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Sample records for acute mucosal pathogenesis

  1. [The effect of certain pro-inflammatory mediators on the pathogenesis of acute gastric mucosal lesion in early burn stage].

    PubMed

    Gao, W; Guo, Z; Sun, S

    1998-05-01

    To appraise the effect of certain pro-inflammatory mediators on the pathogenesis of acute gastric mucosal lesion in early burn stage. 21 patients with burn injuries of over 30% TBSA were divided into A and B groups according to the main clinical indexes during shock resuscitation and hemodynamic parameters. Fiberoptic endoscopic examination, determination of intramucosal pH (pHi) and measurement of some mediators were done immediately after admission to the hospital and 4 and 7 days after burn injury. It was demonstrated that the level of LPS in plasma, the content of TNF-alpha, IL-8 and ET in group B at 4 and 7 days postburn were significantly higher than those of group A, while the value of pHi in group B was markedly lower than that of group A. Damaging index of gastric mucosa was negatively correlated with pHi (r = -0.89, P < 0.05), but positively with ET (r = 0.91, P = 0.05). These findings suggest that the inflammatory mediators and cytokines promoted secondary damage to gastric mucosa during early postburn. It was believed that pHi was a sensitive index, and it played an important role in the development of stress ulceration.

  2. HIV and mucosal barrier interactions: consequences for transmission and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burgener, Adam; McGowan, Ian; Klatt, Nichole R

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal barrier plays an integral function in human health as it is the primary defense against pathogens, and provides a critical transition between the external environment and the human internal body. In the context of HIV infection, the most relevant mucosal surfaces include those of the gastrointestinal (GI) and genital tract compartments. Several components help maintain the effectiveness of this mucosal surface, including the physical anatomy of the barrier, cellular immunity, soluble factors, and interactions between the epithelial barrier and the local microenvironment, including mucus and host microbiota. Any defects in barrier integrity or function can rapidly lead to an increase in acquisition risk, or with established infection may result in increased pathogenesis, morbidities, or mortality. Indeed, a key feature to all aspects of HIV infection from transmission to pathogenesis is disruption and/or dysfunction of mucosal barriers. Herein, we will detail the host-pathogen relationship of HIV and mucosal barriers in both of these scenarios.

  3. Mucosal environmental sensors in the pathogenesis of dry eye.

    PubMed

    Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Stern, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    The 4th Cullen Symposium, held April 17 and 18, 2014, included expert researchers in mucosal immunity of the eye and other mucosal surfaces, particularly the gut. The theme of the meeting was environmental sensing mechanisms in mucosal tissues and their relevance for initiating ocular surface inflammation in dry eye. There are a number of shared features between the ocular surface and other mucosal surfaces, but distinct differences may exist in the type and distribution of mucins and microbiota. Mechanisms to regulate DC maturation and prevent tissue-damaging inflammation are shared among these sites. Epithelial and dendritic cells are key environmental sensors participating in initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses in response to a variety of environmental stresses.

  4. Mucosal transmission and pathogenesis of chronic wasting disease in ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Perrott, Matthew R.; Sigurdson, Christina J.; Mason, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of cervids is almost certainly transmitted by mucosal contact with the causative prion, whether by direct (animal-to-animal) or indirect (environmental) means. Yet the sites and mechanisms of prion entry remain to be further understood. This study sought to extend this understanding by demonstrating that ferrets exposed to CWD via several mucosal routes developed infection, CWD prion protein (PrPCWD) amplification in lymphoid tissues, neural invasion and florid transmissible spongiform encephalopathy lesions resembling those in native cervid hosts. The ferrets developed extensive PrPCWD accumulation in the nervous system, retina and olfactory epithelium, with lesser deposition in tongue, muscle, salivary gland and the vomeronasal organ. PrPCWD accumulation in mucosal sites, including upper respiratory tract epithelium, olfactory epithelium and intestinal Peyer’s patches, make the shedding of prions by infected ferrets plausible. It was also observed that regionally targeted exposure of the nasopharyngeal mucosa resulted in an increased attack rate when compared with oral exposure. The latter finding suggests that nasal exposure enhances permissiveness to CWD infection. The ferret model has further potential for investigation of portals for initiation of CWD infection. PMID:23100363

  5. Pathogenesis of human papillomavirus-associated mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ian J; Coleman, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a necessary cause of carcinoma of the cervix and other mucosal epithelia. Key events in high-risk HPV (HRHPV)-associated neoplastic progression include persistent infection, deregulated expression of virus early genes in basal epithelial cells and genomic instability causing secondary host genomic imbalances. There are multiple mechanisms by which deregulated virus early gene expression may be achieved. Integration of virus DNA into host chromosomes is observed in the majority of cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), although in ∼15% of cases the virus remains extrachromosomal (episomal). Interestingly, not all integration events provide a growth advantage to basal cervical epithelial cells or lead to increased levels of the virus oncogenes E6 and E7, when compared with episome-containing basal cells. The factors that provide a competitive advantage to some integrants, but not others, are complex and include virus and host contributions. Gene expression from integrated and episomal HRHPV is regulated through host epigenetic mechanisms affecting the virus long control region (LCR), which appear to be of functional importance. New approaches to treating HRHPV-associated mucosal neoplasia include knockout of integrated HRHPV DNA, depletion of virus transcripts and inhibition of virus early gene transcription through targeting or use of epigenetic modifiers. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Role of Mucosal Immunity in the Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Zerina; Bolock, Alexa M.; Good, Misty

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most devastating gastrointestinal disease of prematurity. Although the precise cause is not well understood, the main risk factors thought to contribute to NEC include prematurity, formula feeding, and bacterial colonization. Recent evidence suggests that NEC develops as a consequence of intestinal hyper-responsiveness to microbial ligands upon bacterial colonization in the preterm infant, initiating a cascade of aberrant signaling events, and a robust pro-inflammatory mucosal immune response. We now have a greater understanding of important mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, such as the role of cytokines, immunoglobulins, and immune cells in NEC. In this review, we will provide an overview of the mucosal immunity of the intestine and the relationship between components of the mucosal immune system involved in the pathogenesis of NEC, while highlighting recent advances in the field that have promise as potential therapeutic targets. First, we will describe the cellular components of the intestinal epithelium and mucosal immune system and their relationship to NEC. We will then discuss the relationship between the gut microbiota and cell signaling that underpins disease pathogenesis. We will conclude our discussion by highlighting notable therapeutic advancements in NEC that target the intestinal mucosal immunity. PMID:28316967

  7. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  8. Effects of Mycotoxins on Mucosal Microbial Infection and Related Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure. PMID:26529017

  9. Effects of Mycotoxins on mucosal microbial infection and related pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Juil; Moon, Yuseok

    2015-10-30

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities and water-damaged indoor environments. Susceptibility to mucosal infectious diseases is closely associated with immune dysfunction caused by mycotoxin exposure in humans and other animals. Many mycotoxins suppress immune function by decreasing the proliferation of activated lymphocytes, impairing phagocytic function of macrophages, and suppressing cytokine production, but some induce hypersensitive responses in different dose regimes. The present review describes various mycotoxin responses to infectious pathogens that trigger mucosa-associated diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts of humans and other animals. In particular, it focuses on the effects of mycotoxin exposure on invasion, pathogen clearance, the production of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the prognostic implications of interactions between infectious pathogens and mycotoxin exposure.

  10. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Pels, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinical examination was conducted using the dental preset tray. The condition of the oral mucosa was determined using the WHO scale for oral mucositis. In the first period of antineoplastic therapy the pathological lesions of the oral mucosa of the mucositis type were observed among the examined patients. The lesions had various levels of intensity. Pain was found to be the primary symptom of oral mucositis. In this study the following were observed: local erythema of the oral mucosa in 35%, white pseudomembranous lesions in 18%, erosions in 40% and oral ulcerative lesions in 4% of patients who underwent the antineoplastic therapy. Oral mucositis was observed in 3.17% of children after 6 months of chemotherapy. Local treatment of oral mucositis with polyantibiotic-antifungal mixture, supporting antifungal systemic treatment, and improving the overall peripheral blood conditions in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia improve the condition of the oral mucosa.

  11. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinical examination was conducted using the dental preset tray. The condition of the oral mucosa was determined using the WHO scale for oral mucositis. Results In the first period of antineoplastic therapy the pathological lesions of the oral mucosa of the mucositis type were observed among the examined patients. The lesions had various levels of intensity. Pain was found to be the primary symptom of oral mucositis. In this study the following were observed: local erythema of the oral mucosa in 35%, white pseudomembranous lesions in 18%, erosions in 40% and oral ulcerative lesions in 4% of patients who underwent the antineoplastic therapy. Oral mucositis was observed in 3.17% of children after 6 months of chemotherapy. Conclusion Local treatment of oral mucositis with polyantibiotic-antifungal mixture, supporting antifungal systemic treatment, and improving the overall peripheral blood conditions in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia improve the condition of the oral mucosa. PMID:23788849

  12. Research Advance in Intestinal Mucosal Barrier and Pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Chuan-zi; Guan, Xin; Wu, Huan-gan

    2016-01-01

    To date, the etiology and pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) have not been fully elucidated. It is widely accepted that genetic, immune, and environment factors are closely related to the development of CD. As an important defensive line for human body against the environment, intestinal mucosa is able to protect the homeostasis of gut bacteria and alleviate the intestinal inflammatory and immune response. It is evident that the dysfunction of intestinal mucosa barriers plays a crucial role in CD initiation and development. Yet researches are insufficient on intestinal mucosal barrier's action in the prevention of CD onset. This article summarizes the research advances about the correlations between the disorders of intestinal mucosal barriers and CD. PMID:27651792

  13. Treatment and pathogenesis of acute hyperkalemia

    PubMed Central

    Mushiyakh, Yelena; Dangaria, Harsh; Qavi, Shahbaz; Ali, Noorjahan; Pannone, John; Tompkins, David

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and various treatment modalities for acute hyperkalemia and presents a systematic approach to selecting a treatment strategy. Hyperkalemia, a life-threatening condition caused by extracellular potassium shift or decreased renal potassium excretion, usually presents with non-specific symptoms. Early recognition of moderate to severe hyperkalemia is vital in preventing fatal cardiac arrhythmias and muscle paralysis. Management of hyperkalemia includes the elimination of reversible causes (diet, medications), rapidly acting therapies that shift potassium into cells and block the cardiac membrane effects of hyperkalemia, and measures to facilitate removal of potassium from the body (saline diuresis, oral binding resins, and hemodialysis). Hyperkalemia with potassium level more than 6.5 mEq/L or EKG changes is a medical emergency and should be treated accordingly. Treatment should be started with calcium gluconate to stabilize cardiomyocyte membranes, followed by insulin injection, and b-agonists administration. Hemodialysis remains the most reliable method to remove potassium from the body and should be used in cases refractory to medical treatment. Prompt detection and proper treatment are crucial in preventing lethal outcomes. PMID:23882341

  14. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis.

  15. Role of endogenous sulphydryls and neutrophil infiltration in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by piroxicam in rats.

    PubMed

    Avila, J R; de la Lastra, C A; Martin, M J; Motilva, V; Luque, I; Delgado, D; Esteban, J; Herrerias, J

    1996-02-01

    In the present report we studied the formation of severe gastric erosions produced in fasted rats by intragastric administration of piroxicam (PRX), an enolic acid-derived NSAID. The time course of gastric damage and the possible role of mucus secretion, endogenous sulphydryl compounds, changes of gastric vascular permeability and neutrophil infiltration in the development of PRX-induced gastric lesions were also investigated. PRX dose-dependently (1.25-20 mg/kg) caused acute gastric haemorrhagic erosion in the rat. The lesions increased with time until 9 hr after dosing. Mucus secretion did not change significantly with respect to the control group with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of PRX at different times (3 and 6 hours) of treatment. There was also no increase in the concentration of its components. In addition, oral pretreatment of the animals with PRX did not significantly change the amount of dye trapped in the stomach. In contrast, non-protein SH fraction was decreased after administration of PRX and MPO activity as an index of neutrophil infiltration was significantly increased. These results suggest that independently of the PRX dose, depletion of endogenous non-protein SH and neutrophil infiltration could play an important part in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by PRX.

  16. Potential role of the NADPH oxidase NOX1 in the pathogenesis of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masashi; Kato, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Naoki; Iimori, Maho; Utsumi, Daichi; Kitahara, Yumeno; Iwata, Kazumi; Matsuno, Kuniharu; Amagase, Kikuko; Yabe-Nishimura, Chihiro; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-05-15

    Although NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) has been shown to be highly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this enzyme are not yet fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of NOX1 in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis induced by the cancer chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in mice. Intestinal mucositis was induced in Nox1 knockout (Nox1KO) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice via single, daily administration of 5-FU for 5 days. In WT mice, 5-FU caused severe intestinal mucositis characterized by a shortening of villus height, a disruption of crypts, a loss of body weight, and diarrhea. In Nox1KO mice, however, the severity of mucositis was significantly reduced, particularly with respect to crypt disruption. The numbers of apoptotic caspase-3- and caspase-8-activated cells in the intestinal crypt increased 24 h after the first 5-FU administration but were overall significantly lower in Nox1KO than in WT mice. Furthermore, the 5-FU-mediated upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β, and NOX1 and the production of reactive oxygen species were significantly attenuated in Nox1KO mice compared with that in WT mice. These findings suggest that NOX1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. NOX1-derived ROS production following administration of 5-FU may promote the apoptotic response through upregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: new issues on pathogenesis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vitoux, Dominique; Nasr, Rihab; de The, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia appears to be one of the best understood among human malignancies. The ability of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide to directly target the oncogenic promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic receptor A (PML-RARA) fusion protein also made this disease the first model for oncogene-targeted therapies. A set of recent data has significantly increased the complexity of our view of acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis, as well as of therapeutic response. This review summarizes and discusses these findings, which yield novels questions and models.

  18. OCT visualization of acute radiation mucositis: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkova, Natalia; Maslennikova, Anna; Terentieva, Anna; Fomina, Yulia; Khomutinnikova, Nina; Balalaeva, Irina; Vyseltseva, Yulia; Larin, Roman; Kornoukhova, Natalia; Shakhov, Andrey; Shakhova, Natalia; Gelikonov, Grigory; Kamensky, Vladislav; Feldchtein, Felix

    2005-08-01

    We present pilot results in optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualization of normal mucosa radiation damage. 15 patients undergoing radiation treatment of head and neck cancer were enrolled. OCT was used to monitor the mucositis development during and after treatment. OCT can see stages of radiation mucositis development, including hidden ones, before any clinical manifestations.

  19. Smoking during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer and acute mucosal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Szeszko, Beata; Osowiecka, Karolina; Rucińska, Monika; Wasilewska-Teśluk, Ewa; Gliński, Krzysztof; Kępka, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Aim We compared the incidence of RTOG/EORTC grade III and higher acute mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer who continued to smoke during radiotherapy with those who quit smoking. Background There are conflicting data on the relationship between smoking during radiotherapy and the severity of acute mucosal reaction. More studies dealing with this issue are needed. Materials and methods Among 136 patients receiving curative radio(chemo)therapy, 37 (27%) declared that they had not quit smoking during radiotherapy. The intensity of mucositis was scored daily by a nurse and weekly by a physician using the RTOG/EORTC scale. The main end-point of the study was the highest observed RTOG/EORTC grade of mucositis. Results Patients who smoked during radiotherapy (smokers) were younger than their counterparts who quit smoking (non-smokers), p = 0.06. There were no other differences in the baseline characteristics between smokers and non-smokers. Grade III/IV acute mucositis was observed in 43.5% of all patients. The percentage of patients with grade III/IV acute mucositis was similar in smokers and non-smokers (46% vs. 42%, p = 0.71). Nine patients (smokers [13.5%]; non-smokers [4%], p = 0.05) required prolonged hospitalization to heal mucositis. Conclusions In the whole group, smoking during radiotherapy was not related to acute mucosal toxicity evaluated as the rate of the highest observed grade of mucositis. PMID:26109918

  20. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. PMID:26199634

  1. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  2. [Polonium-210 acute and chronic pathomorphology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kvacheva, Yu E

    2015-01-01

    In the present review, the data on the pathology of acute and chronic polonium injuries available from the an open-access domestic and foreign literature are primarily systemized and analyzed. The historical background of the research is presented in brief. On the basis of clinical and experimental generalizations, the current concept regarding the pathogenesis of polonium intoxication has been developed.

  3. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, M A H; Lopez-Lopez, E; te Winkel, M L; Tissing, W; de Rooij, J D E; Gutierrez-Camino, A; Garcia-Orad, A; den Boer, E; Pieters, R; Pluijm, S M F; de Jonge, R; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2015-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treated with four high infusions MTX (HD-MTX: 5 g m(-2)) every other week according to the DCOG-ALL-10 protocol. Mucositis (National Cancer Institute grade ⩾ 3) was the most frequent occurring toxicity during the HD-MTX phase (20%) and occurred especially after the first MTX course. Mucositis was not associated with plasma MTX, plasma folate or plasma homocysteine levels. Patients with mucositis had higher erythrocyte folate levels at the start of protocol M than patients without mucositis (median 1.4 vs 1.2 μmol l(-1), P<0.008), this could reflect an increased MTX uptake in mucosal cells of patients with mucositis. From 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MTX pathway, only patients with the wild-type variant of rs7317112 SNP in the ABCC4 gene had more mucositis (AA (39%) vs AG/GG (15%), P=0.016). We found no evidence that erythrocyte folate levels mediate in the association between the rs7317112 and mucositis.

  4. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Deysi V T; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Carvalho, Cibele B M; Borges, Vanessa F; Wanderley, Carlos W S; Bem, Amanda X C; Leite, Caio A V G; Teixeira, Maraiza A; Batista, Gabriela L P; Silva, Rangel L; Cunha, Thiago M; Brito, Gerly A C; Almeida, Paulo R C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL-1 and IL-18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL-1β (405%), IL-18 (365%), COX-2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL-18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis.

  5. The Adaptor Protein Myd88 Is a Key Signaling Molecule in the Pathogenesis of Irinotecan-Induced Intestinal Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Deysi V. T.; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C. P.; Carvalho, Cibele B. M.; Borges, Vanessa F.; Wanderley, Carlos W. S.; Bem, Amanda X. C.; Leite, Caio A. V. G.; Teixeira, Maraiza A.; Batista, Gabriela L. P.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Almeida, Paulo R. C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common side effect of irinotecan-based anticancer regimens. Mucositis causes cell damage, bacterial/endotoxin translocation and production of cytokines including IL–1 and IL–18. These molecules and toll-like receptors (TLRs) activate a common signaling pathway that involves the Myeloid Differentiation adaptor protein, MyD88, whose role in intestinal mucositis is unknown. Then, we evaluated the involvement of TLRs and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. MyD88-, TLR2- or TLR9-knockout mice and C57BL/6 (WT) mice were given either saline or irinotecan (75 mg/kg, i.p. for 4 days). On day 7, animal survival, diarrhea and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the ileum were obtained for morphometric analysis, myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and measurement of pro-inflammatory markers. Irinotecan reduced the animal survival (50%) and induced a pronounced diarrhea, increased bacteremia, neutrophil accumulation in the intestinal tissue, intestinal damage and more than twofold increased expression of MyD88 (200%), TLR9 (400%), TRAF6 (236%), IL–1β (405%), IL–18 (365%), COX–2 (2,777%) and NF-κB (245%) in the WT animals when compared with saline-injected group (P<0.05). Genetic deletion of MyD88, TLR2 or TLR9 effectively controlled the signs of intestinal injury when compared with irinotecan-administered WT controls (P<0.05). In contrast to the MyD88-/- and TLR2-/- mice, the irinotecan-injected TLR9-/- mice showed a reduced survival, a marked diarrhea and an enhanced expression of IL–18 versus irinotecan-injected WT controls. Additionally, the expression of MyD88 was reduced in the TLR2-/- or TLR9-/- mice. This study shows a critical role of the MyD88-mediated TLR2 and TLR9 signaling in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. PMID:26440613

  6. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Bux, Jürgen; Sachs, Ulrich J H

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) has developed from an almost unknown transfusion reaction to the most common cause of transfusion-related major morbidities and fatalities. A clinical definition of TRALI was established in 2004, based on acute respiratory distress, non-cardiogenic lung oedema temporal association with transfusion and hypoxaemia. Histological findings reveal lung oedema, capillary leucostasis and neutrophil extravasation. However, the pathogenesis of TRALI remains controversial. Leucocyte antibodies, present in fresh frozen plasma and platelet concentrates from multiparous donors, and neutrophil priming agents released in stored cellular blood components have been considered to be causative. As neutrophils and endothelial cells are pivotal in the pathogenesis of TRALI, a threshold model was established to try to unify the various reported findings on pathogenesis. This model comprises the priming of neutrophils and/or endothelium by the patient's co-morbidity, neutrophil and/or endothelial cell activation by the transfused blood component, and the severity of the TRALI reaction.

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated disruption of mucosal barriers and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS disease

    PubMed Central

    Tugizov, Sharof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral, intestinal and genital mucosal epithelia have a barrier function to prevent paracellular penetration by viral, bacterial and other pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can overcome these barriers by disrupting the tight and adherens junctions of mucosal epithelia. HIV-associated disruption of epithelial junctions may also facilitate paracellular penetration and dissemination of other viral pathogens. This review focuses on possible molecular mechanisms of HIV-associated disruption of mucosal epithelial junctions and its role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis of HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:27583187

  8. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  9. Changes in the mucosal barrier during acute and chronic Trichuris muris infection

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, S Z; Thornton, D J; Grencis, R K

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal barrier, part of the innate immune defence, is responsive to the external environment and changes in response to infection. There is disparate evidence for the epithelial and goblet cell products within the intrinsic barrier being part of a response to resolve infection. We comprehensively analysed the changes of mucosal glycoconjugates during acute and chronic infection by utilising the Trichuris muris (T. muris) model. Transcription factors, atonal homolog 1 (Math-1) and SAM pointed domain containing ETS transcription factor (Spdef) were activated during acute infection, which promoted stem cell fate towards a secretory cell phenotype. The thickness of the intermediate barrier, the carbohydrate-rich glycocalyx, composed of cell surface mucins increased with exposure to T. muris, with an increase in Muc4, Muc13 and Muc17. Overall, hypersecretion of glycoproteins into the extrinsic barrier (mediated by IL-13) via the gamma amino-butyric acid-α3 receptor (GABA-α3), was observed during acute infection. Furthermore, altered glycosylation was observed during acute and chronic infection; mucins were more highly charged during acute infection than during chronic infection. This study readdresses the changes within the mucosal barrier, in particular in the cell surface and secreted mucins during acute and chronic nematode infection. PMID:21155842

  10. Oxidative Stress: An Essential Factor in the Pathogenesis of Gastrointestinal Mucosal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Asima; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Mitra, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated as by-products of normal cellular metabolic activities. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are the enzymes involved in protecting cells from the damaging effects of ROS. ROS are produced in response to ultraviolet radiation, cigarette smoking, alcohol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ischemia-reperfusion injury, chronic infections, and inflammatory disorders. Disruption of normal cellular homeostasis by redox signaling may result in cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. ROS are produced within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but their roles in pathophysiology and disease pathogenesis have not been well studied. Despite the protective barrier provided by the mucosa, ingested materials and microbial pathogens can induce oxidative injury and GI inflammatory responses involving the epithelium and immune/inflammatory cells. The pathogenesis of various GI diseases including peptic ulcers, gastrointestinal cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease is in part due to oxidative stress. Unraveling the signaling events initiated at the cellular level by oxidative free radicals as well as the physiological responses to such stress is important to better understand disease pathogenesis and to develop new therapies to manage a variety of conditions for which current therapies are not always sufficient. PMID:24692350

  11. A rare aggravation of severe mucositis post chemotherapy in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Inati, Adlette; Akouri, Grace; Abbas, Hussein A

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating manifestation in children undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Children with mucositis should be properly managed in order to prevent further exacerbation and adverse complications. We hereby present the first report of a severe chemotherapy-induced mucositis, plausibly aggravated by improper dental hygiene leading to shedding of the ventral part of the tongue in a child with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The patient steadily and gradually recovered her oral maneuvers and ability to speak several months later. Her tongue underwent hypertrophy as a compensatory mechanism. We recommend that critical and regular assessment of the oral mucosa and proper dental care and oral hygiene be emphasized in all pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy. Families of affected children need to be educated about the benefits and modes of optimal oral hygiene for their children and the need to seek immediate care for mouth pain and or lesions. Optimal treatment for mucositis needs to be instituted without delay in this high risk pediatric population. Such a preventive and therapeutic approach may prevent associated life threatening oral and systemic complications, promote rapid and complete mucosal healing, alleviate pain and improve quality of life in children with cancer.

  12. Acute and chronic effects of exercise on markers of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Nicolette C; Gleeson, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Decreased secretion rate of salivary markers of mucosal immunity, and in particular salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA), have been implicated as risk factors for subsequent episodes of respiratory infection in athletes. IgA is the predominant Ig in mucosal secretions and acts with innate mucosal defences to provide the 'first line of defence' against pathogens and antigens presented at the mucosa. As well as summarising the evidence concerning the effects of acute exercise and longer-term intensive training on these markers of mucosal immunity, this review explores the factors that impact upon salivary responses to exercise, such as method of saliva collection, stimulation of saliva collection and the method of reporting s-IgA data. The influence of adequate hydration and nutritional supplementation during exercise as well as exercising in extreme environmental conditions on salivary responses is also explored. Finally, the possible mechanisms underlying the acute and longer-term of effects of exercise on salivary responses are examined, with particular emphasis on the potential role of the sympathetic nervous system and the expression and mobilisation of the polymeric Ig receptor.

  13. Rapid dendritic cell recruitment is a hallmark of the acute inflammatory response at mucosal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of challenge sites such as skin and the peritoneal cavity has identified neutrophils as virtually the sole cellular participants in acute bacterial inflammation, peak influx occurring 24-48 h in advance of mononuclear cell populations associated with adaptive immunity. This study challenges the general applicability of this paradigm. We demonstrate here that the earliest detectable cellular response after inhalation of Moraxella catarrhalis organisms is the recruitment of putative class II major histocompatibility complex-bearing dendritic cell (DC) precursors into the airway epithelium, the initial wave arriving in advance of the neutrophil influx. Unlike the neutrophils which rapidly transit into the airway lumen, the DC precursors remain within the epithelium during the acute inflammatory response where they differentiate, and develop the dendriform morphology typical of resident DC found in the normal epithelium. During the ensuing 48-h period, these cells then migrate to the regional lymph nodes. No comparable DC response was observed after epidermal or intraperitoneal challenge, and it may be that mucosal surfaces are unique in their requirement for rapid DC responses during acute inflammation. We hypothesize that the role of the DC influx during acute inflammation may be surveillance for opportunistic viruses, and that this covert protective mechanism is operative at a restricted number of mucosal tissue sites. PMID:8145044

  14. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. Methods We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm-/-). Results ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm-/- mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Conclusions Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury. PMID:24884546

  15. Altered mucosal immune response after acute lung injury in a murine model of Ataxia Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Eickmeier, Olaf; Kim, Su Youn; Herrmann, Eva; Döring, Constanze; Duecker, Ruth; Voss, Sandra; Wehner, Sibylle; Hölscher, Christoph; Pietzner, Julia; Zielen, Stefan; Schubert, Ralf

    2014-05-29

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare but devastating and progressive disorder characterized by cerebellar dysfunction, lymphoreticular malignancies and recurrent sinopulmonary infections. In A-T, disease of the respiratory system causes significant morbidity and is a frequent cause of death. We used a self-limited murine model of hydrochloric acid-induced acute lung injury (ALI) to determine the inflammatory answer due to mucosal injury in Atm (A-T mutated)- deficient mice (Atm(-/-)). ATM deficiency increased peak lung inflammation as demonstrated by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) neutrophils and lymphocytes and increased levels of BALF pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, TNF). Furthermore, bronchial epithelial damage after ALI was increased in Atm(-/-) mice. ATM deficiency increased airway resistance and tissue compliance before ALI was performed. Together, these findings indicate that ATM plays a key role in inflammatory response after airway mucosal injury.

  16. Quality assessment of reporting of animal studies on pathogenesis and treatment of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. A systematic review using the ARRIVE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Iglhaut, Gerhard; Becker, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    To address the following focused question: What is the quality of reporting of pre-clinical research for the study and treatment of mucositis/peri-implantitis? Electronic databases of the PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for animal studies reporting on pathogenesis or therapy of either peri-implant mucositits or peri-implantitis and completed by dual manual searches in duplicate between 1992 and May 2011. Quality assessment (i.e. grading of a checklist of 20 items in different categories) of selected full-text articles was performed according to the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines. Following screening, 75 publications were eligible for the review. For publications reporting on pathogenesis (n = 7) and therapy (n = 1) of peri-implant mucositis, minimum gradings were assigned to items 5 (Methods/Ethical Statement), 9 (Methods/Housing and husbandry), 11 (Methods/Allocation animals to experimental groups), 14 (Results/Baseline data), and 17 (Results/Adverse events). For publications reporting on pathogenesis (n = 34) and therapy (n = 33) of peri-implantitis, minimum grades were mainly assigned to items 9, 11, 14, and 17. This systematic review has identified missing information in the publications on pre-clinical research for the study and treatment of mucositis/peri-implantitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Cytokines and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bamias, Giorgos; Arseneau, Kristen O; Cominelli, Fabio

    2014-11-01

    Cytokines are integral mediators for maintaining intestinal mucosal homeostasis, as well as prominent effector molecules during chronic gut inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on recent studies of the role of specific cytokines in mucosal immunity. Dichotomous, or even opposing, functions have been described for several cytokines involved in intestinal innate immunity (most notably for members of the interleukin-1 family), which depend on the specific inflammatory conditions within the intestinal mucosa. For example, both interleukin-1α and interleukin-33 exhibit 'alarmin'-type properties that can signal tissue or cell damage, which further add to their well described proinflammatory roles. Costimulatory molecules of the tumor necrosis factor/tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, such as TNF-like cytokine 1A and LIGHT, are actively involved in mucosal proinflammatory pathways, but also may exert protection against infectious agents to facilitate recovery from acute inflammation. Finally, innate lymphoid cells are increasingly recognized as important cellular sources of pivotal mucosal cytokines, including the interleukin-23/T helper 17 cytokine, interleukin-22. Elucidating the complexity of cytokine signaling within the normal mucosa and during acute and chronic inflammation will be a pivotal step toward understanding the pathogenesis of immune-mediated gut diseases and developing effective therapies to treat them.

  18. Preventive effect of teprenone on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in compound 48/80-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Kobayashi, Takashi; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Kitagawa, Akira; Nakazawa, Saburo

    2004-03-08

    The preventive effect of teprenone (6,10,14,18-teramethyl-5,9,13,17-nonadecatetaene-2-one), an anti-ulcer drug, on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of compound 48/80 (0.75 mg/kg). Teprenone (20, 100 or 200 mg/kg), which was orally administered 0.5 h after compound 48/80 treatment at which time gastric mucosal lesions appeared, prevented gastric mucosal lesion development at 3 h after the treatment dose-dependently. Gastric mucosal tissues of compound 48/80-treated rats showed increases in myeloperoxidase (an index of neutrophil infiltration) and xanthine oxidase activities and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (an index of lipid peroxidation) content and decreases in Se-glutathione peroxidase activity and hexosamine and vitamin E contents at 3 h after the treatment. Post-administered teprenone attenuated all these changes dose-dependently. These results indicate that teprenone prevents acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in compound 48/80-treated rats possibly by suppressing gastric mucus depletion, neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  19. Initiation of ART during Early Acute HIV Infection Preserves Mucosal Th17 Function and Reverses HIV-Related Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C.; O′Connell, Robert J.; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L.; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L.; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H.; de Souza, Mark S.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation. PMID:25503054

  20. Initiation of ART during early acute HIV infection preserves mucosal Th17 function and reverses HIV-related immune activation.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Alexandra; Deleage, Claire; Sereti, Irini; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Estes, Jacob D; Sandler, Netanya G; Sukhumvittaya, Suchada; Marovich, Mary; Jongrakthaitae, Surat; Akapirat, Siriwat; Fletscher, James L K; Kroon, Eugene; Dewar, Robin; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Chomchey, Nitiya; Douek, Daniel C; O Connell, Robert J; Ngauy, Viseth; Robb, Merlin L; Phanuphak, Praphan; Michael, Nelson L; Excler, Jean-Louis; Kim, Jerome H; de Souza, Mark S; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-12-01

    Mucosal Th17 cells play an important role in maintaining gut epithelium integrity and thus prevent microbial translocation. Chronic HIV infection is characterized by mucosal Th17 cell depletion, microbial translocation and subsequent immune-activation, which remain elevated despite antiretroviral therapy (ART) correlating with increased mortality. However, when Th17 depletion occurs following HIV infection is unknown. We analyzed mucosal Th17 cells in 42 acute HIV infection (AHI) subjects (Fiebig (F) stage I-V) with a median duration of infection of 16 days and the short-term impact of early initiation of ART. Th17 cells were defined as IL-17+ CD4+ T cells and their function was assessed by the co-expression of IL-22, IL-2 and IFNγ. While intact during FI/II, depletion of mucosal Th17 cell numbers and function was observed during FIII correlating with local and systemic markers of immune-activation. ART initiated at FI/II prevented loss of Th17 cell numbers and function, while initiation at FIII restored Th17 cell numbers but not their polyfunctionality. Furthermore, early initiation of ART in FI/II fully reversed the initially observed mucosal and systemic immune-activation. In contrast, patients treated later during AHI maintained elevated mucosal and systemic CD8+ T-cell activation post initiation of ART. These data support a loss of Th17 cells at early stages of acute HIV infection, and highlight that studies of ART initiation during early AHI should be further explored to assess the underlying mechanism of mucosal Th17 function preservation.

  1. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making.

  2. Glomerular Dynamic Studies of the Pathogenesis of Acute Renal Failure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-30

    IAD-A174 113 GLOMERULAR DYNAMIC STUDIES OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANOTE 1/1 RENAL FAILURE(U) VIRGINIA COMNWEALTH UNIV RICHMOND I D E OKEN 3e JUN 84...8217i1 . d /or 1 Special June 30, 1984 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland 21701-5012 Contract...values might be underestimated by tubular inulin leakage if measured in the customary fashion.) Nephron filtration fraction was estimated from the

  3. Effect of low-power (He-Ne) laser on acute mucosal ulceration induced by indomethacin in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djavid, Gholam-reza E.; Erfani, Rebecca; Amoohashemi, Nasim; Pazoki, Mahbobeh; Aghaee, Sanaz; Toroudi, Hamidreza P.

    2002-10-01

    Background: Low-level laser has been used for treatment of ulcer, as well as, pain relief and inflammatory processes. In the present work, the effect of low power laser on mucosal gastric ulceration-induced by indomethacin in rats has been investigated. Materials and Methods: 16 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control (8 rats) and laser exposed group (8 rats). After using ether for anesthesia, 30 mg/kg indomethacin was injected subcutaneously. Exposed stomachs received 30 J He-Ne laser. Five hours later animals were killed and their stomachs were checked and observed for presence of ulceration. Results and Discussion: Gastric mucosal ulceration index was significantly greater in the laser-exposed group than control group. (P=0.02) This experiment suggests that low power He-Ne laser intensified acute mucosal ulcer formation by indomethacin. Changes in the prostaglandin content ofthe stomach may be responsible for these results.

  4. Effect of diallyl disulfide on acute gastric mucosal damage induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Baek, H-S; Kim, S-H; Moon, C; Park, S-H; Kim, S-H; Shin, I-S; Park, S-C; Kim, J-C

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the gastroprotective effects of diallyl disulfide (DADS), a secondary organosulfur compound derived from garlic (Allium sativum L.) on experimental model of ethanol (EtOH)-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The antiulcerogenic activity of DADS was evaluated by gross/histopathological inspection, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lipid peroxidation with antioxidant enzyme activities in the stomach. DADS (100 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage 2 h prior to EtOH treatment (5 ml/kg). The animals were killed 1 h after receiving EtOH treatment. Pretreatment with DADS attenuated EtOH-induced gastric mucosal injury, as evidenced by decreased severity of hemorrhagic lesions and gastric ulcer index upon visual inspection. DADS also prevented histopathological alterations and gastric apoptotic changes caused by EtOH. An increase in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats that coincided with increased serum TNF-α and interleukin 6 levels. In contrast, DADS effectively suppressed production of pro-inflammatory mediators induced by EtOH. Furthermore, DADS prevented the formation of gastric malondialdehyde and the depletion of reduced glutathione content and restored antioxidant enzyme activities, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase in the gastric tissues of EtOH-treated rats. These results indicate that DADS prevents gastric mucosal damage induced by acute EtOH administration in rats and that the protective effects of DADS may be due to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Seroprevalence of herpes virus associated with the presence and severity of oral mucositis in children diagnosed with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Santos de Faria, Andreza Barkokebas; Silva, Igor Henrique Moraes; de Godoy Almeida, Roberta; Silva, Sirleide Pereira da; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro

    2014-04-01

    Acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) is the hematologic neoplasia most commonly diagnosed in children. Among the secondary side effects of chemotherapy, mucositis is the most frequent complication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of herpes viruses HSV-1, EBV, and CMV and the presence and severity of oral mucositis in children and adolescents diagnosed with ALL. Ninety-two patients diagnosed with ALL were evaluated. Serum samples were collected before chemotherapy and tested by ELISA method. Presence of mucositis was observed on the first day before antineoplastic therapy (D0) and on 7th day post-therapy (D7). Classification of mucositis intensity was performed according to toxicity criteria established by the National Cancer Institute. 70.7% of the patients presented mucositis on the D7, and of these, 60% were classified as Grade I and 40% as Grade II; of the 92 individuals tested, 59 (64.1%) presented antibodies for HSV-1, 57 (62%) for EBV, 75 (81.5%) for CMV_IgG, and 21 (22.8%) for CMV_IgM. Using a logistic regression model, the presence of HSV-1 was observed to be 4.10 times greater in Grade II mucositis severity than in Grade I (P = 0.03). Based on the findings of this study, it was possible to conclude that infection by the herpes viruses HSV-1, EBV, and CMV is ubiquitous in the studied population and that HSV-1 may be a risk factor for aggravating the severity of mucositis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Blockade of high-mobility group box 1 attenuates intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xia; Zhao, Hong-Xian; Bai, Chao; Zhou, Xiang-Yu

    2017-07-28

    The release of inflammatory cytokines, that plays a dominant role in local pancreatic inflammation and systemic complications in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is implicated in the mechanism of organ dysfunction and bacterial translocation in SAP. This current study aims to investigate possible role of HMGB1 in the intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction of SAP, and the effect of anti-HMGB1 antibody treatment in intestinal mucosal injury in SAP. Our data revealed that the HMGB1 expression was significantly increased in AP mice induced by caerulein and LPS, and the inhibition of HMGB1 played a protective role in intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction, reduced the serum level of other proinflammatory cytokines include IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α. Next we investigated the downstream receptors involving in HMGB1 signaling. We found that the expressions of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR9 were elevated in ileum of AP mice, the administration of HMGB1 neutralizing antibody significantly reduced the TLR4 and TLR9 expression. It was concluded that HMGB1 contributed the mechanism to the intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction during AP. Blockade of HMGB1 by administration of HMGB1 neutralizing antibody may be a beneficial therapeutic strategy in improving intestinal mucosal barrier dysfunction in SAP.

  7. The pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Lesser, P B; Rie, M; Cullen, D J

    1975-01-01

    Acute pulmonary edema appeared 3 or more days after the onset of acute pancreatitis in 7 patients, an approximate incidence of 8%. The severity of pancreatitis in these patients was characterized by massive requirements for intravenous colloid and by marked hypocalcemia. In addition, at least 5 of the 7 patients had very high serum levels of triglycerides at the time of hospital admission. Hemodynamic studies during pulmonary edema showed normal central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Cardiac index was appropriately elevated. Respiratory treatment, consisting of endotracheal intubation and controlled ventilation with PEEP, was successful in allowing reversal of the pulmonary injury and recovery of respiratory function within 1-2 weeks in all cases. Two patients died later from pancreatic abscesses. The findings indicate that a distinct form of pulmonary injury may occur in acute pancreatitis, characterized by loss of integrity of the alveolar-capilllary membrane, leading to pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury is not known but may be caused by circulating free fatty acids, phospholipase A, or vasoactive substances. The pulmonary membrane lesion appears to heal during the period of intensive respiratory support. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1101836

  8. Acute renal failure: definitions, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, Robert W.; Wang, Wei; Poole, Brian; Mitra, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF), characterized by sudden loss of the ability of the kidneys to excrete wastes, concentrate urine, conserve electrolytes, and maintain fluid balance, is a frequent clinical problem, particularly in the intensive care unit, where it is associated with a mortality of between 50% and 80%. In this review, the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARF are discussed, including the vascular, tubular, and inflammatory perturbations. The clinical evaluation of ARF and implications for potential future therapies to decrease the high mortality are described. PMID:15232604

  9. Modulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis by Helicobacter pylori in immune pathogenesis of gastric mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. Apoptosis induced by microbial infections is implicated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Enhanced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis during H. pylori infection was suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis and gastric pathology. In addition to directly triggering apoptosis, H. pylori induces sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis in gastric epithelial cells. Human gastric epithelial cells sensitized to H. pylori confer susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via modulation of death-receptor signaling. The induction of TRAIL sensitivity by H. pylori is dependent upon the activation of caspase-8 and its downstream pathway. H. pylori induces caspase-8 activation via enhanced assembly of the TRAIL death-inducing signaling complex through downregulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein. Moreover, H. pylori infection induces infiltration of T lymphocytes and triggers inflammation to augment apoptosis. In H. pylori infection, significant increases in CCR6(+) CD3(+) T cell infiltration in the gastric mucosa was observed, and the CCR6 ligand, CCL20 chemokine, was selectively expressed in inflamed gastric tissues. These mechanisms initiate chemokine-mediated T lymphocyte trafficking into inflamed epithelium and induce mucosal injury during Helicobacter infection. This article will review recent findings on the interactions of H. pylori with host-epithelial signaling pathways and events involved in the initiation of gastric pathology, including gastric inflammation and mucosal damage.

  10. Acute kidney injury by radiographic contrast media: pathogenesis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Michele; Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Sabbatini, Massimo; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24-72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  12. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  13. Pathogenesis of acute respiratory illness caused by human parainfluenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Schomacker, Henrick; Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Collins, Peter L; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2012-06-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are a common cause of acute respiratory illness throughout life. Infants, children, and the immunocompromised are the most likely to develop severe disease. HPIV1 and HPIV2 are best known to cause croup while HPIV3 is a common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia. HPIVs replicate productively in respiratory epithelial cells and do not spread systemically unless the host is severely immunocompromised. Molecular studies have delineated how HPIVs evade and block cellular innate immune responses to permit efficient replication, local spread, and host-to-host transmission. Studies using ex vivo human airway epithelium have focused on virus tropism, cellular pathology and the epithelial inflammatory response, elucidating how events early in infection shape the adaptive immune response and disease outcome.

  14. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  15. Methotrexate-induced mucositis in acute leukemia patients is not associated with the MTHFR 677T allele in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Coconi-Linares, Lucia Nancy; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2007-10-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has two common variants with reduced activity due to polymorphisms at nucleotides 677 and 1298. Both affect folate metabolism and thus remethylation of homocysteine, but are also thought to affect nucleotide synthesis and DNA methylation. Methotrexate (MTX), which interrupts folate metabolism, is used in the treatment of a variety of diseases including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but exerts in some patients toxic effects on fast dividing tissues such as mucosal epithelia. The enhanced toxicity may be due to cooperative effects between MTX and MTHFR variants. Accordingly, it has been reported that carrying the 677T allele of the MTHFR is a risk factor for MTX-associated mucositis. As in the Mexican population, which is characterized by a high prevalence of the 677T MTHFR variant, several of its commonly associated defects have not been observed, we investigated the relationship between MTX toxicity and the 677T allele. Out of 28 patients with ALL (CC: 2, CT: 10, TT: 16), 16 had episodes of MTX-associated mucositis (CC: 0, CT: 6, TT: 10). Neither at the gene level nor at the genotype level was a significant association with mucositis found. It may be postulated that the risk of higher MTX toxicity in patients with decreased MTHFR activity could be neutralized by the normally folate rich diet in Mexico.

  16. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  18. Pathogenesis of Acute and Delayed Corneal Lesions after Ocular Exposure to Sulfur Mustard Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    2000) Nanoscale topography of the basement membrane underlying the corneal epithelium of the rhesus macaque. Cell Tissue Res 299: 39–46. 28. Pal-Ghosh...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pathogenesis of acute and delayed corneal lesions after ocular exposure to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER sulfur...involves a progressive corneal degeneration resulting in chronic ocular discomfort and impaired vision for which clinical interventions have typically

  19. Circulating Microbial Products and Acute Phase Proteins as Markers of Pathogenesis in Lymphatic Filarial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Anuradha, R.; George, P. Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, N.; Fay, Michael P.; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+) or without (CP Ag−) active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF); and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]). Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF) and those without active infection (CP Ag− compared to EN) were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein), acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α) are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins. PMID:22685406

  20. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Pigozzi, Luca; Goffi, Alberto; Hirsch, Emilio; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A large body of experimental and clinical data supports the notion that inflammation in acute pancreatitis has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of local and systemic damage and is a major determinant of clinical severity. Thus, research has recently focused on molecules that can regulate the inflammatory processes, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), a family of lipid and protein kinases involved in intracellular signal transduction. Studies using genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibitors of different PI3K isoforms, in particular the class I PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ, have contributed to a greater understanding of the roles of these kinases in the modulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Recent data suggest that PI3Ks are also involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Activation of the PI3K signaling pathway, and in particular of the class IB PI3Kγ isoform, has a significant role in those events which are necessary for the initiation of acute pancreatic injury, namely calcium signaling alteration, trypsinogen activation, and nuclear factor-κB transcription. Moreover, PI3Kγ is instrumental in modulating acinar cell apoptosis, and regulating local neutrophil infiltration and systemic inflammatory responses during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The availability of PI3K inhibitors selective for specific isoforms may provide new valuable therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical course of this disease. This article presents a brief summary of PI3K structure and function, and highlights recent advances that implicate PI3Ks in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25386068

  1. Acute glutaraldehyde mucosal injury of the upper aerodigestive tract due to damage to the working channel of an endoscope.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Priya D; Statham, Melissa McCarty; Rosen, Clark A

    2010-03-01

    Glutaraldehyde (Cidex) is a commonly used agent for cold sterilization of endoscopes despite its known irritative, allergic, and carcinogenic potential. This report details the clinical course of 2 patients who suffered acute glutaraldehyde exposure during office injection procedures. Clinical records of 2 outpatients undergoing office injection procedures were reviewed. One patient underwent bilateral injections of hydroxyapatite, and 1 underwent voice gel injection. Both patients developed acute mucosal injury in the form of supraglottitis and laryngitis. Both patients required inpatient admission with airway monitoring (1 requiring admission to the intensive care unit) and were treated with steroids and antibiotics. The same channel endoscope was used for both procedures and was noted after careful examination to have retained glutaraldehyde inside the scope due to a perforation of the lining of the working channel. Glutaraldehyde can cause acute mucosal injury to supraglottic and glottic structures, and diligent procedures must be maintained for flushing the channels and monitoring glutaraldehyde retention in the channels. Great care should be taken to avoid damage to the lining of working channels from instrumentation.

  2. Protective role of fructokinase blockade in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Hernando, Ana; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Chen, Wei; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos; Le, Myphuong T.; Wempe, Michael F.; Milagres, Tamara; Ishimoto, Takuji; Fini, Mehdi; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J.; Lanaspa, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is associated with high mortality, especially in intensive care unit patients. The polyol pathway is a metabolic route able to convert glucose into fructose. Here we show the detrimental role of endogenous fructose production by the polyol pathway and its metabolism through fructokinase in the pathogenesis of ischaemic acute kidney injury (iAKI). Consistent with elevated urinary fructose in AKI patients, mice undergoing iAKI show significant polyol pathway activation in the kidney cortex characterized by high levels of aldose reductase, sorbitol and endogenous fructose. Wild type but not fructokinase knockout animals demonstrate severe kidney injury associated with ATP depletion, elevated uric acid, oxidative stress and inflammation. Interestingly, both the renal injury and dysfunction in wild-type mice undergoing iAKI is significantly ameliorated when exposed to luteolin, a recently discovered fructokinase inhibitor. This study demonstrates a role for fructokinase and endogenous fructose as mediators of acute renal disease. PMID:28194018

  3. Functional Data Analysis Applied to Modeling of Severe Acute Mucositis and Dysphagia Resulting From Head and Neck Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Gay, Hiram; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Deasy, Joseph O; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-11-15

    Current normal tissue complication probability modeling using logistic regression suffers from bias and high uncertainty in the presence of highly correlated radiation therapy (RT) dose data. This hinders robust estimates of dose-response associations and, hence, optimal normal tissue-sparing strategies from being elucidated. Using functional data analysis (FDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the dose data could overcome this limitation. FDA was applied to modeling of severe acute mucositis and dysphagia resulting from head and neck RT. Functional partial least squares regression (FPLS) and functional principal component analysis were used for dimensionality reduction of the dose-volume histogram data. The reduced dose data were input into functional logistic regression models (functional partial least squares-logistic regression [FPLS-LR] and functional principal component-logistic regression [FPC-LR]) along with clinical data. This approach was compared with penalized logistic regression (PLR) in terms of predictive performance and the significance of treatment covariate-response associations, assessed using bootstrapping. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models was 0.65, 0.69, and 0.67, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 0.81, 0.83, and 0.83, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The calibration slopes/intercepts for the PLR, FPC-LR, and FPLS-LR models were 1.6/-0.67, 0.45/0.47, and 0.40/0.49, respectively, for mucositis (internal validation) and 2.5/-0.96, 0.79/-0.04, and 0.79/0.00, respectively, for dysphagia (external validation). The bootstrapped odds ratios indicated significant associations between RT dose and severe toxicity in the mucositis and dysphagia FDA models. Cisplatin was significantly associated with severe dysphagia in the FDA models. None of the covariates was significantly associated with severe toxicity in the PLR models. Dose levels greater than

  4. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of CNS acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and potential for therapy.

    PubMed

    Frishman-Levy, Liron; Izraeli, Shai

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (CNS-ALL) is a major clinical problem. CNS-directed 'prophylactic' chemo- or radio - therapy is associated with significant early and long-term toxicity. Moreover, greater than a third of the relapses occur in the CNS. To design specific, more effective and less toxic therapy and for personalized precise adjustment of prophylactic therapy there is a need for better understanding of the biology of this disease. Specifically, the precise neurotropic mechanisms of ALL are currently unclear, as is the pathogenesis of CNS relapse. Here we review and contrast the recent findings with earlier studies of pathogenesis of CNS leukaemia. We also describe the challenges in research of this devastating complication of ALL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Protective effects of teprenone and gefarnate against taurocholate/hydrochloric acid-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats].

    PubMed

    Katoh, Y; Tanaka, M; Kawashima, H

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of teprenone on acute gastritis, its inhibitory effects on gastric mucosal damage were compared to that of gefarnate in taurocholate/hydrochloric acid-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats. After oral administration of 160 mM taurocholic acid and 250 mM hydrochloric acid, hemorrhage and erosion were macroscopically observed in the gastric mucosal surface layer. Edema in the submucosal tissue and decreased PAS staining in the mucosa were histomorphologically observed. Concerning macroscopic findings, pretreatment with teprenone at a dose of 50 mg/kg or more significantly reduced pathological changes in the mucosa of the fundic glandular area. However, gefarnate slightly inhibited these changes in at a dose of 50 mg/kg and significantly inhibited them at a dose of 200 mg/kg. With regards to histomorphological findings in the fundic glandular area, teprenone slightly inhibited erosion at a dose of 50 mg/kg, and it significantly and slightly inhibited the decrease in PAS staining in this area at doses of 50 and 200 mg/kg, respectively. Gefarnate at doses of 50 and 200 mg/kg showed significant inhibition of decreased PAS staining in the fundic glandular area. In the pyloric mucosa, decreased PAS staining was slightly inhibited by teprenone at both doses but not by gefarnate at either dose. The differences between teprenone and gefarnate observed in this model appear to be due to their differences in mucus production ability. These results suggest that teprenone was more effective than gefarnate for the treatment of gastritis.

  6. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  7. Protective effect of teprenone against acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Kobayashi, Takashi; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Nakazawa, Saburo

    2003-11-01

    The protective effect of teprenone, an anti-ulcer drug, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (0.75 mg/kg). Teprenone (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) was orally administered 0.5 h before compound 48/80 treatment. Administered teprenone prevented gastric mucosal lesion development found at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment dose-dependently, although no dose of teprenone affected the decreased gastric mucosal blood flow and increased serum serotonin and histamine concentrations found at 3 h after the treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxdiase (an index of neutrophil infiltration) and xanthine oxidase and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (an index of lipid peroxidation) and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus) and adherent mucus occurred in gastric mucosal tissues at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment. Administered teprenone dose-dependently attenuated all these changes found at 3 h after compound 48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered teprenone protects against compound 48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion and its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  8. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-12-01

    Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile.

  9. Role of inflammation and infection in the pathogenesis of human acute liver failure: Clinical implications for monitoring and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mhairi C; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and devastating clinical condition. At present, emergency liver transplantation is the only life-saving therapy in advanced cases, yet the feasibility of transplantation is affected by the presence of systemic inflammation, infection and resultant multi-organ failure. The importance of immune dysregulation and acquisition of infection in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure and its associated complications is now recognised. In this review we discuss current thinking regarding the role of infection and inflammation in the pathogenesis of and outcome in human acute liver failure, the implications for the management of such patients and suggest directions for future research. PMID:27468190

  10. Clinical effectiveness of palifermin in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, Dorina; Petruzzi, Massimo; Di Stasio, Dario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of palifermin, an N-terminal truncated version of endogenous keratinocyte growth factor, in the control of oral mucositis during antiblastic therapy. Twenty patients undergoing allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were treated with palifermin, and compared to a control group with the same number of subjects and similar inclusion criteria. Statistical analysis were performed to compare the outcomes in the treatment vs. control groups. In the treatment group, we found a statistically significant reduction in the duration of parenteral nutrition (P=0.002), duration of mucositis (P=0.003) and the average grade of mucositis (P=0.03). The statistical analysis showed that the drug was able to decrease the severity of mucositis. These data, although preliminary, suggest that palifermin could be a valid therapeutic adjuvant to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from leukaemia.

  11. Beta-defensin 1 plays a role in acute mucosal defense to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Tomalka, Jeffrey; Azodi, Elaheh; Narra, Hema P.; Patel, Krupen; O’Neill, Samantha; Cardwell, Cisley; Hall, Brian A.; Wilson, James M.; Hise, Amy G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that colonizes the mucosal tract of humans. Pathogenic infection occurs in the presence of conditions causing perturbations to the commensal microbiota or host immunity. Early innate immune responses by the epithelium, including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cytokines, are critical for protection against overgrowth. Reduced salivary AMP levels are associated with oral Candida infection and certain AMPs, including human beta-defensins 1 - 3, have direct fungicidal activity. Here we demonstrate that murine β-Defensin 1 (mBD1) is important for control of early mucosal Candida infection and plays a critical role in the induction of innate inflammatory mediators. Mice deficient in mBD1 exhibit elevated oral and systemic fungal burdens as compared to wild-type mice. Neutrophil infiltration to the sites of mucosal Candida invasion, an important step in limiting fungal infection, is significantly reduced in mBD1 deficient mice. These mice also exhibit defects in the expression of other antimicrobial peptides, including mBD2 and mBD4, which may have direct anti-Candida activity. We also show that mBD1 deficiency impacts the production of important anti-fungal inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, IL-6, KC, and IL-17. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a role for the mBD1 peptide in early control of Candida infection in a murine model of mucosal candidiasis, as well as on the modulation of host immunity through augmentation of leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory gene induction. PMID:25595775

  12. Involvement of heparanase in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury: nephroprotective effect of PG545.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Zaid; Hamoud, Shadi; Hassan, Ahmad; Khamaysi, Iyad; Nativ, Omri; Heyman, Samuel N; Muhammad, Rabia Shekh; Ilan, Neta; Singh, Preeti; Hammond, Edward; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Onisto, Maurizio; Bellin, Gloria; Masola, Valentina; Vlodavsky, Israel; Gambaro, Giovani

    2017-03-25

    Despite the high prevalence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its association with increased morbidity and mortality, therapeutic approaches for AKI are disappointing. This is largely attributed to poor understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI. Heparanase, an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate, is involved in extracellular matrix turnover, inflammation, kidney dysfunction, diabetes, fibrosis, angiogenesis and cancer progression. The current study examined the involvement of heparanase in the pathogenesis of ischemic reperfusion (I/R) AKI in a mouse model and the protective effect of PG545, a potent heparanase inhibitor. I/R induced tubular damage and elevation in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen to a higher extent in heparanase over-expressing transgenic mice vs. wild type mice. Moreover, TGF-β, vimentin, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin, biomarkers of fibrosis, and TNFα, IL6 and endothelin-1, biomarkers of inflammation, were upregulated in I/R induced AKI, primarily in heparanase transgenic mice, suggesting an adverse role of heparanase in the pathogenesis of AKI. Remarkably, pretreatment of mice with PG545 abolished kidney dysfunction and the up-regulation of heparanase, pro-inflammatory (i.e., IL-6) and pro-fibrotic (i.e., TGF-β) genes induced by I/R. The present study provides new insights into the involvement of heparanase in the pathogenesis of ischemic AKI.Our results demonstrate that heparanase plays a deleterious role in the development of renal injury and kidney dysfunction,attesting heparanase inhibition as a promising therapeutic approach for AKI.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor participates in the pathogenesis of acute immune complex alveolitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J S; Yabroff, K R; Remick, D G; Kunkel, S L; Chensue, S W; Kunkel, R G; Johnson, K J; Ward, P A

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the role of intrapulmonary TNF in a rat model of acute immune complex-triggered alveolitis. Intratracheal instillation of IgG anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) followed by intravenous infusion of BSA results in acute alveolitis. Over the 4-h course of evolving lung injury, a 10-fold increase in TNF activity occurred in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung sections and BAL cells revealed that alveolar macrophages are the chief source of TNF. Antibodies that specifically neutralize rat TNF activity were raised in rabbits immunized with recombinant mouse TNF alpha. When administered into the lungs with anti-BSA, anti-TNF resulted in a marked reduction (up to 61%) in lung injury. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous TNF alone, or in combination with anti-BSA, resulted in an increase in lung injury compared to controls. Morphometric analysis and measurements of myeloperoxidase activities in whole lung extracts from rats treated with anti-TNF revealed a marked reduction in neutrophils compared to positive controls. The anti-TNF antibody preparation did not inhibit in vitro complement activation or diminish neutrophil chemotactic activity present in activated rat serum. These data indicate that intrapulmonary TNF activity is required for the full development of acute immune complex-triggered alveolitis, that alveolar macrophages are the primary source of this cytokine, and that TNF participates in the pathogenesis of immune complex alveolitis through a mechanism involving neutrophil recruitment. Images PMID:2531759

  14. Induction of Alternatively Activated Macrophages Enhances Pathogenesis during Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J.; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1−/− mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6−/− double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  15. Induction of alternatively activated macrophages enhances pathogenesis during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Carly; Goicochea, Lindsay; Matthews, Krystal; Zhang, Yong; Klover, Peter; Holtzman, Michael J; Hennighausen, Lothar; Frieman, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes acute lung injury (ALI) that often leads to severe lung disease. A mouse model of acute SARS-CoV infection has been helpful in understanding the host response to infection; however, there are still unanswered questions concerning SARS-CoV pathogenesis. We have shown that STAT1 plays an important role in the severity of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and that it is independent of the role of STAT1 in interferon signaling. Mice lacking STAT1 have greater weight loss, severe lung pathology with pre-pulmonary-fibrosis-like lesions, and an altered immune response following infection with SARS-CoV. We hypothesized that STAT1 plays a role in the polarization of the immune response, specifically in macrophages, resulting in a worsened outcome. To test this, we created bone marrow chimeras and cell-type-specific knockouts of STAT1 to identify which cell type(s) is critical to protection from severe lung disease after SARS-CoV infection. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic cells are responsible for the pathogenesis in STAT1(-/-) mice, and because of an induction of alternatively activated (AA) macrophages after infection, we hypothesized that the AA macrophages were critical for disease severity. Mice with STAT1 in either monocytes and macrophages (LysM/STAT1) or ciliated lung epithelial cells (FoxJ1/STAT1) deleted were created. Following infection, LysM/STAT1 mice display severe lung pathology, while FoxJ1/STAT1 mice display normal lung pathology. We hypothesized that AA macrophages were responsible for this STAT1-dependent pathology and therefore created STAT1/STAT6(-/-) double-knockout mice. STAT6 is essential for the development of AA macrophages. Infection of the double-knockout mice displayed a lack of lung disease and prefibrotic lesions, suggesting that AA macrophage production may be the cause of STAT1-dependent lung disease. We propose that the control of AA

  16. Effect of gefarnate on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated with compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, in comparison with that of teprenone.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Kobayashi, Takashi; Imai, Yoichiro; Inui, Kazuo; Yoshino, Junji; Nakazawa, Saburo

    2005-08-01

    We have reported that teprenone (geranylgeranylacetone), an anti-ulcer drug, prevents acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated once with compound 48/80 (C48/80), a mast cell degranulator, possibly by suppressing mucus depletion, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the gastric mucosa. Herein, we examined the preventive effect of gefarnate (geranyl farnesylacetate), an anti-ulcer drug, on acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in rats treated once with C48/80 (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.) in comparison with that of teprenone, because the chemical structure and anti-ulcer action of gefarnate are similar to those of teprenone. Gefarnate (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) administered orally at 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment, at which time gastric mucosal lesions appeared, reduced progressive gastric mucosal lesions at 3 h dose-dependently. At 3 h after C48/80 treatment, the gastric mucosa had decreased adherent mucus and hexosamine contents and increased myeloperoxdiase (an index of neutrophil infiltration) and xanthine oxidase activities and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (an index of lipid peroxidation) content. Post-administered gefarnate attenuated all these changes dose-dependently. These preventive effects of gefarnate were similar to those of teprenone at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Post-administered gefarnate did not affect the increases in serum serotonin and histamine concentrations and the decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow at 3 h after C48/80 treatment like teprenone. These results indicate that orally administered gefarnate prevents acute gastric mucosal lesion progression in C48/80-treated rats possibly by suppressing mucus depletion, neutrophil infiltration, and oxidative stress in the gastric mucosa like teprenone.

  17. Pathogenesis of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mechanisms underlying its relapse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congcong; Chang, Lixian; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2017-05-23

    ETV6/RUNX1 (E/R) is the most common fusion gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Multiple lines of evidence imply a "two-hit" model for the molecular pathogenesis of E/R-positive ALL, whereby E/R rearrangement is followed by a series of secondary mutations that trigger overt leukemia. The cellular framework in which E/R arises and the maintenance of a pre-leukemic condition by E/R are fundamental to the mechanism that underlies leukemogenesis. Accordingly, a variety of studies have focused on the relationship between the clones giving rise to the primary and recurrent E/R-positive ALL. We review here the most recent insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying E/R-positive ALL, as well as the molecular abnormalities prevailing at relapse.

  18. Vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases may play role in the pathogenesis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM).

    PubMed

    Sabayan, B; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2007-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is defined as a multifocal, monophasic, demyelinating, and inflammatory disease involving the central nervous system. It typically begins within 6 weeks of an antigenic challenge such as infection or immunization. Perivenous inflammation, edema and demyelination are the pathological hallmarks of ADEM. Reactivity of T-cells against myelin components such as myelin basic protein has been found in children with ADEM. The triggers for immune responses in ADEM are not known, but the two most widely accepted hypotheses are molecular mimicry and self-sensitization secondary to CNS infection. Inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 2 (IL2) and interferon gamma (INFgamma) are thought to be important in lesion formation in ADEM. Due to the active role of inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of ADEM, any disease contributing to systemic formation of inflammatory cytokines can potentially be an etiologic factor for the initiation of ADEM. In vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases the number of T-cells, T helper type 1 cytokines and other inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha increase substantially. We present this hypothesis that in such setting of inflammation, adhesion molecules are up-regulated on the brain capillary endothelium by cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, altering the permeability of the brain blood barrier and so allowing for inflammatory cell migration. The migratory cells attack the basic myelin protein and the final result is the demyelination seen in ADEM. So we propose that vasculitis and rheumatologic diseases may play role in the pathogenesis of ADEM.

  19. Acute Hendra virus infection: Analysis of the pathogenesis and passive antibody protection in the hamster model

    SciTech Connect

    Guillaume, Vanessa; Wong, K. Thong; Looi, R.Y.; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Barrot, Laura; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2009-05-10

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are recently-emerged, closely related and highly pathogenic paramyxoviruses. We have analysed here the pathogenesis of the acute HeV infection using the new animal model, golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus), which is highly susceptible to HeV infection. HeV-specific RNA and viral antigens were found in multiple organs and virus was isolated from different tissues. Dual pathogenic mechanism was observed: parenchymal infection in various organs, including the brain, with vasculitis and multinucleated syncytia in many blood vessels. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies specific for the NiV fusion protein neutralized HeV in vitro and efficiently protected hamsters from HeV if given before infection. These results reveal the similarities between HeV and NiV pathogenesis, particularly in affecting both respiratory and neuronal system. They demonstrate that hamster presents a convenient novel animal model to study HeV infection, opening new perspectives to evaluate vaccine and therapeutic approaches against this emergent infectious disease.

  20. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. The role of leukocytes in the pathogenesis of fibrin deposition in bovine acute lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Suyemoto, M. M.; Neilsen, N. R.; Slauson, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    The peculiarly fibrinous nature of bovine acute lung injury due to infection with Pasteurella haemolytica A1 suggests an imbalance between leukocyte-directed procoagulant and profibrinolytic influences in the inflamed bovine lung. Calves with experimental pneumonia produced by intratracheal inoculation with P. haemolytica A1 developed acute locally extensive cranioventral fibrinopurulent bronchopneumonia. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) recovered by segmental lavage from affected lung lobes were 30 times more procoagulant than PAM obtained from unaffected lung lobes and 37-fold more procoagulant than PAM from control calf lungs. Unlike the enhancement of procoagulant activity, profibrinolytic activity (plasminogen activator amidolysis) of total lung leukocytes (PAM and plasminogen activator neutrophils [PMN]) was decreased 23 times in cells obtained from affected lung lobes and also was decreased four times in cells obtained from unaffected lobes of infected animals. This marked imbalance in cellular procoagulant and fibrinolytic activity probably contributes significantly to enhanced fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. In addition, PAM from inflamed lungs were strongly positive for bovine tissue factor antigen as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. Intensely tissue factor-positive PAM enmeshed in fibrinocellular exudates and positive alveolar walls were situated such that they were likely to have, in concert, initiated extrinsic activation of coagulation in the acutely inflamed lung. These data collectively suggest that enhanced PAM-directed procoagulant activity and diminished PAM- and PMN-directed profibrinolytic activity represent important modifications of local leukocyte function in bovine acute lung injury that are central to the pathogenesis of lesion development with extensive fibrin deposition and retarded fibrin removal. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2024707

  2. Bovine laminitis: clinical aspects, pathology and pathogenesis with reference to acute equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Boosman, R; Németh, F; Gruys, E

    1991-07-01

    This review deals with the features of clinical and subclinical laminitis in cattle. Prominent clinical signs of acute laminitis are a tender gait and arched back. The sole horn reveals red and yellowish discolourations within five days. In subacute and chronic cases clinical signs are less severe. In chronic laminitis the shape of the claws is altered. Laminitis is frequently followed by sole ulceration and white zone lesions. Blood tests showed no significant changes for laminitic animals. Arteriographic studies of claws affected by laminitis indicated that blood vessels had narrowed lumens. Gross pathology revealed congestion of the corium and rotation of the distal phalanx. Histopathologic studies indicate that laminitis is associated with changes of the vasculature. Peripartum management and nutrition are important factors in its aetiology. It is hypothesised that laminitis is evoked by disturbed digital circulation. In the pathogenesis of acute laminitis three factors are considered important: the occurrence of thrombosis, haemodynamic aspects of the corium, and endotoxins which trigger these pathologic events.

  3. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: Pathogenesis, prognostic factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Algora, Sara; Masegosa-Ataz, José; Gutiérrez-García, María Luisa; Alonso-López, Sonia; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome that is reversible in many cases. It is characterized by an acute deterioration of liver function in the background of a pre-existing chronic liver disease often associated with a high short-term mortality rate. Organ failure (OF) is always associated, and plays a key role in determining the course, and the outcome of the disease. The definition of ACLF remains controversial due to its overall ambiguity, with several disparate criteria among various associations dedicated to the study of liver diseases. Although the precise pathogenesis needs to be clarified, it appears that an altered host response to injury might be a contributing factor caused by immune dysfunction, ultimately leading to a pro-inflammatory status, and eventually to OF. The PIRO concept (Predisposition, Insult, Response and Organ Failure) has been proposed to better approach the underlying mechanisms. It is accepted that ACLF is a different and specific form of liver failure, where a precipitating event is always involved, even though it cannot always be ascertained. According to several studies, infections and active alcoholism often trigger ACLF. Viral hepatitis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, or drug induced liver injury, which can also provoke the syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the physiopathology and prognostic aspects. We believe these features are essential to further understanding and providing the rationale for improveddisease management strategies. PMID:26576097

  4. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis: Pathogenesis, Genetic Background, Clinical Variants and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Heidemeyer, Kristine; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe, usually drug-related reaction, characterized by an acute onset of mainly small non-follicular pustules on an erythematous base and spontaneous resolution usually within two weeks. Systemic involvement occurs in about 20% of cases. The course is mostly benign, and only in rare cases complications lead to life-threatening situations. Recent studies highlight the importance of genetic variations in interleukin-36 receptor antagonist gene (IL-36RN) in the pathogenesis of this disease. The physiopathology of AGEP remains unclear, but an involvement of innate and acquired immune cells together with resident cells (keratinocytes), which recruit and activate neutrophils via production of cytokines/chemokines such as IL-17, IL-36, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, has been postulated. Treatment is based on the removal of the causative drug, supportive care, infection prevention and use of potent topical or systemic steroids. PMID:27472323

  5. The pathogenesis and diagnosis of acute kidney injury in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Colin A.; Batuman, Vecihi; Behrens, Judith; Bridoux, Frank; Sirac, Christophe; Dispenzieri, Angela; Herrera, Guillermo A.; Lachmann, Helen; Sanders, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Renal failure remains a principal cause of morbidity for patients with multiple myeloma. Once reversible factors such as hypercalcemia have been corrected, the most common cause of severe renal failure in these patients is a tubulointerstitial pathology that results from the very high circulating concentrations of monoclonal immunoglobulin free light chains. These endogenous proteins can result in isolated proximal tubule cell cytotoxicity, tubulointerstitial nephritis and cast nephropathy (myeloma kidney). Less frequently, high levels of free light chains can lead to immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis and light chain deposition disease, although these conditions are usually associated with insidious progression of renal failure rather than acute kidney injury. Unless there is rapid intervention, progressive and irreversible damage occurs, particularly interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Despite advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of these processes there has been a gap in translating these achievements into improved patient outcomes. The International Kidney and Monoclonal Gammopathy Research Group was formed to address this need. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms of disease and diagnostic approaches to patients with acute kidney injury complicating multiple myeloma. PMID:22045243

  6. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: Pathogenesis, prognostic factors and management.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Algora, Sara; Masegosa-Ataz, José; Gutiérrez-García, María Luisa; Alonso-López, Sonia; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-11-14

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome that is reversible in many cases. It is characterized by an acute deterioration of liver function in the background of a pre-existing chronic liver disease often associated with a high short-term mortality rate. Organ failure (OF) is always associated, and plays a key role in determining the course, and the outcome of the disease. The definition of ACLF remains controversial due to its overall ambiguity, with several disparate criteria among various associations dedicated to the study of liver diseases. Although the precise pathogenesis needs to be clarified, it appears that an altered host response to injury might be a contributing factor caused by immune dysfunction, ultimately leading to a pro-inflammatory status, and eventually to OF. The PIRO concept (Predisposition, Insult, Response and Organ Failure) has been proposed to better approach the underlying mechanisms. It is accepted that ACLF is a different and specific form of liver failure, where a precipitating event is always involved, even though it cannot always be ascertained. According to several studies, infections and active alcoholism often trigger ACLF. Viral hepatitis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage, or drug induced liver injury, which can also provoke the syndrome. This review mainly focuses on the physiopathology and prognostic aspects. We believe these features are essential to further understanding and providing the rationale for improveddisease management strategies.

  7. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. Results: The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile. PMID:27942550

  8. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-09-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas.

  9. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-01-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas. PMID:1385272

  10. Mucosal Invasion by Fusobacteria is a Common Feature of Acute Appendicitis in Germany, Russia, and China

    PubMed Central

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Dörffel, Yvonne; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Tertychnyy, Alexander; Biche-ool, Salbakay; Stonogin, Sergei; Guo, Yi; Sun, Ning-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim: To investigate the geographic occurrence of mucosa-invading Fusobacteria in acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: Carnoy- and formalin-fixated appendices from Germany, Russia, and China were comparatively investigated. Bacteria were detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Cecal biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions were used as disease controls. Results: Fusobacteria represented mainly by Fusobacterium nucleatum were the major invasive component in bacterial infiltrates in acute appendicitis but were completely absent in controls. The occurrence of invasive Fusobacteria in Germany, Russia, and China was the same. The detection rate in Carnoy-fixated material was 70–71% and in formalin-fixated material was 30–36%. Conclusions: Acute appendicitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease in which F. nucleatum and other Fusobacteria play a key role. PMID:22249094

  11. [Protective effects of sufentanil pretreatment against acute gastric mucosal lesion in rats and its relationship with acid-sensing ion channels].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qun; Tu, Wei-feng

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the effects of sufentanil pretreatment on acute gastric mucosal lesion and its impact on the expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in thoracic dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in rats with water immersion-restraint stress (WIRS). Twenty-four Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups, namely the normal control group (n=6), WIRS group (n=12) and sufentanil pretreatment group (n=6). Gastric mucosal lesion was induced by WIRS, and after 6 h of WIRS, the gastric tissues were excised and observed under microscope, with the ulcer index (UI) calculated. The expression of ASIC3 in the DRG neurons was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the ASIC3 mRNA expression by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Compared with the normal control group, the rats in the WIRS group showed obvious gastric injury with increased UI and extensive expression of ASIC3 in the DRG neurons. Sufentanil pretreatment of the rats subjected to WIRS significantly alleviated the gastric mucosal injury, lowered the UI, and reduced ASIC3 mRNA expression in thoracic DRG neurons. ASIC3 is involved in the development of acute gastric mucosal lesion, and sufentanil pretreatment offers protection of gastric mucosa by inhibiting the expression of ASIC3.

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  13. Influence of acute copper deficiency, cold-restraint stress and the H2 blocker ranitidine on the severity of acute gastric mucosal lesions and lipid peroxidation in rats.

    PubMed

    Velinov, H; Mileva, M; Nachev, C

    2001-09-01

    Acute copper deficiency produces disturbances in the microcirculation and structure of extracellular matrix proteins, causes an increase in mast cell population, which is followed by an increased content of their degranulation products, produces disturbances in histamine metabolism and decreases the activity of some antioxidant enzymes. These pathogenic mechanisms are similar to the processes underlying stress ulcer formation. The histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine, a drug with the highest application for stress ulcer prophylaxis, has the ability to helate the copper ion and to influence its tissue distribution and the processes of generation and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In order to determine the interrelation between the disturbances of copper homeostasis, stress ulcers and ranitidine, we investigated the impact of a short-term diet with powdered milk in combination with cold-restraint stress with or without ranitidine on the severity of acute gastric mucosal lesions, copper content, lipid peroxidation and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the stomachs of rats.

  14. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia; Pedicini, Piernicola; D'Andrea, Marco; Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina; Benassi, Marcello

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  15. Secretory phospholipase A2 in the pathogenesis of acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeewandara, Chandima; Gomes, Laksiri; Udari, Sukhitha; Paranavitane, S.A.; Shyamali, N.L.A.; Ogg, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Platelet activating factor (PAF) is an important mediator of vascular leak in acute dengue. Phospholipase A2s (PLA2) are inflammatory lipid enzymes that generate and regulate PAF and other mediators associated with mast cells. We sought to investigate if mast cell activation and increases in secretory sPLA2s are associated with an increase in PAF and occurrence of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Methods The changes in the levels of mast cell tryptase, PAF and the activity of sPLA2 were determined throughout the course of illness in 13 adult patients with DHF, and 30 patients with dengue fever (DF). Results We found that sPLA2 activity was significantly higher in patients with DHF when compared to those with DF, during the first 120 h of clinical illness. sPLA2 activity was significantly associated with PAF levels, which were also significantly higher in patients with DHF. Although levels of mast cell tryptase were higher in patients with DHF, the difference was not significant, and the levels were not above the reference ranges. sPLA2 activity significantly correlated with the degree of viraemia in patients with DHF but not in those with DF. Conclusion sPLA2 appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of dengue. Since its activity is significantly increased during the early phase of infection in patients with DHF, this suggests that understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide opportunities for early intervention. PMID:28250920

  16. The role of tubuloglomerular feedback in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhleen; Okusa, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in prerenal and intrarenal acute kidney injury (AKI) are not mutually exclusive and prerenal mechanisms continue to play a role in the pathogenesis of established intrarenal AKI. In nearly all forms of AKI, glomeruli are morphologically normal; therefore, the investigative efforts have focused on systemic and intrarenal mechanisms that lead to the failure of filtration at the glomerulus. There is observed and/or deductive evidence supporting the role of tubuloglomerular feedback in mediating the reduction in GFR in various forms of AKI. In prerenal AKI, the activation of various neurohormonal renal vasoconstrictors can increase the sensitivity and responsiveness of tubuloglomerular feedback. In different forms of intrarenal AKI, the varying degree of tubular injury is linked to filtration failure directly by mechanisms such as tubular obstruction or tubular backleak of solutes, or indirectly via the activation of tubuloglomerular feedback. Tubular obstruction or backleak of solutes, while readily understood, do not appear to be consistent features in experimental AKI and have a limited role in explaining the degree of impairment of GFR in human AKI. The functional connection between tubular damage and filtration failure mediated by tubuloglomerular feedback via alterations in nephron plasma flow and glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure is more consistently observed or deduced from experimental data. It also explains the principal abnormality of increased preglomerular resistances, a pathogenic characteristic of both experimental and human AKI.

  17. Acute bovine viral diarrhea associated with extensive mucosal lesions, high morbidity, and mortality in a commercial feedlot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2008, a northwest Texas feedlot underwent an outbreak of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) disease causing high morbidity and mortality involving two lots of calves (Lots A and B). Severe mucosal surface lesions were observed grossly in the oral cavity, larynx and esophagus. Mucosal lesions vari...

  18. Dietary flaxseed intake exacerbates acute colonic mucosal injury and inflammation induced by dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Zarepoor, Leila; Lu, Jenifer T; Zhang, Claire; Wu, Wenqing; Lepp, Dion; Robinson, Lindsay; Wanasundara, Janitha; Cui, Steve; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Fofana, Bourlaye; Tsao, Rong; Wood, Geoffrey A; Power, Krista A

    2014-06-15

    Flaxseed (FS), a dietary oilseed, contains a variety of anti-inflammatory bioactives, including fermentable fiber, phenolic compounds (lignans), and the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) α-linolenic acid. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of FS and its n-3 PUFA-rich kernel or lignan- and soluble fiber-rich hull on colitis severity in a mouse model of acute colonic inflammation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a basal diet (negative control) or a basal diet supplemented with 10% FS, 6% kernel, or 4% hull for 3 wk prior to and during colitis induction via 5 days of 2% (wt/vol) dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their drinking water (n = 12/group). An increase in anti-inflammatory metabolites (hepatic n-3 PUFAs, serum mammalian lignans, and cecal short-chain fatty acids) was associated with consumption of all FS-based diets, but not with anti-inflammatory effects in DSS-exposed mice. Dietary FS exacerbated DSS-induced acute colitis, as indicated by a heightened disease activity index and an increase in colonic injury and inflammatory biomarkers [histological damage, apoptosis, myeloperoxidase, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β), and NF-κB signaling-related genes (Nfkb1, Ccl5, Bcl2a1a, Egfr, Relb, Birc3, and Atf1)]. Additionally, the adverse effect of the FS diet was extended systemically, as serum cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, and IL-1β) and hepatic cholesterol levels were increased. The adverse effects of FS were not associated with alterations in fecal microbial load or systemic bacterial translocation (endotoxemia). Collectively, this study demonstrates that although consumption of a 10% FS diet enhanced the levels of n-3 PUFAs, short-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, and lignans in mice, it exacerbated DSS-induced colonic injury and inflammation.

  19. Double-blind randomized phase III study comparing a mixture of natural agents versus placebo in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Marucci, Laura; Farneti, Alessia; Di Ridolfi, Paolo; Pinnaro, Paola; Pellini, Raul; Giannarelli, Diana; Vici, Patrizia; Conte, Mario; Landoni, Valeria; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    There is no widely accepted intervention in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. In the present double-blind study, we tested 4 natural agents, propolis, aloe vera, calendula, and chamomile versus placebo. Patients undergoing concomitant chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were given natural agent or matched placebo; grade 3 mucositis on physical examination according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 was the primary endpoint. Various covariates were tested at logistic regression, including the individual amount of mucosa receiving at least 9.5 Gy per week (V9.5w). One hundred seven patients were randomized from January 2011 to July 2014, and 104 were assessable (51%-49% were assigned to the placebo group and 53%-51% were assigned to the natural agent). Overall, 61 patients developed peak grade 3 mucositis with no difference between arms (P = .65). Conversely, V9.5w (P = .007) and primary site (P = .037) were independent predictors. The selected natural agents do not prevent mucositis, whereas the role of V9.5w is confirmed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mucosal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  1. Comparative genomics reveals multistep pathogenesis of E2A-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Feng, Jue; Scherer, Florian; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Wong, Stephen H.K.; Wang, Zhong; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer; however, its genetic diversity limits investigation into the molecular pathogenesis of disease and development of therapeutic strategies. Here, we engineered mice that conditionally express the E2A-PBX1 fusion oncogene, which results from chromosomal translocation t(1;19) and is present in 5% to 7% of pediatric ALL cases. The incidence of leukemia in these mice varied from 5% to 50%, dependent on the Cre-driving promoter (Cd19, Mb1, or Mx1) used to induce E2A-PBX1 expression. Two distinct but highly similar subtypes of B cell precursor ALLs that differed by their pre–B cell receptor (pre-BCR) status were induced and displayed maturation arrest at the pro-B/large pre–B II stages of differentiation, similar to human E2A-PBX1 ALL. Somatic activation of E2A-PBX1 in B cell progenitors enhanced self-renewal and led to acquisition of multiple secondary genomic aberrations, including prominent spontaneous loss of Pax5. In preleukemic mice, conditional Pax5 deletion cooperated with E2A-PBX1 to expand progenitor B cell subpopulations, increasing penetrance and shortening leukemia latency. Recurrent secondary activating mutations were detected in key signaling pathways, most notably JAK/STAT, that leukemia cells require for proliferation. These data support conditional E2A-PBX1 mice as a model of human ALL and suggest targeting pre-BCR signaling and JAK kinases as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26301816

  2. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of HeLa cells response to Brucella melitensis infection: A molecular approach to understand the role of the mucosal epithelium in the onset of the Brucella pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Carlos A.; Drake, Kenneth L.; Adams, L. Garry

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. infect hosts primarily by adhering and penetrating mucosal surfaces, however the initial molecular phenomena of this host:pathogen interaction remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that characterizing the epithelial-like human HeLa cell line molecular response to wild type Brucella melitensis infection would help to understand the role of the mucosal epithelium at the onset of the Brucella pathogenesis. RNA samples from B. melitensis-infected HeLa cells were taken at 4 and 12 h of infection and hybridized in a cDNA microarray. The analysis using a dynamic Bayesian network modeling approach (DBN) identified several pathways, biological processes, cellular components and molecular functions altered due to infection at 4 h p.i., but almost none at 12 h p.i. The in silico modeling results were experimentally tested by knocking down the expression of MAPK1 by siRNA technology. MAPK1-siRNA transfected cell cultures decreased the internalization and impaired the intracellular replication of the pathogen in HeLa cells after 4 h p.i. DBN analysis provides important insights into the role of the epithelial cells response to Brucella infection and guide research to novel mechanisms identification. PMID:22484383

  4. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  5. [Pharmacological analysis of the pathogenesis of acute poisoning with the synthetic pyrethroid cypermethrin using the hydrobiont Daphnia magna Straus].

    PubMed

    Podosinovikova, N P; Solov'eva, N E; Mukovskiĭ, L A; Petrov, V V; Matveev, B B; Dolgo-Saburov, V B

    2002-01-01

    The results of pharmacological analysis are presented which provide information on the pathogenesis of acute cypermethrin poisoning that involves disturbances in various systems of the organism. These include changes in the system of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) and violation of the free radical generation processes, Na + channel functioning, cholinergic transmission, etc. The screening of drugs belonging to various pharmacological groups influencing the toxicity of pyrethroids (EAA receptor antagonists, antioxidants, Na + channel blockers, M-cholinoreceptor blockers) revealed promising agents for the treatment of cypermethrin poisoning.

  6. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotective Role of M. pruriens in Ethanol-Induced Gastric Mucosal Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassandarvish, Pouya; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Hadi, A. Hamid A.; Nordin, Noraziah; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    The investigation was to evaluate gastroprotective effects of ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in rats. Forty-eight rats were divided into 8 groups: negative control, extract control, ulcer control, reference control, and four experimental groups. As a pretreatment, the negative control and the ulcer control groups were orally administered carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The reference control was administered omeprazole orally (20 mg/kg). The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was given orally to the extract control group (500 mg/kg) and the experimental groups (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg). After 1 h, CMC was given orally to the negative and the extract control groups. The other groups received absolute ethanol. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. The ulcer control group exhibited significant mucosal injuries with decreased gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa. The extract caused upregulation of Hsp70 protein, downregulation of Bax protein, and intense periodic acid schiff uptake of glandular portion of stomach. Gastric mucosal homogenate showed significant antioxidant properties with increase in synthesis of PGE2, while MDA was significantly decreased. The ethanolic extract of M. pruriens leaves was nontoxic (<5 g/kg) and could enhance defensive mechanisms against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. PMID:23781513

  7. Spatiotemporal Interplay of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and Respiratory Mucosal Cells Drives Viral Dissemination in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Wei, Qiang; Nishiura, Kenji; Peng, Jie; Wang, Haibo; Midkiff, Cecily; Alvarez, Xavier; Qin, Chuan; Lackner, Andrew; Chen, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune responses play a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how SARS-CoV evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here, we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387+ and CD163+ monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells (LCs) and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes (LNs) within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages and the dendritic cell network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  8. The effect of synbiotics on acute radiation-induced diarrhea and its association with mucosal inflammatory and adaptive responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Basileios G; Theodoropoulos, George; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Stoidis, Christos N; Zapatis, Haralambos; Diamantopoulou, Kalliopi; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K; Karatzas, Gabriel; Machairas, Anastasios; Fotiadis, Constantinos; Zografos, George C; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vasileios

    2013-09-01

    Previous clinical studies advocated that probiotics beneficially affect acute radiation-induced diarrhea. These encouraging results were attributed to the restoration of the intestinal flora; however, there is lack of evidence if and how probiotics influence the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential supporting role of a synbiotic preparation (combination of pro- and pre-biotics) on experimentally-induced acute radiation diarrhea from the perspective of mucosal inflammation and histological injury. Ninety adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into six groups. Group A (non-irradiated), group B (non-irradiated/synbiotic supplemented), group C (irradiated), and group D (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up to a week after the beginning of the experiment. Group E (irradiated) and group F (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up for four days. On the last day of the experiments tissues were harvested for structural and molecular assessments. Synbiotic administration could not avert the occurrence of diarrhea, but significantly attenuated its severity. This effect was associated with the significant downregulation of neutrophil accumulation and lipid peroxidation during the acute phase. During the subacute phase, synbiotic treatment significantly improved both the histological profile and radiation mucositis. These mechanisms significantly contributed to the rehabilitation of the intestinal absorptive function as further indicated from the significantly reduced weight loss. Given the optimization of the intestinal flora exerted by synbiotics, the resolution of diarrhea relies on the suppression of the "reactive" and the augmentation of "regenerative" components of acute radiation-induced intestinal response.

  9. Detrimental effects of nicotine on the acute gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol: role of asymmetric dimethylarginine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Yuan; Zou, Yi-You; Wang, Li; Yang, Zhi-Chun; Guo, Ren; Li, Dai; Peng, Jun; Li, Yuan-Jian

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is responsible for the detrimental effects of nicotine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury and its underlying mechanisms. Gastric mucosal injury was induced by an injection of ethanol in the stomach in rats. Animals were pretreated with nicotine for 28 days before ethanol injection. The gastric mucosal ulcer index (UI) and the levels of ADMA and NO in gastric juice were determined. In vitro, the cultured mucosal epithelial cells were treated with nicotine in the presence or absence of ethanol. The concentration of ADMA in the culture medium and the ratio of cell apoptosis were measured, and the effect of nicotine or ADMA alone on cell apoptosis was also examined. In rats treated with ethanol, the UI and ADMA levels were increased and the NO level was decreased, and these effects of ethanol were augmented by pretreatment with nicotine. Administration of nicotine alone did not show significant impact on UI, ADMA level, or NO level. In vitro, incubation of human epithelial cells with ethanol induced cell injury accompanied by increased ADMA levels in the culture medium, an effect which was amplified in the presence of nicotine. Similarly, ethanol was able to induce epithelial cell apoptosis that was exacerbated by nicotine. Incubation of epithelial cells with nicotine alone did not induce cell apoptosis, but administration of ADMA alone did induce cell apoptosis. The results suggest that the gastric mucosal injury induced by ethanol is augmented by nicotine, which is related to the increased ADMA level.

  10. Elevation of S100A4 expression in buccal mucosal fibroblasts by arecoline: involvement in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-I; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-01-01

    S100A4, a member of the calcium-binding proteins, is dramatically elevated in a variety of fibrotic diseases. Areca quid chewing is the most important etiological factor in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). OSF has been considered as a pre-cancerous condition of oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the critical role of S100A4 expression in the pathogenesis of OSF both in vitro and in vivo. Thirty OSF tissues from areca quid chewers and ten normal buccal mucosa samples without areca quid chewing were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry for S100A4 expression in vivo. Collagen gel contraction capability and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP1)/MMP9 in arecoline-stimulated BMFs with S100A4 knockdown was presented in vitro. Initially, S100A4 expression was higher in areca quid chewing-associated OSF specimens than normal buccal mucosa specimens (p = 0.001). Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, led to dose- and time-dependent elevation of S100A4 expression in normal buccal mucosa fibroblasts BMFs (p<0.05). The additions of pharmacological agents rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), and Bay117082 (NF-κB inhibitor) were found to inhibit arecoline-induced S100A4 expression (p<0.05) in BMFs. Down-regulation of S100A4 by lentiviral infection significantly reversed arecoline-induced collagen gel contraction and TIMP1/MMP9 expression. These results suggest that S100A4 expression is significantly up-regulated in OSF specimens. Arecoline-induced S100A4 expression was down-regulated by rapamycin, PD98059, and Bay117082. Targeting S100A4 might be a potential therapeutic target for OSF through TIMP1/MMP9 down-regulation.

  11. Elevation of S100A4 Expression in Buccal Mucosal Fibroblasts by Arecoline: Involvement in the Pathogenesis of Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-I; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Background S100A4, a member of the calcium-binding proteins, is dramatically elevated in a variety of fibrotic diseases. Areca quid chewing is the most important etiological factor in the pathogenesis of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). OSF has been considered as a pre-cancerous condition of oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to determine the critical role of S100A4 expression in the pathogenesis of OSF both in vitro and in vivo. Methodology/Principal Finding Thirty OSF tissues from areca quid chewers and ten normal buccal mucosa samples without areca quid chewing were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry for S100A4 expression in vivo. Collagen gel contraction capability and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP1)/MMP9 in arecoline-stimulated BMFs with S100A4 knockdown was presented in vitro. Initially, S100A4 expression was higher in areca quid chewing-associated OSF specimens than normal buccal mucosa specimens (p = 0.001). Arecoline, a major areca nut alkaloid, led to dose- and time-dependent elevation of S100A4 expression in normal buccal mucosa fibroblasts BMFs (p<0.05). The additions of pharmacological agents rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), and Bay117082 (NF-κB inhibitor) were found to inhibit arecoline-induced S100A4 expression (p<0.05) in BMFs. Down-regulation of S100A4 by lentiviral infection significantly reversed arecoline-induced collagen gel contraction and TIMP1/MMP9 expression. Conclusion/Significance These results suggest that S100A4 expression is significantly up-regulated in OSF specimens. Arecoline-induced S100A4 expression was down-regulated by rapamycin, PD98059, and Bay117082. Targeting S100A4 might be a potential therapeutic target for OSF through TIMP1/MMP9 down-regulation. PMID:23383075

  12. LeuX tRNA-dependent and -independent mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenesis in acute cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Mysorekar, Indira U.; Chen, Swaine L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Jones, Jennifer M.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) contain multiple horizontally acquired pathogenicity-associated islands (PAI) implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. In a murine model of cystitis, type 1 pili-mediated bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation are key events associated with UPEC virulence. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which a conserved PAI contributes to UPEC pathogenesis in acute cystitis. In the human UPEC strain UTI89, spontaneous excision of PAI IIUTI89 disrupts the adjacent leuX tRNA locus. Loss of wild-type leuX-encoded tRNA5Leu significantly delayed, but did not eliminate, FimB recombinase-mediated phase variation of type 1 pili. FimX, an additional FimB-like, leuX-independent recombinase, was also found to mediate type 1 pili phase variation. However, whereas FimX activity is relatively slow in vitro, it is rapid in vivo as a non-piliated strain lacking the other fim recombinases rapidly expressed type 1 pili upon experimental infection. Finally, we found that disruption of leuX, but not loss of PAI IIUTI89 genes, reduced bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation, independent of type 1 piliation. These findings indicate that the predominant mechanism for preservation of PAI IIUTI89 during the establishment of acute cystitis is maintenance of wild-type leuX, and not PAI IIUTI89 gene content. PMID:18036139

  13. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Seno, Takahiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Kida, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Amane; Kukida, Yuji; Fujioka, Kazuki; Fujii, Wataru; Murakami, Ken; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a protein expressed by macrophages infiltrating the area around the coronary arteries of rats with an ectopic cardiac allograft. Some studies have shown that expression of AIF-1 increased in a mouse model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced acute colitis and in acute cellular rejection of human cardiac allografts. These results suggest that AIF-1 is related to acute inflammation. The current study used bleomycin-induced acute lung injury to analyze the expression of AIF-1 and to examine its function in acute lung injury. Results showed that AIF-1 was significantly expressed in lung macrophages and increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice with bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in comparison to control mice. Recombinant AIF-1 increased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α from RAW264.7 (a mouse macrophage cell line) and primary lung fibroblasts, and it also increased the production of KC (CXCL1) from lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AIF-1 plays an important role in the mechanism underlying acute lung injury.

  14. Complement C3 on microglial clusters in multiple sclerosis occur in chronic but not acute disease: Implication for disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; Naessens, Daphne M. P.; Hametner, Simon; Guldenaar, Willemijn; Kooi, Evert‐Jan; Geurts, Jeroen J. G.; Baas, Frank; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Microglial clusters with C3d deposits are observed in the periplaque of multiple sclerosis (MS) brains and were proposed as early stage of lesion formation. As such they should appear in the brain of MS donors with acute disease but thus far this has not been shown. Using postmortem brain tissue from acute (n = 10) and chronic (n = 15) MS cases we investigated whether C3d+ microglial clusters are part of an acute attack against myelinated axons, which could have implications for disease pathogenesis. The specificity of our findings to MS was tested in ischemic stroke cases (n = 8) with initial or advanced lesions and further analyzed in experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI, n = 26), as both conditions are primarily nondemyelinating but share essential features of neurodegeneration with MS lesions. C3d+ microglial clusters were found in chronic but not acute MS. They were not associated with antibody deposits or terminal complement activation. They were linked to slowly expanding lesions, localized on axons with impaired transport and associated with neuronal C3 production. C3d+ microglial clusters were not specific to MS as they were also found in stroke and experimental TBI. We conclude that C3d+ microglial clusters in MS are not part of an acute attack against myelinated axons. As such it is unlikely that they drive formation of new lesions but could represent a physiological mechanism to remove irreversibly damaged axons in chronic disease. GLIA 2017;65:264–277 PMID:27778395

  15. B cell-mediated antigen presentation is required for the pathogenesis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Noorchashm, Hooman; Reed, Amy J; Rostami, Susan Y; Mozaffari, Raha; Zekavat, Ghazal; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Caton, Andrew J; Naji, Ali

    2006-12-01

    Acute allograft rejection requires the activation of alloreactive CD4 T cells. Despite the capacity of B cells to act as potent APCs capable of activating CD4 T cells in vivo, their role in the progression of acute allograft rejection was unclear. To determine the contribution of B cell APC function in alloimmunity, we engineered mice with a targeted deficiency of MHC class II-mediated Ag presentation confined to the B cell compartment. Cardiac allograft survival was markedly prolonged in these mice as compared to control counterparts (median survival time, >70 vs 9.5 days). Mechanistically, deficient B cell-mediated Ag presentation disrupted both alloantibody production and the progression of CD4 T cell activation following heart transplantation. These findings demonstrate that indirect alloantigen presentation by recipients' B cells plays an important role in the efficient progression of acute vascularized allograft rejection.

  16. Glucocorticoid exposure alters the pathogenesis of Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus during acute infection

    PubMed Central

    Young, Erin E.; Prentice, Thomas W.; Satterlee, Danielle; McCullough, Heath; Sieve, Amy N.; Johnson, Robin R.; Welsh, Thomas H.; Welsh, C. Jane R.; Meagher, Mary W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that chronic restraint stress exacerbates Theiler’s virus infection, a murine model for CNS inflammation and multiple sclerosis. The current set of experiments was designed to evaluate the potential role of glucocorticoids in the deleterious effects of restraint stress on acute CNS inflammatory disease. Exposure to chronic restraint stress resulted in elevated levels of corticosterone as well as increased clinical scores and weight loss (Experiment 1). In addition, corticosterone administration alone exacerbated behavioral signs of TMEV-induced sickness (i.e. decreased body weight, increased symptoms of encephalitis, and increased mortality) and reduced inflammation in the CNS (Experiment 2). Infected subjects receiving exogenous corticosterone showed exacerbation of acute phase measures of sickness and severe mortality as well as decreased viral clearance from CNS (Experiment 3). These findings indicate that corticosterone exposure alone is sufficient to exacerbate acute CNS inflammatory disease. PMID:18538803

  17. Imbalance of Th17/Treg cells in pathogenesis of patients with human leukocyte antigen B27 associated acute anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yuqin; Zhu, Gejing; Gu, Yunfeng; Mao, Liping; Hong, Meng; Li, Yali; Zheng, Meiqin

    2017-01-01

    Th17 and regulatory T cells, involved in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, are new lineages of CD4+ T helper cells. However, the role of their imbalance in human leukocyte antigen B27-associated acute anterior uveitis has not been elucidated. In our study, the percentages of Th17 and Treg cells, their molecular markers and related factors in peripheral blood of patients and healthy controls were measured by flow cytometry, real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. We observed a remarkable increase of CD4+ and CD4+IL-17+ T cells in peripheral blood of patients compared to controls. The molecular markers and related factors of Th17 cell were also showed a distinct elevation. Interestingly, we observed an obvious decrease of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and Foxp3 mRNA level in patients. The ratio of Th17/Treg in patients was dramatically higher than controls. Moreover, the ratio of Th17/Treg cells had a more significantly positive correlation with the disease activity score than Th17 cells whereas Treg cells had a negative correlation. Our findings demonstrated a distinct increase of Th17 cells and a significant decrease of Treg cells in patients compared to controls. The imbalance of Th17 and Treg cells may play a vital role in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:28091550

  18. Effects of acute chemotherapy-induced mucositis on spontaneous behaviour and the grimace scale in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, A L; Leach, M C; Preston, F L; Lymn, K A; Howarth, G S

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a frequent side-effect of chemotherapy treatment. Many oncological research programs aim to identify novel treatments for this distressing condition, and these programs frequently use rat models. Little is known about the presence and progression of pain in these models and how this can best be treated by analgesic therapy. We used a number of behaviour-based methods of pain assessment to determine which tools were best suited for pain identification. Baseline measures for behavioural assessment, rat grimace score and sociability were determined through analysis of continuously recorded video data and an applied social interaction test (n = 16). Mucositis was then induced by intraperitoneal injection of 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) and further behavioural analyses undertaken. An assessment of enrichment interaction was also made by determining the mass of a plastic chew toy gnawed both pre- and post-chemotherapy injection. Behavioural scoring was performed 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after injection, with facial expression being scored at the 12, 24 and 48 h time-points. Sociability testing was performed once during the post-injection period. No significant differences were found in grimace scores between baseline and later daily measures. Behaviours similar to those previously reported post-laparotomy were observed. Writhing, twitching and back-arching behaviours were most evident in rats affected by mucositis and were increased in frequency (respective P values: 0.002, 0.004 and 0.008) 48 h after chemotherapy injection compared with baseline, implying that pain onset occurred around this time-point. Social investigatory behaviour was also increased (P = 0.002) following disease onset. Each day, rats post-5FU injection gnawed a greater percentage of their Nylabone enrichment by weight than the saline-injected control rats (P = 0.046). These data suggest that, of the tools tested, behavioural assessment scoring may find greatest

  19. Primary mucosal melanomas: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Marija; Vlajkovic, Slobodan; Jovanovic, Predrag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2012-01-01

    Primary mucosal melanomas arise from melanocytes located in mucosal membranes lining respiratory, gastrointestinal and urogenital tract. Although a majority of mucosal melanomas originate from the mucosa of the nasal cavity and accessory sinuses, oral cavity, anorectum, vulva and vagina, they can arise in almost any part of mucosal membranes. Most of mucosal melanomas occur in occult sites, which together with the lack of early and specific signs contribute to late diagnosis, and poor prognosis. Because of their rareness the knowledge about their pathogenesis and risk factors is insufficient, and also there are not well established protocols for staging and treatment of mucosal melanomas. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with trends toward more conservative treatment since radical surgery did not show an advantage for survival. Radiotherapy can provide better local control in some locations, but did not show improvement in survival. There is no effective systemic therapy for these aggressive tumors. Compared with cutaneous and ocular melanoma, mucosal melanomas have lowest percent of five-year survival. Recently revealed molecular changes underlying mucosal melanomas offer new hope for development of more effective systemic therapy for mucosal melanomas. Herein we presented a comprehensive review of various locations of primary melanoma along mucosal membranes, their epidemiological and clinical features, and treatment options. We also gave a short comparison of some characteristics of cutaneous and mucosal melanomas. PMID:23071856

  20. Old World hantaviruses: aspects of pathogenesis and clinical course of acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Krautkrämer, Ellen; Zeier, Martin

    2014-07-17

    Hantavirus-associated diseases represent emerging infections that are ranked in the highest priority group of communicable diseases for surveillance and epidemiological research. In the last years, several novel hantavirus species were described and the number of host reservoir species harboring hantaviruses is also increasing. Reports of cases with severe or atypical clinical courses become also more frequent. These facts raise more and more questions concerning host reservoir specificity, pathogenicity and molecular mechanism of pathogenesis. Hantavirus disease is characterized by vascular leakage due to increased capillary permeability. The infection manifests often in the lung (hantaviral cardiopulmonary syndrome; HCPS) or in the kidney (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, HFRS). The underlying mechanisms of both syndromes are probably similar despite the difference in organ tropism. Characterization of hantaviral replication cycle and of patient-specific determinants will help to identify factors responsible for the clinical symptoms and course.

  1. Central role of neutrophil in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-wen; Meng, Xiao-xiao; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an acute abdominal disease with the strong systemic inflammatory response, and rapidly progresses from a local pancreatic damage into multiple organ dysfunction. For many decades, the contributions of neutrophils to the pathology of SAP were traditionally thought to be the chemokine and cytokine cascades that accompany inflammation. In this review, we focus mainly on those recently recognized aspects of neutrophils in SAP processes. First, emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic interventions targeting neutrophils significantly lower tissue damage and protect against the occurrence of pancreatitis. Second, trypsin activation promotes the initial neutrophils recruitment into local pancreas, and subsequently neutrophils infiltration in turn triggers trypsin production. Finally, neutrophils have the unique ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps even in the absence of pathogens. PMID:26249268

  2. Mouse Models for the Study of Mucosal Vaccination Against Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Sabirov, Albert; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common infectious diseases in humans. The pathogenesis of OM involves nasopharyngeal colonization (NP) and retrograde ascension of the pathogen up the Eustachian tube into the middle ear (ME). Due to increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, there is an urgent need for vaccines to prevent infections caused by the most common causes of bacterial OM, including nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis. Current vaccine strategies aim to diminish bacterial NP carriage, thereby reducing the likelihood of developing acute OM. To be effective, vaccination should induce local mucosal mmunity both in the ME and in the NP. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that the intranasal route of vaccination is particularly effective at inducing immune responses in the nasal passage and ME for protection against OM. The mouse is increasingly used in these models, because of the availability of murine reagents and the existence of technology to manipulate murine models of disease immunologically and genetically. Previous studies confirmed the suitability of the mouse as a model for inflammatory processes in acute OM. Here, we discuss various murine models of OM and review the applicability of these models to assess the efficacy of mucosal vaccination and the mechanisms responsible for protection. In addition, we discuss various mucosal vaccine antigens, mucosal adjuvants and mucosal delivery systems. PMID:18295938

  3. Biology of HIV Mucosal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV-1 mucosal transmission plays a critical role in HIV-1 infection and AIDS pathogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in biological studies of HIV-1 mucosal transmission, highlighting the implications of these studies in the development of microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Recent findings New studies of initial HIV-1 infection using improved culture models updated the current view of mucosal transmission. Mechanistic studies enhanced our understanding of cell-cell transmission of HIV-1 mediated by the major target cells, including dendritic cells, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Increasing evidence indicated the significance of host factors and immune responses in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission. Summary Recent progress in HIV-1 mucosal infection and transmission enriches our knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Functional studies of HIV-1 interactions with host cells can provide new insights into the design of more effective approaches to combat HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:18802490

  4. [Create the mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced by caerulein plus lipopolysaccharide and study on its pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Chang; Li, Ji Cheng

    2003-04-01

    To set up a nontraumatic and convenient mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Caerulein(Cn) was injected the mice intraperitonealy with lipopolysaccharide(LPS). Serum amylase and pancreas weight were measured in experiment. The pathological changes of pancreas and other organs were observed under light microscope. The ultrastructure of acini were observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). Serum NO concentration were measured and the SOD and MDA in pancreas were examined. The results in Cn + LPS group were showed that serum amylase, NO concentration and pancreas weight were increased, SOD deduced and MDA increased. Severe edema, inflammation infiltration, necrosis and different extent of hemorrhage were showed. The acini were damaged severely. And the lesion of other organs were also happened. In Cn group, there were only pancreatic interstitial edema but no parenchmal necrosis or hemorrhage, and the other organs were normal. In LPS group, pancreas were almost normal and the organs besides pancreas were only showed light inflammation infiltration. The SAP mouse model induced by caerulein plus LPS has the same pathological characteristics of human SAP, which can be used in human SAP research. The unbalance of oxygen free radical release-elimination and oxidation-antioxidation mechanisms might be involved in the pathogenesis of mouse model of severe acute pancreatitis induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein plus LPS.

  5. Molecular Determinants of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Pathogenesis and Virulence in Young and Aged Mouse Models of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Boyd; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Page, Carly; Donaldson, Eric; Roberts, Anjeanette; Vogel, Leatrice; Woodruff, Becky; Scorpio, Diana; Subbarao, Kanta; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes severe acute respiratory tract disease characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and hyaline membrane formation. This pathology often progresses to acute respiratory distress (such as acute respiratory distress syndrome [ARDS]) and atypical pneumonia in humans, with characteristic age-related mortality rates approaching 50% or more in immunosenescent populations. The molecular basis for the extreme virulence of SARS-CoV remains elusive. Since young and aged (1-year-old) mice do not develop severe clinical disease following infection with wild-type SARS-CoV, a mouse-adapted strain of SARS-CoV (called MA15) was developed and was shown to cause lethal infection in these animals. To understand the genetic contributions to the increased pathogenesis of MA15 in rodents, we used reverse genetics and evaluated the virulence of panels of derivative viruses encoding various combinations of mouse-adapted mutations. We found that mutations in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein and, to a much less rigorous extent, in the nsp9 nonstructural protein, were primarily associated with the acquisition of virulence in young animals. The mutations in S likely increase recognition of the mouse angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor not only in MA15 but also in two additional, independently isolated mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs. In contrast to the findings for young animals, mutations to revert to the wild-type sequence in nsp9 and the S glycoprotein were not sufficient to significantly attenuate the virus compared to other combinations of mouse-adapted mutations in 12-month-old mice. This panel of SARS-CoVs provides novel reagents that we have used to further our understanding of differential, age-related pathogenic mechanisms in mouse models of human disease. PMID:22072787

  6. [The pathogenesis of the acute symptoms of Menière's disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jahnke, K

    1977-05-01

    The pathogenesis of vertigo attacks and hearing fluctuations in Menière's disease is discussed on the basis of new electronmicroscopic observations on the perilymph endolymph barrier. The zonulae occludentes (z.o.) of the epithelial cells lining the endolymphatic space are the main sealing elements which control the passive ion transport. They consist of parallel running intramembranous fibrils (cell membrane fusion lines). Recent investigations demonstrated conditions which partially destruct some of such fibrils (e.g. increased osmotic pressure, endocrine disorders). This also may be true in Menière's attacks: tight z.o. are transformed to leaky z.o. such that a high transepithelial ion exchange developes. This would result in reduced generation of the receptor potentials as well as in decreased activities of the first order afferent neurons as it was supposed earlier by other authors. This mechanism may be combined with a decompensation of active ion transport processes due to microcirculation disturbances. Finally it will be pointed out that true ruptures of the endolymphatic walls cannot be the usual mode of reversible lesions in Menières disease but a diffuse leakage of the perilymph-endolymph barrier.

  7. Intrarenal dynamics in the pathogenesis and prevention of acute urate nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Conger, J D; Falk, S A

    1977-01-01

    Tubular fluid flow, urine osmolality, and pH were selectively altered to determine the relative protective roles of these factors in a rat model of acute urate nephrophathy. Various prehyper uricemic conditions were established in five groups of animals: (a) normopenic Wistar rats given no pretreatment (Group I); (b) Wistar rats given acetazolamide, 20 mg/kg, and isotonic NaHCO3 to produce urine alkalinization (Group II); (c) Wistar rats in which a moderate diuresis, similar to that observed in Group II but without urine alkalinization, was induced with furosemide, 2 mg/kg (Group III); (d) Wistar rats in which a high-flow solute diuresis was induced with furosemide, 15 mg/kg (Group IV); (e) Brattleboro rats, homozygous for pituitary diabetes insipidus, that had a spontaneous high-flow water diuresis (Group V). A comparable level of hyperuricemia (19.4+/-2.2 mg/100 ml) was achieved in all animals with intravenous urate infusion. Clearance and micropuncture studies were performed before and 1 h after induction of hyperuicemia. Group I rats had mean falls in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate of 83 and 86%, respectively; nephron filtration rate decreased 66%, and tubular and microvascular pressures increased twofold. In Group II there were 45 and 47% declines in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate, respectively, a 66% fall in nephron filtration rate, and a 30% increase in tubular and vascular pressures. Moderate amounts of urate were seen in the kidneys. Group III had changes in renal function identical to Group II suggesting that the moderate prehyperuricemic diuresis in the latter group and not urine alkalinization produced the partial protection observed. Groups IV and V were completely and comparably protected with renal function studies unchanged from controls. It is concluded that high tubular fluid flow, whether induced by a solute or water diuresis, is the primary mechanism of protection in acute urate nephropathy. At most, urine

  8. Ulinastatin reduces pathogenesis of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gan, Zhengyi; Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Liming; Xu, Guoxiong

    2014-10-01

    Phosgene (CG) is an industrial chemical used to make plastics, rubbers, dyestuff, and pesticides. Although the inhalation of CG is relatively uncommon, its accidental exposure can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). Ulinastatin, a urinary trypsin inhibitor, has been emerged to use for the treatment of acute inflammatory state of a number of organs including the lung. In this study, we examined the pathogenic changes in the lungs after the inhalation of CG gas and also examined the effect of ulinastatin treatment in reversing these changes in rats. We found that the rats exposed to CG gas at a dose of 5.0 g/m(3) for 5 min led to ALI after 6 h. The signs of lung injury include pulmonary edema, hemorrhage, and cellular infiltration in pulmonary alveoli. In addition, interleukin-15 (IL-15) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased in CG-inhaled animals. Ulinastatin administration at 1 h postexposure significantly reduced the intensity of all the pathological changes in the lungs of these CG-exposed animals. Ulinastatin at a dose of 400 U/g was shown to decrease the total number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the levels of IL-15 and ICAM-1 in the serum. We also found that the structure of the lung was protected by ulinastatin treatment. Thus, our data suggest that ulinastatin can be used as an effective drug for the treatment of CG-induced ALI. The serum levels of IL-15 and ICAM-1 can be used as the markers of lung injury after exposure to CG and may also serve as useful therapeutic targets at an early stage. The effects of long-term treatment of ulinastatin and the mechanisms by which ulinastatin decreases the infiltration of blood cells and reduces cytokines need further investigation. © The Author(s) 2012.

  9. What's new in the pathogenesis of the coagulopathy in acute promyelocytic leukemia?

    PubMed

    Mantha, Simon; Tallman, Martin S; Soff, Gerald A

    2016-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is associated with a complex coagulopathy. In spite of substantial recent improvements in treatment regimens, hemorrhagic death remains the main cause of induction failure. In this review, we delineate recent understanding of the pathophysiology and management of the hemorrhagic diathesis of APL. Laboratory and clinical data suggest that the malignant leukocytes mediate the hemorrhagic diathesis associated with APL through multiple mechanisms which lead to a combination of consumptive coagulopathy and primary hyperfibrinolysis. Exposure of tissue factor and Annexin II by the leukemic blasts is the main determinants of these processes. Promyelocyte-derived microparticles have recently been implicated in the coagulopathy as well. Total white cell count and platelet count have emerged as good general predictors of hemorrhagic death, along with the different routine hemostatic parameters. Prompt treatment with all-trans retinoic acid, with or without arsenic trioxide, is the most important step in preventing bleeding complications. Repletion of coagulation factors and platelets with blood products remains the mainstay of supportive treatment, whereas the role of recombinant soluble thrombomodulin is currently being investigated. The coagulopathy of APL is multifactorial, with both disseminated intravascular coagulation and primary hyperfibrinolysis mediated largely by the malignant leukocytes.

  10. Hemodilution is Not Critical in the Pathogenesis of the Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, M.; Moore, E.E.; Droz, N.; Harr, J.; Gonzalez, E.; Fragoso, M.; Silliman, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The acute coagulopathy of trauma is multifactorial; but generally believed to be aggravated by co-existing acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution. While acidosis and hypothermia have been extensively evaluated, there is a paucity of data on the independent role of hemodilution in this scenario. We therefore hypothesized that hemodilution will impair coagulation following experimental trauma and hemorrhagic shock. Methods Adult male Spraque-Dawley rats underwent trauma and hemorrhagic shock, followed by resuscitation with 2× SBV using normal saline (NS). Thrombelastography (TEG) was performed before and after shock. Results In this trauma model, resuscitated resulted in a hemodilution of 50% (43 ± 4.05% vs. 19.8 ± 3.96% Hct preshock vs. postshock, p<0.0001). Despite the substantial hemodilution, there was no significant change in clot strength (12.96 ± 2.84 vs. 11.79 ± 1.28 dynes/cm2 G preshock vs. postshock, p=0.13). Similarly, the onset of coagulation (R time) was not impaired (1.68 ± 1.74 sec vs. 1.75 ± 0.63 sec R time preshock vs. postshock, p=0.45). Conclusion In the absence of hypothermia and acidosis, hemodilution (≤ 50%) has a trivial effect on coagulation following trauma and hemorrhagic shock. These data call to question the commonly held belief that hemodilution per se is critical in the development of postinjury coagulopathy. PMID:21696767

  11. The Role of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus Accessory Proteins in Virus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Ruth; Fielding, Burtram C.

    2012-01-01

    A respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, termed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was first reported in China in late 2002. The subsequent efficient human-to-human transmission of this virus eventually affected more than 30 countries worldwide, resulting in a mortality rate of ~10% of infected individuals. The spread of the virus was ultimately controlled by isolation of infected individuals and there has been no infections reported since April 2004. However, the natural reservoir of the virus was never identified and it is not known if this virus will re-emerge and, therefore, research on this virus continues. The SARS-CoV genome is about 30 kb in length and is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). The genome encodes for proteins that are homologous to known coronavirus proteins, such as the replicase proteins (ORFs 1a and 1b) and the four major structural proteins: nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), membrane (M) and envelope (E). SARS-CoV also encodes for eight unique proteins, called accessory proteins, with no known homologues. This review will summarize the current knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins and will include: (i) expression and processing; (ii) the effects on cellular processes; and (iii) functional studies. PMID:23202509

  12. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity.

  13. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  14. The role of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus accessory proteins in virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ruth; Fielding, Burtram C

    2012-11-07

    A respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus, termed the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), was first reported in China in late 2002. The subsequent efficient human-to-human transmission of this virus eventually affected more than 30 countries worldwide, resulting in a mortality rate of ~10% of infected individuals. The spread of the virus was ultimately controlled by isolation of infected individuals and there has been no infections reported since April 2004. However, the natural reservoir of the virus was never identified and it is not known if this virus will re-emerge and, therefore, research on this virus continues. The SARS-CoV genome is about 30 kb in length and is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). The genome encodes for proteins that are homologous to known coronavirus proteins, such as the replicase proteins (ORFs 1a and 1b) and the four major structural proteins: nucleocapsid (N), spike (S), membrane (M) and envelope (E). SARS-CoV also encodes for eight unique proteins, called accessory proteins, with no known homologues. This review will summarize the current knowledge on SARS-CoV accessory proteins and will include: (i) expression and processing; (ii) the effects on cellular processes; and (iii) functional studies.

  15. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  16. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L; Teixeira, Erica W; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D

    2014-07-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV-host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide.

  17. Antioxidant Properties and Gastroprotective Effects of 2-(Ethylthio)Benzohydrazones on Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ariffin, Azhar; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Abdullah, Zanariah

    2016-01-01

    A series of new 2-(ethylthio)benzohydrazone derivatives (1–6) were prepared and characterised by IR, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The newly prepared compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activities using free radical scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Among them, most powerful antioxidant, compound 1 has been selected in order to illustrate anti-ulcer effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. Four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were respectively treated with 10% Tween 20 as ulcer control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole as reference group, 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg compound 1 as experimental animals. Macroscopically, ulcer control group showed extensive hemorrhagic lesions of gastric mucosa compared with omeprazole or compound 1. Rats pre-treated with compound 1 showed increased in gastric pH and gastric mucus. Histologically, ulcer control group showed severe damage to gastric mucosa with edema and leucocytes infiltration of submucosal layer. In immunohistochemical analysis, rats which were pre-treated with compound 1 showed up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax proteins. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effect of compound 1 may be due to its antioxidant activity, and/or due to up-regulation of HSP70 and down-regulation of Bax protein in stained tissue section. PMID:27272221

  18. Interleukin-17A-induced production of acute serum amyloid A by keratinocytes contributes to psoriasis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Couderc, Elodie; Morel, Franck; Levillain, Pierre; Buffière-Morgado, Amandine; Camus, Magalie; Paquier, Camille; Bodet, Charles; Jégou, Jean-François; Pohin, Mathilde; Favot, Laure; Garcia, Martine; Huguier, Vincent; Mcheik, Jiad; Lacombe, Corinne; Yssel, Hans; Guillet, Gérard; Bernard, François-Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute-serum Amyloid A (A-SAA), one of the major acute-phase proteins, is mainly produced in the liver but extra-hepatic synthesis involving the skin has been reported. Its expression is regulated by the transcription factors NF-κB, C/EBPβ, STAT3 activated by proinflammatory cytokines. Objectives We investigated A-SAA synthesis by resting and cytokine-activated Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes (NHEK), and their inflammatory response to A-SAA stimulation. A-SAA expression was also studied in mouse skin and liver in a model mimicking psoriasis and in the skin and sera of psoriatic and atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Methods NHEK were stimulated by A-SAA or the cytokines IL-1α, IL-17A, IL-22, OSM, TNF-α alone or in combination, previously reported to reproduce features of psoriasis. Murine skins were treated by imiquimod cream. Human skins and sera were obtained from patients with psoriasis and AD. A-SAA mRNA was quantified by RT qPCR. A-SAA proteins were dosed by ELISA or immunonephelemetry assay. Results IL-1α, TNF-α and mainly IL-17A induced A-SAA expression by NHEK. A-SAA induced its own production and the synthesis of hBD2 and CCL20, both ligands for CCR6, a chemokine receptor involved in the trafficking of Th17 lymphocytes. A-SAA expression was increased in skins and livers from imiquimod-treated mice and in patient skins with psoriasis, but not significantly in those with AD. Correlations between A-SAA and psoriasis severity and duration were observed. Conclusion Keratinocytes could contribute to psoriasis pathogenesis via A-SAA production, maintaining a cutaneous inflammatory environment, activating innate immunity and Th17 lymphocyte recruitment. PMID:28708859

  19. Telmisartan treatment targets inflammatory cytokines to suppress the pathogenesis of acute colitis induced by dextran sulphate sodium.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Afrin, Mst Rejina; Miyashita, Shizuka; Nomoto, Mayumi; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2015-08-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) is essential for the regulation of cardiovascular and renal functions to maintain the fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated a locally expressed RAS in various tissues of mammals, which is having pathophysiological roles in those organ system. Interestingly, local RAS has important role during the inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis. Further to delineate its role and also to identify the potential effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, we have used a mouse model of acute colitis induced by dextran sulphate sodium. We have used 0.01 and 5mg/kg body weight doses of telmisartan and administered as enema to facilitate the on-site action and to reduce the systemic adverse effects. Telmisartan high dose treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index score when compared with the colitis control mice. In addition, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers expression were also significantly reduced when compared with the colitis control mice. Subsequent experiments were carried out to investigate some of the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammatory effects and identified that the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 as well as cellular DNA damage were significantly suppressed when compared with the colitis control mice. Similarly the apoptosis marker proteins such as cleaved caspase 3 and 7 levels were down-regulated and anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 level was significantly upregulated by telmisartan treatment. These results indicate that blockade of RAS by telmisartan can be an effective therapeutic option against acute colitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathogenesis of middle ear adhesions.

    PubMed

    Cayé-Thomasen, P; Hermansson, A; Tos, M; Prellner, K

    1996-04-01

    Middle ear adhesions are well-known to the ear surgeon, although data on etiology, pathogenesis, and significance are lacking in current literature. This study on experimental acute otitis media presents histopathological data on these aspects. Pneumococci were inoculated in the right middle ear bulla of 25 rats; the left ear served as control. At days 4, 8, 16, 90, and 180, respectively, 5 rats were decapitated, and the bullae were removed, opened, and stained with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)/alcian blue. The entire middle ear mucosae were dissected from the bone, embedded as whole mounts in colophonium chambers, and examined by light microscopy. Representative parts of the mucosae were sectioned and examined in the same way. All inoculated ears from day 8 and later (20 in total), contained mucosal adhesions of various sizes, shapes, and locations. None were found in control ears. The site of predilection for the development of adhesions was the hypotympanum, followed by the anterior epitympanum, the attic, the drum, the interossicular spaces, and the tubal orifice. Based on present histopathological findings, we conclude that the middle ear adhesion is a pathological phenomenon caused by infection, and we propose a six-stage hypothesis of pathogenesis: 1. Localized epithelial rupture; 2. Prolapse of subepithelial tissue; 3. Epithelialization of the prolapse; resulting in a polypous/fold-like prominence; 4. Growth and elongation of the prominence; 5. Fusion of the end/tip of the prominence with another part of the mucosa; 6. Formation of an adhesion.

  1. Cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation for persistent epithelial defect in severe ocular surface diseases with acute inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Sotozono, Chie; Inatomi, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Takahiro; Koizumi, Noriko; Yokoi, Norihiko; Ueta, Mayumi; Matsuyama, Kotone; Kaneda, Hideaki; Fukushima, Masanori; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of cultivated oral mucosal epithelial transplantation (COMET) for the treatment of persistent epithelial defect (PED). We treated 10 eyes of nine patients with PED (Stevens-Johnson syndrome: three eyes; thermal/chemical injury: five eyes; ocular cicatricial pemphigoid: two eyes) with COMET at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan from 2002 to 2008. Preoperatively, PED existed on over more than 50% of the corneal surface in seven eyes. Severe ocular surface inflammation with fibrovascular tissue surrounded the PED in all 10 eyes. At 24-weeks postoperative, PED had improved in all cases except 1 in which the patient was unable to return to the hospital (95% CI, 55.5-99.7; Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p = 0.0078). The preoperative median of logarithmic minimum angle of resolution was 1.85 (range 0.15-2.70), and 1.85, 1.85, and 1.52 at the 4th, 12th, and 24th postoperative week, respectively. The mean total preoperative ocular surface grading score was 7.0 (range 4-17). At 4 and 12 weeks postoperative, the total ocular surface grading score had improved significantly (p = 0.0020, p = 0.0078), and at 24 weeks postoperative, it was 3.0 (range 2-12, p = 0.0234). During the follow-up period (median 23.3 months, range 5.6-39.7 months), no recurrence of PED was observed in any eye, and long-term ocular surface stability was obtained. COMET enabled complete epithelialization of PED and stabilization of the ocular surface in patients with severe ocular surface disease, thus preventing end-stage cicatrization and vision loss at a later stage. © 2014 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. Innate Lymphoid Cells Are the Predominant Source of IL-17A during the Early Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muir, Roshell; Osbourn, Megan; Dubois, Alice V; Doran, Emma; Small, Donna M; Monahan, Avril; O'Kane, Cecilia M; McAllister, Katherine; Fitzgerald, Denise C; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McAuley, Daniel F; Ingram, Rebecca J

    2016-02-15

    IL-17A is purported to help drive early pathogenesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by enhancing neutrophil recruitment. Although IL-17A is the archetypal cytokine of T-helper 17 cells, it is produced by a number of lymphocytes, the source during ARDS being unknown. To identify the cellular source and the role of IL-17A in the early phase of lung injury. Lung injury was induced in wild-type (C57BL/6) and IL-17 knockout (KO) mice with aerosolized LPS (100 μg) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Detailed phenotyping of the cells expressing RORγt, the transcriptional regulator of IL-17 production, in the mouse lung at 24 hours was performed by flow cytometry. A 100-fold reduction in neutrophil infiltration was observed in the lungs of the IL-17A KO compared with wild-type mice. The majority of RORγt(+) cells in the mouse lung were the recently identified group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s). Detailed characterization revealed these pulmonary ILC3s (pILC3s) to be discrete from those described in the gut. The critical role of these cells was verified by inducing injury in recombinase-activating gene 2 KO mice, which lack T cells but retain innate lymphoid cells. No amelioration of pathology was observed in the recombinase-activating gene 2 KO mice. IL-17 is rapidly produced during lung injury and significantly contributes to early immunopathogenesis. This is orchestrated largely by a distinct population of pILC3s. Modulation of the activity of pILC3s may potentiate early control of the inflammatory dysregulation seen in ARDS, opening up new therapeutic targets.

  3. Gastrointestinal mucositis: the role of MMP-tight junction interactions in tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Dasooqi, Noor; Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J

    2014-07-01

    Chemotherapy for cancer causes significant gut toxicity known as mucositis. The pathogenesis of mucositis is ill defined. Recent clinical research guidelines have highlighted epithelial junctional complexes as emerging targets within mucositis research. Given the robust biological evidence linking tight junctions and matrix metalloproteinases, key mediators of mucositis, tight junction proteins have received significant attention. Despite this, the link between tight junctions, matrix metalloproteinases and mucositis development is yet to be established. This critical review therefore aims to describe the role of matrix metalloproteinases in mucositis, and how matrix metalloproteinase-dependent tight junction disruption may contribute to the pathobiology of mucositis.

  4. [Mucosal immune system and mucosal vaccine].

    PubMed

    Yanagita, M; Hiroi, T; Kiyono, H

    1997-02-01

    In the recent years, mucosal immune system is recognized as the new world in the area of immunology. The host is continuously exposed to the numerous numbers of environmental antigens via the mucosa and the skin. A total surface area of the mucosa is approximately 200 times larger than that of the skin, and the former surface area contains a large numbers of lymphoid cells (> 10(11)). In order to provide an effective defence for the host by vaccine, it is logical to consider the mucosal immune system. According to the new informations obtained by the modern cellular and molecular immunobiological knowledges and approaches, the concept of the mucosal immune system has been rapidly proceeded to apply for the development of mucosal vaccine. In this report, we have reviewed and discussed the recent progress in the characterization of mucosal immune system and the development of mucosal vaccine.

  5. [Preventive effects of troxipide on a newly developed model of acute gastric mucosal lesion (AGML) induced by ischemia/reperfusion plus ammonia in the rat].

    PubMed

    Momo, K; Hoshina, K; Ishibashi, Y; Saito, T

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a unique rat AGML model produced by ischemia/reperfusion plus 0.2% ammonia (I/R.NH3), either treatment which would not induce mucosal injury when used alone. The effects of troxipide and other gastric mucosal defensive drugs were investigated with this I/R.NH3-induced AGML model and other AGML models in rats. The following results were obtained: 1) Like allopurinol, troxipide at 50-200 mg/kg, p.o. dose-dependently prevented I/R.NH3-induced development of AGML and also the ischemia/reperfusion-induced increase of gastric mucosal thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substances; 2) Troxipide at 10(-6)-10(-4) M, like allopurinol, inhibited concentration-dependently in vitro xanthine oxidase activity in gastric mucosal homogenates; 3) Troxipide at 50-200 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited AGMLs induced by bleeding plus 0.2% ammonia and by 1.0% ammonia alone; and 4) Troxipide and sofalcone were similar in preventing all AGMLs tested and also the increase of mucosal TBA-reactive substances, but somewhat differed from teprenone, cetraxate hydrochloride, azulene plus L-glutamine and sucralfate. These findings suggest that troxipide may inhibit I/R.NH3-induced AGML development by preventing generation of oxygen free radicals and by protecting against mucosal fragility due to reduced energy metabolism from poor blood flow and also against ammonia-induced disruption of the gastric mucosal barrier. Therefore, troxipide may be highly effective for various AGMLs with multifactor involvement.

  6. Animal models of mucositis: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Joanne M; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2011-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major acute complication in the clinical setting, occurring in a large percentage of patients undergoing cytotoxic therapy. One of the major problems with alimentary mucositis is that the underlying mechanisms behind its development are not entirely understood, which makes it extremely difficult to develop effective interventions. Animal models provide a critical source of knowledge when sampling from patients is unavailable or interventions are yet to be fully tested. This review focuses on the animal models used to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of mucositis and translate new antimucotoxic agents into clinical trials.

  7. In Vivo and Cadaver Studies of the Canalicular/Lacrimal Sac Mucosal Folds

    PubMed Central

    You, Yongsheng; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xiaogang; Wu, Wencan; Xiao, Tianlin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The study aimed to investigate canalicular/lacrimal sac mucosal folds (CLS-MFs) in vivo and in cadavers in order to explore their functional roles in the lacrimal drainage system. Method. The observations of CLS-MFs in vivo were performed on 16 patients with chronic dacryocystitis after undergoing an endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EE-DCR). The lacrimal sacs and common canaliculi of 19 adult cadavers were dissected. The opening/closing of an orifice and mucosal fold was recorded. All of the specimens were subjected to a histological examination. Results. The upper and lower lacrimal canaliculi in all of the samples united to form a common canaliculus that opened to the lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs were observed in 10 of the 16 patients (62.5%) and 9 of the 19 cadavers (47.4%). The orifices or mucosal folds could be opened or closed when related muscles contracted or relaxed. Histological sections showed a mucosal fold at one side of an orifice. Conclusion. Common canaliculus is the most common type that the canaliculus opens to lacrimal sac. CLS-MFs exist in a certain ratio that can be opened/closed with the movement of the orifices. They may be involved in the drainage of tears or the pathogenesis of acute dacryocystitis or lacrimal sac mucocele. PMID:27242921

  8. Protective effects of alginate–chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in “Danxi’s experiential therapy” for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus

  9. Protective effects of alginate-chitosan microspheres loaded with alkaloids from Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. (Zuojin Pill) against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang-Song; Zhu, Xiao-Ning; Jiang, Heng-Li; Wang, Gui-Fang; Cui, Yuan-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Zuojin Pill (ZJP), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, consists of Coptis chinensis Franch. and Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. in a ratio of 6:1 (w/w) and was first recorded in "Danxi's experiential therapy" for treating gastrointestinal disorders in the 15th century. However, the poor solubility of alkaloids from ZJP restricted the protective effect in treating gastritis and gastric ulcer. The aim of the study was to investigate the protective mechanism of mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids from C. chinensis Franch. and E. rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth. on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats. Surface morphology, particle size, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, mucoadhesiveness, and fluorescent imaging of the microspheres in gastrointestinal tract were studied. The results showed that the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could sustain the release of drugs beyond 12 hours and had gastric mucoadhesive property with 82.63% retention rate in vitro. The fluorescence tracer indicated high retention of mucoadhesive microspheres within 12 hours in vivo. The mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could reduce the gastric injury by decreasing the mucosal lesion index, increasing the percentage of inhibition and increasing the amount of mucus in the gastric mucosa in an ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury rat model. Moreover, the mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids reduce the inflammatory response by decreasing the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), downregulating the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, TNF-α, and IL-1β in gastric mucosa. All the results indicate that mucoadhesive microspheres loaded with alkaloids could not only increase the residence time of alkaloids in rat stomach, but also exert gastroprotective effects through reducing the inflammatory response on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage. Thus, these

  10. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    , WT mice treated acutely with the NE inhibitor showed no long-term behavioral or structural improvements. Together, these findings validate the central role of NE in both acute pathogenesis and chronic functional recovery, and support future exploration of the therapeutic window, taking into account the prolonged period of neutrophil trafficking into the injured immature brain. PMID:25497734

  11. Transgenic killer commensal bacteria as mucosal protectants.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, L

    2001-05-01

    As first line of defense against the majority of infections and primary site for their transmission, mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts represent the most suitable sites to deliver protective agents for the prevention of infectious diseases. Mucosal protection is important not only for life threatening diseases but also for opportunistic infections which currently represent a serious burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost of cures. Candida albicans is among the most prevalent causes of mucosal infections not only in immuno-compromised patients, such as HIV-infected subjects who are frequently affected by oral and esophageal candidiasis, but also in otherwise healthy individuals, as in the case of acute vaginitis. Unfortunately, current strategies for mucosal protection against candidiasis are severely limited by the lack of effective vaccines and the relative paucity and toxicity of commercially available antifungal drugs.

  12. Effects of glucocorticoid agonist and antagonist on the pathogenesis of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rat.

    PubMed

    Paszt, Attila; Eder, Katalin; Szabolcs, Annamária; Tiszlavicz, László; Lázár, György; Duda, Ernö; Takács, Tamás; Lázár, György

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the consequences of treatment with an exogenous glucocorticoid agonist (methylprednisolone) and antagonist (RU-38486) on the local and systemic responses in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. The methylprednisolone and RU-38486 were administered just before pancreatitis induction. Plasma amylase activity, interleukin 6 activity, pancreatic weight/body weight ratio, plasma macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) concentration, and pancreatic nuclear transcription factor (NF) kappaB activity were determined. The extents of pancreas, liver, and lung injuries were assessed by histology. Acute pancreatitis resulted in NF-kappaB activation and proinflammatory cytokine release in rats. In the glucocorticoid agonist group, plasma amylase and interleukin 6 levels were significantly decreased as compared with those of RU-38486 and nontreated groups. Antagonist treatment led to significantly higher MIF production at 8 and 12 hours after L-arginine injection as compared with the agonist-treated and nontreated groups. Glucocorticoid agonist treatment significantly decreased the level of NF-kappaB 24 hours after pancreatitis induction. Histological investigations showed protective effect of agonist treatment on acute pancreatitis-induced tissue damage in the pancreas and lung. These results corroborated the importance of MIF in acute pancreatitis. The glucocorticoid-dependent mechanisms seem to play a crucial role in the control of the inflammatory response and tissue damage in L-arginine-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.

  13. Impact of Mucosal Inflammation on Oral Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ling; Hodara, Vida L.; Chu, Lianrui; Parodi, Laura M.; Smith, Lisa M.; Sexton, Valerie; Cappelli, David; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are the primary route of transmission for most respiratory and sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is epidemiological evidence that genital mucosal inflammation leads to enhanced HIV type 1 (HIV-1) transmission. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of periodontal inflammation on oral HIV transmission using a nonhuman primate model of teeth ligature-induced periodontitis. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was nontraumatically applied to the gingiva after moderate gingivitis was identified through clinical and immunologic analyses (presence of inflammatory cytokines). Overall oral SIV infection rates were similar in the gingivitis-induced and control groups (5 infections following 12 SIV administrations for each), although more macaques were infected with multiple viral variants in the gingivitis group. SIV infection also affected the levels of antiviral and inflammatory cytokines in the gingival crevicular fluid, and a synergistic effect was observed, with alpha interferon and interferon-inducible protein 10 undergoing significant elevations following SIV infection in macaques with gingivitis compared to controls. These increases in antiviral and inflammatory immune modulators in the SIV-infected gingivitis macaques could also be observed in blood plasma, although the effects at both compartments were generally restricted to the acute phase of the infection. In conclusion, while moderate gingivitis was not associated with increased susceptibility to oral SIV infection, it resulted in elevated levels of cytokines in the oral mucosa and plasma of the SIV-infected macaques. These findings suggest a synergy between mucosal inflammation and SIV infection, creating an immune milieu that impacts the early stages of the SIV infection with potential implications for long-term pathogenesis. PMID:23175379

  14. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus that was linked with honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the sudden and massive die-off of honey bee colonies in the U.S. in 2006-2007. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence and genetic diversity of IAPV, host transcripti...

  15. Diagnostic imaging and pathogenesis of the traumatic intratumoural haemorrhage of schwannoma causing acute high radial nerve palsy: case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takada, Jun; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    We describe the first report of haemorrhaged schwannoma presenting with acute high radial nerve palsy after traumatic injury of the upper arm. Anticoagulant therapy may induce intratumoural haemorrhage, resulting in symptomatic increases in size within the limited space of the upper arm. The radiological, surgical and pathological findings are discussed.

  16. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Fua, Tsien; Milross, Chris G.; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Penniment, Michael; Wratten, Chris; Krawitz, Hedley; Poulsen, Michael; Tang, Colin I.; Morton, Randall P.; Hay, K. David; Thomson, Vicki; Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T.; Fraser-Browne, Carol L.; Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  17. Up-regulation of Tight-Junction Proteins by p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/p53 Inhibition Leads to a Reduction of Injury to the Intestinal Mucosal Barrier in Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jun; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Yue-Xian; Niu, Wan-Cheng; Zhou, Feng; Shen, Chang-Bing; Chen, Ren-Guo; Li, Xi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK)/p53 signaling pathway in injury to the intestinal mucosal barrier during severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Both sham operation and SAP groups had 3 subgroups analyzed 3, 6, or 12 hours after the SAP induction. The concentrations of amylase, endotoxin, diamine oxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, and phospho-p38MAPK, p53, and caspase-3 and the messenger RNA levels of zonula occludens protein-1 and occludin in the intestine were measured. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine the expression of zonula occludens protein-1 and occludin. Pathological changes of the pancreas and intestine were also assessed. Then, rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups-sham operation group, SAP group, 3 groups treated with different concentrations of p38MAPK-inhibitor SB203580-and the abovementioned experiment was repeated and analyzed 6 hours after the SAP induction. The phospho-p38MAPK reached a peak value at 6 hours after the SAP induction with obvious pathological injury to the pancreas and intestine. Treatment with SB203580 led to a less damage to the pancreatic and intestinal tissues. These results suggest that SAP activates the p38MAPK/p53 signaling pathway and induces injury to the intestinal mucosal barrier, which can be alleviated by inhibiting the p38MAPK/p53 pathway.

  18. J-waves in patients with an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence, pathogenesis, and clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masafumi; Sato, Masahito; Kitazawa, Hitoshi; Saito, Atsushi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Fujita, Satoru; Fuse, Koichi; Takahashi, Minoru; Takarada, Ken; Oguro, Takeo; Matsushita, Hirooki; Okabe, Masaaki; Yamashina, Akira; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence, clinical significance, and pathogenesis of J-waves were studied in the patients with an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). One hundred and fifty-two consecutive patients with an acute ST-elevation MI were included. The mean age was 68.6 ± 13.5 years, and 78.3% of the patients were male. Following successful PCI, 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored, and J-waves were measured 1 week after the MI and analysed in relation to the location of the MI and arrhythmias. Clinical and ECG parameters were compared between the groups with and without J-waves. The rate dependency of the J-wave amplitude was analysed in the conducted atrial premature beats (APBs). J-waves were present in 60.5% (≥0.1 mV) or 48.9% (≥0.2 mV) of the 152 patients. The J-waves were more often located in the inferior leads and more frequently in an inferior MI. The presence of J-waves was associated with ventricular arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation. The J-wave amplitude increased in the conducted APB, mechanistically suggesting a phase 3 block. Many patients in the early recovery phase after an acute MI had J-waves. This ECG phenomenon was associated with an increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmias. The tachycardia-dependent augmentation of the J-wave amplitude suggested a mechanistic role of conduction delay.

  19. [Screening of key genes and inflammatory signalling pathway involved in the pathogenesis of HLA-B27-associated acute anterior uveitis by gene expression microarray].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Lu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-sheng; Zhang, Xiao-long; Liu, Xu-hui; Xu, Zhuo-zai; Hu, Jun-min; Lu, Qing-jun

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the genes and signalling pathways located upstream of the inflammatory processes in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-associated acute anterior uveitis by gene expression microarray. Experimental study. HLA-B27-positive and-negative monocytes isolated from human peripheral blood were stimulated with Vibrio cholera lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Gene expression microarrays were used to identify the differentially expressed genes. Differentially expressed (DE) genes were testified by real-time PCR and analyzed by a series of bioinformatics-based techniques such as Gene Ontology, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Gene expression microarray analysis revealed marked differences between HLA-B27-positive acute anterior uveitis (AAU) and HLA-B27-negative healthy control peripheral monocytes in the genes that were upregulated in response to LPS stimulation with 1105 genes and 25 genes respectively. Gene Ontology enrichment and pathway analysis indicated that genes participating in protein transport and folding were essential to the inflammatory process. The LPS receptor-Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 induced TLR signalling pathway and pathway related to Vibrio cholerae infection were located upstream of the network and contribute to the overall response. Among the DE genes, PIK3CA, PIK3CB, AKT3, and MAPK1 might play critical roles in inflammation. Equivalent LPS stimulation induces a different response in HLA-B27-positive peripheral monocytes compared to normal control, suggesting that the TLR pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of HLA-B27-associated AAU.

  20. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  1. Candidate genes and pathogenesis investigation for sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome based on gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yan, Jingjun; He, Xingxing; Zhong, Qiang; Zhan, Chengye; Li, Shusheng

    2016-04-18

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury as well as a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Although researchers have made significant progresses in elucidating the pathophysiology of this complex syndrome over the years, the absence of a universal detail disease mechanism up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive treatment. This study aimed to predict some genes or pathways associated with sepsis-related ARDS based on a public microarray dataset and to further explore the molecular mechanism of ARDS. A total of 122 up-regulated DEGs and 91 down-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained. The up- and down-regulated DEGs were mainly involved in functions like mitotic cell cycle and pathway like cell cycle. Protein-protein interaction network of ARDS analysis revealed 20 hub genes including cyclin B1 (CCNB1), cyclin B2 (CCNB2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A). A total of seven transcription factors including forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) and 30 target genes were revealed in the transcription factor-target gene regulation network. Furthermore, co-cited genes including CCNB2-CCNB1 were revealed in literature mining for the relations ARDS related genes. Pathways like mitotic cell cycle were closed related with the development of ARDS. Genes including CCNB1, CCNB2 and TOP2A, as well as transcription factors like FOXM1 might be used as the novel gene therapy targets for sepsis related ARDS.

  2. Histopathology and pathogenesis of caerulein-, duct ligation-, and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Rouse, Rodney L

    2014-09-01

    Three classical rodent models of acute pancreatitis were created in an effort to identify potential pre-clinical models of drug-induced pancreatitis (DIP) and candidate non-invasive biomarkers for improved detection of DIP. Study objectives included designing a lexicon to minimize bias by capturing normal variation and spontaneous and injury-induced changes while maintaining the ability to statistically differentiate degrees of change, defining morphologic anchors for novel pancreatic injury biomarkers, and improved understanding of mechanisms responsible for pancreatitis. Models were created in male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL6 mice through: 1) administration of the cholecystokinin analog, caerulein; 2) administration of arginine; 3) surgical ligation of the pancreatic duct. Nine morphologically detectable processes were used in the lexicon; acinar cell hypertrophy; acinar cell autophagy; acinar cell apoptosis; acinar cell necrosis; vascular injury; interstitial edema, inflammation and hemorrhage; fat necrosis; ductal changes; acinar cell atrophy. Criteria were defined for scoring levels (0 = absent, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate, 3 = severe) for each lexicon component. Consistent with previous studies, histopathology scores were significant greater in rats compared to mice at baseline and after treatment. The histopathology scores in caerulein and ligation-treated rats and mice were significantly greater than those of arginine-treated rats and mice. The present study supports a multifaceted pathogenesis for acute pancreatitis in which intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, damage to acinar cells, fat cells, and vascular cells as well as activation/degranulation of mast cells and activated macrophages all contribute to the initiation and/or progression of acute inflammation of the exocrine pancreas.

  3. Prevention and management of antineoplastic therapy induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Bey, Afshan; Ahmed, Syed S; Hussain, Bilal; Devi, Seema; Hashmi, Sarwat H

    2010-07-01

    With the scientific advancements in the management of malignant diseases, the treatment is expensive and bears high morbidity in term of oral mucositis. It is a debilitating condition and has been researched extensively for its pathogenesis and treatment. Various treatment options include barrier forming, mucosal protectants, mouth rinses, growth factors, lasers and midline-sparing procedures. Some agents are used locally while others are administered systemically. Despite the availability of a wide range of treatment options for mucositis, a cost-effective treatment is yet to be evolved.

  4. Pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 in acute decompensated heart failure: workgroup statements from the eleventh consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    PubMed

    Haase, Michael; Müller, Christian; Damman, Kevin; Murray, Patrick T; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) types 1-5 are still sparsely characterized. In an attempt to address this issue, a consensus conference on CRS was held in Venice, Italy, in November 2012 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). Working group 1 discussed monodirectional mechanisms of CRS type 1 which is characterized by a rapid worsening of cardiac function leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Pre-conference we performed a systematic search and review of the available literature using a modified Delphi analysis. Hereby identified and in this review discussed questions were: (i) What are the predominant pathophysiologic mechanisms of CRS type 1 in acute decompensated heart failure? (ii) Could biomarker profiling identify pathomechanisms or hemodynamic phenotype of patients with CRS type 1? Could predictive biomarkers improve renal safety of therapy in CRS type 1? (iii) How do the timing, severity and duration relate to the mechanisms and outcomes of CRS type 1? In summary, after discussion and appraisal of the best available evidence, working group 1 makes consensus recommendations for future research on pathologic mechanisms of CRS type 1 and recommendations for clinical practice where treatment is in either proof or disproof of a mechanism.

  5. Why mucosal health?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculture species depend more heavily on mucosal barriers than their terrestrial agricultural counterparts as they are continuously interacting with the aquatic microbiota. Unlike classical immune centers, such as the spleen and kidney, the accessibility of mucosal surfaces through immersion/dip t...

  6. Acute infection with the intestinal parasite Trichuris muris has long-term consequences on mucosal mast cell homeostasis and epithelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Sorobetea, Daniel; Holm, Jacob Bak; Henningsson, Henrietta; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    A hallmark of parasite infection is the accumulation of innate immune cells, notably granulocytes and mast cells, at the site of infection. While this is typically viewed as a transient response, with the tissue returning to steady state once the infection is cleared, we found that mast cells accumulated in the large-intestinal epithelium following infection with the nematode Trichuris muris and persisted at this site for several months after worm expulsion. Mast cell accumulation in the epithelium was associated with the induction of type-2 immunity and appeared to be driven by increased maturation of local progenitors in the intestinal lamina propria. Furthermore, we also detected increased local and systemic levels of the mucosal mast cell protease MCPt-1, which correlated highly with the persistent epithelial mast cell population. Finally, the mast cells appeared to have striking consequences on epithelial barrier integrity, by regulation of gut permeability long after worm expulsion. These findings highlight the importance of mast cells not only in the early phases of infection but also at later stages, which has functional implications on the mucosal tissue. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Herbs in Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Maryam; Jafari, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammatory mucosal destruction as a result of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which in severe cases can impair patients’ quality of life. Moreover, mucosal infection and/or systemic involvement due to compromised immunity leads to delay or discontinuation of the treatment. Many strategies and agents have been suggested for the management of this condition. Because of their lower side effects compared to chemical drugs, general interest in evaluating therapeutic effects of herbs has been increased intensively. Herbal plants apply their effect through different mechanisms of action: antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, and anticarcinogenic activity. Recently, various natural agents in plants have been noticed in mucositis, which may improve the symptoms through different interventions. The purpose of this review is to focus on the preventive or therapeutic use of herbal medicine to alleviate oral mucositis. PMID:28511530

  8. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  9. Role of lysosomal enzymes released by alveolar macrophages in the pathogenesis of the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, M. N.; Martín, T.; Sánchez, M. L.; Buitrago, J. M. González; Jiménez, A.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrolytic enzymes are the major constituents of alveolar macrophages (AM) and have been shown to be involved in many aspects of the inflammatory pulmonary response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of lysosomal enzymes in the acute phase of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HPs). An experimental study on AM lysosomal enzymes of an HP-guinea-pig model was performed. The results obtained both in vivo and in vitro suggest that intracellular enzymatic activity decrease is, at least partly, due to release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. A positive but slight correlation was found between extracellular lysosomal activity and four parameters of lung lesion (lung index, bronchoalveolar fluid total (BALF) protein concentration, BALF LDH and BALF alkaline phosphatase activities). All the above findings suggest that the AM release of lysosomal enzymes during HP is a factor involved, although possibly not the only one, in the pulmonary lesions appearing in this disease. PMID:18475615

  10. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  11. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:28589080

  12. Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) is a major dose-limiting toxicity in head and neck cancer patients. It is a normal tissue injury caused by radiation/radiotherapy (RT), which has marked adverse effects on patient quality of life and cancer therapy continuity. It is a challenge for radiation oncologists since it leads to cancer therapy interruption, poor local tumor control, and changes in dose fractionation. RIOM occurs in 100% of altered fractionation radiotherapy head and neck cancer patients. In the United Sates, its economic cost was estimated to reach 17,000.00 USD per patient with head and neck cancers. This review will discuss RIOM definition, epidemiology, impact and side effects, pathogenesis, scoring scales, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  13. Pathogenesis and therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W L

    1990-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the stomach and duodenum are normally protected from the damaging effects of acid and pepsin by a balancing mechanism of mucosal resistance. If an imbalance occurs, peptic ulcer may result. Traditional teaching has emphasized the importance of acid (and pepsin) as the cause of this imbalance; however, it is clear that acid and pepsin are not the only important factors in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. More recent investigative efforts have been directed at what constitutes mucosal resistance and how it can be disrupted to produce, in the presence of gastric acid, a peptic ulcer. Depletion of endogenous prostaglandins and Helicobacter pylori gastritis have emerged as prominent theories. As evidence exists both to support and refute these theories in humans, any definitive conclusions cannot be made at this time. The acute management of peptic ulcer disease is directed at relieving pain, accelerating ulcer healing, and preventing complications. Peptic ulcers can be healed with antisecretory agents (i.e., H2-receptor antagonists, omeprazole), antacids, prostaglandins, and sucralfate. Because they are effective, safe, and convenient, the H2-receptor antagonists are the most widely used agents for the management of peptic ulcer disease. Because the H2-receptor antagonist agents are equally effective in their indicated uses and are equally safe based on scientifically valid data, selection should be based primarily on cost. Omeprazole is the newest antisecretory agent: a single morning dose of 20 mg suppresses acid secretion for 24 h. The agent offers little advantage over H2-receptor antagonists for the majority of patients with peptic ulcer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The PDZ-Binding Motif of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Is a Determinant of Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) lacking the envelope (E) protein is attenuated in vivo. Here we report that E protein PDZ-binding motif (PBM), a domain involved in protein-protein interactions, is a major determinant of virulence. Elimination of SARS-CoV E protein PBM by using reverse genetics caused a reduction in the deleterious exacerbation of the immune response triggered during infection with the parental virus and virus attenuation. Cellular protein syntenin was identified to bind the E protein PBM during SARS-CoV infection by using three complementary strategies, yeast two-hybrid, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy assays. Syntenin redistributed from the nucleus to the cell cytoplasm during infection with viruses containing the E protein PBM, activating p38 MAPK and leading to the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of syntenin using siRNAs led to a decrease in p38 MAPK activation in SARS-CoV infected cells, further reinforcing their functional relationship. Active p38 MAPK was reduced in lungs of mice infected with SARS-CoVs lacking E protein PBM as compared with the parental virus, leading to a decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and to virus attenuation. Interestingly, administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor led to an increase in mice survival after infection with SARS-CoV, confirming the relevance of this pathway in SARS-CoV virulence. Therefore, the E protein PBM is a virulence domain that activates immunopathology most likely by using syntenin as a mediator of p38 MAPK induced inflammation. PMID:25122212

  15. Cyr61 participates in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia by enhancing cellular survival via the AKT/NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xianjin; Song, Yanfang; Wu, Conglian; Pan, Chuxi; Lu, Pingxia; Wang, Meihua; Zheng, Peizheng; Huo, Rongfen; Zhang, Chenqing; Li, Wanting; Lin, Yulin; Cao, Yingping; Li, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Cyr61 (CCN1) is the product of a growth factor–inducible immediate early gene and is involved in cell adhesion, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Cyr61 is overexpressed in human tumors and is involved in the development of tumors. However, the role that Cyr61 plays in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells remains undetermined. The aim of this study was to identify the role of Cyr61 in regulating ALL cell survival. Here, we found that the level of Cyr61 was increased in the plasma and bone marrow (BM) from ALL patients compared with samples from normal control patients. Furthermore, we observed that Cyr61 could effectively stimulate Jurkat (T ALL cell lines), Nalm-6 (B ALL cell lines), and primary ALL cell survival. Mechanistically, we showed that Cyr61 stimulated ALL cell survival via the AKT/NF-κB signaling pathways and the consequent up-regulation of Bcl-2. Taken together, our study is the first to reveal that Cyr61 is elevated in ALL and promotes cell survival through the AKT/NF-κB pathway by up-regulating Bcl-2. Our findings suggest that Cyr61 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ALL. PMID:27725691

  16. [Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of childhood acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Wang, Chun-mei; Xu, Song-tao; Song, Li-li; Zhao, Xiao-ming; Wang, Qun-ying; Sheng, Guang-yao

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) and its products cytotoxin-associated protein (Cag A), vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) in childhood acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (aITP), to evaluate the effect of Hp on their clinical outcome. Subjects were enrolled according to case-control design, including 184 aITP children and 154 healthy controls. They were inquired for demographic characteristics, the risk factors regarding Hp infection and ITP through a uniformed questionnaire. Patients with Hp infection were diagnosed by combined detection of serum Hp antibodies and stool antigens. CagA and VacA proteins were tested by ELISA method. In addition, clinical data and follow-up data of aITP children were collected. Non-conditional logistic regression and t test were applied for statistical analysis. (1) The prevalence of Hp infection in aITP children and controls were 41.30% and 35.71%, respectively. No association between Hp infection and children aITP was found with OR of 1.170 (95%CI: 0.7163 - 1.673) after adjusting for confounding variables. (2) No statistical differences regarding initial platelet counts, megakaryocytes counts and the constituent ratio were found between the aITP children with and without Hp infection (P > 0.05). (3) No differences regarding initial platelet counts were found between aITP children with and without the expression of CagA (P > 0.05). The follow-up data showed that 32.88% of aITP children with Hp infection, as well as 29.70% of aITP children without Hp infection developed into cITP. No association between Hp infection and development to cITP was found with adjusted OR 1.171 (95%CI: 0.555 - 2.11 2). The results didn't suggest that Hp is unlikely to play a role in the onset of childhood aITP, and in the development of aITP to cITP.

  17. Mucosal Health in Aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract The mucosal surfaces (skin, gill, and intestine) constitute the first line of defense against pathogen invasion while simultaneously carrying out a diverse array of other critical physiological processes, including nutrient absorption, osmoregulation, and waste excretion. Aquaculture specie...

  18. Increase of circulating miR-223 and insulin-like growth factor-1 is associated with the pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke in patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between circulating microRNA-223 and pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke is unknown. Here we investigated the roles and possible targets of circulating microRNA-223 in human ischemic stroke within the first 72 hours. Methods Blood samples were collected from patients within 72 hours after cerebral ischemia (n = 79) and compared with healthy control samples (n = 75). The level of possible downstream factors of microRNA-223 including insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and interleukin-6 was examined by ELISA assay. The relationship between the microRNA-223 level and NIHSS scores, TOAST subtypes, and infarct volume was analyzed respectively. In addition, twelve adult male CD-1 mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion using the suture technique. Circulating blood and brain tissue in the ischemic ipsilateral hemisphere were collected at 24 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. microRNA-223 was detected by real-time polymerase chain reactions. Results microRNA-223 levels in the circulating blood of acute ischemic stroke patients were greatly increased compared to the control (p < 0.05). microRNA-223, which were negatively correlated with NIHSS scores (r = −0.531, p < 0.01) and infarct volume (r = −0.265, p = 0.039), was significantly up-regulated in large artery and small artery strokes. The plasma level of insulin-like growth factor-1 was positively associated with that of microRNA-223 (r = 0.205, p = 0.022). Moreover, microRNA-223 in blood and brain were positively correlated (r = 0.834, p < 0.05), and they were up-regulated significantly in mice that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (p < 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that microRNA-223 is associated with acute ischemic stroke and possibly plays a role in stroke through up-regulating growth factor such as insulin-like growth factor-1 gene. PMID:24708646

  19. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commensal bacteria, with keratin dispersed in the intercellular spaces. Neutrophils migrate through the oral mucosa and form nests within the biofilm mass. The cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan is exposed during mucosal biofilm growth and is more uniformly present on the surface of biofilm organisms invading the oral mucosa. We conclude that C. albicans forms complex mucosal biofilms consisting of both commensal bacterial flora and host components. These discoveries are important since they can prompt a shift of focus for current research in investigating the role of Candida-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of mucosal infections as well as the role of β-glucan mediated signaling in the host response. PMID:19956771

  20. Interactions between PBEF and oxidative stress proteins-a potential new mechanism underlying PBEF in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Qin; Adyshev, Djanybek M.; Singleton, Patrick; Li, Hailong; Cepeda, Javier; Huang, Sheng-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Verin, Alexander D.; Tu, Jiancheng; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Ye, Shui Qing

    2008-01-01

    Identification of pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) interacting partners may reveal new molecular mechanisms of PBEF in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). The interactions between PBEF and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1(ND1), ferritin light chain and interferon induced transmembrane 3 (IFITM3) in human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells were identified and validated. ND1, ferritin and IFITM3 are involved in oxidative stress and inflammation. Overexpression of PBEF increased its interactions and intracellular oxidative stress, which can be attenuated by rotenone. The interaction modeling between PBEF and ND1 is consistent with the corresponding experimental finding. These interactions may underlie a novel role of PBEF in the pathogenesis of ALI. Structured summary MINT-6538697: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with NADH1 (uniprotkb:P03886) by two hybrid (MI:0018) MINT-6538811, MINT-6538868: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with interferon-induced transmembra (uniprotkb:Q01628) by anti bait coimmunoprecipitation (MI:0006) MINT-6538787, MINT-6538841: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with NADH1 (uniprotkb:P03886) by anti bait coimmunoprecipitation (MI:0006) MINT-6538755: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with gamma-glutamil-transferase (uniprotkb:P19440) by two hybrid (MI:0018) MINT-6538799, MINT-6538862: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with Ferritin light chain (uniprotkb:P02792) by anti bait coimmunoprecipitation (MI:0006) MINT-6538769: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with E2L6 (uniprotkb:O14933) by two hybrid (MI:0018) MINT-6538741: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with Adenosine A2aR (uniprotkb:P29274) by two hybrid (MI:0018) MINT-6538727: PBEF (uniprotkb:P43490) physically interacts (MI:0218) with interferon-induced transmembra (uniprotkb:Q01628) by two hybrid (MI:0018) MINT-6538712: PBEF

  1. Astrovirus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cydney; Hargest, Virginia; Cortez, Valerie; Meliopoulos, Victoria A.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    Astroviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young, elderly, and the immunocompromised. Since the discovery of human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV-1) in 1975, the family Astroviridae has expanded to include two more human clades and numerous mammalian and avian-specific genotypes. Despite this, there is still little known about pathogenesis. The following review highlights the current knowledge of astrovirus pathogenesis, and outlines the critical steps needed to further astrovirus research, including the development of animal models of cell culture systems. PMID:28117758

  2. Gene, environment, microbiome and mucosal immune tolerance in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.; Scher, Jose U.

    2016-01-01

    RA is a complex multifactorial chronic disease that transitions through several stages. Multiple studies now support that there is a prolonged phase in early RA development during which there is serum elevation of RA-related autoantibodies including RF and ACPAs in the absence of clinically evident synovitis. This suggests that RA pathogenesis might originate in an extra-articular location, which we hypothesize is a mucosal site. In discussing this hypothesis, we will present herein the current understanding of mucosal immunology, including a discussion about the generation of autoimmune responses at these surfaces. We will also examine how other factors such as genes, microbes and other environmental toxins (including tobacco smoke) could influence the triggering of autoimmunity at mucosal sites and eventually systemic organ disease. We will also propose a research agenda to improve our understanding of the role of mucosal inflammation in the development of RA. PMID:25539828

  3. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-driven PI3K/Akt/Sp1 signalling and H2S production facilitates the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Liao, Ribin; Qiang, Zhanrong; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-04-30

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a disease usually associated with systemic organ dysfunction or pancreatic necrosis. Most patients with SAP suffer from defective intestinal motility in the early phase of the disease. Additionally, SAP-induced inflammation produces hydrogen sulphide (H2S) that impairs the gastrointestinal (GI) system. However, the exact mechanism of H2S in the regulation of SAP is yet to be elucidated. In the present paper, we used a rat model of SAP to evaluate the role of H2S on intestinal motility by counting the number of bowel movements and investigating the effect of H2S on inflammation. We treated colonic muscle cells (CMCs) with SAP plasma, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or interleukin-6 (IL-6) and measured the expressions of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and Sp1 and PI3K/Akt by using quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemical detection. We used the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and the siRNA si-Sp1 to suppress the activity of the PI3K/Akt/Sp1 signalling pathway. We found that, in the SAP rat model, H2S facilitated an inhibitory effect on intestinal motility and enhanced the inflammatory response caused by SAP (P<0.05). The expressions of CSE and CBS in CMCs were significantly increased after treatment with TNF-α or IL-6 (P<0.05). Blocking the PI3K/Akt/Sp1 pathway remarkably inhibited the synthesis of CSE and CBS. Our data demonstrated that H2S plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of SAP and that SAP is modulated by inflammation driven by the PI3K/Akt/Sp1 signalling pathway. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. The importance of nitric oxide and arginase in the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammation: are those contra players with the same direction?

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Stojanovic, Ivana; Pavlovic, Radmila; Pavlovic, Dusica

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) products (NOx) and arginase activity in acute neuroinflammation, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma of clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients, who were divided into groups on the basis of clinical and radiological disease activity. The NOx levels, in both, CSF and plasma, were increased in CIS (p = 0.0015, p = 0.0014, respectively) and RRMS group (p = 0.002, p = 0.0019, respectively), while arginase activity approached low levels, in CIS (p = 0.009, p = 0.02, respectively) and RRMS group (p = 0.018, p = 0.034, respectively) compared to controls. The NOx levels were higher in CSF and plasma of CIS than in RRMS group (p = 0.065, p = 0.037, respectively), inverse to arginase activity which was higher, in CSF and plasma, in RRMS than in CIS group (p = 0.031, p = 0.02, respectively). The CSF and plasma NOx values positively correlated with the clinical disease activity in CIS (r = 0.09, p = 0.81; r = 0.45, p = 0.023, respectively) and RRMS group (r = 0.311, p = 0.04; r = 0.512, p = 0.01, respectively). Also, CSF and plasma arginase activity showed negative correlation with clinical disease activity in CIS (r = 0.39, p = 0.03; r = 0.1, p = 0.65, respectively) and RRMS group (r = 0.43, p = 0.03; r = 0.62, p = 0.015, respectively). The CSF NOx levels showed positive correlation with volume of acute radiological lesions of CNS in CIS (r = 0.25, p = 0.045) and RRMS group (r = 0.31, p = 0.04), while arginase activity showed the negative correlations in CIS (r = 0.41; p = 0.035) and RRMS group (r = 0.52, p = 0.022). The results support NO and arginase involvement in the pathogenesis of acute neuroinflammation, which determination may be useful as surrogate markers for clinical and radiological disease activity.

  6. Animal models of herpes simplex virus immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Christina M; Huneke, Richard B; Wigdahl, Brian; Jennings, Stephen R

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous human pathogens represented by two distinct serotypes: herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1); and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). In the general population, adult seropositivity rates approach 90% for HSV-1 and 20-25% for HSV-2. These viruses cause significant morbidity, primarily as mucosal membrane lesions in the form of facial cold sores and genital ulcers, with much less common but more severe manifestations causing death from encephalitis. HSV infections in humans are difficult to study in many cases because many primary infections are asymptomatic. Moreover, the neurotropic properties of HSV make it much more difficult to study the immune mechanisms controlling reactivation of latent infection within the corresponding sensory ganglia and crossover into the central nervous system of infected humans. This is because samples from the nervous system can only be routinely obtained at the time of autopsy. Thus, animal models have been developed whose use has led to a better understanding of multiple aspects of HSV biology, molecular biology, pathogenesis, disease, and immunity. The course of HSV infection in a spectrum of animal models depends on important experimental parameters including animal species, age, and genotype; route of infection; and viral serotype, strain, and dose. This review summarizes the animal models most commonly used to study HSV pathogenesis and its establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from latency. It focuses particularly on the immune response to HSV during acute primary infection and the initial invasion of the ganglion with comparisons to the events governing maintenance of viral latency.

  7. [The role of disequilibrium of expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and their tissue inhibitors in pathogenesis of hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury in mice].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-feng; Zhu, Guang-fa; Liu, Shuang; Foda, Hussein D

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 (MMP-2/9) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1/2) in pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by hyperoxia. Seventy-two C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into normal control group, hyperoxia for 24 hours group, hyperoxia for 48 hours group, and hyperoxia for 72 hours group, with 18 mice in each group. The mice in hyperoxia groups were exposed to >98% oxygen in sealed cages, and the normal control group were placed outside of the cage to breathe room air. At the end of the exposure time the animals were euthanized, the right lung was removed and phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was used to lavage the lung through the endotracheal catheter. The wet/dry weight ratio, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein content and the volume of pleural fluid were measured, the severity of lung injury was assessed; the expression of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1/2 mRNA in lung tissue at 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were assessed by reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); the amount of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1/2 protein in lung tissue were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hyperoxia caused ALI as evidenced by the increase in lung wet/dry weight ratio, BALF protein content and the volume of pleural fluid as compared with the normal control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). RT-PCR study showed increased expression of MMP-2/9 and TIMP-1 mRNA in lung tissues (P<0.05 or P<0.01), and ELISA assay also demonstrated upregulation of MMP-2/9 and an increase in TIMP-1 amount in BALF compared with their normal control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The ratios of both MMP-2 mRNA/TIMP-2 mRNA and MMP-2 protein/TIMP-2 protein were all increased in hyperoxia groups as compared with their normal control group (all P<0.01). Hyperoxia causes ALI in mice, and disturbance of MMP-2/TIMP-2 balance plays an important role in the development of hyperoxia-induced ALI in mice.

  8. Malaria Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Louis H.; Good, Michael F.; Milon, Genevieve

    1994-06-01

    Malaria is a disease caused by repeated cycles of growth of the parasite Plasmodium in the erythrocyte. Various cellular and molecular strategies allow the parasite to evade the human immune response for many cycles of parasite multiplication. Under certain circumstances Plasmodium infection causes severe anemia or cerebral malaria; the expression of disease is influenced by both parasite and host factors, as exemplified by the exacerbation of disease during pregnancy. This article provides an overview of malaria pathogenesis, synthesizing the recent field, laboratory, and epidemiological data that will lead to the development of strategies to reduce mortality and morbidity.

  9. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  10. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  11. A case of acute oesophageal necrosis (AEN) in a hypothermic patient. The grave prognosis of the black oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Salem, George A; Ahluwalia, Sumit; Guild, Ralph T

    2015-01-01

    Acute oesophageal necrosis, also known as black oesophagus, is a rare, and potentially lethal syndrome which is often diagnosed incidentally during upper endoscopy for evaluation of upper gastrointestinal bleed. It is characterised by diffuse circumferential black mucosal discolouration in the distal oesophagus secondary to necrosis that may extend proximally to involve variable length of the oesophagus. One theory of pathogenesis is that the relatively low perfusion state in the distal areas of the oesophagus makes it susceptible to mucosal injury. We present a case of acute oesophageal necrosis in a 62year-old lady with history of alcoholic cirrhosis who presented with haematemesis and severe hypothermia, and was eventually found to have acute oesophageal necrosis.

  12. [Mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Santos, Renata Cristina Schmidt; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of present study was to classify oral mucositis according to the Common Toxicity Criterion (CTC) international parameters in head and neck tumor patients simultaneously treated with radio and chemotherapy, and characterize a patient profile in our area, observing the individuals' habits, tumor characteristics, treatment protocol and acute reaction intensity. Fifty patients undergoing simultaneous 66 to 70 Gy megavoltage radiotherapy and cisplatin/carboplatin chemotherapy were evaluated in this study. Weekly evaluations of the degree of mucositis were perfoemed according to CTC, a four-degree ordinal scale; 36% of all patients and 100% of those with diabetes discontinued treatment due to mucositis, showing that this pathology contributes to the severity of mucositis.

  13. Vitamin D and mucosal immune function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Significant advances have been made in the characterization of Vitamin D and the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) in immune function. The studies of signaling pathways involved in the response to infection and inflammation have led to a more detailed understanding of the cellular response to Vitamin D through VDR. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding how Vitamin D contributes to mucosal immune function, particularly in relation to the molecular mechanisms by which Vitamin D and VDR influence mucosal immunity, bacterial infection, and inflammation. Recent findings Recently, it was shown that Vitamin D modulates the T cell antigen receptor, further demonstrating that Vitamin D has a nonclassical role in immunoregulation. The anti-inflammation and anti-infection functions for Vitamin D are newly identified and highly significant activities. Vitamin D/VDR have multiple critical functions in regulating the response to intestinal homeostasis, tight junctions, pathogen invasion, commensal bacterial colonization, antimicrobe peptide secretion, and mucosal defense. Interestingly, microorganisms modulate the VDR signaling pathway. Summary Vitamin D is known as a key player in calcium homeostasis and electrolyte and blood pressure regulation. Recently, important progress has been made in understanding how the noncanonical activities of Vitamin D influence the pathogenesis and prevention of human disease. Vitamin D and VDR are directly involved in T cell antigen receptor signaling. The involvement of Vitamin D/VDR in anti-inflammation and anti-infection represents a newly identified and highly significant activity for VDR. Studies have indicated that the dysregulation of VDR may lead to exaggerated inflammatory responses, raising the possibility that defects in Vitamin D and VDR signaling transduction may be linked to bacterial infection and chronic inflammation. Further characterization of Vitamin D/VDR will help elucidate the pathogenesis of

  14. Mucosal melanoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballester Sánchez, R; de Unamuno Bustos, B; Navarro Mira, M; Botella Estrada, R

    2015-03-01

    Mucosal melanoma is a rare melanoma subtype that differs from the cutaneous form of the tumor in its biology, clinical manifestations, and management. Diagnosis is usually late due to a lack of early or specific signs and the location of lesions in areas that are difficult to access on physical examination. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for localized disease. The value of sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is still unclear. Radiotherapy can be used as adjuvant therapy for the control of local disease. c-KIT mutations are more common than in other types of melanoma and this has led to significant advances in the use of imatinib for the treatment of metastatic mucosal melanoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. An immunological perspective on rheumatic heart disease pathogenesis: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Bright, Philip David; Mayosi, Bongani M; Martin, William John

    2016-10-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and the related rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are autoimmune diseases thought to be triggered by group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. RHD is a leading cause of mortality in the developing world. The strong epidemiological association between GAS throat infection and ARF is highly suggestive of causation, but does not exclude other infections as contributory. There is good evidence of both humoral and cellular autoreactivity and GAS/self cross-reactivity in established RHD. RHD pathogenesis could feasibly be triggered and driven by humoral and/or cellular molecular cross-reactivity between GAS and host cardiac tissues (molecular mimicry). However, good evidence of humoral pathogenicity is lacking and the specific triggering event for RHD remains unknown. It is likely that the critical immunological events leading to ARF/RHD occur at the point of contact between GAS and the immune system in the throat, strongly implicating the mucosal immune system in RHD pathogenesis. Additionally, there is circumstantial evidence that continued live GAS may play a role in ARF/RHD pathogenesis. We suggest that future avenues for study should include the exclusion of GAS components directly contributing to RHD pathogenesis; large genome-wide association studies of patients with RHD looking for candidate genes involved in RHD pathogenesis; genome-wide association studies of GAS from patients with ARF taken at diagnosis to look for characteristics of rheumatogenic strains; and performing case/control studies of GAS pharyngitis/ARF/patients with RHD, and controls to identify microbiological, immunological and environmental differences to elucidate RHD pathogenesis.

  16. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  17. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model

    PubMed Central

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Key points Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders.Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability.Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6‐trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO‐1 and FAK.These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Abstract Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6‐trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)‐induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS‐induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS‐induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS‐induced changes in ZO‐1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased

  18. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  19. Current Trends in the Management of Oral Mucositis Related to Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Biswa Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common toxicities observed during radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment for cancers. Mucositis results in sore mouth, altered taste sensation, pain and dysphagia leading to malnutrition. Left untreated, oral mucositis leads to ulceration, orodental infection, bleeding and discontinuation of effective radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Frequent hospitalization, enteral or parenteral nutrition, increased demand for analgesics ultimately account for increased cost of healthcare. Quantification of oral mucositis using standardized grading system is important for appropriate evaluation, reporting and management. In the recent past there is a paradigm shift in the pathobiology of cancer therapy related mucositis. Clear understanding of its pathogenesis is essential for the formulation of effective mucositis care. Numerous drug therapies, radiation techniques and oral care protocols have been tried in the past to reduce oral mucositis, None have proven to be consistently effective. Current trends for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis is multi-targeted treatment supplemented by aggressive oral hygiene, reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitors, growth factors and use of specific topical agents to improve treatment of oral mucositis in future. PMID:22570584

  20. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  1. Do mucosal folds in the eustachian tube function as microturbinates?

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Kayhan; Snyderman, Carl H; Sando, Isamu

    2011-04-01

    Mucosal folds in the eustachian tube (ET) may function as microturbinates and provide protection and clearance. Descriptive study. Nineteen whole-mount temporal bone ET specimens (nine pediatric and 10 adult) were evaluated in the present study. Five specific localizations for each case were selected. The cartilaginous segment of the ET was divided vertically and the length of mucosal surfaces and the number of mucosal folds of anterior and posterior walls on the histological sections were analyzed with MetaMorph 7.5.2.0 software. The length of the mucosal surface of the posterior wall of the ET was longer than the anterior wall (P < .05). In pediatric specimens, the posterior wall had more mucosal folds than adult specimens (P < .05). Microturbinates in the posterior wall of the ET may provide important protection and clearance functions for children and play a role in the pathogenesis of eustachian tube dysfunction Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc., Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Oleic acid-induced mucosal injury in developing piglet intestine.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, O R; Henninger, K; Fowler, M; Tso, P; Crissinger, K D

    1993-03-01

    A role for luminal nutrients, in particular products of lipid digestion, in the pathogenesis of mucosal injury to developing intestine has been postulated. We evaluated changes in mucosal permeability and light and electron microscopic histology induced by luminal perfusion with the long-chain fatty acid oleate in developing piglet intestine as a function of age and concentration of the fatty acid. 51Cr-labeled EDTA plasma-to-lumen clearance was measured in jejunum and ileum of 1-day-, 3-day-, 2-wk-, and 1-mo-old piglets during sequential perfusion with saline control (20 min); 0, 1, 5, and 10 mM oleic acid/10 mM taurocholate in saline (20 min); and normal saline (60 min). The jejunum of piglets < or = 2 wk showed significantly greater increases in mucosal permeability compared with 1-mo-old animals after perfusion with oleic acid. This effect was dependent on the luminal concentration of the fatty acid and was associated with mucosal injury evident under light and electron microscopy. In contrast, the overall response in ileum was more attenuated compared with jejunum. Thus oleic acid, a common dietary fatty acid, induces dose- and age-dependent injury in developing piglet intestine. Investigation of the mechanisms of this injury may provide the basis for dietary modifications directed at decreasing the risk of mucosal injury during enteral feeding in neonatal intestine.

  3. Cancer Treatment-Induced Mucositis Pain: Strategies for Assessment and Management

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Debra J

    2006-01-01

    Mucositis pain is a major clinical problem associated with cancer treatment. Mucosal tissue injury is a dose-limiting side effect and also limits nutritional intake and oral function, resulting in weight loss and nutritional deficits for many patients. The pathophysiology of mucositis is thought to be a complex array of cytokine-mediated events, which begins with mucosal atrophy and eventually leads to the painful ulceration of the mucosa. This article reviews current research related to pain management for mucositis. Effective treatment for mucositis pain must be targeted at the various factors involved in the pain experience. Although a number of interventions aimed to prevent and treat mucositis have been studied, there is little evidence to recommend any one treatment modality. While current strategies for pain management rely on general treatment for acute pain, research developments are aimed at targeting the specific receptors and enzymes involved in mucositis. As these breakthroughs become available clinically, thorough assessment and timely directed interventions must be implemented in order to limit patient distress from mucositis. This article presents an assessment tool specific to mucositis pain, including physical, functional, and pain parameters. PMID:18360600

  4. Organizing a mucosal defense.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Rodney D; Lorenz, Robin G

    2005-08-01

    Gastrointestinal associated lymphoid tissue can be divided into loosely organized effector sites, which include the lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and more organized structures, such as mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs), Peyer's patches (PPs), isolated lymphoid follicles, and cryptopatches (CPs). These organized structures in the gastrointestinal tract have been hypothesized to play the role of primary lymphoid organ, supporting the extrathymic development of T lymphocytes (CPs), secondary lymphoid organs involved in the induction of the mucosal immune response (PPs), and tertiary lymphoid structures whose function is still under debate (isolated lymphoid follicles). The most widely studied lymphoid structure found in the small intestine is the PP. PPs are secondary lymphoid structures, and their development and function have been extensively investigated. However, single lymphoid aggregates resembling PPs have been also described in humans and in the murine small intestines. These isolated lymphoid follicles have both germinal centers and an overlying follicle-associated epithelium, suggesting that they also can function as inductive sites for the mucosal immune response. This review compares and contrasts the development and function of the four main organized gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues: CPs, isolated lymphoid follicles, PPs, and mesenteric LNs.

  5. New Frontiers in the Pathobiology and Treatment of Cancer Regimen-Related Mucosal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cinausero, Marika; Aprile, Giuseppe; Ermacora, Paola; Basile, Debora; Vitale, Maria G.; Fanotto, Valentina; Parisi, Giuseppe; Calvetti, Lorenzo; Sonis, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Mucositis is a common complication of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted agents. It often affects compliance to anticancer therapies as it frequently causes schedule delays, interruptions or discontinuations of treatment. Moreover, the economic impact related to the management of mucositis is topical and several estimations of additional hospital costs due to this clinical condition have been recently reported. The ability to determine risk factors for mucositis, to early detect its onset, to assess correctly the degree of this toxicity and to plan its multidisciplinary management are all key elements to guarantee the quality of life of patients and to avoid useless dose reduction or interruption of treatment. The pathogenesis of mucositis is multifactorial and it is classily subdivided into oral and gastrointestinal mucositis according to its anatomic presentation. Treatment and patients’ related factors might help in predicting the frequency and the potential degree of symptoms onset. Here we discuss about clinical presentation and pathogenesis of mucositis in relation to different kinds of treatments. Moreover, we focus on therapeutic and prevention strategies, describing past and present management according to international guidelines and the most promising new data about agents potentially able to further improve the treatment of mucositis in the next future. PMID:28642709

  6. Hydrophobicity of mucosal surface and its relationship to gut barrier function.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaofa; Caputo, Francis J; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-03-01

    Loss of the gut barrier has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and, thus, understanding the intestinal barrier is of potential clinical importance. An important, but relatively neglected, component of the gut barrier is the unstirred mucus layer, which through its hydrophobic and other properties serves as an important barrier to bacterial and other factors within the gut lumen. Thus, the goal of this study was to establish a reproducible method of measuring mucosal hydrophobicity and test the hypothesis that conditions that decrease mucosal hydrophobicity are associated with increased gut permeability. Hydrophobicity was measured in various segments of normal gut by measuring the contact angle of an aqueous droplet placed on the mucosal surface using a commercial goniometer. Second, the effect of the mucolytic agent N-acetyl cysteine on mucosal hydrophobicity and gut permeability was measured, as was the effects of increasing periods of in vivo gut ischemia on these parameters. Gut ischemia was induced by superior mesenteric artery occlusion, and gut permeability was measured by the mucosal-to-serosal passage of fluoresceine isothiocyanate-dextran (4.3 kDa) (FD4) across the everted sacs of ileum. Intestinal mucosal hydrophobicity showed a gradual increase from the duodenum to the end of the ileum and remained at high level in the cecum, colon, and rectum. Both N-acetyl cysteine treatment and ischemia caused a dose-dependent decrease in mucosal hydrophobicity, which significantly correlated increased gut permeability. Mucosal hydrophobicity of the intestine can be reproducibly measured, and decreases in mucosal hydrophobicity closely correlate with increased gut permeability. These results suggest that mucosal hydrophobicity can be a reliable method of measuring the barrier function of the unstirred mucus layer and a useful parameter in evaluating the pathogenesis of gut barrier dysfunction.

  7. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P

    2011-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of C. albicans biofilm formation under diverse conditions, though the most relevant Bcr1 target genes can vary with the biofilm niche. An important determinant of mucosal biofilm formation is the interaction with host defenses. Finally, studies of interactions between bacterial species and C. albicans provide insight into the communication mechanisms that endow polymicrobial biofilms with unique properties.

  8. Targeting early infection to prevent HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

    PubMed

    Haase, Ashley T

    2010-03-11

    Measures to prevent sexual mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are urgently needed to curb the growth of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and ultimately bring it to an end. Studies in animal models and acute HIV-1 infection reviewed here reveal potential viral vulnerabilities at the mucosal portal of entry in the earliest stages of infection that might be most effectively targeted by vaccines and microbicides, thereby preventing acquisition and averting systemic infection, CD4 T-cell depletion and pathologies that otherwise rapidly ensue.

  9. Poxvirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Buller, R M; Palumbo, G J

    1991-01-01

    Poxviruses are a highly successful family of pathogens, with variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, being the most notable member. Poxviruses are unique among animal viruses in several respects. First, owing to the cytoplasmic site of virus replication, the virus encodes many enzymes required either for macromolecular precursor pool regulation or for biosynthetic processes. Second, these viruses have a very complex morphogenesis, which involves the de novo synthesis of virus-specific membranes and inclusion bodies. Third, and perhaps most surprising of all, the genomes of these viruses encode many proteins which interact with host processes at both the cellular and systemic levels. For example, a viral homolog of epidermal growth factor is active in vaccinia virus infections of cultured cells, rabbits, and mice. At least five virus proteins with homology to the serine protease inhibitor family have been identified and one, a 38-kDa protein encoded by cowpox virus, is thought to block a host pathway for generating a chemotactic substance. Finally, a protein which has homology with complement components interferes with the activation of the classical complement pathway. Poxviruses infect their hosts by all possible routes: through the skin by mechanical means (e.g., molluscum contagiosum infections of humans), via the respiratory tract (e.g., variola virus infections of humans), or by the oral route (e.g., ectromelia virus infection of the mouse). Poxvirus infections, in general, are acute, with no strong evidence for latent, persistent, or chronic infections. They can be localized or systemic. Ectromelia virus infection of the laboratory mouse can be systemic but inapparent with no mortality and little morbidity, or highly lethal with death in 10 days. On the other hand, molluscum contagiosum virus replicates only in the stratum spinosum of the human epidermis, with little or no involvement of the dermis, and does not spread systemically from the site of

  10. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P < 0.01). OSA VP mucosal surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P < 0.0001) than healthy VP mucosal surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe

  11. The Role of Intestinal Microbiota in the Development and Severity of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Michel J.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Mucositis, also referred to as mucosal barrier injury, is one of the most debilitating side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment. Clinically, mucositis is associated with pain, bacteremia, and malnutrition. Furthermore, mucositis is a frequent reason to postpone chemotherapy treatment, ultimately leading towards a higher mortality in cancer patients. According to the model introduced by Sonis, both inflammation and apoptosis of the mucosal barrier result in its discontinuity, thereby promoting bacterial translocation. According to this five-phase model, the intestinal microbiota plays no role in the pathophysiology of mucositis. However, research has implicated a prominent role for the commensal intestinal microbiota in the development of several inflammatory diseases like inflammatory bowel disease, pouchitis, and radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. Furthermore, chemotherapeutics have a detrimental effect on the intestinal microbial composition (strongly decreasing the numbers of anaerobic bacteria), coinciding in time with the development of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We hypothesize that the commensal intestinal microbiota might play a pivotal role in chemotherapy-induced mucositis. In this review, we propose and discuss five pathways in the development of mucositis that are potentially influenced by the commensal intestinal microbiota: 1) the inflammatory process and oxidative stress, 2) intestinal permeability, 3) the composition of the mucus layer, 4) the resistance to harmful stimuli and epithelial repair mechanisms, and 5) the activation and release of immune effector molecules. Via these pathways, the commensal intestinal microbiota might influence all phases in the Sonis model of the pathogenesis of mucositis. Further research is needed to show the clinical relevance of restoring dysbiosis, thereby possibly decreasing the degree of intestinal mucositis. PMID:20523891

  12. Mucosal vaccines: the promise and the challenge.

    PubMed

    Neutra, Marian R; Kozlowski, Pamela A

    2006-02-01

    Most infectious agents enter the body at mucosal surfaces and therefore mucosal immune responses function as a first line of defence. Protective mucosal immune responses are most effectively induced by mucosal immunization through oral, nasal, rectal or vaginal routes, but the vast majority of vaccines in use today are administered by injection. As discussed in this Review, current research is providing new insights into the function of mucosal tissues and the interplay of innate and adaptive immune responses that results in immune protection at mucosal surfaces. These advances promise to accelerate the development and testing of new mucosal vaccines against many human diseases including HIV/AIDS.

  13. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  14. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D; Schlievert, Patrick M; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J; Southern, Peter J; Reilly, Cavan S; Peterson, Marnie L; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G; Nephew, Karla R; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Carlis, John V; Haase, Ashley T

    2009-04-23

    Although there has been great progress in treating human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model point to opportunities at the earliest stages of infection in which a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3alpha (also known as CCL20), plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5(+ )cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruits CD4(+) T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate-a widely used antimicrobial compound with inhibitory activity against the production of MIP-3alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines-can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo it can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This new approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for the development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission.

  15. Glycerol monolaurate prevents mucosal SIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingsheng; Estes, Jacob D.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Duan, Lijie; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Southern, Peter J.; Reilly, Cavan S.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Brunner, Kevin G.; Nephew, Karla R.; Pambuccian, Stefan; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Carlis, John V.; Haase, Ashley T.

    2009-01-01

    While there has been great progress in treating HIV-1 infection1, preventing transmission has thus far proven an elusive goal. Indeed, recent trials of a candidate vaccine and microbicide have been disappointing, both for want of efficacy and concerns about increased rates of transmission2–4. Nonetheless, studies of vaginal transmission in the SIV-rhesus macaque model point to opportunities in the earliest stages of infection where a vaccine or microbicide might be protective, by limiting the expansion of infected founder populations at the portal of entry5, 6. Here we show in this SIV-macaque model, that an outside-in endocervical mucosal signalling system, involving MIP-3α, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and CCR5+cell-attracting chemokines produced by these cells, in combination with the innate immune and inflammatory responses to infection in both cervix and vagina, recruit CD4+T cells to fuel this obligate expansion. We then show that glycerol monolaurate, a widely used antimicrobial compound 7 with inhibitory activity against production of MIP-3α and other proinflammatory cytokines8, can inhibit mucosal signalling and the innate and inflammatory response to HIV-1 and SIV in vitro, and in vivo can protect rhesus macaques from acute infection despite repeated intra-vaginal exposure to high doses of SIV. This novel approach, plausibly linked to interfering with innate host responses that recruit the target cells necessary to establish systemic infection, opens a promising new avenue for development of effective interventions to block HIV-1 mucosal transmission. PMID:19262509

  16. Renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, ( 51 Cr)EDTA, and 24 Na in man during acute renal failure after shock. Implications for the pathogenesis of anuria.

    PubMed

    Reubi, F C; Vorburger, C; Tuckman, J

    1973-02-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [(51)Cr]EDTA, and (24)Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of (24)Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase.

  17. Renal Distribution Volumes of Indocyanine Green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na in Man during Acute Renal Failure after Shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANURIA

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, F. C.; Vorburger, C.; Tuckman, J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of 24Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase. PMID:4630601

  18. Systematic review: the role of the gut microbiota in chemotherapy- or radiation-induced gastrointestinal mucositis - current evidence and potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Touchefeu, Y; Montassier, E; Nieman, K; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; Bruley des Varannes, S; Le Vacon, F; de La Cochetière, M F

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal mucositis is defined as inflammation and/or ulcers of the gastrointestinal tract occurring as a complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and affects about 50% of all cancer patients. To assess the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal mucositis and the potential for manipulations of the microbiota to prevent and to treat mucositis. Search of the literature published in English using Medline, Scopus and the Cochrane Library, with main search terms 'intestinal microbiota', 'bacteremia', 'mucositis', 'chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea', 'chemotherapy-induced mucositis', 'radiotherapy-induced mucositis'. The gut microbiota plays a major role in the maintenance of intestinal homoeostasis and integrity. Patients receiving cytotoxic and radiation therapy exhibit marked changes in intestinal microbiota, with most frequently, decrease in Bifidobacterium, Clostridium cluster XIVa, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, and increase in Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides. These modifications may contribute to the development of mucositis, particularly diarrhoea and bacteraemia. The prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis by probiotics has been investigated in randomised clinical trials with some promising results. Three of six trials reported a significantly decreased incidence of diarrhoea. One trial reported a decrease in infectious complications. The gut microbiota may play a major role in the pathogenesis of mucositis through the modification of intestinal barrier function, innate immunity and intestinal repair mechanisms. Better knowledge of these effects may lead to new therapeutic approaches and to the identification of predictive markers of mucositis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  20. Oral mucosal disease: pemphigus.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Mignogna, Michele

    2008-06-01

    Pemphigus defines a group of rare mucocutaneous autoimmune diseases of which pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is the most common. The aetiology and pathogenesis of PV are not completely clear, but there is a fairly strong genetic background: ethnic groups such as Ashkenazi Jews and people of Mediterranean and Indian origin are particularly susceptible and there is a link to HLA class II alleles. The initiating event in PV is not clear, but circulating IgG autoantibodies develop, directed particularly against the intercellular cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) in desmosomes of stratified squamous epithelium. Oral lesions often herald the disease and are initially vesiculobullous, but they rupture readily to leave ulcers. Involvement of other mucosa and skin is almost inevitable and PV is potentially life threatening. The diagnosis is confirmed by biopsy with histological examination and immunostaining. Management is largely by systemic immunosuppression with corticosteroids, usually azathioprine or other agents, but newer treatments with potentially fewer adverse effects look promising.

  1. Iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Ouyang, Jie; Wieczorek, Rosemary; DeSoto, Fidelina

    2009-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal erosion, ulcer, necrosis and strictures after an acute iron overdose are well described. However, gastric mucosal injury in patients receiving therapeutic iron has received only scant recognition despite its wide use. We report a case of iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury in a 76-year-old male who presented with iron deficiency anemia and had been taking ferrous sulfate tablet for 4 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a pale, villous appearing flat lesion along the lesser curvature of gastric body. Histopathologic examination of EGD biopsies of the flat lesion showed brown crystalline materials deposited in the lamina propria of gastric mucosa, which was accompanied with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and foreign body reaction. The crystalline materials were covered and admixed with gastric epithelium. Prussian blue iron stain confirmed that the brown crystalline materials were iron. The iron and hemosiderin accumulation was also seen in cytoplasm of epithelial cells and lumen of fundic gastric glands. The recognition and reporting by pathologists of iron-induced changes in EGD biopsies will alert clinicians to this underrecognized but easily correctable complication by alternative forms of iron therapy, such as liquid preparation.

  2. NOX1 is responsible for cell death through STAT3 activation in hyperoxia and is associated with the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carnesecchi, Stephanie; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Zanetti, Filippo; Singovski, Grigory; Deffert, Christine; Donati, Yves; Cagarelli, Thomas; Pache, Jean-Claude; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Reith, Walter; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to alveolar cell death in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and we previously demonstrated that NOX1-derived ROS contributed to hyperoxia-induced alveolar cell death in mice. The study investigates whether NOX1 expression is modulated in epithelial cells concomitantly to cell death and associated to STAT3 signaling in the exudative phase of ARDS. In addition, the role of STAT3 activation in NOX1-dependent epithelial cell death was confirmed by using a lung epithelial cell line and in mice exposed to hyperoxia. NOX1 expression, cell death and STAT3 staining were evaluated in the lungs of control and ARDS patients by immunohistochemistry. In parallel, a stable NOX1-silenced murine epithelial cell line (MLE12) and NOX1-deficient mice were used to characterize signalling pathways. In the present study, we show that NOX1 is detected in alveolar epithelial cells of ARDS patients in the exudative stage. In addition, increased alveolar epithelial cell death and phosphorylated STAT3 are observed in ARDS patients and associated with NOX1 expression. Phosphorylated STAT3 is also correlated with TUNEL staining. We also confirmed that NOX1-dependent STAT3 activation participates to alveolar epithelial cell death. Silencing and acute inhibition of NOX1 in MLE12 led to decreased cell death and cleaved-caspase 3 induced by hyperoxia. Additionally, hyperoxia-induced STAT3 phosphorylation is dependent on NOX1 expression and associated with cell death in MLE12 and mice. This study demonstrates that NOX1 is involved in human ARDS pathophysiology and is responsible for the damage occurring in alveolar epithelial cells at least in part via STAT3 signalling pathways. PMID:24551274

  3. Differential phenotypic and functional properties of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ling; Peng, Hui; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells, tissue-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s. Recently identified liver-resident NK cells, which can mount contact hypersensitivity responses, and mucosal ILC1s that are involved in pathogenesis of colitis are distinct from cNK cells in several aspects, but the issue of how they are related to each other has not been clearly clarified. Here, we show that liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s have different phenotypes, as evidenced by distinct expression patterns of homing-associated molecules. Moreover, mucosal ILC1s exhibit tissue residency akin to liver-resident NK cells. Importantly, liver-resident NK cells express relative high levels of cytotoxic effector molecules, which are poorly expressed by mucosal ILC1s, and exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity compared with mucosal ILC1s. These results demonstrate differential phenotypic and functional characteristics of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s, shedding new light on the diversity of ILC family.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced mucositis: the role of the gastrointestinal microbiome and toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Daniel W; Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J

    2013-01-01

    Alimentary mucositis is a major clinical problem. Patients with mucositis are at significantly increased risk of infection and are often hospitalized for prolonged periods. More importantly, these patients often have to undergo reductions in their cytotoxic therapy, which may lead to reduced survival. Unfortunately, there are very limited therapeutic options for mucositis and no effective prevention. The human gut microbiome is receiving increased attention as a key player in the pathogenesis of alimentary mucositis with recent literature suggesting that changes in bacteria lead to mucositis. The bacteria which are found throughout the gut are tightly regulated by the toll-like receptor (TLR) family which currently has 13 known members. TLRs play a critical role in gut homeostasis and bacterial regulation. Furthermore, TLRs play a critical role in the regulation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key regulator of alimentary mucositis. However to date, no research has clearly identified a link between TLRs and alimentary mucositis. This critical literature review seeks to correct this.

  5. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  6. Pathogenesis of arenavirus hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Moraz, Marie-Laurence; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses belong to the most devastating emerging human diseases and represent serious public health problems. Arenavirus VHFs in humans are acute diseases characterized by fever and, in severe cases, different degrees of hemorrhages associated with a shock syndrome in the terminal stage. Over the past years, much has been learned about the pathogenesis of arenaviruses at the cellular level, in particular their ability to subvert the host cell's innate antiviral defenses. Clinical studies and novel animal models have provided important new information about the interaction of hemorrhagic arenaviruses with the host's adaptive immune system, in particular virus-induced immunosuppression, and have provided the first hints towards an understanding of the terminal hemorrhagic shock syndrome. The scope of this article is to review our current knowledge on arenavirus VHF pathogenesis with an emphasis on recent developments.

  7. Omics in fish mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Irene; Magadán, Susana

    2017-10-01

    The mucosal immune system of fish is a complex network of immune cells and molecules that are constantly surveilling the environment and protecting the host from infection. A number of "omics" tools are now available and utilized to understand the complexity of mucosal immune systems in non-traditional animal models. This review summarizes recent advances in the implementation of "omics" tools pertaining to the four mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues in teleosts. Genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and "omics" in microbiome research require interdisciplinary collaboration and careful experimental design. The data-rich datasets generated are proving really useful at discovering new innate immune players in fish mucosal secretions, identifying novel markers of specific mucosal immune responses, unraveling the diversity of the B and T cell repertoires and characterizing the diversity of the microbial communities present in teleost mucosal surfaces. Bioinformatics, data analysis and storage platforms should be developed to facilitate rapid processing of large datasets, especially when mammalian tools such as bioinformatics analysis software are not available in fishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, Takahiro; Kanai, Yuta; Tani, Hideki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs) are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26901882

  9. Studies on the pathogenesis of acute inflammation. I. The inflammatory reaction to thermal injury as observed in the rabbit ear chamber.

    PubMed

    ALLISON, F; SMITH, M R; WOOD, W B

    1955-12-01

    A special adaptation of the rabbit ear chamber has been devised to study in vivo, under high magnification, the acute inflammatory reaction to thermal injury. Systematic observations of the cellular response have led to the following conclusions. 1. Contrary to the commonly accepted view, vasodilatation does not always precede the adherence of leucocytes to vascular endothelium. 2. The fact that leucocytes often adhere to one another as well as to the endothelium indicates that the increased adhesiveness characteristic of the early stages of inflammation is not limited to the surfaces of the endothelial cells. 3. The sharing of erythrocytes and platelets in this increased stickiness suggests that a "plasma factor" is involved. There is indirect but as yet inconclusive evidence that the plasma factor may concern the clotting mechanism of the blood. 4. The adherence of leucocytes to the endothelium is usually first noted on the side of the vessel closest to the site of injury. This previously undescribed phenomenon of "unilateral sticking" is in keeping with the concept that the vascular reaction is caused by products of cellular damage which diffuse to the vessel from the site of injury. 5. Leucocytes always become adherent to the endothelium before penetrating the vessel wall. They often migrate about for some time on the endothelial surface before undergoing diapedesis. 6. Although no definite stomata are at any time visible in the endothelium, penetrating leucocytes may leave behind temporary defects through which other leucocytes and even erythrocytes may pass. 7. The diapedesis of leucocytes appears to depend primarily upon cellular motility. It may occur in static vessels where there is presumably little if any hydrostatic pressure. 8. The diapedesis of erythrocytes, on the other hand, is a passive process depending upon intravascular pressure. Its occurrence is greatly exaggerated in areas in which intravascular pressure becomes elevated. Such elevations

  10. Helminths and mucosal immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Joel V

    2006-08-01

    Geographic and ethnic variations in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease frequency suggest that environmental factors affect disease risk. Prevention of parasitic worms (helminths) through improved hygiene may be one factor leading to the increased disease prevalence. Helminths alter host mucosal and systemic immunity. Animals exposed to helminths are protected from experimental colitis and other immunological diseases, and helminthic colonization can be used to treat ongoing murine and human disease. Helminths induce mucosal T cells to make Th2 and regulatory cytokines. Helminth-induced mucosal IL4, TGFbeta, and IL10 likely are part of the protective process. Helminths affect pathways of innate immunity like TLR4 expression and function. Worms also induce various regulatory-type T-cell subsets in the gut that limit effector T-cell growth and function. These effects of once ever-present helminths may have protected people from immune-mediated illnesses like inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Mucosal adaptation to indomethacin induced gastric damage in man--studies on morphology, blood flow, and prostaglandin E2 metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrock, C J; Rees, W D

    1992-01-01

    The effect of 28 days' continuous administration of oral indomethacin on gastroduodenal morphology, gastric mucosal blood flow, and gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism in man was studied to define further the mechanisms of mucosal injury induced by indomethacin. Indomethacin caused acute gastroduodenal damage in all cases, which was maximal at 24 hours of administration. With continued intake, mucosal adaptation occurs resulting in resolution of endoscopic mucosal damage. At the time of maximal mucosal damage, gastric mucosal blood flow was significantly reduced compared with values before treatment (p less than 0.001 in fundus and p less than 0.002 in antrum), with good correlation between the severity of damage and the magnitude of the reduction in blood flow (r = 0.76). Mucosal recovery was associated with a return of the blood flow to normal. PGE2 in mucosal homogenate was significantly reduced by indomethacin in both the fundus (p less than 0.01) and antrum (p less than 0.01) after 24 hours but there was no correlation between the magnitude of this reduction and the severity of mucosal damage (r = -0.34). Despite mucosal recovery by 28 days, PGE2 values remained significantly below those before treatment in both the fundus (p less than 0.01) and antrum (p less than 0.01). The PGE2 degradation capacity was not influenced by indomethacin. In conclusion, mucosal adaptation to acute damage by indomethacin occurs in man and seems independent of local PGE2 metabolism. PMID:1541410

  12. Cannabinoid HU210 Protects Isolated Rat Stomach against Impairment Caused by Serum of Rats with Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis. PMID:23285225

  13. Cannabinoid HU210 protects isolated rat stomach against impairment caused by serum of rats with experimental acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis.

  14. Novel insights into phosgene-induced acute lung injury in rats: role of dysregulated cardiopulmonary reflexes and nitric oxide in lung edema pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenli; Liu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Truebel, Hubert; Pauluhn, Juergen

    2013-02-01

    Phosgene gas is a lower respiratory tract irritant. As such, it stimulates nociceptive vagal C-fiber-related reflexes in a dose-rate and concentration × exposure duration (C × t)-dependent manner. In rats, this reflex is characterized by extended apnea time periods, bradycardia, and hypothermia. Although inhalation exposures at nonlethal C × t products show rapid reversibility of reflexively induced changes in respiratory patterns, lethal C × t products seem to cause prolonged stimulation after discontinued exposure to phosgene. This observation has been taken as indirect evidence that phosgene-induced lethal lung edema is likely to be associated with a dysfunctional neurogenic control of cardiopulmonary and microvascular physiology. In order to verify this hypothesis, data from respiratory function measurements during and after the inhalation exposure to phosgene gas were compared with time-course measurements of cardiac function over 20 h post-phosgene exposure. These data were complemented by time-course analyses of nitric oxide (NO(e)) and carbon dioxide in exhaled breath, including time-dependent changes of extravasated protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and hemoglobin in blood. The nitric oxidase synthetase inhibitors L-NAME and L-NIL were used to further elucidate the role of NO(e) in this type of acute lung injury and whether its analysis can serve as an early biomarker of pulmonary injury. Collectively, the sequence and time course of pathological events in phosgene-induced lung edema appear to suggest that overstimulated, continued sensorimotor vagal reflexes affect cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. A continued parasympathetic tone appears to be involved in this etiopathology.

  15. Immunoglobulin Responses at the Mucosal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Chorny, Alejo

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are colonized by large communities of commensal bacteria and represent the primary site of entry for pathogenic agents. To prevent microbial intrusion, mucosal B cells release large amounts of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules through multiple follicular and extrafollicular pathways. IgA is the most abundant antibody isotype in mucosal secretions and owes its success in frontline immunity to its ability to undergo transcytosis across epithelial cells. In addition to translocating IgA onto the mucosal surface, epithelial cells educate the mucosal immune system as to the composition of the local microbiota and instruct B cells to initiate IgA responses that generate immune protection while preserving immune homeostasis. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the cellular interactions and signaling pathways governing IgA production at mucosal surfaces and discuss new findings on the regulation and function of mucosal IgD, the most enigmatic isotype of our mucosal antibody repertoire. PMID:21219173

  16. Pathogenesis of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection: effects of suppression of antibody response on viral mRNA levels and on development of acute disease.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Storgaard, T; Kamstrup, N; Aasted, B; Porter, D D

    1994-01-01

    We suppressed the B-cell development and antibody response in mink by using treatment with polyclonal anti-immunoglobulin M (anti-IgM) to study the effects of antiviral antibodies on development of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV)-induced disease in more detail. Newborn mink kits were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg of either anti-IgM or a control preparation three times a week for 30 to 34 days. At 21 days after birth, groups of mink kits were infected with the highly virulent United isolate of ADV. At selected time points, i.e., postinfection days 9, 13, 29, and 200, randomly chosen mink kits were sacrificed, and blood and tissues were collected for analyses. The efficacy of immunosuppressive treatment was monitored by electrophoretic techniques and flow cytometry. Effects of treatment on viral replication, on viral mRNA levels, and on development of acute or chronic disease were determined by histopathological, immunoelectrophoretic, and molecular hybridization techniques. Several interesting findings emerged from these studies. First, antiviral antibodies decreased ADV mRNA levels more than DNA replication. Second, suppression of B-cell development and antibody response in mink kits infected at 21 days of age resulted in production of viral inclusion bodies in alveolar type II cells. Some of these kits showed mild clinical signs of respiratory disease, and one kit died of respiratory distress; however, clinical signs were seen only after release of immunosuppression, suggesting that the production of antiviral antibodies, in combination with the massive amounts of free viral antigen present, somehow is involved in the induction of respiratory distress. It is suggested that the antiviral antibody response observed in mink older than approximately 14 days primarily, by a yet unknown mechanism, decreases ADV mRNA levels which, if severe enough, results in restricted levels of DNA replication and virion production. Furthermore, such a restricted ADV

  17. Immunology of Gut Mucosal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pasetti, Marcela F.; Simon, Jakub K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding the mechanisms underlying the induction of immunity in the gastrointestinal mucosa following oral immunization and the cross-talk between mucosal and systemic immunity should expedite the development of vaccines to diminish the global burden caused by enteric pathogens. Identifying an immunological correlate of protection in the course of field trials of efficacy, animal models (when available), or human challenge studies is also invaluable. In industrialized country populations, live attenuated vaccines (e.g. polio, typhoid, and rotavirus) mimic natural infection and generate robust protective immune responses. In contrast, a major challenge is to understand and overcome the barriers responsible for the diminished immunogenicity and efficacy of the same enteric vaccines in underprivileged populations in developing countries. Success in developing vaccines against some enteric pathogens has heretofore been elusive (e.g. Shigella). Different types of oral vaccines can selectively or inclusively elicit mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A and serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and a variety of cell-mediated immune responses. Areas of research that require acceleration include interaction between the gut innate immune system and the stimulation of adaptive immunity, development of safe yet effective mucosal adjuvants, better understanding of homing to the mucosa of immunologically relevant cells, and elicitation of mucosal immunologic memory. This review dissects the immune responses elicited in humans by enteric vaccines. PMID:21198669

  18. Microbiome and mucosal inflammation as extra-articular triggers for rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Brusca, Samuel B; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Despite progress towards understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), its etiology remains elusive. Genes are important but rather insufficient to explain the majority of RA cases. This review describes novel data supporting the microbiome and its interactions with the human host as potential en(‘in’)vironmental factors in RA pathogenesis. Recent Findings Animal models of inflammatory arthritis have shown that the presence of bacteria in mucosal surfaces is sufficient to alter local and systemic host immune responses and elicit joint inflammation. Human RA studies have focused on three mucosal sites: the gut, the gingival, and the respiratory tree. The oral microbiome, and specifically Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has long been implicated. Novel sequencing technologies have allowed investigations into the role of the gut microbiome in the development of autoimmune arthritis. Most recently, the pulmonary parenchyma has also been described as yet another possible mucosal site of initiation of autoimmunity in RA. Summary Emerging data implicates the microbiome in RA pathogenesis. Mucosal sites exposed to a high load of bacterial antigens - such as the periodontium, lung, and gut - may represent the initial site of autoimmune generation. If validated, these findings could lead to the discovery of potential biomarkers and therapeutic approaches in the pre-clinical and clinical phases of RA. PMID:24247114

  19. Microbiome and mucosal inflammation as extra-articular triggers for rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Brusca, Samuel B; Abramson, Steven B; Scher, Jose U

    2014-01-01

    Despite the progress toward understanding the molecular pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), its cause remains elusive. Genes are important but rather insufficient to explain the majority of RA cases. This review describes the novel data supporting the microbiome and its interactions with the human host as potential en('in')vironmental factors in RA pathogenesis. Animal models of inflammatory arthritis have shown that the presence of bacteria in mucosal surfaces is sufficient to alter local and systemic host immune responses and elicit joint inflammation. Human RA studies have focused on three mucosal sites: the gut, the gingiva, and the respiratory tree. The oral microbiome, and specifically Porphyromonas gingivalis, has long been implicated. Novel sequencing technologies have allowed investigations into the role of the gut microbiome in the development of autoimmune arthritis. Most recently, the pulmonary parenchyma has also been described as yet another possible mucosal site of initiation of autoimmunity in RA. Emerging data implicate the microbiome in RA pathogenesis. Mucosal sites exposed to a high load of bacterial antigens--such as the periodontium, lung, and gut--may represent the initial site of autoimmune generation. If validated, these findings could lead to the discovery of potential biomarkers and therapeutic approaches in the preclinical and clinical phases of RA.

  20. Mucosal vaccination promotes clearance of Streptococcus agalactiae vaginal colonization.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jacqueline A; Lewis, Emma L; Byland, Leah M; Bonakdar, Maryam; Randis, Tara M; Ratner, Adam J

    2017-03-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in infants, and colonization of the maternal genital tract is the primary risk factor for newborn infection. Despite the importance of mucosal colonization in GBS pathogenesis, relevant host and bacterial factors are incompletely understood. We investigated the role of humoral immunity in clearance of vaginal colonization in vivo. B-cell-deficient mice or those lacking neonatal Fc-receptor, a mediator of IgG transport to the vaginal mucosa, exhibit prolonged GBS vaginal colonization compared to wild type animals. Intranasal but not intramuscular immunization induced systemic and mucosal immune responses and decreased GBS colonization duration without altering initial colonization density. Vaccine-induced clearance of GBS was serotype-specific, suggesting a role for anti-capsule antibodies in protection. Our results support a role for humoral immunity in GBS eradication from the female genital tract and suggest that mucosal vaccination may prime colonization clearance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Feline immunodeficiency virus clade C mucosal transmission and disease courses.

    PubMed

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-05-01

    The transmissibility and pathogenicity of a clade C feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-C) was examined via the oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosa. FIV-C was transmissible by all three mucosal routes. Vaginal transmission was most efficient (100%), oral exposure resulted in a 80% infection rate, and rectal transmission was least effective (44%). In contrast to previous intravenous passage studies, a broader range of host-virus relationships was observed after mucosal exposure. Three categories of FIV-C infection were defined: (1) rapidly progressive infection marked by high virus burdens and rapid CD4+ cell depletion (43% of vaginally exposed animals); (2) conventional (typical) infection featuring slowly progressive CD4+ cell decline (61% of all exposed animals); and (3) regressive (transient) infection marked by low and then barely detectable virus burdens and no CD4+ cell alterations (22% of rectally inoculated cats). These disease courses appear to have parallels in mucosal HIV and SIV infections, emphasizing the importance of the virus-mucosa interface in lentiviral pathogenesis.

  2. Mechanism-based management for mucositis: option for treating side effects without compromising the efficacy of cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    Mucositis is a major side effect induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although mucositis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients, management is largely limited to controlling symptoms, and few therapeutic agents are available for treatment. Since mucositis could be inhibited by the modulation of radiotherapy- or chemotherapy-induced pathways independently of cancer treatment, there is an opportunity for the development of more targeted therapies and interventions. This article examined potential therapeutic agents that have been investigated for the prevention and/or inhibition of mucositis induced by conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. They can be classified according to their mechanisms of action: scavenging reactive oxygen species, inhibition of specific cytokine production or inflammation, and inhibition of apoptosis. These early events may be good target pathways for preventing the pathogenesis of mucositis. Considering that both cancer therapy and therapeutic agents for mucositis act on both normal and cancer cells, agents that inhibit mucositis should act through mechanisms that selectively protect normal cells without compromising cancer treatment. Therefore, mechanism-based guidance for the treatment of mucositis is critical to prevent risky treatments for cancer patients and to relieve detrimental side effects effectively from cancer therapy. PMID:27103826

  3. Prevention and treatment of chemo- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Demarosi, F; Bez, C; Carrassi, A

    2002-05-01

    The administration of many chemo-radiotherapy regimens in patients with cancer may be complicated by toxicities that limit the clinicians' abilities to deliver the most effective doses of active agents. Oral mucositis is a major dose-limiting toxic effect and the most important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation and those receiving certain chemotherapeutic agents for a variety of human malignancies. The intent of this paper is to review preventive strategies and treatment approaches for patients with established oral mucositis. Many agents of differing mechanisms of action have been used in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by anticancer therapies. Currently, no intervention is completely successful at preventing or treating oral mucositis. The several solutions, drugs and methods used and studied in the prophylaxis and therapy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis reflects the need of new, more efficient tools in the management of this complication. Current studies and our increasing understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of oral mucositis will lead to new approaches to the management and improved quality of life for these patients.

  4. Rebamipide gargle in preventive management of chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, B; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Yathiraj, Prahlad H; Fernandes, Donald; Chhaparwal, Yogesh

    2017-09-01

    Oral mucositis is inflammation of mucosa of oral cavity which is an inevitable and acute side effect in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for head & neck cancer. Though many agents have been tried in prevention & treatment of oral mucositis, until date no single agent exists that is universally established to be effective. 60 Patients diagnosed with Head & Neck cancer recruited for concurrent chemo-radiotherapy were assigned in a double blind fashion into 2 groups using computer based 1:1 ratio randomization. Subjects in Group 1 were given Rebamipide gargle while subjects in Group 2 were given Placebo gargle in similar colour coded bottles to gargle 6 times/day. Subjective assessment of oral mucositis was done by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and objective scoring according to RTOG system. All subjects in the Group 1 reported good treatment compliance but 4 subjects in Group 2 developed burning sensation to gargle and were excluded. Onset of oral mucositis was 3.5days earlier in Group 2 (mean=11.17) as compared to Group 1 (mean=14.63). At the end of chemo-radiotherapy, severity of oral mucositis was significantly lower in Group 1 (mean=1.97) than in Group 2 (mean=2.81). Findings of this study revealed that Rebamipide gargle may be an effective means to prolong the onset of oral mucositis and may reduce the severity of oral mucositis in undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Mucosal Immune System of Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish possess an adaptive immune system associated with each of their mucosal body surfaces. Evidence obtained from mucosal vaccination and mucosal infection studies reveal that adaptive immune responses take place at the different mucosal surfaces of teleost. The main mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) of teleosts are the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), the gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT) and the recently discovered nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Teleost MALT includes diffuse B cells and T cells with specific phenotypes different from their systemic counterparts that have co-evolved to defend the microbe-rich mucosal environment. Both B and T cells respond to mucosal infection or vaccination. Specific antibody responses can be measured in the gills, gut and skin mucosal secretions of teleost fish following mucosal infection or vaccination. Rainbow trout studies have shown that IgT antibodies and IgT+ B cells are the predominant B cell subset in all MALT and respond in a compartmentalized manner to mucosal infection. Our current knowledge on adaptive immunity in teleosts is limited compared to the mammalian literature. New research tools and in vivo models are currently being developed in order to help reveal the great intricacy of teleost mucosal adaptive immunity and help improve mucosal vaccination protocols for use in aquaculture. PMID:26274978

  6. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  7. Predominance of Th2 cytokines, CXC chemokines and innate immunity mediators at the mucosal level during severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in children.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Martin, Jesus F; Garcia-Arevalo, Maria C; De Lejarazu, Raul Ortiz; Ardura, Julio; Eiros, Jose M; Alonso, Ana; Matías, Vanesa; Pino, Maria; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo; Blanco-Quiros, Alfredo

    2007-09-01

    Profiling of immune mediators in both nasal and plasma samples is a common approach to the study of pathogenesis in respiratory viral infections. Nevertheless, mucosal immunity functions essentially independently from peripheral immunity. In our study, 27 immune mediators were profiled in parallel, in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) and plasma from 22 < 2 year-old children with a severe respiratory syncytial virus infection involving the lower respiratory tract, using a multiplex assay. NPAs from 22 children with innocent heart murmurs were used as controls. Differences in mediator concentrations between NPAs from patients and controls were assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Ratios of innate/adaptive-immunity mediators, Th2/Th1-cytokines and CXC/CC-chemokines were calculated for NPAs and plasmas and differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon test. Associations mediators, severity and leukocyte counts were studied using the Spearman-Karber test. increased levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-12p70, IFNgamma, TNFalpha), Th2 cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10), chemokines (IP-10, IL-8, MIP1alpha, MIP-1beta), growth factors (FGFb, PDGFbb, GCSF) and IL-1RA, IL-17 were observed in patient NPAs in comparison to controls. In the relative comparisons between patient NPAs and plasmas, a predominance of innate immunity mediators, Th2 cytokines and CXC chemokines was found at the mucosal level. No association between the level of each mediator in NPAs and plasma was found. In plasma, PDGFbb, VEGF, MIP-1alpha, IL-8 correlated with severity; RANTES and IL-6 correlated with leukocyte counts. acute respiratory syncytial virus infection induces a relative predominance of innate-immunity mediators, Th2 cytokines and CXC chemokines in the mucosal compartment in infected children.

  8. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N.; Ferre, April L.; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C.; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M. Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A. R.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. Methods and Findings To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10–15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Conclusions Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes. PMID:27232996

  9. Mucosal immunology of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Berin, M Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A

    2013-05-06

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors, such as dietary factors and microbiota, in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and the microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy.

  10. Mucosal vaccination: lung versus nose.

    PubMed

    Vujanic, Ana; Sutton, Philip; Snibson, Kenneth J; Yen, Hung-Hsun; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2012-07-15

    The induction of potent mucosal immune responses able to prevent the establishment of infection at the onset of mucosal pathogen colonisation represents a desirable but challenging goal for vaccine development. Here we compare nasal vaccine delivery with intra-pulmonary vaccination using a sheep lymphatic cannulation model. Our results demonstrate that nasal delivery of a non-infective ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine does not induce primary immune responses in the lymph draining the nasal lymph nodes, suggesting that local immune responses in the lymph nodes draining the nasal cavity are relatively weak. However, this mode of delivery can boost existing immunity in the nasal lymph. Using the same adjuvant we were able to induce very potent immune responses in both blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), following intra-pulmonary delivery of ISCOMATRIX(®) influenza vaccine, even when very small doses of antigen were employed. Lung delivery could also induce comparable immune responses against other recombinant antigens mixed with ISCOMATRIX(®) adjuvant and could therefore become a method of choice for the induction of immunity to mucosal pathogens infecting the lower respiratory tract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sean M; Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N; Ferre, April L; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; Veazey, Ronald S; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A R; Shacklett, Barbara L; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  12. Mucosal Immunology of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Berin, M. Cecilia; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2013-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence at a higher rate than can be explained by genetic factors, suggesting a role for as yet unidentified environmental factors. In this review, we summarize the state of knowledge about the healthy immune response to antigens in the diet and the basis of immune deviation that results in IgE sensitization and allergic reactivity to foods. The intestinal epithelium forms the interface between the external environment and the mucosal immune system, and emerging data suggest that the interaction between intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal dendritic cells is of particular importance in determining the outcome of immune responses to dietary antigens. Exposure to food allergens through non-oral routes, in particular through the skin, is increasingly recognized as a potentially important factor in the increasing rate of food allergy. There are many open questions on the role of environmental factors such as dietary factors and microbiota in the development of food allergy, but data suggest that both have an important modulatory effect on the mucosal immune system. Finally, we discuss recent developments in our understanding of immune mechanisms of clinical manifestations of food allergy. New experimental tools, particularly in the field of genomics and microbiome, are likely to shed light on factors responsible for the growing clinical problem of food allergy. PMID:23660362

  13. Vestibuloplasty: allograft versus mucosal graft.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, H M; Parhiz, A; Ghafari, S

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the application of alloderm and mucosal graft for vestibuloplasty. This randomized controlled trial with split mouth design was carried out on 20 edentulous patients. Patients underwent vestibuloplasty surgery with the Clark technique. Half of the prepared bed in each patient was covered with alloderm and the other half with mucosal graft. Vestibule depth (width of fixed tissue) and relapse in the two sides immediately after surgery, and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery were measured and compared. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Student's paired t and Friedman tests. The width of the fixed tissue in the alloderm graft at 1, 3 and 6 month intervals was significantly lower than that in the autograft (P<0.05). The difference in relapse between the two grafts was not statistically significant at any time. The results of the study suggest that alloderm is as effective as mucosal grafts in vestibuloplasty. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of Infliximab Biosimilar CT-P13 Induction Therapy on Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Klaudia; Rutka, Mariann; Golovics, Petra A; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lovász, Barbara D; Nyári, Tibor; Gecse, Krisztina B; Kolar, Martin; Bortlik, Martin; Duricova, Dana; Machkova, Nadezda; Hruba, Veronika; Lukas, Martin; Mitrova, Katarina; Malickova, Karin; Bálint, Anita; Nagy, Ferenc; Bor, Renáta; Milassin, Ágnes; Szepes, Zoltán; Palatka, Károly; Lakatos, Péter L; Lukas, Milan; Molnár, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    CT-P13 is the first biosimilar to infliximab that has been approved for the same indications as its originator infliximab. No data are available on the effect of infliximab biosimilar on mucosal healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. UC patients, who received CT-P13 therapy from its local introduction at three Hungarian and one Czech inflammatory bowel disease centres, were prospectively enrolled. Sigmoidoscopy was performed after the end of the induction therapy at week 14. Mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0 or 1. Complete mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0. Trough level of CT-P13 was measured at week 14. Sixty-three UC patients who underwent CT-P13 induction therapy were enrolled in the study. Indication for the therapy was acute, severe flare up and chronic, refractory activity in 24 and 39 patients, respectively. Cumulative clinical response and steroid-free remission at week 14 were achieved in 82.5% and 47.6% of the patients, respectively. Sigmoidoscopy revealed steroid-free mucosal healing in 47.6% of the patients, and complete mucosal healing was present in 27%. Mayo endoscopic subscore decreased significantly at week 14 compared to baseline. Trough levels of infliximab correlated with mucosal healing. This is, to our knowledge, the first study examining the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in UC. The results indicate that mucosal healing is achieved in two-thirds of UC patients by the end of the induction treatment with CT-P13. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis due to lupus].

    PubMed

    Hani, Mohamed Aziz; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Zribi, Riadh; Bouasker, Ibtissem; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2004-02-01

    Among digestive clinical presentations of systemic lupus erythematosus, acute pancreatitis remains a serious affection with very poor prognosis. To date, pathogenesis is still unclear. We report two cases of fatal acute pancreatitis related to systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Acute Renal Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    to other intermediaries that are important. To explore this possibility, fructose- l ,6-diphosphate (FDP), a metabolite in the glycolytic pathway, was...Supported b- this contract. *1. Shapiro JI, Cheung C, Itabashi A , Chan L , Schrier RW: The protective effect of verapamil on renal function after warm and...proximal tubules. Am J Physiol, in press. *8. Shapiro JI, Chan L , Cheung C, Itabashi A , Rossi N, Schrier RW: The effect of ATP depletion in the isolated

  17. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Acute Renal Failure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    clarified. ATRIAIL PEPTIDE .er-Ser-Cs-he-Gly-GIy-Arg-Xle-Asp-Arg -Ile-Gly- ka-Gln-Ser-Gly-Leu-G y--C s-Asn-Ser-Phe-Arg-Tyr 24 AP-I (1-21 Amino acid ...AP-II (1-22 Amino acid ) AP-III (1-24 Amino acid ) The exact mechanism of natriuresis of these peptides, however, is unclear. To avoid extrarenal...granules were shown to induce natriuresis when injected in vivo into rats. Since then substances from these granules have been purified and amino

  18. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  19. Effects of dosmalfate, a new cytoprotective agent, on acute and chronic trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Isabel; La Casa, Carmen; Orjales, Aurelio; Alarcón de la Lastra, Catalina

    2003-01-24

    Activated neutrophils and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of bowel disease. Increased expression of epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF receptor) has been reported for the colon mucosa surrounding areas of ulceration, suggesting a pivotal role in mucosal defence and repair. In this study, we examined the effects of dosmalfate, a new flavonoid derivative compound (diosmin heptakis) with antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, on acute and chronic experimental trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. The inflammation response was assessed by neutrophil infiltration as evaluated by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. Mucosal TNF-alpha production and histological analysis of the lesions was also carried out. In addition, we studied the expression of the EGF receptor inmunohistochemically during the healing of TNBS-induced chronic colitis. A 2-day treatment with 400 or 800 mg/kg of dosmalfate ameliorated the colon damage score and the incidence of adhesions. It also significantly (P<0.05) decreased myeloperoxidase activity and colonic mucosal production of TNF-alpha. Chronic treatment (14 days) with 800 mg/kg/day of dosmalfate also had significant protective effects on TNBS-induced colitis which were reflected by significant attenuation (P<0.05) of the damage score while the inflammatory indicators were not improved. The chronic beneficial effect of dosmalfate was apparently related to the enhancement of EGF receptor expression. These findings confirm the protective effects of dosmalfate in acute and chronic experimental colitis.

  20. Doxepin Rinse Versus Placebo in the Treatment of Acute Oral Mucositis Pain in Patients Receiving Head and Neck Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial (NCCTG-N09C6 [Alliance])

    PubMed Central

    Leenstra, James L.; Miller, Robert C.; Qin, Rui; Martenson, James A.; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Bearden, James D.; Puri, Dev R.; Stella, Philip J.; Mazurczak, Miroslaw A.; Klish, Marie D.; Novotny, Paul J.; Foote, Robert L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Painful oral mucositis (OM) is a significant toxicity during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to test the efficacy of doxepin hydrochloride in the reduction of radiotherapy-induced OM pain. Patients and Methods In all, 155 patients were randomly allocated to a doxepin oral rinse or a placebo for the treatment of radiotherapy-related OM pain. Patients received a single dose of doxepin or placebo on day 1 and then crossed over to receive the opposite agent on a subsequent day. Pain questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes. Patients were then given the option to continue doxepin. The primary end point was pain reduction as measured by the area under the curve (AUC) of the pain scale using data from day 1. Results Primary end point analysis revealed that the AUC for mouth and throat pain reduction was greater for doxepin (−9.1) than for placebo (−4.7; P < .001). Crossover analysis of patients completing both phases confirmed that patients experienced greater mouth and throat pain reduction with doxepin (intrapatient changes of 4.1 for doxepin-placebo arm and −2.8 for placebo-doxepin arm; P < .001). Doxepin was associated with more stinging or burning, unpleasant taste, and greater drowsiness than the placebo rinse. More patients receiving doxepin expressed a desire to continue treatment than did patients with placebo after completion of each of the randomized phases of the study. Conclusion A doxepin rinse diminishes OM pain. Further studies are warranted to determine its role in the management of OM. PMID:24733799

  1. The Development of an AIDS Mucosal Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xian; Chen, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that mucosal tissues contain the largest surface area of the human body and are the front line of natural host defense against various pathogens. In fact, more than 80% of infectious disease pathogens probably gain entry into the susceptible human hosts through open mucosal surfaces. Human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1), a mainly sexually transmitted virus, also primarily targets the vaginal and gastrointestinal mucosa as entry sites for viral transmission, seeding, replication and amplification. Since HIV-1 establishes its early replication in vaginal or rectal mucosal tissues, the induction of sufficient mucosal immunity at the initial site of HIV-1 transmission becomes essential for a protective vaccine. However, despite the fact that current conventional vaccine strategies have remained unsuccessful in preventing HIV-1 infection, sufficient financial support and resources have yet to be given to develop a vaccine able to elicit protective mucosal immunity against sexual transmissions. Interestingly, Chinese ancestors invented variolation through intranasal administration about one thousand years ago, which led to the discovery of a successful smallpox vaccine and the final eradication of the disease. It is the hope for all mankind that the development of a mucosal AIDS vaccine will ultimately help control the AIDS pandemic. In order to discover an effective mucosal AIDS vaccine, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of mucosal immunology and to test various mucosal vaccination strategies. PMID:21994611

  2. Neisseria prophage repressor implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; McClure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W; Genco, Caroline A

    2013-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the -10 and -35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis.

  3. Neisseria Prophage Repressor Implicated in Gonococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; Mcclure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the −10 and −35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:23876804

  4. Voice Disorders in Mucosal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Lucena, Márcia Mendonça; da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vieira, Jéssica Rafael; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena; Terceiro, Benivaldo Ramos Ferreira; de Sousa Torraca, Tania Salgado; de Oliveira Schubach, Armando; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. Objective To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases - Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age) and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. Results 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81%) were male and five (19%) female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years). The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%), followed by dysphonia (38.5%), odynophagia (30.8%) and dysphagia (26.9%). 23 patients (84.6%) presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. Conclusion We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some resonance

  5. Mucosal disease series. Number IV. Erythema multiforme.

    PubMed

    Farthing, P; Bagan, J-V; Scully, C

    2005-09-01

    Erythema multiforme (EM) is an acute mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction characterised by a skin eruption, with or without oral or other mucous membrane lesions. Occasionally EM may involve the mouth alone. EM has been classified into a number of different variants based on the degree of mucosal involvement and the nature and distribution of the skin lesions. EM minor typically affects no more than one mucosa, is the most common form and may be associated with symmetrical target lesions on the extremities. EM major is more severe, typically involving two or more mucous membranes with more variable skin involvement - which is used to distinguish it from Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), where there is extensive skin involvement and significant morbidity and a mortality rate of 5-15%. Both EM major and SJS can involve internal organs and typically are associated with systemic symptoms. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) may be a severe manifestation of EM, but some experts regard it as a discrete disease. EM can be triggered by a number of factors, but the best documented is preceding infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV), the lesions resulting from a cell mediated immune reaction triggered by HSV-DNA. SJS and TEN are usually initiated by drugs, and the tissue damage is mediated by soluble factors including Fas and FasL.

  6. Pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kar Neng

    2012-03-20

    Since its first description in 1968, IgA nephropathy has remained the most common form of idiopathic glomerulonephritis leading to chronic kidney disease in developed countries. The exact pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy is still not well defined. Current data implicate an important genetic factor, especially in promoting the overproduction of an aberrant form of IgA1. The immunochemical aberrancy of IgA nephropathy is characterized by the undergalactosylation of O-glycans in the hinge region of IgA1. However, such aberrant glycosylation alone does not cause renal injury. The next stage of disease development requires the formation of glycan-specific IgG and IgA antibodies that recognize the undergalactosylated IgA1 molecule. These antibodies often have reactivity against antigens from extrinsic microorganisms and might arise from recurrent mucosal infection. B cells that respond to mucosal infections, particularly tonsillitis, might produce the nephritogenic IgA1 molecule. With increased immune-complex formation and decreased clearance owing to reduced uptake by the liver, IgA1 binds to the glomerular mesangium via an as yet unidentified receptor. Glomerular IgA1 deposits trigger the local production of cytokines and growth factors, leading to the activation of mesangial cells and the complement system. Emerging data suggest that mesangial-derived mediators following glomerular deposition of IgA1 lead to podocyte and tubulointerstitial injury via mesangio-podocytic-tubular crosstalk. This Review summarizes the latest findings in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

  7. Citrulline and albumin as biomarkers for gastrointestinal mucositis in recipients of hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W J F M; Herbers, A H E; Brüggemann, R J M; Feuth, T; Peter Donnelly, J; Blijlevens, N M A

    2013-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucositis is a common side effect of intense chemotherapy to prepare patients for hematopoietic SCT. Measuring intestinal damage objectively remains difficult, and clinicians often rely on albumin levels as an indicator of GI mucositis, but citrulline might be a more specific marker, which has in the past been shown to correlate with clinical signs of GI mucositis. We evaluated the courses of albumin and citrulline following different conditioning regimens for SCT and studied their relatedness to the subsequent inflammatory response using C-reactive protein. Patterns of albumin and citrulline differed significantly between myeloablative and non-myeloablative conditioning regimens. After myeloablative regimens, decreasing citrulline levels preceded the occurrence of inflammation unlike albumin levels, which decreased thereafter. Albumin levels were greatly influenced by inflammation, confirming it to be a 'negative acute-phase protein', whereas citrulline levels were not. Citrulline appeared to be a better biomarker of GI mucositis than albumin. Measuring citrulline might prove useful in clinical decision making, in identifying GI mucositis, and it would also be of interest to see how it compares with other biomarkers in the setting of acute GI GVHD.

  8. Reciprocal Interactions between Commensal Bacteria and γδ Intraepithelial Lymphocytes during Mucosal Injury1

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Anisa S.; Behrendt, Cassie L.; Hooper, Lora V.

    2009-01-01

    The intestinal mucosal surface is in direct contact with a vast beneficial microbiota. The symbiotic nature of this relationship is threatened when the surface epithelium is injured, yet little is known about how mucosal surfaces maintain homeostasis with commensal microbes following damage. γδ Intraepithelial lymphocytes (γδ IEL) reside at the gut epithelial surface, where they stimulate mucosal healing following acute injury. A genome-wide analysis of the γδ IEL response to dextran sulfate sodium-induced colonic damage revealed induction of a complex transcriptional program, including coordinate regulation of cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and antibacterial factors. Studies in germfree mice demonstrated that commensal microbiota regulate key components of this transcriptional program, thus revealing a dialogue between commensal bacteria and γδ IEL in injured epithelia. Analysis of TCRδ-deficient mice indicated that γδ T cells are essential for controlling mucosal penetration of commensal bacteria immediately following dextran sulfate sodium-induced damage, suggesting that a key function of γδ IEL is to maintain host-microbial homeostasis following acute mucosal injury. Taken together, these findings disclose a reciprocal relationship between γδ T cells and intestinal microbiota that promotes beneficial host-microbial relationships in the intestine. PMID:19234201

  9. Mucosal immunity and probiotics in fish.

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A

    2014-07-01

    Teleost mucosal immunity has become the subject of unprecedented research studies in recent years because of its diversity and defining characteristics. Its immune repertoire is governed by the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues (MALT) which are divided into gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissues (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissues (GIALT). The direct contact with its immediate environment makes the mucosal surfaces of fish susceptible to a wide variety of pathogens. The inherent immunocompetent cells and factors in the mucosal surfaces together with the commensal microbiota have pivotal role against pathogens. Immunomodulation is a popular prophylactic strategy in teleost and probiotics possess this beneficial feature. Most of the studies on the immunomodulatory properties of probiotics in fish mainly discussed their impacts on systemic immunity. In contrast, few of these studies discussed the immunomodulatory features of probiotics in mucosal surfaces and are concentrated on the influences in the gut. Significant attention should be devoted in understanding the relationship of mucosal immunity and probiotics as the present knowledge is limited and are mostly based on extrapolations of studies in humans and terrestrial vertebrates. In the course of the advancement of mucosal immunity and probiotics, new perspectives in probiotics research, e.g., probiogenomics have emerged. This review affirms the relevance of probiotics in the mucosal immunity of fish by revisiting and bridging the current knowledge on teleost mucosal immunity, mucosal microbiota and immunomodulation of mucosal surfaces by probiotics. Expanding the knowledge of immunomodulatory properties of probiotics especially on mucosal immunity is essential in advancing the use of probiotics as a sustainable and viable strategy for successful fish husbandry.

  10. Modulation of gut mucosal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kleessen, Brigitta; Blaut, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Non-digestible inulin-type fructans, such as oligofructose and high-molecular-weight inulin, have been shown to have the ability to alter the intestinal microbiota composition in such a way that members of the microbial community, generally considered as health-promoting, are stimulated. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are the most frequently targeted organisms. Less information exists on effects of inulin-type fructans on the composition, metabolism and health-related significance of bacteria at or near the mucosa surface or in the mucus layer forming mucosa-associated biofilms. Using rats inoculated with a human faecal flora as an experimental model we have found that inulin-type fructans in the diet modulated the gut microbiota by stimulation of mucosa-associated bifidobacteria as well as by partial reduction of pathogenic Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and thereby benefit health. In addition to changes in mucosal biofilms, inulin-type fructans also induced changes in the colonic mucosa stimulating proliferation in the crypts, increasing the release of mucins, and altering the profile of mucin components in the goblet cells and epithelial mucus layer. These results indicate that inulin-type fructans may stabilise the gut mucosal barrier. Dietary supplementation with these prebiotics could offer a new approach to supporting the barrier function of the mucosa.

  11. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  12. Antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, analgesics, and nutritional supplements for alimentary tract mucositis.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Elad, Sharon; Altman, Arnold; Damato, Kathryn; Epstein, Joel

    2006-06-01

    This review focuses on the value of several groups of agents for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. The review refers to alimentary mucositis as a generalized term that includes oral mucositis and gastrointestinal mucositis. This paper is part of the systematic review made by the mucositis study group which operates in the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/International Society of Oral Oncology (ISOO). Several new guidelines are suggested in this review as an update to the primary systematic review that was published by the same group in 2004.

  13. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  14. Mucosal Immunosenescence In The Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shintaro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that pathogen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody (Ab) is the major player at mucosal surfaces for host defense. However, alterations in the mucosal immune system occur in advanced aging which results in a failure of induction of SIgA Abs for protection from infectious diseases. Signs of mucosal senescence first appear in the gut immune system. Further, changes in the intestinal microbiota most likely influence mucosal immunity. To overcome the immunological aging decline in mucosal immunity, several adjuvant systems including mucosal dendritic cell (DC) targeting have been shown to be attractive and effective immunological strategies. Similarly, antigen (Ag) uptake-M cells are ideal targets for facilitating Ag-specific mucosal immune responses. However, the numbers of M cells are reduced in aged mice. In this regard, Spi-B, an essential transcription factor for the functional and structural differentiation of M cells could be a potent strategy for the induction of effective mucosal immunity in aging. PMID:25531743

  15. Localized Pemphigus Vegetans without Mucosal Involvement.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vk; Jindal, N; Imchen, S

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vegetans is a rare variant of pemphigus vulgaris. A 62-year-old woman presented with erythematous moist vegetative plaque on the left breast and left groin. There was no mucosal involvement. Histopathological and direct immunofluorescence findings were suggestive of pemphigus vegetans. She showed excellent response to oral steroids. Literature is scarcely available on the limited involvement with pemphigus vegetans without mucosal involvement.

  16. Biology and Mucosal Immunity to Myxozoans

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Daniela; Bartholomew, Jerri; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2014-01-01

    Myxozoans are among the most abundant parasites in nature. Their life cycles involve two hosts: an invertebrate, usually an annelid, and a vertebrate, usually a fish. They affect fish species in their natural habitats but also constitute a menace for fish aquaculture. Using different strategies they are able to parasitize and cause damage in multiple organs, including mucosal tissues, which they use also as portals of entry. In fish, the main mucosal sites include the intestine, skin and gills. Recently the finding of a specific mucosal immunoglobulin in teleost (IgT), analogous to mammalian IgA, and the capacity of fish to develop a specific mucosal immune response against different pathogens, has highlighted the importance of studying immune responses at mucosal sites. In this review, we describe the major biological characteristics of myxozoan parasites and present the data available regarding immune responses for species that infect mucosal sites. As models for mucosal immunity we review the responses to Enteromyxum spp. and Ceratomyxa shasta, both of which parasitize the intestine. The immune response at the skin and gills is also described, as these mucosal tissues are used by myxozoans as attaching surfaces and portal of entry, and some species also parasitize these sites. Finally, the development of immunoprophylactic strategies is discussed. PMID:23994774

  17. Vaccination strategies for mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ogra, P L; Faden, H; Welliver, R C

    2001-04-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans.

  18. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  19. Suppression of gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1999-02-01

    The effect of the antiulcer agent sulglycotide on gastric epithelial cell apoptosis and the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) during Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-induced acute gastritis was investigated. Rats, pretreated twice daily for 3 consecutive days with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, were subjected to surface epithelial application of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (50 microg/animal), and, after 4 additional days on the drug or vehicle regimen, their mucosal tissue was used for histologic assessment, quantitation of TNF-alpha and IL-4, and the assay of epithelial cell apoptosis. In the absence of sulglycotide, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide caused acute mucosal responses manifested by the inflammatory infiltration of the lamina propria with lymphocytes and plasma cells, edema, hyperemia, and epithelial hemorrhage. These responses were accompanied by an 11-fold increase in epithelial cell apoptosis and a 9-fold enhancement of the mucosal expression of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. However, the mucosal expression of regulatory cytokine IL-4 decreased by 15%. Treatment with sulglycotide produced significant (56.6%) reduction in the extent of acute mucosal inflammatory changes caused by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the effect of sulglycotide was manifested in an 88.3% reduction in the epithelial cell apoptosis and a 69.1% decrease in the mucosal expression of TNF-alpha, whereas the expression of IL-4 showed only marginal (6%) enhancement. The results suggest that the cytoprotective agent sulglycotide suppresses the inflammatory and apoptotic events elicited in gastric mucosa by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide through stimulation of TNF-alpha expression.

  20. Mucosal vaccines: a paradigm shift in the development of mucosal adjuvants and delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, Devegowda Vishakante; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Shinde, Chetan G; Iyer, Meenakshi

    2015-04-01

    Mucosal immune responses are the first-line defensive mechanisms against a variety of infections. Therefore, immunizations of mucosal surfaces from which majority of infectious agents make their entry, helps to protect the body against infections. Hence, vaccinization of mucosal surfaces by using mucosal vaccines provides the basis for generating protective immunity both in the mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Mucosal vaccines offer several advantages over parenteral immunization. For example, (i) ease of administration; (ii) non-invasiveness; (iii) high-patient compliance; and (iv) suitability for mass vaccination. Despite these benefits, to date, only very few mucosal vaccines have been developed using whole microorganisms and approved for use in humans. This is due to various challenges associated with the development of an effective mucosal vaccine that can work against a variety of infections, and various problems concerned with the safe delivery of developed vaccine. For instance, protein antigen alone is not just sufficient enough for the optimal delivery of antigen(s) mucosally. Hence, efforts have been made to develop better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for improved mucosal Th1 and Th2 immune responses using an efficient and safe immunostimulatory molecule and novel delivery carriers. Therefore, in this review, we have made an attempt to cover the recent advancements in the development of adjuvants and delivery carriers for safe and effective mucosal vaccine production.

  1. Mucosal vaccines: novel strategies and applications for the control of pathogens and tumors at mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis Cs; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites.

  2. Pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infections.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2003-06-01

    Acanthamoeba are free-living, harmless organisms, however, given the opportunity and the appropriate conditions, they can cause painful, sight-threatening as well as fatal infections and, thus, are considered opportunistic pathogens. Acanthamoeba infections have become increasingly important in the past few years due to increasing populations of contact lens users and AIDS patients. The mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba tend to be highly complex, depending on parasite, host and the environmental factors. Elucidation of the biochemical, cellular and molecular basis of the pathogenesis of diseases caused by Acanthamoeba may lead to the development of therapeutic interventions.

  3. Microbial host interactions in IBD: implications for pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Sartor, R Balfour; Muehlbauer, Marcus

    2007-12-01

    Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and pouchitis appear to be caused by pathogenic T-cell responses to discrete antigens from the complex luminal microbiota, with susceptibility conferred by genetic polymorphisms that regulate bacterial killing, mucosal barrier function, or immune responses. Environmental triggers initiate or reactivate inflammation and modulate genetic susceptibility. New pathogenesis concepts include defective bacterial killing by innate immune cells in CD, colonization of the ileum in CD with functionally abnormal Escherichia coli that adhere to and invade epithelial cells and resist bacterial killing, and alterations in enteric microbiota composition in CD, UC, and pouchitis detected by molecular probes. The considerable therapeutic potential of manipulating the enteric microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease patients has not been realized, probably due to failure to recognize heterogenic disease mechanisms that require individualized use of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics, combination therapies, and genetically engineered bacteria to restore mucosal homeostasis.

  4. The therapeutic management of gut barrier leaking: the emerging role for mucosal barrier protectors.

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, L R; Scaldaferri, F; Bruno, G; Petito, V; Franceschi, F; Gasbarrini, A

    2015-01-01

    Gut barrier is a functional unit organized as a multi-layer system and its multiple functions are crucial for maintaining gut homeostasis. Numerous scientific evidences showed a significant association between gut barrier leaking and gastro-intestinal/extra-intestinal diseases. In this review we focus on the relationship between gut barrier leaking and human health. At the same time we speculate on the possible new role of gut barrier protectors in enhancing and restoring gut barrier physiology with the final goal of promoting gut health. The alteration of the equilibrium in gut barrier leads to the passage of the luminal contents to the underlying tissues and thus into the bloodstream, resulting in the activation of the immune response and in the induction of gut inflammation. This permeability alteration is the basis for the pathogenesis of many diseases, including infectious enterocolitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, celiac disease, hepatic fibrosis, food intolerances and also atopic manifestations. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disease are able to alter the permeability of the intestinal barrier. Recent data highlighted and introduced the possibility of using gelatin tannate, a mucosal barrier protector, for an innovative approach in the management of intestinal diseases, allowing an original therapeutic orientation with the aim of enhancing mucus barrier activity and restoring gut barrier. These results suggest how the mucus layer recovering, beside the gut microbiota modulation, exerted by gut barrier protectors could be a useful weapon to re-establish the physiological intestinal homeostasis after an acute and chronic injury.

  5. Role of the Host Defense System and Intestinal Microbial Flora in the Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Claudia N.; Petrosyan, Mikael; Giuliani, Stefano; Williams, Monica; Hunter, Catherine; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease that affects primarily the intestine of premature infants. Despite recent advances in neonatology, NEC remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Neonatal mucosal defenses and adherence of bacterial pathogens may play an important role in the pathogenesis of NEC. Methods Review and synthesis of pertinent literature. Results Putative factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of NEC include abnormal patterns of gut colonization by bacteria, immaturity of the host immune system and mucosal defense mechanisms, intestinal ischemia, formula feeding, and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier integrity. Conclusion Host defenses and intestinal microbial ecology are believed to play important roles in the pathogenesis of NEC. Commensal bacteria and probiotic therapy may be of therapeutic utility in the maintenance of the gut epithelial barrier. PMID:19943775

  6. Mucositis management in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2006-04-01

    Mucositis is an important toxicity to be aware of in anticancer therapy. It contributes to a reduction in cure rates from cancer. Until recently, it has been poorly understood and therefore has not been well managed. It causes patient distress, delays in treatment administration, and reductions in dose intensity, and it costs the health-care system a large amount of money. Mucositis has traditionally been associated more with hematologic malignancies than with solid tumors, because the incidence of severe mucositis has been much higher with the high-dose chemotherapy regimens used in hematologic malignancies. However, the chemotherapy used in solid tumors also causes mucositis and deserves further study. The separation between oral and gastrointestinal mucositis is potentially false and is being removed, with much research now investigating the entire alimentary canal. There are similarities and differences between radiation therapy- and chemotherapy-induced mucositis, and these have implications for treatment and prevention scheduling and type. Risk prediction is another area that requires more work, but there is real hope that, in the future, we might be able to predict who will suffer from mucositis and in which parts of the alimentary canal, thus enabling us to appropriately target the newer antimucotoxic therapies. The Mucositis Study Goup of the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer has recently published management guidelines for oral and gastrointestinal mucositis and is in the process of updating them. The guidelines serve as an excellent starting place for future mucositis research because they not only review the available treatments but also discuss mechanisms and epidemiology.

  7. Contributions of Neutrophils to Resolution of Mucosal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Sean P.; Ehrentraut, Stefan F.; Glover, Louise E.; Kominsky, Douglas J.; Campbell, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the blood stream into surrounding tissues involves a regulated series of events central to acute responses in host defense. Accumulation of PMN within mucosal tissues have historically been considered pathognomonic features of both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. Historically PMNs have been deemed necessary but detrimental when recruited, given the potential for tissue damage that results from a variety of mechanisms. Recent work, however, has altered our preconcieved notions of PMN contributions to inflammatory processes. In particular, significant evidence implicates a central role for the PMN in triggering inflammatory resolution. Such mechanisms involve both metabolic and biochemical crosstalk pathways during the intimate interactions of PMN with other cell types at inflammatory sites. Here, we highlight several recent examples of how PMN coordinate the resolution of ongoing inflammation, with a particular focus on the gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:22968707

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  9. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed.

  10. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-28

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Intestinal mucosal atrophy and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Gohil, Kartik; Basson, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    Mucosal adaptation is an essential process in gut homeostasis. The intestinal mucosa adapts to a range of pathological conditions including starvation, short-gut syndrome, obesity, and bariatric surgery. Broadly, these adaptive functions can be grouped into proliferation and differentiation. These are influenced by diverse interactions with hormonal, immune, dietary, nervous, and mechanical stimuli. It seems likely that clinical outcomes can be improved by manipulating the physiology of adaptation. This review will summarize current understanding of the basic science surrounding adaptation, delineate the wide range of potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and discuss how these might be incorporated into an overall treatment plan. Deeper insight into the physiologic basis of adaptation will identify further targets for intervention to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23197881

  12. Proteases in bacterial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingmer, Hanne; Brøndsted, Lone

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for protein quality control under adverse conditions experienced in the host, as well as for the timely degradation of central virulence regulators. We have focused on the contribution of the conserved Lon, Clp, HtrA and FtsH proteases to pathogenesis and have highlighted common biological processes for which their activities are important for virulence.

  13. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  14. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Tornvall, Per

    2017-09-15

    Takotsubo syndrome is a recently recognized acute cardiac disease entity with a clinical presentation resembling that of an acute coronary syndrome. The typical takotsubo syndrome patient has a unique circumferential left (bi-) ventricular contraction abnormality profile that extends beyond a coronary artery supply territory and appears to follow the anatomical cardiac sympathetic innervation. The syndrome predominantly affects postmenopausal women and is often preceded by emotional or physical stress. Patients with predisposing factors such as malignancy and other chronic comorbidities are more prone to suffer from takotsubo syndrome. The pathogenesis of takotsubo syndrome is elusive. Several pathophysiological mechanisms involving myocardial ischemia (multivessel coronary artery spasm, microvascular dysfunction, aborted myocardial infarction), left ventricular outlet tract obstruction, blood-borne catecholamine myocardial toxicity, epinephrine-induced switch in signal trafficking, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction have been proposed. The syndrome is usually reversible; nevertheless, during the acute stage, a substantial number of patients develop severe complications such as arrhythmias, heart failure including pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock, thromboembolism, cardiac arrest, and rupture. Treatment of precipitating factors, predisposing diseases, and complications is fundamental during the acute stage of the disease. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of takotsubo syndrome are reviewed in this paper.

  15. Colonic mucosal pseudolipomatosis: disinfectant colitis?

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Baek, Il Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Colonic pseudolipomatosis is rare and its pathogenesis is still unclear. A number of mechanisms, including mechanical injury during an endoscopic procedure or chemical injury by disinfectant, seem to contribute to its pathogenesis. In our endoscopy unit, pseudolipomatosis occurred in an epidemic pattern after changing the endoscopic disinfectant from 2% glutaraldehyde to peracetic acid compound to decrease the length of endoscope reprocessing time. We assumed that pseudolipomatosis could be a type of chemical colitis produced by the residual disinfectant solution that remained on the surface or in a channel of the endoscope after reprocessing. The aim of this report was to highlight a series of 12 cases of colonic pseudolipomatosis in order to describe the endoscopic and pathological features and discuss the harmful effect of disinfectants as a possible cause of pseudolipomatosis. To identify the cause of the lesions, we systematically reviewed each patient history and the endoscopic and histological features. From March 2004 to February 2005, 1276 colonoscopies were performed and 12 cases (0.94%) of colonic pseudolipomatosis were diagnosed at the Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital of Hallym University. The pathogenesis of colonic pseudolipomatosis is not well-known, but our experience indicates the endoscopic disinfectant as the probable cause of pseudolipomatosis rather than either mechanical traumatic injury or intraluminal air pressure-related injury.

  16. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-05

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  17. Mucosal Vaccine Development Based on Liposome Technology

    PubMed Central

    Norling, Karin; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Immune protection against infectious diseases is most effective if located at the portal of entry of the pathogen. Hence, there is an increasing demand for vaccine formulations that can induce strong protective immunity following oral, respiratory, or genital tract administration. At present, only few mucosal vaccines are found on the market, but recent technological advancements and a better understanding of the principles that govern priming of mucosal immune responses have contributed to a more optimistic view on the future of mucosal vaccines. Compared to live attenuated vaccines, subcomponent vaccines, most often protein-based, are considered safer, more stable, and less complicated to manufacture, but they require the addition of nontoxic and clinically safe adjuvants to be effective. In addition, another limiting factor is the large antigen dose that usually is required for mucosal vaccines. Therefore, the combination of mucosal adjuvants with the recent progress in nanoparticle technology provides an attractive solution to these problems. In particular, the liposome technology is ideal for combining protein antigen and adjuvant into an effective mucosal vaccine. Here, we describe and discuss recent progress in nanoparticle formulations using various types of liposomes that convey strong promise for the successful development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. PMID:28127567

  18. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  19. The mucosal immune system for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Aayam; Azegamia, Tatsuhiko; Kiyonoa, Hiroshi

    2014-11-20

    Mucosal surfaces are continuously exposed to the external environment and therefore represent the largest lymphoid organ of the body. In the mucosal immune system, gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs), including Peyer's patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, play an important role in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in the gut. GALTs have unique organogenesis characteristics and interact with the network of dendritic cells and T cells for the simultaneous induction and regulation of IgA responses and oral tolerance. In these lymphoid tissues, antigens are up taken by M cells in the epithelial layer, and antigen-specific immune responses are subsequently initiated by GALT cells. Nasopharynx- and tear-duct-associated lymphoid tissues (NALTs and TALTs) are key organized lymphoid structures in the respiratory tract and ocular cavities, respectively, and have been shown to interact with each other. Mucosal surfaces are also characterized by host-microbe interactions that affect the genesis and maturation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues and the induction and regulation of innate and acquired mucosal immune responses. Because most harmful pathogens enter the body through mucosal surfaces by ingestion, inhalation, or sexual contact, the mucosa is a candidate site for vaccination. Mucosal vaccination has some physiological and practical advantages, such as decreased costs and reduced risk of needle-stick injuries and transmission of bloodborne diseases, and it is painless. Recently, the application of modern bioengineering and biochemical engineering technologies, including gene transformation and manipulation systems, resulted in the development of systems to express vaccine antigens in transgenic plants and nanogels, which will usher in a new era of delivery systems for mucosal vaccine antigens. In this review, based on some of our research group's thirty seven years of progress and effort, we highlight the unique features of mucosal immune

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Visconte, Valeria; Selleri, Carmine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Tiu, Ramon V.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematologic disorders characterized by inefficient hematopoiesis, hypercellular bone marrow, dysplasia of blood cells and cytopenias. Most patients are diagnosed in their late 60s to early 70s. MDS is a risk factor for the development of acute myeloid leukemia which can occur in 10-15% of patients with MDS. A variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms contributes to the genesis and persistence of MDS including immunologic, epigenetic, cytogenetic and genetic factors. The only potential curative option for MDS is hematopoietic cell transplantation which is suitable for only a few patients. Currently approved therapeutic options for MDS, including lenalidomide, decitabine, and 5-azacytidine, are targeted to improve transfusion requirements and quality of life. Moreover, 5-azacytidine has also been demonstrated to improve survival in some patients with higher risk MDS. New ways to predict which patients will better gain benefit from currently available therapeutic agents are the primary challenges in MDS. In the last 10 years, chromosome scanning and high throughput technologies (single nucleotide polymorphism array genotyping, comparative genomic hybridization, and whole genome/ exome sequencing) have tremendously increased our knowledge of MDS pathogenesis. Indeed, the molecular heterogeneity of MDS supports the idea of different therapeutic approaches which will take into account the diverse morphologic and clinical presentations of MDS patients rather than a restricted therapeutic strategy. This review will summarize the molecular abnormalities in key relevant components of the biology and pathogenesis of MDS and will provide an update on the clinical impact and therapeutic response in MDS patients. PMID:24778995

  1. Defining the Role of Skin and Mucosal Biopsy in Facial Allotransplantation: A 2-Year Review and Analysis of Histology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Arif; Sosin, Michael; Bojovic, Branko; Christy, Michael R; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2015-09-01

    The implications of allograft skin and mucosal biopsy findings on classification of rejection and treatment remain unclear. Following facial allotransplantation, scheduled surveillance allograft skin and mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained. Clinical concern for acute rejection prompted biopsies off schedule. Compilation of biopsy results, Banff grading, immunosuppression, and clinical correlation were critically reviewed for a 2-year follow-up. A total of 39 biopsy specimens at 21 time points were obtained for analysis, including allograft skin (n = 21), mucosa (n = 17), and a lesion (n = 1). The patient had three episodes of acute rejection warranting treatment. Discordance between skin and mucosa occurred in 55.6 percent of biopsy specimens (p = 0.01). Mucosa concordance with the clinical evaluation occurred in 38.9 percent of biopsy specimens (p = 0.02), and skin concordance with clinical evaluation was present in 81 percent of biopsy specimens (p = 0.01). The clinical utility of mucosal biopsy remains elusive. The authors' experience suggests that mucosal or skin biopsy, alone, should not drive the decision-making process in treatment. Skin biopsies are more likely to confirm clinical suspicion of rejection than mucosal histology. Data from other institutions are lacking, and future reporting may help elucidate the role of mucosal and skin biopsy in facial allotransplantation. Diagnostic, V.

  2. Oral mucositis. A complication of radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a complication of head and neck radiotherapy. It is understood what causes the inflammation and what biological tissue changes occur, however, a definite cure for oral mucositis has not yet been found. Supportive treatments, analgesics, antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory agents have been prescribed, none of which has been a thorough measure of treatment. An effective cure for oral mucositis is still in the midst of scientific research. In the interim local palliative treatments will help to alleviate the patients', debilitating symptoms.

  3. Palliation of radiation-related mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, B.R.; Spektor, W.S.

    1990-01-01

    Oral mucositis associated with head and neck radiotherapy can substantially hinder completion of cancer therapy. Alleviation of this often severe stomatitis can provide enhanced patient comfort and facilitate appropriate care. A double-blind format was used in a pilot project to measure, against a control rinse, the effectiveness of an oral rinse consisting of hydrocortisone, nystatin, tetracycline, and diphenhydramine in controlling radiation-related mucositis. A combination of clinical evaluation and patient responses to a questionnaire was used to judge the results of the topical medications. Patients using the experimental medication developed less mucositis than did patients in the control group.

  4. An NK Cell Perforin Response Elicited via IL-18 Controls Mucosal Inflammation Kinetics during Salmonella Gut Infection

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anna A.; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Sellin, Mikael E.; Felmy, Boas; Verbree, Carolin; Gadient, Sandra; Westermann, Alexander J.; Vogel, Jörg; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S.Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and –injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf-/- ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S.Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:27341123

  5. An NK Cell Perforin Response Elicited via IL-18 Controls Mucosal Inflammation Kinetics during Salmonella Gut Infection.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anna A; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Sellin, Mikael E; Felmy, Boas; Verbree, Carolin; Gadient, Sandra; Westermann, Alexander J; Vogel, Jörg; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salome; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S.Tm) is a common cause of self-limiting diarrhea. The mucosal inflammation is thought to arise from a standoff between the pathogen's virulence factors and the host's mucosal innate immune defenses, particularly the mucosal NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. However, it had remained unclear how this switches the gut from homeostasis to inflammation. This was studied using the streptomycin mouse model. S.Tm infections in knockout mice, cytokine inhibition and -injection experiments revealed that caspase-1 (not -11) dependent IL-18 is pivotal for inducing acute inflammation. IL-18 boosted NK cell chemoattractants and enhanced the NK cells' migratory capacity, thus promoting mucosal accumulation of mature, activated NK cells. NK cell depletion and Prf-/- ablation (but not granulocyte-depletion or T-cell deficiency) delayed tissue inflammation. Our data suggest an NK cell perforin response as one limiting factor in mounting gut mucosal inflammation. Thus, IL-18-elicited NK cell perforin responses seem to be critical for coordinating mucosal inflammation during early infection, when S.Tm strongly relies on virulence factors detectable by the inflammasome. This may have broad relevance for mucosal defense against microbial pathogens.

  6. Synthetic pathways of gallbladder mucosal prostanoids: the role of cyclooxygenase-1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Longo, W E; Panesar, N; Mazuski, J E; Kaminski, D

    1999-02-01

    Acute cholecystitis is associated with increased gallbladder prostanoid formation and the inflammatory changes and prostanoid increases can be inhibited by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Recent information indicates that prostanoids are produced by two cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to determine the COX enzymatic pathway in gallbladder mucosal cells involved in the production of prostanoids stimulated by inflammatory agents. Human gallbladder mucosal cells were isolated from cholecystectomy specimens and maintained in cell culture and studied in comparison with cells from a well differentiated gallbladder mucosal carcinoma cell line. COX enzymes were evaluated by Western immunoblotting and prostanoids were measured by ELISA. Unstimulated and stimulated cells were exposed to specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors. In both normal and transformed cells constitutive COX-1 was evident and in gallbladder cancer cells lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) induced the formation of constitutive COX-1 enzyme. While not detected in unstimulated normal mucosal cells and cancer cells, COX-2 protein was induced by both lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPC. Unstimulated gallbladder mucosal cells and cancer cells produced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha, 6-keto PGF1alpha) continuously. In freshly isolated normal gallbladder mucosal cells, continuously produced 6 keto PGF1alpha was inhibited by both COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors while PGE2 levels were not affected. Both LPS and LPC stimulated PGE2 and 6 keto PGF1alpha formation were blocked by COX-2 inhibitors in freshly isolated, normal human gallbladder mucosal cells and in the gallbladder cancer cells. The prostanoid response of gallbladder cells stimulated by proinflammatory agents is inhibited by COX-2 inhibitors suggesting that these agents may be effective in treating the pain and inflammation of gallbladder disease.

  7. Chronic Rhinosinusitis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Whitney W.; Lee, Robert J.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2015-01-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. CRS in particular can be divided into two major subgroups based upon whether nasal polyps are present (CRSwNP) or absent (CRSsNP). Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and may be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in cystic fibrosis, CRSsNP and CRSwNP. PMID:26654193

  8. Bacterial pathogenesis and mediators in apical periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2007-01-01

    Apical periodontitis is a group of inflammatory diseases caused by microorganisms (mainly bacteria) infecting the necrotic root canal system. The pathogenesis of different types of apical periodontitis and even the same type in different individuals is unlikely to follow a stereotyped fashion with regard to the involved bacterial mediators. Disease pathogenesis is rather complex and involves a multitude of bacteria- and host-related factors. This review article discusses the bacterial pathogenesis of acute and chronic apical periodontitis, with the main focus on the bacterial mediators conceivably involved in the different stages of the infectious process, including secreted products (enzymes, exotoxins, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptides, heat-shock proteins and metabolic end-products) and structural components (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, lipoproteins, fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins and vesicles, DNA, and exopolysaccharides). Knowledge of the bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis is important to the understanding of the disease process and to help establishing proper therapeutic measures to inactivate this bacterial "artillery".

  9. Prevention and management of radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Lauren J; Pace, Makala B; Siddiqui, Asif

    2013-06-15

    Current strategies for preventing and managing radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia are reviewed, with an emphasis on pharmacologic interventions. Nearly two thirds of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy during the course of treatment, frequently resulting in acute skin and mucosal toxicities. The severity of radiotherapy-associated toxicities varies according to multiple treatment- and patient-related factors (e.g., total radiation dose and dose fractionation schedule, volume of organ or tissue irradiated, use of concurrent versus sequential chemotherapy, comorbid conditions, functional performance status). Three major radiation toxicities encountered in clinical practice are (1) radiation dermatitis, typically managed with a variety of topical agents such as water-based moisturizing creams or lotions, topical steroids, antiinflammatory emulsions, and wound dressings, (2) radiation-induced oral mucositis, which can be managed through proper basic oral care practices, appropriate pain management, and the use of medicated mouthwashes and oral rinses and gels, and (3) radiation-induced xerostomia, which can be alleviated with saliva substitutes, moistening agents, and sialagogues. Pharmacists involved in the care of patients receiving radiotherapy can play an important role in optimizing symptom control, educating patients on self-care strategies, and adverse effect monitoring and reporting. Radiation-induced dermatitis, mucositis, and xerostomia can cause significant morbidity and diminished quality of life. Pharmacologic interventions for the prevention and treatment of these toxicities include topical agents for dermatitis; oral products, analgesics, and palifermin for mucositis; and amifostine, saliva substitutes, and pilocarpine for xerostomia.

  10. HIV enteropathy and aging: gastrointestinal immunity, mucosal epithelial barrier, and microbial translocation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyin; Kotler, Donald P

    2014-07-01

    Despite decreases in morbidity and mortality as a result of antiretroviral therapy, gastrointestinal dysfunction remains common in HIV infection. Treated patients are at risk for complications of 'premature' aging, such as cardiovascular disease, osteopenia, neurocognitive decline, malignancies, and frailty. This review summarizes recent observations in this field. Mucosal CD4 lymphocytes, especially Th17 cells, are depleted in acute HIV and simian immune deficiency virus (SIV) infections, although other cell types also are affected. Reconstitution during therapy often is incomplete, especially in mucosa. Mucosal barrier function is affected by both HIV infection and aging and includes paracellular transport via tight junctions and uptake through areas of apoptosis; other factors may affect systemic antigen exposure. The resultant microbial translocation is associated with systemic immune activation in HIV and SIV infections. There is evidence of immune activation and microbial translocation in the elderly. The immune phenotypes of immunosenescence in HIV infection and aging appear similar. There are several targets for intervention; blockage of residual mucosal virus replication, preventing antigen uptake, modulating the microbiome, improving T cell recovery, combining therapies aimed at mucosal integrity, augmenting mucosal immunity, and managing traditional risk factors for premature aging in the general population. Aging may interact with HIV enteropathy to enhance microbial translocation and immune activation.

  11. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure.

    PubMed

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2013-06-06

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases.

  12. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure

    PubMed Central

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Viswa Chandra, Rampalli

    2013-01-01

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases. PMID:23749826

  13. Microbiota and mucosal immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno M; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota.

  14. Topical therapy for mucosal yeast infections.

    PubMed

    Summers, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal yeast infection is best understood as a consequence of compromised mucosal cell-mediated and innate immunity. Defense against oral candidiasis is dominantly cell mediated. The innate immune system may play the main role in regulating vulvovaginal yeast infection. Conditions that compromise cell-mediated immunity such as leukemia, severe illness and HIV infection must be considered as predisposing factors for recurrent oral candidiasis. Compromise of vaginal innate immunity due to mucosal allergy or due to a genetic defect such as mannose-binding lectin deficiency contributes to chronic vulvovaginal yeast infection. Treatment of cofactors must be considered in order to achieve control in recurrent mucosal yeast infection. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Targeting Mucosal Healing in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Aarti; Wasan, Sharmeel K.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of medical treatment for Crohn's disease includes improving patients' quality of life while reducing the need for hospitalization and surgery. The current medical armamentarium includes 5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, and biologic agents. In the past, response to treatment was measured by clinical improvement in symptoms; however, with the advent of disease-modifying medications, mucosal healing has emerged as an increasingly important goal of therapy. Mucosal healing, or endoscopic remission, is associated with increased rates of clinical remission, fewer hospitalizations, and fewer abdominal surgeries. Both the immunomodulator and biologic classes of medications are effective at inducing mucosal healing. Despite several limitations, mucosal healing has become a desirable and valid measure of disease activity. PMID:21869869

  16. Microbiota and Mucosal Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Bruno M.; Scalvenzi, Thibault; Benlamara, Sarah; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We know that animals live in a world dominated by bacteria. In the last 20 years, we have learned that microbes are essential regulators of mucosal immunity. Bacteria, archeas, and viruses influence different aspects of mucosal development and function. Yet, the literature mainly covers findings obtained in mammals. In this review, we focus on two major themes that emerge from the comparative analysis of mammals and amphibians. These themes concern: (i) the structure and functions of lymphoid organs and immune cells in amphibians, with a focus on the gut mucosal immune system; and (ii) the characteristics of the amphibian microbiota and its influence on mucosal immunity. Lastly, we propose to use Xenopus tadpoles as an alternative small-animal model to improve the fundamental knowledge on immunological functions of gut microbiota. PMID:25821449

  17. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  18. Chemotherapy-induced mucosal barrier dysfunction: an updated review on the role of intestinal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M

    2013-06-01

    Gut toxicity, or mucositis, is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy that until recently received very little attention. Despite significant research, the mechanisms that underpin chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity (CIGT) remain unclear. Recently however, there has been renewed interest in the role tight junctions play in the pathogenesis of CIGT and associated diarrhea. Thus, this review will cover the role of tight junctions in maintaining gastrointestinal homeostasis and touch on recently proposed mechanisms of how tight junctions may contribute to the development of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. There is a wealth of anecdotal evidence regarding the role of tight junctions in the pathogenesis of gut toxicity. However, few studies have quantified or assessed the molecular changes in tight junctions in response to chemotherapy. This review will highlight the major findings of these studies and discuss the potential mechanisms by which tight junction disruption and mucosal barrier dysfunction may contribute to diarrhea. The significant clinical and economic impact associated with CIGT and diarrhea has only recently been appreciated. This has prompted significant research efforts in an attempt to reveal the pathophysiology of this debilitating complication. Renewed interest has been shown regarding the role of tight junctions in not only maintaining gastrointestinal health, but also contributing to mucosal barrier injury and diarrhea development. More detailed research into the effect chemotherapy has on the molecular characteristics of tight junctions will lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of CIGT and may uncover the therapeutic potential of tight junctions in treating diarrhea.

  19. Polyamines and Gut Mucosal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Jennifer; Chang, Elizabeth T.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Rao, Jaladanki N.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium of gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa has the most rapid turnover rate of any tissue in the body and its integrity is preserved through the dynamic balance between cell migration, proliferation, growth arrest and apoptosis. To maintain tissue homeostasis of the GI mucosa, the rates of epithelial cell division and apoptosis must be highly regulated by various extracellular and intracellular factors including cellular polyamines. Natural polyamines spermidine, spermine and their precursor putrescine, are organic cations in eukaryotic cells and are implicated in the control of multiple signaling pathways and distinct cellular functions. Normal intestinal epithelial growth depends on the available supply of polyamines to the dividing cells in the crypts, and polyamines also regulate intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis. Although the specific molecular processes controlled by polyamines remains to be fully defined, increasing evidence indicates that polyamines regulate intestinal epithelial integrity by modulating the expression of various growth-related genes. In this review, we will extrapolate the current state of scientific knowledge regarding the roles of polyamines in gut mucosal homeostasis and highlight progress in cellular and molecular mechanisms of polyamines and their potential clinical applications. PMID:25237589

  20. Celiac disease: pathogenesis of a model immunogenetic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is characterized by small-intestinal mucosal injury and nutrient malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals in response to the dietary ingestion of wheat gluten and similar proteins in barley and rye. Disease pathogenesis involves interactions among environmental, genetic, and immunological factors. Although celiac disease is predicted by screening studies to affect approximately 1% of the population of the United States and is seen both in children and in adults, 10%–15% or fewer of these individuals have been diagnosed and treated. This article focuses on the role of adaptive and innate immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of celiac disease and how current concepts of immunopathogenesis might provide alternative approaches for treating celiac disease. PMID:17200705

  1. Fungal Aflatoxins Reduce Respiratory Mucosal Ciliary Function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.; Workman, Alan D.; Carey, Ryan M.; Chen, Bei; Rosen, Phillip L.; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D.; Palmer, James N.; Kennedy, David W.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins secreted by Aspergillus flavus, which can colonize the respiratory tract and cause fungal rhinosinusitis or bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. A. flavus is the second leading cause of invasive aspergillosis worldwide. Because many respiratory pathogens secrete toxins to impair mucociliary immunity, we examined the effects of acute exposure to aflatoxins on airway cell physiology. Using air-liquid interface cultures of primary human sinonasal and bronchial cells, we imaged ciliary beat frequency (CBF), intracellular calcium, and nitric oxide (NO). Exposure to aflatoxins (0.1 to 10 μM; 5 to 10 minutes) reduced baseline (~6–12%) and agonist-stimulated CBF. Conditioned media (CM) from A. fumigatus, A. niger, and A. flavus cultures also reduced CBF by ~10% after 60 min exposure, but effects were blocked by an anti-aflatoxin antibody only with A. flavus CM. CBF reduction required protein kinase C but was not associated with changes in calcium or NO. However, AFB2 reduced NO production by ~50% during stimulation of the ciliary-localized T2R38 receptor. Using a fluorescent reporter construct expressed in A549 cells, we directly observed activation of PKC activity by AFB2. Aflatoxins secreted by respiratory A. flavus may impair motile and chemosensory functions of airway cilia, contributing to pathogenesis of fungal airway diseases. PMID:27623953

  2. Hepatitis E: Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subrat K.; Varma, Satya P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a single, positive-sense, capped and poly A tailed RNA virus classified under the family Hepeviridae. Enteric transmission, acute self-limiting hepatitis, frequent epidemic and sporadic occurrence, high mortality in affected pregnants are hallmarks of hepatitis E infection. Lack of an efficient culture system and resulting reductionist approaches for the study of replication and pathogenesis of HEV made it to be a less understood agent. Early studies on animal models, sub-genomic expression of open reading frames (ORF) and infectious cDNA clones have helped in elucidating the genome organization, important stages in HEV replication and pathogenesis. The genome contains three ORF's and three untranslated regions (UTR). The 5′ distal ORF, ORF1 is translated by host ribosomes in a cap dependent manner to form the non-structural polyprotein including the viral replicase. HEV replicates via a negative-sense RNA intermediate which helps in the formation of the positive-sense genomic RNA and a single bi-cistronic sub-genomic RNA. The 3′ distal ORF's including the major structural protein pORF2 and the multifunctional host interacting protein pORF3 are translated from the sub-genomic RNA. Pathogenesis in HEV infections is not well articulated, and remains a concern due to the many aspects like host dependent and genotype specific variations. Animal HEV, zoonosis, chronicity in immunosuppressed patients, and rapid decompensation in affected chronic liver diseased patients warrants detailed investigation of the underlying pathogenesis. Recent advances about structure, entry, egress and functional characterization of ORF1 domains has furthered our understanding about HEV. This article is an effort to review our present understanding about molecular biology and pathogenesis of HEV. PMID:25755485

  3. A physical identity for the gastric mucosal barrier.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    1990-07-16

    An oligolamellar lining which is probably phospholipid has been demonstrated on the gastric mucosal surface of the rat by transmission electron microscopy using fixation procedures specially developed to avoid the destruction of hydrophobic surfaces. This structure is unlikely to be an artefact since the use of two hydrophobic probes in epifluorescence microscopy gave emissions characteristic of oligolamellar phospholipid prepared in vitro. Moreover, lipid solvents almost eliminated both the fluorescence and the hydrophobicity. An oligolamellar lining was seen also on deeper structures, including oxyntic ducts and canaliculi in parietal cells, and it might offer a physical basis for the hitherto elusive gastric mucosal barrier. Parietal cells were also found to contain multilamellar bodies which, in the lung at least, represent phospholipid (surfactant) in a particularly surface-active form and one conducive to its deposition on tissue surfaces. This suggests that the parietal cell could gear the protection (surfactant) to the potential insult (acid) by secreting both together. The demonstration of a simple physical barrier preventing the stomach from digesting itself is discussed in regard to suggesting the use of certain surface-active foods which could be beneficial in preventing gastric ulcers and their recurrence after the acute phase has been treated using conventional therapies.

  4. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolism in Fungal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Brunke, Sascha; Brown, Alistair J.P.; Hube, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Fungal pathogens must assimilate local nutrients to establish an infection in their mammalian host. We focus on carbon, nitrogen, and micronutrient assimilation mechanisms, discussing how these influence host–fungus interactions during infection. We highlight several emerging trends based on the available data. First, the perturbation of carbon, nitrogen, or micronutrient assimilation attenuates fungal pathogenicity. Second, the contrasting evolutionary pressures exerted on facultative versus obligatory pathogens have led to contemporary pathogenic fungal species that display differing degrees of metabolic flexibility. The evolutionarily ancient metabolic pathways are conserved in most fungal pathogen, but interesting gaps exist in some species (e.g., Candida glabrata). Third, metabolic flexibility is generally essential for fungal pathogenicity, and in particular, for the adaptation to contrasting host microenvironments such as the gastrointestinal tract, mucosal surfaces, bloodstream, and internal organs. Fourth, this metabolic flexibility relies on complex regulatory networks, some of which are conserved across lineages, whereas others have undergone significant evolutionary rewiring. Fifth, metabolic adaptation affects fungal susceptibility to antifungal drugs and also presents exciting opportunities for the development of novel therapies. PMID:25190251

  6. Pathogenesis of microbial keratitis.

    PubMed

    Lakhundi, Sahreena; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening ocular infection caused by bacteria, fungi, and protist pathogens. Epithelial defects and injuries are key predisposing factors making the eye susceptible to corneal pathogens. Among bacterial pathogens, the most common agents responsible for keratitis include Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Serratia species. Fungal agents of corneal infections include both filamentous as well as yeast, including Fusarium, Aspergillus, Phaeohyphomycetes, Curvularia, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium and Candida species, while in protists, Acanthamoeba spp. are responsible for causing ocular disease. Clinical features include redness, pain, tearing, blur vision and inflammation but symptoms vary depending on the causative agent. The underlying molecular mechanisms associated with microbial pathogenesis include virulence factors as well as the host factors that aid in the progression of keratitis, resulting in damage to the ocular tissue. The treatment therefore should focus not only on the elimination of the culprit but also on the neutralization of virulence factors to minimize the damage, in addition to repairing the damaged tissue. A complete understanding of the pathogenesis of microbial keratitis will lead to the rational development of therapeutic interventions. This is a timely review of our current understanding of the advances made in this field in a comprehensible manner. Coupled with the recently available genome sequence information and high throughput genomics technology, and the availability of innovative approaches, this will stimulate interest in this field.

  7. Pathogenesis of Rhinovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Joshua L; Turner, Ronald B.; Braciale, Thomas; Heymann, Peter W.; Borish, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Since its discovery in 1956, rhinovirus (RV) has been recognized as the most important virus producing the common cold syndrome. Despite its ubiquity, little is known concerning the pathogenesis of RV infections, and some of the research in this area has led to contradictions regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of RV-induced illness. In this article, we discuss the pathogenesis of this virus as it relates to RV-induced illness in the upper and lower airway, an issue of considerable interest in view of the minimal cytopathology associated with RV infection. We endeavor to explain why many infected individuals exhibit minimal symptoms or remain asymptomatic, while others, especially those with asthma, may have severe, even life-threatening, complications (sequelae). Finally, we discuss the immune responses to RV in the normal and asthmatic host focusing on RV infection and epithelial barrier integrity and maintenance as well as the impact of the innate and adaptive immune responses to RV on epithelial function. PMID:22542099

  8. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Recent findings Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Summary Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:24126718

  9. Pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Herrick, A L

    2005-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is not fully understood. However, the last 20 yr have witnessed enormous increases in our understanding of different mechanisms which, singly or in combination, may contribute. A key point is that Raynaud's phenomenon can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to a number of underlying conditions, and that the pathogenesis and pathophysiology vary between these conditions. This review concentrates upon those subtypes of Raynaud's phenomenon of most interest to rheumatologists: systemic sclerosis-related Raynaud's phenomenon, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to hand-arm vibration syndrome. In this review, I shall discuss the main mechanisms thought to be important in pathophysiology under the three broad headings of 'vascular', 'neural' and 'intravascular'. While these are false distinctions because all interrelate, they facilitate discussion of the key elements: the blood vessel wall (particularly the endothelium), the neural control of vascular tone, and the many circulating factors which can impair blood flow and/or cause endothelial injury. Vascular abnormalities include those of both structure and function. Neural abnormalities include deficiency of the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (released from sensory afferents), alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor activation (possibly with up-regulation of the normally 'silent' alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptor) and a central nervous system component. Intravascular abnormalities include platelet activation, impaired fibrinolysis, increased viscosity and probably oxidant stress. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon increases, so do our possibilities for identifying effective treatments.

  10. Visceral and mucosal involvement in neonatal haemangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Maruani, A; Piram, M; Sirinelli, D; Herbreteau, D; Saliba, E; Machet, M C; Lorette, G

    2012-10-01

    Two types of neonatal haemangiomatosis (NH) are distinguished: diffuse which is associated with a high rate of mortality linked to mucosal/visceral involvement, and benign. First, this study aimed to examine the frequency of mucosal and visceral (especially hepatic) involvement in NH, according to skin extension, and second, it aimed to examine clinical, pathological (with glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) immunostaining), and imaging features of NH, including follow-up data. This was a descriptive retrospective study carried out in the University Hospital Center of Tours, France. The study included 19 patients with cutaneous NH (number of skin haemangiomas ranging from 5 to >100). Mucosal involvement was observed in 32% of all cases (100% and 19% in diffuse and other cutaneous cases respectively) and hepatic involvement in 42% (67% and 38% respectively). The number of hepatic haemangiomas ranged from 1 to >10. Half of the hepatic haemangiomas cases exhibited increased hepatic arterial blood flow. Mucosal and hepatic involvement was frequent in cases with a high number of cutaneous haemangiomas (>100), but only frequency of mucosal involvement was statistically significant (P = 0.021). © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Gastroprotective agents in mucosal defense against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Murty, V L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1994-09-01

    1. Convincing evidence now exists that infection with H. pylori plays a major role in the pathogenesis of gastric disease. Having a niche bordering two major perimeters of mucosal defenses, the bacterium apparently exerts its detrimental effect on the mucus layer as well as the gastric epithelium. Therefore, gastroprotective agents capable of counteracting these detrimental effects of H. pylori are gaining importance in the treatment of gastric disease. 2. The colonization of gastric mucosa by H. pylori involves specific glycolipid receptors bearing acidic substituents, a process inhibited by gastric sulfomucins. Two antiulcer agents bearing sulfated sugar groups have been demonstrated to possess the ability to interfere with H. pylori colonization process. These are sucralfate and sulglycotide. The two agents are also potent inhibitors of H. pylori glycosulfatase activity directed against indigenous mucosal defenses. 3. A variety of extracellular enzymes such as proteases, lipases and phospholipases, elaborated by H. pylori cause the weakening of the integrity of gastric mucus coat and render the underlying epithelium vulnerable to noxious luminal contents. Among the most potent agents capable of countering the proteolytic activity of H. pylori are nitecapone, ebrotidine and sulglycotide, while ebrotidine and sulglycotide were found to be most effective inhibitors of H. pylori lipolytic activities. 4. The gastric epithelial integrity is compromized by the H. pylori cell-wall lipopolysaccharide untoward effect on the epithelial surface receptors. The interference of the lipopolysaccharide with the laminin receptor was found to be most efficiently countered by ebrotidine, sulglycotide and sucralfate, whereas sulglycotide is the most potent in the reversal of the inhibitory effect of the lipopolysaccharide on mucin receptor binding.

  12. Gastroprotective effect of aucubin against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Yin, Bing; Lv, Le; Wang, Ziye; He, Jiao; Chen, Ziyang; Wen, Xin; Zhang, Yongmin; Sun, Wenji; Li, Yang; Zhao, Ye

    2017-09-14

    Aucubin, an iridoid glycoside, was isolated from seeds of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver. This study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of aucubin against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice. Mice were orally administrated with aucubin (20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days. On the 3rd day, the mice of gastric mucosal injury were induced with 70% ethanol after the last administration of aucubin. Gastric tissue of mice were submitted for evaluating the severity of gastric mucosal injury. The protective effect of aucubin was evaluated by the gastric ulcer index and histological examinations and determining the levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and some gastric mucosal protection factors. Prophylactic oral administration of aucubin decreased gastric ulcer indexes and histological scores. A significant decrease of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were observed in aucubin administrated groups. In addition, mice administrated with aucubin increased glutathione (GSH) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as normalized the levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in gastric tissue of mice. The findings of this study demonstrated that aucubin shows protective effect against ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Furthermore, aucubin enhanced gastric mucosal protection by up-regulation of HSP-70 level and normalization of EGF, VEGF and COX-1 levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Controversies in dengue pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Scott B

    2012-01-01

    Research into the pathogenesis of dengue fever has exploded over the last half-century, with issues that were considered simple becoming more complex as additional data are found. This has led to the development of a number of controversies that are being studied across the globe and debated in the literature. In this paper, the following six controversies are analysed and, where possible, resolved: the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is not useful; DHF is not significantly associated with secondary dengue infection; DHF results from infection with a ‘virulent’ dengue virus; DHF is owing to abnormal T-cell responses; DHF results from auto-immune responses; and DHF results from direct infection of endothelial cells. PMID:22668442

  14. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  15. The Pathogenesis of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Stearns-Kurosawa, Deborah J.; Osuchowski, Marcin F.; Valentine, Catherine; Kurosawa, Shinichiro; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is a serious clinical condition that represents a patient’s response to a severe infection and has a very high mortality rate. Normal immune and physiologic responses eradicate pathogens, and the pathophysiology of sepsis is due to the inappropriate regulation of these normal reactions. In an ideal scenario, the first pathogen contact with the inflammatory system should eliminate the microbe and quickly return the host to homeostasis. The septic response may accelerate due to continued activation of neutrophils and macrophages/monocytes. Upregulation of lymphocyte costimulatory molecules and rapid lymphocyte apoptosis, delayed apoptosis of neutrophils, and enhanced necrosis of cells/tissues also contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. The coagulation system is closely tied to the inflammatory response, with cross talk between the two systems driving the dysregulated response. Biomarkers may be used to help diagnose patients with sepsis, and they may also help to identify patients who would benefit from immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:20887193

  16. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Walker, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents. PMID:23202452

  17. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2008-01-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema. PMID:18246188

  18. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    PubMed Central

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Gentilini, Alessandra; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:27657051

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2008-02-01

    Emphysema is one manifestation of a group of chronic, obstructive, and frequently progressive destructive lung diseases. Cigarette smoking and air pollution are the main causes of emphysema in humans, and cigarette smoking causes emphysema in rodents. This review examines the concept of a homeostatically active lung structure maintenance program that, when attacked by proteases and oxidants, leads to the loss of alveolar septal cells and airspace enlargement. Inflammatory and noninflammatory mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, as well as the role of the innate and adaptive immune systems, are being explored in genetically altered animals and in exposure models of this disease. These recent scientific advances support a model whereby alveolar destruction resulting from a coalescence of mechanical forces, such as hyperinflation, and more recently recognized cellular and molecular events, including apoptosis, cellular senescence, and failed lung tissue repair, produces the clinically recognized syndrome of emphysema.

  20. Pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, S; Bischoff, J

    2013-07-01

    Haemangioma is a vascular tumour of infancy that is well known for its rapid growth during the first weeks to months of a child's life, followed by a spontaneous but slow involution. During the proliferative phase, the vessels are disorganized and composed of immature endothelial cells. When the tumour involutes, the vessels mature and enlarge but are reduced in number. Fat, fibroblasts and connective tissue replace the vascular tissue, with few, large, feeding and draining vessels evident. Both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have been proposed as mechanisms contributing to the neovascularization in haemangioma tumours. In recent years, several of the 'building blocks', the cells comprising the haemangioma, have been isolated. Among them are haemangioma progenitor/stem cells, endothelial cells and pericytes. This review focuses on these cell types, and the molecular pathways within these cells that have been implicated in driving the pathogenesis of infantile haemangioma.

  1. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Pirih, Flavia Q.; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D. V.; Jorge, Adrian C. A.; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental implants are a vastly used treatment option for tooth replacement. Dental implants are however susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Materials and Methods Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice eight weeks after tooth extraction. Following four weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis-lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for six weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (micro-CT) and histologically following LPS-treatment. Results LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. Conclusion The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these two conditions. PMID:24967609

  2. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  3. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis.

    PubMed

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D V; Jorge, Adrian C A; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants are a widely used treatment option for tooth replacement. However, they are susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice 8 weeks after tooth extraction. Following 4 weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis -lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for 6 weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (microcomputerized tomograph [CT]), and histologically following LPS-treatment. LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these 2 conditions.

  4. Detection of Leishmania in Unaffected Mucosal Tissues of Patients with Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania (Viannia) Species

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Roger Adrian; Lozano, Leyder Elena; Romero, Ibeth Cristina; Cardona, Maria Teresa; Prager, Martin; Pacheco, Robinson; Diaz, Yira Rosalba; Tellez, Jair Alexander; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2016-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Viannia) species are the principal cause of mucosal leishmaniasis. The natural history and pathogenesis of mucosal disease are enigmatic. Parasitological evaluation of mucosal tissues has been constrained by the invasiveness of conventional sampling methods. Methods We evaluated the presence ofLeishmania in the mucosa of 26 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis and 2 patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis. Swab samples of the nasal mucosa, tonsils, and conjunctiva were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with LV-B1 primers and Southern blot hybridization. Results Two patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 21 (81%) of 26 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis had Leishmania kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA) in mucosal tissues. kDNA was amplified from swab samples of nasal mucosa from 14 (58%) of 24 patients, tonsils from 13 (46%) of 28 patients, and conjunctiva from 6 (25%) of 24 patients. kDNA was detected in the mucosa of patients with cutaneous disease caused by Leishmania panamensis, Leishmania guyanensis, and Leishmania braziliensis. Conclusion The asymptomatic presence of parasites in mucosal tissues may be common in patients with Leishmania (Viannia) infection. PMID:19569974

  5. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  6. Pathogenesis of acne.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Morohashi, M

    2001-03-01

    Acne vulgaris is a skin disorder of the sebaceous follicles that commonly occurs in adolescence and in young adulthood. The major pathogenic factors involved are hyperkeratinization, obstruction of sebaceous follicles resulting from abnormal keratinization of the infundibular epithelium, stimulation of sebaceous gland secretion by androgens, and microbial colonization of pilosebaceous units by Propionibacterium acnes, which promotes perifollicular inflammation. The clinical presentation of acne can range from a mild comedonal form to severe inflammatory cystic acne of the face, chest, and back. At the ultrastructural level, follicular keratinocytes in comedones can be seen to possess increased numbers of desmosomes and tonofilaments, which result in ductal hypercornification. The increased activity of sebaceous glands elicited by androgen causes proliferation of P. acnes, an anaerobe present within the retained sebum in the pilosebaceous ducts. The organism possesses a ribosome-rich cytoplasm and a relatively thick cell wall, and produces several biologically active mediators that may contribute to inflammation, for instance, by promoting leukocyte migration and follicular rupture. In inflamed lesions, numerous neutrophils and macrophages infiltrate around hair follicles and sometimes phagocytose P. acnes. To examine the participation of neurogenic factors in the pathogenesis of acne, we quantitatively assessed the effects of neuropeptides on the morphology of sebaceous glands in vitro using electron microscopy. Substance P, which can be elicited by stress, promoted the development of cytoplasmic organelles in sebaceous cells, stimulated sebaceous germinative cells, and induced significant increases in the area of sebaceous glands. It also increased the size of individual sebaceous cells and the number of sebum vacuoles for each differentiated sebaceous cell, all of which suggests that substance P promotes both the proliferation and the differentiation of sebaceous

  7. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  8. Connexins in respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, Joanna; Losa, Davide; Chanson, Marc; Ruez, Richard

    2014-04-17

    The mucosal lining forms the physical and chemical barrier that protects against pathogens and hostile particles and harbors its own population of bacteria, fungi and archea, known as the microbiota. The immune system controls tolerance of this population of microorganisms that have proven to be beneficial for its host. Keeping its physical integrity and a correct balance with the microbiota, the mucosa preserves its homeostasis and its protective function and maintains host's health. However, in some conditions, pathogens may succeed in breaching mucosal homeostasis and successfully infecting the host. In this review we will discuss the role the mucosa plays in the defense against bacterial pathogens by considering the gap junction protein connexins. We will detail their implication in mucosal homeostasis and upon infection with bacteria in the respiratory and the gastrointestinal tracts. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mucosal Immunity and Candida albicans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Naglik, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between mucosal surfaces and microbial microbiota are key to host defense, health, and disease. These surfaces are exposed to high numbers of microbes and must be capable of distinguishing between those that are beneficial or avirulent and those that will invade and cause disease. Our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these discriminatory processes has recently begun to expand as new studies bring to light the importance of epithelial cells and novel immune cell subsets such as Th17 T cells in these processes. Elucidating how these mechanisms function will improve our understanding of many diverse diseases and improve our ability to treat patients suffering from these conditions. In our voyage to discover these mechanisms, mucosal interactions with opportunistic commensal organisms such as the fungus Candida albicans provide insights that are invaluable. Here, we review current knowledge of the interactions between C. albicans and epithelial surfaces and how this may shape our understanding of microbial-mucosal interactions. PMID:21776285

  10. C. albicans Colonization of Human Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Peter; Horbul, Julie; Maher, Diane; Davis, Dana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a low level commensal organism in normal human populations with the continuous potential to expand and cause a spectrum of clinical conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using ex vivo human organ cultures and populations of primary human cells, we have developed several related experimental systems to examine early-stage interactions between C. albicans and mucosal surfaces. Experiments have been conducted both with exogenously added C. albicans and with overtly normal human mucosal surfaces supporting pre-existing infections with natural isolates of Candida. Under different culture conditions, we have demonstrated the formation of C. albicans colonies on human target cells and filament formation, equivalent to tissue invasion. Conclusions/Significance These organ culture systems provide a valuable new resource to examine the molecular and cellular basis for Candida colonization of human mucosal surfaces. PMID:18446191

  11. Pathogenesis of Group A Streptococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococci are model extracellular gram-positive pathogens responsible for pharyngitis, impetigo, rheumatic fever, and acute glomerulonephritis. A resurgence of invasive streptococcal diseases and rheumatic fever has appeared in outbreaks over the past 10 years, with a predominant M1 serotype as well as others identified with the outbreaks. emm (M protein) gene sequencing has changed serotyping, and new virulence genes and new virulence regulatory networks have been defined. The emm gene superfamily has expanded to include antiphagocytic molecules and immunoglobulin-binding proteins with common structural features. At least nine superantigens have been characterized, all of which may contribute to toxic streptococcal syndrome. An emerging theme is the dichotomy between skin and throat strains in their epidemiology and genetic makeup. Eleven adhesins have been reported, and surface plasmin-binding proteins have been defined. The strong resistance of the group A streptococcus to phagocytosis is related to factor H and fibrinogen binding by M protein and to disarming complement component C5a by the C5a peptidase. Molecular mimicry appears to play a role in autoimmune mechanisms involved in rheumatic fever, while nephritis strain-associated proteins may lead to immune-mediated acute glomerulonephritis. Vaccine strategies have focused on recombinant M protein and C5a peptidase vaccines, and mucosal vaccine delivery systems are under investigation. PMID:10885988

  12. Animal models for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Sculean, Anton; Engebretson, Steven P; Becker, Jürgen; Sager, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of infectious diseases affecting osseointegrated implants in function has become a demanding issue in implant dentistry. Since the early 1990s, preclinical data from animal studies have provided important insights into the etiology, pathogenesis and therapy of peri-implant diseases. Established lesions in animals have shown many features in common with those found in human biopsy material. The current review focuses on animal studies, employing different models to induce peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Role of gastric blood flow, neutrophil infiltration, and mucosal cell proliferation in gastric adaptation to aspirin in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Brzozowski, T; Stachura, J; Dembinski, A; Majka, J

    1994-01-01

    Gastric mucosa exhibits the ability to adapt to ulcerogenic action of aspirin but the mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown. In this study, acute gastric lesions were produced by single or repeated doses of acidified aspirin in rats with intact or resected salivary glands and with intact or suppressed synthase of nitric oxide. A single oral dose of aspirin produced a dose dependent increase in gastric lesions accompanied by considerable blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, significant reduction in gastric blood flow, and almost complete suppression of biosynthesis of prostaglandins. After rechallenge with aspirin, the mucosal damage became smaller and progressively declined with repeated aspirin insults. Gastric adaptation to aspirin was accompanied by a significant rise in gastric blood flow, reduction in both blood neutrophilia and mucosal neutrophil infiltration, and a remarkable increase in mucosal cell regeneration and mucosal content of epidermal growth factor. Salivectomy, which reduced the mucosal content of epidermal growth factor, aggravated the initial mucosal damage induced by the first exposure to acidified aspirin but did not prevent the adaptation of this mucosa to repeated aspirin insults. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, eliminated the hyperaemic response to repeated aspirin but did not abolish the development of adaptation to aspirin showing that the maintenance of the gastric blood flow plays little part in this adaptation. In conclusion, the stomach adapts readily to repeated aspirin insults and this is accompanied by a considerable reduction in blood neutrophilia and the severity of neutrophil infiltration and by an extensive proliferation of mucosal cells possibly involving epidermal growth factor. PMID:7525421

  14. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  15. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

  16. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  17. Intestinal Permeability in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Pathogenesis, Clinical Evaluation, and Therapy of Leaky Gut.

    PubMed

    Michielan, Andrea; D'Incà, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial with data suggesting the role of a disturbed interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiota. A defective mucosal barrier may result in increased intestinal permeability which promotes the exposition to luminal content and triggers an immunological response that promotes intestinal inflammation. IBD patients display several defects in the many specialized components of mucosal barrier, from the mucus layer composition to the adhesion molecules that regulate paracellular permeability. These alterations may represent a primary dysfunction in Crohn's disease, but they may also perpetuate chronic mucosal inflammation in ulcerative colitis. In clinical practice, several studies have documented that changes in intestinal permeability can predict IBD course. Functional tests, such as the sugar absorption tests or the novel imaging technique using confocal laser endomicroscopy, allow an in vivo assessment of gut barrier integrity. Antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy reduces mucosal inflammation and restores intestinal permeability in IBD patients. Butyrate, zinc, and some probiotics also ameliorate mucosal barrier dysfunction but their use is still limited and further studies are needed before considering permeability manipulation as a therapeutic target in IBD.

  18. Pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A; Hadden, R D; Gregson, N A; Smith, K J

    1999-12-01

    Recent neurophysiological and pathological studies have led to a reclassification of the diseases that underlie Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN) and acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). The Fisher syndrome of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia is the most striking of several related conditions. Significant antecedent events include Campylobacter jejuni (4-66%), cytomegalovirus (5-15%), Epstein-Barr virus (2-10%), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (1-5%) infections. These infections are not uniquely associated with any clinical subtype but severe axonal degeneration is more common following C. jejuni and severe sensory impairment following cytomegalovirus. Strong evidence supports an important role for antibodies to gangliosides in pathogenesis. In particular antibodies to ganglioside GM1 are present in 14-50% of patients with GBS, and are more common in cases with severe axonal degeneration associated with any subtype. Antibodies to ganglioside GQ1b are very closely associated with Fisher syndrome, its formes frustes and related syndromes. Ganglioside-like epitopes exist in the bacterial wall of C. jejuni. Infection by this and other organisms triggers an antibody response in patients with GBS but not in those with uncomplicated enteritis. The development of GBS is likely to be a consequence of special properties of the infecting organism, since some strains such as Penner 0:19 and 0:41 are particularly associated with GBS but not with enteritis. It is also likely to be a consequence of the immunogenetic background of the patient since few patients develop GBS after infection even with one of these strains. Attempts to match the subtypes of GBS to the fine specificity of anti-ganglioside antibodies and to functional effects in experimental models continue but have not yet fully explained the pathogenesis. T cells are also involved in the pathogenesis of

  19. Gastric Mucosal Energy Metabolism and “Stress Ulceration,”

    PubMed Central

    Menguy, Rene; Masters, Y. F.

    1974-01-01

    Acute gastric erosions following hemorrhagic shock (stress ulceration) have been attributed to gastric hyperacidity, altered gastric secretion of mucus and an abnormal permeability of the gastric mucosa to H+. This report aims at presenting evidence supporting an alternate hypothesis: the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia to mucosal necrosis is a deficit in gastric mucosal energy metabolism. Our experimental procedure consisted of harvesting the stomachs of rats and rabbits by “stop-freeze” (liquid N2) at different intervals after the induction of hemorrhagic shock. Levels of adenosine-phosphates and of glycolytic intermediates in gastric mucosa were measured. We studied the changes in the levels of these substrates produced by shock as well as by factors capable, when combined with shock, of rendering the gastric mucosa more vulnerable to stress ulceration. The influence of shock and of these modifying factors were evaluated by comparison with data from appropriately designed control experiments. In parallel experiments we examined the frequency of stress ulceration (gross and microscopic) under these same standard conditions. There have emerged from these studies a number of observations all based upon data with the highest statistical significance. The data are consonant with the hypothesis stated above: an energy deficit severe enough to cause cellular necrosis is the event linking shock-induced gastric mucosal ischemia and stress ulceration. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4278107

  20. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-06-21

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions.

  1. Acromegaly pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Melmed, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulated growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion is usually caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and leads to acromegaly — a disorder of disproportionate skeletal, tissue, and organ growth. High GH and IGF1 levels lead to comorbidities including arthritis, facial changes, prognathism, and glucose intolerance. If the condition is untreated, enhanced mortality due to cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and pulmonary dysfunction is associated with a 30% decrease in life span. This Review discusses acromegaly pathogenesis and management options. The latter include surgery, radiation, and use of novel medications. Somatostatin receptor (SSTR) ligands inhibit GH release, control tumor growth, and attenuate peripheral GH action, while GH receptor antagonists block GH action and effectively lower IGF1 levels. Novel peptides, including SSTR ligands, exhibiting polyreceptor subtype affinities and chimeric dopaminergic-somatostatinergic properties are currently in clinical trials. Effective control of GH and IGF1 hypersecretion and ablation or stabilization of the pituitary tumor mass lead to improved comorbidities and lowering of mortality rates for this hormonal disorder. PMID:19884662

  2. Pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ce; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the final pathological result of various chronic liver diseases, and fibrosis is the precursor of cirrhosis. Many types of cells, cytokines and miRNAs are involved in the initiation and progression of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a pivotal event in fibrosis. Defenestration and capillarization of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are major contributing factors to hepatic dysfunction in liver cirrhosis. Activated Kupffer cells destroy hepatocytes and stimulate the activation of HSCs. Repeated cycles of apoptosis and regeneration of hepatocytes contribute to pathogenesis of cirrhosis. At the molecular level, many cytokines are involved in mediation of signaling pathways that regulate activation of HSCs and fibrogenesis. Recently, miRNAs as a post-transcriptional regulator have been found to play a key role in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Robust animal models of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, as well as the recently identified critical cellular and molecular factors involved in the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis will facilitate the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for these conditions. PMID:24966602

  3. Pathogenesis of tinea.

    PubMed

    Brasch, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    Dermatophytes are hyphomycetes that can degrade keratin. This puts them in a position to cause infections of the keratin-containing superficial skin. The resulting clinical picture is called tinea. The pathogenesis and course of tinea is decisively determined by pathogen-related factors and by the defense mechanisms of the host. An infection starts with an adherence of fungal propagules, followed by the formation of hyphae that can spread within the tissue. This process is accompanied by a release of fungal enzymes and other pathogenic factors. Next keratinocytes are activated, the epidermal barrier is destroyed, epidermal proliferation is enhanced and defensins are expressed within the epidermis. In addition, innate and specific immune responses are initiated, involving neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, antibodies and T cells. The cellular mechanisms are thought to be crucial for healing. Special conditions apply to nail infections, because within nail plates the fungi are not accessible to effective defense mechanisms, as well as to infections of hair follicles that contain specific concentrations of steroid hormones. Dermatophytes that penetrate into the dermis can cause granulomatous inflammatory reactions and systemic immune reactions are supposed to be a trigger of so-called id reactions. © The Author • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  4. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  5. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893942

  6. Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most frequently encountered member of the coagulase-negative staphylococci on human epithelial surfaces. It has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, especially in infections of indwelling medical devices. The mechanisms that S. epidermidis uses to survive during infection are in general of a passive nature, reflecting their possible origin in the commensal life of this bacterium. Most importantly, S. epidermidis excels in forming biofilms, sticky agglomerations that inhibit major host defense mechanisms. Furthermore, S. epidermidis produces a series of protective surface polymers and exoenzymes. Moreover, S. epidermidis has the capacity to secrete strongly cytolytic members of the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) family, but PSMs in S. epidermidis overall appear to participate primarily in biofilm development. Finally, there is evidence for a virulence gene reservoir function of S. epidermidis, as it appears to have transferred important immune evasion and antibiotic resistance factors to Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, S. epidermidis also has a beneficial role in balancing the microflora on human epithelial surfaces by controlling outgrowth of harmful bacteria such as in particular S. aureus. Recent research yielded detailed insight into key S. epidermidis virulence determinants and their regulation, in particular as far as biofilm formation is concerned, but we still have a serious lack of understanding of the in vivo relevance of many pathogenesis mechanisms and the factors that govern the commensal life of S. epidermidis.

  7. Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Accorona, Remo; Botti, Gerardo; Farina, Davide; Fossati, Piero; Gatta, Gemma; Gogas, Helen; Lombardi, Davide; Maroldi, Roberto; Nicolai, Piero; Ravanelli, Marco; Vanella, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck is a very rare and aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. The nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and oral cavity are the most common locations. One-, 3- and 5-year survival rates between 2000 and 2007 were 63%, 30% and 20%, respectively. Cigarette smoking seems to be a risk factor even though the evidence for this is very low. Clinical signs and symptoms are usually nonspecific. While surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for most mucosal melanomas of the head and neck region, radiotherapy has a role in local control of the disease after surgery. Many new treatment options in the last years, in particular targeted therapies (i.e. inhibitors of c-KIT, NRAS/MEK or BRAF) and immunotherapies (anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies), have changed the history of cutaneous melanoma. Despite the different biology, mucosal melanoma is currently treated in the same way as cutaneous melanoma; however, patients with mucosal melanoma were excluded from the majority of recent clinical trials. Recent molecular findings offer new hope for the development of more effective systemic therapy.

  8. Concomitant early mucosal and cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Cafe, Virginia; Costa, Jackson; Oliveira, Fabiano; Bafica, Andre; Rosato, Andrea; de Freitas, Luiz A R; Brodskyn, Claudia; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2006-08-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is often clinically silent until reaching a highly advanced state. In this prospective study, 6 of 220 patients with early cutaneous leishmaniasis were diagnosed with mucosal involvement by otorhinolaryngological examination (a rate similar to the reported rate of late ML). Detection of early ML may represent an important strategy in preventing severe mucosal destruction in human leishmaniasis.

  9. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings.

  10. Pathogenesis of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gundy, Karl Van; Sharma, Om P.

    1987-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. The organs that are involved by sarcoidosis include the lungs in which the granuloma is seen in more than 90% of patients to the pituitary, which is only rarely affected. There are many hypotheses as to the cause of sarcoidosis. Some of them rely on the similarities seen between sarcoidosis and the other granuloma-forming diseases such as tuberculosis, berylliosis, pine pollen inhalation and acute and chronic bacterial and viral infections, while others find similarities between sarcoidosis and immune reactions observed in autoimmune disorders. Still other explanations implicate a genetic predisposition or a still-unknown agent as the underlying cause of the granuloma formation. Images PMID:3310401

  11. Bacterial neuraminidase facilitates mucosal infection by participating in biofilm production

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Grace; Muir, Amanda; Gomez, Marisa I.; Waks, Jonathan; Reddy, Bharat; Planet, Paul; Singh, Pradeep K.; Kanetko, Yukihiro; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Hsiao, Yu-Shan; Tong, Liang; Prince, Alice

    2006-01-01

    Many respiratory pathogens, including Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express neuraminidases that can cleave α2,3-linked sialic acids from glycoconjugates. As mucosal surfaces are heavily sialylated, neuraminidases have been thought to modify epithelial cells by exposing potential bacterial receptors. However, in contrast to neuraminidase produced by the influenza virus, a role for bacterial neuraminidase in pathogenesis has not yet been clearly established. We constructed a mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by deleting the PA2794 neuraminidase locus (Δ2794) and tested its virulence and immunostimulatory capabilities in a mouse model of infection. Although fully virulent when introduced i.p., the Δ2794 mutant was unable to establish respiratory infection by i.n. inoculation. The inability to colonize the respiratory tract correlated with diminished production of biofilm, as assessed by scanning electron microscopy and in vitro assays. The importance of neuraminidase in biofilm production was further demonstrated by showing that viral neuraminidase inhibitors in clinical use blocked P. aeruginosa biofilm production in vitro as well. The P. aeruginosa neuraminidase has a key role in the initial stages of pulmonary infection by targeting bacterial glycoconjugates and contributing to the formation of biofilm. Inhibiting bacterial neuraminidases could provide a novel mechanism to prevent bacterial pneumonia. PMID:16862214

  12. Defensins as anti-inflammatory compounds and mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kohlgraf, Karl G; Pingel, Lindsey C; Dietrich, Deborah E; Brogden, Kim A

    2010-01-01

    Human neutrophil peptide α-defensins and human β-defensins are small, well-characterized peptides with broad antimicrobial activities. In mixtures with microbial antigens, defensins attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses by dendritic cells in culture, attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses in the nasal fluids of exposed mice and enhance antibody responses in the serum of vaccinated mice. Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, defensins first start by binding to microbial antigens and adhesins, often attenuating toxic or inflammatory-inducing capacities. Binding is not generic; it appears to be both defensin-specific and antigen-specific with high affinities. Binding of defensins to antigens may, in turn, alter the interaction of antigens with epithelial cells and antigen-presenting cells attenuating the production of proinflammatory cytokines. The binding of defensins to antigens may also facilitate the delivery of bound antigen to antigen-presenting cells in some cases via specific receptors. These interactions enhance the immunogenicity of the bound antigen in an adjuvant-like fashion. Future research will determine the extent to which defensins can suppress early events in inflammation and enhance systemic antibody responses, a very recent and exciting concept that could be exploited to develop therapeutics to prevent or treat a variety of oral mucosal infections, particularly where inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of disease and its long-term sequelae. PMID:20020832

  13. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Buery, Rosario Rivera; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Gunduz, Mehmet; Lefeuvre, Mathieu; Fujii, Masae; Inoue, Masahisa; Setsu, Kojun; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in other melanoma subtypes. The purpose of this study was to determine RAS protein expression and NRAS and BRAF mutation in 18 primary OMM cases using immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. Results showed that RAS is intensely expressed in both in situ and invasive OMMs. However, NRAS mutation was only observed in 2/15 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified cases both of which were silent mutations. On the other hand, BRAF missense mutations were observed only in 1/15 cases with PCR amplification. NRAS and BRAF mutations were independent from previously reported c-kit mutations. The classical V600E BRAF mutation was not found; instead a novel V600L was observed suggesting that the oncogenic event in OMM is different from that in skin melanoma. The low frequency of NRAS and BRAF mutations indicate that these genes are not common, but probable events in OMM pathogenesis, most likely independent of c-kit mutation.

  14. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  15. A mucosal model to study microbial biofilm development and anti-biofilm therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michele J.; Parks, Patrick J.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are a sessile colony of bacteria which adhere to and persist on surfaces. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms is considered a virulence factor, and in fact is central to the pathogenesis of some organisms. Biofilms are inherently resistant to chemotherapy and host immune responses. Clinically, biofilms are considered a primary cause of a majority of infections, such as otitis media, pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients and endocarditis. However, the vast majority of the data on biofilm formation comes from traditional microtiter-based or flow displacement assays with no consideration given to host factors. These assays, which have been a valuable tool in high-throughput screening for biofilm-related factors, do not mimic a host-pathogen interaction and may contribute to an inappropriate estimation of the role of some factors in clinical biofilm formation. We describe the development of a novel ex vivo model of biofilm formation on a mucosal surface by an important mucosal pathogen, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This model is being used for the identification of microbial virulence factors important in mucosal biofilm formation and novel anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:23246911

  16. Dusquetide: Reduction in oral mucositis associated with enduring ancillary benefits in tumor resolution and decreased mortality in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Curtis, Amarinthia; Azawi, Samar; Worden, Francis; Katz, Sanford; Adkins, Douglas; Bonomi, Marcelo; Scott, Zack; Elder, Jenna; Sonis, Stephen T; Straube, Richard; Donini, Oreola

    2017-09-01

    Innate immunity is a key component in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis, a universal toxicity of chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Dusquetide, a novel Innate Defense Regulator, has demonstrated both nonclinical and clinical efficacy in ameliorating severe oral mucositis (SOM). Long term follow-up studies from the Phase 2 clinical study evaluating dusquetide as a treatment for SOM in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients receiving CRT have now been completed. Extended analysis indicates that dusquetide therapy was well-tolerated and did not contribute to increased infection, tumor growth or mortality. Potential ancillary benefits of duquetide therapy were also identified.

  17. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them.

  18. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  19. Oral mucosal health in liver transplant recipients and controls.

    PubMed

    Helenius-Hietala, Jaana; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Grönroos, Lisa; Rissanen, Harri; Vehkalahti, Miira M; Suominen, Liisa; Isoniemi, Helena; Meurman, Jukka H

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs and other medications may predispose patients to oral diseases. Data on oral mucosal health in recipients of liver transplantation (LT) are limited. We, therefore, recruited 84 LT recipients (64 with chronic liver disease and 20 with acute liver failure) for clinical oral examinations in a cross-sectional, case-control study. Their oral health had been clinically examined before transplantation. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs) was assessed in groups with different etiologies of liver disease and in groups with different immunosuppressive medications, and these groups were compared to controls selected from a nationwide survey in Finland (n = 252). Risk factors for OMLs were evaluated with logistic regression. OMLs were more frequent in LT recipients versus controls (43% versus 15%, P < 0.001), and the use of steroids raised the prevalence to 53%. Drug-induced gingival overgrowth was the single most common type of lesion, and its prevalence was significantly higher for patients using cyclosporine A (CSA; 29%) versus patients using tacrolimus (TAC; 5%, P = 0.007); the prevalence was even higher with the simultaneous use of calcium channel blockers and CSA (47%) or TAC (8%, P = 0.002). Lesions with malignant potential such as drug-induced lichenoid reactions, oral lichen planus-like lesions, leukoplakias, and ulcers occurred in 13% of the patients with chronic liver disease and in 6% of the controls. Every third patient with chronic liver disease had reduced salivary flow, and more than half of all patients were positive for Candida; this risk was higher with steroids. In conclusion, the high frequency of OMLs among LT recipients can be explained not only by immunosuppressive drugs but also by other medications. Because dry mouth affects oral health and OMLs may have the potential for malignant transformation, annual oral examinations are indicated. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  20. A piglet model of acute gastroenteritis induced by Shigella dysenteriae Type 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwang-Il; Zhang, Quanshun; Nunnari, John; Tzipori, Saul

    2010-03-15

    The lack of a standardized laboratory animal model that mimics key aspects of human shigellosis remains a major obstacle to addressing questions about pathogenesis, screening therapeutics, and evaluation of vaccines. We characterized a piglet model for Shigella dysenteriae type 1. Piglets developed acute diarrhea, anorexia, and dehydration, which could often be fatal, with symptom severity depending on age and dose. Bacteria were apparent in the lumen and on the surface epithelium throughout the gut initially, but severe mucosal damage and bacterial cellular invasion were most profound in the colon. Detached necrotic colonocytes were present in the lumen, with inflammatory cells outpouring from damaged mucosa. High levels of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-12 were followed by high levels of other proinflammatory cytokines. Elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-10 were detected in feces and in gut segments from infected animals. Bacteria were present inside epithelial cells and within colonic lamina propria. In contrast, an isogenic strain lacking Shiga toxin induced similar but milder symptoms, with moderate mucosal damage and lower cytokine levels. We conclude that piglets are highly susceptible to shigellosis, providing a useful tool with which to compare vaccine candidates for immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and response to challenge; investigate the role of virulence factors; and test the efficacy of microbial agents.

  1. Mimicking the host and its microenvironment in vitro for studying mucosal infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Ledesma, Maria A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Why is a healthy person protected from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections, while individuals with cystic fibrosis or damaged epithelium are particularly susceptible to this opportunistic pathogen? In order to address this question, it is essential to thoroughly understand the dynamic interplay between the host microenvironment and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, using modeI systems that represent key aspects of human mucosal tissues in health and disease allows recreating in vivo host-pathogen interactions in a physiologically relevant manner. In this review, we discuss how factors of mucosal tissues, such as apical-basolateral polarity, junctional complexes, extracellular matrix proteins, mucus, multicellular complexity (including indigenous microbiota), and other physicochemical factors affect P. aeruginosa pathogenesis and are thus important to mimic in vitro. We highlight in vitro cell and tissue culture model systems of increasing complexity that have been used over the past 35 years to study the infectious disease process of P. aeruginosa, mainly focusing on lung models, and their respective advantages and limitations. Continued improvements of in vitro models based on our expanding knowledge of host microenvironmental factors that participate in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis will help advance fundamental understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and increase the translational potential of research findings from bench to the patient’s bedside. PMID:24737619

  2. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-12-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including Bacillus anthracis in experimental models of disease.

  3. New generation of oral mucosal vaccines targeting dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Sahay, Bikash; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    As most infectious organisms gain entry at mucosal surfaces, there is a great deal of interest in developing vaccines that elicit effective mucosal immune responses against pathogen challenge. Targeted vaccination is one of the most effective methods available to prevent and control infectious diseases. Mucosal vaccines can offer lower costs, better accessibility, needle free delivery, and a higher capacity for mass immunizations during pandemics. Both local mucosal immunity and robust systemic responses can be achieved through mucosal vaccination. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular components of the mucosal immune system have allowed for the development of a novel mucosal vaccine platform utilizing specific dendritic cell-targeting peptides and orally administered lactobacilli to elicit efficient antigen specific immune responses against infections, including B. anthracis in experimental models of disease. PMID:23835515

  4. Genetically modified enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines induce mucosal immune responses without inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alexandra; Randall, Roger; Darsley, Michael; Choudhry, Naheed; Thomas, Nicola; Sanderson, Ian R; Croft, Nick M; Kelly, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Objective Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of acute diarrhoea in children in the developing world, in travellers and in the military. Safe, effective vaccines could reduce morbidity and mortality. As immunity to ETEC is strain specific, the ability to create vaccines in vitro which express multiple antigens would be desirable. It was hypothesised that three genetically attenuated ETEC strains, one with a genetic addition, would be immunogenic and safe, and they were evaluated in the first licensed UK release of genetically modified oral vaccines. Methods Phase 1 studies of safety and immunogenicity were carried out at a Teaching Hospital in London. Varying oral doses of any of three oral vaccines, or placebo, were administered to volunteers of both sexes (n = 98). Peripheral blood responses were measured as serum antibodies (IgG or IgA) by ELISA, antibody‐secreting cell (ASC) responses by enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT), and antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) by ELISA. Mucosal antibody secretion was measured by ELISA for specific IgG and IgA in whole gut lavage fluids (WGLFs). Results Significant mucosal IgA responses were obtained to colonisation factors CFA/I, CS1, CS2 and CS3, both when naturally expressed and when genetically inserted. Dose–response relationships were most clearly evident in the mucosal IgA in WGLF. Vaccines were well tolerated and did not elicit interleukin (IL) 8 or IL6 secretion in WGLF. Conclusions Genetically modified ETEC vaccines are safe and induce significant mucosal IgA responses to important colonisation factors. Mucosal IgA responses were clearly seen in WGLF, which is useful for evaluating oral vaccines. PMID:17566016

  5. Effects of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Expressions and Functional Activities of Human Duodenal Mucosal Bicarbonate Transport Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guorong; Jin, Hai; Deng, Shili; Xu, Jingyu; Liu, Xuemei; Xie, Rui; Tuo, Biguang

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced duodenal ulcerogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of H. pylori infection on the expressions and functional activities of human duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins and hope to further clarify the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The experiments were performed in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, and H. pylori-negative healthy subjects. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion was measured by Ussing Chamber technology. The expressions of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) and SLC26A6 (solute-linked carrier 26 gene A6), in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were markedly lower than those in healthy controls. Basal and both forskolin- and prostaglandin E2 -stimulated duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretions in the patients with H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers were also lower than those in healthy controls. After anti-H. pylori treatment for H. pylori-associated duodenal ulcers, duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion and CFTR and SLC26A6 expressions in H. pylori-eradicated patients recovered to levels comparable to healthy controls, but those were found to be not significantly altered in non-H. pylori-eradicated patients. The further results showed that decreases in the H. pylori-induced CFTR and SLC26A6 expression were related to the severity and virulent factors of H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection impairs the expressions and functional activities of duodenal mucosal bicarbonate transport proteins, CFTR and SLC26A6, which contributes to the development of duodenal ulcer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A blockade of complement activation prevents rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion injury by modulating mucosal mast cell degranulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, T; Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Saotome, T; Bamba, T

    1998-01-01

    We attempted to define the putative role of complement activation in association with mucosal mast cell (MMC) degranulation in the pathogenesis of rapid intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. We prepared complement activity-depleted rats by the administration of the anti-complement agent K-76COOH and the serine-protease inhibitor FUT-175. Autoperfused segments of the jejunum were exposed to 60 min of ischaemia, followed by reperfusion for various time periods, and the epithelial permeability was assessed by the 51Cr-EDTA clearance rate. The number of MMC was immunohistochemically assessed. In control rats, the maximal increase in mucosal permeability was achieved by 30–45 min of reperfusion. This increase was significantly attenuated by the administration of either K-76COONa alone or in combination with FUT-175. In contrast, the administration of carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI), which prevents the inactivation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins such as C5a, significantly enhanced the increase in I/R-induced mucosal permeability. These findings were confirmed morphologically by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the I/R-induced mucosal injury was accompanied by a marked decrease in the number of MMC, and administration of K-76COOH significantly inhibited this change. These results indicate that complement activation and the generation of complement-derived anaphylatoxins are key events in I/R-induced mucosal injury. It is likely that intestinal I/R-induced mucosal injury may be partially mediated by MMC activation associated with the complement activation. PMID:9528887

  7. A Mouse Model of Otitis Media Identifies HB-EGF as a Mediator of Inflammation-Induced Mucosal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kwang; Chavez, Eduardo; Kurabi, Arwa; Baird, Andrew; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections. While it is usually treated without difficulty, up to 20% of children may progress to long-term complications that include hearing loss, impaired speech and language development, academic underachievement, and irreversible disease. Hyperplasia of middle ear mucosa contributes to the sequelae of acute otitis media and is of important clinical significance. Understanding the role of growth factors in the mediation of mucosal hyperplasia could lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions for this disease and its sequelae. Methods From a whole genome gene array analysis of mRNA expression during acute otitis media, we identified growth factors with expression kinetics temporally related to hyperplasia. We then tested these factors for their ability to stimulate mucosal epithelial growth in vitro, and determined protein levels and histological distribution in vivo for active factors. Results From the gene array, we identified seven candidate growth factors with upregulation of mRNA expression kinetics related to mucosal hyperplasia. Of the seven, only HB-EGF (heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor) induced significant mucosal epithelial hyperplasia in vitro. Subsequent quantification of HB-EGF protein expression in vivo via Western blot analysis confirmed that the protein is highly expressed from 6 hours to 24 hours after bacterial inoculation, while immunohistochemistry revealed production by middle ear epithelial cells and infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusion Our data suggest an active role for HB-EGF in the hyperplasia of the middle ear mucosal epithelium during otitis media. These results imply that therapies targeting HB-EGF could ameliorate mucosal growth during otitis media, and thereby reduce detrimental sequelae of this childhood disease. PMID:25033458

  8. Pathogenesis of asthma.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2008-06-01

    While asthma is considered an inflammatory disorder of the conducting airways, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the disease is heterogeneous with respect to immunopathology, clinical phenotypes, response to therapies, and natural history. Once considered purely an allergic disorder dominated by Th2-type lymphocytes, IgE, mast cells, eosinophils, macrophages, and cytokines, the disease also involves local epithelial, mesenchymal, vascular and neurologic events that are involved in directing the Th2 phenotype to the lung and through aberrant injury-repair mechanisms to remodeling of the airway wall. Structural cells provide the necessary "soil" upon which the "seeds" of the inflammatory response are able to take root and maintain a chronic phenotype and upon which are superimposed acute and subacute episodes usually driven by environmental factors such as exposure to allergens, microorganisms, pollutants or caused by inadequate antiinflammatory treatment. Greater consideration of additional immunologic and inflammatory pathways are revealing new ways of intervening in the prevention and treatment of the disease. Thus increased focus on environmental factors beyond allergic exposure (such as virus infection, air pollution, and diet) are identifying targets in structural as well as immune and inflammatory cells at which to direct new interventions.

  9. Pathogenesis of Thrombotic Microangiopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X. Long; Sadler, J. Evan

    2008-01-01

    Profound thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia characterize thrombotic microangiopathy, which includes two major disorders: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). TTP has at least three types: congenital or familial, idiopathic, and nonidiopathic. The congenital and idiopathic TTP syndromes are caused primarily by deficiency of ADAMTS13, owing to mutations in the ADAMTS13 gene or autoantibodies that inhibit ADAMTS13 activity. HUS is similar to TTP, but is associated with acute renal failure. Diarrhea-associated HUS accounts for more than 90% of cases and is usually caused by infection with Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (O157:H7). Diarrhea-negative HUS is associated with complement dysregulation in up to 50% of cases, caused by mutations in complement factor H, membrane cofactor protein, factor I or factor B, or by autoanti-bodies against factor H. The incomplete penetrance of mutations in either ADAMTS13 or complement regulatory genes suggests that precipitating events or triggers may be required to cause thrombotic microangiopathy in many patients. PMID:18215115

  10. The role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the pathogenesis of sinonasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Muluk, N Bayar; Arikan, O K; Atasoy, P; Kiliç, R; Yalçinozan, E Tuna

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of sinonasal polyps has not been known completely. We investigated the role of endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) in the pathogenesis of sinonasal polyps. Study group (Groups 1-3) consisted of nasal polyp samples of patients with sinonasal polyps; and control group consisted of inferior turbinate samples of patients without nasal polyp. In Group 1: 14 specimens from ethmoid sinus; in Group 2: 10 specimens from nasal cavity; in Group 3: 10 specimens from maxillary sinus; and in Group 4 (Control): 9 specimens from inferior turbinate were included. By immunohistochemical staining technique, eNOS Positivity Index in mucosal layers; and in the inflammatory cells were assessed. eNOS Positivity Index was higher at apical layer of epithelium; and perivascular and glandular parts of subepithelial layer. As a rate of mononuclear cells increased, eNOS positivity increased at basal part of epithelium. In eNOS Positivity Index of mononuclear cells increased ones, eNOS values also increased at glands of subepithelial layer. In nasal cavity, eNOS positivity index of all cells was significantly higher than that of the control group. Increased eNOS all cells positivity index values were seen with decreased glandular and endothelial eNOS values. In all cells group, fibroblasts were seen beside the mononuclear cells. It was observed that eNOS was not expressed in PMNC (mainly neutrophils), growing more in acute inflammatory process; and was expressed in MNCs and all cells group with fibroblasts which were the cells of chronic inflammatory process. Especially MNCs and fibroblasts may play a role in the polyp formation process. In males and in patients with longer polyp duration, eNOS values decreased. We concluded that eNOS Positivity Index was higher at apical layer of epithelium; and perivascular and glandular parts of subepithelial layer. eNOS plays role in vascular dilatation, increases in vascular permeability; increases in nasal secretion due to glandular

  11. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  12. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  13. Targeted inhibition of IL-18 attenuates irinotecaninduced intestinal mucositis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Júnior, R C P; Freitas, H C; Wong, D V T; Wanderley, C W S; Nunes, L G; Leite, L L; Miranda, S P; Souza, M H L P; Brito, G A C; Magalhães, P J C; Teixeira, M M; Cunha, F Q; Ribeiro, R A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intestinal mucositis is a common side-effect of irinotecan-based cancer chemotherapy regimens. This mucositis is associated with cytokine activation and NO synthesis. Production of IL-18 is up-regulated in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, we have investigated the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. Experimental Approach Wild type (WT), IL-18 or caspase-1 knockout mice were treated with either saline or irinotecan (60 mg·kg−1 per 4 days, i.p.) or the IL-18 binding protein (IL-18bp, 10 mg·kg−1) before irinotecan. On day 5, diarrhoea was monitored and proximal intestinal strips were obtained for histopathology, in vitro gut contractility, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible NOS (iNOS) activity, and detection of IL-18 expression. Key Results Irinotecan induced severe diarrhoea accompanied by intestinal injury (villi shortening and increased crypt depth). Additionally, irinotecan treatment increased MPO and iNOS activity, iNOS immunostaining and IL-18 expression in WT mice compared with saline treatment. The IL-18 production was associated with macrophages. In vitro, intestinal smooth muscle strips were hyperresponsive to ACh after irinotecan treatment. Increases in MPO and iNOS activity, intestinal contractility and diarrhoea were prevented in caspase-1 knockout and IL-18 knockout mice, and in IL-18bp-treated WT mice. Furthermore, the Survival of irinotecan-treated mice was increased and iNOS immunoexpression and IL-18 production prevented in IL-18 knockout mice. Conclusions and Implications Targeting IL-18 function may be a promising therapeutic approach to decreasing the severity of intestinal mucositis during irinotecan treatment regimens. PMID:24428790

  14. Siblings of patients with Crohn's disease exhibit a biologically relevant dysbiosis in mucosal microbial metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Charlotte; van der Gast, Christopher J; Rogers, Geraint B; Cuthbertson, Leah; McCartney, Sara; Stagg, Andrew J; Lindsay, James O; Whelan, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    To determine the existence of mucosal dysbiosis in siblings of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) using 454 pyrosequencing and to comprehensively characterise and determine the influence of genotypical and phenotypical factors, on that dysbiosis. Siblings of patients with CD have elevated risk of developing CD and display aspects of disease phenotype, including faecal dysbiosis. Whether the mucosal microbiota is disrupted in these at-risk individuals is unknown. Rectal biopsy DNA was extracted from 21 patients with quiescent CD, 17 of their healthy siblings and 19 unrelated healthy controls. Mucosal microbiota was analysed by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and were classified into core and rare species. Genotypical risk was determined using Illumina Immuno BeadChip, faecal calprotectin by ELISA and blood T-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Core microbiota of both patients with CD and healthy siblings was significantly less diverse than controls. Metacommunity profiling (Bray-Curtis (SBC) index) showed the sibling core microbial composition to be more similar to CD (SBC=0.70) than to healthy controls, whereas the sibling rare microbiota was more similar to healthy controls (SBC=0.42). Faecalibacterium prausnitzii contributed most to core metacommunity dissimilarity both between siblings and controls, and between patients and controls. Phenotype/genotype markers of CD risk significantly influenced microbiota variation between and within groups, of which genotype had the largest effect. Individuals with elevated CD-risk display mucosal dysbiosis characterised by reduced diversity of core microbiota and lower abundance of F. prausnitzii. This dysbiosis in healthy people at risk of CD implicates microbiological processes in CD pathogenesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Cow's milk and type 1 diabetes: the real debate is about mucosal immune function.

    PubMed

    Harrison, L C; Honeyman, M C

    1999-08-01

    The hypothesis that early exposure of the infant to cow's milk (or lack of breast-feeding) predisposes the child to type 1 diabetes dates from the 1980s. It has important implications, but remains controversial because the evidence on which it is based has been indirect and is open to criticism. Two meta-analyses of multiple studies in which diabetes prevalence was associated retrospectively with infant feeding revealed only a marginal increase in relative risk. Two recent prospective studies found no apparent association between development of antibodies to islet antigens and feeding patterns in high-risk infants with a first-degree type 1 diabetic relative. Studies reporting increased humoral and cellular immunity to cow's milk proteins in children with type 1 diabetes often lack appropriate controls and standardization and do not, in themselves, establish a causal connection to disease pathogenesis. A review of published data leads to the conclusion that increased immunity to cow's milk proteins is not disease-specific, but reflects genetic predisposition to increased immunity to dietary proteins in general, associated with the HLA haplotype A1-B8-DR3-DQ2 (A1*0501, B1*0201), which also predisposes to celiac disease and selective IgA deficiency. We suggest that the cow's milk hypothesis could be productively reframed around mucosal immune function in type 1 diabetes. Breast milk contains growth factors, cytokines, and other immunomodulatory agents that promote functional maturation of intestinal mucosal tissues. In the NOD mouse model, environmental cleanliness may influence diabetes incidence through mucosal mechanisms, and exposure of the mucosa to insulin (present in breast milk) induces regulatory T-cells and decreases diabetes incidence. The mucosa is a major immunoregulatory barrier, and cow's milk happens to be the first dietary protein it encounters. The basic question is whether impaired mucosal immune function predisposes to type 1 diabetes.

  16. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections.

  17. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  18. The microbiome and regulation of mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Andrew J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a mucosal surface constantly exposed to foreign antigens and microbes, and is protected by a vast array of immunologically active structures and cells. Epithelial cells directly participate in immunological surveillance and direction of host responses in the gut and can express numerous pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), TLR1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR9, and nucleotide oligomerization domain 2, as well as produce chemotactic factors for both myeloid and lymphoid cells following inflammatory stimulation. Within the epithelium and in the underlying lamina propria resides a population of innate lymphoid cells that, following stimulation, can become activated and produce effector cytokines and exert both protective and pathogenic roles during inflammation. Lamina propria dendritic cells play a large role in determining whether the response to a particular antigen will be inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. It is becoming clear that the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiome, as a whole community, exerts a profound influence on mucosal immune regulation. The microbiome produces short-chain fatty acids, polysaccharide A, α-galactosylceramide and tryptophan metabolites, which can induce interleukin-22, Reg3γ, IgA and interleukin-17 responses. However, much of what is known about microbiome–host immune interactions has come from the study of single bacterial members of the gastrointestinal microbiome and their impact on intestinal mucosal immunity. Additionally, evidence continues to accumulate that alterations of the intestinal microbiome can impact not only gastrointestinal immunity but also immune regulation at distal mucosal sites. PMID:24329495

  19. The Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging zoonotic disease distributed in sub-Saharan African countries and the Arabian Peninsula. The disease is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes, and virus replication in domestic ruminant results in high rates of mortality and abortion. RVFV infection in humans usually causes a self-limiting, acute and febrile illness; however, a small number of cases progress to neurological disorders, partial or complete blindness, hemorrhagic fever, or thrombosis. This review describes the pathology of RVF in human patients and several animal models, and summarizes the role of viral virulence factors and host factors that affect RVFV pathogenesis. PMID:21666766

  20. Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Shuo; Wong, Gary; Shi, Weifeng; Liu, Jun; Lai, Alexander C K; Zhou, Jiyong; Liu, Wenjun; Bi, Yuhai; Gao, George F

    2016-06-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have been discovered, including those that cause severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), two pathogens that, upon infection, can cause fatal respiratory disease in humans. It was recently discovered that dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia harbor three different HCoV species, including a dominant MERS HCoV lineage that was responsible for the outbreaks in the Middle East and South Korea during 2015. In this review we aim to compare and contrast the different HCoVs with regard to epidemiology and pathogenesis, in addition to the virus evolution and recombination events which have, on occasion, resulted in outbreaks amongst humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2011-05-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging zoonotic disease distributed in sub-Saharan African countries and the Arabian Peninsula. The disease is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) of the family Bunyaviridae and the genus Phlebovirus. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes, and virus replication in domestic ruminant results in high rates of mortality and abortion. RVFV infection in humans usually causes a self-limiting, acute and febrile illness; however, a small number of cases progress to neurological disorders, partial or complete blindness, hemorrhagic fever, or thrombosis. This review describes the pathology of RVF in human patients and several animal models, and summarizes the role of viral virulence factors and host factors that affect RVFV pathogenesis.

  2. Pathogenesis of Thromboembolism and Endovascular Management.

    PubMed

    Behravesh, Sasan; Hoang, Peter; Nanda, Alisha; Wallace, Alex; Sheth, Rahul A; Deipolyi, Amy R; Memic, Adnan; Naidu, Sailendra; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease that includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is associated with high mortality, morbidity, and costs. It can result in long-term complications that include postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) adding to its morbidity. VTE affects 1/1000 patients, costs $13.5 billion annually to treat, and claims 100,000 lives annually in the US. The current standard of care for VTE is anticoagulation, though thrombolysis may be performed in patients with PE and threatened limb. This review discusses pathogenesis and medical treatment of VTE and then focuses on endovascular treatment modalities. Mechanical- and catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is discussed, as well as patient selection criteria, and complications. The first prospective study (CaVenT) comparing CDT with anticoagulation alone in acute DVT, despite study shortcomings, corroborates the existing literature indicating improved outcomes with CDT. The potential of the ongoing prospective, multicenter, randomized ATTRACT trial is also highlighted.

  3. Pathogenesis of Thromboembolism and Endovascular Management

    PubMed Central

    Behravesh, Sasan; Hoang, Peter; Nanda, Alisha; Wallace, Alex; Sheth, Rahul A.; Deipolyi, Amy R.; Memic, Adnan; Naidu, Sailendra

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a disease that includes deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is associated with high mortality, morbidity, and costs. It can result in long-term complications that include postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) adding to its morbidity. VTE affects 1/1000 patients, costs $13.5 billion annually to treat, and claims 100,000 lives annually in the US. The current standard of care for VTE is anticoagulation, though thrombolysis may be performed in patients with PE and threatened limb. This review discusses pathogenesis and medical treatment of VTE and then focuses on endovascular treatment modalities. Mechanical- and catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is discussed, as well as patient selection criteria, and complications. The first prospective study (CaVenT) comparing CDT with anticoagulation alone in acute DVT, despite study shortcomings, corroborates the existing literature indicating improved outcomes with CDT. The potential of the ongoing prospective, multicenter, randomized ATTRACT trial is also highlighted. PMID:28154761

  4. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as mucosal adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Iho, Sumiko; Maeyama, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Fumiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial DNA comprising palindromic sequences and containing unmethylated CpG is recognized by toll-like receptor 9 of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and induces the production of interferon-α and chemokines, leading to the activation of a Th1 immune response. Therefore, synthetic equivalents of bacterial DNA (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides) have been developed for clinical applications. They are usually phosphorothioated for in vivo use; this approach also leads to adverse effects as reported in mouse models.Mucosal vaccines that induce both mucosal and systemic immunity received substantial attention in recent years. For their development, phosphodiester-linked oligodeoxynucleotides, including the sequence of a palindromic CpG DNA may be advantageous as adjuvants because their target pDCs are present right there, in the mucosa of the vaccination site. In addition, the probability of adverse effects is believed to be low. Here, we review the discovery of such CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and their possible use as mucosal adjuvants. PMID:25751765

  5. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    PubMed

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P < 0.05) association between mucosal lesions and the use of dentures and tobacco, whereas stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  6. Mucosal perforators from the facial artery.

    PubMed

    Coronel-Banda, Mauricio E; Serra-Renom, Jose M; Lorente, Marian; Larrea-Terán, Wendy P

    2014-07-01

    The cutaneous perforators of the facial artery have been well described, but to our knowledge the oral mucosal perforators have not. We studied 10 facial arteries from 10 hemifaces in 5 cadavers. The arteries were injected with latex, and we studied all perforators that extended from the facial artery and headed directly to the oral mucosa. The diameter and length of the facial artery and its mucosal perforators were measured and compared. We found 52 oral mucosal perforators in the 10 facial arteries injected with latex. Their mean (SD) diameter was 0.5 (0.2) mm and the mean (SD) number/facial artery was 5.2 (1.1). Their mean (SD) length was 16.4 (5.3) mm. Most of those to the cheek were localised between the branching-off points of the inferior and superior labial arteries. The facial artery has perforators to the oral mucosa of the cheek, most of them between the points at which the labial arteries emerge.

  7. Methylsulfonylmethane is effective against gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2017-09-15

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is a natural organosulfur compound has been widely used as a dietary supplement. MSM has protective effects against various disorders through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties however the effect of MSM on gastric mucosal injury remains unclear. The aim of the present study is to determine whether MSM has beneficial effects on ethanol/HCl-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Macroscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa revealed that ethanol/HCl administration produced apparent mucosal injuries, while pretreatment with MSM (200 and 400mg/kg, orally) could effectively protect gastric mucosa against the injuries caused by acidified ethanol. MSM significantly increased the levels of glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), carbonyl protein, and nitric oxide (NO) in gastric tissues compared with those in the ethanol group. MSM suppressed gastric inflammation by reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with MSM decreased the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) as a key regulator of inflammation in gastric mucosa. Taken together, these data suggest that MSM is able to decrease the severity of ethanol/HCl-induced gastric mucosal injury through inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dermoscopic appearance of an amelanotic mucosal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Andreas; Beck-Zoul, Ulrike; Held, Laura; Haase, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypomelanotic or amelanotic melanomas are challenging to identify, especially at mucosal sites. The dermoscopic clues to the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas have been reported to be structureless zones with the presence of blue, gray, or white colors. Case A female in her seventies noted a new lesion on the inside of her right labia that first appeared two months prior. Her past medical history was significant for rheumatoid arthritis requiring ongoing treatment with methotrexate for 20 years and adalimumab for 10 years. After no response to two weeks of local treatment for suspected herpes simplex infection, her gynecologist performed a skin biopsy. Based on the histopathological diagnosis of an amelanotic melanoma (Breslow thickness of 1.3 mm) the patient was referred to dermatology for further assessment. Polarized dermoscopy revealed a distinct asymmetric, sharply demarcated homogenous white papule (4 × 5 mm) as well as polymorphous vessels. Conclusion Dermoscopy may aid in the diagnosis of amelanotic mucosal melanomas. Our case revealed a structureless white area and polymorphous vessels. Additional clues to the diagnosis were the advanced age of the patient and the clinical presentation of a new lesion. PMID:27867742

  9. Hitting the mucosal road in tolerance induction.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    Within the last decades a dramatic increase in allergic diseases has been recognized in the Westernized societies, leading to the fact that meanwhile 25-30% of the population is afflicted by allergic disorders. Besides a hereditary disposition, other factors, including a reduced microbial contact early in life or changes in nutrition, might also have influenced this epidemiological development. So far the only causative treatment against type-I allergies is specific immunotherapy. In young and monosensitized patients this treatment is highly efficacious, while there are clear limitations in older or multisensitized patients. Allergy research therefore aims at establishing new and more efficacious treatment strategies in prophylactic as well as therapeutic settings. Our research programs focus on the development of novel allergy vaccines based on the induction of mucosal tolerance. In different mouse models of respiratory allergy mucosal treatment with genetically engineered allergen constructs proved to prevent the development of allergic mono- and multisensitivities. The additional use of mucosal adjuvants seems particularly important to improve therapeutic treatment approaches. Recent studies on the inverse relation of certain parasite infections and the development of allergy prompted us to search for selected parasitic molecules with immunosuppressive properties as potential adjuvant systems for novel allergy vaccines. An overview of our recent studies will be given.

  10. Pathogenesis of and unifying hypothesis for idiopathic pouchitis.

    PubMed

    Coffey, J Calvin; Rowan, Fiachra; Burke, John; Dochery, Neil G; Dochery, Neil; Kirwan, William O; O'Connell, P Ronan

    2009-04-01

    Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is the procedure of choice in the surgical management of refractory ulcerative colitis. Pouchitis affects up to 60% of patients following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis. It overlaps significantly with ulcerative colitis such that improvements in our understanding of one will impact considerably on the other. The symptoms are distressing and impinge significantly on patients' quality of life. Despite 30 years of scientific and clinical investigation, the pathogenesis of pouchitis is unknown; however, recent advances in molecular and cell biology make a synergistic hypothesis possible. This hypothesis links interaction between epithelial metaplasia, changes in luminal bacteria (in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria), and altered mucosal immunity. Specifically, colonic metaplasia supports colonization by sulfate-reducing bacteria that produce hydrogen sulfide. This causes mucosal depletion and subsequent inflammation. Although in most cases antibiotics lead to bacterial clearance and symptom resolution, immunogenetic subpopulations can develop a chronic refractory variant of pouchitis. The aims of this paper are to discuss proposed pathogenic mechanisms and to describe a novel mechanism that combines many hypotheses and explains several aspects of pouchitis. The implications for the management of both pouchitis and ulcerative colitis are discussed.

  11. Evidence supporting the use of probiotics for the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Luca D; Geier, Mark S; Butler, Ross N; Cummins, Adrian G; Howarth, Gordon S

    2011-03-01

    Although chemotherapy remains the current best practice for the treatment of neoplasia, the severity of its associated side-effects continues to impact detrimentally on the quality of life. Mucositis can affect both the oral cavity and intestine, and represents one of the most common side-effects of chemotherapy. It is characterized by ulceration, inflammation, diarrhoea, and intense abdominal pain. Despite extensive research there remains no definitive therapy for mucositis. This may be due to the multiple factors which contribute to its pathogenesis, including up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, increased apoptosis of epithelial cells, alteration of the gastrointestinal microbiota, and damage to the epithelium. Although employed increasingly in other gastrointestinal disorders, probiotics are yet to be comprehensively investigated in the treatment or prevention of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Probiotic-based therapies have been shown to exert beneficial effects, including modulation of the microbiota and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This review outlines the current evidence supporting the use of probiotics in intestinal mucositis, and suggests further research directions for the future.

  12. Antioxidant agents: a future alternative approach in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis?

    PubMed

    de Freitas Cuba, Letícia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently employed for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). It destroys tumor cells, but it is not selective, also affecting healthy tissues and producing adverse effects. One that stands out is oral mucositis because of the morbidity that it is capable of causing. This lesion is characterized by the presence of erythema, ulcerations, pain, opportunistic infections, and weight loss. These side effects can lead to serious situations that require the interruption of the antineoplastic treatment and can result in hospitalization and even death. The complex mechanisms linked to the pathogenesis of oral mucositis were recently established, and since then, the control of oxidative stress (OS) has been tied to the prevention and management of this disease. The authors have carried out a review of the literature about the use of antioxidant agents in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, using the PubMed database. This review has shown that the research on use of antioxidants (AOX) has proved insufficient to justify suggesting the products in treatment protocols. Results are promising, however, and AOX may represent a future alternative in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis.

  13. Adhesion molecules in primary oral mucosal melanoma: study of claudins, integrins and immunoglobulins in a series of 35 cases.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Sheyla Batista; Nico, Marcello Menta S; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Cláudia Malheiros; Buim, Marcilei E; Fernandes, Juliana Dumet; Sangueza, Martin; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa

    2013-07-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive tumor. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlation between increased tumor invasion and the metastatic phenotype and altered adhesion molecule expression profiles. The present study analyzed the expression of integrins, claudins, and immunoglobulin-like adhesion molecules in oral mucosal melanomas and correlated results with clinical parameters. Immunohistochemical analyses of the expression patterns of these molecules were performed on thirty-five cases of primary oral mucosal melanomas organized in a tissue microarray. The results were correlated with clinical and histological features of the cohort. A number of integrin subunits were negative and this was related with vascular invasion. Positivity of integrin beta-3 and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) was statistically associated with extensive vascular invasion (P < 0.05). Lower expression of CD54 (intercellular cell adhesion molecule) was associated with cases with extensive necrosis. Most cases with metastatic disease were negative for CD66 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule). Several subunits of claudins were negative and, although not statistically significant, this lack of expression was partially associated with histological factors of poor prognosis. Altered patterns of adhesion molecule expression, mainly integrins and immunoglobulin-like proteins, may participate in the pathogenesis and outcome of oral mucosal melanomas.

  14. Understanding dengue pathogenesis: implications for vaccine design.

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    In the second half of the twentieth century dengue spread throughout the tropics, threatening the health of a third of the world's population. Dengue viruses cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including more than 500,000 reported cases of the severe forms of the disease--dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Attempts to create conventional vaccines have been hampered by the lack of suitable experimental models, the need to provide protection against all four serotypes simultaneously and the possible involvement of virus-specific immune responses in severe disease. The current understanding of dengue pathogenesis is outlined in this review, with special emphasis on the role of the immune response. The suspected involvement of the immune system in increased disease severity and vascular damage has raised concerns about every vaccine design strategy proposed so far. Clearly more research is needed on understanding the correlates of protection and mechanisms of pathogenesis. There is, however, an urgent need to provide a solution to the escalating global public health problems caused by dengue infections. Better disease management, vector control and improved public health measures will help reduce the current disease burden, but a safe and effective vaccine is probably the only long-term solution. Although concerns have been raised about the possible safety and efficacy of both conventional and novel vaccine technologies, the situation is now so acute that it is not possible to wait for the perfect vaccine. Consequently the careful and thorough evaluation of several of the current candidate vaccines may be the best approach to halting the spread of disease. PMID:15868023

  15. Chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants: Sunrise on the ocean.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yufei; Fan, Qingze; Hao, Dongxia; Wu, Jie; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-11-04

    Mucosal vaccination, which is shown to elicit systemic and mucosal immune responses, serves as a non-invasive and convenient alternative to parenteral administration, with stronger capability in combatting diseases at the site of entry. The exploration of potent mucosal adjuvants is emerging as a significant area, based on the continued necessity to amplify the immune responses to a wide array of antigens that are poorly immunogenic at the mucosal sites. As one of the inspirations from the ocean, chitosan-based mucosal adjuvants have been developed with unique advantages, such as, ability of mucosal adhesion, distinct trait of opening the junctions to allow the paracellular transport of antigen, good tolerability and biocompatibility, which guaranteed the great potential in capitalizing on their application in human clinical trials. In this review, the state of art of chitosan and its derivatives as mucosal adjuvants, including thermo-sensitive chitosan system as mucosal adjuvant that were newly developed by author's group, was described, as well as the clinical application perspective. After a brief introduction of mucosal adjuvants, chitosan and its derivatives as robust immune potentiator were discussed in detail and depth, in regard to the metabolism, safety profile, mode of actions and preclinical and clinical applications, which may shed light on the massive clinical application of chitosan as mucosal adjuvant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gut permeability and mucosal inflammation: bad, good or context dependent.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Sorrell, M F; Batra, S K; Dhawan, P; Singh, A B

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disease. A breach in the mucosal barrier, otherwise known as "leaky gut," is alleged to promote mucosal inflammation by intensifying immune activation. However, interaction between the luminal antigen and mucosal immune system is necessary to maintain mucosal homeostasis. Furthermore, manipulations leading to deregulated gut permeability have resulted in susceptibility in mice to colitis as well as to creating adaptive immunity. These findings implicate a complex but dynamic association between mucosal permeability and immune homeostasis; however, they also emphasize that compromised gut permeability alone may not be sufficient to induce colitis. Emerging evidence further supports the role(s) of proteins associated with the mucosal barrier in epithelial injury and repair: manipulations of associated proteins also modified epithelial differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, the role of gut permeability and proteins associated in regulating mucosal inflammatory diseases appears to be more complex than previously thought. Herein, we review outcomes from recent mouse models where gut permeability was altered by direct and indirect effects of manipulating mucosal barrier-associated proteins, to highlight the significance of mucosal permeability and the non-barrier-related roles of these proteins in regulating chronic mucosal inflammatory conditions.

  17. Challenges in mucosal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    The mucosal surface is the largest route through which pathogens enter the human body. To control the outbreak of mucosal infectious diseases, we must use our knowledge of the mucosal immune system to create vaccines that elicit protective mucosal and systemic immunity. Mucosal vaccines have advantages over traditional injectable vaccines in that they not only induce effective mucosal immune responses, but they also do not cause physical or psychological discomfort. Mucosal vaccines currently licensed for human use include oral vaccines against Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhi, poliovirus and rotavirus, and nasal vaccines against influenza virus. To further improve the existing vaccines, it will be necessary to develop novel vaccine production, storage and delivery systems through innovative strategies derived from interdisciplinary scientific research. Our accumulated knowledge of the innate and acquired arms of the mucosal immune system and the recent scientific and technical advancements in the fields of molecular biology, plant biology, bio-engineering and chemical engineering, genome biology and systems biology have created a unique research and development platform for the development of the next generation of mucosal vaccines. This review summarizes the current perspectives and future directions of mucosal vaccine development with emphasis on oral and nasal vaccines for the control of infectious diseases. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Mucosal melanomas in the racially diverse population of California.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Lisa; Wong, Michael K; Peng, David H; Cockburn, Myles

    2017-02-01

    Mucosal melanomas are rare, poorly understood neoplasms without a consensus standard of care. We sought to define mucosal melanoma tumor characteristics and the racial/ethnic attributes of patients with mucosal melanomas. We analyzed 130,920 cutaneous melanomas and 1919 mucosal melanomas recorded in the population-based California Cancer Registry from 1988 to 2013. Although only 1% of melanomas occurring in nonHispanic whites were mucosal, other racial/ethnic groups had a higher proportion of mucosal melanomas (15% for Asian/Pacific Islanders, 9% for nonHispanic blacks, and 4% for Hispanics). Anorectal mucosal melanomas were most common in female Asian/Pacific Islanders, whereas genitourinary mucosal melanomas were highest in nonHispanic whites, and head and neck tumors were most common among Hispanics. Stage at presentation was not uniform among racial/ethnic groups, with Asian/Pacific Islanders having the highest rates of metastasis. The lack of a standardized staging system for mucosal melanomas confounds classification and knowledge regarding metastasis. Small sample size limits comparative analysis across race, stage, site, and depth. Mucosal melanomas differ by race/ethnicity with regard to anatomic site, stage, and depth. Because early detection offers the best chance of increased survival, greater awareness will aid clinicians who care for patients at risk for these aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advances in the pathogenesis of cardiorenal syndrome type 3.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Anna; Virzì, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; de Cal, Massimo; Pastori, Silvia; Clementi, Maurizio; Granata, Antonio; Vescovo, Giorgio; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 3 is a subclassification of the CRS whereby an episode of acute kidney injury (AKI) leads to the development of acute cardiac injury or dysfunction. In general, there is limited understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in CRS type 3. An episode of AKI may have effects that depend on the severity and duration of AKI and that both directly and indirectly predispose to an acute cardiac event. Experimental data suggest that cardiac dysfunction may be related to immune system activation, inflammatory mediators release, oxidative stress, and cellular apoptosis which are well documented in the setting of AKI. Moreover, significant derangements, such as fluid and electrolyte imbalance, metabolic acidosis, and uremia, which are typical features of acute kidney injury, may impair cardiac function. In this review, we will focus on multiple factors possibly involved in the pathogenesis issues regarding CRS type 3.

  20. The Sympathetic Nervous System in the Pathogenesis of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Ilan S

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a unique clinical condition of acute heart failure and reversible left ventricular dysfunction frequently precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress. There is growing evidence that exaggerated sympathetic stimulation is central to the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Precisely how catecholamines mediate myocardial stunning in takotsubo syndrome remains incompletely understood; but possible mechanisms include epicardial spasm, microvascular dysfunction, direct adrenergic-receptor-mediated myocyte injury, and systemic vascular effects that alter ventricular-arterial coupling. Risk factors that increase sympathetic tone and/or catecholamine sensitivity may render individuals particularly susceptible to takotsubo syndrome during episodes of acute stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: Pathogenesis and Clinical Picture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Du, Hong; Wang, Li M; Wang, Ping Z; Bai, Xue F

    2016-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which is a zoonosis endemic in eastern Asia, especially in China. The reservoir host of HTNV is field mouse (Apodemus agraricus). The main manifestation of HFRS, including acute kidney injury, increases vascular permeability, and coagulation abnormalities. In this paper, we review the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HFRS including virus factor, immunity factor and host genetic factors. Furthermore, the treatment and prevention will be discussed.

  2. Starter Feeding Supplementation Alters Colonic Mucosal Bacterial Communities and Modulates Mucosal Immune Homeostasis in Newborn Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junhua; Bian, Gaorui; Sun, Daming; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of starter feeding supplementation on colonic mucosal bacterial communities and on mucosal immune homeostasis in pre-weaned lambs. We selected eight pairs of 10-day-old lamb twins. One twin was fed breast milk (M, n = 8), while the other was fed breast milk plus starter (M+S, n = 8). The lambs were sacrificed at 56 days age. Colonic content was collected to determine the pH and the concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactate. The colonic mucosa was harvested to characterize the bacterial communities using Illumina MiSeq sequencing and to determine mRNA expression levels of cytokines and toll-like receptors (TLR) using quantitative real-time PCR. The results show that starter feeding decreased luminal pH and increased the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total VFA, and lactate in the colon. The principal coordinate analysis (PCA) and analysis of molecular variance show that starter feeding supplementation significantly affected the colonic mucosal bacterial communities with a higher relative abundance of the dominant taxa unclassified S24-7, Oscillibacter, Prevotella, Parabacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Ruminobacter, and Succinivibrio, and a lower proportion of unclassified Ruminococcaceae, RC9_gut_group, Blautia, Phocaeicola, Phascolarctobacterium, unclassified BS11_gut_group, unclassified family_XIII, and Campylobacter in lambs. Meanwhile, starter feeding decreased mRNA expression of TLR4 and cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ in colonic tissue. Furthermore, the changes in the colonic mucosal mRNA expression of TLR and cytokines were associated with changes in mucosal bacterial composition. These findings may provide new insights into colonic mucosal bacteria and immune homeostasis in developing lambs. PMID:28382025

  3. Activated Glucocorticoid Receptor Interacts with the INHAT Component Set/TAF-Iβ and Releases it from a Glucocorticoid-responsive Gene Promoter, Relieving Repression: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Glucocorticoid Resistance in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia with Set-Can Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Iβ, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Iβ interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Iβ was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Iβ from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Iβ acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids. PMID:18096310

  4. Activated glucocorticoid receptor interacts with the INHAT component Set/TAF-Ibeta and releases it from a glucocorticoid-responsive gene promoter, relieving repression: implications for the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistance in acute undifferentiated leukemia with Set-Can translocation.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-02-13

    Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Ibeta, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Ibeta interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Ibeta was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Ibeta from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Ibeta acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids.

  5. Buccal mucosal graft in reconstructive urology: uses beyond urethral stricture.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Abhishek; Dican, Razvan; Beier, Jörn; Keller, Hansjörg

    2014-07-01

    The use of buccal mucosal grafts for the reconstruction of urethral strictures is an established procedure. Because of its robustness, the buccal mucosal graft could also potentially provide an alternative for other indications in reconstructive urology. We report here six consecutive patients who received a buccal mucosal graft for ureteral strictures, glans reconstruction and stoma stenosis. The follow up for all patients ranged from 26 to 50 months. The buccal mucosal graft showed excellent functional results for the ureteral strictures and stenosis from ureterocutaneostomy. For glans reconstructions, the buccal mucosal grafts delivered excellent cosmetic and functional results without causing meatal stenosis. We conclude the buccal mucosal graft can be used in reconstructive surgery beyond the reconstruction of urethral strictures.

  6. miR-153-3p, a new bio-target, is involved in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease via inhibition of indoleamine- 2,3-dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Luo, Hong-xue; Ye, Xiao-yang; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Tong-feng; Hu, Yue-huan; Zhang, Hong-yu; Huo, Ming-Rui; Wan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, seeking reliable biomarkers and delineating the potential biological mechanism are important for optimizing treatment strategies and improving their curative effect. In this study, using a microRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based chip assay, microRNA-153-3p (miR-153-3p) was screened and selected as a potential biomarker of aGVHD. The elevated plasma miR-153-3p levels at +7 d after transplant could be used to predict the upcoming aGVHD. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for aGVHD+/aGVHD- patients receiving haploidentical transplant was 0.808 (95% confidence interval, 0.686-0.930) in a training set and 0.809 (95% confidence interval, 0.694-0.923) in a validation set. Interestingly, bioinformatics analysis indicated that indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a potential target of miR-153-3p. In vitro study confirmed that IDO could be directly inhibited by miR-153-3p. In a GVHD model, recipient mice injected with a miR-153-3p antagomir exhibited higher IDO expression levels at the early stage after transplantation, as well as delayed aGVHD and longer survival, indicating that the miR-153-3p level at +7 d post-transplant is a good predictor of aGVHD. miR-153-3p participates in aGVHD development by inhibiting IDO expression and might be a novel bio-target for aGVHD intervention. PMID:27340781

  7. Enhancement of gastric mucosal blood flow with sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Guslandi, M; Sorghi, M; Tittobello, A

    1994-01-01

    Twelve patients with dyspepsia whose gastric abnormalities ranged from diffuse reddening of the mucosa to multiple erosions were treated for 4 weeks with oral sulglycotide, a sulphated glycopeptide with known gastroprotective and ulcer-healing properties. Before and after treatment, gastric mucosal blood flow was assessed by means of laser Doppler flowmetry. A significant (P < 0.01) increase in mucosal perfusion was observed after sulglycotide treatment, suggesting that enhancement of mucosal blood flow may contribute to the therapeutic properties of the drug.

  8. Evidence for a common mucosal immune system in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Heather L; Obradovic, Milan R

    2015-07-01

    The majority of lymphocytes activated at mucosal sites receive instructions to home back to the local mucosa, but a portion also seed distal mucosa sites. By seeding distal sites with antigen-specific effector or memory lymphocytes, the foundation is laid for the animal's mucosal immune system to respond with a secondary response should to this antigen be encountered at this site in the future. The common mucosal immune system has been studied quite extensively in rodent models but less so in large animal models such as the pig. Reasons for this paucity of reported induction of the common mucosal immune system in this species may be that distal mucosal sites were examined but no induction was observed and therefore it was not reported. However, we suspect that the majority of investigators simply did not sample distal mucosal sites and therefore there is little evidence of immune response induction in the literature. It is our hope that more pig immunologists and infectious disease experts who perform mucosal immunizations or inoculations on pigs will sample distal mucosal sites and report their findings, whether results are positive or negative. In this review, we highlight papers that show that immunization/inoculation using one route triggers mucosal immune system induction locally, systemically, and within at least one distal mucosal site. Only by understanding whether immunizations at one site triggers immunity throughout the common mucosal immune system can we rationally develop vaccines for the pig, and through these works we can gather evidence about the mucosal immune system that may be extrapolated to other livestock species or humans.

  9. Early diagnosis and regional evaluation of radiation mucositis by newly developed TC-99M DTPA labelled agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamamura, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Higashi, K.

    1994-05-01

    We have developed a new drug for treating acute radiation mucositis which consists of a steroid with potent localized anti-inflammatory effect, and sodium alginate with strong adherence to mucosal surface, and since then we have treated many patients with success. In the present study, we labelled this agent with Tc-99m DTPA, and administered to 10 healthy volunteers and 35 patients with acute radiation mucositis, and determined the values of mean transit time (MTT) and T1/2 from the dynamic phase and the time taken for the mixture to reach to cardia according to Talliefer`s method. Abnormal radionuclide (RN) accumulation in the esophagus was evaluated at 10 minutes after the administration and, the ratio of abnormal RN accumulation count were calculated. In the healthy volunteers, the MTT was 2.67 seconds, T1/2 14.0 seconds, and the time for the drug to reach the stomach 5.25 seconds. Even in the patients with acute radiation mucositis, these values were not significantly different from the healthy controls. However, the images taken at 10 minutes after the administration revealed abnormal RN accumulation corresponding to the irradiated region in all patients. The ratio of this abnormal RN accumulation to the total RN count in the esophagus was 52.48%, the pre-administration RN ratio was 6.45%. None of the healthy volunteers produced abnormal RN accumulation. The ratio of total RN count in the esophagus to pre-administration RN count was only 1.87% in the healthy volunteers, whereas 11.39% in the radiation mucositis group. When Tc-99m DTPA-labelled water was used similarly, the region of radiation esophagitis was not identified on scintigraphy. It was thus suggested that diagnosis of radiation mucositis could be made only with this new agent of high viscosity and very strong mucous adhesive property. Owing to its repeatability and simplicity, this new agent seemed to be useful to make the early diagnosis and regional evaluation of radiation mucositis possible.

  10. Supersaturated Calcium Phosphate Rinse in Preventing Oral Mucositis in Young Patients Undergoing Autologous or Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mucositis; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. The pathogenesis of bornaviral diseases in mammals.

    PubMed

    Tizard, Ian; Ball, Judith; Stoica, George; Payne, Susan

    2016-12-01

    Natural bornavirus infections and their resulting diseases are largely restricted to horses and sheep in Central Europe. The disease also occurs naturally in cats, and can be induced experimentally in laboratory rodents and numerous other mammals. Borna disease virus-1 (BoDV-1), the cause of most cases of mammalian Borna disease, is a negative-stranded RNA virus that replicates within the nucleus of target cells. It causes severe, often lethal, encephalitis in susceptible species. Recent events, especially the discovery of numerous new species of bornaviruses in birds and a report of an acute, lethal bornaviral encephalitis in humans, apparently acquired from squirrels, have revived interest in this remarkable family of viruses. The clinical manifestations of the bornaviral diseases are highly variable. Thus, in addition to acute lethal encephalitis, they can cause persistent neurologic disease associated with diverse behavioral changes. They also cause a severe retinitis resulting in blindness. In this review, we discuss both the pathological lesions observed in mammalian bornaviral disease and the complex pathogenesis of the neurologic disease. Thus infected neurons may be destroyed by T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. They may die as a result of excessive inflammatory cytokine release from microglia. They may also die as a result of a 'glutaminergic storm' due to a failure of infected astrocytes to regulate brain glutamate levels.

  12. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  13. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment.

  14. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p < 0.05) systemic immune response (serum IgG level) was observed in case of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  15. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  16. Mucosal microbiome dysbiosis in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coker, Olabisi Oluwabukola; Dai, Zhenwei; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhao, Guijun; Cao, Lei; Nakatsu, Geicho; Wu, William Kk; Wong, Sunny Hei; Chen, Zigui; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to characterise the microbial changes associated with histological stages of gastric tumourigenesis. We performed 16S rRNA gene analysis of gastric mucosal samples from 81 cases including superficial gastritis (SG), atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer (GC) from Xi'an, China, to determine mucosal microbiome dysbiosis across stages of GC. We validated the results in mucosal samples of 126 cases from Inner Mongolia, China. We observed significant mucosa microbial dysbiosis in IM and GC subjects, with significant enrichment of 21 and depletion of 10 bacterial taxa in GC compared with SG (q<0.05). Microbial network analysis showed increasing correlation strengths among them with disease progression (p<0.001). Five GC-enriched bacterial taxa whose species identifications correspond to Peptostreptococcus stomatis, Streptococcus anginosus, Parvimonas micra, Slackia exigua and Dialister pneumosintes had significant centralities in the GC ecological network (p<0.05) and classified GC from SG with an area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.82. Moreover, stronger interactions among gastric microbes were observed in Helicobacter pylori-negative samples compared with H. pylori-positive samples in SG and IM. The fold changes of selected bacteria, and strengths of their interactions were successfully validated in the Inner Mongolian cohort, in which the five bacterial markers distinguished GC from SG with an AUC of 0.81. In addition to microbial compositional changes, we identified differences in bacterial interactions across stages of gastric carcinogenesis. The significant enrichments and network centralities suggest potentially important roles of P. stomatis, D. pneumosintes, S. exigua, P. micra and S. anginosus in GC progression. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Gut mucosal immunostimulation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vitiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M; de Budeguer, M V; Perdigón, G

    2000-12-01

    The beneficial properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on human health have been frequently demonstrated. The interaction of LAB with the lymphoid cells associated to the gut to activate the mucosal immune system and the mechanisms by which they can exert an adjuvant effect is still unclear, as well as if this property is common for all the LAB. We studied the influence of the oral administration of different geneous of LAB such as Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, L. plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus. We determined if the LAB assayed were able to stimulate the specific, the non-specific immune response (inflammatory response), or both. We demonstrated that all the bacteria assayed were able to increase the number of IgA producing cells associated to the lamina propria of small intestine. This effect was dose dependent. The increase in IgA+ producing cells was not always correlated with an increase in the CD4+ T cell number, indicating that some LAB assayed only induced clonal expansion of B cells triggered to produce IgA. Most of them, induced an increase in the number of cells involved in the inflammatory immune response. CD8+ T cell were diminished or not affected, with exception of L. plantarum that induced an increase at low dose. This fact would mean that LAB are unable to induce cytotoxicity mechanisms. We demonstrated the importance in the selection of LAB to be used as gut mucosal adjuvant. The different behaviours observed among them on the gut mucosal immune response, specially those that induce inflammatory immune response, show that not all the LAB can be used as oral adjuvant and that the beneficial effect of them can not generalized to genous or specie. The immunoadjuvant capacity would be a property of the strain assayed.

  18. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yongguo; Abedi, Vida; Carbo, Adria; Zhang, Xiaoying; Lu, Pinyi; Philipson, Casandra; Hontecillas, Raquel; Hoops, Stefan; Liles, Nathan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut inflammation. Our modeling predictions dissect the mechanisms by which effector CD4+ T cell responses contribute to tissue damage in the gut mucosa following immune dysregulation.Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T

  19. [Milestones in understanding the pathogenesis of immunmediated intestinal disorders. Evolution of their diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Arató, András

    2013-09-22

    In the last decades our knowledge has been enormously broadened about the structure and function of the gut associated lymphoid system. It was recognized how intricate and finely tuned connection exists between the gut bacterial flora and the intestinal mucosa. This subtle balance ensures mucosal homeostasis, which has a key role in organ defence against pathogens. However, at the same time this system makes possible the development of oral tolerance toward the commensals and the food antigens. In case of any disturbances in this finely tuned process, immunmediated intestinal disorders may easily develop. The first part of this paper reviews the structure and function of the mucosal immune system, while the second part surveys the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease and cow's milk allergy induced enteropathy.

  20. Bacterial Exposure Induces and Activates Matrilysin in Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Boado, Yolanda S.; Wilson, Carole L.; Hooper, Lora V.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Parks, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Matrilysin, a matrix metalloproteinase, is expressed and secreted lumenally by intact mucosal and glandular epithelia throughout the body, suggesting that its regulation and function are shared among tissues. Because matrilysin is produced in Paneth cells of the murine small intestine, where it participates in innate host defense by activation of prodefensins, we speculated that its expression would be influenced by bacterial exposure. Indeed, acute infection (10–90 min) of human colon, bladder, and lung carcinoma cells, primary human tracheal epithelial cells, and human tracheal explants with type 1–piliated Escherichia coli mediated a marked (25–50-fold) and sustained (>24 h) induction of matrilysin production. In addition, bacterial infection resulted in activation of the zymogen form of the enzyme, which was selectively released at the apical surface. Induction of matrilysin was mediated by a soluble, non-LPS bacterial factor and correlated with the release of defensin-like bacteriocidal activity. Bacteria did not induce matrilysin in other cell types, and expression of other metalloproteinases by epithelial cells was not affected by bacteria. Matrilysin was not detected in germ-free mice, but the enzyme was induced after colonization with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These findings indicate that bacterial exposure is a potent and physiologically relevant signal regulating matrilysin expression in epithelial cells. PMID:10725342

  1. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital.

  2. Peptic activity and gastroduodenal mucosal damage.

    PubMed Central

    Raufman, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    This contribution reviews briefly the history of the discovery and characterization of peptic activity; secretory models and current concepts regarding the regulation of pepsinogen secretion; and evidence that pepsin is a necessary co-factor for gastroduodenal mucosal injury. Several animal studies indicate that peptic activity is required for acid- and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastroduodenal ulceration. A more vigorous approach to the development of anti-peptic drugs for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease is encouraged. Images Figure 1 PMID:9041694

  3. Oral administration of a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit promotes mucosal healing in the colon.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, K J; Royal, J M; Kouokam, J C; Haribabu, B; Jala, V R; Yaddanapudi, K; Hamorsky, K T; Dryden, G W; Matoba, N

    2016-11-02

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a component of a licensed oral cholera vaccine. However, CTB has pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects whose impacts on the gut are not fully understood. Here, we found that oral administration in mice of a plant-made recombinant CTB (CTBp) significantly increased several immune cell populations in the colon lamina propria. Global gene expression analysis revealed that CTBp had more pronounced impacts on the colon than the small intestine, with significant activation of TGFβ-mediated pathways in the colon epithelium. The clinical relevance of CTBp-induced impacts on colonic mucosa was examined. In a human colon epithelial model using Caco2 cells, CTBp, but not the non-GM1-binding mutant G33D-CTBp, induced TGFβ-mediated wound healing. In a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) acute colitis mouse model, oral administration of CTBp protected against colon mucosal damage as manifested by mitigated body weight loss, decreased histopathological scores, and blunted escalation of inflammatory cytokine levels while inducing wound healing-related genes. Furthermore, biweekly oral administration of CTBp significantly reduced disease severity and tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane/DSS model of ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Altogether, these results demonstrate CTBp's ability to enhance mucosal healing in the colon, highlighting its potential application in ulcerative colitis therapy besides cholera vaccination.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 2 November 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.95.

  4. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reaction. 4. Aspirin increased bleeding from a rate on placebo of 1.2 microliters 10 min-1 geometric mean (95% confidence limits) (0.7-1.8) microliters 10 min-1 to 20.0 (11.6-34.2) microliters 10 min-1, (P less than 0.01). The rate of bleeding after aspirin preceded by ethamsylate [14.1 (8.5-23.4) microliters 10 min-1] was not significantly different from that after aspirin alone. 5. We conclude that ethamsylate does not reduce acute aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in healthy humans. PMID:2789070

  5. Galectins in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: Characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shun; Zhao, Honggang; Thongda, Wilawan; Zhang, Dongdong; Su, Baofeng; Yu, Dan; Peatman, Eric; Li, Chao

    2016-02-01

    Galectins, a family of β-galactoside-binding lectins with conserved CRDs, which can recognize the glycans on the surface of viruses, bacteria and protozoan parasites, are emerging as key players in many important pathological processes, including acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmunity and apoptosis. Although galectins have attracted great interest in mammals, they are still poorly-characterized in teleost. Previously, several studies have reported their high expression levels in mucosal tissues before and post infection. Given the important roles for galectins in mucosal immunity, therefore, we characterized the galectin gene family and profiled family member expression after challenge with two different Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Here, twelve galectins genes were captured in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), and phylogenetic analysis showed the strongest relationship to zebrafish and salmon, which is consistent with their phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, the galectin genes were widely expressed in catfish tissues, while most of the galectin genes were strongly expressed in mucosal tissues (skin, gill and intestine). In addition, the expression profiles of galectins after bacterial infection varied depending on both pathogen and tissue type, suggesting that galectins may exert disparate functions or exhibit distinct tissue-selective roles in the host immune response to bacterial pathogens. Further studies are needed, however, to expand functional characterization and examine whether galectins may also play additional physiological roles in catfish immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of BML-111 on the intestinal mucosal barrier in sepsis and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaizheng; Liu, Zuoliang; Zhao, Shangping; Sun, Chuanzheng; Yang, Mingshi

    2015-08-01

    5(S),6(R)-7-trihydroxymethyl heptanoate (BML-111) is an lipoxin A4 receptor agonist, which modulates the immune response and attenuates hemorrhagic shock-induced acute lung injury. However, the role of BML-111 in sepsis and in the intestinal mucosal barrier are not well understood. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of BML-111 on the intestinal mucosal barrier in a rat model of sepsis. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of action of BML-111 was evaluated. The cecal ligation and puncture-induced rat model of sepsis was constructed, and BML-111 was administered at three different doses. The results revealed that BML-111 suppressed the elevation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, while enhancing the elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor-β in the intestine. In addition, BML-111 significantly upregulated rat defensin-5 mRNA expression levels and downregulated the induction of cell apoptosis as well as caspase-3 activity in the intestine. All these results demonstrated that BML-111 exerted protective effects on the intestinal mucosal barrier in sepsis. Further, it was indicated that alterations in the expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 may be one of the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effect of BML-111. The present study therefore suggested that BML-111 may be a novel therapeutic agent for sepsis.

  7. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  8. Rhubarb extract partially improves mucosal integrity in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Juliana E; Eden, Georgina L; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Pei, Jinxin V; Yool, Andrea J; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of orally gavaged aqueous rhubarb extract (RE) on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis in rats. METHODS Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged daily (1 mL) with water, high-dose RE (HDR; 200 mg/kg) or low-dose RE (LDR; 20mg/kg) for eight days. Intestinal mucositis was induced (day 5) with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) via intraperitoneal injection. Intestinal tissue samples were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histological examination. Xenopus oocytes expressing aquaporin 4 water channels were prepared to examine the effect of aqueous RE on cell volume, indicating a potential mechanism responsible for modulating net fluid absorption and secretion in the gastrointestinal tract. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. RESULTS Bodyweight was significantly reduced in rats administered 5-FU compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). Rats administered 5-FU significantly increased intestinal MPO levels (≥ 307%; P < 0.001), compared to healthy controls. However, LDR attenuated this effect in 5-FU treated rats, significantly decreasing ileal MPO activity (by 45%; P < 0.05), as compared to 5-FU controls. 5-FU significantly reduced intestinal mucosal thickness (by ≥ 29% P < 0.001) as compared to healthy controls. LDR significantly increased ileal mucosal thickness in 5-FU treated rats (19%; P < 0.05) relative to 5-FU controls. In xenopus oocytes expressing AQP4 water channels, RE selectively blocked water influx into the cell, induced by a decrease in external osmotic pressure. As water efflux was unaltered by the presence of extracellular RE, the directional flow of water across the epithelial barrier, in the presence of extracellular RE, indicated that RE may alleviate water loss across the epithelial barrier and promote intestinal health in chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. CONCLUSION In summary, low dose RE improves selected parameters of mucosal integrity and reduces ileal

  9. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Onodera, Kei; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the environment, and the immune system. Recently, some studies provided strong evidence that the process of autophagy affects several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Autophagy is a cellular stress response that plays key roles in physiological processes, such as innate and adaptive immunity, adaptation to starvation, degradation of aberrant proteins or organelles, antimicrobial defense, and protein secretion. Dysfunctional autophagy is recognized as a contributing factor in many chronic inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Autophagy plays multiple roles in IBD pathogenesis by altering processes that include intracellular bacterial killing, antimicrobial peptide secretion by Paneth cells, goblet cell function, proinflammatory cytokine production by macrophages, antigen presentation by dendritic cells, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in enterocytes. Recent studies have identified susceptibility genes involved in autophagy, such as NOD2, ATG16L1, and IRGM, and active research is ongoing all over the world. The aim of this review is a systematic appraisal of the current literature to provide a better understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of IBD. Understanding these mechanisms will bring about new strategies for the treatment and prevention of IBD. PMID:28373760

  10. Efficacy of Enteral Supplementation Enriched with Glutamine, Fiber, and Oligosaccharide on Mucosal Injury following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Tatsumi, Hiroomi; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Ibata, Soushi; Ono, Kaoru; Murase, Kazuyuki; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Yasushi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Miyanishi, Koji; Akizuki, Emi; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Mizugichi, Toru; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Kato, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The combination of glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharides (GFO) is thought to be beneficial for alleviating gastrointestinal mucosal damage caused by chemotherapy. A commercial enteral supplementation product (GFO) enriched with these 3 components is available in Japan. We performed a retrospective study to test whether oral GFO decreased the severity of mucosal injury following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of 44 HSCT patients, 22 received GFO and 22 did not. Severity of diarrhea/mucositis, overall survival, weight loss, febrile illness/documented infection, intravenous hyperalimentation days/hospital days, engraftment, acute and chronic GVHD, and cumulative incidence of relapse were studied. Sex, age, performance status, diagnosis, disease status, and treatment variables were similar in both groups. There were fewer days of diarrhea grade 3–4 in patients receiving GFO than in those who did not (0.86 vs. 3.27 days); the same was true for days of mucositis grade 3–4 (3.86 vs. 6.00 days). Survival at day 100 was 100% in the GFO group, but only 77.3% for the patients not receiving GFO (p = 0.0091, log-rank test). Weight loss and the number of days of intravenous hyperalimentation were better in the GFO group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.0014, respectively). Although not significant, less gut bacterial translocation with Enterococcus species developed in the GFO group (p = 0.0728) than in the non-GFO group. Other outcomes were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative clinical study of GFO supplementation to alleviate mucosal injury after allo-HSCT. We conclude that glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharide supplementation is an effective supportive therapy to decrease the severity of mucosal damage in HSCT. PMID:25493082

  11. Gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: down-regulation of nitric oxide synthase-2 and caspase-3 by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Slomiany, A

    1999-07-22

    We applied the animal model of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide-induced gastritis to assess the effect of antiulcer agent, sulglycotide, on the mucosal inflammatory responses by analyzing the interplay between the activity of a key apoptotic caspase, caspase-3, epithelial cell apoptosis, and the expression of constitutive (cNOS) and inducible (NOS-2) nitric oxide synthase. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide applied intragastrically elicited within 4 days a pattern of mucosal responses resembling that of acute gastritis. This was accompanied by an 11.2-fold increase in epithelial cell apoptosis, a 6.5-fold induction in mucosal expression of NOS-2 and a 2.2-fold decline in cNOS, and a 5.4-fold increase in caspase-3 activity. Treatment with sulglycotide led to a 56.7% reduction in the extent of mucosal inflammatory changes elicited by H. pylori lipopolysaccharide and an 88.3% decrease in the epithelial cells apoptosis. Furthermore, this effect of sulglycotide was associated with a 51% decrease in mucosal expression of caspase-3 activity, a 73.7% decline in NOS-2, and a 64.1% increase in cNOS. The findings suggest that sulglycotide suppresses the H. pylori-induced mucosal inflammatory responses by up-regulating cNOS and interfering with the events propagated by NOS-2 and caspase-3.

  12. Gastric acid response to acute exposure to hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The influence of environmental stressors on the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease has received increased awareness. Stress affects different physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow. Repeated exposures of rapid-onset, highly-sustained hypergravity cause severe physical stress in the pilot. Although the effects of exposure to hypergravity on cardiovascular and cerebral functions have been the subjects of numerous studies, crucial information regarding pathophysiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract following hypergravity exposure is lacking. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute exposure to hypergravity on gastric secretory activity and gastrin release. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to +10Gz three times for 3 min. Gastric juice and blood were collected. The volume and total acidity of gastric juice, and the plasma gastrin level was measured. Acute exposure to +10Gz significantly decreased the gastric juice parameters. The gastric juice volume and total acidity of hypergravity-exposed rats were 3.54 ± 0.32 mL/100 g and 84.90 ± 5.17 mEq/L, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of the nonexposed rats (4.62 ± 0.39 mL/100 g and 97.37 ± 5.42 mEq/L; P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, plasma gastrin level was not significantly altered following hypergravity exposure. We demonstrated that acute exposure to hypergravity led to a significant decrease in the gastric juice volume and acidity but did not alter the plasma gastrin level. PMID:27992379

  13. The development of mucosal vaccines for both mucosal and systemic immune induction and the roles played by adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is the most successful immunological practice that improves the quality of human life and health. Vaccine materials include antigens of pathogens and adjuvants potentiating the effectiveness of vaccination. Vaccines are categorized using various criteria, including the vaccination material used and the method of administration. Traditionally, vaccines have been injected via needles. However, given that most pathogens first infect mucosal surfaces, there is increasing interest in the establishment of protective mucosal immunity, achieved by vaccination via mucosal routes. This review summarizes recent developments in mucosal vaccines and their associated adjuvants. PMID:28168169

  14. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  15. Th17 cells and Mucosal Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Shean J.; Dubin, Patricia J.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Th17 cells are a new lineage of T-cells that are controlled by the transcription factor RORγt and develop independent of GATA-3, T-bet, Stat 4 and Stat 6. Novel effector molecules produced by these cells include IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and IL-26. IL-17RA binds IL-17A and IL-17F and is critical for host defense against extracellular planktonic bacteria by regulating chemokine gradients for neutrophil emigration into infected tissue sites as well as host granulopoiesis. Moreover IL-17 and IL-22 regulate the production of antimicrobial proteins in mucosal epithelium. Although TGF-β1 and IL-6 have been shown to be critical for development of Th17 cells from naïve precursors, IL-23 is also important in regulating IL-17 release in mucosal tissues in response to infectious stimuli. Compared to Th1 cells, IL-23 and IL-17 show limited roles in controlling host defense against primary infections with intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggesting a predominate role of the Th17 lineage in host defense against extracellular pathogens. However in the setting of chronic biofilm infections, as that occurs with Cystic Fibrosis or bronchetctasis, Th17 cells may be key contributors of tissue injury. PMID:18054248

  16. IL-36R signalling activates intestinal epithelial cells and fibroblasts and promotes mucosal healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Kristina; Backert, Ingo; Wirtz, Stefan; Hueber, Axel; Schett, Georg; Vieth, Michael; Probst, Hans Christian; Bopp, Tobias; Neurath, Markus F; Neufert, Clemens

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36R signalling plays a proinflammatory role in different organs including the skin, but the expression of IL-36R ligands and their molecular function in intestinal inflammation are largely unknown. We studied the characteristics of IL-36R ligand expression in IBDs and experimental colitis. The functional role of IL-36R signalling in the intestine was addressed in experimental colitis and wound healing models in vivo by using mice with defective IL-36R signalling (IL-36R-/-) or Myd88, neutralising anti-IL-36R antibodies, recombinant IL-36R ligands and RNA-seq genome expression analysis. Expression of IL-36α and IL-36γ was significantly elevated in active human IBD and experimental colitis. While IL-36γ was predominantly detected in nuclei of the intestinal epithelium, IL-36α was mainly found in the cytoplasm of CD14(+) inflammatory macrophages. Functional studies showed that defective IL-36R signalling causes high susceptibility to acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis and impairs wound healing. Mechanistically, IL-36R ligands released upon mucosal damage activated IL-36R(+) colonic fibroblasts via Myd88 thereby inducing expression of chemokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-6. Moreover, they induced proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and expression of the antimicrobial protein lipocalin 2. Finally, treatment of experimental intestinal wounds with IL-36R ligands significantly accelerated mucosal healing in vivo. IL-36R signalling is activated upon intestinal damage, stimulates IECs and fibroblasts and drives mucosal healing. Modulation of the IL-36R pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic strategy for induction of mucosal healing in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  18. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-06-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes.

  19. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula.

  20. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B.; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  1. Bovine viral diarrhoea: pathogenesis and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Hill, Fraser I; Reichel, Michael P; Brownlie, Joe

    2014-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is the most prevalent infectious disease of cattle. It causes financial losses from a variety of clinical manifestations and is the subject of a number of mitigation and eradication schemes around the world. The pathogenesis of BVDV infection is complex, with infection pre- and post-gestation leading to different outcomes. Infection of the dam during gestation results in fetal infection, which may lead to embryonic death, teratogenic effects or the birth of persistently infected (PI) calves. PI animals shed BVDV in their excretions and secretions throughout life and are the primary route of transmission of the virus. These animals can usually be readily detected by virus or viral antigen detection assays (RT-PCR, ELISA), except in the immediate post-natal period where colostral antibodies may mask virus presence. PI calves in utero (the 'Trojan cow' scenario) currently defy detection with available diagnostic tests, although dams carrying PI calves have been shown to have higher antibody levels than seropositive cows carrying non-PI calves. Acute infection with BVDV results in transient viraemia prior to seroconversion and can lead to reproductive dysfunction and immunosuppression leading to an increased incidence of secondary disease. Antibody assays readily detect virus exposure at the individual level and can also be used in pooled samples (serum and milk) to determine herd exposure or immunity. Diagnostic tests can be used to diagnose clinical cases, establish disease prevalence in groups and detect apparently normal but persistently infected animals. This review outlines the pathogenesis and pathology of BVD viral infection and uses this knowledge to select the best diagnostic tests for clinical diagnosis, monitoring, control and eradication efforts. Test methods, types of samples and problems areas of BVDV diagnosis are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in patients receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sarrión-Pérez, Maria G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy). It is an inflammatory process that affects the mucosa of the oral cavity, giving rise to erythematous areas in combination with ulcers that can reach a large size. The true importance of oral mucositis is the complications it causes – fundamentally intense pain associated to the oral ulcers, and the risk of overinfection. This in turn may require reduction or even suspension of the antineoplastic treatment, with the risk of seriously worsening the patient prognosis. This points to the importance of establishing therapeutic tools of use in the prevention and/or treatment of mucositis. The present study offers a literature review of all the articles published over the last 10 years referred to the prevention and/or treatment of oral mucositis associated to chemotherapy. Key words:Oral mucositis, management, prevention, treatment, chemotherapy. PMID:24596640

  3. Recent progress in HIV vaccines inducing mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Rochereau, Nicolas; Lawrence, Philip; Girard, Marc P; Genin, Christian; Verrier, Bernard; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-07-31

    In spite of several attempts over many years at developing a HIV vaccine based on classical strategies, none has convincingly succeeded to date. As HIV is transmitted primarily by the mucosal route, particularly through sexual intercourse, understanding antiviral immunity at mucosal sites is of major importance. An ideal vaccine should elicit HIV-specific antibodies and mucosal CD8⁺ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) as a first line of defense at a very early stage of HIV infection, before the virus can disseminate into the secondary lymphoid organs in mucosal and systemic tissues. A primary focus of HIV preventive vaccine research is therefore the induction of protective immune responses in these crucial early stages of HIV infection. Numerous approaches are being studied in the field, including building upon the recent RV144 clinical trial. In this article, we will review current strategies and briefly discuss the use of adjuvants in designing HIV vaccines that induce mucosal immune responses.

  4. Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed Esmat; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2017-05-07

    The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves rad