-specific and required the activation of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) or transient receptor potential cation channel V1 (TRPV1). Activation of ASIC3 was associated with increased activity of tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels but not protein kinase Cϵ (PKCϵ) in isolectin B4 (IB4)-negative muscle nociceptors. In contrast, increased activity of TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels with ASIC3 or TRPV1 activation in NaV1.8-positive muscle nociceptors was required for the development of chronic hyperalgesia. Accordingly, compared to wild type mice, NaV1.8-null mice showed briefer acid-induced hyperalgesia (5 days vs. >27 days). Conclusion ASIC3 activation may manifest a new type of nociceptor priming in IB4-negative muscle nociceptors. The activation of ASIC3 and TRPV1 as well as enhanced NaV1.8 activity are essential for the development of long-lasting hyperalgesia in acid-induced, chronic, widespread muscle pain. PMID:24957987

  8. Intradendritic recordings from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, R K; Prince, D A; Basbaum, A I

    1979-01-01

    Dendritic activity in guinea pig hippocampal CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons was examined by using an in vitro preparation. Histologically confirmed intradendritic recordings showed that dendrites had an average input resistance of 47.0 M omega and average membrane time constant of 33.3 msec. Active spike responses could be evoked by intracellular injection of outward current or by the activation of synaptic inputs. The predominant activity was burst firing. A typical intracellularly recorded dendritic burst consisted o spikes on a slowly increasing depolarizing potential. The spike components of the burst were of two distinct types: low threshold, fast spikes; and high threshold, slow spikes. Tetrodotoxin (1 microgram/ml) blocked the fast spikes, but slow spikes could still be evoked with direct intracellular stimulation. In contrast to dendritic responses, direct depolarization of CA1 somata did not give rise to burst generation. Orthodromic stimuli evoked large-amplitude excitatory postsynaptic potentials, followed by inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in dendrites of CA1 and CA3 neurons. In two instances, simultaneous recordings were obtained from coupled pairs of elements that were presumed to be soma and dendrite of the same CA3 pyramidal neuron. Depolarization of either element led to burst generation at that site, and the underlying slow depolarization appeared to evoke a burst at the other site. This potential postsynaptic amplifying mecahnism was not ordinarily functional because even suprathreshold orthodromic activation did not normally evoke bursting in dendrites. Images PMID:284423

  9. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and aging.

    PubMed

    Klempin, Friederike; Kempermann, Gerd

    2007-08-01

    The demographic changes in the foreseeable future stress the need for research on successful cognitive aging. Advancing age constitutes a primary risk factor for disease of the central nervous system most notably neurodegenerative disorders. The hippocampus is one of the brain regions that is prominently affected by neurodegeneration and functional decline even in what is still considered "normal aging". Plasticity is the basis for how the brain adapts to changes over time. The discovery of adult hippocampal neurogenesis has added a whole new dimension to research on structural plasticity in the adult and aging hippocampus. In this article, we briefly summarize and discuss recent findings on the regulation of adult neurogenesis with relevance to aging. Aging is an important co-variable for many regulatory mechanisms affecting adult neurogenesis but so far, only few studies have specifically addressed this interaction. We hypothesize that adult neurogenesis contributes to a neural reserve, i.e. the maintained potential for structural plasticity that allows compensation in situations of functional losses with aging. As such we propose that adult neurogenesis might contribute to the structural correlates of successful aging. PMID:17401726

  10. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Li, Ji; Le, Jing-Jing; Shao, Lei; Du, Xin; Dong, Jing-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin. PMID:27212922

  11. Developmental changes in hippocampal associative coding.

    PubMed

    Goldsberry, Mary E; Kim, Jangjin; Freeman, John H

    2015-03-11

    Behavioral analyses of the ontogeny of memory have shown that hippocampus-dependent learning emerges relatively late in postnatal development compared with simple associative learning. Maturation of hippocampal mnemonic mechanisms has been hypothesized to underlie the development of the later emerging learning processes. However, the role of hippocampal maturation in learning has not been examined directly. The goal of the present study was to examine developmental changes in hippocampal neuronal coding during acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent learning task. We recorded activity from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat pups while they were trained on trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning task that involves the association of a conditioned stimulus (CS) with an unconditioned stimulus over a stimulus-free trace interval. The inclusion of the trace interval is what makes the task hippocampus dependent. In the present study, rats were trained at 21-23, 24-26, and 31-33 d of age. Previous research from our laboratory and others shows that trace conditioning begins to emerge during the third postnatal week. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons show a substantial increase in responsiveness to task-relevant events during development. Moreover, there is an age-related increase in the proportion of neurons that respond to a combination of trial events (e.g., CS and trace). Our findings indicate that the developmental emergence of hippocampally mediated learning is related to increases in the strength and complexity of CA1 associative coding.

  12. Developmental Changes in Hippocampal Associative Coding

    PubMed Central

    Goldsberry, Mary E.; Kim, Jangjin

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral analyses of the ontogeny of memory have shown that hippocampus-dependent learning emerges relatively late in postnatal development compared with simple associative learning. Maturation of hippocampal mnemonic mechanisms has been hypothesized to underlie the development of the later emerging learning processes. However, the role of hippocampal maturation in learning has not been examined directly. The goal of the present study was to examine developmental changes in hippocampal neuronal coding during acquisition of a hippocampus-dependent learning task. We recorded activity from CA1 pyramidal cells in rat pups while they were trained on trace eyeblink conditioning. Trace eyeblink conditioning is a Pavlovian conditioning task that involves the association of a conditioned stimulus (CS) with an unconditioned stimulus over a stimulus-free trace interval. The inclusion of the trace interval is what makes the task hippocampus dependent. In the present study, rats were trained at 21–23, 24–26, and 31–33 d of age. Previous research from our laboratory and others shows that trace conditioning begins to emerge during the third postnatal week. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons show a substantial increase in responsiveness to task-relevant events during development. Moreover, there is an age-related increase in the proportion of neurons that respond to a combination of trial events (e.g., CS and trace). Our findings indicate that the developmental emergence of hippocampally mediated learning is related to increases in the strength and complexity of CA1 associative coding. PMID:25762670

  13. Disentangling hippocampal shape anomalies in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hosung; Mansi, Tommaso; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and epileptic syndromes related to malformations of cortical development (MCD) are associated with complex hippocampal morphology. The contribution of volume and position to the overall hippocampal shape in these conditions has not been studied. We propose a surface-based framework to localize volume changes through measurement of Jacobian determinants, and quantify fine-scale position and curvature through a medial axis model. We applied our methodology to T1-weighted 3D volumetric MRI of 88 patients with TLE and 78 patients with MCD, including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD, n = 29), heterotopia (HET, n = 40), and polymicrogyria (PMG, n = 19). Patients were compared to 46 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Surface-based analysis of volume in TLE revealed severe ipsilateral atrophy mainly along the rostro-caudal extent of the hippocampal CA1 subfield. In MCD, patterns of volume changes included bilateral CA1 atrophy in HET and FCD, and left dentate hypertrophy in all three groups. The analysis of curvature revealed medial bending of the posterior hippocampus in TLE, whereas in MCD there was a supero-medial shift of the hippocampal body. Albeit hippocampal shape anomalies in TLE and MCD result from a combination of volume and positional changes, their nature and distribution suggest different pathogenic mechanisms.

  14. Cystitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Uncomplicated urinary tract infection; UTI - acute; Acute bladder infection; Acute bacterial cystitis ... International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 ...

  15. Comparative study of protective activities of Neospora caninum bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1, NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, in a mouse model of acute parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Nagashima, Kotomi; Akatsuka, Yui; Murakami, Takashi; Ito, Akira; Imai, Soichi; Ike, Kazunori

    2013-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that causes severe neuromuscular diseases, repeated abortion, stillbirth, and congenital infection in livestock and companion animals. The development of an effective vaccine against neosporosis in cattle is an important issue due to the significant worldwide economic impact of this disease. We evaluated the immunogenicity of four bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1 (first described in this study), NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, using an acute infection mouse model to determine synergistic effects with the tachyzoite antigen as a candidate for vaccine production. Mice were inoculated with the recombinant vaccines (r-)NcBAG1, rNcBSR4, rNcMAG1, rNcSAG4, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (adjuvant control group) in an oil-in-water emulsion with bitter gourd extract, a Th1 immune stimulator, or PBS alone as the infection control group. Mice inoculated with each vaccine developed antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and isolated splenocytes from mice produced high levels of interferon-γ when infected with the N. caninum tachyzoite. The mice inoculated with rNcBAG1, rNcMAG1, or rNcSAG4 developed slight to moderate clinical symptoms but did not succumb to infection. In contrast, rNcBSR4 and both control groups developed severe disease and some mice required euthanasia. The parasitic burden in the brain tissues of vaccinated mice was assessed by N. caninum-specific real-time PCR at 5 weeks after infection. The parasite load in rNcBAG1-, rNcMAG1-, and rNcSAG4-inoculated mice was significantly lower than that in adjuvant and infection control mice. Therefore, these antigens may be useful for the production of a N. caninum-specific vaccination protocol.

  16. Sex differences in hippocampal response to endocannabinoids after exposure to severe stress.

    PubMed

    Zer-Aviv, Tomer Mizrachi; Akirav, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Women are more vulnerable to stress-related mental disorders than men and the naturally occurring fluctuation in estrogen that occur across the estrus cycle can dramatically influence the pathophysiology observed following traumatic events. It has been demonstrated that the endocannabinoid (eCB) system could represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in males. The current study aimed to examine the effects of exposure to a traumatic event and acute enhancement of eCB signaling on hippocampal-dependent learning and plasticity in male and female rats. Males and females were exposed to the single prolonged stress (SPS) model of PTSD (restraint, forced swim, and sedation) followed by acute administration of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 (0.3 mg/kg). Females were in diestrus during SPS exposure. SPS exposure impaired extinction and hippocampal plasticity tested a week later in males and females. Sex differences were observed in the effects of URB597 on hippocampal plasticity of SPS-exposed rats. Also, URB597 normalized the SPS-induced upregulation in CB1 receptor levels in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus in males. In females, URB597 normalized the SPS-induced up regulation in CB1 receptors in the amygdala and PFC, but not hippocampus. Our findings support the eCB system as a therapeutic target for the treatment of disorders associated to inefficient fear coping in males and females. There are differences in the hippocampal response of males and females to the enhancement of eCB signaling after intense stress suggesting sex differences in treatment efficacy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26928784

  17. Regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels as a candidate to treat cognitive deficits in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Ana; Giralt, Albert; Arumí, Helena; Alberch, Jordi; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) patients and mouse models show learning and memory impairment associated with hippocampal dysfunction. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (nNOS/cGMP) pathway is implicated in synaptic plasticity, and in learning and memory processes. Here, we examined the nNOS/cGMP pathway in the hippocampus of HD mice to determine whether it can be a good therapeutic target for cognitive improvement in HD. We analyzed hippocampal nNOS and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 and 9 levels in R6/1 mice, and cGMP levels in the hippocampus of R6/1, R6/2 and Hdh(Q7/Q111) mice, and of HD patients. We also investigated whether sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, could improve cognitive deficits in R6/1 mice. We found that hippocampal cGMP levels were 3-fold lower in 12-week-old R6/1 mice, when they show deficits in object recognition memory and in passive avoidance learning. Consistent with hippocampal cGMP levels, nNOS levels were down-regulated, while there were no changes in the levels of PDE5 and PDE9 in R6/1 mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of sildenafil (3 mg/Kg) immediately after training increased cGMP levels, and improved memory in R6/1 mice, as assessed by using the novel object recognition and the passive avoidance test. Importantly, cGMP levels were also reduced in R6/2 mouse and human HD hippocampus. Therefore, the regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels can be a suitable treatment for cognitive impairment in HD. PMID:24040016

  18. Neurobiological toxicity of radiation in hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong

    2013-03-01

    Worldwide radiation exposure is increasing due to recent nuclear accidents, space travel, atomic weapons testing and use, and medical treatments. In adult animals, ionizing radiation can significantly impact hippocampal neurogenesis and negatively affect hippocampal functions such as cognition. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the mechanisms underlying these effects. This article reviews in vivo and in vitro studies on the effects of irradiation on hippocampal neurogenesis and function in order to gain new mechanistic insights. This information will provide complementary views of our understanding of the normal brain's tolerance to radiation exposure, the potentially serious implications of radiation exposure to cognition, and lead to a discussion of potential strategies for pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention.

  19. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and memory interference.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Becker, Suzanna; Luu, Paul; Rosenzweig, Shira; Wojtowicz, J Martin

    2012-02-14

    Rats, subjected to low-dose irradiation that suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis, or a sham treatment, were administered a visual discrimination task under conditions of high, or low interference. Half of the rats engaged in running activity and the other half did not. In the non-runners, there was no effect of irradiation on learning, or remembering the discrimination response under low interference, but irradiation treatment increased their susceptibility to interference, resulting in loss of memory for the previously learned discrimination. Irradiated rats that engaged in running activity exhibited increased neuronal growth and protection from memory impairment. The results, which show that hippocampal cells generated in adulthood play a role in differentiating between conflicting, context-dependent memories, provide further evidence of the importance of neurogenesis in hippocampus-sensitive memory tasks. The results are consistent with computational models of hippocampal function that specify a central role for neurogenesis in the modulation of interfering influences during learning and memory.

  20. Cholinergic modulation of hippocampal network function

    PubMed Central

    Teles-Grilo Ruivo, Leonor M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic septohippocampal projections from the medial septal area to the hippocampus are proposed to have important roles in cognition by modulating properties of the hippocampal network. However, the precise spatial and temporal profile of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus remains unclear making it difficult to define specific roles for cholinergic transmission in hippocampal dependent behaviors. This is partly due to a lack of tools enabling specific intervention in, and recording of, cholinergic transmission. Here, we review the organization of septohippocampal cholinergic projections and hippocampal acetylcholine receptors as well as the role of cholinergic transmission in modulating cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, and rhythmic network oscillations. We point to a number of open questions that remain unanswered and discuss the potential for recently developed techniques to provide a radical reappraisal of the function of cholinergic inputs to the hippocampus. PMID:23908628

  1. Timing is Essential for Rapid Effects of Corticosterone on Synaptic Potentiation in the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joels, Marian; Krugers, Harm; Wiegert, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Stress facilitates memory formation, but only when the stressor is closely linked to the learning context. These effects are, at least in part, mediated by corticosteroid hormones. Here we demonstrate that corticosterone rapidly facilitates synaptic potentiation in the mouse hippocampal CA1 area when high levels of the hormone and high-frequency…

  2. Doublecortin knockout mice show normal hippocampal-dependent memory despite CA3 lamination defects.

    PubMed

    Germain, Johanne; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Grannec, Gael; Denis, Cécile; Lepousez, Gabriel; Giros, Bruno; Francis, Fiona; Nosten-Bertrand, Marika

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked doublecortin gene (DCX) cause major neocortical disorganization associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy. Although Dcx knockout (KO) mice exhibit normal isocortical development and architecture, they show lamination defects of the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer largely restricted to the CA3 region. Dcx-KO mice also exhibit interneuron abnormalities. As well as the interest of testing their general neurocognitive profile, Dcx-KO mice also provide a relatively unique model to assess the effects of a disorganized CA3 region on learning and memory. Based on its prominent anatomical and physiological features, the CA3 region is believed to contribute to rapid encoding of novel information, formation and storage of arbitrary associations, novelty detection, and short-term memory. We report here that Dcx-KO adult males exhibit remarkably preserved hippocampal- and CA3-dependant cognitive processes using a large battery of classical hippocampus related tests such as the Barnes maze, contextual fear conditioning, paired associate learning and object recognition. In addition, we show that hippocampal adult neurogenesis, in terms of proliferation, survival and differentiation of granule cells, is also remarkably preserved in Dcx-KO mice. In contrast, following social deprivation, Dcx-KO mice exhibit impaired social interaction and reduced aggressive behaviors. In addition, Dcx-KO mice show reduced behavioral lateralization. The Dcx-KO model thus reinforces the association of neuropsychiatric behavioral impairments with mouse models of intellectual disability.

  3. Age-associated changes in hippocampal-dependent cognition in Diversity Outbred mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Teng; Spiegel, Amy M; Gallagher, Michela

    2014-11-01

    Episodic memory impairment due to aging has been linked to hippocampal dysfunction. Evidence exists for alterations in specific circuits within the hippocampal system that are closely coupled to individual differences in the presence and severity of such memory loss. Here, we used the newly developed Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse that was designed to model the genetic diversity in human populations. Young and aged DO mice were tested in a hippocampal-dependent water maze task. Young mice showed higher proficiency and more robust memory compared to the overall performance of aged mice. A substantial number of the older mice, however,