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Sample records for acute mycoplasma pneumoniae

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  2. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aram; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Cho, Joong Bum; Kim, Yae-Jean; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Choe, Yon Ho

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for approximately 20% to 30% of community-acquired pneumonia, and is well known for its diverse extrapulmonary manifestations. However, acute necrotizing pancreatits is an extremely rare extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infection. A 6-year-old girl was admitted due to abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, and confused mentality. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was diagnosed according to symptoms, laboratory test results, and abdominal computed tomography scans. M. pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a 4-fold increase in antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by particle agglutination antibody assay. No other etiologic factors or pathogens were detected. Despite the occurrence of a large infected pseudocyst during the course, the patient was able to discharge without morbidity by early aggressive supportive care. This is the first case in Korea of a child with acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with M. pneumoniae infection. PMID:26473143

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an aetiological agent of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy.

    PubMed

    Di Lernia, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy (AHEI) is considered a separate clinical entity among cutaneous small vessel vasculitis of childhood. It usually occurs in children younger than 2 years of age, with spontaneous recovery occurring within a few weeks. A history of recent upper respiratory or urinary tract infections or immunisation is found in most patients. Although Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been linked to a wide array of skin eruptions or diseases, it is not recognised as a possible cause of acute haemorrhagic oedema of infancy. The authors report a child with AHEI and a concurrent M. pneumoniae infection.

  4. Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion Therapy for Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Motoo Ogino, Hiroyuki; Shimohira, Masashi; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-05-15

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was treated in an 8-year-old girl. She experienced acute pancreatitis during treatment for M. pneumoniae. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed necrotizing pancreatitis. The computed tomographic severity index was 8 points (grade E). A protease inhibitor, ulinastatin, was provided via intravenous infusion but was ineffective. Continuous regional arterial infusion therapy was provided with gabexate mesilate (FOY-007, a protease inhibitor) and meropenem trihydrate, and the pancreatitis improved. This case suggests that infusion therapy is safe and useful in treating necrotizing pancreatitis in children.

  5. Relevance of serology for Mycoplasma pneumoniae diagnosis compared with PCR and culture in acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Raafat, Doaa; El Metaal, Amal Abd

    2009-01-01

    We studied Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the etiologic pathogen in acute exacerbations of asthma and the value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), culture, and serologic tests for its accurate diagnosis. For the study, 59 nonsmoking patients with asthma (37 females, 22 males; age, 15-50 years) underwent clinical, radiologic, and laboratory examinations. Bacteria isolated from sputum were Streptococcus pneumoniae (32 [54%]), Staphylococcus aureus (23 [39%]), and M pneumoniae (5 [15%]). All M pneumoniae were associated with S pneumoniae (8/32 [25%]) and S aureus (1/23 [4%]). No M pneumoniae were isolated as single pathogens. Serologic testing for M pneumoniae revealed that all samples were positive for specific IgG; 40 (68%) had a high titer, and 19 (32%) had a moderate titer. Of 59 samples, 29 (49%) were positive by Serodia Myco II gelatin particle testing (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). PCR was positive in 25 samples, all of which had a high IgG titer; all culture-positive cases were PCR+. M pneumoniae is a common bacterial pathogen associated with acute exacerbations of asthma in people 15 years or older. Prompt laboratory diagnosis of M pneumoniae requires direct detection by PCR and culture. A high serologic titer can be a clue for the presence of M pneumoniae.

  6. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  7. The History of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    In the United States in the 1930s, although the pathogen was not known, atypical pneumonia was clinically distinguished from pneumococcal pneumonia by its resistance to sulfonamides. Reimann (1938) reported seven patients with an unusual form of tracheo bronchopneumonia and severe constitutional symptoms. He believed the clinical picture of this disease differed from that of the disease caused by influenza viruses or known bacteria and instead suspected "primary atypical pneumonia." For many years, the responsible infectious agent was tentatively classified as a filterable virus that could pass through a Seitz filter to remove bacteria and was reported to be a psittacosis-like or new virus. After that, Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) identified an agent that was the principal cause of primary atypical pneumonia using cotton rats, hamsters, and chick embryos. Eaton et al. (1942, 1944, 1945) did not perform an inoculation study in human volunteers. During the 1940s, there were three groups engaged in discovering the etiology of the primary atypical pneumonia. (1) Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases Diseases directed by John Dingle, (2) Dr. Monroe Eaton's group, the Virus Research Laboratory of the California State Public Health Department, (3) The Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research directed by Horsfall. During 1940s, the members of the Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases concluded that the bacteria-free filtrates obtained from the patients, presumably containing a virus, could induce primary atypical pneumonia in human volunteers via Pinehurst trials. During 1950s, serological approaches for identification of the Eaton agent developed such as Fluorescent-Stainable Antibody, and at the beginning of the1960s, the Eaton agent successfully grew in media, and finally accepted as a cause of primary atypical pneumonia. Thus, technical difficulties with visualizing the agent and failure to recognize the full significance of the Pinehurst

  8. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae meningoencephalitis in a young adult].

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Marcelo; D'Giano, Carlos; Goicoechea, María Teresa; Morello, Fernando; Salsamendi, Paz; Mora, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections have extrapulmonary complications that involve the nervous system. The neurologic manifestations are diverse. Although the prognosis is usually favorable, the patients can undergo severe permanent sequelae. We present a young female adult with acute meningoencephalitis as a complication of a lower respiratory infection, which followed a benign course without neurologic sequelae.

  9. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a cause of febrile hemolytic anemia in travelers].

    PubMed

    Ficko, C; Andriamanantena, D; Flateau, F; Mangouka, L; Soler, C; Carmoi, T; Rapp, C

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause varied hematologic manifestations that are frequently associated with lower respiratory tract infections. Acute febrile hemolysis without respiratory symptoms is quite rare. We describe the case of a 25-year-old man, admitted for acute fever with hemolysis, after returning from Djibouti. M. pneumoniae infection was proved by serological testing. A favorable outcome followed macrolide treatment. PMID:23352983

  10. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Gretchen L; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, "walking" pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  11. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae associated organising pneumonia in a 10 year old boy.

    PubMed

    Wachowski, O; Demirakça, S; Müller, K-M; Scheurlen, W

    2003-03-01

    We describe a 10 year old boy with organising pneumonia associated with acute Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The diagnosis of organising pneumonia was made by open lung biopsy and the M pneumoniae infection was proven serologically. Antibiotic and long term corticosteroid treatment resulted in steadily improving pulmonary function monitored by spirometry. The introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment with NSAIDs/immunosuppressive agents in order to spare steroids was well tolerated and resulted in further improvement of the pulmonary function. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae associated organising pneumonia to be reported in a child.

  13. Accuracy of IgM antibody testing, FQ-PCR and culture in laboratory diagnosis of acute infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adults and adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adults and adolescents is hampered by a lack of rapid and standardized tests for detection. Methods CAP patients from 12 teaching hospitals were prospectively and consecutively recruited. Basic and clinical information, throat swabs and paired sera were collected. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected by IgG and IgM antibody tests, fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) and culture. A comparative study of the diagnostic values of three methods, including sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was conducted. A fourfold or greater increase of IgG antibody titers of paired sera was set as the diagnostic “gold standard”. Results One hundred and twenty-five CAP patients (52.8% males, median age 47 years, range 14–85) were enrolled. Twenty-seven (21.6%) patients were diagnosed with acute Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections by the “gold standard”. Specificity values of all three methods were around 90%. An increasing trend of sensitivity, positive predictive value and PLR was found, with the lowest in IgM testing (7.4%, 28.6% and 1.45), intermediate in FQ-PCR (40.7%, 50% and 3.63), and highest in culture (55.6%, 75% and 10.9). Conclusions In the defined group of patients, there was a good agreement between positive rate of MP cultivation of throat swabs and acute M. pneumoniae infection (PLR of 10.9). Since the sensitivity is low in all of the evaluated methods, the logical approach would be to incorporate PCR, culture and serological tests for optimum diagnosis of acute Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in adults and adolescents. PMID:23578215

  14. [Severe haemolysis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Anne Lisbeth; Aagaard, Thomas Granum; Birgens, Henrik; Søborg, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is naturally resistant to betalactamase antibiotics but is sensitive to macrolides. Occasionally, infections with M. pneumoniae can lead to severe anaemia due to its ability to cause haemolysis when cold agglutination occurs. Increasing bacterial resistance to macrolid antibiotics is a growing concern worldwide. We present two cases where infection with M. pneumoniae caused severe haemolysis, one of which was macrolide-resistant.

  15. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  16. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  17. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011-2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50-90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if the

  18. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections in Japan and Therapeutic Strategies for Macrolide-Resistant M. pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia) is a major cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is important for etiological and epidemiological studies of acute respiratory infections. In Japan, nation-wide surveillance of M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been conducted as a part of the National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) program. This surveillance started in 1981, and significant increases in the numbers of M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients were noted in 1984, 1988, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2015. The epidemics in 2011 and 2012 were particularly widespread and motivated researchers to conduct detailed epidemiological studies, including genotyping and drug resistance analyses of M. pneumoniae isolates. The genotyping studies based on the p1 gene sequence suggested that the p1 gene type 1 lineage has been dominant in Japan since 2003, including the epidemic period during 2011–2012. However, more detailed p1 typing analysis is required to determine whether the type 2 lineages become more relevant after the dominance of the type 1 lineage. There has been extensive research interest in implications of the p1 gene types on the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae infections. Serological characterizations of sera from patients have provided a glimpse into these associations, showing the presence of type specific antibody in the patient sera. Another important epidemiological issue of M. pneumoniae pneumonia is the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MRMP). MRMPs were noted among clinical isolates in Japan after 2000. At present, the isolation rate of MRMPs from pediatric patients is estimated at 50–90% in Japan, depending on the specific location. In view of the situation, Japanese societies have issued guiding principles for treating M. pneumoniae pneumonia. In these guiding principles, macrolides are still recommended as the first-line drug, however, if

  19. Complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ben; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Young Jin; Son, Byong Kwan; Lim, Myung Kwan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who developed left hemiparesis and left facial palsy, 6 days after the initiation of fever and respiratory symptoms due to pneumonia. Chest radiography, conducted upon admission, showed pneumonic infiltration and pleural effusion in the left lung field. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Brain magnetic resonance angiography and transfemoral cerebral angiography revealed complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was identified by a 4-fold increase in IgG antibodies to M. pneumoniae between acute and convalescent sera by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fibrinogen and D-dimer levels were elevated, while laboratory exams in order to identify other predisposing factors of pediatric stroke were all negative. This is the first reported pediatric case in English literature of a M. pneumoniae-associated cerebral infarction involving complete occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. PMID:27186223

  20. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verschoor, Chris P.; Bowdish, Dawn M.E.; Provias, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We report a case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection as one possible trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome (acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis), a rare disorder of microvascular injury often described as a postinfectious complication of an upper respiratory illness. Methods: This is a case of a 27-year-old man presenting with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 and an acute head CT revealing extensive vasogenic edema in the right hemisphere associated with mass effect in the context of a recent upper respiratory illness. Right frontal biopsy was performed on day 2, which showed acute cerebritis, and the patient was aggressively treated with antibiotics. However, over the next 5 days from presentation, the vasogenic edema increased, leading ultimately to brain herniation and death. Results: A full autopsy was performed at 5 days from presentation, which showed areas of vessel wall fibrinoid necrosis throughout the right hemisphere as well as, but less so, in the left frontal lobe and pons. Chest x-ray on presentation revealed atypical pneumonia, blood tests were positive for cold agglutinins, and at full autopsy, there was myocarditis, all in keeping with recent M pneumoniae infection. DNA obtained from lung and diseased brain (postmortem) was positive for Mycoplasma providing more direct evidence for brain invasion by this organism as the ultimate trigger for Weston Hurst syndrome. Conclusions: This is a rare case report of Weston Hurst syndrome having both initial brain biopsy on day 2 and full autopsy results on day 5 of presentation revealing important clinical clues about the pathogenesis of this often fatal disorder. PMID:26819961

  2. Serological study of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections.

    PubMed

    Srifuengfung, Somporn; Techachaiwiwat, Wanida; Dhiraputra, Chertsak

    2004-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody was determined in 811 sera of different patients admitted to Siriraj Hospital with respiratory tract infection from July 1, 2000 to August 31, 2003 by agglutination with gelatin particle agglutination test kit (SERODIA-MYCO II, Fujirebio Inc. Japan) in microtiter plates. Three hundred and three sera were positive (37.36%). The five most positive titer were found in patients 5-9 yr (40.26%), followed by patients 1-4 yr (24.75%), 10-14 yr (19.80%), 30-39 yr (5.28%) and 20-29 yr (3.96%). The positive titers ranged from 40 to > 20,480. Female:male ratio in positive patients was approximately the same (1.19:1). High titers (> or = 320) were found in 146 out of 303 patients (48.18%). The infection was mostly found in children aged 5-9 yr. Detection of antibody to M. pneumoniae infection showed that 37.36% of patients who were suspected of having atypical bacterial pneumonia were positive.

  3. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Warren L; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases.

  4. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  5. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  6. Isothermal Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Directly from Respiratory Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Brianna L.; Wolff, Bernard J.; DeLaney, Alexandra A.; Diaz, Maureen H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) across patient populations of all ages. We have developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that enables rapid, low-cost detection of M. pneumoniae from nucleic acid extracts and directly from various respiratory specimen types. The assay implements calcein to facilitate simple visual readout of positive results in approximately 1 h, making it ideal for use in primary care facilities and resource-poor settings. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 100 fg by testing serial dilutions of target DNA ranging from 1 ng to 1 fg per reaction, and no cross-reactivity was observed against 17 other Mycoplasma species, 27 common respiratory agents, or human DNA. We demonstrated the utility of this assay by testing nucleic acid extracts (n = 252) and unextracted respiratory specimens (n = 72) collected during M. pneumoniae outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring in the United States from February 2010 to January 2014. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 88.5% tested on extracted nucleic acid and 82.1% evaluated on unextracted clinical specimens compared to a validated real-time PCR test. Further optimization and improvements to this method may lead to the availability of a rapid, cost-efficient laboratory test for M. pneumoniae detection that is more widely available to primary care facilities, ultimately facilitating prompt detection and appropriate responses to potential M. pneumoniae outbreaks and clusters within the community. PMID:26179304

  7. Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in HIV-infected patients using a microparticle agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Vengatesan, A; Kownhar, Hayath; Solomon, Suniti; Rao, Usha Anand

    2006-06-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is increasingly recognized as a common and important pathogen in community settings, and is responsible for various pulmonary and extrapulmonary conditions in the normal population. However, the seroepidemiology of acute M. pneumoniae infection in HIV-infected individuals is still unclear worldwide. This study examined the seroprevalence of antibodies to M. pneumoniae in HIV-infected patients admitted with respiratory complaints at a tertiary AIDS care centre in Chennai, India. A commercial gelatin microparticle agglutination test (Serodia-Myco II, Fujirebio) was used for the determination of antibodies against M. pneumoniae in acute serum specimens. Of the 200 HIV-infected patients with underlying pulmonary conditions tested, 34 (17 % positivity; 95 % CI 12-23 %) had antibodies specific to M. pneumoniae, while among the 40 patients with no underlying pulmonary symptoms, five (12.5 % positivity; 95 % CI 4-27 %) had evidence of anti-M. pneumoniae antibody. This shows that the incidence of M. pneumoniae seropositivity is greater in patients with underlying pulmonary complaints. Most positive titres were found in the age group 28-37 years in the symptomatic and symptom-free groups (64.7 and 60 %, respectively). The positive titres ranged from 40 to >20 480. High titres (> or =320) were found in 10 out of the 39 patients (25.6 %). This seroprevalence study reports a 16.2 % prevalence of M. pneumoniae infections in HIV-infected patients by a particle agglutination test.

  8. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques and Serological Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Loens, Katherine; Ieven, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) belongs to the class Mollicutes and has been recognized as a common cause of respiratory tract infections (RTIs), including community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), that occur worldwide and in all age groups. In addition, M. pneumoniae can simultaneously or sequentially lead to damage in the nervous system and has been associated with a wide variety of other acute and chronic diseases. During the past 10 years, the proportion of LRTI in children and adults, associated with M. pneumoniae infection has ranged from 0 to more than 50%. This variation is due to the age and the geographic location of the population examined but also due to the diagnostic methods used. The true role of M. pneumoniae in RTIs remains a challenge given the many limitations and lack of standardization of the applied diagnostic tool in most cases, with resultant wide variations in data from different studies. Correct and rapid diagnosis and/or management of M. pneumoniae infections is, however, critical to initiate appropriate antibiotic treatment and is nowadays usually done by PCR and/or serology. Several recent reviews, have summarized current methods for the detection and identification of M. pneumoniae. This review will therefore provide a look at the general principles, advantages, diagnostic value, and limitations of the most currently used detection techniques for the etiological diagnosis of a M. pneumoniae infection as they evolve from research to daily practice. PMID:27064893

  9. A serological investigation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Joosting, A C; Harwin, R M; Coppin, A; Battaglia, P; van der Hoef, P

    1976-12-18

    Sera from patients with respiratory disease were examined for antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae by complement fixation test. During the study period of about 6 years, a 3-year cycle of infection was observed, which coincided with some epidemics in the UK and USA, suggesting the possibility of an approximately simultaneous world-wide spread. The epidemics lasted about 18 months each, during which the incidence of infection was over 10 times that of the interepidemic periods.

  10. Infection with and Carriage of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Children

    PubMed Central

    Meyer Sauteur, Patrick M.; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Nadal, David; Berger, Christoph; Vink, Cornelis; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.

    2016-01-01

    “Atypical” pneumonia was described as a distinct and mild form of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) already before Mycoplasma pneumoniae had been discovered and recognized as its cause. M. pneumoniae is detected in CAP patients most frequently among school-aged children from 5 to 15 years of age, with a decline after adolescence and tapering off in adulthood. Detection rates by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or serology in children with CAP admitted to the hospital amount 4–39%. Although the infection is generally mild and self-limiting, patients of every age can develop severe or extrapulmonary disease. Recent studies indicate that high rates of healthy children carry M. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract and that current diagnostic PCR or serology cannot discriminate between M. pneumoniae infection and carriage. Further, symptoms and radiologic features are not specific for M. pneumoniae infection. Thus, patients may be unnecessarily treated with antimicrobials against M. pneumoniae. Macrolides are the first-line antibiotics for this entity in children younger than 8 years of age. Overall macrolides are extensively used worldwide, and this has led to the emergence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, which may be associated with severe clinical features and more extrapulmonary complications. This review focuses on the characteristics of M. pneumoniae infections in children, and exemplifies that simple clinical decision rules may help identifying children at high risk for CAP due to M. pneumoniae. This may aid physicians in prescribing appropriate first-line antibiotics, since current diagnostic tests for M. pneumoniae infection are not reliably predictive. PMID:27047456

  11. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia.

  12. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  13. Manifestations and complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae disease: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lind, K.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the annual number of reports on extrapulmonary symptoms during Mycoplasma (M.) pneumoniae disease has increased. Clinical and epidemiological data indicate that symptoms from the skin and mucous membranes, from the central nervous system, from the heart, and perhaps from other organs as well are not quite uncommon manifestations of M. pneumoniae disease. Reports on unusual courses of the disease have also accumulated, including cases of severe respiratory symptoms, sometimes seen in patients with underlying disease or with a concomitant viral infection. Serious extrapulmonary manifestations have been common in fatal cases of M. pneumoniae disease. Some observations and experimental data on these manifestations and on the possible pathogenic mechanisms are dealt with. The conclusion is that such mechanisms are still largely unknown. PMID:6433567

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae caused different microbial structure and correlation network in lung microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heping; Dai, Wenkui; Qiu, Chuangzhao; Li, Shuaicheng; Wang, Wenjian; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Hongmei; Li, Yuzheng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Xin; Zhou, Qian; Han, Lijuan; Li, Yinhu

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most serious diseases for children, with which lung microbiota are proved to be associated. We performed 16S rDNA analysis on broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for 32 children with tracheomalacia (C group), pneumonia infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (D1 group) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) (D2 group). Children with tracheomalacia held lower microbial diversity and accumulated Lactococcus (mean ± SD, 45.21%±5.07%, P value <0.05), Porphyromonas (0.12%±0.31%, P value <0.05). D1 and D2 group were enriched by Streptococcus (7.57%±11.61%, P value <0.01 when compared with D2 group) and Mycoplasma (0.67%±1.25%, P value <0.01) respectively. Bacterial correlation in C group was mainly intermediated by Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. Whilst, D1 group harbored simplest microbial correlation in three groups, and D2 group held the most complicated network, involving enriched Staphylococcus (0.26%±0.71%), Massilia (0.81%±2.42%). This will be of significance for understanding pneumonia incidence and progression more comprehensively, and discerning between bacterial infection and carriage. PMID:27293852

  15. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  16. Correlation between Radiological and Pathological Findings in Patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Studies focused on the pathological–radiological correlation of human Mycoplasma (M) pneumoniae pneumonia have rarely been reported. Therefore, we extensively reviewed the literature regarding pathological and radiological studies of Mycoplasma pneumonia, and compared findings between open lung biopsy specimen and computed tomography (CT). Major three correlations were summarized. (1) Peribronchial and perivascular cuffing characterized by mononuclear cells infiltration was correlated with bronchovascular bundles thickening on CT, which was the most common finding of this pneumonia. (2) Cellular bronchitis in the small airways accompanied with exudates or granulation tissue in the lumen revealed as centrilobular nodules on CT. (3) Neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen radiologically demonstrated as air-space consolidation or ground-glass opacities. In M. pulmonis-infected mice model, pathologic patterns are strikingly different according to host cell-mediated immunity (CMI) levels; treatment with interleukin-2 lead to marked cellular bronchitis in the small airways and treatment with prednisolone or cyclosporin-A lead to neutrophils and exudates in the alveolar lumen. Patients with centrilobular nodules predominant radiologic pattern have a high level of CMI, measuring by tuberculin skin test. From these findings, up-regulation of host CMI could change radiological pattern to centrilobular nodules predominant, on the other hand down-regulation of host CMI would change radiological pattern to ground-glass opacity and consolidation. It was suggested the pathological features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia may be altered by the level of host CMI. PMID:27242720

  17. Antimicrobial and immunologic activities of clarithromycin in a murine model of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Robert D; Rios, Ana Maria; Chavez-Bueno, Susana; Jafri, Hasan S; Hatfield, Jeanine; Rogers, Beverly B; McCracken, George H; Ramilo, Octavio

    2003-05-01

    Because macrolide antibiotics are hypothesized to possess immunomodulatory activity independent of their antimicrobial activity, we evaluated the immunomodulatory effect of clarithromycin in a murine model of lung inflammation induced by either live or UV-killed Mycoplasma pneumoniae. BALB/c mice were intranasally inoculated once with live or UV-killed M. pneumoniae. Clarithromycin (25 mg/kg of body weight) or placebo was subcutaneously administered once daily in both groups of mice. In mice infected with live M. pneumoniae, clarithromycin treatment significantly reduced quantitative M. pneumoniae bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) culture, pulmonary histopathologic scores (HPS), and airway resistance-obstruction (as measured by plethysmography) compared with placebo. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, gamma interferon, interleukin-6 (IL-6), mouse KC (functional IL-8), JE/MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha in BAL fluid were also significantly decreased in mice infected with live M. pneumoniae given clarithromycin. In contrast, mice inoculated with UV-killed M. pneumoniae had no significant reduction in HPS, airway resistance-obstruction, or BAL cytokine or chemokine concentrations in response to clarithromycin administration. Clarithromycin therapy demonstrated beneficial effects (microbiologic, histologic, respiratory, and immunologic) on pneumonia in the mice infected with live M. pneumoniae; this was not observed in the mice inoculated with UV-killed M. pneumoniae.

  18. Novel aspects on the pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Nakagaki, Kazuhide; Sasaki, Yoshiko; Niwa, Shoichi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Nunokawa, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Kosuke; Tsujimoto, Naoki; Hirao, Susumu; Wada, Hiroo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Nakata, Koh; Kimura, Hirokazu; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia. Knowledge regarding Mp pneumonia obtained from animal models or human subjects has been discussed in many different reports. Accumulated expertise concerning this critical issue has been hard to apply clinically, and potential problems may remain undiscovered. Therefore, our multidisciplinary team extensively reviewed the literature regarding Mp pneumonia, and compared findings from animal models with those from human subjects. In human beings, the characteristic pathological features of Mp pneumonia have been reported as alveolar infiltration with neutrophils and lymphocytes and lymphocyte/plasma cell infiltrates in the peri-bronchovascular area. Herein, we demonstrated the novel aspects of Mp pneumonia that the severity of the Mp pneumonia seemed to depend on the host innate immunity to the Mp, which might be accelerated by antecedent Mp exposure (re-exposure or latent respiratory infection) through up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 expression on bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. The macrolides therapy might be beneficial for the patients with macrolide-resistant Mp pneumonia via not bacteriological but immunomodulative effects. This exhaustive review focuses on pathogenesis and extends to some therapeutic implications such as clarithromycin, and discusses the various diverse aspects of Mp pneumonia. It is our hope that this might lead to new insights into this common respiratory disease. PMID:25157244

  19. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Macrolide Resistance and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pereyre, Sabine; Goret, Julien; Bébéar, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes community-acquired respiratory tract infections, particularly in school-aged children and young adults. These infections occur both endemically and epidemically worldwide. M. pneumoniae lacks cell wall and is subsequently resistant to beta-lactams and to all antimicrobials targeting the cell wall. This mycoplasma is intrinsically susceptible to macrolides and related antibiotics, to tetracyclines and to fluoroquinolones. Macrolides and related antibiotics are the first-line treatment of M. pneumoniae respiratory tract infections mainly because of their low MIC against the bacteria, their low toxicity and the absence of contraindication in young children. The newer macrolides are now the preferred agents with a 7-to-14 day course of oral clarithromycin or a 5-day course of oral azithromycin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia due to M. pneumoniae, according to the different guidelines worldwide. However, macrolide resistance has been spreading for 15 years worldwide, with prevalence now ranging between 0 and 15% in Europe and the USA, approximately 30% in Israel and up to 90–100% in Asia. This resistance is associated with point mutations in the peptidyl-transferase loop of the 23S rRNA and leads to high-level resistance to macrolides. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations can be detected using several molecular methods applicable directly from respiratory specimens. Because this resistance has clinical outcomes such as longer duration of fever, cough and hospital stay, alternative antibiotic treatment can be required, including tetracyclines such as doxycycline and minocycline or fluoroquinolones, primarily levofloxacin, during 7–14 days, even though fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are contraindicated in all children and in children < 8 year-old, respectively. Acquired resistance to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones has never been reported in M. pneumoniae clinical isolates but reduced susceptibility was reported

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Current Knowledge on Macrolide Resistance and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereyre, Sabine; Goret, Julien; Bébéar, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes community-acquired respiratory tract infections, particularly in school-aged children and young adults. These infections occur both endemically and epidemically worldwide. M. pneumoniae lacks cell wall and is subsequently resistant to beta-lactams and to all antimicrobials targeting the cell wall. This mycoplasma is intrinsically susceptible to macrolides and related antibiotics, to tetracyclines and to fluoroquinolones. Macrolides and related antibiotics are the first-line treatment of M. pneumoniae respiratory tract infections mainly because of their low MIC against the bacteria, their low toxicity and the absence of contraindication in young children. The newer macrolides are now the preferred agents with a 7-to-14 day course of oral clarithromycin or a 5-day course of oral azithromycin for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia due to M. pneumoniae, according to the different guidelines worldwide. However, macrolide resistance has been spreading for 15 years worldwide, with prevalence now ranging between 0 and 15% in Europe and the USA, approximately 30% in Israel and up to 90-100% in Asia. This resistance is associated with point mutations in the peptidyl-transferase loop of the 23S rRNA and leads to high-level resistance to macrolides. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations can be detected using several molecular methods applicable directly from respiratory specimens. Because this resistance has clinical outcomes such as longer duration of fever, cough and hospital stay, alternative antibiotic treatment can be required, including tetracyclines such as doxycycline and minocycline or fluoroquinolones, primarily levofloxacin, during 7-14 days, even though fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are contraindicated in all children and in children < 8 year-old, respectively. Acquired resistance to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones has never been reported in M. pneumoniae clinical isolates but reduced susceptibility was reported in in

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Role as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Talkington, Deborah F.

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a unique bacterium that does not always receive the attention it merits considering the number of illnesses it causes and the degree of morbidity associated with it in both children and adults. Serious infections requiring hospitalization, while rare, occur in both adults and children and may involve multiple organ systems. The severity of disease appears to be related to the degree to which the host immune response reacts to the infection. Extrapulmonary complications involving all of the major organ systems can occur in association with M. pneumoniae infection as a result of direct invasion and/or autoimmune response. The extrapulmonary manifestations are sometimes of greater severity and clinical importance than the primary respiratory infection. Evidence for this organism's contributory role in chronic lung conditions such as asthma is accumulating. Effective management of M. pneumoniae infections can usually be achieved with macrolides, tetracyclines, or fluoroquinolones. As more is learned about the pathogenesis and immune response elicited by M. pneumoniae, improvement in methods for diagnosis and prevention of disease due to this organism may occur. PMID:15489344

  2. Evaluation of Meridian ImmunoCard Mycoplasma test for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Matas, L; Domínguez, J; De Ory, F; García, N; Galí, N; Cardona, P J; Hernández, A; Rodrigo, C; Ausina, V

    1998-01-01

    The Meridian ImmunoCard Mycoplasma kit, a 10-min card-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to detect immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae was evaluated. We compared the ImmunoCard with the Fujirebio Serodia Myco II particle agglutination test, as well as with the complement fixation (CF) test to detect M. pneumoniae antibodies in paediatric patients. The ImmunoCard test and Serodia Myco II test agreed in 93.95%, and ImmunoCard test and CF test agreed in 83.51% of the 182 specimens tested. Nine specimens gave negative particle agglutination titres in the acute phase sample, and 28 specimens gave negative CF titres in the acute phase sample, although in the ImmunoCard test they were positive. These results may indicate that the ImmunoCard assay detects lower IgM levels of antibodies than the Serodia Myco II and CF test. The ImmunoCard appears to be a good screening assay test for M. pneumoniae IgM in children in whom M. pneumoniae IgM is found frequently.

  3. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. infection in community-acquired pneumonia, Germany, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Rohde, Gernot

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011-2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae-positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae-positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP.

  4. Limited Utility of Culture for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae for Diagnosis of Respiratory Tract Infections ▿

    PubMed Central

    She, Rosemary C.; Thurber, Andy; Hymas, Weston C.; Stevenson, Jeffery; Langer, Janine; Litwin, Christine M.; Petti, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the utility of culture for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae to diagnose respiratory tract infections. Compared to PCR and IgM serology, culture was less sensitive and had extremely low yield. Culture is not recommended for these pathogens, and this method should be eliminated from routine practice. PMID:20610673

  5. Pneumonia of lambs in the Abruzzo region of Italy: anatomopathological and histopathological studies and localisation of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ettorre, Chiara; Sacchini, Flavio; Scacchia, Massimo; Della Salda, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    The most common forms of inflammation of the lower respiratory tract in lambs are acute enzootic pneumonia, caused mainly by Mannheimia haemolytica, chronic enzootic pneumonia (defined as 'atypical' in lambs), the aetiological of which is Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and viral inflammation principally caused by parainfluenza virus type 3. The authors conducted anatomopathological and histopathological studies of the most commonly encountered spontaneous lung inflammations in lambs slaughtered in the Abruzzo region of Italy, with special attention to 'atypical pneumonia'. Microbiological isolations and a histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis were performed to reveal any possible correlations between causal agents and lesion patterns. Positive results for M. ovipneumoniae were compared to those for Mycoplasma isolation to evaluate the sensitivity of the two techniques. Of a total of 156 samples, 31 (19.8%) demonstrated involvement of M. ovipneumoniae, 15 (9.6%) were positive on microbiological isolation confirmed by typing with biomolecular methods and, finally, histological lesions (atypical pneumonia) were observed in the remaining 16 cases (10.2%). Of these 31 samples, 23 (14.7% of the total) demonstrated postive antigen in alveolar macrophages and giant cells on immunohistochemical testing. These data revealed the presence of chronic enzootic pneumonia in the Abruzzo area and the importance of immunohistochemistry (in combination with isolation and anatomopathological and histopathological examination) for the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by M. ovipneumoniae, as well as the high sensitivity shown by antigen marker expression, even in samples where bacterial load was limited.

  6. Characterization of I/F1 glycoprotein as a receptor for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, U R; Kirschfink, M; König, A L; Nicklas, W; Roelcke, D

    1992-01-01

    Serologic evidence of anti-I and anti-Fl cold agglutinins occurring in mycoplasma infections led to the isolation of I/Fl glycoprotein from human erythrocyte membranes. Mycoplasma pneumoniae bound to purified I/Fl glycoprotein in a dose-dependent fashion depending on sialylated carbohydrate determinants. This was shown by the decreased binding of mycoplasmas to either sialidase-treated I/Fl glycoprotein (dot blot analysis) or sialidase-treated erythrocytes (hemagglutination test). Structural properties of the receptor for optimal binding could be explored by hemagglutination inhibition assays. Glycophorins were excluded as receptors. These results indicate that Fl (and I) antigens are receptors for M. pneumoniae. Images PMID:1370278

  7. Promoter of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae rRNA operon.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, H C; Gafny, R; Glaser, G; Razin, S

    1988-01-01

    RNA transcripts starting from the 5' end of the single Mycoplasma pneumoniae rRNA operon were analyzed by several methods. By primer extension analysis a start site was found 62 nucleotides upstream from the start site of the 16S rRNA. This site was preceded by a putative Pribnow box; however, a defined -35 recognition region was absent. The cloned rRNA operon was transcribed in vitro by using purified RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli. A single start site could be demonstrated within a few nucleotides of the start site found by primer extension analysis of M. pneumoniae transcripts. When fragments from the cloned operon were used as hybridization probes, S1 nuclease mapping yielded a single transcript extending approximately 193 nucleotides upstream from the 16S rRNA start site. The region surrounding this endpoint did not resemble any known promoter sequence. Dot blot hybridization of M. pneumoniae RNA to three oligonucleotides consisting of nucleotides -5 to -21, -38 to -54, and -112 to -132 (from the start of the 16S rRNA gene) indicated that most rRNA transcripts were processed at the stem site preceding the 16S rRNA gene. The majority of the longer precursor transcripts, extending beyond this point, did not extend further upstream to an oligonucleotide consisting of nucleotides -112 to -132. It was concluded that transcription of the rRNA operon of M. pneumoniae is initiated by a single promoter. The nucleotide sequence of the region is presented. Images PMID:2838465

  8. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae - A Primary Cause of Severe Pneumonia Epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) Population

    PubMed Central

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D.; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Ólöf G.; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004–2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a

  9. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. Infection in Community-Acquired Pneumonia, Germany, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W.; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Group, CAPNETZ Study

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011–2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae–positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae–positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP. PMID:25693633

  11. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can predispose bighorn sheep to fatal Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has been isolated from the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS). However experimental reproduction of fatal pneumonia in BHS with M. ovipneumoniae was not successful. Therefore the specific role, if any, of M. ovipneumoniae in BHS pneumonia is unclear. The objective of th...

  12. Long-chain fatty acid perturbations in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Leon, O; Panos, C

    1981-01-01

    The fatty acid content of Mycoplasma pneumoniae increased 2.5- to 9.6-fold when the growth medium was supplemented with a saturated, unsaturated, or beta-hydroxy fatty acid, the greatest increase occurring with palmitic acid. The amount of each supplemented fatty acid found within this organism was 2.8 to 5.5% of the total fatty acid content; the exception was palmitic acid. Up to 57% of the palmitic acid was utilized from the supplemented medium, whereas only 0.2 to 10% of the other fatty acids was utilized. Chromatographic and isotopic analyses revealed that 22% of the labeled palmitic acid incorporated from the palmitic acid-supplemented medium remained free in this organism. Also, even though complex lipid synthesis increased a minimum of 3.8-fold under these conditions, this mycoplasma continued to incorporate intact complex lipids from the growth medium. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal studies which used high concentrations of various long-chain fatty acids showed that only palmitic, myristic, and beta-hydroxydecanoic acids were not bactericidal. The addition of palmitic acid to the growth medium resulted in the formation of exceedingly long, filamentous cells in approximately 25% of the population. Osmotic fragility and electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies showed a correlation among this increased fatty acid content, decreased membrane fluidity, and the increased osmotic fragility of palmitic acid-grown cells. In addition, these cells had a lowered cholesterol content. The effect of such compositional changes on osmotic fragility is discussed in this paper. Finally, the profound increase in the total fatty acid content of palmitic acid-grown cells altered neither sensitivity to tetracycline or erythromycin nor the amount of hydrogen peroxide secreted. Images PMID:6787014

  13. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  14. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  15. Previously Uncharacterized Mycoplasma Isolates from an Investigation of Canine Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, D.; Tully, J. G.; Yu, B.; Morton, V.; Friedman, M. H.; Steger, L.

    1970-01-01

    Mycoplasmas recovered from the respiratory tract and genitourinary system of dogs, with and without respiratory infection, have been characterized by biological and immunological methods. Some of the isolates were indentified as being similar to the three species of canine mycoplasmas described earlier under the designation Mycoplasma spumans, M. canis, and M. maculosum. Other mycoplasmas placed in three groups (A, C, and D) were found to be clearly distinct from the three classified species. Group A strains fermented glucose but not mannose and were serologically distinct from other canine mycoplasmas recovered in this study. These strains were subsequently found to be biologically and serologically related to a previously reported, but unclassified, canine mycoplasma. Group D strains differed in some biological properties but were serologically related. These were found to be nonfermenting mycoplasmas representing isolations from the throat and bladder of dogs. They were serologically distinct from other canine mycoplasmas and were apparently unrelated to other known mycoplasma serotypes. Group C mycoplasmas were recovered only from the lungs of dogs. Within the group, they differ in some immunological properties but appear to be serologically distinct from other canine strains. They can also be separated from other dog strains in their ability to ferment glucose and mannose. Group B strains were found to have biological properties similar to M. canis strains but seemed to be only partially related to this serotype when examined in several serological techniques. It is suggested that these strains might represent antigenic variants of M. canis. PMID:16557682

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae modulates STAT3-STAT6/EGFR-FOXA2 signaling to induce overexpression of airway mucins.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yonghua; Kuang, Zhizhou; Jing, Jia; Miao, Jinfeng; Mei, Li Yu; Lee, Ryan J; Kim, Susie; Choe, Shawn; Krause, Duncan C; Lau, Gee W

    2014-12-01

    Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in the airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis. Mycoplasma pneumoniae, long appreciated as one of the triggers of acute exacerbations of chronic pulmonary diseases, has recently been reported to promote excessive mucus secretion. However, the mechanism of mucin overproduction induced by M. pneumoniae remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the mechanism by which M. pneumoniae induces mucus hypersecretion by using M. pneumoniae infection of mouse lungs, human primary bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells cultured at the air-liquid interface, and the conventionally cultured airway epithelial NCI-H292 cell line. We demonstrated that M. pneumoniae induced the expression of mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B by activating the STAT6-STAT3 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal pathways, which in turn downregulated FOXA2, a transcriptional repressor of mucin biosynthesis. The upstream stimuli of these pathways, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6, and IL-13, increased dramatically upon exposure to M. pneumoniae. Inhibition of the STAT6, STAT3, and EGFR signaling pathways significantly restored the expression of FOXA2 and attenuated the expression of airway mucins MUC5AC and MUC5B. Collectively, these studies demonstrated that M. pneumoniae induces airway mucus hypersecretion by modulating the STAT/EGFR-FOXA2 signaling pathways. PMID:25287927

  17. Late increase of interleukin-18 levels in blood during Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Narita, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    To the Editor, we read with great interest the article by Chung et al. which appeared recently in the journal. In that paper the authors reported that the decreased IL-18 response in severe pneumonia group vs. non-severe group was observed regardless of asthma status of the patients, whose findings were somewhat different from ours on non-asthmatic patients which showed higher serum levels of IL-18 in severe cases of pneumonia than in mild cases in terms of both in children and in adults. In this point, the timing of venous sampling must be an important factor in explaining the discrepant results. Our previous results suggest that the level of IL-18 in blood as a marker of disease severity should cautiously be interpreted considering a timing of sampling; a value of IL-18 in a blood sample which is obtained at the first visit to the hospital does not always represent the highest level of IL-18 because of the fact that the time which elapsed from the onset of illness to the blood sampling may vary among patients. Analyses on sequential samples, therefore, must be necessary to fully understand the perplexing nature of cytokine activation during Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

  18. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Catarina; Sanches, Inês; Ferreira, Catarina

    2012-03-20

    Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) was recently described as an unusual pattern of diffuse lung disease. Particular characteristics make the differential diagnosis with the well recognised clinical patterns of diffuse alveolar damage, cryptogenic organising pneumonia or eosinophilic pneumonia. The lack of hyaline membranes, the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin, absence of noticeable eosinophils and patchy distribution suggests that AFOP define a distinct histological pattern. The authors describe the case of a woman diagnosed with AFOP after surgical lung biopsy, in association with primary biliary cirrhosis. The patient presented dyspnoea, fatigue, dry cough and thoracic pain. The CT scan showed bilateral patchy infiltrates predominantly in the lower lobes. Flexible bronchoscopy and subsidiary techniques were inconclusive and biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery led to anatomopathological diagnosis of AFOP. The patient is having a good clinical response to prednisone.

  19. Alterations in the metabolism of hamster tracheas in organ culture after infection by virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hu, P C; Collier, A M; Baseman, J B

    1975-04-01

    Exposure of hamster tracheal rings in organ culture to virulent Mycoplasma pneumoniae organisms leads to alterations in macromolecular biosynthesis and metabolic activity of the respiratory epithelial cells. Avirulent organisms derived from the same parent strain do not produce these effects. During the course of infection by virulent mycoplasmas, tracheal rings show an initial increase in [14C]galactose uptake followed by a significant decline as infection progresses which is also accompanied by abnormal processing of galactose as evidenced by amounts of 14CO2 released. Parallel decreases in the rate of [3H]orotic acid and [3H]amino acid uptake are observed. Within 24 h after infection of tracheal rings by virulent mycoplasmas, inhibition of host cell ribonucleic acid and protien synthesis is evident. Ribonucleic acid synthesis in infected cells, analyzed by gel electrophoresis, is reduced by 80% at 48 h and is negligible by 96 h. The course of mycoplasma infection can be interrupted or reversed by erythromycin after the initial mycoplasma-host cell interaction since addition of erythromycin 24 h or earlier after infection prevents the onset of abnormal orotic acid uptake. However, 48 h after infection, rescue of host cells by erythromycin cannot occur and cytopathology becomes evident. These data suggest that mediation of host cell injury requires continued protein synthesis by attached mycoplasmas, and the primary effect of mycoplasma infection on tracheal organ culture may be at a transcriptional or translational level.

  20. Two Cases of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia with A2063G Mutation in the 23S rRNA Gene in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Chun, Jin Kyong; Oh, Ki Jin; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of pneumonia caused by the same macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in siblings. M. pneumoniae was identified using real-time PCR. Direct sequence analysis of the 23S rRNA gene revealed a point mutation in V domain (A2063G) of the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:23301225

  1. Setting a standard for the initiation of steroid therapy in refractory or severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Inamura, Norikazu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-03-01

    Serum interleukin (IL)-18 level was thought to be a useful as a predictor of refractory or severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, and steroid administration is reported to be effective in this situation. The serum levels of IL-18 correlated significantly with those of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The purpose of this study was to set a standard for the initiation of steroid therapy in M. pneumoniae pneumonia using a simple serum marker. We analyzed 41 adolescent and adult patients with refractory or severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia who received steroid therapy, and compared them with 108 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia who responded to treatment promptly (control group). Serum LDH levels were significantly higher in the refractory and severe group than in the control group at the initiation of steroid therapy (723 vs 210 IU/L, respectively; p < 0.0001). From receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, we calculated serum LDH cut-off levels of 364 IU/L at initiation of steroid therapy and 302 IU/L at 1-3 days before the initiation of steroid therapy. The administration of steroids to patients in the refractory and severe group resulted in the rapid improvement of symptoms and a decrease in serum LDH levels in all patients. Serum LDH level can be used as a useful parameter to determine the initiation of steroid therapy in refractory or severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia. A serum LDH level of 302-364 IU/L seems to be an appropriate criterion for the initiation of steroid therapy.

  2. Epizootic Pneumonia of Bighorn Sheep following Experimental Exposure to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Thomas E.; Cassirer, E. Frances; Potter, Kathleen A.; Lahmers, Kevin; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Srikumaran, Subramaniam; Foreyt, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopneumonia is a population limiting disease of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The cause of this disease has been a subject of debate. Leukotoxin expressing Mannheimia haemolytica and Bibersteinia trehalosi produce acute pneumonia after experimental challenge but are infrequently isolated from animals in natural outbreaks. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, epidemiologically implicated in naturally occurring outbreaks, has received little experimental evaluation as a primary agent of bighorn sheep pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings In two experiments, bighorn sheep housed in multiple pens 7.6 to 12 m apart were exposed to M. ovipneumoniae by introduction of a single infected or challenged animal to a single pen. Respiratory disease was monitored by observation of clinical signs and confirmed by necropsy. Bacterial involvement in the pneumonic lungs was evaluated by conventional aerobic bacteriology and by culture-independent methods. In both experiments the challenge strain of M. ovipneumoniae was transmitted to all animals both within and between pens and all infected bighorn sheep developed bronchopneumonia. In six bighorn sheep in which the disease was allowed to run its course, three died with bronchopneumonia 34, 65, and 109 days after M. ovipneumoniae introduction. Diverse bacterial populations, predominantly including multiple obligate anaerobic species, were present in pneumonic lung tissues at necropsy. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to a single M. ovipneumoniae infected animal resulted in transmission of infection to all bighorn sheep both within the pen and in adjacent pens, and all infected sheep developed bronchopneumonia. The epidemiologic, pathologic and microbiologic findings in these experimental animals resembled those seen in naturally occurring pneumonia outbreaks in free ranging bighorn sheep. PMID:25302992

  3. Delineation of immunodominant and cytadherence segment(s) of Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adhesion of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) to host epithelial cells requires several adhesin proteins like P1, P30 and P116. Among these proteins, P1 protein has been inedited as one of the major adhesin and immunogenic protein present on the attachment organelle of M. pneumoniae. In the present study, we scanned the entire sequence of M. pneumoniae P1 protein to identify the immunodominant and cytadherence region(s). M. pneumoniae P1 gene was synthesized in four segments replacing all the UGA codons to UGG codons. Each of the four purified P1 protein fragment was analyzed for its immunogenicity with anti-M. pneumoniae M129 antibodies (Pab M129) and sera of M. pneumoniae infected patients by western blotting and ELISA. Antibodies were produced against all the P1 protein fragments and these antibodies were used for M. pneumoniae adhesion, M. pneumoniae adhesion inhibition and M. pneumoniae surface exposure assays using HEp-2 cells lines. Results Our results show that the immunodominant regions are distributed throughout the entire length of P1 protein, while only the N- and C- terminal region(s) of P1 protein are surface exposed and block cytadhesion to HEp-2 cells, while antibodies to two middle fragments failed to block cytadhesion. Conclusions These results have important implications in designing strategies to block the attachment of M. pneumoniae to epithelial cells, thus preventing the development of atypical pneumonia. PMID:24774062

  4. In Vitro Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Colonization of Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Oliver A.; Krunkosky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important cause of respiratory disease, especially in school-age children and young adults. We employed normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in air-liquid interface culture to study the interaction of M. pneumoniae with differentiated airway epithelium. These airway cells, when grown in air-liquid interface culture, polarize, form tight junctions, produce mucus, and develop ciliary function. We examined both qualitatively and quantitatively the role of mycoplasma gliding motility in the colonization pattern of developing airway cells, comparing wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants thereof with moderate to severe defects in gliding motility. Adherence assays with radiolabeled mycoplasmas demonstrated a dramatic reduction in binding for all strains with airway cell polarization, independent of acquisition of mucociliary function. Adherence levels dropped further once NHBE cells achieved terminal differentiation, with mucociliary activity strongly selecting for full gliding competence. Analysis over time by confocal microscopy demonstrated a distinct colonization pattern that appeared to originate primarily with ciliated cells, but lateral spread from the base of the cilia was slower than expected. The data support a model in which the mucociliary apparatus impairs colonization yet cilia provide a conduit for mycoplasma access to the host cell surface and suggest acquisition of a barrier function, perhaps associated with tethered mucin levels, with NHBE cell polarization. PMID:24478073

  5. Rapid diagnostic method for the identification of Mycoplasma pneumoniae respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kato, Tadashi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2016-05-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests are useful tools in the early diagnosis of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) caused by a specific pathogens. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of a rapid and simple antigen test for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Ribotest Mycoplasma(®) in adolescent and adult patients with RTIs. In addition, we evaluated the accuracy of clinical and laboratory findings for the early presumptive diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI. We compared 55 cases with laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection using serology, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 346 cases without laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae infection. Pneumonia cases were excluded in this study. Among patients with M. pneumoniae infection, the incidences of cough, sore throat, and sputum production were high, with rates of 98%, 61%, and 67%, respectively, but the specificity was low. The prevalence of nasal symptoms was significantly lower in patients with M. pneumoniae infection (9%) than in non-M. pneumoniae infection (70%; p < 0.0001). When PCR was used as the control test, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall agreement rates with Ribotest(®) were 71%, 89%, and 87%, respectively. Clinical symptoms and laboratory data were of limited value in making the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTI in adolescent and adult patients. Our results suggested that Ribotest(®) may be helpful in distinguishing M. pneumoniae RTI patients from those without the disease. Physicians should consider the use of Ribotest(®) when patients have a persistent cough without nasal symptoms. PMID:26993174

  6. Potential Molecular Targets for Narrow-Spectrum Agents to Combat Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection and Disease.

    PubMed

    Balish, Mitchell F; Distelhorst, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    As Mycoplasma pneumoniae macrolide resistance grows and spreads worldwide, it is becoming more important to develop new drugs to prevent infection or limit disease. Because other mycoplasma species have acquired resistance to other classes of antibiotics, it is reasonable to presume that M. pneumoniae can do the same, so switching to commonly used antibiotics like fluoroquinolones will not result in forms of therapy with long-term utility. Moreover, broad-spectrum antibiotics can have serious consequences for the patient, as these drugs may have severe impacts on the natural microbiota of the individual, compromising the health of the patient either short-term or long-term. Therefore, developing narrow-spectrum antibiotics that effectively target only M. pneumoniae and no more than a small portion of the microbiota is likely to yield impactful, positive results that can be used perhaps indefinitely to combat M. pneumoniae. Development of these agents requires a deep understanding of the basic biology of M. pneumoniae, in many areas deeper than what is currently known. In this review, we discuss potential targets for new, narrow-spectrum agents and both the positive and negative aspects of selecting these targets, which include toxic molecules, metabolic pathways, and attachment and motility. By gathering this information together, we anticipate that it will be easier for researchers to evaluate topics of priority for study of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26941728

  7. Potential Molecular Targets for Narrow-Spectrum Agents to Combat Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Mitchell F.; Distelhorst, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    As Mycoplasma pneumoniae macrolide resistance grows and spreads worldwide, it is becoming more important to develop new drugs to prevent infection or limit disease. Because other mycoplasma species have acquired resistance to other classes of antibiotics, it is reasonable to presume that M. pneumoniae can do the same, so switching to commonly used antibiotics like fluoroquinolones will not result in forms of therapy with long-term utility. Moreover, broad-spectrum antibiotics can have serious consequences for the patient, as these drugs may have severe impacts on the natural microbiota of the individual, compromising the health of the patient either short-term or long-term. Therefore, developing narrow-spectrum antibiotics that effectively target only M. pneumoniae and no more than a small portion of the microbiota is likely to yield impactful, positive results that can be used perhaps indefinitely to combat M. pneumoniae. Development of these agents requires a deep understanding of the basic biology of M. pneumoniae, in many areas deeper than what is currently known. In this review, we discuss potential targets for new, narrow-spectrum agents and both the positive and negative aspects of selecting these targets, which include toxic molecules, metabolic pathways, and attachment and motility. By gathering this information together, we anticipate that it will be easier for researchers to evaluate topics of priority for study of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26941728

  8. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae--a primary cause of severe pneumonia epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population.

    PubMed

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Olöf G; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004-2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a

  9. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae--a primary cause of severe pneumonia epizootics in the Norwegian Muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population.

    PubMed

    Handeland, Kjell; Tengs, Torstein; Kokotovic, Branko; Vikøren, Turid; Ayling, Roger D; Bergsjø, Bjarne; Sigurðardóttir, Olöf G; Bretten, Tord

    2014-01-01

    The Norwegian muskox (Ovibos moschatus) population lives on the high mountain plateau of Dovre and originates from animals introduced from Greenland. In the late summers of 2006 and 2012, severe outbreaks of pneumonia with mortality rates of 25-30% occurred. During the 2012 epidemic high quality samples from culled sick animals were obtained for microbiological and pathological examinations. High throughput sequencing (pyrosequencing) of pneumonic lung tissue revealed high concentrations of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in all six animals examined by this method and Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida in four animals, whereas no virus sequences could be identified. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and P. multocida multocida were also isolated by culture. Using real time PCR on lung swabs, M. ovipneumoniae was detected in all of the 19 pneumonic lungs examined. Gross pathological examination revealed heavy consolidations primarily in the cranial parts of the lungs and it also identified one case of otitis media. Histologically, lung lesions were characterized as acute to subacute mixed exudative and moderately proliferative bronchoalveolar pneumonia. Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed high load of M. ovipneumoniae antigens within lung lesions, with particularly intensive staining in the neutrophils. Similar IHC finding were observed in archived lung tissue blocks from animals examined during the 2006 epidemic. An M. ovipneumoniae specific ELISA was applied on bio-banked muskox sera from stray muskoxen killed in the period 2004-2013 and sick muskoxen culled, as well as sera from wild reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) on Dovre and muskoxen from Greenland. Serology and mycoplasma culturing was also carried out on sheep that had been on pasture in the muskox area during the outbreak in 2012. Our findings indicated separate introductions of M. ovipneumoniae infection in 2006 and 2012 from infected co-grazing sheep. Salt licks shared by the two species were a

  10. The serological diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection: a comparison of complement fixation, haemagglutination and immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, S. A.; Tettmar, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 193 sera were examined for antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae by three techniques - complement fixation (CF), haemagglutination (HA) and immunofluorescence (IF), the last method being used to assess IgM, IgG and IgA antibodies. The most reliable single test for diagnosis was HA, and the most useful combination of tests was HA with IF (IgM and IgG). The IgA IF was not found to be diagnostically helpful. PMID:3934260

  11. New insights into the pathogenesis and detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Balish, Mitchell F; Atkinson, T Prescott

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in persons of all ages and may be responsible for up to 40% of community-acquired pneumonias. A wide array of extrapulmonary events may accompany the infections caused by this organism, related to autommunity or direct spread. This review includes a discussion of the latest knowledge concerning the molecular pathological basis of mycoplasmal respiratory disease, how the organism interacts with the host immune system and its association with the development of chronic conditions such as asthma, recent emergence of macrolide resistance and the status of laboratory diagnostic methods. PMID:19072181

  12. Study of antibodies against viruses, chlamydiae, rickettsiae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Copelovici, Y; Niculescu, R; Teleguţă, L; Dincă, A; Stoian, N; Cristea, A; Ossman, J; Alămiţă, I; Vlăsceanu, S

    1981-01-01

    Seroconversion to different viral, chlamydial, rickettsial and mycoplasma antigens was followed up in 134 children aged 0-6 years, hospitalized with different respiratory diseases. Parainfluenza viruses type 1, 2 and 3 and adenoviruses appeared to be involved in the etiology of most of the cases; respiratory syncytial virus was often found to play a role in pneumonia/bronchopneumonia and in "influenza-like illness", while chlamydiae and M. pneumoniae could be incriminated in cases of "influenza-like illness", as well as in the other categories of respiratory disease. Mixed infections with the agents studied could be detected.

  13. Transient cold agglutinins associated with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Pinkos, Alyssa C; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Monaghan, Kelly N; Sample, Saundra H; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-12-01

    This report details a case of reversible cold agglutinins in a dog with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia. An 11-month-old female spayed Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented for lethargy and cough. Thoracic radiographs revealed an alveolar pattern present bilaterally in the cranioventral lung lobes. Septic neutrophilic inflammation with suspected Mycoplasma sp. organisms was noted on cytologic examination of a trans-tracheal wash, and the dog was treated empirically with IV ampicillin/sulbactam and enrofloxacin pending culture results. Red blood cell agglutination was noted unexpectedly on several blood film reviews during hospitalization; however, the dog never developed clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis. Cold agglutinins were demonstrated based on the results of a saline dilution and cold agglutinin test that showed agglutination at 4°C but not at room temperature (21°C) or 37°C. Based on a positive culture for M cynos, the dog was treated for 8 weeks with oral enrofloxacin. After clinical and radiographic resolution of the pneumonia, repeated saline dilution and cold agglutinin tests of peripheral blood were negative at all temperatures. Reversible, asymptomatic cold agglutinins are common in human patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, but this is the first reported case in a dog.

  14. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  15. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  16. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Cross, Kristen E; Benitez, Alvaro J; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children. PMID:27191004

  17. Identification of Bacterial and Viral Codetections With Mycoplasma pneumoniae Using the TaqMan Array Card in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maureen H.; Cross, Kristen E.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Hicks, Lauri A.; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M.; Chappell, James D.; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae was detected in a number of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in a recent prospective study. To assess whether other pathogens were also detected in these patients, TaqMan Array Cards were used to test 216 M pneumoniae-positive respiratory specimens for 25 additional viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens. It is interesting to note that 1 or more codetections, predominantly bacterial, were identified in approximately 60% of specimens, with codetections being more common in children. PMID:27191004

  18. Antibody Response to Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Protection of Host and Influence on Outbreaks?

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Roger; Jacobs, Enno

    2016-01-01

    In humans of all ages, the cell wall-less and genome-reduced species Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract. The well-documented occurrence of major peaks in the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia cases reported world-wide, the multifaceted clinical manifestations of infection and the increasing number of resistant strains provide reasons for ongoing interest in the pathogenesis of mycoplasmal disease. The results of recent studies have provided insights into the interaction of the limited virulence factors of the bacterium with its host. In addition, the availability of complete M. pneumoniae genomes from patient isolates and the development of proteomic methods for investigation of mycoplasmas have not only allowed characterization of sequence divergences between strains but have also shown the importance of proteins and protein parts for induction of the immune reaction after infection. This review focuses on selected aspects of the humoral host immune response as a factor that might influence the clinical course of infections, subsequent protection in cases of re-infections and changes of epidemiological pattern of infections. The characterization of antibodies directed to defined antigens and approaches to promote their induction in the respiratory mucosa are also preconditions for the development of a vaccine to protect risk populations from severe disease due to M. pneumoniae. PMID:26858711

  19. Neurological disease associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PCR evidence against a direct invasive mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fink, C G; Sillis, M; Read, S J; Butler, L; Pike, M

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To investigate the pathology in patients presenting with sudden onset neurological illnesses associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Methods—M pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a highly rigorous interpretation of serological markers initially using complement fixation, agglutination and IgM antibodies. Confirmation of the serological diagnosis was achieved using indirect immunofluorescence for IgM, IgA, and IgG. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from these patients were examined using the polymerase chain reaction to look for evidence of M pneumoniae DNA. Results—No M pneumoniae DNA was found in any serum or CSF samples. Diagnosis of M pneumoniae infection by agglutination and complement fixation antibodies was not always confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Conclusion—The neurological lesions in these patients do not appear to be caused by the direct invasion of M pneumoniae into the nervous system. The lesions may be an immune response to infection. Serological diagnosis of M pneumoniae continues to be a laboratory problem. PMID:16695976

  20. Development of a Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme for Molecular Typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Holden, Matthew T G; Spiller, O Brad; Chalker, Victoria J

    2015-10-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major human respiratory pathogen causing both upper and lower respiratory disease in humans of all ages, and it can also result in other serious extrapulmonary sequelae. A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. pneumoniae was developed based on the sequences of eight housekeeping genes (ppa, pgm, gyrB, gmk, glyA, atpA, arcC, and adk) and applied to 55 M. pneumoniae clinical isolates and the two type strains M129 and FH. A total of 12 sequence types (STs) resulted for 57 M. pneumoniae isolates tested, with a discriminatory index of 0.21 STs per isolate. The MLST loci used in this scheme were shown to be stable in 10 strains following 10 sequential subculture passages. Phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences of the eight loci indicated two distinct genetic clusters that were directly linked to multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) type. Genetic MLST clustering was confirmed by genomic sequence analysis, indicating that the MLST scheme developed in this study is representative of the genome. Furthermore, this MLST scheme was shown to be more discriminatory than both MLVA and P1 typing for the M. pneumoniae isolates examined, providing a method for further and more detailed analysis of observed epidemic peaks of M. pneumoniae infection. This scheme is supported by a public Web-based database (http://pubmlst.org/mpneumoniae).

  1. Role of Relative Humidity in the Survival of Airborne Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. N.; Bailey, G. D.; Hatch, M. T.

    1968-01-01

    Aerosols of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were studied at several relative humidities at a controlled temperature of 27 C. Production of an experimentally reproducible aerosol required preatomization of the organism in its suspending fluid and was dependent on the type of fluid used in atomization as well as on the procedures used to produce an aerosol. The airborne particles studied were within the range of epidemiological significance, with most being 2 μm or less in diameter. Survival of the airborne mycoplasma in these particles was found to be best at very low and at very high humidities. The most lethal relative humidity levels were at 60 and 80%, at which levels fewer than 1% of the organisms survived over a 4-hr observation period. However, survival of the organism at most relative humidity levels was such that long-term infectivity could be expected from aerosols of M. pneumoniae. Because of the extreme sensitivity of M. pneumoniae at critical humidity levels, control of the airborne transmission of these organisms may be possible in selected spaces. PMID:5686020

  2. Various blood parameters in commercial hens acutely and chronically infected with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Branton, S L; May, J D; Lott, B D; Maslin, W R

    1997-01-01

    Two trials were conducted to study the effects of acute (Trial 1) and chronic (Trial 2) mycoplasma infections on differential leukocyte counts in chickens. The trials initially included either 20 (Trial 1) or 40 (Trial 2) 6-wk-old commercial leghorn chickens negative for antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS). Chickens were inoculated with F strain MG (FMG), MS (WVU 1853), or both. One group of chickens remained uninoculated and served as a negative control for both trials. Chickens were housed in fiberglass isolation units from 6 to 10 wk (Trial 1) or 6 to 70 wk of age (Trial 2). Differential leukocyte counts were examined from 6 to 10 wk (Trial 1) or 66 to 70 wk of age (Trial 2) in all chickens. Also, in Trial 2, packed cell volumes (PCVs) and plasma protein values were examined from 66 to 70 wk of age. In the acute study (Trial 1), differential leukocyte counts revealed statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in heterophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and basophil values among treatments. In general, the differential counts of FMG- and MS-infected birds were characterized by heterophilia, lymphopenia, monocytosis, eosinopenia, and basopenia. Histopathologic examination of the spleen, liver, kidney, and bone marrow revealed a high degree of lymphoid foci within the spleen and bone marrow of all infected chickens. In the chronic study (Trial 2), no statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed in differential leukocyte counts, PCV, and plasma protein values among treatments. Histopathologic examination of spleen, liver, kidney, and bone marrow did not reveal any difference among treatments.

  3. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.Air samplers were placed at a short (60-80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients' rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens.All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients' rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects.The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients.

  4. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.Air samplers were placed at a short (60-80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients' rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens.All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients' rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects.The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  5. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  6. Standardized methods and quality control limits for agar and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Waites, Ken B; Duffy, Lynn B; Bébéar, Cécile M; Matlow, Anne; Talkington, Deborah F; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A; Bade, Donald J; Zheng, Xiaotian; Davidson, Maureen K; Shortridge, Virginia D; Watts, Jeffrey L; Brown, Steven D

    2012-11-01

    An international multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted to develop standard media and consensus methods for the performance and quality control of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum using broth microdilution and agar dilution techniques. A reference strain from the American Type Culture Collection was designated for each species, which was to be used for quality control purposes. Repeat testing of replicate samples of each reference strain by participating laboratories utilizing both methods and different lots of media enabled a 3- to 4-dilution MIC range to be established for drugs in several different classes, including tetracyclines, macrolides, ketolides, lincosamides, and fluoroquinolones. This represents the first multilaboratory collaboration to standardize susceptibility testing methods and to designate quality control parameters to ensure accurate and reliable assay results for mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas that infect humans.

  7. Chronic meningitis with intracranial hypertension and bilateral neuroretinitis following Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Karampatsas, Konstantinos; Patel, Himanshu; Basheer, Sheikh N; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2014-12-23

    A previously well 12-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of headache, nausea, vomiting and left-sided weakness. He subsequently developed meningism, right abducens nerve palsy, persistent papilloedema and reduced visual acuity in association with a bilateral macular star, consistent with neuroretinitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination indicated chronic meningitis and serological testing confirmed recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, although PCR in CSF was negative. He was treated for aseptic meningitis with ceftriaxone, aciclovir, azithromycin and acetazolamide for intracranial hypertension, with gradual improvement in clinical condition and visual acuity over several weeks. This is the first report of M. pneumoniae chronic meningitis further complicated with bilateral neuroretinitis and intracranial hypertension. Evidence of central nervous system inflammation in the absence of direct infection suggests an immune-mediated pathophysiology. Although the use of macrolides with antibiotic and immunomodulatory activity might be beneficial, it was not possible to ascertain whether it influenced clinical recovery in this case.

  8. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can predispose bighorn sheep to fatal Mannheimia haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Herndon, Caroline N; Subramaniam, Renuka; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Cassirer, E Frances; Haldorson, Gary J; Foreyt, William J; Rurangirwa, Fred R; Knowles, Donald P; Besser, Thomas E; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2010-10-26

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has been isolated from the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS). However experimental reproduction of fatal pneumonia in BHS with M. ovipneumoniae was not successful. Therefore the specific role, if any, of M. ovipneumoniae in BHS pneumonia is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether M. ovipneumoniae alone causes fatal pneumonia in BHS, or predisposes them to infection by Mannheimia haemolytica. We chose M. haemolytica for this study because of its isolation from pneumonic BHS, and its consistent ability to cause fatal pneumonia under experimental conditions. Since in vitro culture could attenuate virulence of M. ovipneumoniae, we used ceftiofur-treated lung homogenates from pneumonic BHS lambs or nasopharyngeal washings from M. ovipneumoniae-positive domestic sheep (DS) as the source of M. ovipneumoniae. Two adult BHS were inoculated intranasally with lung homogenates while two others received nasopharyngeal washings from DS. All BHS developed clinical signs of respiratory infection, but only one BHS died. The dead BHS had carried leukotoxin-positive M. haemolytica in the nasopharynx before the onset of this study. It is likely that M. ovipneumoniae colonization predisposed this BHS to fatal infection with the M. haemolytica already present in this animal. The remaining three BHS developed pneumonia and died 1-5 days following intranasal inoculation with M. haemolytica. On necropsy, lungs of all four BHS showed lesions characteristic of bronchopneumonia. M. haemolytica and M. ovipneumoniae were isolated from the lungs. These results suggest that M. ovipneumoniae alone may not cause fatal pneumonia in BHS, but can predispose them to fatal pneumonia due to M. haemolytica infection.

  9. Network of Surface-Displayed Glycolytic Enzymes in Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Their Interactions with Human Plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anne; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Jacobs, Enno

    2015-01-01

    In different bacteria, primarily cytosolic and metabolic proteins are characterized as surface localized and interacting with different host factors. These moonlighting proteins include glycolytic enzymes, and it has been hypothesized that they influence the virulence of pathogenic species. The presence of surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes and their interaction with human plasminogen as an important host factor were investigated in the genome-reduced and cell wall-less microorganism Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common agent of respiratory tract infections of humans. After successful expression of 19 glycolytic enzymes and production of polyclonal antisera, the localization of proteins in the mycoplasma cell was characterized using fractionation of total proteins, colony blot, mild proteolysis and immunofluorescence of M. pneumoniae cells. Eight glycolytic enzymes, pyruvate dehydrogenases A to C (PdhA-C), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA), lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh), phosphoglycerate mutase (Pgm), pyruvate kinase (Pyk), and transketolase (Tkt), were confirmed as surface expressed and all are able to interact with plasminogen. Plasminogen bound to recombinant proteins PdhB, GapA, and Pyk was converted to plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator and plasmin-specific substrate d-valyl-leucyl-lysine-p-nitroanilide dihydrochloride. Furthermore, human fibrinogen was degraded by the complex of plasminogen and recombinant protein PdhB or Pgm. In addition, surface-displayed proteins (except PdhC) bind to human lung epithelial cells, and the interaction was reduced significantly by preincubation of cells with antiplasminogen. Our results suggest that plasminogen binding and activation by different surface-localized glycolytic enzymes of M. pneumoniae may play a role in successful and long-term colonization of the human respiratory tract. PMID:26667841

  10. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    DOE PAGES

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The structurally known GlpO from Streptococcus sp. (SspGlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (SpGlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. pneumoniae GlpO (MpGlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged MpGlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model themore » Bordetella pertussis protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant MpGlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced MpGlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by MpGlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as SspGlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting MpGlpO and SpGlpO.« less

  11. Is There any Relationship Between Extra-Pulmonary Manifestations of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection and Atopy/Respiratory Allergy in Children?

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of respiratory infections in children, but sometimes extra-pulmonary diseases can be observed. The immunological mechanisms involved in these extra-respiratory complications are unknown. Here, we report a small case series of Mycoplasma-related diseases including 5 children who developed: i) aseptic meningitis; ii) urticarial rash and pericardial effusion; iii) pleural effusion with severe eosinophilia; iv) Stevens-Johnson syndrome; v) multiform erythema. Interestingly, all children were moderately to highly atopic, as a common immunologic feature. PMID:27114818

  12. Integrated Information and Prospects for Gliding Mechanism of the Pathogenic Bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae forms a membrane protrusion at a cell pole and is known to adhere to solid surfaces, including animal cells, and can glide on these surfaces with a speed up to 1 μm per second. Notably, gliding appears to be involved in the infectious process in addition to providing the bacteria with a means of escaping the host's immune systems. However, the genome of M. pneumoniae does not encode any of the known genes found in other bacterial motility systems or any conventional motor proteins that are responsible for eukaryotic motility. Thus, further analysis of the mechanism underlying M. pneumoniae gliding is warranted. The gliding machinery formed as the membrane protrusion can be divided into the surface and internal structures. On the surface, P1 adhesin, a 170 kDa transmembrane protein forms an adhesin complex with other two proteins. The internal structure features a terminal button, paired plates, and a bowl (wheel) complex. In total, the organelle is composed of more than 15 proteins. By integrating the currently available information by genetics, microscopy, and structural analyses, we have suggested a working model for the architecture of the organelle. Furthermore, in this article, we suggest and discuss a possible mechanism of gliding based on the structural model, in which the force generated around the bowl complex transmits through the paired plates, reaching the adhesin complex, resulting in the repeated catch of sialylated oligosaccharides on the host surface by the adhesin complex. PMID:27446003

  13. Assessment of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae-induced Pneumonia using Different Lung Lesion Scoring Systems: a Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morante, B; Segalés, J; Fraile, L; Pérez de Rozas, A; Maiti, H; Coll, T; Sibila, M

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the primary aetiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP) and one of the major contributors to the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Gross lung lesions in pigs affected by EP consist of cranioventral pulmonary consolidation (CVPC), usually distributed bilaterally in the apical, intermediate, accessory and cranial parts of the diaphragmatic lobes. Several lung scoring methods are currently in place for the evaluation of CVPC. The aims of this study were (1) to review the lung lesion scoring systems used to assess pneumonia associated with M. hyopneumoniae infection, and (2) to evaluate eight of these scoring systems by applying them to the lungs of 76 pigs with experimentally-induced M. hyopneumoniae pneumonia. A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was observed and the coefficients of determination in a regression analysis were very high between each pair-wise comparison, except for a unique scoring system based on image analysis. A formula of equivalence between lung scoring methods was developed in order to compare the results obtained with these methods. The present review provides a basis for comparison (even retrospectively) of lesions evaluated using different lung scoring systems.

  14. The Evolution of Advanced Molecular Diagnostics for the Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Maureen H.; Winchell, Jonas M.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advancements in the methods used for detecting and characterizing Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common cause of respiratory illness and community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. The repertoire of available molecular diagnostics has greatly expanded from nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAATs) that encompass a variety of chemistries used for detection, to more sophisticated characterizing methods such as multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), Multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), single nucleotide polymorphism typing, and numerous macrolide susceptibility profiling methods, among others. These many molecular-based approaches have been developed and employed to continually increase the level of discrimination and characterization in order to better understand the epidemiology and biology of M. pneumoniae. This review will summarize recent molecular techniques and procedures and lend perspective to how each has enhanced the current understanding of this organism and will emphasize how Next Generation Sequencing may serve as a resource for researchers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the genomic complexities of this insidious pathogen. PMID:27014191

  15. Integrated Information and Prospects for Gliding Mechanism of the Pathogenic Bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae forms a membrane protrusion at a cell pole and is known to adhere to solid surfaces, including animal cells, and can glide on these surfaces with a speed up to 1 μm per second. Notably, gliding appears to be involved in the infectious process in addition to providing the bacteria with a means of escaping the host's immune systems. However, the genome of M. pneumoniae does not encode any of the known genes found in other bacterial motility systems or any conventional motor proteins that are responsible for eukaryotic motility. Thus, further analysis of the mechanism underlying M. pneumoniae gliding is warranted. The gliding machinery formed as the membrane protrusion can be divided into the surface and internal structures. On the surface, P1 adhesin, a 170 kDa transmembrane protein forms an adhesin complex with other two proteins. The internal structure features a terminal button, paired plates, and a bowl (wheel) complex. In total, the organelle is composed of more than 15 proteins. By integrating the currently available information by genetics, microscopy, and structural analyses, we have suggested a working model for the architecture of the organelle. Furthermore, in this article, we suggest and discuss a possible mechanism of gliding based on the structural model, in which the force generated around the bowl complex transmits through the paired plates, reaching the adhesin complex, resulting in the repeated catch of sialylated oligosaccharides on the host surface by the adhesin complex. PMID:27446003

  16. Construction of an EcoRI restriction map of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and localization of selected genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Pirkl, E; Herrmann, R

    1992-01-01

    A restriction map of the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a small human pathogenic bacterium, was constructed by means of an ordered cosmid library which spans the complete bacterial chromosome. The positions of 143 endonuclease EcoRI restriction fragments were determined and aligned with the physical map. In addition, restriction sites for the rare-cutting enzymes XhoI (25 sites), ApaI (13 sites), NotI (2 sites), and SfiI (2 sites) were included. The resulting map consists of 185 restriction sites, has a mean resolution of 4.4 kbp, and predicts a genome size of 809 kbp. In addition, several genes were identified and mapped to their respective genomic EcoRI restriction fragments. Images PMID:1429453

  17. Early Serologic Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia: An Observational Study on Changes in Titers of Specific-IgM Antibodies and Cold Agglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Churl; Youn, You-Sook; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Han; Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been some limitations on early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection because of no immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses and variable detection rates of polymerase chain reaction in the early stage of the disease. We wanted to discuss regarding early diagnostic method using short-term paired titration of MP-specific IgM and cold agglutinins (CAs) in the early stage of MP pneumonia. The participants of this study were 418 children with MP pneumonia during 2 recent epidemics (2006–2007 and 2011), and they were diagnosed by an anti-MP IgM antibody test (Serodia Myco II) examined twice during hospitalization at presentation and around discharge (mean of 3.4 ± 1.3 days apart). CA titers were simultaneously examined twice during study period. Anti-MP IgM antibody titer ≥1:40 and CA titer ≥1:4 were considered positive, respectively. The relationships between 2 IgM antibodies in the early stage were evaluated. Regarding MP-specific antibody titers, 148 patients showed a seroconversion, 245 patients exhibited increased titers, and 25 patients had unchanged higher titers (≥1:640) during hospitalization. The median MP-specific antibody titers at each examination time were 1:80 and 1:640, respectively; those of CAs were 1:8 and 1:32, respectively. Illness duration prior to admission showed a trend of association with both titers, and patients with shorter illness duration had a higher rate of negative titers or lower titers at each examination time. CAs and MP-specific antibody titers were correlated in the total patients at presentation and at 2nd examination (P < 0.001, respectively), and the diagnostic corresponding rates of CAs to IgM antibody test were 81% to 96% in patient subgroups. Short-term paired MP specific-IgM determinations in the acute stage may be used as a definitive diagnostic method for MP pneumonia. Paired CA titers showed a correlation with MP-specific antibody titers, suggesting they can be used as an adjuvant

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Genotyping Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and SNaPshot Technology

    PubMed Central

    Touati, A.; Blouin, Y.; Sirand-Pugnet, P.; Renaudin, H.; Oishi, T.; Vergnaud, G.; Bébéar, C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important tool for identifying grouped cases and investigating outbreaks. In the present study, we developed a new genotyping method based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the whole-genome sequencing of eight M. pneumoniae strains, using the SNaPshot minisequencing assay. Eight SNPs, localized in housekeeping genes, predicted lipoproteins, and adhesin P1 genes were selected for genotyping. These SNPs were evaluated on 140 M. pneumoniae clinical isolates previously genotyped by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA-5) and adhesin P1 typing. This method was also adapted for direct use with clinical samples and evaluated on 51 clinical specimens. The analysis of the clinical isolates using the SNP typing method showed nine distinct SNP types with a Hunter and Gaston diversity index (HGDI) of 0.836, which is higher than the HGDI of 0.583 retrieved for the MLVA-4 typing method, where the nonstable Mpn1 marker was removed. A strong correlation with the P1 adhesin gene typing results was observed. The congruence was poor between MLVA-5 and SNP typing, indicating distinct genotyping schemes. Combining the results increased the discriminatory power. This new typing method based on SNPs and the SNaPshot technology is a method for rapid M. pneumoniae typing directly from clinical specimens, which does not require any sequencing step. This method is based on stable markers and provides information distinct from but complementary to MLVA typing. The combined use of SNPs and MLVA typing provides powerful discrimination of strains. PMID:26202117

  19. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    To feel better, you can take these self-care measures at home: Control your fever with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen or naproxen), or acetaminophen. DO NOT give aspirin to children. Do ...

  20. Relationship Among Chlamydia and Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Seropositivity, IKZF1 Genotype and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in A General Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Shigeo; Tabara, Yasuharu; Matsumoto, Hisako; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Takahashi, Meiko; Ito, Isao; Ito, Yutaka; Murase, Kimihiko; Terao, Chikashi; Kosugi, Shinji; Yamada, Ryo; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Chin, Kazuo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a possible risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The association of COPD with the pathogenicity of infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae is controversial. We conducted a cross-sectional study to clarify the association between atypical pneumoniae seropositivity and COPD in a general population. We also investigated genetic polymorphisms conferring susceptibility to a pneumonia titer. The study included 9040 Japanese subjects (54 ± 13 years). COPD was defined as a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity of less than 70%. Serum levels of IgA and IgG antibodies to C pneumoniae were determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay, and M pneumoniae seropositivity was assessed by a particle agglutination test. Subjects seropositive for C pneumoniae (26.1%) had a higher prevalence of COPD (seropositive, 5.8%; seronegative, 3.1%; P < 0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, height, weight, and smoking status. The association between M pneumoniae seropositivity (20.4%) and COPD was also significant in covariate-adjusted analysis (P < 0.001). A genome-wide association analysis of the C pneumoniae IgA index identified a susceptible genotype (rs17634369) near the IKZF1 gene, and the seropositive rate of C pneumoniae significantly differed among genotypes (AA, 22.5; AG, 25.3; GG, 29.7%, P < 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, seropositivity for both C pneumoniae (odds ratio = 1.41, P = 0.004) and M pneumoniae (odds ratio = 1.60, P = 0.002) was an independent determinant for COPD, while no direct association was found with the rs17634369 genotype. Seropositivity for both C pneumoniae and M pneumoniae is an independent risk factor for COPD in the general population. PMID:27082601

  1. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia following recent cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Lokendra K; Jha, Kunal Kishor

    2016-01-01

    In this report we describe the case of an 18 year old female who presented with fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray revealed diffuse bilateral infiltrates and eosinophilia was reported from her broncholaveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. She started smoking 3 weeks prior to the onset of symptoms and based on her clinical presentation, BAL findings and dramatic improvement, acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) was diagnosed. PMID:27642564

  2. MyMpn: a database for the systems biology model organism Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wodke, Judith A H; Alibés, Andreu; Cozzuto, Luca; Hermoso, Antonio; Yus, Eva; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Serrano, Luis; Roma, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    MyMpn (http://mympn.crg.eu) is an online resource devoted to studying the human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a minimal bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Due to its small size, its ability to grow in vitro, and the amount of data produced over the past decades, M. pneumoniae is an interesting model organisms for the development of systems biology approaches for unicellular organisms. Our database hosts a wealth of omics-scale datasets generated by hundreds of experimental and computational analyses. These include data obtained from gene expression profiling experiments, gene essentiality studies, protein abundance profiling, protein complex analysis, metabolic reactions and network modeling, cell growth experiments, comparative genomics and 3D tomography. In addition, the intuitive web interface provides access to several visualization and analysis tools as well as to different data search options. The availability and--even more relevant--the accessibility of properly structured and organized data are of up-most importance when aiming to understand the biology of an organism on a global scale. Therefore, MyMpn constitutes a unique and valuable new resource for the large systems biology and microbiology community.

  3. Response of Airborne Mycoplasma pneumoniae to Abrupt Changes in Relative Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, M. T.; Wright, D. N.; Bailey, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of an abrupt change in the relative humidity on the viability of airborne Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been examined. When the microbial aerosols were permitted to equilibrate in air held at either low or high humidities and were then subjected to a sudden shift to a mid-range humidity, a significant loss (>90%) of the colony-forming units per liter of aerosol occurred within 8 min. In contrast, a change in the relative humidity of more than 18% in either direction from a lethal mid-range humidity noticeably decreased the rate of biological decay. Double humidity shifts (i.e., from dry to a mid-range level and then to a high humidity range) were very detrimental, with very few survivors after 8 min. These results indicate that the biological stability of airborne M. pneumoniae may be easily modified by a sudden change in the relative humidity, such as occurs in natural atmospheres. This increased sensitivity brought about by producing changes in relative humidity through the lethal humidity range may provide a method whereby the control of these organisms in naturally contaminated indoor air environments may be eventually achieved. PMID:5437301

  4. Development of Real-Time Multiplex Nucleic Acid Sequence-Based Amplification for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in Respiratory Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Loens, K.; Beck, T.; Ursi, D.; Overdijk, M.; Sillekens, P.; Goossens, H.; Ieven, M.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time multiplex isothermal nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) was developed to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens using the NucliSens Basic Kit (bioMérieux, Boxtel, The Netherlands). Oligonucleotide primers were derived from the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila 16S rRNA. For real-time detection, molecular beacons were used. Specificity was established on a panel of bacterial strains. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined by testing dilutions of wild-type in vitro-generated RNA in water and dilutions of reference strains in lysis buffer or added to pools of respiratory specimens. Subsequently, a limited number of M. pneumoniae-, C. pneumoniae-, and L. pneumophila-positive and -negative clinical specimens were analyzed. Specific detection of the 16S rRNA of the three organisms was achieved. The analytical sensitivity of the multiplex NASBA on spiked respiratory specimens was slightly diminished compared to the results obtained with the single-target (mono) real-time assays. We conclude that the proposed real-time multiplex NASBA assay, although less sensitive than the real-time mono NASBA assay, is a promising tool for the detection of M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and Legionella spp. in respiratory specimens, regarding handling, speed, and number of samples that can be analyzed in a single run. PMID:18032625

  5. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The structurally known GlpO from Streptococcus sp. (SspGlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (SpGlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. pneumoniae GlpO (MpGlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged MpGlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model the Bordetella pertussis protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant MpGlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced MpGlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by MpGlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as SspGlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting MpGlpO and SpGlpO.

  6. Macrolide Resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Detection Rate by Real-Time PCR in Primary and Tertiary Care Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Oh, Ki Jin; Cho, Hyun Mi; Park, Soon Deok; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in primary and tertiary care hospitals and its macrolide resistance rate. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 195 pediatric patients in primary and tertiary care hospitals from October to November 2010. The AccuPower MP real-time PCR kit (Bioneer, Korea) was used for the detection of M. pneumoniae. Direct amplicon sequencing was performed to detect point mutations conferring resistance to macrolides in the 23S rRNA gene. Results Among the 195 specimens, 17 (8.7%) were M. pneumoniae positive, and 3 of the strains (17.6%) obtained from these 17 specimens displayed the A2063G mutation in 23S rRNA. Three macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae isolates were isolated from patients hospitalized at the primary care hospital. The positive rates of M. pneumoniae for the primary and tertiary care hospitals were 12.1% (15/124) and 2.8% (2/71), respectively (P=0.033). Conclusions The positive rate of M. pneumoniae in the primary care hospital was higher than that in the tertiary care hospital. Simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae and macrolide-resistant mutation genes in the 23S rRNA by real-time PCR is needed for rapid diagnosis and therapy of M. pneumoniae infections. PMID:24205489

  7. [A case of bettolepsy in acute pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Valenkevich, L N; Markelova, N N

    1992-03-01

    Literature lists more than 300 case reports of bettolepsy developing mainly in chronic diseases of the respiratory organs (chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, pulmonary emphysema, cor pulmonale) as well as in patients with epilepsy and organic brain diseases. The authors describe a case of bettolepsy in a patient with acute (croupous) pneumonia without respiratory diseases in the anamnesis and without a burdened neurological status. The role of nicotin and alcohol in the development of bettolepsy is shown. The problems of pathogenesis, clinical picture, differential diagnosis and treatment of bettolepsy are discussed. PMID:1413706

  8. Resolution of migratory pulmonary infiltrates by moxifloxacin in a patient with dual infection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2012-12-01

    A 37-year-old Japanese woman, who was not vaccinated against Bordetella pertussis, developed a nocturnal fever with persistent dry cough for more than 2 weeks. A chest radiograph showed poorly-defined nodular opacities in the left lung. Due to the significant rise in serum antibodies for both Mycoplasma pneumoniae and B. pertussis, a diagnosis of dual infection with the organisms was made. Despite the use of susceptible antibiotics, the patient symptoms did not improve and her chest radiograph showed migratory pulmonary infiltrates. However, a quinolone derivative, moxifloxacin, dramatically improved her symptoms and resolved the pulmonary infiltrates shortly after administration. In this case, due to the lymphocyte-stimulatory nature of M. pneumoniae and B. pertussis, an increased immunological response was likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. The immunomodulatory property of moxifloxacin was thought to repress the increased lymphocyte activity, and thus facilitated complete remission of the disease. PMID:23299070

  9. Herd-specific strains of Mycoplasma bovis in outbreaks of mycoplasmal mastitis and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Aebi, Marlis; Bodmer, Michèle; Frey, Joachim; Pilo, Paola

    2012-06-15

    Mycoplasma bovis causes severe economic losses in livestock production, particularly on the Northern American continent and more recently also in continental Europe. The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether the recently emerging outbreaks were due to a particular clone or strain of M. bovis or whether these outbreaks are due to multiple infectious strains of M. bovis. The study is based on the analysis M. bovis isolated from cattle of herds with outbreaks of mycoplasmal mastitis or pneumonia from geographically non related parts of Switzerland. M. bovis isolates were typed by insertion sequence (IS) element analysis based upon ISMbov1 and ISMbov2 southern-blot hybridization. We observed a strong divergence of M. bovis strains among affected herds which mostly were herd specific. This argues against the assumption that a recent infiltration of a particular clone of M. bovis is the cause of the perilous emerging outbreaks. The study suggests that transmission occurs from animal to animal most probably via milk. PMID:22306036

  10. The immunodominant 90-kilodalton protein is localized on the terminal tip structure of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Franzoso, G; Hu, P C; Meloni, G A; Barile, M F

    1993-01-01

    Immunoblot analysis of convalescent-phase sera of experimentally infected chimpanzees or monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to the 90- and 40-kDa proteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae indicated that both proteins were present in cytadsorbing, pathogenic strains PI-1428, M129, and FH but absent in noncytadsorbing, nonpathogenic strain M129-B176. Adsorption of convalescent-phase chimpanzee sera with virulent strain PI-1428 removed reactivity, whereas adsorption with avirulent strain M129-B176 did not remove reactivity to these two proteins. By using proteolysis and specific MAbs, we demonstrated that the 90- and 40-kDa proteins were surface exposed. Immunoelectron microscopy employing specific MAbs showed that the 90-kDa protein is localized on the terminal tip attachment apparatus. However, the MAb specific for the 40-kDa protein failed to indicate a similar localization. Nevertheless, these data, taken together, indicate that the immunodominant 90- and 40-kDa proteins are surface exposed, are localized on the terminal tip apparatus, and might be involved in the attachment mechanism. Images PMID:8454358

  11. Large-scale metabolome analysis and quantitative integration with genomics and proteomics data in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tobias; Marcos, Josep; Wodke, Judith A H; Paetzold, Bernhard; Liebeke, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Serrano, Luis

    2013-07-01

    Systems metabolomics, the identification and quantification of cellular metabolites and their integration with genomics and proteomics data, promises valuable functional insights into cellular biology. However, technical constraints, sample complexity issues and the lack of suitable complementary quantitative data sets prevented accomplishing such studies in the past. Here, we present an integrative metabolomics study of the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. We experimentally analysed its metabolome using a cross-platform approach. We explain intracellular metabolite homeostasis by quantitatively integrating our results with the cellular inventory of proteins, DNA and other macromolecules, as well as with available building blocks from the growth medium. We calculated in vivo catalytic parameters of glycolytic enzymes, making use of measured reaction velocities, as well as enzyme and metabolite pool sizes. A quantitative, inter-species comparison of absolute and relative metabolite abundances indicated that metabolic pathways are regulated as functional units, thereby simplifying adaptive responses. Our analysis demonstrates the potential for new scientific insight by integrating different types of large-scale experimental data from a single biological source.

  12. Acute Mastoiditis Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Obringer, Emily; Chen, Judy L

    2016-05-01

    Acute mastoiditis (AM) is a relatively rare complication of acute otitis media (AOM). The most common pathogens include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Pneumococcal vaccination and changes in antibiotic prescribing recommendations for AOM may change the incidence of AM in the future. Diagnosis of AM can be made based on clinical presentation, but computed tomography of the temporal bone with contrast should be considered if there is concern for complicated AM. Both extracranial and intracranial complications of AM may occur. Previously, routine cortical mastoidectomy was recommended for AM treatment, but new data suggest that a more conservative treatment approach can be considered, including intravenous (IV) antibiotics alone or IV antibiotics with myringotomy. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e176-e179.]. PMID:27171806

  13. Acute interstitial pneumonia: report of a series.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, A; Cancellieri, A; Chilosi, M; Trisolini, R; Boaron, M; Crimi, N; Poletti, V

    2003-01-01

    Four cases of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) are described with special emphasis on clinical background, lung imaging and bronchoalveolar lavage findings. A retrospective chart review of four patients with histologically-proven AIP, diagnosed between 1998 and 2000, was carried out. Clinical data, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) findings, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and histological features were analysed. Three patients died and only one is in follow-up. HRCT showed areas of ground glass attenuation and alveolar consolidation in all patients. Histology, documented by open lung biopsy or autopsy specimens, was consistent with the organising form of diffuse alveolar damage pattern. BAL findings were characteristic, with a huge neutrophilia associated with scattered atypical type II pneumocytes collected in clusters with extracellular amorphous material (fragments of hyaline membranes) observed in two out of three cases. In this paper, four cases of acute interstitial pneumonia are reported in detail. The poor prognosis associated with this entity has been confirmed and the possible diagnostic role of the bronchoalveolar lavage is emphasised.

  14. [Acute interstitial pneumonia: diagnostic approach and management].

    PubMed

    Feuillet, S; Tazi, A

    2011-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) encompasses a spectrum of pulmonary disorders characterized by involvement of the lung interstitium and distal airways (bronchioles and alveoli). The onset of respiratory symptoms is acute, most often within two weeks. Most AIP take place de novo, but sometimes represent an acute exacerbation of chronic lung disease. The clinical presentation of AIP comprises rapidly progressive dyspnoea, associated sometimes with cough, fever, myalgia and asthenia. Chest radiography shows diffuse pulmonary opacities. The associated hypoxemia may be severe enough to cause acute respiratory failure. Underlying aetiologies are numerous and variable, particularly in relation to the underlying immune status of the host. Various histopathological entities may be responsible for AIP although diffuse alveolar damage is the predominant pattern. The diagnostic approach to a patient presenting with AIP is to try to determine the most likely underlying histopathological pattern and to search for a precise aetiology. It relies mainly on a meticulous clinical evaluation and accurate biological investigation, essentially guided by the results of bronchoalveolar lavage performed in an area identified by abnormalities on high resolution computed tomography of the lungs. Initial therapeutic management includes symptomatic measures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment adapted to the clinical context, frequently combined with systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  15. Isolation and immunological detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in sheep with atypical pneumonia, and lack of a role for Mycoplasma arginini.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y-C; Miles, R J; Nicholas, R A J; Kelly, D P; Wood, A P

    2008-06-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae NCTC 10151(T) and four new isolates from UK sheep flocks were compared. Only glucose and pyruvate were used as energy sources by the five strains: glucose was the best energy source for the type strain, pyruvate supported better growth of the new strains. Whole cell protein patterns and antigenic profiles showed high similarity between all five strains. The new isolates fell into two groups in ELISA tests. Serum samples from 30 pneumonic sheep were assessed for M. ovipneumoniae infection and Mycoplasma arginini co-infection. Fourteen (out of 30) serum samples were positive for M. ovipneumoniae both by ELISA and immunoblotting. Twelve antigenic proteins of M. ovipneumoniae were detected in infected serum samples: the antigen patterns were unique, with between one and at least seven occurring in any one sample. All serum samples were designated as negative for M. arginini antibodies by both ELISA and immunoblotting.

  16. Acute interstitial pneumonia and acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Swigris, Jeffrey J; Brown, Kevin K

    2006-12-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AEIPF) are similar respiratory disorders characterized by the rapid development of progressive dyspnea and cough. Both frequently lead to respiratory failure and death. Pathologically, each is characterized by the presence of a diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) pattern; in AIP, DAD is the sole pattern, whereas in AEIPF DAD is superimposed upon a background usual interstitial pneumonia. They differ in that patients with AEIPF have preexisting idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, whereas patients with AIP have no predisposing disorders to account for their disease. Because both presentations overlap with multiple other causes of acute lung injury, a comprehensive evaluation is necessary to rule out disorders such as overwhelming infection or congestive heart failure. Although a confident diagnosis can be achieved without it, a surgical lung biopsy is necessary to provide a definitive diagnosis. Despite minimal evidence, glucocorticoids are frequently begun once microbiological evaluation confirms the absence of infection. Despite therapy, the case fatality rate ranges up to 70% for both, with most patients dying in the first 2 weeks. Survivors of the acute event can recover to their previous baseline; however, most AIP survivors will stabilize with some functional impairment, whereas in those with AEIPF, progressive fibrosis with functional deterioration is the rule.

  17. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Sheppard, Edward S; Winchell, Jonas M; Dluhy, Richard A; Waites, Ken B; Atkinson, T Prescott; Krause, Duncan C

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  18. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Ratliff, Amy E.; Crabb, Donna M.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Dluhy, Richard A.; Waites, Ken B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains. PMID:26121242

  19. Specificity and Strain-Typing Capabilities of Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Detection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kelley C; Benitez, Alvaro J; Ratliff, Amy E; Crabb, Donna M; Sheppard, Edward S; Winchell, Jonas M; Dluhy, Richard A; Waites, Ken B; Atkinson, T Prescott; Krause, Duncan C

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for > 20% of all community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). At present the most effective means for detection and strain-typing is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity and specificity but requires separate tests for detection and genotyping, lacks standardization between available tests and between labs, and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We have developed and previously described a silver nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples, and the ability to distinguish between reference strains of the two main genotypes of M. pneumoniae. Furthermore, we have established a qualitative lower endpoint of detection for NA-SERS of < 1 genome equivalent (cell/μl) and a quantitative multivariate detection limit of 5.3 ± 1 cells/μl. Here we demonstrate using partial least squares- discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) of sample spectra that NA-SERS correctly identified M. pneumoniae clinical isolates from globally diverse origins and distinguished these from a panel of 12 other human commensal and pathogenic mycoplasma species with 100% cross-validated statistical accuracy. Furthermore, PLS-DA correctly classified by strain type all 30 clinical isolates with 96% cross-validated accuracy for type 1 strains, 98% cross-validated accuracy for type 2 strains, and 90% cross-validated accuracy for type 2V strains.

  20. Carbamazepine-Induced Incomplete Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Report of a Case in Children without Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    PubMed

    Techasatian, Leelawadee; Panombualert, Sunee; Uppala, Rattapon; Jetsrisuparb, Charoon

    2015-08-01

    Incomplete Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare reactive skin condition. Most cases are occurred in children and all are associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection. We reported an unusual case of a 6-year-old boy who developed the presentation of isolated mucosal erosion with a lack of skin findings, which indicated incomplete SJS after two weeks of carbamazepine (CBZ) administration. Findings of positive HLA-B*1502 allele supported a possible causative influence of carbamazepine inducing SJS. Interestingly, this patient was tested negatively for M. pneumoniae. This is a significant finding since there is no previous report of incomplete SJS without M. pneumoniae infection. Discontinuation of CBZ and administration of systemic corticosteroids were accomplished to treat SJS, which resulted in complete recovery. Our interesting findings highlighted the manifestation of incomplete SJS, which can present with other causes rather than M. pneumoniae infection. Early manifestation of mucosal change without typical skin lesions should not be neglected in the diagnosis of incomplete SJS. PMID:26742396

  1. Single-nucleotide polymorphism PCR for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and determination of macrolide resistance in respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Ji, Misuk; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Oh, Ji-Min; Jo, Ji Yoon; Choi, Eun Hwa; Yoo, Soo Jin; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Mi-Na; Sung, Heungsup

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR assay to be performed directly on respiratory samples for the simultaneous detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and its 23S rRNA gene mutations, which are responsible for macrolide resistance. For multiplex SNP PCR, two outer primers for amplification of the 23S rRNA gene and two mutant-specific primers for the discrimination of single base changes were designed. A total of 73M. pneumoniae-positive samples and 100M. pneumoniae-negative samples were analyzed using this assay. By SNP PCR, we detected two mutations conferring high-level macrolide resistance in 22 samples (A2063G from 20 and A2064G from 2 samples); these results are identical to those produced by the 23S rRNA gene sequencing of M. pneumoniae-positive samples. Thus, this assay can be used as a practical method for the simultaneous detection of M. pneumoniae and mutations associated with macrolide resistance directly from respiratory samples. PMID:24780151

  2. Airway Epithelial NF-κB Activation Promotes Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clearance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Nelson, Mark L.; Gally, Fabienne; Smith, Sean; Wu, Qun; Minor, Maisha; Case, Stephanie; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti; Chu, Hong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective Respiratory infections including atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) contribute to the pathobiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mp infection mainly targets airway epithelium and activates various signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have shown that short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) serves as a novel host defense protein and is up-regulated upon Mp infection through NF-κB activation in cultured human and mouse primary airway epithelial cells. However, the in vivo role of airway epithelial NF-κB activation in host defense against Mp infection has not been investigated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation on lung Mp clearance and its association with airway epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. Methodology/Main Results Non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog 9-t-butyl doxycycline (9-TB) was initially optimized in mouse primary tracheal epithelial cell culture, and then utilized to induce in vivo airway epithelial specific NF-κB activation in conditional NF-κB transgenic mice (CC10-CAIKKβ) with or without Mp infection. Lung Mp load and inflammation were evaluated, and airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that 9-TB treatment in NF-κB transgene positive (Tg+), but not transgene negative (Tg−) mice significantly reduced lung Mp load. Moreover, 9-TB increased airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein expression in NF-κB Tg+ mice. Conclusion By using the non-antimicrobial 9-TB, our study demonstrates that in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes lung bacterial clearance, which is accompanied by increased epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. PMID:23285237

  3. Comparison of antigens of pneumonia-associated mycoplasma species by gel diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ball, H J; Todd, D

    1978-09-01

    Comparison of fluorocarbon-extracted antigens of six mycoplasma species by double immunodiffusion and counterimmunodiffusion techniques revealed a close reciprocal relationship among Mycoplasma dispar, M. ovipneumoniae, and M. hyopneumoniae. A lesser degree of cross-reaction was also demonstrated between these three species and M. hyorhinis and M. bovoculi. The interrelationships were more clearly demonstrated by double immunodiffusion than by counterimmunodiffusion.

  4. Comparison of antigens of pneumonia-associated mycoplasma species by gel diffusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ball, H J; Todd, D

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of fluorocarbon-extracted antigens of six mycoplasma species by double immunodiffusion and counterimmunodiffusion techniques revealed a close reciprocal relationship among Mycoplasma dispar, M. ovipneumoniae, and M. hyopneumoniae. A lesser degree of cross-reaction was also demonstrated between these three species and M. hyorhinis and M. bovoculi. The interrelationships were more clearly demonstrated by double immunodiffusion than by counterimmunodiffusion. Images PMID:101469

  5. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  6. Antigen-pulsed bone marrow derived and pulmonary dendritic cells promote Th2 cell responses and immunopathology in lungs during the pathogenesis of murine mycoplasma pneumonia1

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Nicole A.; Zhou, Xia; Pulse, Mark; Hodge, Lisa M.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a common cause of pneumonia in humans and animals, and attempts to create vaccines have not only failed to generate protective host responses, but exacerbated the disease. Mycoplasma pulmonis causes a chronic inflammatory lung disease resulting from a persistent infection, similar to other mycoplasma respiratory diseases. Using this model, Th1 subsets promote resistance to mycoplasma disease and infection, while Th2 responses contribute to immunopathology. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the capacity of cytokine differentiated dendritic cells (DC) populations to influence the generation of protective and/or pathologic immune responses during M. pulmonis respiratory disease in BALB/c mice. We hypothesized that intratracheal inoculation of mycoplasma antigen-pulsed bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) could result in the generation of protective T cell responses during mycoplasma infection. However, intratracheal inoculation (priming) of mice with antigen-pulsed DCs resulted enhanced pathology in the recipient mice when challenged with mycoplasma. Inoculation of immunodeficient SCID mice with antigen-pulsed DCs demonstrated that this effect was dependent on lymphocyte responses. Similar results were observed when mice were primed with antigen-pulsed pulmonary, but not splenic, DCs. Lymphocytes generated in uninfected mice after the transfer of either antigen-pulsed BMDCs or pulmonary DCs were shown to be IL13+ Th2 cells, known to be associated with immunopathology. Thus, resident pulmonary DC most likely promote the development of immunopathology in mycoplasma disease through the generation of mycoplasma-specific Th2 responses. Vaccination strategies that disrupt or bypass this process could potentially result in a more effective vaccination. PMID:24973442

  7. [A case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to Nicolase (serrapeptase) after recovery from acute eosinophilic pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kai, Naoko; Shirai, Ryo; Hirata, Norio; Iwata, Atsuko; Umeki, Kenji; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kenji; Tokimatsu, Issei; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2009-03-01

    A case of eosinophilic pneumonia due to Nicolase (serrapeptase) after recovery from acute eosinophilic pneumonia is described. A 32-year-old woman was previously admitted to another hospital because of acute onset of dyspnea accompanied by cough and fever. Chest X-ray films revealed diffuse infiltration in both lungs two days after her symptoms occurred. Her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed 13% eosinophils and transbronchial lung biopsy specimen also showed many eosinophils infiltrating in the lesions of the bronchial submucosa and alveolar septa. No infectious causes or related drugs were found. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia was diagnosed, and her condition improved gradually without steroid treatment. Because she recovered clinically and radiologically, she was discharged from hospital. Half a month later she was treated with Nicolase because of pharyngitis. She was admitted to the hospital again because of dyspnea, cough and fever three days after commencing to take Nicolase. Chest X-ray films also revealed diffuse infiltration in both lungs with pleural effusion, and her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed 37% eosinophils. When the drug lymphocyte stimulation test was performed, it was positive for Nicolase. Therefore drug-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was diagnosed. This is a very rare case of Nicolase (serrapeptase)-induced eosinophilic pneumonia after recovering from acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

  8. Clonal Spread of a Unique Strain of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Within a Single Family in Italy.

    PubMed

    Chironna, Maria; Loconsole, Daniela; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Morea, Anna; Scalini, Egidio; Quarto, Michele; Tafuri, Silvio; Germinario, Cinzia; Manzionna, Mariano

    2016-03-01

    Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-MP) is an increasing problem worldwide. This study describes the clonal spread of a unique strain of MR-MP within a single family. On January 23, 2015, nasopharyngeal swabs and sputum samples were collected from the index case (a 9-year-old girl) in southern Italy. The patient had pneumonia and was initially treated with clarithromycin. MR-MP infection was suspected due to prolonged symptoms despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Two further cases of pneumonia occurred in relatives (a 7-year-old cousin and the 36-year-old mother of the index case); therefore, respiratory samples were also collected from other family members. Sequence analysis identified mutations associated with resistance to macrolides. Both P1 major adhesion protein typing and multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing were performed to assess the relatedness of the strains. The index case, the cousin, the mother, and another 4 family members (twin siblings of the index case, a 3-year-old cousin, and the grandmother) were positive for MR-MP. All strains harbored the mutation A2063G, had the same P1 subtype (1), and were MLVA (7/4/5/7/2) type Z. In addition, the index case's aunt (31 years of age and the probable source of infection) harbored an M pneumoniae strain with the same molecular profile; however, this strain was susceptible to macrolides. This cluster of MR-MP infection/carriage caused by a clonal strain suggests a high transmission rate within this family and highlights the need for increased awareness among clinicians regarding the circulation of MR-MP. Novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of M pneumoniae infections are required. PMID:26986172

  9. Clonal Spread of a Unique Strain of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Within a Single Family in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chironna, Maria; Loconsole, Daniela; De Robertis, Anna Lisa; Morea, Anna; Scalini, Egidio; Quarto, Michele; Tafuri, Silvio; Germinario, Cinzia; Manzionna, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MR-MP) is an increasing problem worldwide. This study describes the clonal spread of a unique strain of MR-MP within a single family. On January 23, 2015, nasopharyngeal swabs and sputum samples were collected from the index case (a 9-year-old girl) in southern Italy. The patient had pneumonia and was initially treated with clarithromycin. MR-MP infection was suspected due to prolonged symptoms despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. Two further cases of pneumonia occurred in relatives (a 7-year-old cousin and the 36-year-old mother of the index case); therefore, respiratory samples were also collected from other family members. Sequence analysis identified mutations associated with resistance to macrolides. Both P1 major adhesion protein typing and multiple loci variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) typing were performed to assess the relatedness of the strains. The index case, the cousin, the mother, and another 4 family members (twin siblings of the index case, a 3-year-old cousin, and the grandmother) were positive for MR-MP. All strains harbored the mutation A2063G, had the same P1 subtype (1), and were MLVA (7/4/5/7/2) type Z. In addition, the index case's aunt (31 years of age and the probable source of infection) harbored an M pneumoniae strain with the same molecular profile; however, this strain was susceptible to macrolides. This cluster of MR-MP infection/carriage caused by a clonal strain suggests a high transmission rate within this family and highlights the need for increased awareness among clinicians regarding the circulation of MR-MP. Novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of M pneumoniae infections are required. PMID:26986172

  10. Identification by culture, PCR, and immunohistochemistry of mycoplasmas and their molecular typing in sheep and lamb lungs with pneumonia in Eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kılıc, Ayşe; Kalender, Hakan; Eroksuz, Hatice; Muz, Adile; Tasdemir, Bülent

    2013-10-01

    This study used cultures, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunoperoxidase to examine samples from 216 lungs from sheep and lambs with macroscopic pneumonia lesions for the presence of Mycoplasma species. DNA was extracted from lung tissue samples and broth cultures with the help of a DNA extraction kit and replicated using genus-specific and species-specific primers for mycoplasma. The lung samples were examined by the immunoperoxidase method using hyperimmune Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae serum. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) test was used for the molecular typing of M. ovipneumoniae isolates. Mycoplasma was isolated in the cultures of 80 (37.03 %) of a total of 216 lung samples. Genus-specific mycoplasma DNA was identified by PCR in 96 (44.44 %) samples in broth cultures and 36 (16.66 %) directly in the lung tissue. Of these 96 cases in which genus-specific identification was made, 57 (59.37 %) were positive for reaction with species-specific primers for M. ovipneumoniae and 31 (32.29 %) for Mycoplasma arginini. The DNA of neither of the latter two species could be identified in the remaining eight samples (8.33 %) where mycoplasma had been identified. As for the immunoperoxidase method, it identified M. ovipneumoniae in 61 of 216 lung samples (28 %). Positive staining was concentrated in the bronchial epithelium cell cytoplasm and cell surface. RAPD analysis resulted in 15 different profiles. Our results suggest that PCR methods could be successfully used in the diagnosis of mycoplasma infections as an alternative to culture method and identifying this agent at the species level.

  11. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of immunoglobulin G reactive with a recombinant protein expressed from the gene encoding the 116-kilodalton protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M F; Whithear, K G; Noormohammadi, A H; Markham, P F; Catton, M; Leydon, J; Browning, G F

    1999-04-01

    Serology remains the method of choice for laboratory diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Currently available serological tests employ complex cellular fractions of M. pneumoniae as antigen. To improve the specificity of M. pneumoniae diagnosis, a recombinant protein was assessed as a serodiagnostic reagent. A panel of recombinant proteins were expressed from a cloned M. pneumoniae gene that encodes a 116-kDa surface protein antigen. The recombinant proteins were assessed for reactivity with patient sera and the most antigenic was further assessed for its serodiagnostic potential by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA based on the recombinant protein was equivalent in sensitivity to the commercial test (Serodia Myco II; Fujirebio Inc.) to which it was compared. Southern and Western blotting data suggested that the recombinant protein derived from the 116-kDa protein of M. pneumoniae could provide a species-specific diagnostic tool, although further assessment is required.

  12. Evaluation of 12 commercial tests and the complement fixation test for Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies, with PCR used as the "gold standard".

    PubMed

    Beersma, Matthias F C; Dirven, Kristien; van Dam, Alje P; Templeton, Kate E; Claas, Eric C J; Goossens, Herman

    2005-05-01

    Serology and nucleic acid amplification are the main diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Since no reference standard is generally accepted, serologic assays for M. pneumoniae have not been evaluated on a broad scale. In this study, 12 commercially available serologic assays (for immunoglobulin G [IgG] and IgM) and the complement fixation test (CFT) were evaluated by using M. pneumoniae DNA detection by real-time PCR as the "gold standard." The assays tested were Platelia EIA (Bio-Rad), SeroMP EIA (Savyon), Serion classic EIA (Virion/Serion), Biotest EIA (Biotest), Ridascreen EIA (r-Biopharm), AniLabsystems EIA (Labsystems), Novum EIA (Novum Diagnostica), Diagnosys EIA (MP products), Genzyme/Virotech EIA, ImmunoWell EIA (Genbio), ImmunoCard EIA (Meridian), and SerodiaMycoII microparticle agglutination (Fujirebio). Serum samples (n = 46) from 27 PCR-positive patients with a known first day of disease and sera (n = 33) from PCR-negative controls were obtained from prospective studies of acute lower respiratory tract infections. Additionally, control sera (n = 63) from patients with acute viral or bacterial respiratory infections other than those caused by M. pneumoniae were tested. The results showed low specificities for both the Novum and the ImmunoCard IgM assays. The IgM assays with the best performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity were AniLabsystems (77% and 92%, respectively), SeroMP (71% and 88%, respectively), and CFT (65% and 97%, respectively). Good receiver operating characteristic areas under the curve were found for CFT (0.94), the Platelia assay (0.87), and the AniLabsystems assay (0.85). We conclude that there are few commercial serologic assays for the detection of M. pneumoniae infections with appropriate performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity and that PCR has become increasingly important for the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae infections in defined groups of patients.

  13. Rapid and combined detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus using AllGlo quadruplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; He, Hui; Pan, Ping; He, Songzhe; Dong, Xueyan; Chen, Yueming; Wang, Shuying; Yu, Daojun

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The causes of ARI are dynamic, and co-infections of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus are recently developed causes of ARI. Here, we established a quadruplex quantitative PCR (qPCR) method to rapidly identify and simultaneously detect a single infection or co-infection of these three pathogens and an internal control in a single tube using AllGlo probes. The analysis demonstrated a wide linear range of detection from 101 to 108 copies per test and a low coefficient of variation of less than 5 %. The amplification efficiencies were all close to 1, and the correlation coefficients (r2) were all greater than 0.99. We found no significant difference in a comparative reagent test (P >0.05). Moreover, the results of tests on clinical samples using AllGlo quadruplex qPCR and TaqMan uniplex qPCR were in near-perfect agreement (κ =0.97). Clinically, the availability of this method will enable better differential diagnosis, disease surveillance and controlled outcomes. PMID:27093597

  14. [Serrapeptase-induced lung injury manifesting as acute eosiniphilic pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, S; Kawanami, R; Motizuki, Y; Nakahara, Y; Kawamura, T; Tanaka, A; Watanabe, S

    2000-07-01

    An 84-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of fever, cough, and hemoptysis. The patient had acute respiratory failure (PaO2 < 40 mmHg) on admission, with diffuse interstitial infiltration and bilateral pleural effusion. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was bloody, and contained a high percentage of eosinophils (32%). A diagnosis of acute eosinophilic pneumonia was established, and the patient made a rapid recovery after corticosteroids were administered. When the DLST (drug lymphocyte stimulation test) was performed after the corticosteroid therapy was stopped, it was positive for serrapeptase, which had been prescribed for chronic cystitis for 3 months before the onset of the pneumonia. This was a case of drug (serrapeptase)-induced pneumonitis manifesting as acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

  15. Chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep in New Zealand - a review of the role of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Alley, M R; Ionas, G; Clarke, J K

    1999-10-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia (CNP) is a common disease which affects lambs in New Zealand during late summer and autumn. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae can be recovered from a high proportion of lesions but it is also present in some normal lungs. Bacteria, especially Pasteurella haemolytica, can also be recovered from more than half the lungs of affected animals. Isolates of M. ovipneumoniae are genetically heterogeneous, as demonstrated by examination of their DNA or total cellular proteins, and are serologically heterogeneous as shown by metabolic inhibition tests. The number of strains present in New Zealand is large and several distinguishable strains can be recovered from each affected lung. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae has pathogenic potential as indicated by its ability to produce hydrogen peroxide, cause ciliostasis and by its possession of a capsule. Chronic non-progressive pneumonia can be transmitted consistently to over 50% of lambs by inoculation of pooled pneumonic lung homogenate and transmission can be suppressed by broad spectrum antibiotics. In contrast, penicillin does not prevent the development of lesions but diminishes their severity. Pooled lung homogenate treated with digitonin, which inactivates mycoplasmas, has failed to transmit CNP. Pure cultures of M. ovipneumoniae produce only mild lesions in some animals, whereas inoculation with pooled lung homogenate (from which no viruses were isolated) containing mixed strains of M. ovipneumoniae and free from bacteria, is more effective in producing lesions. Research work to date suggests that CNP may be initiated by colonisation of the lung by M. ovipneumoniae which causes ciliostasis and elicits an exudate allowing colonisation of the lungs by bacteria especially M. haemolytica and by other strains of M. ovipneumoniae. The immune response to the initial strain of M. ovipneumoniae may inhibit its replication but would be less effective in inhibiting heterologous strains of the organism allowing

  16. Relationship Among Chlamydia and Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Seropositivity, IKZF1 Genotype and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in A General Japanese Population: The Nagahama Study.

    PubMed

    Muro, Shigeo; Tabara, Yasuharu; Matsumoto, Hisako; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Takahashi, Meiko; Ito, Isao; Ito, Yutaka; Murase, Kimihiko; Terao, Chikashi; Kosugi, Shinji; Yamada, Ryo; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Chin, Kazuo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a possible risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The association of COPD with the pathogenicity of infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae is controversial. We conducted a cross-sectional study to clarify the association between atypical pneumoniae seropositivity and COPD in a general population. We also investigated genetic polymorphisms conferring susceptibility to a pneumonia titer. The study included 9040 Japanese subjects (54 ± 13 years). COPD was defined as a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity of less than 70%. Serum levels of IgA and IgG antibodies to C pneumoniae were determined using an enzyme-linked immunoassay, and M pneumoniae seropositivity was assessed by a particle agglutination test. Subjects seropositive for C pneumoniae (26.1%) had a higher prevalence of COPD (seropositive, 5.8%; seronegative, 3.1%; P < 0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, height, weight, and smoking status. The association between M pneumoniae seropositivity (20.4%) and COPD was also significant in covariate-adjusted analysis (P < 0.001). A genome-wide association analysis of the C pneumoniae IgA index identified a susceptible genotype (rs17634369) near the IKZF1 gene, and the seropositive rate of C pneumoniae significantly differed among genotypes (AA, 22.5; AG, 25.3; GG, 29.7%, P < 0.001). On multiple regression analysis, seropositivity for both C pneumoniae (odds ratio = 1.41, P = 0.004) and M pneumoniae (odds ratio = 1.60, P = 0.002) was an independent determinant for COPD, while no direct association was found with the rs17634369 genotype. Seropositivity for both C pneumoniae and M pneumoniae is an independent risk factor for COPD in the general population. PMID:27082601

  17. Crystallization, Preliminary X-ray Analysis and Biophysical Characterization of HPr Kinase/Phosphatase of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauer, K.

    2002-01-01

    The Mycoplasma pneumoniae HPr kinase/phosphatase (HPrK/P) is a member of a large family of enzymes which are central to carbon regulation in Gram-positive bacteria. The full-length M. pneumonia HPrK/P was crystallized from solutions of polyethylene glycol 8000 and KCl or NaCl which also contained the non-hydrolysable ATP analog adenosine 5'-[{beta},{gamma}-methylene]triphosphate (AMPPCP). The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 117.1, b = 127.7, c = 170.7 {angstrom}. A complete X-ray intensity data set has been collected and processed to 2.50 {angstrom} resolution. The slow self-rotation function revealed the presence of a sixfold axis. Dynamic light-scattering (DLS) experiments indicated a molecular weight of 197 kDa for HPrK/P in the absence of AMPPCP and of 217 kDa in the presence of the ATP analog. Thus, the biophysical and crystallographic data suggest that HPrK/P is a functional hexamer that undergoes an ATP-binding-induced conformational change.

  18. Lymphatic fluctuation in the parenchymal remodeling stage of acute interstitial pneumonia, organizing pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, E R; Araujo, C A L; Lombardi, J G; Ab'Saber, A M; Carvalho, C R R; Kairalla, R A; Capelozzi, V L

    2012-05-01

    Because the superficial lymphatics in the lungs are distributed in the subpleural, interlobular and peribroncovascular interstitium, lymphatic impairment may occur in the lungs of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) and increase their severity. We investigated the distribution of lymphatics in different remodeling stages of IIPs by immunohistochemistry using the D2-40 antibody. Pulmonary tissue was obtained from 69 patients with acute interstitial pneumonia/diffuse alveolar damage (AIP/DAD, N = 24), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/organizing pneumonia (COP/OP, N = 6), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP/NSIP, N = 20), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP, N = 19). D2-40+ lymphatic in the lesions was quantitatively determined and associated with remodeling stage score. We observed an increase in the D2-40+ percent from DAD (6.66 ± 1.11) to UIP (23.45 ± 5.24, P = 0.008) with the advanced process of remodeling stage of the lesions. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed a better survival for patients with higher lymphatic D2-40+ expression than 9.3%. Lymphatic impairment occurs in the lungs of IIPs and its severity increases according to remodeling stage. The results suggest that disruption of the superficial lymphatics may impair alveolar clearance, delay organ repair and cause severe disease progress mainly in patients with AIP/DAD. Therefore, lymphatic distribution may serve as a surrogate marker for the identification of patients at greatest risk for death due to IIPs.

  19. Bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute coma.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Enise; Voss, Frederik; Gerigk, Roland; Lauterbach, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Loss of protective airway reflexes in patients with acute coma puts these patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia complicating the course of the primary disease. Available data vary considerably with regard to bacteriology, role of anaerobic bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Our objective was to research the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in acute coma patients who were not pre-treated with antibiotics or hospitalized within 30 days prior to the event. We prospectively analyzed 127 patient records from adult patients admitted, intubated and ventilated to a tertiary medical intensive care unit with acute coma. Bacteriology and antibiotic resistance testing from tracheal aspirate sampled within 24 h after admission, blood cultures, ICU scores (APACHE II, SOFA), hematology, and clinical chemistry were assessed. Patients were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The majority of patients with acute coma suffered from acute cardiovascular disorders, predominantly myocardial infarction, followed by poisonings, and coma of unknown cause. In a majority of our patients, microaspiration resulted in overt infection. Most frequently S. aureus, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae were isolated. Anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides spec., Fusobacteria, Prevotella spec.) were isolated from tracheal aspirate in a minority of patients, and predominantly as part of a mixed infection. Antibiotic monotherapy with a 2nd generation cephalosporin, or a 3rd generation gyrase inhibitor, was most effective in our patients regardless of the presence of anaerobic bacteria.

  20. Resveratrol ameliorates Serratia marcescens-induced acute pneumonia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Chen, Jan-Kan

    2008-04-01

    Serratia marcescens is an important nosocomial pathogen, which has been especially problematic as a cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia in the past two decades. Treatment of S. marcescens-related infections has been limited by emergence of multiple drug-resistant strains. Thus, the development of alternative agents for the prevention and treatment of Serratia infection is urgently needed. Resveratrol (RSV) is a compound with diverse biological effects including anti-cancer, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetes, and cancer chemoprevention. Whether RSV has in vivo prophylactic or therapeutic potential against infection remains uncharacterized. In the present study, we used a murine acute pneumonia model initiated by intratracheal application of S. marcescens to evaluate whether RSV possesses anti-infection properties. We showed that pretreatment with RSV for 3 days markedly increased alveolar macrophage infiltration, elevated NK cell activity, and decreased bacterial burden in the infected lung with a subsequent decrease in mortality. These effects were associated with significantly less-severe inflammatory phenotypes in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, including reduced neutrophil infiltration of the lungs, reduced phagocytosis activity, and reduced secretion of cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. To further characterize the underlying mechanism responsible for these effects of RSV, LPS derived from S. marcescens was used to induce acute pneumonia in rats, with or without RSV pretreatment. RSV was shown to ameliorate acute pneumonia via inhibition of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, including inhibition of IkappaBalpha phosphorylation and subsequent NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that RSV might be beneficial as a prophylactic treatment in patients at risk of an episode of S. marcescens-induced acute pneumonia.

  1. Periodicity in Attachment Organelle Revealed by Electron Cryotomography Suggests Conformational Changes in Gliding Mechanism of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Akihiro; Matsuo, Lisa; Kato, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a pathogenic bacterium, glides on host surfaces using a unique mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a protrusion comprised of knoblike surface structures and an internal core. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional structure of the organelle in detail by electron cryotomography. On the surface, knoblike particles formed a two-dimensional array, albeit with limited regularity. Analyses using a nonbinding mutant and an antibody showed that the knoblike particles correspond to a naplike structure that has been observed by negative-staining electron microscopy and is likely to be formed as a complex of P1 adhesin, the key protein for binding and gliding. The paired thin and thick plates feature a rigid hexagonal lattice and striations with highly variable repeat distances, respectively. The combination of variable and invariant structures in the internal core and the P1 adhesin array on the surface suggest a model in which axial extension and compression of the thick plate along a rigid thin plate is coupled with attachment to and detachment from the substrate during gliding. PMID:27073090

  2. The multivariate detection limit for Mycoplasma pneumoniae as determined by Nanorod Array-Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and comparison with limit of detection by qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kelley C.; Sheppard, Edward S.; Rivera-Betancourt, Omar E.; Choi, Joo-Young; Dluhy, Richard A.; Thurman, Kathleen A.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Krause, Duncan C.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a cell wall-less bacterial pathogen of the human respiratory tract that accounts for up to 20% of community-acquired pneumonia. At present, the standard for detection and genotyping is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which can exhibit excellent sensitivity but lacks standardization and has limited practicality for widespread, point-of-care use. We previously described a Ag nanorod array-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (NA-SERS) biosensing platform capable of detecting M. pneumoniae in simulated and true clinical throat swab samples with statistically significant specificity and sensitivity. We report here that differences in sample preparation influence the integrity of mycoplasma cells for NA-SERS analysis, which in turn impacts the resulting spectra. We have established a multivariate detection limit (MDL) using NA-SERS for M. pneumoniae intact-cell sample preparations. Using an adaptation of International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)-recommended methods for analyzing multivariate data sets, we found that qPCR had roughly 10× better detection limits than NA-SERS when expressed in CFU/ml and DNA concentration (fg). However, the NA-SERS MDL for intact M. pneumoniae was 5.3 ± 1.0 genome equivalents (cells/μl). By comparison, qPCR of a parallel set of samples yielded a limit of detection of 2.5 ± 0.25 cells/μl. Therefore, for certain standard metrics NA-SERS provides a multivariate detection limit for M. pneumoniae that is essentially identical to that determined via qPCR. PMID:25335653

  3. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  4. A case of acute interstitial pneumonia indistinguishable from bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: high-resolution CT findings and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ichikado, K; Johkoh, T; Ikezoe, J; Yoshida, S; Honda, O; Mihara, N; Nakamura, H; Tsujimura, T; Suga, M; Ando, M

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proved acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with subacute onset whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings were indistinguishable from those of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP)/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). The HRCT findings were air-space consolidation with air-bronchiologram associated with little ground-glass attenuation, and nodules. Some cases of AIP present HRCT findings indistinguishable from those of BOOP/COP.

  5. [Differential magnetic resonance diagnosis of central lung cancer and acute pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Gamova, E V; Nudnov, N V

    2006-01-01

    The paper analyzes the authors' own data of chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 86 patients with verified central lung cancer and acute pneumonia. The MRI signs of lung cancer are systematized in exo-, endo-, and peribronchial forms of growth. The additional capacities of contrast enhancement are analyzed. The MRI semiotics of acute pneumonia has been developed. The differential diagnostic criteria for recognizing central lung cancer and acute pneumonia have been also elaborated.

  6. Protective efficacy of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1C DNA vaccine fused with the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuiming; Wang, Shiping; Hu, Shihai; Yu, Minjun; Zeng, Yanhua; You, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Jinhong; Wu, Yimou

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the immunomodulatory responses of a DNA vaccine constructed by fusing Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 protein carboxy terminal region (P1C) with the Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB). BALB/c mice were immunized by intranasal inoculation with control DNAs, the P1C DNA vaccine or the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine. Levels of the anti-M. pneumoniae antibodies and levels of interferon-γ and IL-4 in mice were increased significantly upon inoculation of the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine when compared with the inoculation with P1C DNA vaccine. The LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently enhanced the M. pneumoniae-specific IgA and IgG levels. The IgG2a/IgG1 ratio was significantly higher in bronchoalveolar lavages fluid and sera from mice fusion with LTB and P1C than mice receiving P1C alone. When the mice were challenged intranasally with 10(7) CFU M. pneumoniae strain (M129), the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine conferred significantly better protection than P1C DNA vaccine (P < 0.05), as suggested by the results, such as less inflammation, lower histopathological score values, lower detectable number of M. pneumoniae strain, and lower mortality of challenging from 5 × 10(8) CFU M. pneumoniae. These results indicated that the LTB-P1C fusion DNA vaccine efficiently improved protective efficacy against M. pneumoniae infection and effectively attenuated development of M. pneumoniae in mice.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel potential virulence factor of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: characterization of the unusual cysteine desulfurase/desulfhydrase HapE.

    PubMed

    Großhennig, Stephanie; Ischebeck, Till; Gibhardt, Johannes; Busse, Julia; Feussner, Ivo; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing atypical pneumonia with a minimalized and highly streamlined genome. So far, hydrogen peroxide production, cytadherence, and the ADP-ribosylating CARDS toxin have been identified as pathogenicity determinants. We have studied haemolysis caused by M. pneumoniae, and discovered that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the oxidation of heme, but not for lysis of erythrocytes. This feature could be attributed to hydrogen sulfide, a compound that has previously not been identified as virulence factor in lung pathogens. Indeed, we observed hydrogen sulfide production by M. pneumoniae. The search for a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme identified HapE, a protein with similarity to cysteine desulfurases. In contrast to typical cysteine desulfurases, HapE is a bifunctional enzyme: it has both the cysteine desulfurase activity to produce alanine and the cysteine desulfhydrase activity to produce pyruvate and hydrogen sulfide. Experiments with purified HapE showed that the enzymatic activity of the protein is responsible for haemolysis, demonstrating that HapE is a novel potential virulence factor of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26711628

  8. Microbiological and serological studies on caprine pneumonias in Oman.

    PubMed

    Jones, G E; Wood, A R

    1988-01-01

    Eight of 10 typical cases of contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia in Oman yielded strain F38-like mycoplasmas from the lungs in high titre, but no other mycoplasmas: both negative animals had been treated with tylosin shortly before death. Among 21 other lungs examined three of six cases of acute pneumonia yielded Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae; one also yielded M capricolum. M ovipneumoniae was also isolated from all eight cases of chronic pneumonia sampled from an abattoir, and from the lungs of three animals which died without overt signs of pneumonia. A single isolate of M arginini and three of unidentified mycoplasmas were also obtained from goats with and without pneumonia. Various bacterial species were isolated, none of which predominated. Antibodies to M mycoides subspecies capri (M m capri) and strain F38 were detected in sera from eight different sources. Assuming titres of 1 in 40 or more as positive in the indirect haemagglutination test used, 29 per cent of 422 serum samples had antibodies to M m capri alone, 2.6 per cent to strain F38 alone and 3.6 per cent to both organisms. These results confirm the presence of F38-like mycoplasmas in Oman, and indicate also widespread infection with M m capri. The role of the latter in caprine pneumonias in Oman requires elucidation.

  9. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Teens > Pneumonia Print A A A ... having to go to the hospital. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (pronounced: noo-MOW-nyuh) is an infection ...

  10. Critical Role of Macrophages and Their Activation via MyD88-NFκB Signaling in Lung Innate Immunity to Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jen-Feng; Zindl, Carlene L.; Duffy, Lynn B.; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Jung, Yong Woo; van Rooijen, Nico; Waites, Ken B.; Krause, Duncan C.; Chaplin, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp), a common cause of pneumonia, is associated with asthma; however, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We investigated the cellular immune response to Mp in mice. Intranasal inoculation with Mp elicited infiltration of the lungs with neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages. Systemic depletion of macrophages, but not neutrophils, resulted in impaired clearance of Mp from the lungs. Accumulation and activation of macrophages were decreased in the lungs of MyD88−/− mice and clearance of Mp was impaired, indicating that MyD88 is a key signaling protein in the anti-Mp response. MyD88-dependent signaling was also required for the Mp-induced activation of NFκB, which was essential for macrophages to eliminate the microbe in vitro. Thus, MyD88-NFκB signaling in macrophages is essential for clearance of Mp from the lungs. PMID:21203444

  11. Recombinant 46-kilodalton surface antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli can be used for early specific diagnosis of mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Futo, S; Seto, Y; Okada, M; Sato, S; Suzuki, T; Kawai, K; Imada, Y; Mori, Y

    1995-03-01

    The 46-kDa surface antigen (P46) is the early and species-specific immunogenic protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Three TGA codons encoding tryptophan in the P46 gene were replaced with TGG by an in vitro mutagenesis technique. The mutated P46 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli by using the chelating peptide tag system. The purified recombinant P46 was successfully used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae in swine serum. It did not cross-react with sera from swine infected with Mycoplasma flocculate, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, or Mycoplasma hyosynoviae. With this method, mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine was detectable within 2 weeks after infection. PMID:7751376

  12. Recombinant 46-kilodalton surface antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli can be used for early specific diagnosis of mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Futo, S; Seto, Y; Okada, M; Sato, S; Suzuki, T; Kawai, K; Imada, Y; Mori, Y

    1995-01-01

    The 46-kDa surface antigen (P46) is the early and species-specific immunogenic protein of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Three TGA codons encoding tryptophan in the P46 gene were replaced with TGG by an in vitro mutagenesis technique. The mutated P46 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli by using the chelating peptide tag system. The purified recombinant P46 was successfully used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies against M. hyopneumoniae in swine serum. It did not cross-react with sera from swine infected with Mycoplasma flocculate, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, or Mycoplasma hyosynoviae. With this method, mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine was detectable within 2 weeks after infection. PMID:7751376

  13. Inhibition of pulmonary nuclear factor kappa-B decreases the severity of acute Escherichia coli pneumonia but worsens prolonged pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is central to the pathogenesis of inflammation in acute lung injury, but also to inflammation resolution and repair. We wished to determine whether overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor IκBα could modulate the severity of acute and prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury in a series of prospective randomized animal studies. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo intratracheal instillation of (a) 5 × 109 adenoassociated virus (AAV) vectors encoding the IκBα transgene (5 × 109 AAV-IκBα); (b) 1 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; (c) 5 × 1010 AAV-IκBα; or (d) vehicle alone. After intratracheal inoculation with Escherichia coli, the severity of the lung injury was measured in one series over a 4-hour period (acute pneumonia), and in a second series after 72 hours (prolonged pneumonia). Additional experiments examined the effects of IκBα and null-gene overexpression on E. coli-induced and sham pneumonia. Results In acute pneumonia, IκBα dose-dependently decreased lung injury, improving arterial oxygenation and lung static compliance, reducing alveolar protein leak and histologic injury, and decreasing alveolar IL-1β concentrations. Benefit was maximal at the intermediate (1 × 1010) IκBα vector dose; however, efficacy was diminished at the higher (5 × 1010) IκBα vector dose. In contrast, IκBα worsened prolonged pneumonia-induced lung injury, increased lung bacterial load, decreased lung compliance, and delayed resolution of the acute inflammatory response. Conclusions Inhibition of pulmonary NF-κB activity reduces early pneumonia-induced injury, but worsens injury and bacterial load during prolonged pneumonia. PMID:23622108

  14. Acute interstitial pneumonia: radiographic and CT findings in nine patients.

    PubMed

    Primack, S L; Hartman, T E; Ikezoe, J; Akira, M; Sakatani, M; Müller, N L

    1993-09-01

    The radiologic findings were reviewed in nine patients with biopsy- or autopsy-proved acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). All patients had bilateral air-space opacification on radiographs and bilateral, symmetric areas of ground-glass attenuation on computed tomographic (CT) scans. The areas of ground-glass attenuation had a patchy distribution in six patients (67%) and were diffuse in three patients. Air-space consolidation was seen at CT in six patients (67%) and involved mainly the lower lung zones in three patients and upper lung zones in one patient and was diffuse in two patients. A predominantly subpleural distribution of the consolidation was present in two patients. Eight of the nine patients died within 3 months of presentation. The authors conclude that the radiographic and CT features of AIP are similar to those of adult respiratory distress syndrome and represent acute alveolar damage. AIP differs from the more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia in clinical presentation and in pathologic and radiologic findings.

  15. Evaluation of four commercial IgG- and IgM-specific enzyme immunoassays for detecting Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody: comparison with particle agglutination assay.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Soo Jin; Oh, Hye-Jeon; Shin, Bo-Moon

    2007-10-01

    Diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is important due to its variable clinical manifestations and absence of response to beta-lactams. Introduction of enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for serologic diagnosis of M. pneumoniae has made it possible to separate the analyses of specific IgG and IgM antibodies. We compared four different commercial EIAs, ImmunoWELL IgG, IgM (GenBio), Medac IgG, IgA, IgM (Medac), Platelia IgG, IgM (Sanofi Pasteur), and Ridascreen IgG, IgA, IgM (r-Biopharm) with indirect particle agglutination assay (PA), Serodia-MycoII (Fujirebio). We tested 91 specimens from 73 pediatric patients (2-17 yr) hospitalized at a tertiary-care hospital between December 2005 and January 2006. The measurements of IgM EIAs were correlated with PA titers (Spearman's correlation coefficient, from 0.89 to 0.92) with high concordance rates, ranging from 82.4% to 92.3%. However, some negative IgM-EIA results in PA-positive specimens indicated that serial samplings with convalescent sera would be necessary to confirm M. pneumoniae infection.

  16. Adenovirus Pneumonia Complicated With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ka-Ho; Lin, Lung-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Severe adenovirus infection in children can manifest with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and respiratory failure, leading to the need for prolonged mechanical support in the form of either mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support. Early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) intervention for children with ARDS should be considered if selection criteria fulfill. We report on a 9-month-old boy who had adenovirus pneumonia with rapid progression to ARDS. Real-time polymerase chain reaction tests of sputum and pleural effusion samples confirmed adenovirus serotype 7. Chest x-rays showed progressively increasing infiltrations and pleural effusions in both lung fields within 11 days. Because conventional ARDS therapies failed, we initiated ECMO with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) for 9 days. Chest x-rays showed gradual improvements in lung expansion. This patient was subsequently discharged after a hospital stay of 38 days. Post-ECMO and adenovirus sequelae were followed in our outpatient department. Adenovirus pneumonia in children can manifest with severe pulmonary morbidity and respiratory failure. The unique lung recruitment by HFOV can be a useful therapeutic option for severe ARDS patients when combined with sufficient lung rest provided by ECMO. PMID:25997046

  17. [Perioperative lung injury: acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and acute interstitial pneumonia after pulmonary resection].

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Kondo, Takashi

    2004-12-01

    The mortality rate after surgical resection for lung cancer has been reported to range between 1% and 3%, with 30% caused by acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) or acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Approximately 20% of patients with IPF have lung cancer, while 2% to 4% of lung cancer patients have IPF. The incidence of postoperative acute exacerbation of IPF is about 20%. Some investigations in Japan revealed that 10% to 17% of lung cancer patients undergoing lung resection, who have not been diagnosed with IPF preoperatively, have localized-usual interstitial pneumonia (Lo-UIP) lesions. Approximately 20% of patients with Lo-UIP show postoperative acute exacerbation, while about 0.5% of those without Lo-UIP develop AIP after surgery. There is no confirmed treatment or prophylaxis. Most patients who develop postoperative acute exacerbation or AIP are treated with methylpredonisolone (1,000 mg/day x 3 days), but the mortality rate is 50% or greater. We emphasize that more efforts should be made to develop strategies to prevent postoperative acute exacerbation of IPF and AIP.

  18. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia associated with glyphosate-surfactant exposure.

    PubMed

    De Raadt, Wanda M; Wijnen, Petal A; Bast, Aalt; Bekers, Otto; Drent, Marjolein

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient who developed acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) after recent onset of smoking and exposure to glyphosate-surfactant.The additional exposure associated with the recent start of smoking may have contributed to the development and/or severity of AEP.A clinical relapse after re-challenge four years later both with smoking and glyphosate-surfactant made the association highly likely.Respiratory distress is a factor of poor outcome and mortality after ingestion of glyphosate-surfactant.This case highlights the importance of a thorough exposure history e.g., possible occupational and environmental exposures together with drug-intake.Genotyping should be considered in cases of severe unexplained pulmonary damage. PMID:26278698

  19. Acute interstitial pneumonia in siblings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Yeon; Kim, Jong Min; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Myung Joon; Cho, Sang-Ho

    2008-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a rapidly progressive condition of unknown cause that occurs in a previously healthy individual and produces the histologic findings of diffuse alveolar damage. Since the term AIP was first introduced in 1986, there have been very few case reports of AIP in children. Here we present a case of AIP in a 3-yr-old girl whose other two siblings showed similar radiologic findings. The patient was confirmed to have AIP from autopsy showing histological findings of diffuse alveolar damage and proliferation of fibroblasts. Her 3-yr-old brother was also clinically and radiologically highly suspected as having AIP, and the other asymptomatic 8-yr-old sister was radiologically suspected as having AIP.

  20. Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: Pyrethroid Exposure & Change In Smoking Habit!

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Kevin; Klair, Jagpal Singh; Johnsrud, Andrew; Meena, Nikhil K

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia (AEP) in a 29-year-old white woman with recent use of a'flea bomb' (containing pyrethroids) at home while remaining indoors, about 48 hours prior to presentation, and recent change in smoking habit (restarted 2 weeks prior after quitting for 10 years). She presented with two days of worsening fever, shortness of breath, productive cough, developed hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. She required a PEEP of 20 and 100% FiO2 to maintain oxygenation. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed 36% Eosinophils. She was given IV steroids with dramatic clinical and radiological improvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report associating AEP with pyrethroid exposure. PMID:27434983

  1. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Acute placental infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: report of a unique case.

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Salwa S; Amr, Samir S; Lage, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman, gravida 9, with seven healthy children and a history of one abortion (p 7 + 1), presented at 18 weeks of gestation with fever and malodorous vaginal discharge. Ultrasound revealed a macerated fetus. The placenta showed acute chorioamnionitis and acute villitis with microabscess formation. Blood and vaginal cultures both grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. This is the first reported case in English literature of Klebsiella pneumoniae causing suppurative placentitis leading to fetal demise. PMID:16040328

  3. Prevalence, genotyping and macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae among isolates of patients with respiratory tract infections, Central Slovenia, 2006 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Kogoj, Rok; Mrvic, Tatjana; Praprotnik, Marina; Kese, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study we employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyse the occurrence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae among upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the Central Region of Slovenia between January 2006 and December 2014. We also used a culture and pyrosequencing approach to genotype strains and infer their potential macrolide resistance. Of a total 9,431 tested samples from in- and out-patient with RTI, 1,255 (13%) were found to be positive by M. pneumoniae PCR. The proportion of positive samples was 19% (947/5,092)among children (≤16 years-old) and 7% (308/4,339) among adults (>16 years-old). Overall, among those PCR tested, the highest proportions of M. pneumonia infections during the study period were observed in 2010 and 2014. In these two years, 18% (218/1,237) and 25% (721/2,844) of samples were positive respectively,indicating epidemic periods. From the 1,255 M. pneumoniae PCR-positive samples, 783 (614 from paediatric and 169 from adult patients) were successfully cultured. Of these, 40% (312/783) were constituted of strains belonging to the P1 type II genomic group, while 60% (469/783) contained strains of the P1 type I group. Two isolates comprised both P1 type Iand II strains. Results of a genotype analysis by year,showed that the dominant M. pneumoniae P1 type during the 2010 epidemic was P1 type II (82% of isolates;81/99), which was replaced by P1 type I in the 2014 epidemic (75%; 384/510). This observation could indicate that the two epidemics may have been driven by a type shift phenomenon, although both types remained present in the studied population during the assessed period of time. Only 1% of strains (7/783) were found to harbour an A2063G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene,which confers macrolide resistance, suggesting that the occurrence of M. pneumoniae macrolide resistance still seems to be sporadic in our geographic area.

  4. Isolation of Chlamydia Pneumoniae from Serum Samples of the Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petyaev, Ivan M; Zigangirova, Nayilia A; Petyaev, Alexey M; Pashko, Ulia P; Didenko, Lubov V; Morgunova, Elena U; Bashmakov, Yuriy K

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited body of evidence suggests that lipopolysaccharide of C. pneumoniae as well as C. pneumoniae-specific immune complexes can be detected and isolated from human serum. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of viable elementary bodies of C.pneumoniae in serum samples of patients with acute coronary syndrome and healthy volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Serum specimens from 26 healthy volunteers and 56 patients with acute coronary syndrome were examined subsequently by serological (C.pneumoniae-specific IgA and IgG), PCR-based and bacteriological methods. Conventional, nested and TaqMan PCR were used to detect C.pneumoniae genetic markers (ompA and 16S rRNA) in DNA from serum specimens extracted with different methods. An alternative protocol which included culturing high-speed serum sediments in HL cells and further C.pneumoniae growth evaluation with immunofluorescence analysis and TaqMan PCR was established. Pellet fraction of PCR-positive serum specimens was also examined by immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS: Best efficiency of final PCR product recovery from serum specimens has been shown with specific C. pneumoniae primers using phenol-chloroform DNA extraction protocol. TaqMan PCR analysis revealed that human serum of patients with acute coronary syndrome may contain genetic markers of C. pneumoniae with bacterial load range from 200 to 2000 copies/ml serum. However, reliability and reproducibility of TaqMan PCR were poor for serum specimens with low bacterial copy number (<200 /ml). Combination of bacteriological, immunofluorescence and PCR- based protocols applied for the evaluating HL cells infected with serum sediments revealed that 21.0 % of the patients with acute coronary syndrome have viable forms C.pneumoniae in serum. The detection rate of C.pneumoniae in healthy volunteers was much lower (7.7%). Immunological profile of the patients did not match accurately C.pneumoniae detection rate in serum specimens. Elementary

  5. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria. PMID:26654847

  6. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria.

  7. Low-pathogenicity Mycoplasma spp. alter human monocyte and macrophage function and are highly prevalent among patients with ventilator-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, T J; Gadsby, N J; Templeton, K E; McMullan, R; McKenna, J P; Rennie, J; Robb, C T; Walsh, T S; Rossi, A G; Conway Morris, A; Simpson, A J

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) remains a significant problem within intensive care units (ICUs). There is a growing recognition of the impact of critical-illness-induced immunoparesis on the pathogenesis of VAP, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We hypothesised that, because of limitations in their routine detection, Mycoplasmataceae are more prevalent among patients with VAP than previously recognised, and that these organisms potentially impair immune cell function. Methods and setting 159 patients were recruited from 12 UK ICUs. All patients had suspected VAP and underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). VAP was defined as growth of organisms at >104 colony forming units per ml of BAL fluid on conventional culture. Samples were tested for Mycoplasmataceae (Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp.) by PCR, and positive samples underwent sequencing for speciation. 36 healthy donors underwent BAL for comparison. Additionally, healthy donor monocytes and macrophages were exposed to Mycoplasma salivarium and their ability to respond to lipopolysaccharide and undertake phagocytosis was assessed. Results Mycoplasmataceae were found in 49% (95% CI 33% to 65%) of patients with VAP, compared with 14% (95% CI 9% to 25%) of patients without VAP. Patients with sterile BAL fluid had a similar prevalence to healthy donor BAL fluid (10% (95% CI 4% to 20%) vs 8% (95% CI 2% to 22%)). The most common organism identified was M. salivarium. Blood monocytes from healthy volunteers incubated with M. salivarium displayed an impaired TNF-α response to lipopolysaccharide (p=0.0003), as did monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) (p=0.024). MDM exposed to M. salivarium demonstrated impaired phagocytosis (p=0.005). Discussion and conclusions This study demonstrates a high prevalence of Mycoplasmataceae among patients with VAP, with a markedly lower prevalence among patients with suspected VAP in whom subsequent cultures refuted the diagnosis. The most

  8. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  9. Azithromycin versus cefaclor in the treatment of acute bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kinasewitz, G; Wood, R G

    1991-10-01

    In this randomised, double-blind study carried out in 28 centres, azithromycin (500 mg single dose on day 1, followed by 250 mg once-daily on days 2-5) was compared with cefaclor (500 mg t.i.d. for 10 days) in the treatment of acute bacterial pneumonia. A total of 119 patients entered the study, and of these 71 were evaluable and included in the efficacy analysis. The overall satisfactory clinical response was 97.3% for azithromycin patients and 100% for cefaclor patients. The clinical cure rates of azithromycin and cefaclor were 46.9% and 41.0%, respectively; improvement was seen in an additional 46.9% of azithromycin-treated patients and in 59.0% of the cefaclor group. The bacteriological eradication rates were 80.4% and 92.6%, respectively. These rates of clinical and bacteriological efficacy, were not statistically different. Both antibiotics were well tolerated during the study; only two patients (one on each study drug) discontinued medication due to adverse events. The overall incidence of side effects was 18.9% (10 of 53 patients) for azithromycin- and 12.1% (eight of 66 patients) for cefaclor-treated patients. Gastrointestinal disturbances were the most commonly reported side effects (nine of 10 azithromycin-treated patients and six of eight cefaclor-treated patients). In addition, two cefaclor patients reported headache. All azithromycin side effects were mild or moderate in severity, but there were two severe occurrences in the cefaclor group (1 nausea, 1 vomiting) the later leading to discontinuation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... en español Neumonía You're out in the rain, jumping around in puddles, and somebody yells, "Get ... you really catch it from playing in the rain? What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (say: noo-MOW-nyuh) ...

  11. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  12. The Multidisciplinary Swallowing Team Approach Decreases Pneumonia Onset in Acute Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Shiro; Hirayama, Junko; Nakamori, Masahiro; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kubo, Satoshi; Nagano, Yuka; Nagao, Akiko; Yamane, Naoya; Nishikawa, Yuichi; Takamoto, Megumi; Ueno, Hiroki; Ochi, Kazuhide; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in acute stroke patients at high rates, and many of them develop aspiration pneumonia. Team approaches with the cooperation of various professionals have the power to improve the quality of medical care, utilizing the specialized knowledge and skills of each professional. In our hospital, a multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team was organized. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of a team approach on dysphagia by comparing the rates of pneumonia in acute stroke patients prior to and post team organization. All consecutive acute stroke patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2009 and March 2014 were registered. We analyzed the difference in the rate of pneumonia onset between the periods before team organization (prior period) and after team organization (post period). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazards model to determine the predictors of pneumonia. We recruited 132 acute stroke patients from the prior period and 173 patients from the post period. Pneumonia onset was less frequent in the post period compared with the prior period (6.9% vs. 15.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Based on a multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model, it was determined that a swallowing team approach was related to pneumonia onset independent from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score on admission (adjusted hazard ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.84, p = 0.02). The multidisciplinary participatory swallowing team effectively decreased the pneumonia onset in acute stroke patients. PMID:27138162

  13. Minocycline-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia: A case report and review of the literature☆

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sharon W.

    2015-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) can be a challenging diagnosis and is often initially misdiagnosed as one of the more common pneumonia syndromes such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Early bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is critical in distinguishing the diagnosis to initiate proper management. The etiology of AEP is unknown, though many drugs have been implicated, including minocycline. Minocycline is commonly used for pneumonia, acute bronchitis, urinary tract infections, and acne and is likely the cause of AEP in our patient. There are 26 case reports of minocycline-induced AEP. In most cases, outcomes were favorable and symptoms rapidly resolved upon discontinuation of minocycline, with 11 cases employing steroids, one case twelve hours of CPAP and another 5 days of intubation. None resulted in mortality. Although it is difficult to evaluate without further studies, steroids should be recommended for minocycline-induced AEP, especially for those with severe or persistent symptoms. PMID:26236618

  14. Pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  15. [Acute community-acquired pneumonia of moderate and grave severity investigated by bronchoscopy. Analysis of 193 cases hospitalized in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Vivès, L; Biel, P; Maler, G; Labonne, F; Lecoules, N; Dufour, M; Marignol, G; Vanche, J

    1996-01-01

    Between February 1989 and June 1994 193 cases of acute community acquired pneumonia (PAC) which were of intermediate or great severity were admitted to two hospitals in the South West of France. These patients were explored using bronchofibroscopy (FB) with a protected brush (BP) and alveolar microlavage (MLBA) and quantitative cultures were performed, also there were other specimens taken in a regular fashion. The percentage of positive examinations was 60% for brushings (BP), 59% for MLBA and 21% for blood cultures and 16% for serological tests. An aetiology was determined in 137 cases (70.9%). The organisms recovered were Streptococcus pneumoniae (49.6%), gram negative bacilli (17.4%), Haemophilus influenzae (11.7%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (4.4%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (4.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.6%), Chlamydia pneumoniae (2.2%), Legionella pneumophila (0.7%), and various 5.8%. The overall mortality was 15% despite immediate antibiotics based on the likely organism in 88% of cases. The study of prognostic factors confirmed the Fine score system (determined a posteriori) which constitutes a useful and practical index determining the management of PAC. On the other hand the role of bacteriological documentation in improving the vital prognosis remains to be confirmed. If bronchofibroscopy has appeared to us as a safe and useful means of investigation, the management of these disease remains to specified. We suggest that its use is reserved for subjects with life threatening disease (a Fine score equal to or greater than 3) or for those patients who are likely to have unusual germs: failure of previous antibiotics, diabetes, malnourishment, cancer, airflow obstruction and inhalation. PMID:8711237

  16. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  17. The pneumoplex assays, a multiplex PCR-enzyme hybridization assay that allows simultaneous detection of five organisms, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Legionella micdadei, and Bordetella pertussis, and its real-time counterpart.

    PubMed

    Khanna, M; Fan, J; Pehler-Harrington, K; Waters, C; Douglass, P; Stallock, J; Kehl, S; Henrickson, K J

    2005-02-01

    Respiratory disease caused by atypical bacteria remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality for adults and children, despite the widespread use of effective antimicrobials agents. Culture remains the "gold standard" for the detection of these agents. However, culture is labor-intensive, takes several days to weeks for growth, and can be very insensitive for the detection of some of these organisms. Newer singleplex PCR diagnostic tests are sensitive and specific, but multiple assays would be needed to detect all of the common pathogens. Therefore, we developed the Pneumoplex assays, a multiplex PCR-enzyme hybridization assay (the standard assay) and a multiplex real-time assay to detect the most common atypical pathogens in a single test. Primer and probe sequences were designed from conserved regions of specific genes for each of these organisms. The limits of detection were as follows: for Bordetella pertussis, 2 CFU/ml; for Legionella pneumophila (serotypes 1 to 15) and Legionella micdadei, 9 and 80 CFU/ml, respectively; for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 5 CFU/ml; and for Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae, 0.01 50% tissue culture infective doses. Recombinant DNA controls for each of these organisms were constructed, and the number of copies for each DNA control was calculated. The Pneumoplex could detect each DNA control down to 10 copies/ml. The analytical specificity demonstrated no cross-reactivity between 23 common respiratory pathogens. One hundred twenty-five clinical bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples tested by the standard assay demonstrated that the Pneumoplex yielded a sensitivity and a specificity of 100 and 98.5%, respectively. This test has the potential to assist clinicians in establishing a specific etiologic diagnosis before initiating therapy, to decrease hospital costs, and to prevent inappropriate antimicrobial therapy.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae among Japanese children with acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hotomi, Muneki; Nakajima, Kouji; Hiraoka, Masanobu; Nahm, Moon H; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine may change the epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The increased prevalence of non-vaccine serotypes as the cause of pneumococcal diseases has already reported in the United States and Europe. However, little attention has been focused on the S. pneumoniae. In this study, nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae were identified in 15 isolates (6.4%) out of 236 pneumococcal strains obtained from the nasopharynges of children with acute otitis media (AOM), in 3 isolates (14.3%) out of 21 strains from acute rhinosinusitis, and in 2 isolates (12.5%) out of 16 nasopharyngeal carriage strains obtained from normal healthy children. Among the 20 nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae isolates, 15 (75.0%) isolates had the pspK gene. Seven sequence types (STs) were identified: ST7502 (5 strains), ST1106 (2 strains), ST7803 (2 strains), ST7786 (1 strain), ST6741 (1 strain), ST7496 (1 strain), and ST8642 (1 strain). Because nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains are not targeted by the current available pneumococcal vaccines, these strains will gradually become more common in nasopharyngeal carriage. The increase in colonization and dissemination of these strains would increase the risk of AOM and other systemic pneumococcal diseases against which current vaccines cannot provide protection. Nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae may thus become more prevalent as human pathogen.

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  20. Acute fibrinous organising pneumonia: a manifestation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Fady; Ayaz, Syed Zain; Choate, Jacquelyn

    2014-10-29

    A 50-year-old man was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for acute arthritis of his right big toe. Within a few days, he developed dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Symptoms improved with discontinuation of the antibiotic but worsened again with its reintroduction. An open lung biopsy was performed. We describe the workup performed and the factors that pointed to a final diagnosis of TMP-SMX-related pulmonary toxicity in the form of acute fibrinous organising pneumonia.

  1. Acute Bilateral Tuberculous Pneumonia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rama; Bhat, Nitin; D’Souza, Savio; Chenchaiah, Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a common infection associated with immunocompromised state. It usually presents with fibrosis or fibrocavitary lesions in the lung. We report a case of bilateral tuberculous pneumonia of acute presentation in a young lady who was being treated for systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:27437280

  2. Time course of lung function changes in atypical pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Benusiglio, L N; Stalder, H; Junod, A F

    1980-01-01

    We measured pulmonary function in each of 21 patients suffering from "atypical", non-bacterial pneumonia during the acute illness and during convalescence (two to 18 months) to study the course and the nature of functional impairment at different stages of the disease. In six patients, no aetiological agent was found. An aetiological agent was identified in 15 of the patients: Mycoplasma pneumoniae (seven patients), influenza A (three patients), parainfluenza 3 (one patient), varicella (two patients), Q fever (one patient), coxsackie B3 (one patient). At the time of admission we observed a restrictive pattern in 52%, an obstructive pattern (decreased FEV1/FVC ratio) in 52% abnormalities in distribution of ventilation (abnormal slope of phase 3) in 63%, and abnormalities in gas exchange (increased AaDO2) in 75% of the patients. The frequency of abnormalities in these pulmonary function tests decreased dramatically after two to four weeks and nearly disappeared in most patients during convalescence. The only major residual abnormality was a decreased FEV1/FVC ratio in five subjects, four of whom were smokers. However, when MMEF and V75 were measured at this stage, their average value for all the groups of patients with the exclusion of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae group, was markedly reduced. These data suggest that small airways involvement can be demonstrated during the convalescence of patients recovering from various types of atypical pneumonia other than those caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae. PMID:7444825

  3. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T Cells Dampen Inflammatory Disease in Murine Mycoplasma Pneumonia and Promote IL-17 and IFN-γ Responses

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Adam N.; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas cause respiratory diseases characterized by persistent infection and chronic airway inflammation. Mycoplasma lung disease is immunopathologic, with CD4+ Th cells determining both disease severity and resistance to infection. Th2 cell responses promote immunopathology, while Th1 cells confer resistance to infection. However, regulatory CD4+ T cells may also have a role in the pathogenesis of mycoplasma respiratory diseases. We hypothesized Treg cells control the severity of the inflammatory lesions and may also promote persistence of infection. To examine this, BALB/c mice were depleted of CD25+ cells, and had increased disease severity due to Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. Increases in mycoplasma antibody responses and lymphocyte infiltration into lungs also occurred after CD25+ cell depletion. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells promoted IFN-γ and IL-17 mycoplasma-specific CD4+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo, while dampening IL-13+ Th responses. Neither IL-10 nor TGF-ß expression was detected in CD4+CD25+ T cells from lymph nodes. Thus, a regulatory T cell population plays an important role in controlling damaging immune responses in mycoplasma respiratory disease but does not contribute to persistence of infection. It appears that a regulatory T cell population preferentially dampens Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory responses to mycoplasma through a mechanism independent of IL-10 or TGF-ß characteristic of “classic” Treg cells. PMID:27175511

  4. Efficacy of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Tanahashi, Norio

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective study examined the effectiveness of cilostazol in preventing aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute cerebral infarction. The 189 subjects ranged in age from 31 to 95 years and included 57 with small-artery occlusion, 107 with large-artery atherothrombosis, and 25 with other disorders. Patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism or preexisting pneumonia at the time of hospital admission were excluded from the analysis. Neurologic symptoms, cognitive function, and swallowing function were assessed at the first clinical examination, and the ability to perform activities of daily living was assessed at both hospital admission and discharge. Outcome and food intake status were also assessed at hospital discharge. Pneumonia was detected in 27 of 189 subjects (14.3%), in 20 subjects during nasogastric tube feeding implemented because of oral intake difficulties (fasting group) and in 7 subjects after initiation of oral feeding (oral intake group). Cilostazol was administered to 48 of the 189 subjects (25.4%). The incidence of pneumonia was 6.3% (3 of 48) in patients who received cilostazol, compared with 17% (24 of 141) in those who did not receive cilostazol. Our data suggest that cilostazol appears to prevent the occurrence of pneumonia in both the chronic and acute stages of cerebral infarction.

  5. Sudden psychotic episode probably due to meningoencephalitis and Chlamydia pneumoniae acute infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Since 9% to 20% of all cases of acute psychosis presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) are due to a general medical condition, cautious medical workup should be mandatory in such patients. Differential diagnosis must consider conditions as diverse as renal failure or CNS infection. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection usually causes a self-limited respiratory syndrome. Rarely, acute neurological complications occur, with acute meningoencephalitis most frequently reported. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and is difficult to confirm. Case report We describe a 22 year-old female Caucasian who, three days after a mild pharingitis, developed an acute psychosis with exuberant symptoms interspersed with periods of lucidity, in a background of normal consciousness and orientation. Initial medical and imagiological workup were inconclusive. After 20 days of unsuccessful treatment with antipsychotics she developed a high fever and was re-evaluated medically. Lumbar puncture revealed an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed irregular thickening and nodularity of the lateral ventricles' lining. An anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM antibody titter of 85 IU/ml was detected. All symptoms cleared after treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of acute CP-associated meningoencephalitis manifesting as an acute psychotic episode. It illustrates the principle that non-organic psychiatric syndromes must remain a diagnosis of exclusion in first-time acute psychosis. PMID:16164756

  6. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a New York City firefighter exposed to World Trade Center dust.

    PubMed

    Rom, William N; Weiden, Michael; Garcia, Roberto; Yie, Ting An; Vathesatogkit, Pratan; Tse, Doris B; McGuinness, Georgeann; Roggli, Victor; Prezant, David

    2002-09-15

    We report a sentinel case of acute eosinophilic pneumonia in a firefighter exposed to high concentrations of World Trade Center dust during the rescue effort from September 11 to 24. The firefighter presented with a Pa(O2) of 53 mm Hg and responded to oxygen and corticosteroids. Computed tomography scan showed patchy ground glass density, thickened bronchial walls, and bilateral pleural effusions. Bronchoalveolar lavage recovered 70% eosinophils, with only 1% eosinophils in peripheral blood. Eosinophils were not degranulated and increased levels of interleukin-5 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum. Mineralogic analysis counted 305 commercial asbestos fibers/10(6) macrophages including those with high aspect ratios, and significant quantities of fly ash and degraded fibrous glass. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare consequence of acute high dust exposure. World Trade Center dust consists of large particle-size silicates, but fly ash and asbestos fibers may be found in bronchoalveolar lavage cells.

  7. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms.

  8. Role of CD 11/CD 18 in neutrophil emigration during acute and recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kumasaka, T.; Doyle, N. A.; Quinlan, W. M.; Graham, L.; Doerschuk, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined CD11/CD18-mediated adhesion in neutrophil emigration during acute and recurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia. Neutrophil emigration during acute pneumonia was studied in anti-CD18 antibody or murine-IgG-pretreated rabbits 4 hours after intrabronchial instillation of P. aeruginosa. To examine emigration in recurrent pneumonias, rabbits given P. aeruginosa on day 0 received anti-CD18 antibody or IgG on day 7. A second instillate was placed either at the initial site or in a separate lobe, and emigration into alveolar spaces was quantitated morphometrically after 4 hours. The results show that CD11/CD18 was required for neutrophil emigration in acute pneumonias and in recurrent pneumonias that occurred at a site distant from the initial infection. However, when the recurrent pneumonia occurred in the previously inflamed site, CD11/CD18 was not required. When the same number of organisms were instilled on days 0 and 7, emigration was reduced to 15 to 20 percent of the number that migrated initially and only CD18-independent adhesion pathways were used. Increasing the concentration of organisms threefold increased emigration through both CD18-dependent and CD18-independent pathways. These data indicate that P. aeruginosa induces CD11/CD18-dependent emigration during acute pneumonia and recurrent pneumonia at previously uninflamed sites. However, adhesion pathways are altered in regions of chronic inflammation, and a greater proportion of neutrophil emigration occurs through CD11/CD18-independent pathways. PMID:8644870

  9. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82–0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  10. The Diagnostic Value of Serum C-Reactive Protein for Identifying Pneumonia in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Respiratory Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Agustín; Utrillo, Laia; Bielsa, Silvia; Falguera, Miquel; Porcel, José M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The clinical diagnosis of pneumonia is sometimes difficult since chest radiographs are often indeterminate. In this study, we aimed to assess whether serum C-reactive protein (CRP) could assist in identifying patients with pneumonia. Methods. For one winter, all consecutive patients with acute respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency ward of a single center were prospectively enrolled. In addition to chest radiographs, basic laboratory tests, and microbiology, serum levels of CRP were measured at entry. Results. A total of 923 (62.3%) of 1473 patients hospitalized for acute respiratory symptoms were included. Subjects with a final diagnosis of pneumonia had higher serum CRP levels (median 187 mg/L) than those with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (63 mg/L) or acute bronchitis (54 mg/L, p < 0.01). CRP was accurate in identifying pneumonia (area under the curve 0.84, 95% CI 0.82-0.87). The multilevel likelihood ratio (LR) for intervals of CRP provided useful information on the posttest probability of having pneumonia. CRP intervals above 200 mg/L were associated with LR+ > 5, for which pneumonia is likely, whereas CRP intervals below 75 mg/L were associated with LR < 0.2, for which pneumonia is unlikely. Conclusion. Serum CRP may be a useful addition for diagnosing pneumonia in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory symptoms. PMID:27610265

  11. [Evaluation of commercial usefulness for microparticle agglutination Serodia-Myco II test for serodiagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumonia infections].

    PubMed

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Kałuzewski, Stanisław; Jagielski, Marek; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of Serodia-Myco II agglutination test (Fujirebio, Japan) for diagnosis of the M. pneumoniae infections was evaluated. A total of 66 serum samples obtained from patients with respiratory tract infections were tested by Serodia-Myco II test, complement fixation (CF) test, ELISA-IgG/-IgM, and by latex agglutination (LA) test prepared in our laboratory. Using CF test and ELISA as the reference tests, Serodia-Myco II test gave too many false positive results. This test in relation to CF test, ELISA-IgM, ELISA-IgG, and LA test showed a very high sensitivity, virtually 100%, with a low specificity, below 50%. It seems that oversensitivity of the Serodia-Myco II test is caused by too low cut off (40) value recommended by the manufacturer. The Serodia-Myco II test may be used in routine serodiagnosis of mycoplasmosis under condition that cut off value will be raised to 160 and the positive results of this test will be confirmed by the CF test or ELISA.

  12. [A toxicometric assessment of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings].

    PubMed

    Iskandarov, A I

    1993-01-01

    The author analyzes clinical and morphologic manifestations of pneumonia and the conditions under which acute respiratory failure formed in 572 subjects who suffered poisoning with psychotropic and soporific drugs, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus insecticides, caustic poisons, alcohol and its surrogates. Toxicometric (quantitative) assessment of the toxic effects and measurement of the toxins concentrations under which respiratory failure developed helped detect new mechanisms in the patho- and thanatogenesis of pneumonias and acute respiratory failure in poisonings. These data are of great interest for practical forensic medicine, since they permit substantiating the causes of death in various types of poisonings. The diagram proposed by the author permits assessment of the initial chemical trauma from the clinical and morphologic picture of poisoning.

  13. Development of a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM in human serum specimens.

    PubMed

    Ou, Liming; Lv, Qingyu; Wu, Canjun; Hao, Huaijie; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection is crucial for prompt treatment and good patient outcome. However, serological tests to detect MP rapidly and conveniently are still lacking. This study aimed to use the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor® 647 as the detection marker to develop a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) for detection of MP-specific IgM in serum specimen. Monoclonal mouse antibody against human IgM (μ-chain specific) and goat anti-rabbit IgG were labeled with Alexa Fluor® 647 (anti-IgM-AF647 and anti-IgG-AF647). A mixture of natural MP antigen and recombinant P1 antigen was coated as the test line (T line) and rabbit IgG was coated as the control line (C line) on a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane. The MP antigens captured IgM-anti-IgM-AF647 complex on the T line. Rabbit IgG captured anti-IgG-AF647 on the C line. The fluorescence intensity on the T line and C line was measured. Sartorius CN140 NC membrane showed higher sensitivity than CN95. The optimal reaction time for the LFIA was 10min. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve based on 34 MP positive and 166 MP negative serum samples was 0.986 (p<0.001). The cutoff value of T/C area ratio was 0.3830. The LFIA strips did not react with serum from patients infected with non-MP pathogens including influenza viruses and bacteria causing respiratory tract infection. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were between 3.28% and 10.14%. The shelf life was calculated to be 2years at room temperature. The LFIA strips and the commercial EUROIMMUN kit showed consistent results on 372 serum specimens. The overall consistency rate was 96.37% with a Kappa value of 0.842 (p<0.001). The LFIA in the current study may be a sensitive and specific approach to detect early MP infection rapidly and conveniently. PMID:26979644

  14. Development of a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay for rapid detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM in human serum specimens.

    PubMed

    Ou, Liming; Lv, Qingyu; Wu, Canjun; Hao, Huaijie; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-05-01

    Early diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection is crucial for prompt treatment and good patient outcome. However, serological tests to detect MP rapidly and conveniently are still lacking. This study aimed to use the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor® 647 as the detection marker to develop a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) for detection of MP-specific IgM in serum specimen. Monoclonal mouse antibody against human IgM (μ-chain specific) and goat anti-rabbit IgG were labeled with Alexa Fluor® 647 (anti-IgM-AF647 and anti-IgG-AF647). A mixture of natural MP antigen and recombinant P1 antigen was coated as the test line (T line) and rabbit IgG was coated as the control line (C line) on a nitrocellulose (NC) membrane. The MP antigens captured IgM-anti-IgM-AF647 complex on the T line. Rabbit IgG captured anti-IgG-AF647 on the C line. The fluorescence intensity on the T line and C line was measured. Sartorius CN140 NC membrane showed higher sensitivity than CN95. The optimal reaction time for the LFIA was 10min. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve based on 34 MP positive and 166 MP negative serum samples was 0.986 (p<0.001). The cutoff value of T/C area ratio was 0.3830. The LFIA strips did not react with serum from patients infected with non-MP pathogens including influenza viruses and bacteria causing respiratory tract infection. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were between 3.28% and 10.14%. The shelf life was calculated to be 2years at room temperature. The LFIA strips and the commercial EUROIMMUN kit showed consistent results on 372 serum specimens. The overall consistency rate was 96.37% with a Kappa value of 0.842 (p<0.001). The LFIA in the current study may be a sensitive and specific approach to detect early MP infection rapidly and conveniently.

  15. Effects of inhaled CO administration on acute lung injury in baboons with pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Bryan D.; Hess, Dean R.; Harris, R. Scott; Wolf, Monroe A.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Roggli, Victor L.; Davies, John D.; Winkler, Tilo; Stenzler, Alex; Baron, Rebecca M.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Choi, Augustine M.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) gas has therapeutic potential for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome if a safe, evidence-based dosing strategy and a ventilator-compatible CO delivery system can be developed. In this study, we used a clinically relevant baboon model of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia to 1) test a novel, ventilator-compatible CO delivery system; 2) establish a safe and effective CO dosing regimen; and 3) investigate the local and systemic effects of CO therapy on inflammation and acute lung injury (ALI). Animals were inoculated with S. pneumoniae (108-109 CFU) (n = 14) or saline vehicle (n = 5); in a subset with pneumonia (n = 5), we administered low-dose, inhaled CO gas (100–300 ppm × 60–90 min) at 0, 6, 24, and/or 48 h postinoculation and serially measured blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels. We found that CO inhalation at 200 ppm for 60 min is well tolerated and achieves a COHb of 6–8% with ambient CO levels ≤ 1 ppm. The COHb level measured at 20 min predicted the 60-min COHb level by the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation with high accuracy. Animals given inhaled CO + antibiotics displayed significantly less ALI at 8 days postinoculation compared with antibiotics alone. Inhaled CO was associated with activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in the lung and with augmentation of renal antioxidative programs. These data support the feasibility of safely delivering inhaled CO gas during mechanical ventilation and provide preliminary evidence that CO may accelerate the resolution of ALI in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate pneumonia model. PMID:26320156

  16. Acute exposure of mice to high-dose ultrafine carbon black decreases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that inhalation of carbonaceous particulate matter from biomass combustion increases susceptibility to bacterial pneumonia. In vitro studies report that phagocytosis of carbon black by alveolar macrophages (AM) impairs killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have previously reported high levels of black carbon in AM from biomass smoke-exposed children and adults. We therefore aimed to use a mouse model to test the hypothesis that high levels of carbon loading of AM in vivo increases susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Female outbred mice were treated with either intranasal phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or ultrafine carbon black (UF-CB in PBS; 500 μg on day 1 and day 4), and then infected with S. pneumoniae strain D39 on day 5. Survival was assessed over 72 h. The effect of UF-CB on AM carbon loading, airway inflammation, and a urinary marker of pulmonary oxidative stress was assessed in uninfected animals. Results Instillation of UF-CB in mice resulted a pattern of AM carbon loading similar to that of biomass-smoke exposed humans. In uninfected animals, UF-CB treated animals had increased urinary 8-oxodG (P = 0.055), and an increased airway neutrophil differential count (P < 0.01). All PBS-treated mice died within 72 h after infection with S. pneumoniae, whereas morbidity and mortality after infection was reduced in UF-CB treated animals (median survival 48 h vs. 30 h, P < 0.001). At 24 hr post-infection, UF-CB treated mice had lower lung and the blood S. pneumoniae colony forming unit counts, and lower airway levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine/growth-related oncogene (KC/GRO), and interferon gamma. Conclusion Acute high level loading of AM with ultrafine carbon black particles per se does not increase the susceptibility of mice to pneumococcal infection in vivo. PMID:20958976

  17. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  18. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Giunta, Leandra; Spataro, Giuseppina; Rapisarda, Venerando; Velardita, Mario; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Pavone, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease. PMID:23970901

  19. Sorafenib-induced acute interstitial pneumonia in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Iguchi, Eriko; Matsuda, Fumihiro; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Osaki, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) induced by sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we present three patients with advanced HCC who developed AIP during sorafenib therapy, with fatal complications in two cases. Case 1 was a 76-year-old man who developed dyspnea. Chest CT showed interstitial pneumonia. Sorafenib was discontinued immediately, and prednisolone was started. His pneumonia resolved. A drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for sorafenib was positive. Case 2 was a 75-year-old man and case 3 was a 77-year-old man, both of whom developed high-grade fever and hypoxemia during sorafenib therapy, and were diagnosed with AIP. In spite of high-dose steroid therapy, their respiratory failure worsened and both patients died. In all three cases, serum KL-6 or surfactant protein D concentrations were elevated, and blood and sputum cultures did not grow pathogens. All three patients were smokers with restrictive lung disease on preoperative respiratory function testing, but did not have respiratory symptoms before sorafenib therapy. The clinical features of these three cases suggest that male gender, older age, smoking history, and lung disease are associated with acute sorafenib-induced AIP in patients with advanced HCC.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos,” a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio D.; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos” strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease. PMID:27389272

  1. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a rare histopathological variant of chemotherapy-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Sen, Shiraj; Naina, Harris

    2016-04-06

    Bleomycin-induced lung injury is the most common chemotherapy-associated lung disease, and is linked with several histopathological patterns. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a relatively new and rare histological pattern of diffuse lung injury. We report the first known case of bleomycin-induced AFOP. A 36-year-old man with metastatic testicular cancer received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin, before being transitioned to paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin. He subsequently presented with exertional dyspnoea, cough and pleuritic chest pain. CT of the chest demonstrated bilateral ground glass opacities with peribronchovascular distribution and pulmonary function tests demonstrated a restrictive pattern of lung disease with impaired diffusion. Transbronchial biopsy revealed intra-alveolar fibrin deposits with organising pneumonia, consisting of intraluminal loose connective tissue consistent with AFOP. The patient received high-dose corticosteroids with symptomatic and radiographic improvement. AFOP should be recognised as a histopathological variant of bleomycin-induced lung injury.

  2. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycoplasma genitalium to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Renaudin, H; Tully, J G; Bebear, C

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibilities of seven clinical isolates of Mycoplasma genitalium and three strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to a variety of antibiotics were examined by an agar dilution method. Macrolides, pristinamycin, and tetracyclines were very active against both species. Sparfloxacin was the most active quinolone tested. None of the 21 antibiotics tested had differential activity toward the two organisms. PMID:1503451

  3. Journey of a survivor of near drowning, polymicrobial pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, Margaret M; Wahl, Gary; Yamshchikov, Alexandra V; Smith, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    This article discusses a woman who collapsed and landed in a puddle of water in a park near a horse trail. Her rescue and resuscitation started an extraordinary effort by her body to heal from multiple insults. This case study highlights the diagnosis and support of polymicrobial pneumonia secondary to near drowning and the multisystem complications throughout the 3-month hospitalization. It highlights the evidence for treatment of the polymicrobial nature of submersion injury, acute lung injury, and benefits of progressive mobility. Social media as a tool for the family's communication and coping are also discussed.

  4. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness. PMID:24401781

  5. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from Argentinian pediatric patients suffering from acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Gagetti, Paula; Faccone, Diego; Fossati, Sofía; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Hernández, Claudia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Lopardo, Horacio; Corso, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae emerged in Argentina in 1995, representing 26% of invasive infection isolates in children under 5 years old. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of ermB and mefA genes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates from acute otitis media (AOM) and to determine their genetic relatedness. Between May 2009 and August 2010, 126 S. pneumoniae isolates from 324 otherwise healthy children with a first episode of AOM were included. Twenty six of these isolates (20.6%) were resistant to erythromycin. Most frequent serotypes were: 14 (46.2%), 6A (23.1%), 19F (7.7%) and 9V (7.7%). Twenty (76.9%) carried the mefA gene, 5 (19.2%) have the ermB gene, and 1 (3.9%) both ermB + mefA. Ten clonal types were identified, mostly related to Sweden(15A)-25/ST782 (SLV63), CloneB(6A)/ST473 and England(14)-9/ ST9. This is the first study assessing the mechanisms of macrolide resistance in pneumococci isolates from pediatric AOM in Argentina and their genetic relatedness.

  6. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. Results SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001) and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001) compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4%) SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01). Conclusion and Significance The result suggests that SAM children with cough or

  7. Molecular Biology and Pathogenicity of Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Razin, Shmuel; Yogev, David; Naot, Yehudith

    1998-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the entire genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae has attracted considerable attention to the molecular biology of mycoplasmas, the smallest self-replicating organisms. It appears that we are now much closer to the goal of defining, in molecular terms, the entire machinery of a self-replicating cell. Comparative genomics based on comparison of the genomic makeup of mycoplasmal genomes with those of other bacteria, has opened new ways of looking at the evolutionary history of the mycoplasmas. There is now solid genetic support for the hypothesis that mycoplasmas have evolved as a branch of gram-positive bacteria by a process of reductive evolution. During this process, the mycoplasmas lost considerable portions of their ancestors’ chromosomes but retained the genes essential for life. Thus, the mycoplasmal genomes carry a high percentage of conserved genes, greatly facilitating gene annotation. The significant genome compaction that occurred in mycoplasmas was made possible by adopting a parasitic mode of life. The supply of nutrients from their hosts apparently enabled mycoplasmas to lose, during evolution, the genes for many assimilative processes. During their evolution and adaptation to a parasitic mode of life, the mycoplasmas have developed various genetic systems providing a highly plastic set of variable surface proteins to evade the host immune system. The uniqueness of the mycoplasmal systems is manifested by the presence of highly mutable modules combined with an ability to expand the antigenic repertoire by generating structural alternatives, all compressed into limited genomic sequences. In the absence of a cell wall and a periplasmic space, the majority of surface variable antigens in mycoplasmas are lipoproteins. Apart from providing specific antimycoplasmal defense, the host immune system is also involved in the development of pathogenic lesions and exacerbation of mycoplasma induced diseases. Mycoplasmas are

  8. Phylogeny of some mycoplasmas from ruminants based on 16S rRNA sequences and definition of a new cluster within the hominis group.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, B; Uhlén, M; Johansson, K E

    1996-10-01

    Almost complete (> 96%) 16S rRNA sequences from nine ruminant mycoplasmas have been determined by solid-phase DNA sequencing. Polymorphisms were found in four of the 16S rRNA sequences, which indicated the existence of two different rRNA operons. Seven polymorphisms were found in Mycoplasma agalatiae, three were found in Mycoplasma bovis, one was found in Mycoplasma alkalescens, and one was found in Mycoplasma bovirhinis. The sequence data were used for construction of phylogenetic trees. All but one of the ruminant mycoplasmas sequenced in this work clustered in the hominis group. A close relationship was found between M. agalactiae and M. bovis, with a 99% nucleotide similarity between their 16S rRNA sequences. They were also found to be members of the Mycoplasma lipophilum cluster of the hominis group. Furthermore, the 16S rRNA comparisons showed that Mycoplasma alkalescens and Mycoplasma canadense are closely related (> 98.5%), and these species were found to cluster in the Mycoplasma hominis cluster of the hominis group. Interestingly, M. bovirhinis grouped in a new phylogenetic cluster of the hominis group. The new cluster, which was supported by bootstrap percentage values, signature nucleotide analysis, and higher-order structural elements, was named the Mycoplasma synoviae cluster. Mycoplasma bovoculi, Mycoplasma conjunctivae, and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae clustered in the Mycoplasma neurolyticum cluster of the hominis group. Mycoplasma alvi clustered with Mycoplasma pirum in the M. pneumoniae cluster of the pneumoniae group.

  9. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which presented an acute interstitial pneumonia-like image on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Susaki, Kentaro; Danjo, Junichi; Nakashima, Shusaku; Shimada, Hiromi; Izumikawa, Miharu; Takeuchi, Yohei; Mitsunaka, Hiroki; Bandoh, Shuji; Imataki, Osamu; Nose, Masato; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A female patient was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with MCTD by chest CT scan. Corticosteroid therapy was refractory for lung involvement, and she died due to acute respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed that AIP was compatible with lung involvement of CAPS. We therefore suggest that chest CT might reveal AIP-like findings in CAPS patients whose condition is complicated with pulmonary manifestations.

  10. [Legionnaire's pneumonia with rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. A case report].

    PubMed

    Sposato, Bruno; Mariotta, Salvatore; Ricci, Alberto; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Schmid, Giovanni

    2003-09-01

    Legionella pneumophyla is the agent responsible of Legionnaire's disease. It appears as a severe pneumonia and often requires admission in Intensive Care Unit. In literature, renal failure is reported to occur in 15 percent of Legionnaire disease and this event induce a mortality over 50% of these cases. The authors describe a case of Legionnaire's pneumonia with respiratory failure, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Patient was a female, 61 yrs old, admitted to our hospital because of fever (38 degrees-38.5 degrees C), severe respiratory failure (pH = 7.49, PaCO2 = 23.1 mmHg, PaO2 = 56.7 mmHg), oliguria (< 200 ml/24 h); chest x-rays and computed tomography (TC) showed a pneumonia at right lower lobe. Among other things, in blood analysis was noted the following values: BUN = 47 mg/dl, creatinine = 2.1 mg/dl, Na+ = 133 mmol/L, Cl- = 97 mmol/L, Ca+ = 7.2 mg/dl, K+ = 5.8 mmol/L, AST = 213 U/L, ALT = 45 U/L, LDH = 1817 U/L, CPK = 16738 U/L, CPK-MB = 229 U/L, myoglobin > 4300 ng/ml., leucocyte count = 17,500/mmc (N = 92%, L = 3%, M = 5%), positive anti Legionella IgG and IgM (IgG > 1:64, IgM > 1:96), evidence of Legionella soluble antigen in the urine analysis. Therapy with clarytromicyne (500 mg b.i.d i.v.) and rifampicin (600 mg/die i.v.) was begun; computed tomography showed after six days an improvement of pulmonary lesion but, in the following days, health status and blood analysis got worse. Patient went on antibiotics and underwent haemotherapy (Hb: 8 gr/dl), haemodialysis because of acute renal failure but healthy status worse furthermore and she died on 18th days after admission. This case point out rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure is suggestive for Legionnaire's disease and is associated with high rate of mortality.

  11. A fatal case of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in a woman affected by glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Laura; Mancini, Chiara; Marvisi, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    This report presents the case of a 67-year-old woman affected by glioblastoma. After a few days of adjuvant therapy with temozolomide and prophylaxis with trimetrophin-sulfamethoxazolo to prevent Pneumocystis Jiroveci, she had progressive and rapid worsening of symptoms with weakness, dyspnea and orthopnea. She had peripheral edema and proximal hyposthenia of the lower limbs. Chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacities and laboratory exams revealed hypoxemia and hypocapnia, an initial reduction in platelet and white blood cells, and an elevation of LDH, AST, ALT, and active urinary sediment. Blood cultures, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) data and transbronchial biopsy showed no infections, and in particular no evidence of Pneumocystis Jiroveci pneumonia. Histological examination revealed a typical pattern of AIP. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and high-dose steroids. The symptoms worsened and respiratory failure required mechanical ventilation. The pneumonia was not responsive to medical or invasive care. She died after ten days of hospitalization. At present very little can be found in the literature about lung toxicity caused by temozolomide. This case can be added as a new report describing this risk. The combination therapy with temozolamide and trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action inducing various forms of pulmonary toxicity. ESTABLISHED FACTS: Acute interstitial pneumonia is a common manifestation of lung toxicity caused by drugs. The clinical course is favorable with a good response to corticosteroids. NOVEL INSIGHT: This is the first fatal case of lung toxicity caused by Temozolomide. Clinicians must be aware that a combination therapy including trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action in inducing pulmonary toxicity.

  12. Pathophysiology of acute meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and adjunctive therapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Collodel, Allan; Moreira, Ana Paula; Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute purulent infection affecting piamater, arachnoid and the subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory host's response is potentially fatal and contributes to the neurological sequelae. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx, followed by bacteremia, microbial invasion and blood-brain barrier traversal. S. pneumoniae is recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors inducing the activation of factor nuclear kappa B or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and subsequent up-regulation of lymphocyte populations and expression of numerous proteins involved in inflammation and immune response. Many brain cells can produce cytokines, chemokines and others pro-inflammatory molecules in response to bacteria stimuli, as consequence, polymorphonuclear are attracted, activated and released in large amounts of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, leading to the peroxynitrite formation, generating oxidative stress. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, blood-brain barrier breakdown contributing to cell injury during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:22618789

  13. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy for acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia: A case series.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukihiro; Takihara, Takahisa; Niimi, Kyoko; Komatsu, Masamichi; Sato, Masako; Tanaka, Jun; Takiguchi, Hiroto; Tomomatsu, Hiromi; Tomomatsu, Katsuyoshi; Hayama, Naoki; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Takuya; Urano, Tetsuya; Takagi, Atsushi; Asano, Koichiro

    2016-03-01

    We report 3 cases (all men, age: 69-81 years) of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia (AEIP) that were successfully treated with a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), which delivers heated, humidified gas at a fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) up to 1.0 (100%). Oxygenation was insufficient under non-rebreathing face masks; however, the introduction of HFNC with an FIO2 of 0.7-1.0 (flow rate: 40 L/min) improved oxygenation and was well-tolerated until the partial pressure of oxygen in blood/FIO2 ratio increased (between 21 and 26 days). Thus, HFNC might be an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic addition to the management of AEIP. PMID:26879483

  14. Acute pulmonary edema following liposuction due to heart failure and atypical pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Graf, Andreas; Hanisch, Volkmar

    2015-05-01

    Microcannular liposuction in tumescent anesthesia is the most effective treatment for painful lipedema. Tumescent anesthesia is an established and safe procedure in local analgesia when performed according to guidelines. Major adverse effects are rare. In patients with advanced lipedema, however, the commonly presented comorbidities bear additional risks.We report on post-surgical acute pulmonary edema after tumescent liposuction according to guidelines in a 52-year-old female patient with lipedema of the legs. We discuss in detail possible scenarios that might be involved in such emergency. In the present case the most likely was a retarded community acquired atypical pneumonia with aggravation of pre-existent comorbidities.A combined treatment with intravenous b-lactam antibiosis, positive pressure ventilation, and continuous venovenous hemodialysis and filtration resulted in complete remission in a couple of days. In conclusion, tumescent liposuction of advanced lipedema patients should only be performed in well-trained centers with sufficient infrastructure.

  15. Chlamydiae and Mycoplasma infections in pulmonary MALT lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chanudet, E; Adam, P; Nicholson, A G; Wotherspoon, A C; Ranaldi, R; Goteri, G; Pileri, S A; Ye, H; Müller-Hermelink, H K; Du, M-Q

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia psittaci were detected at low frequencies (<20%) among 69 pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas, 30 other lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) and 44 non-LPD. The incidence of individual Chlamydiae was generally higher in MALT lymphoma than non-LPD, although not reaching statistical significance. Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA was not detected. PMID:17876330

  16. The proline-rich P65 protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a component of the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction and exhibits size polymorphism in the strains M129 and FH.

    PubMed Central

    Proft, T; Hilbert, H; Layh-Schmitt, G; Herrmann, R

    1995-01-01

    Previously, we described the identification of a novel Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129 protein, named P65 because of its apparent molecular mass of 65 kDa estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (T. Proft and R. Herrmann, Mol. Microbiol. 13:337-348, 1994). DNA sequence analysis of the P65 open reading frame (orfp65), however, revealed an ORF encoding a protein with a molecular weight of 47,034. This discrepancy can be explained by the unusual amino acid composition of this protein. According to the deduced amino acid sequence, the N-terminal half of P65 contains several penta- and hexapeptides (DPNAY and DPNQAY) forming a proline-rich acidic domain. Secondary-structure predictions indicated beta-sheets and turns within that region, suggesting an extended and rigid conformation. Near the C terminus of P65 the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was found. This motif is known to play an important role in binding of extracellular matrix proteins to integrins. P65 could be located exclusively to the Triton X-100-insoluble cell fraction. The results of immunofluorescence microscopy and of immunoadsorption experiments indicated that P65 carries surface-exposed regions. Mild treatment of whole cells with proteases resulted in cleavage of a limited amount of P65 molecules, suggesting either that only a small percentage of P65 molecules are exposed on the surface or that protease cleavage is hampered by a compact protein conformation or by binding of an unknown component to P65. P65 exhibits size polymorphism in M. pneumoniae M129 and FH. This is caused by an intragenetic duplication of a 54-bp sequence within the FH orfp65. As a consequence, the number of DPNAY pentapeptides increased from 9 to 12 repeats in the FH strain. PMID:7768845

  17. [Pneumonia: The urgent problem of 21st century medicine].

    PubMed

    Chuchalin, A G

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyzes the systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the strategic issues of pneumonia, which have been published in the past 3 years. It discusses the prevalence and mortality rates of acquired pneumonia, hospital-acquired (nosocomial) pneumonia, healthcare-associated pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and Mycoplasma pneumonia, and the specific features of their etiology, diagnosis, and treatment. A large number of investigations emphasize the relevance of this problem in current clinical practice.

  18. Survival of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) commingled with domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in the absence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Besser, Thomas E; Cassirer, E Frances; Yamada, Catherine; Potter, Kathleen A; Herndon, Caroline; Foreyt, William J; Knowles, Donald P; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is an important agent of the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) pneumonia that has previously inevitably followed experimental commingling with domestic sheep (Ovis aries), we commingled M. ovipneumoniae-free domestic and bighorn sheep (n=4 each). One bighorn sheep died with acute pneumonia 90 days after commingling, but the other three remained healthy for >100 days. This unprecedented survival rate is significantly different (P=0.002) from that of previous bighorn-domestic sheep contact studies but similar to (P>0.05) bighorn sheep survival following commingling with other ungulates. The absence of epizootic respiratory disease in this experiment supports the hypothesized role of M. ovipneumoniae as a key pathogen of epizootic pneumonia in bighorn sheep commingled with domestic sheep.

  19. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  20. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and acute encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like flaccid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kanae; Kano, Gen; Shibata, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2011-05-01

    A 3-year-old male presented with Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The patient developed an episode of HLH with severe skin eruption following C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Symptoms responded to steroid/cyclosporine A therapy, but the patient slowly lost consciousness and developed systemic flaccid paralysis. He was diagnosed with encephalitis/myelitis by brain and spinal MRI. Neurological symptoms and signs gradually resolved. We thought that the immune response to C. pneumoniae infection triggered the development of HLH, associated with unusual neurological complications. This report describes a novel case of C. pneumoniae-associated HLH and with poliomyelitis like flaccid paralysis. PMID:21370423

  1. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country. PMID:16163422

  2. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  3. Multiple Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes in aural discharge samples from children with acute otitis media with spontaneous otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Turner, Katy M E; Sikora, Paulina; Gould, Katherine; Hinds, Jason; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Januário, Luís; Finn, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Among 55 children with cultures positive for acute otitis media with spontaneous otorrhea, 28 (51%) had cultures positive for aural Streptococcus pneumoniae, and in 10 of these, two distinct strains were detected, in which 5 had pairs of strains that were both capsule-bearing serotypes. Such cases were more likely to have cultures positive for other otopathogens than those with only one pneumococcus present.

  4. Viral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S B

    1991-09-01

    Viral pneumonias are common in infants and young children but rare in adults. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral pathogens in infants and children. Influenza virus types A and B account for over one half of viral pneumonias in adults. Immunocompromised hosts are susceptible to pneumonias caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and other herpesviruses, as well as rubeola and adenovirus. Diagnosis of viral pneumonia depends on appropriate viral cultures and acute and convalescent sera for specific antibodies. Superinfection with bacteria is common in adults. Anti-viral therapy is available for several respiratory viruses. Ribavirin, amantadine/rimantadine, interferon alpha, and acyclovir are antiviral drugs that may be of benefit in treatment and prophylaxis. Prevention of viral pneumonia will depend upon improved viral immunization practices.

  5. Increased Risk of Acute Kidney Injury following Pneumococcal Pneumonia: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Te-Yu; Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pneumococcal disease leads to renal complications ranging from persistent proteinuria to end-stage renal disease. Studies on the association between pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are scant. This study assessed the relationship between PP and risk of AKI. Methods This nationwide population-based cohort study examined data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for the period 2000–2011. We identified inpatients with newly diagnosed PP according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. In addition, we selected a comparison cohort from inpatient claims without the diagnosis of PP that was randomly frequency-matched with the PP cohort according to age, sex, index year and comorbidities. We analyzed the risks of AKI by using Cox proportional hazards regression models, adjusted for sex, age, and comorbidities. Results A total of 10,069 patients with PP and 10,069 controls were enrolled in this study. After adjustments for age, sex, and comorbidities, patients with PP had a 1.11-fold risk of developing AKI compared with the comparison cohort. Conclusion This study indicates that AKI risks are higher in patients with PP compared with the comparison cohort. Careful follow-up observation and aggressive treatment are necessary for patients with PP to reduce the risk of AKI. PMID:27362355

  6. Characterization of acute interstitial pneumonia in cattle in southern Alberta feedyards.

    PubMed Central

    Ayroud, M; Popp, J D; VanderKop, M A; Yost, G S; Haines, D M; Majak, W; Karren, D; Yanke, L J; McAllister, T A

    2000-01-01

    Field data were collected over 2 consecutive years to characterize acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in feedyard cattle. Thirty-eight cattle with clinical symptoms of AIP were examined following emergency slaughter; 31 (all heifers) were confirmed to have AIP on the basis of gross and histological lung pathology. The 7 without AIP, plus 17 asymptomatic penmates, were used as contemporary controls. Plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) metabolites were higher (P < 0.001) in heifers afflicted with AIP than in the control animals, and concentrations of 3MI mercapturates in the urine were lower (P < 0.007) in affected heifers. Concentrations of 3MI adducts in lung tissue and in microsomal protein did not differ (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups, and 3MI was not detected in ruminal fluid from either group. Total ruminal bacterial numbers and populations of lactobacilli and protozoa were similar (P > 0.05) between the AIP-positive and unafflicted groups, but fewer (P < 0.05) cellulolytic bacteria were present in the positive group. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus antigen was not found in lung tissue from any of the heifers confirmed to have AIP. To our knowledge, this study is the first to implicate 3MI metabolites as having a role in feedyard AIP. Further research is required to determine the factors responsible for the elevation in 3MI adducts in plasma and urine of feedyard cattle afflicted with AIP. Images Figure 1. PMID:10907577

  7. Acute myocardial infarction versus other cardiovascular events in community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Julio; Cosentini, Roberto; Valenti, Vincenzo; Voza, Antonio; Rossi, Paolo; Stolz, Daiana; Legnani, Delfino; Pesci, Alberto; Richeldi, Luca; Peyrani, Paula; Massari, Fernando Maria; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on clinical outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus other cardiovascular events (CVEs) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This was an international, multicentre, observational, prospective study of CAP patients hospitalised in eight hospitals in Italy and Switzerland. Three groups were identified: those without CVEs, those with AMI and those with other CVEs. Among 905 patients, 21 (2.3%) patients experienced at least one AMI, while 107 (11.7%) patients experienced at least one other CVE. Patients with CAP and either AMI or other CVEs showed a higher severity of the disease than patients with CAP alone. Female sex, liver disease and the presence of severe sepsis were independent predictors for the occurrence of AMI, while female sex, age >65 years, neurological disease and the presence of pleural effusion predicted other CVEs. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among those who experienced AMI in comparison to those experiencing other CVEs (43% versus 21%, p=0.039). The presence of AMI showed an adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital mortality of 3.57 (p=0.012) and for other CVEs of 2.63 (p=0.002). These findings on AMI versus other CVEs as complications of CAP may be important when planning interventional studies on cardioprotective medications.

  8. Acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot cattle: effects of feeding feather meal or vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M; Yost, Garold S

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding 1.5% cysteine-rich feather meal or 550 IU of vitamin E for 40 d before slaughter on the rates of death and emergency slaughter due to acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in commercial feedlots. Blood and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 83 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP, 40 asymptomatic penmates, and 40 heifers receiving either feather meal (20) or vitamin E (20); the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Blood and lung tissue were analyzed for thiol adducts of 3-methyleneindolenine (3ME) and reduced glutathione. Supplementation with feather meal or vitamin E had no effect on the rates of death and emergency slaughter attributable to AIP and did not influence the levels of 3ME or reduced glutathione in blood or lung tissue. Although supplementation with greater amounts of feather meal or vitamin E may have been necessary to significantly affect factors related to feedlot AIP, increased supplementation would be uneconomical for commercial feedlots, given the relatively low incidence of AIP.

  9. Characterization of acute interstitial pneumonia in cattle in southern Alberta feedyards.

    PubMed

    Ayroud, M; Popp, J D; VanderKop, M A; Yost, G S; Haines, D M; Majak, W; Karren, D; Yanke, L J; McAllister, T A

    2000-07-01

    Field data were collected over 2 consecutive years to characterize acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in feedyard cattle. Thirty-eight cattle with clinical symptoms of AIP were examined following emergency slaughter; 31 (all heifers) were confirmed to have AIP on the basis of gross and histological lung pathology. The 7 without AIP, plus 17 asymptomatic penmates, were used as contemporary controls. Plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) metabolites were higher (P < 0.001) in heifers afflicted with AIP than in the control animals, and concentrations of 3MI mercapturates in the urine were lower (P < 0.007) in affected heifers. Concentrations of 3MI adducts in lung tissue and in microsomal protein did not differ (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups, and 3MI was not detected in ruminal fluid from either group. Total ruminal bacterial numbers and populations of lactobacilli and protozoa were similar (P > 0.05) between the AIP-positive and unafflicted groups, but fewer (P < 0.05) cellulolytic bacteria were present in the positive group. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus antigen was not found in lung tissue from any of the heifers confirmed to have AIP. To our knowledge, this study is the first to implicate 3MI metabolites as having a role in feedyard AIP. Further research is required to determine the factors responsible for the elevation in 3MI adducts in plasma and urine of feedyard cattle afflicted with AIP.

  10. Effect of dietary melengestrol acetate on the incidence of acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot heifers.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M; Yost, Garold S

    2006-07-01

    Over a 3-y period, 906,000 cattle were monitored in 23 feedlots in southern Alberta for symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Plasma, urine, and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 299 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP and from 156 healthy penmates and analyzed for 3-methylindole (3MI) derivatives and reduced glutathione concentration. From each animal, the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Concentrations of glutathione in lung tissue were reduced (P < 0.001) in animals showing clinical symptoms of AIP as compared with their asymptomatic penmates. Animals histologically confirmed as having AIP had higher levels of 3MI protein adducts in blood and lung tissue (P < 0.05) than did emergency-slaughtered animals without AIP. Within feedlots, where pens of heifers were fed either a standard dosage of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or none, the rate of death attributable to AIP was similar between treatment groups, but emergency slaughter after clinical diagnosis of AIP was done 3.2 times more often (P < 0.001) in the MGA-fed heifers than in the group not fed MGA. Use of MGA did not influence glutathione concentration. As growth performance of heifers given steroidal implants may not be improved by feeding MGA, the most cost-effective method of reducing the incidence of AIP-related emergency slaughter in feedlot heifers may be to eliminate MGA from the diet.

  11. [Case of acute interstitial pneumonia that responded to therapy but relapsed six months later].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Zen; Suga, Tatsuo; Hamaguchi, Shigeto; Yamaguchi, Shouzaburou; Hara, Kenichirou; Aoki, Fumiaki; Aoki, Nozomi; Aoyagi, Kana; Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Kasiwabara, Kenji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kawabata, Yoshinori

    2007-10-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted because of general fatigue. A chest computed tomography showed bilateral alveolar consolidation and ground glass opacities. Although we treated him with broad-spectrum antibiotics, his symptoms and chest image findings did not improve. Thoracoscopic lung biopsy (rS2, S9) was performed. The specimens showed obstructive type intraluminar organization and interstitial inflammatory thickening. Membranous organization was seen in a limited area. The etiology of the illness could not be identified. We diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) because the specimens showed diffuse alveolar damage pattern (DAD/P) and because of unknown etiology. The symptoms and chest image findings were improved on treatment with corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide. However, he was readmitted because of dyspnea 6 months later after the thoracoscopic lung biopsy. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral diffuse ground glass opacities and reticular opacities in both lower lobes. We employed mechanical ventilation, antibiotics, sivelestat sodium hydrate and steroid pulse therapy, but he died without any response to treatment. The findings of autopsy revealed DAD/P accompanied by a new lesion mainly composed of membranous organization and hyaline membrane. We believe this case is valuable when considering the variety of responses to treatment of AIP and prognosis.

  12. Effect of dietary melengestrol acetate on the incidence of acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot heifers

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tim A.; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M.; Yost, Garold S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Over a 3-y period, 906 000 cattle were monitored in 23 feedlots in southern Alberta for symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Plasma, urine, and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 299 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP and from 156 healthy penmates and analyzed for 3-methylindole (3MI) derivatives and reduced glutathione concentration. From each animal, the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Concentrations of glutathione in lung tissue were reduced (P < 0.001) in animals showing clinical symptoms of AIP as compared with their asymptomatic penmates. Animals histologically confirmed as having AIP had higher levels of 3MI protein adducts in blood and lung tissue (P < 0.05) than did emergency-slaughtered animals without AIP. Within feedlots, where pens of heifers were fed either a standard dosage of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or none, the rate of death attributable to AIP was similar between treatment groups, but emergency slaughter after clinical diagnosis of AIP was done 3.2 times more often (P < 0.001) in the MGA-fed heifers than in the group not fed MGA. Use of MGA did not influence glutathione concentration. As growth performance of heifers given steroidal implants may not be improved by feeding MGA, the most cost-effective method of reducing the incidence of AIP-related emergency slaughter in feedlot heifers may be to eliminate MGA from the diet. PMID:16850945

  13. Lipid metabolites as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for acute community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    To, Kelvin K W; Lee, Kim-Chung; Wong, Samson S Y; Sze, Kong-Hung; Ke, Yi-Hong; Lui, Yin-Ming; Tang, Bone S F; Li, Iris W S; Lau, Susanna K P; Hung, Ivan F N; Law, Chun-Yiu; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is important in patient triage and treatment decisions. To identify biomarkers that distinguish patients with CAP from non-CAP controls, we conducted an untargeted global metabolome analysis for plasma samples from 142 patients with CAP (CAP cases) and 97 without CAP (non-CAP controls). Thirteen lipid metabolites could discriminate between CAP cases and non-CAP controls with area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic curve of >0.8 (P ≤ 10(-9)). The levels of glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines and L-palmitoylcarnitine were higher, while the levels of lysophosphatidylethanolamines were lower in the CAP cases than those in non-CAP controls. All 13 metabolites could distinguish CAP cases from the non-infection, extrapulmonary infection and non-CAP respiratory tract infection subgroups. The levels of trihexosylceramide (d18:1/16:0) were higher, while the levels of lysophosphatidylethanolamines were lower, in the fatal than those of non-fatal CAP cases. Our findings suggest that lipid metabolites are potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for CAP.

  14. Clinical features and outcome of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yuko; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Kishi, Jun; Kawano, Hiroshi; Morizumi, Shun; Sato, Seidai; Kondo, Mayo; Takikura, Terumi; Tezuka, Toshifumi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Acute exacerbation (AE) of interstitial lung disease is reported to be developed in not only idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis but also connective tissue disease-associated interstitial pneumonia (CTD-IP). As the significance of AE of CTD-IP has not been so widely recognized, its clinical feature is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the incidence, clinical features and outcome of AE of CTD-IP. We retrospectively reviewed admitted cases in our department with medical record from 2011 to 2015. Among 155 patients with CTD-IP, 10 (6.5%) cases developed AE (6 rheumatoid arthritis, 2 polymyositis/dermatomyositis, 1 systemic lupus erythematosus, 1 Sjögren syndrome), and one died of AE within 30 days. Median survival time after the onset of AE was 169 days in all 10 patients. The treatment with immunosuppressant just before AE onset might improve the prognosis of AE. The median survival time after the onset of AE was significantly longer in patients showing good response to corticosteroid compared with those with poor response to corticosteroid (805 days and 45 days, respectively) (p <0.05), suggesting that there are some cases in CTD-IP, showing the good response to corticosteroid even when AE was complicated. J. Med. Invest. 63: 294-299, August, 2016. PMID:27644575

  15. Eosinophilic Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Akuthota, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Summary: This review starts with discussions of several infectious causes of eosinophilic pneumonia, which are almost exclusively parasitic in nature. Pulmonary infections due specifically to Ascaris, hookworms, Strongyloides, Paragonimus, filariasis, and Toxocara are considered in detail. The discussion then moves to noninfectious causes of eosinophilic pulmonary infiltration, including allergic sensitization to Aspergillus, acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, Churg-Strauss syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndromes, and pulmonary eosinophilia due to exposure to specific medications or toxins. PMID:23034324

  16. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: an update for outpatients management].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Noémie; Gehri, Mario; Gervaix, Alain; Guinan, Stéphane; Barazzone-Argiroffo, Constance

    2016-02-17

    Pneumonia should be considered in febrile children with tachypnea and/or chest recession. Virus are the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 5 years old. Streptococcus pneumonia can be found at any age. Mycoplasma pneumonia is more frequent in older children. Systematic chest radiograph is not necessary but must be obtained in patients with hypoventilation and in those with failed initial antibiotic therapy. Mycoplasma pneumonia should be tested according to patient age and response to initial antibiotic. First line antibiotherapy is amoxicilline. Antibiotic treatment is frequently not necessary in children under 5 but should be considered depending on clinical presentation and C reactive protein value.

  17. Serological diagnosis of enzootic pneumonia of swine by a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a monoclonal antibody and recombinant antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Okada, Munenori; Asai, Tetsuo; Futo, Satoshi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Mukai, Tetsuya; Yazawa, Shigeto; Uto, Takehiko; Shibata, Isao; Sato, Shizuo

    2005-02-25

    To facilitate the control of enzootic pneumonia (EP) of swine caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the complement fixation (CF) test has been used for the detection of M. hyopneumoniae antibodies. However, the CF test is a cumbersome and time-consuming technique and cross-reactivity are major drawbacks associated with this method. To circumvent these drawbacks, we have developed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), consisting of purified monoclonal antibody (Mab) against the 46 kDa surface antigen (P46) of M. hyopneumoniae and recombinant P46 protein expressed in Escherichia coli, for the detection of antibodies to M. hyopneumoniae in serum samples from pigs experimentally inoculated with M. hyopneumoniae and from naturally infected pigs, and compared the practical usefulness of ELISA using the CF test. In experimentally inoculated pigs, the CF and ELISA antibodies were detected at almost the same time, and a good correlation was demonstrated between the CF test and the ELISA. In a survey conducted on field samples, the seropositivity by ELISA in pigs of age 2-6 months was increased. At the time of slaughter, approximately 80% of the animals were seropositive for ELISA. However, a gradual decrease in the prevalence of ELISA positive samples was observed in sows with increasing parity. No correlation was seen between the results obtained with the two methods in the clinical samples. The CF test appears to have limited value for the diagnosis of EP in conventional herds because nonspecific reactions were frequently observed. Therefore, this ELISA is a useful alternative to the CF test currently used for the diagnosis of EP. PMID:15708823

  18. The bacteriology of acute pneumonia and meningitis in children in Papua New Guinea: assumptions, facts and technical strategies.

    PubMed

    Gratten, M; Montgomery, J

    1991-09-01

    Acute respiratory infections in children aged less than 5 years in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea were investigated bacteriologically for 10 years from November 1978. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae were responsible for 73% of all bacteria cultured from lung aspirate (83 samples), 85.5% from blood (1024 samples) and 92% from cerebrospinal fluid (155 samples). Nonencapsulated H. influenzae was carried by up to 90% of children and was the predominant haemophilus type cultured from lung tissue. Mixed infections of the lung with two types of H. influenzae (8 cases) and both H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae (18 cases), commonly together with other organisms of questionable pathogenicity, reflected the proximity of this organ to the upper respiratory tract. Serotype b accounted for 62% and 82% of H. influenzae isolated from bacteraemic pneumonia and meningitis cases, respectively. Polymicrobic bacteraemic pneumonia occurred in 16 children. Both H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae establish dense, unregulated long-term colonization in the nasopharynx during the neonatal period. Each inhibit autochthonous microflora by mechanisms that are currently unclear. Infections with two or more types occur in 30% (S. pneumoniae) and 60% (H. influenzae) of carriage-positive children. 70-75% of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae isolates from blood concomitantly colonize the upper respiratory tract. Intense exposure of Papua New Guinean children to penicillin at all levels of health care since the 1940s has resulted in widespread relative resistance among pneumococci to this antibiotic. Resistant strains are now found in 32 serotypes, and in children penicillin resistance is present in 75% of all carriage strains and 52% and 22% of blood and cerebrospinal fluid isolates, respectively. Penicillin-susceptible and resistant pneumococcal serotypes commonly coexist in multiply populated carriage sites. Resistance to betalactam antibiotics is rare among H. influenzae

  19. Bone marrow-derived cells participate in stromal remodeling of the lung following acute bacterial pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Serikov, Vladimir B; Mikhaylov, Viatcheslav M; Krasnodembskay, Anna D; Matthay, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been shown to graft injured tissues, differentiate in specialized cells, and participate in repair. The importance of these processes in acute lung bacterial inflammation and development of fibrosis is unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the temporal sequence and lineage commitment of BMDC in mouse lungs injured by bacterial pneumonia. We transplanted GFP-tagged BMDC into 5-Gy-irradiated C57BL/6 mice. After 3 months of recovery, mice were subjected to LD(50) intratracheal instillation of live E. coli (controls received saline) which produced pneumonia and subsequent areas of fibrosis. Lungs were investigated by immunohistology for up to 6 months. At the peak of lung inflammation, the predominant influx of BMDC were GFP(+) leukocytes. Postinflammatory foci of lung fibrosis were evident after 1-2 months. The fibrotic foci in lung stroma contained clusters of GFP(+) CD45(+) cells, GFP(+) vimentin-positive cells, and GFP(+) collagen I-positive fibroblasts. GFP(+) endothelial or epithelial cells were not identified. These data suggest that following 5-Gy irradiation and acute bacterial pneumonia, BMDC may temporarily participate in lung postinflammatory repair and stromal remodeling without long-term engraftment as specialized endothelial or epithelial cells.

  20. Antibiotic treatment in acute Otitis Media promotes superinfection with resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae carried before initiation of treatment.

    PubMed

    Dagan, R; Leibovitz, E; Cheletz, G; Leiberman, A; Porat, N

    2001-03-15

    Antibiotic-resistant pneumococci are difficult to eradicate from middle ear fluid (MEF) and the nasopharynx (NP). Bacteriologic eradication from the NP and MEF during acute otitis media (AOM) by 3 common antibiotic drugs was prospectively evaluated. In 19 (16%) of 119 MEF culture-positive patients, an organism susceptible to the treatment drug (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or both) was isolated from the initial MEF, whereas resistant S. pneumoniae was present in the NP; in 9 (47%) patients, the initial resistant NP organism (identified by serotyping, resistance to the administered drug, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) replaced the susceptible MEF organism within only a few days after initiation of treatment. In regions where resistant pneumococci are prevalent, antibiotics may not only fail to eradicate the organisms, but they may often induce MEF superinfection with resistant pneumococci initially carried in the NP. This is an important mechanism by which, in recently treated patients, AOM infections often become refractory to treatment. PMID:11237804

  1. Eosinophilic Fasciitis Associated with Mycoplasma arginini Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silló, Pálma; Pintér, Dóra; Ostorházi, Eszter; Mazán, Mercedes; Wikonkál, Norbert; Pónyai, Katinka; Volokhov, Dmitriy V.; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Szathmary, Susan; Stipkovits, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) with generalized sclerodermiform skin lesions developed over a 19-month period in a previously healthy 23-year-old man. Although we confirmed EF by skin histology and laboratory tests, the recurrent fevers and the clinical observation of sclerotic prepuce with urethritis indicated further bacteriological analysis by conventional microbiological and DNA-based tests. Urethra cultures were positive for an arginine-hydrolyzing mycoplasma and Ureaplasma urealyticum. The patient also had serum IgM antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based qualitative detection. Mycoplasma arginini was isolated from two independent venous blood serum samples and was identified by conventional microbiological tests and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and rpoB genes (GenBank sequence accession numbers HM179555 and HM179556, respectively). M. arginini genomic DNA also was detected by species-specific PCR in the skin lesion biopsy sample. Treatment with corticosteroids and long-term courses of selected antibiotics led to remission of skin symptoms and normalization of laboratory values. This report provides the first evidence of EF associated with mycoplasma infection and the second report of human infection with M. arginini and therefore suggests that this mycoplasma infection might have contributed to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:22189109

  2. A combination of predispositions and exposures as responsible for acute eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP) is a rare febrile illness which is characterized by respiratory failure and often requires mechanical ventilation. The causes and sequence of events of this disease at a biochemical and histological level remain largely unknown. In this article we report the exceptional case, possibly unique, of a patient who developed AEP and three pneumothoraces within less than one month during her hospitalization. Case presentation A 39-year-old German woman was admitted to our hospital for a laparoscopy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia. The surgical intervention was followed by peritonitis in the early postoperative course. Following anaesthesia induction with propofol/midazolam and during the prolonged therapy with several broad-spectrum antibiotics, she developed AEP and three spontaneous (one left-sided and two right-sided) pneumothoraces, the latter ones observed in quick succession. Symptoms, laboratory markers, and chest radiology significantly improved after a one-day treatment with methylprednisolone. Conclusions On the whole, these pathological occurrences, together with similar cases reported in literature, can support the conclusion of possible predisposing genetic factors at the lung tissue level of AEP patients, a view that might shed new light on the pathogenesis of this disease. To provide a coherent pattern that explains the reported evidence for AEP and pneumothoraces, independently from the causative stimulus, the supposed molecular mutations could be localized in the connective tissue rather than in the epithelial cells. In order to interpret clinical and laboratory evidence, as well as to support the main conclusions, the important part of scientific research here presented can also assist physicians in making more informed decisions for the treatment of patients with pulmonary infiltrates. PMID:24475879

  3. Using decision trees to manage hospital readmission risk for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, John P; Zasadil, Scott; Keyser, Donna J; Peele, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    To improve healthcare quality and reduce costs, the Affordable Care Act places hospitals at financial risk for excessive readmissions associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia (PN). Although predictive analytics is increasingly looked to as a means for measuring, comparing, and managing this risk, many modeling tools require data inputs that are not readily available and/or additional resources to yield actionable information. This article demonstrates how hospitals and clinicians can use their own structured discharge data to create decision trees that produce highly transparent, clinically relevant decision rules for better managing readmission risk associated with AMI, HF, and PN. For illustrative purposes, basic decision trees are trained and tested using publically available data from the California State Inpatient Databases and an open-source statistical package. As expected, these simple models perform less well than other more sophisticated tools, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (or AUC) of 0.612, 0.583, and 0.650, respectively, but achieve a lift of at least 1.5 or greater for higher-risk patients with any of the three conditions. More importantly, they are shown to offer substantial advantages in terms of transparency and interpretability, comprehensiveness, and adaptability. By enabling hospitals and clinicians to identify important factors associated with readmissions, target subgroups of patients at both high and low risk, and design and implement interventions that are appropriate to the risk levels observed, decision trees serve as an ideal application for addressing the challenge of reducing hospital readmissions.

  4. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  5. Clinical predictors of acute radiological pneumonia and hypoxaemia at high altitude.

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, J M; Steinhoff, M; Ruiz, J G; Mesa, M L; Martinez, N; Dussan, B

    1994-01-01

    Fast breathing has been recommended as a predictor of childhood pneumonia. Children living at high altitude, however, may breathe faster in response to the lower oxygen partial pressure, which may change the accuracy of prediction of a high respiratory rate. To assess the usefulness of clinical manifestations in the diagnosis of radiological pneumonia or hypoxaemia, or both, at high altitude (2640 m above sea level), 200 children aged 7 days to 36 months presenting to an urban emergency room with cough lasting less than seven days were studied. Parents were interviewed and the children evaluated using standard forms. The results of chest radiographs and pulse oximetry obtained after clinical examination were interpreted blind. Radiological pneumonia and haemoglobin oxygen saturation < 88% were used as 'gold standards'. One hundred and thirty (65%) and 125 (63%) children had radiological pneumonia and hypoxaemia respectively. Crepitations and decreased breath sounds were statistically associated with pneumonia, and rapid breathing as perceived by the child's mother, chest retractions, nasal flaring, and crepitations with hypoxaemia. The best single predictor of the presence of pneumonia is a high respiratory rate, although the results are not as good as those reported by other studies. A respiratory rate > or = 50/minute had good sensitivity (76%) and specificity (71%) for hypoxaemia in infants. Hypoxaemia had a good sensitivity and specificity for pneumonia mainly in infants (83% and 73%, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that decreased or increased respiratory sounds and crepitations were associated with pneumonia, and that hypoxaemia is the best predictor when auscultatory findings are excluded. These results suggest that some clinical predictors appear to be less accurate in Bogota than in places at lower altitude, and that pulse oximetry can be used for predicting pneumonia. PMID:7979525

  6. [Comparison of culture and real-time PCR methods in the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in acute otitis media effusion specimens].

    PubMed

    Eser, Ozgen Köseoğlu; Alp, Sehnaz; Ergin, Alper; Ipçi, Kaan; Alp, Alpaslan; Gür, Deniz; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2012-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are the major etiologic agents of acute otitis media. This study was aimed to compare the detection rate of S.pneumoniae and H.influenzae by culture and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) in the middle ear effusions of patients diagnosed as acute otitis media. A total of 60 middle ear effusion samples collected from children with acute otitis media were included in the study. The samples were inoculated and incubated in BACTEC Ped Plus blood culture bottles and BACTEC 9120 system (BD Diagnostic Systems, MD), respectively, and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. For the molecular diagnosis of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae, ply pneumolysin gene and HIB capsule region, respectively were amplified by Rt-PCR (LightCycler, Roche Diagnostics, Germany). H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were isolated from 5 (8.3%) and 3 (5%) of the patient samples with conventional culture methods, respectively. In addition in 11.6% of the samples other microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans) were also isolated. On the other hand H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were detected in 38 (63.3%) and 24 (40%) of the samples with Rt-PCR, respectively. There was about eight fold increase in the detection frequency of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae with Rt-PCR compared to culture methods. When culture was accepted as the gold standard method, the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of Rt-PCR in the detection of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae were estimated as 80%, 51% and 98.2%, respectively. As a result, Rt-PCR was shown to be a sensitive method and could be preferred for the rapid diagnosis of H.influenzae and S.pneumoniae in the etiological diagnosis of acute otitis media, especially in culture negative cases.

  7. When co-colonizing the nasopharynx haemophilus influenzae predominates over Streptococcus pneumoniae except serotype 19A strains to cause acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R; Chang, Arthur; Pichichero, Michael E

    2012-06-01

    Of 368 acute otitis media (AOM) cases among 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate-vaccinated children, 43.5% were colonized by multiple otopathogens in the nasopharynx but only 7.1% experienced polymicrobial AOM. When co-colonization occurred, Haemophilus influenzae predominated over all Streptococcus pneumoniae strains except 19A strains to cause AOM. Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae both predominated over Moraxella catarrhalis to cause AOM.

  8. Income inequality and 30 day outcomes after acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lagu, Tara; Rothberg, Michael B; Avrunin, Jill; Pekow, Penelope S; Wang, Yongfei; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between income inequality and the risk of mortality and readmission within 30 days of hospitalization. Design Retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. Hierarchical, logistic regression models were developed to estimate the association between income inequality (measured at the US state level) and a patient’s risk of mortality and readmission, while sequentially controlling for patient, hospital, other state, and patient socioeconomic characteristics. We considered a 0.05 unit increase in the Gini coefficient as a measure of income inequality. Setting US acute care hospitals. Participants Patients aged 65 years and older, and hospitalized in 2006-08 with a principal diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. Main outcome measures Risk of death within 30 days of admission or rehospitalization for any cause within 30 days of discharge. The potential number of excess deaths and readmissions associated with higher levels of inequality in US states in the three highest quarters of income inequality were compared with corresponding data in US states in the lowest quarter. Results Mortality analyses included 555 962 admissions (4348 hospitals) for acute myocardial infarction, 1 092 285 (4484) for heart failure, and 1 146 414 (4520); readmission analyses included 553 037 (4262), 1 345 909 (4494), and 1 345 909 (4524) admissions, respectively. In 2006-08, income inequality in US states (as measured by the average Gini coefficient over three years) varied from 0.41 in Utah to 0.50 in New York. Multilevel models showed no significant association between income inequality and mortality within 30 days of admission for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia. By contrast, income inequality was associated with rehospitalization (acute myocardial infarction, risk ratio 1.09 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.15), heart failure 1

  9. Genomic repeats, genome plasticity and the dynamics of Mycoplasma evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Blanchard, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasmas evolved by a drastic reduction in genome size, but their genomes contain numerous repeated sequences with important roles in their evolution. We have established a bioinformatic strategy to detect the major recombination hot-spots in the genomes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma pulmonis. This allowed the identification of large numbers of potentially variable regions, as well as a comparison of the relative recombination potentials of different genomic regions. Different trends are perceptible among mycoplasmas, probably due to different functional and structural constraints. The largest potential for illegitimate recombination in M.pulmonis is found at the vsa locus and its comparison in two different strains reveals numerous changes since divergence. On the other hand, the main M.pneumoniae and M.genitalium adhesins rely on large distant repeats and, hence, homologous recombination for variation. However, the relation between the existence of repeats and antigenic variation is not necessarily straightforward, since repeats of P1 adhesin were found to be anti-correlated with epitopes recognized by patient antibodies. These different strategies have important consequences for the structures of genomes, since large distant repeats correlate well with the major chromosomal rearrangements. Probably to avoid such events, mycoplasmas strongly avoid inverse repeats, in comparison to co-oriented repeats. PMID:11972343

  10. Corn mint (Mentha arvensis) extract diminishes acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salin, Olli; Törmäkangas, Liisa; Leinonen, Maija; Saario, Elise; Hagström, Marja; Ketola, Raimo A; Saikku, Pekka; Vuorela, Heikki; Vuorela, Pia M

    2011-12-28

    Corn mint ( Mentha arvensis ) provides a good source of natural phenols such as flavone glycosides and caffeic acid derivatives, which may have prophylactic properties against inflammations. This study investigated whether corn mint extract would be beneficial against a universal respiratory tract pathogen, Chlamydia pneumoniae , infection. The extract inhibited the growth of C. pneumoniae CWL-029 in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was confirmed against a clinical isolate K7. The phenolic composition of the extract was analyzed by UPLC-ESI/Q-TOF/MS, the main components being linarin and rosmarinic acid. These compounds were active in vitro against C. pneumoniae. Linarin completely inhibited the growth at 100 μM. Inbred C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with C. pneumoniae K7. M. arvensis extract was given intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days prior to inoculation and continued for 10 days postinfection. The extract was able to diminish the inflammatory parameters related to C. pneumoniae infection and significantly (p = 0.019) lowered the number of C. pneumoniae genome equivalents detected by PCR at biologically relevant amounts.

  11. The Epidemiology of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Colonization and Infection among Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Residents.

    PubMed

    Mills, John P; Talati, Naasha J; Alby, Kevin; Han, Jennifer H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE An improved understanding of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) is needed. The objective of this study was to assess risk factors for colonization or infection with CRKP in LTACH residents. METHODS A case-control study was performed at a university-affiliated LTACH from 2008 to 2013. Cases were defined as all patients with clinical cultures positive for CRKP and controls were those with clinical cultures positive for carbapenem-susceptible K. pneumoniae (CSKP). A multivariate model was developed to identify risk factors for CRKP infection or colonization. RESULTS A total of 222 patients were identified with K. pneumoniae clinical cultures during the study period; 99 (45%) were case patients and 123 (55%) were control patients. Our multivariate analysis identified factors associated with a significant risk for CRKP colonization or infection: solid organ or stem cell transplantation (OR, 5.05; 95% CI, 1.23-20.8; P=.03), mechanical ventilation (OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.24-5.28; P=.01), fecal incontinence (OR, 5.78; 95% CI, 1.52-22.0; P=.01), and exposure in the prior 30 days to meropenem (OR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.04-12.1; P=.04), vancomycin (OR, 2.94; 95% CI, 1.18-7.32; P=.02), and metronidazole (OR, 4.22; 95% CI, 1.28-14.0; P=.02). CONCLUSIONS Rates of colonization and infection with CRKP were high in the LTACH setting, with nearly half of K. pneumoniae cultures demonstrating carbapenem resistance. Further studies are needed on interventions to limit the emergence of CRKP in LTACHs, including targeted surveillance screening of high-risk patients and effective antibiotic stewardship measures. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;37(1):55-60. PMID:26455382

  12. Trajectories of Risk for Specific Readmission Diagnoses after Hospitalization for Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, or Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Krumholz, Harlan M.; Hsieh, Angela; Dreyer, Rachel P.; Welsh, John; Desai, Nihar R.; Dharmarajan, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of rehospitalization is elevated in the immediate post-discharge period and declines over time. It is not known if the extent and timing of risk vary across readmission diagnoses, suggesting that recovery and vulnerability after discharge differ by physiologic system. Objective We compared risk trajectories for major readmission diagnoses in the year after discharge among all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized with heart failure (HF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or pneumonia from 2008–2010. Methods We estimated the daily risk of rehospitalization for 12 major readmission diagnostic categories after accounting for the competing risk of death after discharge. For each diagnostic category, we identified (1) the time required for readmission risk to peak and then decline 50% from maximum values after discharge; (2) the time required for readmission risk to approach plateau periods of minimal day-to-day change; and (3) the extent to which hospitalization risks are higher among patients recently discharged from the hospital compared with the general elderly population. Results Among >3,000,000 hospitalizations, the yearly rate of rehospitalization was 67.0%, 49.5%, and 55.3% after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. The extent and timing of risk varied by readmission diagnosis and initial admitting condition. Risk of readmission for gastrointestinal bleeding/anemia peaked particularly late after hospital discharge, occurring 10, 6, and 7 days after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. Risk of readmission for trauma/injury declined particularly slowly, requiring 38, 20, and 38 days to decline by 50% after hospitalization for HF, AMI, and pneumonia, respectively. Conclusions Patterns of vulnerability to different conditions that cause rehospitalization vary by time after hospital discharge. This finding suggests that recovery of various physiologic systems occurs at different rates and

  13. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae alleviates influenza-induced acute lung injury via limiting NK cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Sun, Rui; Gao, Xiang; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-08-01

    A protective effect induced by bacterial preinfection upon a subsequent lethal influenza virus infection has been observed, but the underlying immune mechanisms have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a mouse model of Klebsiella pneumoniae preinfection to gain insight into how bacterial preinfection influences the subsequent lethal influenza virus infection. We found that K. pneumoniae preinfection significantly attenuated lung immune injury and decreased mortality during influenza virus infection, but K. pneumoniae-specific immunity was not involved in this cross-protection against influenza virus. K. pneumoniae preinfection limited NK cell expansion, which was involved in influenza-induced immune injury and death. Furthermore, K. pneumoniae preinfection could not control NK cell expansion and death during influenza virus infection in Rag1(-/-) mice, but adoptive transfer of T cells from wild-type mice was able to restore this protective effect. Our data suggest that the adaptive immune response activated by bacterial infection limits the excessive innate immune response induced by a subsequent influenza infection, ultimately protecting mice from death.

  15. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Strain SC01 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Falong; Tang, Cheng; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Huanrong; Yue, Hua

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic nonprogressive pneumonia in both sheep and goats. Studies concerning its molecular pathogenesis, genetic analysis, and vaccine development have been hindered due to limited genomic information. Here, we announce the first complete genome sequence of this organism. PMID:21742877

  16. Isolation of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae from pneumonic lung of swine.

    PubMed

    Dahlia, H; Tan, L J; Zarrahimah, Z; Maria, J

    2009-12-01

    The isolation of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae from a piglet with severe pneumonia is described. This is the first report of M. hyosynoviae isolation in the country. The lung sample where the isolation was made was severely consolidated, suppurative and pleurisy. The pathogenicity of the M. hyosynoviae isolated has yet to be determined. PMID:20237449

  17. Molecular cartography in acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections--a non-targeted metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Müller, Constanze; Dietz, Inga; Tziotis, Dimitrios; Moritz, Franco; Rupp, Jan; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-06-01

    Infections with Chlamydia pneumoniae cause several respiratory diseases, such as community-acquired pneumonia, bronchitis or sinusitis. Here, we present an integrated non-targeted metabolomics analysis applying ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to determine metabolite alterations in C. pneumoniae-infected HEp-2 cells. Most important permutations are elaborated using uni- and multivariate statistical analysis, logD retention time regression and mass defect-based network analysis. Classes of metabolites showing high variations upon infection are lipids, carbohydrates and amino acids. Moreover, we observed several non-annotated compounds as predominantly abundant after infection, which are promising biomarker candidates for drug-target and diagnostic research.

  18. Legionella pneumonia presenting with bilateral flank pain, hyponatraemia and acute renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Birkin, Celia; Biyani, Chandra Shekhar; Browning, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is an often overlooked but a possible cause of sporadic community acquired pneumonia. High fever, cough and gastrointestinal symptoms are non-specific symptoms. Hyponatremia is more common in LD than pneumonia linked with other causes. A definitive diagnosis is usually confirmed by culture, urinary antigen testing for Legionella species. Macolide or quinolone antibiotic is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of Legionella pneumonia presenting with high fever, bilateral flank pain and oliguria. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this diagnosis when managing patients with flank pain. The case highlights the problems in differentiating LD from renal colic and the importance of proper history, physical examination with laboratory tests for appropriate management. PMID:22154178

  19. Chronic Endometritis and Positive Mycoplasma Cultures: Is There a Correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Nyirjesy, Paul; Amin-Hanjani, Soheil

    1995-01-01

    Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of mycoplasma strains (Mycoplasma hominis or Ureaplasma urealyticum) on the development of chronic endometritis. Methods: Fifty-eight patients with acute pelvic infection were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Endometrial cultures and biopsies were obtained on admission and 5–7 and 21–28 days after completion of treatment. Results: Of 148 samples, 40 were positive for mycoplasma strains (group A) and 58 were positive for mycoplasma with other pathogens (group B). Twenty-seven samples were positive for other pathogens only (group C). Chronic endometritis was seen in 7 (17.5%), 30 (51.7%), and 10 (37%) in group A, B, and C patients, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of mycoplasma strains in the endometrial cavity was not found to be associated with an increased incidence of chronic endometritis. PMID:18475413

  20. Successful combination therapy with corticosteroids, biweekly intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide and cyclosporin A for acute interstitial pneumonia in patients with dermatomyositis : report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akitake; Shoji, Norikazu; Kikuchi, Eigo; Uekubo, Kazuaki; Aoki, Naoko; Sonoda, Yui; Torigai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Kentaro; Okai, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    We report three patients with dermatomyositis (DM) complicated with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). All of them complained of fever and acutely worsening dyspnea and were treated immediately by combination therapies with pulse therapy with methylprednisone (mPSL) followed by corticosteroids, biweekly intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide (IVCY) and cyclosporine A (CSA). They recovered rapidly soon after an initiation of this combination regimen. Early intervention with aggressive combination therapy is life-saving for the treatment of AIP in patients with DM.

  1. [Survival by a young woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders and with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to severe pneumonia who showed increased serum neutrophil elastase activity].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirokazu; Sawaguchi, Hirochiyo; Nakajima, Shigenori

    2006-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman with malnutrition due to alcoholism and eating disorders was found to have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis due to severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. S. pneumoniae was detected by an in vitro rapid immunochromatographic assay for S. pneumoniae antigen in urine on the day of admission and by blood culture 2 days after admission. Symptoms and laboratory findings improved after treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate, antibiotics, and mechanical ventilation. Treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate also decreased serum neutrophil elastase activity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of early treatment with sivelestat sodium hydrate in ARDS due to severe pneumonia.

  2. Experimental studies on the pathogenicity of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini for the respiratory tract of goats.

    PubMed

    Goltz, J P; Rosendal, S; McCraw, B M; Ruhnke, H L

    1986-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were the species of Mollicutes most commonly isolated from 175 goats with respiratory disease in Ontario. The pathogenicity of M. ovipneumoniae, strain B321B and M. arginini, strain D53e, was assessed in goats following endobronchial inoculation. One out of three two year old goats developed fever after inoculation with a pure culture of strain B321B, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis when necropsied three weeks later. Neither of the remaining goats had lesions in the respiratory tract. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae was recovered from one of the animals four days after inoculation, but not at necropsy from any of the goats, at which time a marked humoral immune response with growth inhibiting antibodies was detected. In a second experiment three four to five week old goats were inoculated with the same strain and three other goats were given placebo treatment. One experimental goat developed fever and coughing, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis in the right side and pneumonia. Another goat had focal pneumonia in the left diaphragmatic lobe. Microscopically there was subacute hyperplastic suppurative bronchiolitis, atelectasis and nonsuppurative alveolitis. The infected animals did not clear the mycoplasma and not all of them produced antibodies. Mycoplasma arginini, strain D53e, did not induce lesions in any of four goat kids within 14 days after inoculation but did cause transient elevations in rectal temperature, circulating monocytes, circulating neutrophils and blood fibrinogen. Mycoplasma arginini was infective and immunogenic for all inoculated animals and showed a particular affinity for the tonsil. Thus, this study provides the first evidence that M. ovipneumoniae is pathogenic for goats causing pneumonia and pleuritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Experimental studies on the pathogenicity of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini for the respiratory tract of goats.

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, J P; Rosendal, S; McCraw, B M; Ruhnke, H L

    1986-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were the species of Mollicutes most commonly isolated from 175 goats with respiratory disease in Ontario. The pathogenicity of M. ovipneumoniae, strain B321B and M. arginini, strain D53e, was assessed in goats following endobronchial inoculation. One out of three two year old goats developed fever after inoculation with a pure culture of strain B321B, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis when necropsied three weeks later. Neither of the remaining goats had lesions in the respiratory tract. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae was recovered from one of the animals four days after inoculation, but not at necropsy from any of the goats, at which time a marked humoral immune response with growth inhibiting antibodies was detected. In a second experiment three four to five week old goats were inoculated with the same strain and three other goats were given placebo treatment. One experimental goat developed fever and coughing, and it had extensive subacute fibrinous pleuritis in the right side and pneumonia. Another goat had focal pneumonia in the left diaphragmatic lobe. Microscopically there was subacute hyperplastic suppurative bronchiolitis, atelectasis and nonsuppurative alveolitis. The infected animals did not clear the mycoplasma and not all of them produced antibodies. Mycoplasma arginini, strain D53e, did not induce lesions in any of four goat kids within 14 days after inoculation but did cause transient elevations in rectal temperature, circulating monocytes, circulating neutrophils and blood fibrinogen. Mycoplasma arginini was infective and immunogenic for all inoculated animals and showed a particular affinity for the tonsil. Thus, this study provides the first evidence that M. ovipneumoniae is pathogenic for goats causing pneumonia and pleuritis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3742358

  4. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma fermentans induce cell apoptosis and changes in gene expression profiles of 32D cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin; Shou, Chengchao

    2011-01-01

    Infection of mycoplasmas has been linked to various human diseases including arthritis, pneumonia, infertility and cancer. While Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Mycoplasma fermentans have been detected in gastric adenocarcinomas, the mechanisms underlyine the pathogenesis are unknown. In this study, cell growth kinetics, Hoechst 33258 staining, DNA ladder assays, Western blotting analysis and cDNA microarray assays were performed to investigate the roles of M. hyorhinis and M. fermentans during infection of mammalian cells. Our data demonstrated that these mycoplasmas inhibid the growth of immortalised cell lines (32D and COS-7) ane tumor cell lines (HeLa and AGS). In addition, the infection of the 32D cell line with M. hyorhinis and M. fermentans induced compression of the nucleus, degradation of the cell genome and dysregulation of the expression of genes related to proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, signaling pathway and metabolism. Apoptosis related proteins Bcl-2, Bid and p53 were down-regulated, Fas was up-regulated and Bax was dysregulated in mycoplasma-infected 32D cells. Together, our data demonstrated that infection of mycoplasmas inhibitd cele growts through modification of gene expression profiles and post-translation modification of proliferation and apoptosis related proteins. PMID:22446603

  5. The Usefulness of the Delta Neutrophil Index for Predicting Superimposed Pneumonia in Patients with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Wook; Kwon, Woocheol; Lee, Seok Jeong; Kang, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyung Il; Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Kyoung-Chul; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2016-01-01

    Background Although respiratory infections, such as pneumonia, have long been recognized as precipitators of exacerbation in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), identifying signs of concomitant pneumonia in ADHF is a clinical diagnostic challenge. We evaluated the predictive value of the delta neutrophil index (DNI), a new indicator for immature granulocytes, for diagnosing superimposed pneumonia in patients presenting with ADHF in the emergency department (ED). Methods This was a retrospective and observational study of consecutive patients (>18 years old) diagnosed with an ADHF in the ED over a 7-month period. Patients were categorized into either the ADHF group or the ADHF with pneumonia group. DNI, serum white blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and β-natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured upon ED arrival. Results The ADHF with pneumonia group included 30 patients (20.4%). Median initial DNI, WBC, and CRP were significantly higher in the ADHF with pneumonia group [0% vs. 1.8%, p<0.001, 8,200 cells/mL vs. 10,470 cells/mL, p<0.001, and 0.56 mg/dL vs. 6.10 mg/dL, p<0.001]. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that only initial DNI significantly predicted the presence of superimposed pneumonia in patients with ADHF. In the receiver operating characteristic curves for initial DNI, WBC, and CRP for differentiating superimposed pneumonia in ADHF patients, the area under curve (AUC) of DNI (0.916 [95% confidence interval 0.859–0.955]) was good. AUC of DNI was significantly higher than AUC of CRP and WBC [0.828 and 0.715] (DNI vs. CRP, p = 0.047 and DNI vs. WBC, p<0.001). Conclusions Initial DNI, which was measured upon ED arrival, was significantly higher in the ADHF with pneumonia group than in the ADHF group. The initial DNI’s ability of prediction for ADHF with superimposed pneumonia in the ED was good and it was better than those of serum WBC and CRP. Therefore, DNI may serve as a convenient and useful marker for early

  6. Acute Onset Anti-Synthetase Syndrome With Pericardial Effusion and Non-Specific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aditya; Patel, Samir R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-synthetase syndrome (AS) is a clinical entity which is described classically by the triad of interstitial lung disease (ILD), inflammatory myositis and presence of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies (ASA). We describe a rare presentation of this condition with regard to the uncharacteristically acute nature of presentation, acute decompensation in clinical condition, development of acute interstitial pneumonitis requiring rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and accompaniment of significant pericardial effusion on presentation, followed by rapid improvement with initiation of steroids. PMID:27540445

  7. [Critical evaluation and predictive value of clinical presentation in out-patients with acute community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Mayaud, C; Fartoukh, M; Prigent, H; Parrot, A; Cadranel, J

    2006-01-01

    Diagnostic probability of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) depends on data related to age and clinical and radiological findings. The critical evaluation of data in the literature leads to the following conclusions: 1) the prevalence of CAP in a given population with acute respiratory disease is 5% in outpatients and 10% in an emergency care unit. This could be as low as 2% in young people and even higher than 40% in hospitalized elderly patients; 2) the collection of clinical data is linked to the way the patient is examined and to the expertise of the clinician. The absolute lack of "vital signs" has a good negative predictive value in CAP; presence of unilateral crackles has a good positive predictive value; 3) there is a wide range of X-ray abnormalities: localized alveolar opacities; interstitial opacities, limited of diffused. The greatest radiological difficulties are encountered in old people with disorders including chronic respiratory or cardiac opacities and as a consequence of the high prevalence of bronchopneumonia episodes at this age; 4) among patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT) infections, the blood levels of leukocytes, CRP and procalcitonine are higher in CAP patients, mainly when their disease has a bacterial origin. Since you have not a threshold value reliably demonstrated in large populations with LRT infections or acute respiratory disease, presence or absence of these parameters could only be taken as a slight hint for a CAP diagnosis. PMID:17084571

  8. Aspiration pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic pneumonia; Aspiration of vomitus; Necrotizing pneumonia; Aspiration pneumonitis ... The type of bacteria that caused the pneumonia depends on: Your ... facility, for example) Whether you were recently hospitalized ...

  9. [Pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is a serious medical pathology frequent in elderly people. The physiological changes of the respiratory system linked with age reduce postural drainage capacities and increase the risk of acute respiratory failure. Associated with other comorbidities, chronic inhalation is a major risk factor of pneumonia in elderly people. Prevention is based on vaccination, nutrition, dental care and an adapted diet.

  10. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM).

    PubMed

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3μm-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis. PMID:22226908

  11. β-Lactamase-Producing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Fails To Protect Streptococcus pneumoniae from Amoxicillin during Experimental Acute Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Westman, Eva; Lundin, Susanne; Hermansson, Ann; Melhus, Åsa

    2004-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common reason for outpatient antimicrobial therapy. Mixed infections pose a potential problem, since the first-line drug used for the treatment of AOM, amoxicillin, can be neutralized by β-lactamase-producing pathogens of the upper respiratory tract. To study the effects of a 5-day course of amoxicillin on a mixed middle ear infection, rats were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae alone or in combination with β-lactamase-producing nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Amoxicillin was introduced at the clinical peak of the infection. Local and systemic changes were monitored by otomicroscopy, bacterial culture, and analysis of histological changes and the expression of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) gene. β-Lactamase-producing H. influenzae did not demonstrate an ability to protect S. pneumoniae. Amoxicillin eradicated the pneumococci in all treated animals but increased to some degree the ability of H. influenzae to persist at the site of infection. Thus, only an insignificant acceleration of the resolution of the AOM caused by a mixture of pathogens was observed during treatment. Moderate to major morphological changes could not be avoided by treatment of the mixed infections, but a slight downregulation of TGF-β expression was observed. In contrast to infections caused by a single pathogen, the mixed infections induced white plaques in the tympanic membrane at a remarkably high frequency independent of treatment. These experimental findings constitute support for further studies of antimicrobial drugs and AOM caused by bacteria with and without mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. PMID:15328122

  12. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  13. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia. PMID:27224212

  14. A novel human enterovirus C (EV-C118) identified in two children hospitalised because of acute otitis media and community-acquired pneumonia in Israel.

    PubMed

    Daleno, Cristina; Greenberg, David; Piralla, Antonio; Scala, Alessia; Baldanti, Fausto; Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-02-01

    We report the discovery of a novel enterovirus C (EV-C118) identified in two Israeli children hospitalised for acute otitis media and community-acquired pneumonia. The highest pair-wise sequence identity scores with the EV-C109 and EV-C117 reference strains were, respectively, 63.5% and 63.6% nucleotide identity, and 82.5% and 79.9% amino acid identity.

  15. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections.

  16. [Nosocomial pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Díaz, Emili; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio; Vallés, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) is one of the most common infections acquired among hospitalised patients. Within the HAP, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection complication among patients with acute respiratory failure. The VAP and HAP are associated with increased mortality and increased hospital costs. The rise in HAP due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria also causes an increase in the incidence of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy, with an associated increased risk of hospital mortality. It is very important to know the most common organisms responsible for these infections in each hospital and each Intensive Care Unit, as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, in order to reduce the incidence of inappropriate antibiotic therapy and improve the prognosis of patients. Additionally, clinical strategies aimed at the prevention of HAP and VAP should be employed in hospital settings caring for patients at risk for these infections. PMID:23827827

  17. World Health Organization International Standard To Harmonize Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C Micha; Baylis, Sally A; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Montag-Lessing, Thomas; Chudy, Michael; Kreß, Julia; Ulrych, Ursula; Czurda, Stefan; Rosengarten, Renate

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays (referred to here as NAT assays) are increasingly used as an alternative to culture-based approaches for the detection of mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures. Assay features, like the limit of detection or quantification, vary widely between different mycoplasma NAT assays. Biological reference materials may be useful for harmonization of mycoplasma NAT assays. An international feasibility study included lyophilized preparations of four distantly related mycoplasma species (Acholeplasma laidlawii, Mycoplasma fermentans, M. orale, M. pneumoniae) at different concentrations which were analyzed by 21 laboratories using 26 NAT assays with a qualitative, semiquantitative, or quantitative design. An M. fermentans preparation was shown to decrease the interassay variation when used as a common reference material. The preparation was remanufactured and characterized in a comparability study, and its potency (in NAT-detectable units) across different NATs was determined. The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) established this preparation to be the "1st World Health Organization international standard for mycoplasma DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique-based assays designed for generic mycoplasma detection" (WHO Tech Rep Ser 987:42, 2014) with a potency of 200,000 IU/ml. This WHO international standard is now available as a reference preparation for characterization of NAT assays, e.g., for determination of analytic sensitivity, for calibration of quantitative assays in a common unitage, and for defining regulatory requirements in the field of mycoplasma testing.

  18. Mycoplasmas in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus): identification and association with abortion.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael; Taylor, Trevor K; Duignan, Pádraig J; Swingler, Jane; Marenda, Marc; Arnould, John P Y; Kirkwood, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria from the genus Mycoplasma are common inhabitants of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genital tracts of mammals. The understanding of the pathological significance of mycoplasmas in seals is poor, as few studies have utilized the specific culture techniques required to isolate these bacteria. The current study surveyed for the Mycoplasma species present in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) and investigated the association between infection and pathology. Mycoplasmas were found in the nasal cavities of 55/80 (69%) of apparently healthy individuals. Isolates from 18 individuals were investigated through 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing, and 3 species were identified: M. zalophi, M. phocae, and Mycoplasma sp. (GenBank no. EU714238.1), all of which had previously been isolated from Northern Hemisphere pinnipeds. In addition, mycoplasmas were isolated from the lungs of 4 out of 16 juveniles and 1 out of 5 adults sampled at necropsy. Isolates obtained were M. zalophi, Mycoplasma sp. EU714238.1, and M. phocicerebrale, but infection was not associated with lung pathology in these age classes. Inflammatory disease processes of the heart and/or lungs were present in 12 out of 32 (38%) aborted fetuses on microscopic examination. Predominant findings were interstitial pneumonia, pericarditis, and myocarditis. Mycoplasma phocicerebrale was isolated from the thymus of an aborted fetus, and 3 out of 11 (27%) fetuses with inflammatory heart or lung lesions were PCR-positive for Mycoplasma. In conclusion, several species of Mycoplasma are part of the normal flora of the nasal cavity of Australian fur seals, and some mycoplasmas may be associated with abortion in this species of seal. PMID:22362792

  19. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p = 0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, P<0.05). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that patients with CAP had a worse survival rate than patients without CAP (P<0.05). Clinical characteristics, including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, C-reactive protein, and CAP, were found to be closely associated with survival of AECOPD individuals. Further multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed that CAP and APACHE II were independent risk factors for inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, P<0.01 and APACHE II: hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06–1.37, P<0.01). Conclusion CAP may be an independent risk factor for higher inhospital mortality in critically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  1. Duration of Colonization With Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria at Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals in Chicago, Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Haverkate, Manon R.; Weiner, Shayna; Lolans, Karen; Moore, Nicholas M.; Weinstein, Robert A.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hayden, Mary K.; Bootsma, Martin C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. High prevalence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae has been reported in long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs), in part because of frequent readmissions of colonized patients. Knowledge of the duration of colonization with KPC is essential to identify patients at risk of KPC colonization upon readmission and to make predictions on the effects of transmission control measures. Methods. We analyzed data on surveillance isolates that were collected at 4 LTACHs in the Chicago region during a period of bundled interventions, to simultaneously estimate the duration of colonization during an LTACH admission and between LTACH (re)admissions. A maximum-likelihood method was used, taking interval-censoring into account. Results. Eighty-three percent of patients remained colonized for at least 4 weeks, which was the median duration of LTACH stay. Between LTACH admissions, the median duration of colonization was 270 days (95% confidence interval, 91–∞). Conclusions. Only 17% of LTACH patients lost colonization with KPC within 4 weeks. Approximately half of the KPC-positive patients were still carriers when readmitted after 9 months. Infection control practices should take prolonged carriage into account to limit transmission of KPCs in LTACHs.

  2. Genetic susceptibility to nosocomial pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and poor outcome in patients at risk of critical illness.

    PubMed

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Smelaya, Tamara V; Vesnina, Irina N; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Moroz, Viktor V

    2014-04-01

    Genetic susceptibility may partially explain the clinical variability observed during the course of similar infections. To establish the contribution of genetic host factors in the susceptibility to critical illness, we genotyped 750 subjects (419 at high risk of critical illness) for 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the xenobiotics detoxification/oxidative stress and vascular homeostasis metabolic pathways. In the group of nosocomial pneumonia (NP; 268 patients) the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is significantly higher for the carriers of CYP1A1 rs2606345 T/T genotypes and AhR rs2066853 G/A-A/A genotypes. AGTR1 rs5186 allele C is more common among NP non-survivors. The duration of stay in intensive care units (ICU) is higher for NP patients with ABCB1 rs1045642-T allele. The cumulative effect of the risk alleles in the genes comprising two sets of genes partners (xenobiotics detoxification: CYP1A1, AhR and RAS family: ACE, AGT, AGTR1) is associated with the development of both NP and ARDS.

  3. Metabolomics Investigation Reveals Metabolite Mediators Associated with Acute Lung Injury and Repair in a Murine Model of Influenza Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liang; Zheng, Dahai; Lee, Yie Hou; Chan, Tze Khee; Kumar, Yadunanda; Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Chen, Jian Zhu; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Ong, Choon Nam

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infection (IVI) can cause primary viral pneumonia, which may progress to acute lung injury (ALI) and respiratory failure with a potentially fatal outcome. At present, the interactions between host and influenza virus at molecular levels and the underlying mechanisms that give rise to IVI-induced ALI are poorly understood. We conducted a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of serum, lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from a non-lethal mouse model with influenza A virus at 0, 6, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days post infection (dpi), representing the major stages of IVI. Distinct metabolite signatures were observed in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, indicating the molecular differences between systematic and localized host responses to IVI. More than 100 differential metabolites were captured in mice sera, lung tissues and BALF, including purines, pyrimidines, acylcarnitines, fatty acids, amino acids, glucocorticoids, sphingolipids, phospholipids, etc. Many of these metabolites belonged to pulmonary surfactants, indicating IVI-induced aberrations of the pulmonary surfactant system might play an important role in the etiology of respiratory failure and repair. Our findings revealed dynamic host responses to IVI and various metabolic pathways linked to disease progression, and provided mechanistic insights into IVI-induced ALI and repair process. PMID:27188343

  4. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  5. Evolution of amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of adults with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia in response to antimicrobial-resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M; Benninger, Michael S; Jacobs, Michael R

    2004-06-01

    Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired respiratory tract infections no longer depend solely on the characteristics of the patient and the clinical syndrome, but on those of the offending pathogen, including presence and level of antimicrobial resistance. The most common respiratory tract pathogens known to cause acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, especially b-lactum and macrolide resistance, among S pneumoniae and H influenzae has increased dramatically during the past 2 decades, diminishing the activity of many older antimicrobials against resistant organisms. A pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate has been developed to fulfill the need for an oral b-lactam antimicrobial that achieves a greater time that the serum drug concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration (T > MIC) of antimicrobials against pathogens than conventional formulations to improve activity against S pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to penicillin. The b-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate allows for coverage of b-lactamase-producing pathogens, such as H influenzae and M catarrhalis. This article reviews the rationale for, and evolution of, oral amoxicillin clavulanate for ABRS and CAP

  6. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. PMID:26661344

  7. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy.

  8. Evidence for Enhanced Cellular Uptake and Binding of Thyroxine In Vivo during Acute Infection with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    DeRubertis, Frederick R.; Woeber, Kenneth A.

    1972-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that acute pneumococcal infections in man and in the rhesus monkey are accompanied by accelerated metabolic disposal of L-thyroxine (T4). In order to study the influence of acute pneumococcal infection on the kinetics of hormone distribution, the early cellular uptake of T4 (CT4), reflecting the net effect of plasma and cellular binding factors, was assessed in rhesus monkeys from the differences in instantaneous distribution volumes of T4-131I and albumin-125I during the first 60 min after their simultaneous injection. Hepatic and renal uptakes of 131I were also determined. Plasma binding of T4 was assessed by measuring the per cent of free T4 (% FT4) in serum. Six monkeys were studied 12 hr (INF-12) and seven 24 hr (INF-24) after intravenous inoculation with Diplococcus pneumoniae; seven controls were inoculated with a heat-killed culture. CT4 at 60 min as per cent administered dose was 31.5 ±2.0 (mean ±SE) in INF-12 and 33.0±0.8 in INF-24, values significantly greater than control (22.4±1.3). By contrast, mean% FT4 was identical in control and INF-12 (0.028 ±0.002 and 0.028 ±0.001) and variably increased in INF-24 (0.034 ±0.003). Thus, in the infected monkeys CT4 and% FT4 were not significantly correlated. The increased CT4 in the infected monkeys could not be ascribed to an increase in vascular permeability and did not correlate with the magnitude of fever. Although the increased CT4 could not be accounted for by increased hepatic or renal uptake of hormone, hepatic and renal T4 spaces were increased, results consistent with increased binding by these tissues. Our data indicate that the cellular uptake of T4 is increased early in acute pneumococcal infection and suggest that this results from a primary enhancement of cell-associated binding factors for T4. PMID:5014612

  9. An open, comparative pilot study of thiamphenicol glycinate hydrochloride vs clarithromycin in the treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections due to Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Todisco, T; Eslami, A; Baglioni, S; Todisco, C

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of thiamphenicol glycinate hydrochloride (TGH) i.m. versus clarithromycin in acute lower respiratory infections due to Chlamydia pneumonia. 113 patients with suspected pneumonia were screened. 40 patients with IgM and/or IgA titers > or = 1:16 and/or IgG titers > or = 1:512 were assigned to 10 days of treatment with TGH 1500 mg daily or clarithromycin 1000 mg daily. 34 patients were considered a clinical success. 33 patients were a radiological success. 22 patients showed a decrease in IgG values. 3 patients had an increase in IgG values. Blood/urine values presented no clinically significant variations. Clinical efficacy was similar in both treatment groups. These are the first results confirming in vivo the recent in vitro evidence that TGH is effective against acute lower respiratory tract infections due to C. pneumoniae, thus representing an alternative therapy to clarithromycin.

  10. Mycoplasma genitalium: from Chrysalis to Multicolored Butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Robinson, David; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The history, replication, genetics, characteristics (both biological and physical), and factors involved in the pathogenesis of Mycoplasma genitalium are presented. The latter factors include adhesion, the influence of hormones, motility, possible toxin production, and immunological responses. The preferred site of colonization, together with current detection procedures, mainly by PCR technology, is discussed. The relationships between M. genitalium and various diseases are highlighted. These diseases include acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis, balanoposthitis, chronic prostatitis, and acute epididymitis in men and urethritis, bacterial vaginosis, vaginitis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and reproductive disease in women. A causative relationship, or otherwise strong association, between several of these diseases and M. genitalium is apparent, and the extent of this, on a subjective basis, is presented; also provided is a comparison between M. genitalium and two other genital tract-orientated mollicutes, namely, Mycoplasma hominis, the first mycoplasma of human origin to be discovered, and Ureaplasma species. Also discussed is the relationship between M. genitalium and infertility and also arthritis in both men and women, as is infection in homosexual and immunodeficient patients. Decreased immunity, as in HIV infections, may enhance mycoplasmal detection and increase disease severity. Finally, aspects of the antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance of M. genitalium, together with the treatment and possible prevention of mycoplasmal disease, are discussed. PMID:21734246

  11. Characteristics and outcomes of acute otitis media in children carrying streptococcus pneumoniae or haemophilus influenzae in their nasopharynx as a single otopathogen after introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Caeymaex, Laurence; Varon, Emmanuelle; Levy, Corinne; Béchet, Stéphane; Derkx, Véronique; Desvignes, Véronique; Doit, Catherine; Cohen, Robert

    2014-05-01

    After PCV7 implementation, clinical characteristics were investigated in 832 young children with acute otitis media, carrying a single S. pneumoniae or H. influenzae in their nasopharynx. As compared with H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae-associated acute otitis media was less frequently associated with treatment failure (odds ratio = 0.5; 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.83) and recurrence (odds ratio = 0.4; 95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.75). Post-PCV7 serotype replacement seemed not to affect the acute otitis media characteristics in these children.

  12. Value of bronchoalveolar lavage in the management of severe acute pneumonia and interstitial pneumonitis in the immunocompromised child.

    PubMed Central

    de Blic, J; McKelvie, P; Le Bourgeois, M; Blanche, S; Benoist, M R; Scheinmann, P

    1987-01-01

    The diagnostic value of 73 bronchoalveolar lavages was assessed in 67 immunocompromised children (aged 3 months to 16 years) with pulmonary infiltrates. Thirty one children had primary and 19 secondary immune deficiency, 14 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and three AIDS related complex. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed during fibreoptic bronchoscopy, under local anaesthesia in all but two. One or more infective agents was found in eight of 11 patients with severe acute pneumonia and in 26 of 62 patients with interstitial pneumonitis. In interstitial pneumonitis, the most frequently encountered agents were Pneumocystis carinii (12), cytomegalovirus (8), and Aspergillus fumigatus (3). The yield was related to the severity of interstitial pneumonitis. The mean cellular count and cytological profile in lavage returns from patients with varying infective agents or underlying pathological conditions showed no significant difference, except in those children with AIDS and AIDS related complex who had appreciable lymphocytosis (mean percentage of lymphocytes 28 (SD 17]. In children with AIDS and chronic interstitial pneumonitis lymphocytosis without pneumocystis infection was observed in eight of nine bronchoalveolar lavage returns and was suggestive of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. Finally, bronchoalveolar lavage produced a specific diagnosis from the microbiological or cytological findings in 44 instances (60%). Transient exacerbation of tachypnoea was observed in the most severely ill children but there was no case of respiratory decompensation attributable to the bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage is a safe and rapid examination for the investigation of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised children. It should be performed as a first line investigation and should reduce the use of open lung biopsy techniques. PMID:2827334

  13. Natural Antioxidant Betanin Protects Rats from Paraquat-Induced Acute Lung Injury Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further. PMID:25861636

  14. Natural antioxidant betanin protects rats from paraquat-induced acute lung injury interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Junyan; Ma, Deshun; Zhang, Miao; Yang, Xuelian; Tan, Dehong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of betanin on a rat paraquat-induced acute lung injury (ALI) model was investigated. Paraquat was injected intraperitoneally at a single dose of 20 mg/kg body weight, and betanin (25 and 100 mg/kg/d) was orally administered 3 days before and 2 days after paraquat administration. Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the last betanin dosage, and lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected. In rats treated only with paraquat, extensive lung injury characteristic of ALI was observed, including histological changes, elevation of lung : body weight ratio, increased lung permeability, increased lung neutrophilia infiltration, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 protein levels, increased BALF interleukin (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels, reduced BALF IL-10 levels, and increased lung nuclear factor kappa (NF-κB) activity. In rats treated with betanin, paraquat-induced ALI was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that betanin attenuates paraquat-induced ALI possibly via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, the potential for using betanin as an auxilliary therapy for ALI should be explored further.

  15. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections.

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium tuberculosis in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ebrahim S.; Baharoon, Salim A.; Alsafi, Eiman; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss our center’s experience with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a major tertiary referral hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with community-acquired pneumonia secondary to mycobacterium TB infection who were admitted for critical care in a single center of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from 2004 to 2013. Results: In our review of 350 patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to Intensive Care Unit, 11 cases of TB complicated with ARDS were identified. The mean age of patients was 51.9 years. The median time from hospital admission to pulmonary TB diagnosis and start of therapy was 5 days, while the median time from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment was 18 days. The mortality rate was 64%, and the median length of hospital stay before death was 21.4 days. Delayed treatment, as well as high acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and CURB-65 scores at presentation, were independent risk factors for death. Conclusion: Patients with pulmonary TB infrequently present to intensive care with acute symptoms that meet all criteria for ARDS. Such a presentation of TB carries a high mortality risk. PMID:27570853

  17. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  18. Abortion associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in a bison (Bison bison) herd

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant health threat in bison and is an increasing concern and source of economic loss for producers. Clinical manifestations of infection documented in bison include pneumonia, respiratory distress and polyarthritis. The current study des...

  19. A multilocus sequence typing method and curated database for Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant problem in bison, causing necrotic pha...

  20. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necro...

  1. Relative virulence in bison and cattle of bison-associated genotypes of Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from bovine respiratory disease complex. It has recently emerged as a major health problem in bison, causing pharyngitis, pneumonia, arthritis, dystocia and abortion. In cattle, M. b...

  2. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis in bison is a newly emerging and potentially devastating threat to the bison industry. This bacterium is increasingly being identified, both in the United States and Canada, as the cause of severe respiratory disease outbreaks with devastating consequences for the health of the ani...

  3. [Empirical therapeutic approach to infection by resistant gram positive (acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and health care pneumonia). Value of risk factors].

    PubMed

    González-DelCastillo, J; Núñez-Orantos, M J; Candel, F J; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic treatment inadequacy is common in these sites of infection and may have implications for the patient's prognosis. In acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections, the document states that for the establishment of an adequate treatment it must be assessed the severity, the patient comorbidity and the risk factors for multidrug-resistant microorganism. The concept of health care-associated pneumonia is discussed and leads to errors in the etiologic diagnosis and therefore in the selection of antibiotic treatment. This paper discusses how to perform this approach to the possible etiology to guide empirical treatment. PMID:27608306

  4. Impact of Chisan (ADAPT-232) on the quality-of-life and its efficacy as an adjuvant in the treatment of acute non-specific pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Narimanian, M; Badalyan, M; Panosyan, V; Gabrielyan, E; Panossian, A; Wikman, G; Wagner, H

    2005-11-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized (simple randomisation), pilot (phase III) study of Chisan, (ADAPT-232; a standardised fixed combination of extracts of Rhodiola rosea L., Schisandra chinensis Turcz. Baill., and Eleutherococcus senticosus Maxim) was carried out on two parallel groups of patients suffering from acute nonspecific pneumonia. Sixty patients (males and females; 18-65 years old) received a standard treatment with cephazoline, bromhexine, and theophylline: in addition, one group of 30 patients was given Chisan mixture, whilst the second group of 30 patients received a placebo, each medication being taken twice daily from the beginning of the study for 10-15 days. The primary outcome measurements were the duration of antibiotic therapy associated with the clinical manifestations of the acute phase of the disease, together with an evaluation of mental performance in a psychometric test and the self-evaluation of quality-of-life (QOL) (WHOQOL-Bref questionnaires) before treatment and on the first and fifth days after clinical convalescence. The mean duration of treatment with antibiotics required to bring about recovery from the acute phase of the disease was 2 days shorter in patients treated with Chisan compared with those in the placebo group. With respect to all QOL domains (physical, psychological, social and ecological), patients in the Chisan group scored higher at the beginning of the rehabilitation period, and significantly higher on the fifth day after clinical convalescence, than patients in the control group. Clearly, adjuvant therapy with ADAPT-232 has a positive effect on the recovery of patients by decreasing the duration of the acute phase of the illness, by increasing mental performance of patients in the rehabilitation period, and by improving their QOL. Both the clinical and laboratory results of the present study suggest that Chisan (ADAPT-232) can be recommended in the standard treatment of patients with acute non

  5. Isolation and molecular identification of mycoplasma genitalium from the secretion of genital tract in infertile male and female

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni Moghadam, Naeime; Kheirkhah, Babak; Mirshekari, Toraj Reza; Fasihi Harandi, Majid; Tafsiri, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasmas can cause acute and chronic diseases at multiple sites with wide-range complications and have been implicated as cofactors in diseases. The infections influenced form genital mycoplasmas specifically Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium potentially affect reproductive disorders, and infertility. Objective: Isolation and molecular identification of Mycoplasma genitalium from the genital tract of infertile male and vaginal discharge of infertile female referred to Infertility Center of Kerman in 2013. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, prospective study. We included 100 infertile male and 100 infertile female that were referred to the Infertility Center of Kerman. Then for isolation and molecular identification of Mycoplasma genitalium from urethral and vaginal discharge polymerase chain reaction was performed on Mycoplasma genus and genitalium. Results: From a total of 100 semen samples 45 patients (45%) were mycoplasma-positive and 13 (28.8%) were genitalium species positive. Also, from a total of 100 women samples 43 women (43%) were mycoplasma-positive and 10 (23.2%) were genitalium species positive. Positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic tree was drawn. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, a high percentage of infertile male and female were infected with the Mycoplasma genitalium. For prevention of harmful and significant consequences of this infection, we suggest a screening program in symptomatic infertile couples. PMID:25469132

  6. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  7. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline.

  8. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  9. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Travis M; Johnson, Steven W; DiMondi, V Paul; Wilson, Dustin T

    2016-01-01

    JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. PMID:27354817

  10. Chest Pain in Adolescent Japanese Male Mimicking Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin K.; Naheed, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Acute chest pain with very elevated troponin level and abnormal EKG in adult population is considered sine qua non to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) unless proved otherwise. Similar presentation in adolescent population is seen less often but raises suspicion for ACS. Most common etiology for chest pain with cardiac enzyme elevation in adolescent population is usually viral myopericarditis. The adolescent population presenting with chest pain and elevated cardiac enzymes should be carefully evaluated for ACS and other etiologies including myocarditis, myopericarditis, pulmonary embolism, acute rheumatic fever, and trauma. We report one Japanese adolescent male with mycoplasma pneumoniae myocarditis who presented to the ER with chest pain, elevated cardiac enzymes, and abnormal EKG. PMID:25202456

  11. DNA repair in reduced genome: the Mycoplasma model.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabíola Marques; Fonseca, Marbella Maria; Batistuzzo De Medeiros, Sílvia; Scortecci, Kátia Castanho; Blaha, Carlos Alfredo Galindo; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2005-11-01

    The occurrence of bacteria with a reduced genome, such as that found in Mycoplasmas, raises the question as to which genes should be enough to guarantee the genomic stability indispensable for the maintenance of life. The aim of this work was to compare nine Mycoplasma genomes in regard to DNA repair genes. An in silico analysis was done using six Mycoplasma species, whose genomes are accessible at GenBank, and M. synoviae, and two strains of M. hyopneumoniae, whose genomes were recently sequenced by The Brazilian National Genome Project Consortium and Southern Genome Investigation Program (Brazil) respectively. Considering this reduced genome model, our comparative analysis suggests that the DNA integrity necessary for life can be primarily maintained by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is the only complete repair pathway. Furthermore, some enzymes involved with base excision repair (BER) and recombination are also present and can complement the NER activity. The absence of RecR and RecO-like ORFs was observed only in M. genitalium and M. pneumoniae, which can be involved with the conservation of gene order observed between these two species. We also obtained phylogenetic evidence for the recent acquisition of the ogt gene in M. pulmonis and M. penetrans by a lateral transference event. In general, the presence or nonexistence of repair genes is shared by all species analyzed, suggesting that the loss of the majority of repair genes was an ancestral event, which occurred before the divergence of the Mycoplasma species. PMID:16153783

  12. In situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in calves with acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Register, K B; Lee, E K; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A; Gallup, J M; Ackermann, M R

    1999-09-01

    The in situ expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA in normal and pneumonic lung tissues of Holstein calves with bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) was compared with that of age-matched non-BLAD Holstein calves by in situ hybridization. Twenty-four Holstein calves (both BLAD and non-BLAD) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups and inoculated intrabronchially with Pasteurella haemolytica or pyrogen-free saline. Lung tissues were collected and fixed in 10% neutral formalin at 2 or 4 hours postinoculation (PI). The expression and distribution of ICAM-1 mRNA in the different cell types of the lung tissue was detected by in situ hybridization with a 307-base-pair bovine ICAM-1 riboprobe. In lungs of both non-BLAD and BLAD saline-inoculated calves, ICAM-1 expression was present in epithelial cells but occurred in <30% of cells in bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. ICAM-1 expression in vascular endothelial cells was present in <30% of cells in pulmonary arteries and veins. The expression of ICAM-1 was significantly greater (>60% of cells) in bronchiolar and alveolar epithelial cells and pulmonary endothelial cells of arteries and veins in both BLAD and non-BLAD calves inoculated with P. haemolytica. Bronchiolar epithelium had the highest intensity of mRNA expression and highest percentage of cells that were stained, whereas bronchial epithelium had the lowest intensity and percentage of cells stained. Most alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in infected lungs also expressed ICAM-1. ICAM-1 expression was generally increased in infected BLAD calves at 2 hours PI as compared with non-BLAD calves but not at 4 hours PI. The increased expression of ICAM-1 during acute P. haemolytica pneumonia in calves suggests that ICAM-1 is upregulated and may play a role in leukocyte infiltration. The extent of ICAM-1 expression in P. haemolytica-inoculated calves with BLAD was initially enhanced but otherwise similar to that in non

  13. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S.; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Long‐lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad‐spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient‐performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty‐five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80‐76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. Am. J. Hematol. 91:271–276, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661344

  14. [Travel-associated pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Geerdes-Fenge, H F

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory infections are responsible for up to 11% of febrile infections in travellers or immigrants from tropical and subtropical regions. The main pathogens are the same as in temperate climate zones: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, influenza viruses, Legionella pneumophila. However, some pulmonary diseases can be attributed to bacterial, parasitic, viral or fungal pathogens that are endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. The most commonly imported infections are malaria, dengue, and tuberculosis. Pulmonary symptoms and eosinophilia in returning travellers and migrants may be caused by several parasitic infections such as Katayama syndrome, Loeffler syndrome, tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, amebiasis, paragonimiasis, echinococcosis, and toxocariasis. In Asia, Tsutsugamushi fever is transmitted by chiggers, spotted fever rickettsiae are transmitted by ticks. Transmission of zoonotic diseases occurs mainly via contact with infected animals or their excretions, human-to-human transmission is generally rare: MERS-CoA (dromedary camels), pulmonary hantavirus infection (rodents), tularemia (rabbits and hares), leptospirosis (rats), Q-fever (sheep and goats), very rarely anthrax (hides of ruminants) and pest (infected rats and wildlife). Inhalation of contaminated dust can cause infections with dimorphic fungi: histoplasmosis (bat guano) and coccidioidomycosis in America and parts of Africa, blastomycosis in America. Some infections can cause symptoms years after a stay in tropical or subtropical regions (melioidosis, tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension). Noninfectious respiratory diseases caused by inhalation of high amounts of air pollution or toxic dusts may also be considered. PMID:25290923

  15. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, James M; Jordan, David S; Simmons, Warren; Renfrow, Matthew B; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions.

  16. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Jordan, David S.; Simmons, Warren; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:26599081

  17. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Daubenspeck, James M; Jordan, David S; Simmons, Warren; Renfrow, Matthew B; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:26599081

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, L. A.; Kuo, C. C.; Grayston, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes acute respiratory disease. The spectrum of C. pneumoniae infection has been extended to atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations. Seroepidemiologic studies have associated C. pneumoniae antibody with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, carotid artery disease, and cerebrovascular disease. The association of C. pneumoniae with atherosclerosis is corroborated by the presence of the organism in atherosclerotic lesions throughout the arterial tree and the near absence of the organism in healthy arterial tissue. C. pneumoniae has also been isolated from coronary and carotid atheromatous plaques. To determine whether chronic infection plays a role in initiation or progression of disease, intervention studies in humans have been initiated, and animal models of C. pneumoniae infection have been developed. This review summarizes the evidence for the association and potential role of C. pneumoniae in cardiovascular disease. PMID:9866733

  19. Experimental studies of chronic pneumonia of sheep.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, J S; Jones, G E; Rae, A G

    1979-01-01

    Strains of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica isolated from sheep affected with chronic pneumonia were inoculated by endobronchial route to conventionally-reared and SPF (Specific Pathogen-Free) lambs. Changes resembling those of the naturally-occurring disease were produced in most lambs given the organisms in combination and in some given M. ovipneumoniae alone. Similar but less extensive changes were seen in SPF lambs and fewer animals were affected. Different strains of M. ovipneumoniae did not affect the extent of changes produced in SPF lambs. M. ovipneumoniae became established in the lungs of both types of sheep; P. haemolytica did so less readily. It was concluded that chronic pneumonia may be reproduced in conventional animals by combined inoculation of M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica. Age and status of immunity to mycoplasmas may account for the different responses of conventional and SPF lambs.

  20. Antibody responses of Chlamydophila pneumoniae pneumonia: Why is the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia difficult?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Akaike, Hiroto; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Nakano, Takashi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Okimoto, Niro

    2015-07-01

    The ELNAS Plate Chlamydophila pneumoniae commercial test kit for the detection of anti-C. pneumoniae-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA and IgG antibodies has become available in Japan recently. To determine the optimum serum collection point for the ELNAS plate in the diagnosis of C. pneumoniae pneumonia, we analyzed the kinetics of the antibody response in patients with laboratory-confirmed C. pneumoniae pneumonia. We enrolled five C. pneumoniae pneumonia cases and collected sera from patients for several months. The kinetics of the IgM and IgG antibody responses were similar among the five patients. Significant increases in IgM and IgG antibody titer between paired sera were observed in all patients. IgM antibodies appeared approximately 2-3 weeks after the onset of illness, reached a peak after 4-5 weeks, and were generally undetectable after 3-5 months. IgG antibodies developed slowly for the first 30 days and reached a plateau approximately 3-4 months after the onset of illness. The kinetics of IgA antibody responses were different among the five patients, and significant increases in IgA antibody titer between paired sera were observed in only two patients. Although the sample size was small, the best serum collection time seemed to be approximately 3-6 weeks after onset of illness when using a single serum sample for the detection of IgM antibodies. Paired sera samples should be obtained at least 4 weeks apart. IgA antibody analysis using ELNAS may not be a useful marker for acute C. pneumoniae pneumonia.

  1. Acute microbiologically negative hypoxic interstitial pneumonia on HAART: Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome unmasking Pneumocystis Jiroveci infection with an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sovaila, S; de Raigniac, A; Picard, C; Taulera, O; Lascoux-Combe, C; Sereni, D; Bourgarit, A

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy for AIDS sometimes engenders inflammatory manifestations resulting from an inappropriate and unbalanced immune-system restoration, called Immune Reconstitution inflammatory Syndrome, which, in turn, can unmask a subclinical infection/pathology. Despite our patient’s evident syndrome, the atypical clinical, microbiologic and radiologic feature of Pneumocystis pneumonia made its diagnosis difficult. PMID:22802889

  2. [The ethiology structure of community-acquried pneumonia of young adults in closed communities].

    PubMed

    Nosach, E S; Skryl', S V; Kulakova, N V; Martynova, A V

    2012-01-01

    Despite of success in ethiology evaluation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and instant improvement of diagnostic methods microbiological spectrum of CAP is still remaining underestimated and is still the problem for the routine clinical practice. In our study we estimated the role of fastidious bacteria which cause atypical CAP such as Chlamydophilla pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila. Furthermore we also defined the role of viral pathogens in ethiology of CAP.

  3. Pneumonia (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  4. Identification of lipoprotein MslA as a neoteric virulence factor of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek, S M; Frasca, S; Schumacher, V L; Liao, X; Padula, M; Djordjevic, S P; Geary, S J

    2010-08-01

    Many lipoproteins are expressed on the surfaces of mycoplasmas, and some have been implicated as playing roles in pathogenesis. Family 2 lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have a conserved "mycoplasma lipoprotein X" central domain and a "mycoplasma lipoprotein 10" C-terminal domain and are differentially expressed in response to environmental conditions. Homologues of family 2 lipoproteins are Mycoplasma specific and include the lipoprotein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, encoded by the MGA0674 gene. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the M. gallisepticum live attenuated vaccine strain F and the virulent strain R(low), reported in this study, indicated that MGA0674 is one of several differentially expressed genes. The MGA0674-encoded lipoprotein is a proteolytically processed, immunogenic, TX-114 detergent-phase protein which appears to have antigenic divergence between field strains R(low) and S6. We examined the virulence of an R(low) Delta MGA0674 mutant (P1H9) in vivo and observed reduced recovery and attenuated virulence in the tracheas of experimentally infected chickens. The virulence of two additional R(low) Delta MGA0674 mutants, 2162 and 2204, was assessed in a second in vivo virulence experiment. These mutants exhibited partial to complete attenuation in vivo, but recovery was observed more frequently. Since only Mycoplasma species harbor homologues of MGA0674, the gene product has been renamed "Mycoplasma-specific lipoprotein A" (MslA). Collectively, these data indicate that MslA is an immunogenic lipoprotein exhibiting reduced expression in an attenuated strain and plays a role in M. gallisepticum virulence. PMID:20515935

  5. Gene expression and production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 6, and gamma interferon in C3H/HeN and C57BL/6N mice in acute Mycoplasma pulmonis disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, C B; Simecka, J W; Davidson, M K; Davis, J K; Schoeb, T R; Lindsey, J R; Everson, M P

    1995-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether the production of various cytokines is associated with Mycoplasma pulmonis disease expression. Susceptible C3H/HeN and resistant C57BL/6N mice were inoculated intranasally with 10(7) CFU of virulent M. pulmonis UAB CT or avirulent M. pulmonis UAB T. Expression of genes for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-6, and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in whole lung tissue and TNF-alpha gene expression in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells was determined by reverse transcription-PCR using specific cytokine primers at various times postinoculation. In addition, concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, and IFN-gamma were determined in BAL fluid and serum samples at various times postinoculation. Our results showed that there was a sequential appearance of cytokines in the lungs of infected mice: TNF-alpha, produced primarily by BAL cells, appeared first, followed by IL-1 and IL-6, which were followed by IFN-gamma. Susceptible C3H/HeN mice had higher and more persistent concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in BAL fluid than did resistant C57BL/6N mice, indicating that TNF-alpha and possibly IL-6 are important factors in pathogenesis of acute M. pulmonis disease in mice. Serum concentrations of IL-6 were elevated in C3H/HeN mice, but not C57BL/6N mice, following infection with M. pulmonis, suggesting that IL-6 has both local and systemic effects in M. pulmonis disease. PMID:7558323

  6. Survival of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) commingled with domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in the absence of mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To test the hypothesis that Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is an important agent of the bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) pneumonia that has previously inevitably followed experimental commingling with domestic sheep (Ovis aries), we commingled M. ovipneumoniae–free domestic and bighorn sheep (n=4 each). On...

  7. Influenza, Campylobacter and Mycoplasma Infections, and Hospital Admissions for Guillain-Barré Syndrome, England

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Sarah J.; Rodrigues, Laura C.

    2006-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in polio-free regions. Considerable evidence links Campylobacter infection with GBS, but evidence that implicates other pathogens as triggers remains scarce. We conducted a time-series analysis to investigate short-term correlations between weekly laboratory-confirmed reports of putative triggering pathogens and weekly hospitalizations for GBS in England from 1993 through 2002. We found a positive association between the numbers of reports of laboratory-confirmed influenza A in any given week and GBS hospitalizations in the same week. Different pathogens may trigger GBS in persons of different ages; among those <35 years, numbers of weekly GBS hospitalizations were associated with weekly Campylobacter and Mycoplasma pneumoniae reports, whereas among those >35 years, positive associations were with influenza. Further studies should estimate the relative contribution of different pathogens to GBS incidence, overall and by age group, and determine whether influenza is a real trigger for GBS or a marker for influenza vaccination. PMID:17326939

  8. Mycoplasmas and ovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, G E; Foggie, A; Sutherland, A; Harker, D B

    1976-08-21

    The clinical course of an outbreak of keratoconjunctivitis in housed lambs and their dams was followed. Signs were transient generally and became severe in only a small proportion of lambs. The outbreak became most obvious when the lambs were 46 to 55 days old, when 46.9 per cent were affected. Mycoplasma conjunctivae isolations, confirmed by comparison with the type strain by biochemical and serological reactions, increased to 62.1 per cent of all eyes swabbed, but no correlation could be demonstrated between presence of the organism and clinical status. The reasons for this are discussed. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae was also recovered from the eyes of a small number of lambs. Instillation of a broth culture of M conjunctivae into the conjunctival sacs of four hoggs produced a transient keratoconjunctivitis similar to that observed in the field, but no effect was observed in animals inoculated intravenously. M conjunctivae may therefore be the aetiological agent of non-follicular infectious ovine keratoconjunctivitis, although further work in gnotobiotic or specific pathogen free lambs is required to establish the fact beyond doubt.

  9. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  10. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  11. Mycoplasma bovis mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer.

    PubMed

    2015-12-19

    Mycoplasma bovis causing mastitis and arthritis in a dairy heifer. Nutritional myopathy in a three-month-old suckler calf. Acute fasciolosis in ewes in Ayrshire. Cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology causing death of a three-year-old Suffolk ram. Spinal aspergillosis in a seven-week-old pheasant poult These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for August from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26679914

  12. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The

  13. Evaluation of the ability of tilmicosin to prevent adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cilia using a differentiated swine respiratory epithelial culture system.

    PubMed

    Thacker, E L; Young, T F; Erickson, B Z; DeBey, M C

    2001-01-01

    Mycoplasmal pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a serious economic problem for swine producers in the United States. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonizes ciliated respiratory epithelial cells. The organism has been shown to be sensitive to tilmicosin, a synthetic macrolide, in antibiotic sensitivity assays. The efficacy of tilmicosin to inhibit adherence of M. hyopneumoniae to ciliated epithelial cells without direct contact between the antibiotic and the organism was evaluated using in vitro methods. The study demonstrated that tilmicosin inhibited the adherence of M. hyopneumoniae at the highest level tested in the system (2 microg/ml) suggesting that tilmicosin may be efficacious against mycoplasmal pneumonia.

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, C C; Jackson, L A; Campbell, L A; Grayston, J T

    1995-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) is a recently recognized third species of the genus Chlamydia that causes acute respiratory disease. It is distinct from the other two chlamydial species that infect humans, C. trachomatis and C. psittaci, in elementary body morphology and shares less than 10% of the DNA homology with those species. The organism has a global distribution, with infection most common among children between the ages of 5 and 14 years. In children, TWAR infection is usually mild or asymptomatic, but it may be more severe in adults. Pneumonia and bronchitis are the most common clinical manifestations of infection, and TWAR is responsible for approximately 10% of cases of pneumonia and 5% of cases of bronchitis in the United States. The microimmunofluorescence serologic assay is specific for TWAR and can distinguish between recent and past infections. The organism can be isolated in cell culture; however, PCR techniques have recently facilitated its detection in tissues and clinical specimens. PMID:8665464

  15. Comparative analysis of the humoral immune response to Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae surface antigens in children suffering from recurrent acute otitis media and chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J C; Stol, Kim; de Vogel, Corné P; Riesbeck, Kristian; Lafontaine, Eric R; Murphy, Timothy F; van Belkum, Alex; Hermans, Peter W M; Hays, John P

    2012-06-01

    A prospective clinical cohort study was established to investigate the humoral immune response in middle ear fluids (MEF) and serum against bacterial surface proteins in children suffering from recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) and chronic otitis media with effusion (COME), using Luminex xMAP technology. The association between the humoral immune response and the presence of Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx and middle ear was also studied. The levels of antigen-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM showed extensive interindividual variation. No significant differences in anti-M. catarrhalis and anti-S. pneumoniae serum and MEF median fluorescence intensity (MFI) values (anti-M. catarrhalis and antipneumococcal IgG levels) were observed between the rAOM or COME groups for all antigens tested. No significant differences were observed for M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae colonization and serum IgG levels against the Moraxella and pneumococcal antigens. Similar to the antibody response in serum, no significant differences in IgG, IgA, and IgM levels in MEF were observed for all M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae antigens between OM M. catarrhalis- or S. pneumoniae-positive and OM M. catarrhalis- or S. pneumonia-negative children suffering from either rAOM or COME. Finally, results indicated a strong correlation between antigen-specific serum and MEF IgG levels. We observed no significant in vivo expressed anti-M. catarrhalis or anti-S. pneumoniae humoral immune responses using a range of putative vaccine candidate proteins. Other factors, such as Eustachian tube dysfunction, viral load, and genetic and environmental factors, may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of OM and in particular in the development of rAOM or COME.

  16. Chlamydia pneumoniae and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P; Davies, P; Tunnicliffe, W; Ayres, J; Honeybourne, D; Wise, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—This study was designed to test the association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with asthma in a multiracial population, after adjustments for several potential confounding variables.
METHODS—Antibodies to C pneumoniae were measured by microimmunofluorescence in 123 patients with acute asthma, 1518 control subjects admitted to the same hospital with various non-cardiovascular, non-pulmonary disorders, and 46 patients with severe chronic asthma, including some with "brittle" asthma. Acute infection or reinfection was defined by titres of IgG of ⩾512 or IgM ⩾8 or a fourfold rise in IgG, and previous infection by IgG 64-256 or IgA ⩾8. Logistic regression was used to control for likely confounders, including ethnic origin, age, sex, smoking habit, steroid medication, diabetes mellitus and social deprivation, on antibody levels.
RESULTS—Antibody titres consistent with acute C pneumoniae infection were found in 5.7% of patients with acute asthma and 5.7% of control patients, while 14.6% of patients with acute asthma and 12.7% of control patients had titres suggesting previous infection. These two groups did not differ significantly. However, titres suggesting previous infection were found in 34.8% of patients with severe chronic asthma: the difference between this group and the control group was statistically significant with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.99 (95% confidence interval 1.60 to 9.97).
CONCLUSIONS—These data raise important questions about the previously demonstrated association of C pneumoniae infection with asthma, and suggest that future studies of this association should give particular attention to the presence or absence of a history of severe chronic asthma.

 PMID:9741366

  17. Emergence of blaKPC-containing Klebsiella pneumoniae in a long-term acute care hospital: a new challenge to our healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Endimiani, Andrea; DePasquale, John M.; Forero, Sandra; Perez, Federico; Hujer, Andrea M.; Roberts-Pollack, Daneshia; Fiorella, Paul D.; Pickens, Nancy; Kitchel, Brandon; Casiano-Colón, Aida E.; Tenover, Fred C.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To characterize isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC carbapenemase (KPC-Kp) associated with an outbreak in a long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) in South Florida. Methods During 21 March to 20 April 2008, 241 K. pneumoniae isolates detected at Integrated Regional Laboratories (Ft. Lauderdale, FL) for which the ertapenem MICs were ≥4 mg/L were studied. PCR, cloning and sequence analysis were used to detect blaKPC and to characterize the β-lactamase and outer membrane proteins (Omps). The expression level of KPC enzymes was studied by immunoblotting. Genetic relatedness of isolates was investigated with rep-PCR and PFGE. Clinical records of patients were investigated. Results Seven KPC-Kp strains were isolated from different patients located at a single LTACH, with a further three isolates being recovered from patients at different hospitals. All KPC-Kp isolates in patients from the LTACH and from one hospital patient were genetically related and shared PFGE patterns that clustered with known sequence type (ST) 258 strains. These strains were highly resistant to carbapenems (MICs ≥ 32 mg/L) due to an increased level of KPC expression and loss of Omps. Rectal colonization was documented in all LTACH patients with KPC-Kp isolates. Treatment failures were common (crude mortality rate of 69%). Active surveillance and enhanced infection control practices terminated the KPC-Kp outbreak. Conclusions The detection of KPC-Kp in an LTACH represents a serious infection control and therapeutic challenge in a new clinical setting. The speed at which the epidemic of KPC-Kp is spreading in our healthcare system mandates urgent action. PMID:19740911

  18. Risk of ruling out severe acute respiratory syndrome by ruling in another diagnosis: Variable incidence of atypical bacteria coinfection based on diagnostic assays

    PubMed Central

    Zahariadis, George; Gooley, Ted A; Ryall, Phyllis; Hutchinson, Christine; Latchford, Mary I; Fearon, Margaret A; Jamieson, Frances B; Richardson, Susan; Kuschak, Theodore; Mederski, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused the first epidemic of the 21st century and continues to threaten the global community. OBJECTIVE To assess the incidence of coinfection in patients confirmed to have SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, and thus, to determine the risk of ruling out SARS by ruling in another diagnosis. METHODS The present report is a retrospective study evaluating the incidence and impact of laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV and other pulmonary pathogens in 117 patients. These patients were evaluated in a Toronto, Ontario, community hospital identified as the epicentre for the second SARS outbreak. RESULTS Coinfection with other pulmonary pathogens occured in patients with SARS. Seventy-three per cent of the patient population evaluated had laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV infection. Serology showing acute or recent Chlamydophila pneumoniae or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection revealed an incidence of 30% and 9%, respectively, in those with SARS. These rates are similar to previously published studies on coinfection in pneumonia. All nucleic acid diagnostic assays were negative for C pneumoniae and M pneumoniae in respiratory samples from patients with SARS having serological evidence for these atypical pathogens. CONCLUSIONS Diagnostic assays for well-recognized pulmonary pathogens have limitations, and ruling out SARS-CoV by ruling in another pulmonary pathogen carries significant risk. Despite positive serology for atypical pathogens, in a setting where clinical suspicion for SARS is high, specific tests for SARS should be performed to confirm or exclude a diagnosis. PMID:16470249

  19. Association between acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Freudenberger, Todd D; Madtes, David K; Curtis, J Randall; Cummings, Peter; Storer, Barry E; Hackman, Robert C

    2003-11-15

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) has been reported following hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, but the clinical features and risk factors for this disorder have not been well characterized. This case-control study of 49 patients with histologic BOOP and 161 control subjects matched by age and year of transplantation describes the clinical features and analyzes the risk factors for BOOP following HSC transplantation. Data on clinical features and outcome were collected by chart review. Odds ratios, estimating the relative risk of BOOP in allogeneic HSC recipients, were calculated by conditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Clinical features of BOOP in this population were similar to idiopathic BOOP and BOOP occurring in other disease settings. There was an association between acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the subsequent development of BOOP (odds ratios, 3.8 [95% CI, 1.2 to 12.3] and 3.1 [95% CI, 1.1 to 9.2], respectively). Patients with BOOP were more likely to have acute GVHD involving the skin (odds ratio, 4.6; P =.005) and chronic GVHD involving the gut (odds ratio, 6.6; P =.018) and oral cavity (odds ratio, 5.9; P =.026). This study shows that histologic BOOP following HSC transplantation has clinical features that resemble idiopathic BOOP and is strongly associated with prior acute and chronic GVHD. These results have important implications for the care of patients who develop respiratory symptoms after HSC transplantation and may help elucidate the pathogenesis of idiopathic BOOP.

  20. Performance evaluation of two microbial transport media designed for preservation and transport of Chlamydiae, Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sara L; Madhusudhan, Kunapuli T; Agans, Krystle; Dearen, Karen; Knight, Jennifer; Brasel, Trevor; Karamchi, Mehdi; Sherwood, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    The ability of a non-propagating transport device (test device) to maintain the viability of clinically relevant bacteria was compared with a similar commercial device (predicate device) to establish performance equivalence. Test bacteria, namely Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Ureaplasma urealyticum, were inoculated into the test [Puritan Medical Products Universal Transport System (UniTranz-RT(TM))] and predicate (BD Universal Viral Transport System) devices, and incubated at 4 °C and room temperature for up to 72 h. Bacterial viability was assessed at selected time points post-incubation using shell vial assays followed by immunofluorescence staining (for Chlamydia) or by standard culture techniques (for Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma). Results indicated that the Chlamydia strains were equally stable in both test and predicate devices through 72 h storage, at both test temperatures. Quantifiable levels of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma were recovered from the test and predicate devices throughout the storage period. Low-temperature storage improved bacterial viability when compared with room temperature storage. In addition, the predicate device demonstrated slightly improved performance versus the test device in the context of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma following 72 h storage. The overall results of the study confirmed the full performance of UniTranz-RT(TM) as a microbial transport medium and established equal performance with the predicate device.

  1. Pneumonia in stroke patients: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ding, R; Logemann, J A

    2000-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 378 consecutive stroke patients who were referred between June 1994 and June 1997 for videofluorographic study of oropharyngeal swallow. Patients who had radiation therapy, brain tumor, brain surgery, head and/or spinal cord trauma, oral-pharyngeal disease or surgery, or other neurologic diseases in addition to the stroke were excluded from the study. Patients were assigned to two groups: one with pneumonia and one without pneumonia. One hundred one patients were included in the pneumonia group, and 277 patients were included in the nonpneumonia group. Within the pneumonia group, patients were assigned to an acute pneumonia group (pneumonia within 6 months poststroke) and a chronic pneumonia group (pneumonia more than 6 months poststroke). Variables examined in the study included patients' medical history and the findings from the videofluorographic studies. Pearson chi-square analysis was used to identify those variables that were significantly different between the pneumonia and nonpneumonia patient groups and between the acute and chronic pneumonia groups. Results showed that stroke patients who developed pneumonia had a significantly higher incidence of multiple-location and unspecified lesion strokes, chronic airway disease in their medical history, and aspiration during the videofluorographic studies when compared with patients who did not develop pneumonia. Within the pneumonia group, the acute pneumonia group was found to have a significantly higher incidence of hypertension and diabetes in their medical history and a significantly higher incidence of aspiration and reduced laryngeal elevation during the videofluorographic studies. Between 48% and 55% of all stroke patients in the study aspirated. Patients who suffered multiple strokes, brainstem stroke, or subcortical stroke had the greatest frequency of aspiration.

  2. Effect of the Diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease on Risk-Adjusted Mortality in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction, Congestive Heart Failure and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D.; Zhou, Ying; Alexoff, Aimee; Melitas, Constantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measurement of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia (PN) is a high priority since these are common reasons for hospitalization. However, mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that are hospitalized for these common medical conditions is unknown. Methods A retrospective review of the 2005–2011 National Inpatient Sample (NIS), (approximately a 20% sample of discharges from community hospitals) was performed. A dataset for all patients with ICD-9-CM codes for primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia or congestive heart failure with a co-diagnosis of IBD, Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). 1:3 propensity score matching between patients with co-diagnosed disease vs. controls was performed. Continuous variables were compared between IBD and controls. Categorical variables were reported as frequency (percentage) and analyzed by Chi-square tests or Fisher’s exact test for co-diagnosed disease vs. control comparisons. Propensity scores were computed through multivariable logistic regression accounting for demographic and hospital factors. In-hospital mortality between the groups was compared. Results Patients with IBD, CD and UC had improved survival after AMI compared to controls. 94/2280 (4.1%) of patients with IBD and AMI died, compared to 251/5460 (5.5%) of controls, p = 0.01. This represents a 25% improved survival in IBD patients that were hospitalized with AMI. There was a 34% improved survival in patients with CD and AMI. There was a trend toward worsening survival in patients with IBD and CHF. Patients with CD and PN had improved survival compared to controls. 87/3362 (2.59%) patients with CD and PN died, compared to 428/10076 (4.25%) of controls, p < .0001. This represents a 39% improved survival in patients with CD that are hospitalized for PN. Conclusion IBD confers a survival benefit for patients hospitalized with AMI. A

  3. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  4. Aetiology of community acquired pneumonia in Valencia, Spain: a multicentre prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Blanquer, J; Blanquer, R; Borrás, R; Nauffal, D; Morales, P; Menéndez, R; Subías, I; Herrero, L; Redón, J; Pascual, J

    1991-01-01

    A year long multicentre prospective study was carried out in the Valencia region of Spain, to determine the cause of community acquired pneumonia. The study was based on 510 of 833 patients with pneumonia. Of these, 462 were admitted to hospital, where 31 patients died. A cause was established in only 281 cases--208 of bacterial, 60 of viral, and 13 of mixed infection. The most common microorganisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae (14.5%), Legionella sp (14%), Influenza virus (8%), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (4%). There was a higher incidence of Legionella sp than in other studies. PMID:1908605

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from middle ear fluid and nasopharynx of children with acute otitis media exhibit phase variation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Hotomi, Muneki; Hollingshead, Susan K; Ueno, Yumi; Briles, David E; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2011-04-01

    Pneumococcal phase variation of 37 middle ear and 31 nasopharyngeal isolates obtained from children with acute otitis media was examined in the absence of intervening culture. The fraction of the opaque colonies was significantly higher in middle ear isolates than in nasopharyngeal isolates. The difference is probably the result of the pneumococci adapting to differential selective environments.

  6. Upregulation of CD19⁺CD24(hi)CD38(hi) regulatory B cells is associated with a reduced risk of acute lung injury in elderly pneumonia patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Haihan; Xi, Jianjun; Li, Guang-Gang; Xu, Shumin; Wang, Chunmei; Cheng, Tingting; Li, Hongqiang; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiandong; Bai, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication in elderly pneumonia patients who have a rapid progression, and is accompanied by a high mortality rate. Because the treatment options of ALI are limited to supportive care, identifying pneumonia patients who are at higher risk of ALI development is the emphasis of many studies. Here, we approach this problem from an immunological perspective by examining CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells, an important participant in acute and chronic inflammation. We find that elderly pneumonia patients have elevated CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell frequency compared to healthy individuals. This B cell population may express a higher level of IL-10, which has been was shown to suppress CD4(+) T cell-mediated proinflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFNg) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) production, through an IL-10-dependent mechanism. We also observe that the frequency of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell is positively correlated with the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Tregs in peripheral blood. Moreover, consistent with CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cell's anti-inflammatory role, we find that pneumonia patients who later developed ALI have reduced level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells. Together, our results demonstrated that CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in pneumonia patients possess regulatory function in vivo, and are associated with a reduced ALI risk.

  7. Higher levels of mucosal antibody to pneumococcal vaccine candidate proteins are associated with reduced acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in young children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Casey, J R; Pichichero, M E

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal immunity has a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasopharyngeal (NP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8-fold lower IgG and 3-6-fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn.

  8. A predictive analytics approach to reducing 30-day avoidable readmissions among patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or COPD.

    PubMed

    Shams, Issac; Ajorlou, Saeede; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Hospital readmission has become a critical metric of quality and cost of healthcare. Medicare anticipates that nearly $17 billion is paid out on the 20 % of patients who are readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Although several interventions such as transition care management have been practiced in recent years, the effectiveness and sustainability depends on how well they can identify patients at high risk of rehospitalization. Based on the literature, most current risk prediction models fail to reach an acceptable accuracy level; none of them considers patient's history of readmission and impacts of patient attribute changes over time; and they often do not discriminate between planned and unnecessary readmissions. Tackling such drawbacks, we develop a new readmission metric based on administrative data that can identify potentially avoidable readmissions from all other types of readmission. We further propose a tree-based classification method to estimate the predicted probability of readmission that can directly incorporate patient's history of readmission and risk factors changes over time. The proposed methods are validated with 2011-12 Veterans Health Administration data from inpatients hospitalized for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the State of Michigan. Results shows improved discrimination power compared to the literature (c-statistics >80 %) and good calibration.

  9. Higher Levels of Mucosal Antibody to Pneumococcal Vaccine Candidate Proteins Are Associated with Reduced Acute Otitis Media Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Casey, Janet R.; Pichichero, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal immunity plays a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasophargyeal (NP) IgG and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8 fold lower IgG and 3-6 fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn. PMID:25648056

  10. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF MYCOPLASMA SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Domermuth, C. H.; Nielsen, M. H.; Freundt, E. A.; Birch-Andersen, A.

    1964-01-01

    Domermuth, C. H. (Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark), M. H. Nielsen, E. A. Freundt, and A. Birch-Andersen. Ultrastructure of Mycoplasma species. J. Bacteriol. 88:727–744. 1964.—The ultrastructure of 19 strains (15 species) of Mycoplasmatales grown on solid medium was studied with the aid of an electron microscope. The cells possessed a triple-layered limiting membrane 75 to 100 A thick. This membrane appeared to be symmetrical in some strains and asymmetrical in others. An electron-dense material found in close contact with the cell surface was tentatively interpreted to be a capsular substance. Ribosomes and strands of nuclear material were observed in the cytoplasm of cells of all strains. Ribosomes observed in the JA strain of M. gallisepticum were frequently arranged in a regular geometric pattern of characteristic appearance. Dense inclusions sometimes limited by triple-layered membranes (possibly developing elementary bodies), as well as membrane-surrounded vesicles, were observed in the cytoplasm of cells of some strains. Images PMID:14208513

  11. Contributions of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein to a diagnosis of pneumonia in acute lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hopstaken, R M; Muris, J W; Knottnerus, J A; Kester, A D; Rinkens, P E; Dinant, G J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnostic tests enabling general practitioners (GPs) to differentiate rapidly between pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are needed to prevent increase of bacterial resistance by unjustified antibiotic prescribing. AIMS: To assess the diagnostic value of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) for pneumonia; to derive a prediction rule for the presence of pneumonia; and to identify a low-risk group of patients who do not require antibiotic treatment. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Fifteen GP surgeries in the southern part of The Netherlands. METHOD: Twenty-five GPs recorded clinical information and diagnosis in 246 adult patients presenting with LRTI. Venous blood samples for CRP and ESR were taken and chest radiographs (reference standard) were made. Odds ratios, describing the relationships between discrete diagnostic variables and reference standard (pneumonia or no pneumonia) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of ESR, CRP, and final models for pneumonia was performed. Prediction rules for pneumonia were derived from multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Dry cough, diarrhoea, and a recorded temperature of > or = 38 degrees C were independent and statistically significant predictors of pneumonia, whereas abnormal pulmonary auscultation and clinical diagnosis of pneumonia by the GPs were not. ESR and CRP had higher diagnostic odds ratios than any of the symptoms and signs. Adding CRP to the final 'symptoms and signs' model significantly increased the probability of correct diagnosis. Applying a prediction rule for low-risk patients, including a CRP of < 20, 80 of the 193 antibiotic prescriptions could have been prevented with a maximum risk of 2.5% of missing a pneumonia case. CONCLUSION: Most symptoms and signs traditionally associated with pneumonia are not predictive of pneumonia in general practice. The prediction rule for low

  12. Passage of CD18- and CD18+ bovine neutrophils into pulmonary alveoli during acute Pasteurella haemolytica pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M R; Kehrli, M E; Brogden, K A

    1996-11-01

    CD18 is a subunit for three beta 2 integrin molecules (Mac-1, p150, 95, LFA-1), which are expressed on the plasma membrane of neutrophils. These molecules mediate passage of neutrophils into sites of infection. In children and animals that lack CD18 expression, neutrophil infiltration is impaired in most tissues. However, in lung, CD18- neutrophils have been identified in the airway spaces during spontaneous episodes of pneumonia. To determine whether CD18 is vital for passage through the pulmonary alveolar wall, lung lobes of cattle with neutrophils that were deficient in CD18 expression (CD18-) and cattle with normal CD18 expression (CD18+) were inoculated with Pasteurella haemolytica by fiberoptic bronchoscopy; control lobes were inoculated with pyrogen-free saline (PFS). Neutrophil passage into alveolar lumina at 4 and 6 hours postinoculation was measured by computerized image analysis. Blood levels of neutrophils for CD18- cattle ranged from 12- to 26-fold higher than for CD18+ cattle prior to inoculation, and counts in both groups rose slightly postinoculation. In P. haemolytica-inoculated lobes, total numbers of neutrophils in alveolar lumina of the two groups were similar. An increase in the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was fourfold greater in CD18- cattle than in CD18+ cattle. In PFS-inoculated lobes, the number of neutrophils in the alveolar wall was sixfold higher in CD18 cattle than in CD18+ cattle. This work shows that by 4 and 6 hours, CD18- neutrophils enter the alveolar lumen at a rate similar to that in CD18+ cattle. Higher numbers of CD18- neutrophils are present in the alveolar wall of control (PFS) and bacteria-inoculated lobes. Thus, the CD18- cells are increased in the walls of alveoli and numbers of neutrophils that enter the alveolar lumen are similar in CD18+ and CD18- cattle. PMID:8952022

  13. [The significance of genital mycoplasmas in the etiology of puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Nikonov, A P; Ankirskaia, A S; Nisilevich, V F

    1993-01-01

    The rate of genital Mycoplasma isolation from the uterine cavity was studied in 147 puerperae (80 ones with a normal course of the puerperium and 67 with acute postpartum endometritis). Mycoplasma were isolated from the metroaspirate in 11.3% of puerperae in whom the postpartum period ran a normal course; M. urealyticum were found in 8.8% and M. hominis in 2.5% of cases. In endometritis Mycoplasma were isolated from the infection focus 2.5 times more often, i.e. from 28.4% of patients with postpartum endometritis (M. urealyticum were detected in 9.0% and M. hominis in 19.4% of cases). Mycoplasma were the sole agents of endometritis in 9.0% of patients. Hysteroscopic and morphologic studies helped verify the contribution of genital Mycoplasma to the development of acute postpartum endometritis in 19.4% of the patients. Therefore, virtually every fifth patient with postpartum endometritis was in need of purposeful antimycoplasma therapy with tetracycline. PMID:8048680

  14. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls: case series, review of the literature, and evaluation and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Ilana S; Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J; White, Andrew J; Merritt, Diane F

    2012-01-01

    Acute genital ulcers rarely occur in nonsexually active young girls. When present, they can cause significant physical and emotional distress for the patient and her parents, and prompt an evaluation for sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases. With this review, we aim to further characterize acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls by reviewing the medical records of patients with this disorder and to offer an approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers based on our understanding and knowledge of this condition. We retrospectively review our understanding and knowledge of acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active girls at a pediatric hospital. A review of the recent literature on acute genital ulcers and a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of acute genital ulcers are also presented. Twelve patients presented with acute genital ulcers, 11 of which were hospitalized for evaluation and pain management. Extensive work-up failed to reveal a specific infectious or autoimmune etiology in all but one patient, who was diagnosed with acute mycoplasma pneumonia. Acute genital ulcers in nonsexually active young girls likely represent a form of idiopathic vulvar aphthosis. Evaluation of a first episode of acute genital ulcers with mild prodromal symptoms should be limited. Treatment consists primarily of supportive care and symptom relief.

  15. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  16. Different characteristics associated with intensive care unit transfer from the medical ward between patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with and without pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong-Joon; Park, Cheol-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Ok; Ban, Hee-Jung; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Yu-Il; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The rate of hospitalization due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is increasing. Few studies have examined the clinical, laboratory and treatment differences between patients in general wards and those who need transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU). Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics of 374 patients who were initially admitted to the general ward at Chonnam National University Hospital in South Korea due to AECOPD (pneumonic, 194; non-pneumonic, 180) between January 2008 and March 2015. Of these patients, 325 were managed at the medical ward during their hospitalization period (ward group), and 49 required ICU transfer (ICU group). We compared the clinical, laboratory, and treatment characteristics associated with ICU transfer between patients with AECOPD with and without pneumonia. Results Male patients were 86.5% in the ward group and 79.6% in the ICU group. High glucose levels [median 154.5 mg/dL, interquartile range (IQR) 126.8–218.3 in ICU group vs. median 133.0, IQR 109.8–160.3 in ward group], high pneumonia severity index scores (median 100.5, IQR 85.5–118.5 vs. median 86.0, IQR 75.0–103.5), low albumin levels (median 2.9 g/dL, IQR 2.6–3.6 vs. median 3.4, IQR 3.0–3.7), and anemia (73.3% vs. 43.3%) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the pneumonic AECOPD group. High PaCO2 levels (median 53.1 mmHg in ICU group, IQR 38.5–84.6 vs. median 39.7, IQR 34.2–48.6 in ward group) independently increased the risk of ICU transfer in the non-pneumonic AECOPD group. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids (≥30 mg of daily prednisolone) during hospitalization in the medical ward independently reduced the risk of ICU transfer in both groups. Conclusions The characteristics associated with ICU transfer differed between the pneumonic and non-pneumonic AECOPD groups, and systemic corticosteroids use was associated with lower rate of ICU

  17. In Vitro Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Gram-Positive Cocci Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ko-Hung; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Tedizolid is a novel, expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with potent activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens. A total of 425 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria were obtained consecutively from patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or pneumonia. These isolates included methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 100), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 100), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 50), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 50), Streptococcus anginosus group (n = 75), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 50), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (Enterococcus faecium) (n = 50). The MICs of tedizolid and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method. Tedizolid exhibited better in vitro activities than linezolid against MSSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), MRSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. pyogenes (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. agalactiae (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), Streptococcus anginosus group (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), E. faecalis (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), and VRE (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml). The tedizolid MICs against E. faecalis (n = 3) and VRE (n = 2) intermediate to linezolid (MICs, 4 μg/ml) were 1 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The tedizolid MIC90s against S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius were 0.5, 1, and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, and the rates of susceptibility based on the U.S. FDA MIC interpretive breakpoints to the isolates were 16%, 28%, and 72%, respectively. Tedizolid exhibited 2- to 4-fold better in vitro activities than linezolid against a variety of Gram-positive cocci associated with ABSSSIs and pneumonia. The lower susceptibilities of tedizolid against isolates of S. anginosus and S. constellatus than against those of S. intermedius in Taiwan were noted. PMID:26248355

  18. In Vitro Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Gram-Positive Cocci Associated with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ko-Hung; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-10-01

    Tedizolid is a novel, expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with potent activity against a wide range of Gram-positive pathogens. A total of 425 isolates of Gram-positive bacteria were obtained consecutively from patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or pneumonia. These isolates included methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 100), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 100), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 50), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 50), Streptococcus anginosus group (n = 75), Enterococcus faecalis (n = 50), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) (Enterococcus faecium) (n = 50). The MICs of tedizolid and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method. Tedizolid exhibited better in vitro activities than linezolid against MSSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), MRSA (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. pyogenes (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), S. agalactiae (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), Streptococcus anginosus group (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), E. faecalis (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml), and VRE (MIC90s, 0.5 versus 2 μg/ml). The tedizolid MICs against E. faecalis (n = 3) and VRE (n = 2) intermediate to linezolid (MICs, 4 μg/ml) were 1 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The tedizolid MIC90s against S. anginosus, S. constellatus, and S. intermedius were 0.5, 1, and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively, and the rates of susceptibility based on the U.S. FDA MIC interpretive breakpoints to the isolates were 16%, 28%, and 72%, respectively. Tedizolid exhibited 2- to 4-fold better in vitro activities than linezolid against a variety of Gram-positive cocci associated with ABSSSIs and pneumonia. The lower susceptibilities of tedizolid against isolates of S. anginosus and S. constellatus than against those of S. intermedius in Taiwan were noted.

  19. Non-occurrence of Mycoplasma genitalium in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Samra, Z; Borin, M; Bukowsky, Y; Lipshitz, Y; Sompolinsky, D

    1988-02-01

    Five hundred and thirteen clinical specimens, mainly from patients with urogenital inflammations, were examined for Ureaplasma urealyticum and mycoplasmas, including cultures for Mycoplasma genitalium. The study yielded 95 isolates of Ureaplasma urealyticum, 37 isolates of Mycoplasma hominis and two isolates of Mycoplasma fermentans, but no growth of Mycoplasma genitalium was obtained. It was concluded that Mycoplasma genitalium is a relatively rare inhabitant of the human urogenital tract in Israel.

  20. Acute respiratory disease in Spain: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Tellez, A; Perez-Breña, P; Fernandez-Patiño, M V; León, P; Anda, P; Nájera, R

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiologic features of viral and nonviral pathogens involved in acute respiratory diseases are described in the context of cases of infection (especially atypical pneumonia and bronchiolitis) studied at the Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Virología e Immunología Sanitarias in Madrid during a 7-year period (1979-1986). These etiologies were demonstrated in 1,637 (36.2%) of 4,521 cases. Among viruses, respiratory syncytial virus most frequently infected children; influenza virus showed the same pattern of circulation as in other European countries. Of nonviral agents, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and C. burnetii were most often involved in lower respiratory tract infections, with a variable predominance in patients of different ages. A high proportion of cases of M. pneumoniae infection occurred in infants and children aged less than 1 year, and most of these cases occurred during spring and summer. The majority of Q fever cases, including those observed in two outbreaks, occurred in the northern region.

  1. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  2. [Severe community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    PubMed

    Arancibia H, Francisco; Díaz P, Orlando

    2005-01-01

    Patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP) need continuous surveillance and monitoring at intensive care units (ICU), where they can receive specialized support as mechanical ventilation and/or hemodynamic support. Patients that require ICU admittance represent 10 to 30% of all patients interned because a pneumonia. In this category, high complication rate, prolonged hospital stay and high mortality rate are the rule. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria for severe pneumonia establishes the following main criteria: necessity of mechanical ventilation and presence of septic shock; minor criteria: systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, radiological multilobar involvement and PaO2/FiO2 < 250 mmHg. British Thoracic Society (BTS) criteria for severe CAP are: respiratory rate over 30 breaths/min, diastolic blood pressure under 60 mmHg, BUN > 20 mg/dl and mental confusion. In all patients with CAP it is recommended the evaluation of its severity at admission. This evaluation should be done in conjunction with an experienced physician, and if criteria for poor prognosis are met, an early admission to ICU is recommended. ATS and BTS modified criteria (CURB) are useful in this procedure. In severely ill patients with CAP it is recommended to perform the following microbiological analysis: sputum Gram stain and culture, blood culture, pleural fluid Gram stain and culture, if present and tapped, Legionella pneumophila urine antigen test, influenza A and B antigen detection tests (epidemic period: autumn and winter), and serology for atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae).

  3. How Is Pneumonia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Treated? Treatment for pneumonia depends on the type ... can go back to their normal routines. Bacterial Pneumonia Bacterial pneumonia is treated with medicines called antibiotics. ...

  4. The occurrence of Mycoplasma phocicerebrale, Mycoplasma phocidae, and Mycoplasma phocirhinis in grey and common seals (Halichoerus grypus and Phoca vitulina) in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ayling, Roger D; Bashiruddin, Samantha; Davison, Nicholas J; Foster, Geoffrey; Dagleish, Mark P; Nicholas, Robin A J

    2011-04-01

    Following the isolation of Mycoplasma phocicerebrale from the flipper wound of a grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) in Cornwall, UK, surveillance for Mycoplasma species was extended to include other seals rescued or found dead around the UK. Mycoplasma phocicerebrale was frequently detected from the teeth of seals and from infected wounds and respiratory tracts. Mycoplasma phocirhinis, Mycoplasma phocidae, and some unidentified Mycoplasma species were also detected. Mycoplasma phocicerebrale and M. phocidae were the only bacteria consistently identified from the wound infections, but their role in respiratory and other diseases remains unknown, as other bacteria were also isolated from respiratory sites. PMID:21441202

  5. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2015-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of randomly ordered charts generated from pharmacy listings from August 2011 to February 2013. Data were collected by chart review 30 days or more after completion of ceftaroline fosamil therapy. Results Secondary SAB was reported in a total of 48 of 1428 evaluable patients (27 with ABSSSI, 21 with CABP). The mean (SD) patient age was 61 (15) years. At least 1 comorbidity was recorded for 74% of patients with ABSSSI and 81% with CABP. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from 59% of patients with ABSSSI and 76% with CABP. The mean (SD) duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy was 5.8 (4.8) days for ABSSSI and 7.0 (3.8) days for CABP. Clinical success among all patients with SAB treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 58% (52% for SAB secondary to ABSSSI, 67% for SAB secondary to CABP). Clinical success rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus SAB were 50% (8/16) for ABSSSI and 63% (10/16) for CABP. Conclusions This study supports the use of ceftaroline fosamil as a viable treatment option in hospitalized patients with SAB secondary to ABSSSI or CABP. Further studies evaluating the use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of SAB are warranted. PMID:25574117

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p < 0.0001). To clarify the impact of resistance on BSI treatment outcomes, we compared several different models comprised of non-antibiotic treatment-related factors predictive of patients’ 30-day survival status. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score determined at the time of positive blood culture was superior to other investigated models, correctly predicting survival status in 83% of the study cohort. In multivariate analysis accounting for APACHE II, receipt of inadequate empirical therapy was associated with nearly a twofold higher rate of death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1–3.4; p = 0.02). Multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae accounted for two-thirds of all K. pneumoniae BSIs, high rates of inappropriate empirical therapy, and twofold higher rates of patient death irrespective of underlying illness. PMID:25398065

  7. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  8. Association of Mycoplasma corogypsi and Polyarthritis in a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Mark G; Feldman, Sanford H; Wünschmann, Arno; McRuer, David L

    2009-07-01

    On 10 October 2007, a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) was presented to the Wildlife Center of Virginia, Waynesboro, Virginia, USA, because of an inability to fly. Examination revealed multiple swollen, fluctuant joints. The bird suffered from lead toxicosis and had a prominent leukocytosis. Histopathologic evaluation revealed an acute fibrinoheterophilic polyarthritis, and results of routine aerobic and anaerobic culture of joint fluid were negative, although Mycoplasma sp. sequence-specific polymerase chain reaction was positive. Amplification of a portion of the 16S rRNA and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of the amplicon identified Mycoplasma corogypsi. This is the first report of polyarthritis being diagnosed in association with a Mycoplasma sp. in a vulture species. However, fulfilling Koch's postulates through experimental infections is required to draw conclusions concerning an etiologic diagnosis.

  9. Mycoplasmas hyorhinis in different regions of cuba. diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Evelyn; Poveda, Carlos; Gupta, Rakesh; Suarez, Alejandro; Hernández, Yenney; Ramírez, Ana; Poveda, José B.

    2011-01-01

    M. hyorhinis is considered one of the etiological agents of arthritis in sucking pigs, but recently as seen, some strains can produce pneumonia that could not be distinguished from the mycoplasmosis caused by M. hyopneumoniae. The study was conducted to research the presence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis ) in different regions of the country from exudates of pig lungs with typical EP lesions. Exudates from 280 pig lungs with typical EP lesions were studied using molecular techniques such as PCR, real time PCR and amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA. It was detected that the 66% of the samples studied resulted positive to M. hyorhinis, and the presence of this species was detected in all the provinces. Amplification and studies on the intergenic region 16S-23S of M. hyorhinis rRNA demonstrated the existing variability among strains of a same species. This study is the first report on M. hyorhinis detection in Cuba. PMID:24031686

  10. Global suppression of mitogen-activated ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by surface protein activity from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, W; Ajuwape, Adebowale Titilayo Phillip; Rosenbusch, Ricardo Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats. As with many other mycoplasmas involved in animal diseases, protective immune responses have not been achieved with vaccines, even though antibody responses can be obtained. This study focuses on characterizing the interaction of M. ovipneumoniae with ovine PBMC using carboxy-fluorescein-succinimidyl-ester (CFSE) loading and flow cytometry to measure lymphoid cell division. M. ovipneumoniae induced a strong in vitro polyclonal suppression of CD4(+), CD8(+), and B blood lymphocyte subsets. The suppressive activity could be destroyed by heating to 60 degrees C, and partially impaired by formalin and binary ethyleneimine treatment that abolished its viability. The activity resided on the surface-exposed membrane protein fraction of the mycoplasma, since mild trypsin treatment not affecting viability was shown to reduce suppressive activity. Trypsin-treated mycoplasma regained suppressive activity once the mycoplasma was allowed to re-synthesize its surface proteins. Implications for the design of vaccines against M. ovipneumoniae are discussed.

  11. Mycoplasma felis pleuritis in two show-jumper horses.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A M; Baird, J D; Kloeze, H J; Rosendal, S; Bell, M

    1992-04-01

    Mycoplasma felis was identified as the cause of acute pleuritis in 2 show-jumping horses. The pleural exudate was proteinaceous, contained large numbers of neutrophils, and had a markedly increased lactate concentration. M. felis was isolated in pure culture from pleural fluid. Rising serum antibody titers to M. felis as well as a precipitous decline in titers to equine influenza virus were demonstrated in both horses. Pleural effusion in both horses and a pneumothorax detected in one of the horses resolved following a single drainage of pleural fluid and intravenous fluid, antibiotic, and analgesic therapy. PMID:1623728

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Shryock, T R; Lin, T L; Faderan, M; Veenhuizen, M F

    2000-09-15

    A broth microdilution technique was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 15 field isolates of Mycoplasma hyorhinis to 10 antimicrobial agents, representative of different classes, and contrasting newer agents to existing ones. For the macrolides, the MIC(90) for tylosin and tilmicosin was 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively, but was > or = 16 microg/ml for erythromycin. Tetracycline, lincomycin and enrofloxacin each had an MIC(90) of 2 microg/ml. The mycoplasma had similar levels of susceptibility to the aminoglycoside and aminocyclictol classes exhibiting an MIC(90) of 4 microg/ml for gentamicin and 2 microg/ml for spectinomycin. The isolates exhibited high MICs to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole with an MIC(90) > or = 16/304 microg/ml. In summary, M. hyorhinis isolates from the US had low MICs against a variety of antimicrobials tested, with the exception of erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. PMID:10925038

  13. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... tested for the presence of Mycoplasma, as follows: Samples of the virus for this test shall be...

  14. Kinetics and distribution of alcohol oxidising activity in Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, K K; Abu-Groun, E A; Halablab, M A; Miles, R J

    2000-02-01

    Alcohol metabolism by Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma cell suspensions was determined using changes in dissolved oxygen tension to monitor oxygen uptake. All seven Acholeplasma test species oxidised ethanol and (where tested) propanol, butanol and pentanol. The rate of oxidation, at any particular substrate concentration, decreased with increasing alcohol molecular mass. Amongst 20 Mycoplasma species tested, M. agalactiae, M. bovis, M. dispar, M. gallisepticum, M. pneumoniae and M. ovipneumoniae oxidised ethanol. Propanol was also oxidised by M. dispar and isopropanol by M. agalactiae, M. bovis and M. ovipneumoniae. Isopropanol was oxidised at particularly high rates (V(max)100 nmol O(2) taken up min(-1) mg cell protein(-1)) and with a relatively high affinity (K(m) value<2 mM); oxygen uptake was consistent with oxidation to acetone. The significance of alcohol oxidation is unclear, as it would not be predicted to lead to ATP synthesis.

  15. Calf pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bryson, D G

    1985-07-01

    Infectious calf pneumonia is a high-mortality pneumonia of housed dairy-type calves. Viruses are important etiologic agents and infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza type 3 virus (PI-3 virus) may result in extensive, and sometimes fatal, lung damage. Respiratory viral infections are frequently followed by mycoplasmal and secondary bacterial invasion of the lower respiratory tract, which increases the extent and severity of lung damage. Bad housing, particularly bad ventilation, will increase the severity of pneumonia outbreaks. Although the source of respiratory viral infections is not always obvious, it is likely that a proportion of calves acquired infection from their dams early in life. The possibility of cross-infections from other domestic animals and from humans must also be considered. Diagnosis of respiratory virus infections necessitates submission of suitable respiratory tract specimens that are taken at an early stage in the outbreak together with paired sera. Various therapeutic and prophylactic regimens for the control of calf pneumonia are described. PMID:3907774

  16. [Community acquired pneumonia - treatment options according to the international recommendations].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Katarzyna; Kuś, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the main reasons of heath care system utilization. Quick diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation determine favorable outcome. Empirical antibiotic treatment allows to achieve treatment success in most patients. Treatment recommendations are based on big epidemiological trials. Nevertheless, it is sometimes necessary to know the definite etiologic factor of pneumonia. In these cases microbiological diagnostics is useful, i.e. sputum microscopy and culture, blood culture, bronchial lavage culture, bacterial antigen tests in urine, molecular tests. Serological tests do not help much in everyday clinical practice. The most common microorganisms causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP) are: Streptococcus pneumoniae, atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila), Haemophilus influenzae, influenza virus. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa rarely are etiologic factors of CAP. First line antibiotics in pneumonia treatment are beta - lactams. In case of allergy or intolerance of beta - lactams, new fluorochinolones should be used. Macrolides are useful if the atypical etiology is suspected. Duration of treatment in most cases should not exceed 7 days, sometimes it may be even shorter. PMID:27421128

  17. Mycoplasma genitalium: Should We Treat and How?

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Jennifer M.; Golden, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is associated with acute and chronic urethritis in men. Existing data on infection in women are limited and inconsistent but suggest that M. genitalium is associated with urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and possibly female infertility. Data are inconclusive regarding the role of M. genitalium in adverse pregnancy outcomes and ectopic pregnancy. Available data suggest that azithromycin is superior to doxycycline in treating M. genitalium infection. However, azithromycin-resistant infections have been reported in 3 continents, and the proportion of azithromycin-resistant M. genitalium infection is unknown. Moxifloxacin is the only drug that currently seems to uniformly eradicate M. genitalium. Detection of M. genitalium is hampered by the absence of a commercially available diagnostic test. Persons with persistent pelvic inflammatory disease or clinically significant persistent urethritis or cervicitis should be tested for M. genitalium, if possible. Infected persons who have not previously received azithromycin should receive that drug. Persons in whom azithromycin therapy fails should be treated with moxifloxicin. PMID:22080266

  18. Detection of Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum in dairy cattle from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, Pablo J; Estanguet, Abel A; Maito, Julia; Tirante, Liliana; Pol, Martin; Giraudo, José A

    2014-01-01

    Different species of Mycoplasma can affect bovine cattle, causing several diseases. PCR sequencing and further analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA ITS region have shown a significant interspecies variability among Mollicutes. Sixteen suspected isolates of Mycoplasma spp. obtained from milk samples from dairy herds were amplified (16S-23S rRNA ITS region). Fourteen out of those 16 suspected Mycoplasma spp. isolates were PCR-positive. To confirm the identity of Mycoplasma bovis, these 14 isolates were tested by another species-specific PCR. Seven of the isolates rendered a positive result. The products of 16S-23S rRNA ITS PCR from one isolate that was identified as M. bovis and from two other isolates, identified as non- M. bovis were randomly selected, sequenced and analyzed. The three sequences (A, B and C) showed 100% similarity with M. bovis, Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum respectively.

  19. Detection of Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum in dairy cattle from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, Pablo J; Estanguet, Abel A; Maito, Julia; Tirante, Liliana; Pol, Martin; Giraudo, José A

    2014-01-01

    Different species of Mycoplasma can affect bovine cattle, causing several diseases. PCR sequencing and further analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA ITS region have shown a significant interspecies variability among Mollicutes. Sixteen suspected isolates of Mycoplasma spp. obtained from milk samples from dairy herds were amplified (16S-23S rRNA ITS region). Fourteen out of those 16 suspected Mycoplasma spp. isolates were PCR-positive. To confirm the identity of Mycoplasma bovis, these 14 isolates were tested by another species-specific PCR. Seven of the isolates rendered a positive result. The products of 16S-23S rRNA ITS PCR from one isolate that was identified as M. bovis and from two other isolates, identified as non- M. bovis were randomly selected, sequenced and analyzed. The three sequences (A, B and C) showed 100% similarity with M. bovis, Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum respectively. PMID:25011595

  20. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  1. What Is Pneumonia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia (nu-MO-ne-ah) is an infection in ... such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi—can cause pneumonia. The infection inflames your lungs' air sacs, which ...

  2. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... kids under 6 years old. Take your child's temperature at least once each morning and each evening, ... Respiratory System Croup Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Influenza (Flu) Walking Pneumonia Word! Pneumonia Pneumonia Hib ...

  3. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by using rRNA-oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Futo, S; Seto, Y; Mitsuse, S; Mori, Y

    1992-01-01

    A system that uses rRNA-oligodeoxynucleotide hybridization was developed for the detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Synthetic oligonucleotide MHP1 was hybridized specifically with M. hyopneumoniae. Furthermore, the detection of M. hyopneumoniae in clinical samples, such as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung lesions from experimentally infected pigs, was evaluated by this assay. The evidence obtained from the assay indicated that the system can be used to efficiently diagnose mycoplasmal pneumonia of swine. Additionally, a nonradioisotopic system with chemiluminescence detection was tested. This system was 10-fold less sensitive than a test that used radioisotopes. Images PMID:1378059

  4. Gliding Direction of Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Morio, Hanako; Kasai, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile glides in the direction of its cell pole by a unique mechanism in which hundreds of legs, each protruding from its own gliding unit, catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. In this study, we found that 77% of cells glided to the left with a change in direction of 8.4° ± 17.6° μm−1 displacement. The cell body did not roll around the cell axis, and elongated, thinner cells also glided while tracing a curved trajectory to the left. Under viscous conditions, the range of deviation of the gliding direction decreased. In the presence of 250 μM free sialyllactose, in which the binding of the legs (i.e., the catching of sialylated oligosaccharides) was reduced, 70% and 30% of cells glided to the left and the right, respectively, with changes in direction of ∼30° μm−1. The gliding ghosts, in which a cell was permeabilized by Triton X-100 and reactivated by ATP, glided more straightly. These results can be explained by the following assumptions based on the suggested gliding machinery and mechanism: (i) the units of gliding machinery may be aligned helically around the cell, (ii) the legs extend via the process of thermal fluctuation and catch the sialylated oligosaccharides, and (iii) the legs generate a propulsion force that is tilted from the cell axis to the left in 70% and to the right in 30% of cells. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasmas are bacteria that are generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide. Although these species appear to consistently glide in the direction of the protrusion, their exact gliding direction has not been examined. This study analyzed the gliding direction in detail under various conditions and, based on the results, suggested features of the machinery and the mechanism of gliding. PMID:26503848

  5. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  6. Optimized PCR-based detection of mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Paige L; Bess, Dan

    2011-06-20

    The maintenance of contamination-free cell lines is essential to cell-based research. Among the biggest contaminant concerns are mycoplasma contamination. Although mycoplasma do not usually kill contaminated cells, they are difficult to detect and can cause a variety of effects on cultured cells, including altered metabolism, slowed proliferation and chromosomal aberrations. In short, mycoplasma contamination compromises the value of those cell lines in providing accurate data for life science research. The sources of mycoplasma contamination in the laboratory are very challenging to completely control. As certain mycoplasma species are found on human skin, they can be introduced through poor aseptic technique. Additionally, they can come from contaminated supplements such as fetal bovine serum, and most importantly from other contaminated cell cultures. Once mycoplasma contaminates a culture, it can quickly spread to contaminate other areas of the lab. Strict adherence to good laboratory practices such as good aseptic technique are key, and routine testing for mycoplasma is highly recommended for successful control of mycoplasma contamination. PCR-based detection of mycoplasma has become a very popular method for routine cell line maintenance. PCR-based detection methods are highly sensitive and can provide rapid results, which allows researchers to respond quickly to isolate and eliminate contamination once it is detected in comparison to the time required using microbiological techniques. The LookOut Mycoplasma PCR Detection Kit is highly sensitive, with a detection limit of only 2 genomes per μl. Taking advantage of the highly specific JumpStart Taq DNA Polymerase and a proprietary primer design, false positives are greatly reduced. The convenient 8-tube format, strips pre-coated with dNTPs, and associated primers helps increase the throughput to meet the needs of customers with larger collections of cell lines. Given the extreme sensitivity of the kit, great

  7. Subselective magnification angiography of experimental pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, J.J.; Alazraki, N.P.; Jassy, L.N.

    1983-04-01

    An experiment was designed to determine whether or not acute pneumococcal pneumonia in dogs is associated with intravascular thrombosis, or with angiographic features distinguishable from pulmonary embolism. In dogs with normal baseline chest radiographs and perfusion scans, pneumonia was produced by transbronchial instillation of type III pneumococcus. After 2 days, perfusion scans demonstrated discrete appropriate defects. In vivo magnification pulmonary arteriography, postmortem pulmonary arteriography, and histologic examination disclosed no evidence of thrombi.

  8. Healthcare-associated Pneumonia and Aspiration Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Kosaku; Ishii, Hiroshi; Kadota, Jun-Ichi

    2015-02-01

    Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) is a new concept of pneumonia proposed by the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America in 2005. This category is located between community-acquired pneumonia and hospital-acquired pneumonia with respect to the characteristics of the causative pathogens and mortality, and primarily targets elderly patients in healthcare facilities. Aspiration among such patients is recognized to be a primary mechanism for the development of pneumonia, particularly since the HCAP guidelines were published. However, it is difficult to manage patients with aspiration pneumonia because the definition of the condition is unclear, and the treatment is associated with ethical aspects. This review focused on the definition, prevalence and role of aspiration pneumonia as a prognostic factor in published studies of HCAP and attempted to identify problems associated with the concept of aspiration pneumonia.

  9. Outbreak of Mycoplasma pneumoniae–Associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Louise K. Francois; Demirjian, Alicia; Lin, Xia; Robinson, Christine C.; Pretty, Kristin; Benitez, Alvaro J.; Winchell, Jonas M.; Diaz, Maureen H.; Miller, Lisa A.; Foo, Teresa A.; Mason, Melanie D.; Lauper, Ursula L.; Kupfer, Oren; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Glodé, Mary P.; Kutty, Preeta K.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is an uncommon, sporadic disease and outbreaks are rare. In November 2013, an outbreak of SJS was identified at Children’s Hospital Colorado. METHODS: Outbreak cases were children aged 5–21 with a discharge diagnosis of SJS admitted from September 1 to November 30, 2013. Medical charts were reviewed using standardized data collection forms. Respiratory specimens were tested for viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We conducted a separate 4-year retrospective case-control study comparing hospitalized SJS cases with and without evidence of Mp infection. RESULTS: During the outbreak, 8 children met SJS criteria. Median age was 11.5 years (range 8–16 years); 5 (63%) were boys and 5 (63%) were Mp-PCR–positive. Of the 5 PCR-positive children, none had preceding medication exposure, and all had radiographic pneumonia. All outbreak Mp isolates were macrolide susceptible. The retrospective case-control analysis showed that Mp-associated SJS episodes (n = 17) were more likely to have pneumonia (odds ratio [OR] 10.0, confidence interval [CI] 1.3–5.1), preceding respiratory symptoms (OR 30.0, CI 1.6–72.6), an erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥35 mg/dL (OR 22.8, CI 2.1–244.9), and ≤3 affected skin sites (OR 4.5, CI 1.2–17.4) than non–Mp-associated SJS episodes (n = 23). CONCLUSIONS: We report the largest outbreak of SJS in children, which was also predominately associated with Mp infection. Mp-associated SJS was associated with a distinct clinical presentation that included less extensive skin disease, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and evidence of a preceding respiratory infection. PMID:26216320

  10. Comparison of virulence of ovine respiratory mycoplasmas in the mouse mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Buddle, B M; Herceg, M; Davies, D H

    1984-08-01

    The virulence of isolates of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and M. arginini from pneumonic and unaffected ovine lungs was compared in a mouse mammary gland model. The isolates varied in their ability to induce a neutrophilic response in the mammary gland. A moderate to severe form of mastitis was induced by 3 M. ovipneumoniae isolates recovered from pneumonic lungs, while the remaining M. ovipneumoniae isolates from pneumonic lungs and those from unaffected lungs induced a very mild histopathological response. The severity of the mastitis could not be increased by the simultaneous inoculation of a mixture of 5 mycoplasma isolates. Mycoplasma arginini isolates induced only a very mild histopathological response despite having been isolated from pneumonic lungs. The finding that the 3 most virulent M. ovipneumoniae isolates were initially recovered from pneumonic ovine lungs suggested that these virulent isolates may contribute to ovine pneumonia. However, the isolation of M. ovipneumoniae from pneumonic ovine lungs does not necessarily imply that these organisms are the causal agents, since M. ovipneumoniae isolates may vary in virulence.

  11. A new predilection site of Mycoplasma bovis: Postsurgical seromas in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Gille, L; Pilo, P; Valgaeren, B R; Van Driessche, L; Van Loo, H; Bodmer, M; Bürki, S; Boyen, F; Haesebrouck, F; Deprez, P; Pardon, B

    2016-04-15

    Mycoplasma bovis is a highly contagious bacterium, which predominantly causes chronic pneumonia, otitis and arthritis in calves and mastitis in adult cattle. In humans, Mycoplasma species have been associated with post-surgical infections. The present study aimed to identify the bacteria associated with three outbreaks of infected seromas after caesarian section in Belgian Blue beef cattle. A total of 10 cases occurred in three herds which were in close proximity of each other and shared the same veterinary practice. M. bovis could be cultured from seroma fluid in five of the six referred animals, mostly in pure culture and was isolated from multiple chronic sites of infection (arthritis and mastitis) as well. DNA fingerprinting of the isolates targeting two insertion sequence elements suggested spread of M. bovis from chronic sites of infection (udder and joints) to the postsurgical seromas. Identical genetic profiles were demonstrated in two animals from two separate farms, suggesting spread between farms. Mortality rate in the referred animals positive for M. bovis in a seroma was 80% (4/5), despite intensive treatment. A massive increase in antimicrobial use was observed in every affected farm. These observations demonstrate involvement of mycoplasmas in outbreaks of postsurgical seromas in cattle. PMID:27016759

  12. Thallium toxicosis in a dog consequent to ingestion of Mycoplasma agar plates.

    PubMed

    Puschner, Birgit; Basso, Marguerite M; Graham, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    A 1-year-old dog ingested a mixture of blood agar and Mycoplasma agar plates. The Mycoplasma agar plates contained thallium acetate, which resulted in an estimated minimum dose of 5 mg thallium acetate/kg bodyweight. Clinical signs over the course of 2-3 weeks included vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, alopecia, dysphonia, ataxia, paresthesia, intension tremors, megaesophagus with subsequent aspiration pneumonia, and several seizure episodes. The dog was treated with intravenous fluids and placement of a gastric feeding tube. Thallium concentrations in hair were 8.2 µg/g in samples taken on day 19, 16.4 µg/g in samples taken 3 months after exposure, 13.4 µg/g in samples taken 5 months after exposure, and nondetectable in samples taken 7 months after exposure. The blood thallium concentration was 190 µg/l on day 19 and nondetec table 3 months after exposure. Megaesophagus and dysphonia continued for 10 months after exposure. This case of thallium poisoning following ingestion of mycoplasma agar plates demonstrates that unusual sources of thallium still exist and suggests that thallium toxicosis should be included in the list of differential diagnoses in dogs presented with megaesophagus, especially if alopecia and other unexplained peripheral neuropathies are present. Hair and blood samples are useful specimens to reach an accurate diagnosis even if taken several weeks post exposure. The postexposure blood and hair thallium concentrations reported in this case are useful data for diagnosticians investigating dogs with potential thallium poisoning.

  13. Pertussis Accompanying Recent Mycoplasma Infection in a 10-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Mi Kyung; Na, Hyunju; Han, Seung Beom; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Chun, Yoon Hong; Kang, Jin Han

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the incidence of pertussis has been increasing; however, reports on mixed infection of pertussis with other respiratory pathogens are rare in highly immunized populations. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with cough, post-tussive emesis, and fever. She was subsequently diagnosed with bronchopneumonia. Although she had received five doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, polymerase chain reaction of her nasopharyngeal aspirate confirmed Bordetella pertussis infection. In addition, serologic testing for Mycoplasma pneumoniae was also positive. The patient was treated with roxithromycin without any complications. This is the first report of mixed B. pertussis and M. pneumoniae infection in Korea. To avoid under-diagnosis, pertussis should be considered in patients with chronic cough even when other respiratory pathogens have been documented. PMID:26483996

  14. Cytokine expression in lungs of calves spontaneously infected with Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco; González, Jorge F; Arbelo, Manuel; Zucca, Daniele; Fernández, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Cytokine expression in the lung can play an important role during Mycoplasma bovis infection through leukocyte recruitment and activation, and the induction of a broad array of inflammatory mediators. To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of M. bovis-associated pneumonia, cytokine expression was examined, by immunohistochemical methods in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues, in the lung of 20 calves spontaneously infected. Immunolabelling for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-α, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), was usually associated with pneumonia, particularly in macrophages and lymphocytes, and with the presence of M. bovis antigen. The expression was minimal in lungs from negative controls. The results demonstrated consistent upregulation of TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ expression during M. bovis-associated pneumonic lesions. These cytokines can participate in the immune and inflammatory responses during the pulmonary defense mechanisms against M. bovis infection. PMID:25331253

  15. Pertussis Accompanying Recent Mycoplasma Infection in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Mi Kyung; Na, Hyunju; Han, Seung Beom; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Chun, Yoon Hong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the incidence of pertussis has been increasing; however, reports on mixed infection of pertussis with other respiratory pathogens are rare in highly immunized populations. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with cough, post-tussive emesis, and fever. She was subsequently diagnosed with bronchopneumonia. Although she had received five doses of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine, polymerase chain reaction of her nasopharyngeal aspirate confirmed Bordetella pertussis infection. In addition, serologic testing for Mycoplasma pneumoniae was also positive. The patient was treated with roxithromycin without any complications. This is the first report of mixed B. pertussis and M. pneumoniae infection in Korea. To avoid under-diagnosis, pertussis should be considered in patients with chronic cough even when other respiratory pathogens have been documented. PMID:26483996

  16. Adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, G C; Young, T; Ross, R F; Rosenbusch, R F

    1990-03-01

    This work was an attempt to develop an in vitro adherence model for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, using monolayers of human and porcine lung fibroblasts and porcine kidney cells. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae grown in Friis mycoplasma broth was radiolabeled with 35[S]-methionine, washed, concentrated, and inoculated on the monolayers. After 15 minutes of centrifugation to facilitate adherence, monolayers were washed 3 times, dissolved with 0.1N NaOH, and suspended in scintillation liquid, and the radioactivity was determined in a liquid scintillation counter. Adherence, measured as a percentage of counts added, varied according to the mycoplasma strain and the cell line used. Comparison of strains J, 144L, and 232 of M hyopneumoniae revealed 7.5 +/- 5.9, 31.9 +/- 13, and 9.6 +/- 5% adherence to porcine kidney cells, respectively. Slightly different, but proportionally the same relationships were obtained with swine or human fibroblasts. Adherence was decreased slightly by repeated washings of the mycoplasma-treated cell monolayers; however, a plateau was reached, indicating irreversibility of the adherence process. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with nonlabeled organisms substantially blocked adherence by labeled organisms. Dilution of labeled organisms resulted in an increased proportion adhering. Therefore, it appears that the adherence was a receptor-dependent event. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with trypsin prior to the inoculation of monolayers resulted in a marked reduction in adherence. Treatment of the mycoplasmas with hyperimmune swine serum against M hyopneumoniae or normal swine serum resulted in 80 to 90% reduction of adherence; however, no inhibition occurred when mycoplasmas were treated with purified IgG from the hyperimmune serum.

  17. Detection and prevention of mycoplasma hominis infection

    DOEpatents

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Gallia, Gary L.; McCleskey, Ferne K.

    1997-01-21

    The present invention is directed to a rapid and sensitive method for detecting Mycoplasma hominis using M. hominis-specific probes, oligonucleotides or antibodies. In particular a target sequence can be amplified by in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, detected by nucleic acid hybridization using the subject probes and oligonucleotides or detected by immunoassay using M. hominis-specific antibodies. M. hominis-specific nucleic acids which do not recognize or hybridize to genomic nucleic acid of other Mycoplasma species are also provided.

  18. Facts and controversies in the classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Poletti, V; Kitaichi, M

    2000-10-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are defined from the pathological point of view as non granulomatous intralobular inflammatory and fibrotic processes involving the alveolar walls. More than thirty years ago Liebow and Carrington pioneered the notion that morphological characteristics could be used with benefit in separating the different entities found in this group, which present with typical, but not pathognomonic clinical features. In the mid-1980s some entities, including giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP), were removed from this group and considered as peculiar forms. In the early 90s the concept of cellular or nonspecific interstitial pneumonia was reconsidered, leading to an in depth revision of various types of interstitial pneumonia of unknown etiology. The histological pattern observed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is now referred to as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Other entities that have been revised during the last ten years are desquamative interstitial pneumonia/alveolar macrophage pneumonia (DIP/AMP), respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). This paper provides a detailed description of pulmonary disorders which have been included in the new classification systems of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. In the second part of the paper we will discuss several doubts and controversies that this new classification schemes leave unresolved.

  19. Development and host compatibility of plasmids for two important ruminant pathogens, Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shukriti; Citti, Chistine; Sagné, Eveline; Marenda, Marc S; Markham, Philip F; Browning, Glenn F

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis and otitis media in cattle throughout the world. However, despite its clinical significance, there is a paucity of tools to genetically manipulate it, impeding our capacity to further explore the molecular basis of its virulence. To address this limitation, we developed a series of homologous and heterologous replicable plasmids from M. bovis and M. agalactiae. The shortest replicable oriC plasmid based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. bovis was 247 bp and contained two DnaA boxes, while oriC plasmids based on the region downstream of dnaA in M. agalactiae strains 5632 and PG2 were 219 bp and 217 bp in length, respectively, and contained only a single DnaA box. The efficiency of transformation in M. bovis and M. agalactiae was inversely correlated with the size of the oriC region in the construct, and, in general, homologous oriC plasmids had a higher transformation efficiency than heterologous oriC plasmids. The larger pWholeoriC45 and pMM21-7 plasmids integrated into the genomic oriC region of M. bovis, while the smaller oriC plasmids remained extrachromosomal for up to 20 serial passages in selective media. Although specific gene disruptions were not be achieved in M. bovis in this study, the oriC plasmids developed here could still be useful as tools in complementation studies and for expression of exogenous genes in both M. bovis and M. agalactiae.

  20. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia: An overview.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Lionel A

    2015-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and is often misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated. Although it can be caused by a wide variety of micro-organisms, the pneumococcus, atypicals, such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and certain Gram-negative rods are the usual pathogens encountered. The site-of-care decision is critical in determining the site and type of care as well as the extent of diagnostic workup. Antimicrobial therapy should be started as soon as possible particularly in those requiring admission to hospital, but typically the physician does not know with any degree of certainty the identity of the etiologic pathogen. A number of national guidelines have been published to help the physician with this choice. The initial drug(s) can be modified if necessary if the pathogen and its antimicrobial susceptibility pattern becomes known. Adjunctive therapy such as pressors and fluid replacement are of value and macrolides appear to help as well, likely secondary to their immunomodulatory effects. Recent data also suggest a role for steroids.

  2. Seroepidemiological survey of sheep flocks from Northern Japan for Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Nicholas, Robin A J; Hlusek, Miroslav; Bonfini, Barbara; Osawa, Takeshi; Orusa, Riccardo; Tatami, Shingo; Takagi, Eishu; Moriya, Hiroaki; Okura, Norimoto; Kato, Kazuo; Kimura, Atsushi; Harasawa, Ryô; Ayling, Roger D

    2012-03-01

    Sheep flocks from Hokkaido, Iwate and Aomori, three northern prefectures of Japan, were screened for antibodies to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma agalactiae by ELISA. Sixty four animals out of 246 (26%) were seropositive to M. ovipneumoniae, with positive results obtained from all three prefectures. None of the sera tested were serologically positive to M. agalactiae.

  3. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Isolated from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are major contaminants of mammalian cell cultures. Here, the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells is reported. PMID:27738034

  4. sICAM-1 intrathecal synthesis and release during the acute phase in children suffering from Coxsackie A9 and S. pneumoniae meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Lewczuk, Piotr; Padilla-Docal, Bárbara; Noris-García, Elena; Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa Bu; Sánchez-Martínez, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Rey, Alexis; González-Hernández, Marlén

    2008-09-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1) from normal control children as well as from children with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), with Coxsackie A9 virus meningoencephalitis and with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis were studied. sICAM-1 was quantified using an immunoenzimatic assay and albumin using the immunodiffusion technique in both biological fluids. Increased sICAM-1 values in CSF in patients with GBS correspond to an increase of the albumin CSF/serum quotient. In contrast, in inflammatory diseases like S. pneumoniae and Coxsackie A9 virus meningoencephalitis an increased brain-derived fraction was observed. In particular cases these values are 60-65% and 70-75% respectively. The results indicate an additional synthesis of sICAM-1 in subarachnoidal space during central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory process. An important role of sICAM-1 in the transmigration of different cell types into CSF during CNS inflammation in children with S. pneumoniae and Coxsackie A9 meningoencephalitis may be suggested.

  5. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided otherwise in this subchapter, prior to...

  6. A review of interstitial pneumonia in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kerr, L A; Linnabary, R D

    1989-06-01

    Interstitial pneumonias comprise a significant proportion of cattle respiratory diseases. Known by different names, such as acute bovine pulmonary emphysema and edema (ABPE), fog fever, atypical interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and cow asthma, the condition seems to occur predominantly in late summer or fall. However, depending on the etiology, cases have occurred throughout the year. Interstitial pneumonia often begins with acute respiratory distress in animals that were clinically normal 12 hr earlier. Animals are observed breathing very rapid and shallow with their mouths open. If disturbed, death may occur rapidly from hypoxia. Causes of interstitial pneumonia are quite varied ranging from parasitic, viral and bacterial to toxic. Toxic agents constitute the most economically important cause of this condition in cattle. The primary toxin is the amino acid L-tryptophan in lush pasture grasses, a compound which is converted to 3-methylindole by rumen microorganisms. Other leading toxic causes of interstitial pneumonia are perilla mint and moldy sweet potatoes. Although treatments are mainly symptomatic and ineffective, preventive measures will reduce the occurrence of interstitial pneumonia. Prevention consists of denying animals exposure to know pneumotoxic agents, eliminating certain rumen microflora that break down the toxic compounds to reactive metabolites, and supplying ample good forage so that cattle will not as likely consume toxic plants.

  7. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in a patient with interstitial pneumonia and Nocardia asiatica presenting as cavitary lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi; Ohkuma, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Ken; Tamura, Masaki; Honda, Kojiro; Yamada, Atsuko; Araki, Koji; Ishii, Haruyuki; Makino, Hiroshi; Takei, Hidefumi; Karita, Shin; Fujiwara, Masachika; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    A 66-year-old man who suffered from an acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia developed a cavitary lesion after taking immunosuppressive drugs. He was diagnosed with cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia. CMV was not thought to be the underlying cause of the cavitary lung lesions, as only six cases have been described thus far. However, this case clearly demonstrates that the development of cavitary lung lesions can be caused by CMV. Following CMV pneumonia, cavitary lesions again occurred in the patient's lungs that were thought to be the first case of cavitary lesions caused by Nocardia asiatica infection. PMID:23448771

  8. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    PubMed Central

    Yampara Guarachi, Gladis Isabel; Barbosa Moreira, Valeria; Santos Ferreira, Angela; Sias, Selma M. De A.; Rodrigues, Cristovão C.; Teixeira, Graça Helena M. do C.

    2014-01-01

    The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O) evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement. PMID:25374742

  9. Differential expression of cytokine genes and inducible nitric oxide synthase induced by opacity phenotype variants of Streptococcus pneumoniae during acute otitis media in the rat.

    PubMed

    Long, J P; Tong, H H; Shannon, P A; DeMaria, T F

    2003-10-01

    Phase variation in the colonial opacity phenotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been implicated as a factor in bacterial adherence, colonization, and invasion in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal otitis media (OM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether S. pneumoniae opacity variants influence the induction of gene expression for proinflammatory mediators in vivo using the rat model of OM. Both the opaque and transparent phenotype variants induced a significant up-regulation in gene expression for interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) compared to saline sham-inoculated controls at both 4 and 24 h postinoculation (P < 0.05 in all cases). Furthermore, whereas a significant difference in gene expression was evident for only IL-6 (greater following challenge with the opaque variant) and IL-1beta (greater following challenge with the transparent variant) at 4 h, by 24 h the opaque variant cohort demonstrated a significant increase in gene expression for IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, and iNOS relative to animals inoculated with the transparent phenotype variant (P < 0.05 in all cases). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results confirmed the gene expression data as determined by real-time PCR. Moreover, the concentrations of the opaque variant in the middle ear lavage fluid were a full log higher than those of the transparent variant. The aforementioned results indicate that the opaque phenotype variant is more efficient at survival and multiplication within the middle ear space, resulting in the accumulation of more inflammatory cells and the enhanced expression and production of inflammatory mediators. However, when the data were normalized to account for differences in middle ear bacterial titers, it became apparent that the transparent variant of S. pneumoniae is a more potent inducer of inflammation, triggering the accumulation of more inflammatory cells and

  10. Aetiological role of viral and bacterial infections in acute adult lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Creer, D D; Dilworth, J P; Gillespie, S H; Johnston, A R; Johnston, S L; Ling, C; Patel, S; Sanderson, G; Wallace, P G; McHugh, T D

    2006-01-01

    Background Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are a common reason for consulting general practitioners (GPs). In most cases the aetiology is unknown, yet most result in an antibiotic prescription. The aetiology of LRTI was investigated in a prospective controlled study. Methods Eighty adults presenting to GPs with acute LRTI were recruited together with 49 controls over 12 months. Throat swabs, nasal aspirates (patients and controls), and sputum (patients) were obtained and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT‐PCR) assays were used to detect Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, influenza viruses (AH1, AH3 and B), parainfluenza viruses 1–3, coronaviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, rhinoviruses, and enteroviruses. Standard sputum bacteriology was also performed. Outcome was recorded at a follow up visit. Results Potential pathogens were identified in 55 patients with LRTI (69%) and seven controls (14%; p<0.0001). The identification rate was 63% (viruses) and 26% (bacteria) for patients and 12% (p<0.0001) and 6% (p = 0.013), respectively, for controls. The most common organisms identified in the patients were rhinoviruses (33%), influenza viruses (24%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%) compared with 2% (p<0.001), 6% (p = 0.013), and 4% (p = 0.034), respectively, in controls. Multiple pathogens were identified in 18 of the 80 LRTI patients (22.5%) and in two of the 49 controls (4%; p = 0.011). Atypical organisms were rarely identified. Cases with bacterial aetiology were clinically indistinguishable from those with viral aetiology. Conclusion Patients presenting to GPs with acute adult LRTI predominantly have a viral illness which is most commonly caused by rhinoviruses and influenza viruses. PMID:16227331

  11. Community-acquired pneumonia related to intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cillóniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni; Niederman, Michael; van der Eerden, Menno; Chalmers, James; Welte, Tobias; Blasi, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide; the annual incidence of CAP among adults in Europe has ranged from 1.5 to 1.7 per 1000 population. Intracellular bacteria are common causes of CAP. However, there is considerable variation in the reported incidence between countries and change over time. The intracellular pathogens that are well established as causes of pneumonia are Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydophila psittaci, and Coxiella burnetii. Since it is known that antibiotic treatment for severe CAP is empiric and includes coverage of typical and atypical pathogens, microbiological diagnosis bears an important relationship to prognosis of pneumonia. Factors such as adequacy of initial antibiotic or early de-escalation of therapy are important variables associated with outcomes, especially in severe cases. Intracellular pathogens sometimes appear to cause more severe disease with respiratory failure and multisystem dysfunction associated with fatal outcomes. The clinical relevance of intracellular pathogens in severe CAP has not been specifically investigated. We review the prevalence, general characteristics, and outcomes of severe CAP cases caused by intracellular pathogens. PMID:27276986

  12. In Vitro Cell Invasion of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2000-01-01

    The ability of the widespread avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum to invade cultured human epithelial cells (HeLa-229) and chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) was investigated by using the gentamicin invasion assay and a double immunofluorescence microscopic technique for accurate localization of cell-associated mycoplasmas. The presence of intracellular mycoplasmas in both cell lines was clearly demonstrated, with organisms entering the eukaryotic cells within 20 min. Internalized mycoplasmas have the ability to leave the cell, but also to survive within the intracellular space over a 48-h period. Frequencies of invasion were shown to differ between the two cell lines, but were also considerably dependent on the mycoplasma input population. Of the prototype strain R, a low-passage population in artificial medium, Rlow, was capable of active cell invasion, while a high-passage population, Rhigh, showed adherence to but nearly no uptake into HeLa-229 and CEF. By passaging Rlow and Rhigh multiple times through HeLa-229 cells, the invasion frequency was significantly increased. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that M. gallisepticum has the capability of entering nonphagocytic host cells that may provide this pathogen with the opportunity for resisting host defenses and selective antibiotic therapy, establishing chronic infections, and passing through the respiratory mucosal barrier to cause systemic infections. PMID:10858241

  13. Early recognition of Streptococcus pneumoniae in patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bohte, R; Hermans, J; van den Broek, P J

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the predictive value of signs, symptoms, and rapidly available laboratory parameters for pneumococci in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective study on patients with CAP who were admitted to hospital was conducted. Clinical and laboratory data were collected according to a protocol. Two hundred sixty-eight patients aged 18 years or older, not living in a nursing home or not admitted to hospital within one week of this admission, with a new infiltrate on the chest radiograph consistent with pneumonia were included. According to microbiological and serological tests, patients were allocated to one of two aetiological groups, Streptococcus pneumoniae or "other pathogens". Seventy-three variables were examined for a correlation with one of the aetiological categories by means of univariate and multivariate analysis. The resulting discriminant function was considered a clinical test for which posttest probabilities for pneumococcal pneumonia were calculated. Streptococcus pneumoniae was demonstrated in 79 patients and other pathogens in 83; no pathogens were detectable in 106 patients. The variables "cardiovascular disease", "acute onset", "pleuritic pain", "gram-positive bacteria in the sputum Gram stain", and "leucocyte count" correctly predicted the cause of CAP in 80% of all cases in both groups. Depending on the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, posttest probabilities for pneumococcal pneumonia were up to 90%. It is concluded that data on history, together with the result of the Gram stain of sputum and the leucocyte count, can help to distinguish Streptococcus pneumoniae from other pathogens causing CAP.

  14. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia.

  15. Identification of cross-reactive antigens between Mycoplasma pulmonis and Mycoplasma arthritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Minion, F C; Brown, M B; Cassell, G H

    1984-01-01

    Serological cross-reactivity between Mycoplasma pulmonis and Mycoplasma arthritidis was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoanalysis of electrophoretic blots, and protein A immunoprecipitation reactions. The results demonstrate that one-way cross-reactivity was present in both hyperimmunized and naturally infected rats and that the predominant cross-reactive antigens were M. pulmonis surface proteins. Distinct immunoblot patterns were demonstrated for M. pulmonis and M. arthritidis, allowing differentiation of the two species. The response to M. arthritidis antigens during natural infections differed greatly from that during hyperimmunization. Evidence suggested that nonprotein antigens were major determinants eliciting the antibody response to this mycoplasma. Images PMID:6690399

  16. Clinical and economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2011-08-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of mortality and morbidity amongst adults in the Asia-Pacific region. Literature published between 1990 and May 2010 on the clinical and economic burden of CAP amongst adults in this region was reviewed. CAP is a significant health burden with significant economic impact in this region. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and advanced age were risk factors for CAP. Aetiological agents included Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Staphylococcus aureus and atypical pathogens (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella spp.), with important differences in the prevalence of these pathogens within the region. Antibiotic resistance was significant but was not linked to excess mortality. Aetiological pathogens remained susceptible to newer antimicrobial agents. Rational antibiotic use is essential for preventing resistance, and increased surveillance is required to identify future trends in incidence and aetiology and to drive treatment and prevention strategies.

  17. The occurrence of mycoplasmas in selected wild North American waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.; Krapu, G.L.; Robb, J.R.; Kenow, K.P.; Korschgen, C.E.; Chipley, W.H.; Conroy, M.J.; Kleven, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of mycoplasma infection in breeding mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) hens and their broods from the central United States (1988 to 1990); and wintering American black duck (Anas rubripes) and mallard hens from the eastern United States (1990 to 1993). Mycoplasmas were isolated by culturing tracheal swabs from 656 live birds and tissue samples from 112 dead waterfowl. Nine (18%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma anatis; M. anatis was recovered from four mallards, a black duck, and a gadwall (Anas strepera) duckling. Nineteen (37%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma cloacale; these isolates were obtained from mallard, canvasback, and black duck adults, and from a mallard duckling. Additional unspeciated mycoplasmas were isolated from mallards, black ducks, and one canvasback.

  18. Dialysis Culture of T-Strain Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Masover, Gerald K.; Hayflick, Leonard

    1974-01-01

    Using dialyzing cultures of T-strain mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-strain mycoplasmas. Titers above 107 color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-strain mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203

  19. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26993450

  20. Pneumonia outbreaks in calves and finishers.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Pneumonia in calves and finishers. Ovarian tumour in a calf . Abortion associated with bovine herpesvirus 1 in a suckler herd. Parasitic gastroenteritis causing illthrift and death in sheep. Outbreaks of acute fasciolosis in sheep. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS).

  1. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    MedlinePlus

    If you have a weakened immune system, you may receive daily antibiotics to prevent some types of pneumonia. Ask your provider if you should receive the influenza (flu) and pneumococcal (pneumonia) vaccines. Practice ...

  2. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:25636925

  3. Decline in antibiotic resistance and changes in the serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with acute otitis media; a 2001-2011 survey by the French Pneumococcal Network.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M; Varon, E; Lepoutre, A; Gravet, A; Baraduc, R; Brun, M; Chardon, H; Cremniter, J; Croizé, J; Dalmay, F; Demachy, M-C; Fosse, T; Grelaud, C; Hadou, T; Hamdad, F; Koeck, J-L; Luce, S; Mermond, S; Patry, I; Péchinot, A; Raymond, J; Ros, A; Segonds, C; Soullié, B; Tandé, D; Vergnaud, M; Vernet-Garnier, V; Wallet, F; Gutmann, L; Ploy, M-C; Lanotte, P

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of acute otitis media (AOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in antibiotic resistance and circulating serotypes of pneumococci isolated from middle ear fluid of French children with AOM during the period 2001-2011, before and after the introduction of the PCV-7 (2003) and PCV-13 (2010) vaccines. Between 2001 and 2011 the French pneumococcal surveillance network analysed the antibiotic susceptibility of 6683 S. pneumoniae isolated from children with AOM, of which 1569 were serotyped. We observed a significant overall increase in antibiotic susceptibility. Respective resistance (I+R) rates in 2001 and 2011 were 76.9% and 57.3% for penicillin, 43.0% and 29.8% for amoxicillin, and 28.6% and 13.0% for cefotaxime. We also found a marked reduction in vaccine serotypes after PCV-7 implementation, from 63.0% in 2001 to 13.2% in 2011, while the incidence of the additional six serotypes included in PCV-13 increased during the same period, with a particularly high proportion of 19A isolates. The proportion of some non-PCV-13 serotypes also increased between 2001 and 2011, especially 15A and 23A. Before PCV-7 implementation, most (70.8%) penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to PCV-7 serotypes, whereas in 2011, 56.8% of penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci belonged to serotype 19A. Between 2001 and 2011, antibiotic resistance among pneumococci responsible for AOM in France fell markedly, and PCV-7 serotypes were replaced by non-PCV-7 serotypes, especially 19A. We are continuing to assess the impact of PCV-13, introduced in France in 2010, on pneumococcal serotype circulation and antibiotic resistance.

  4. Mechanisms of Interferon-γ Production by Neutrophils and Its Function during Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, John C.; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Martin, Jessica R.; Dang, Hong; Brickey, W. June; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Dinauer, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a common public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity, and cost. Neutrophils are usually the earliest leukocytes to respond to bacteria in the lungs. Neutrophils rapidly sequester in the pulmonary microvasculature and migrate into the lung parenchyma and alveolar spaces, where they perform numerous effector functions for host defense. Previous studies showed that migrated neutrophils produce IFN-γ early during pneumonia induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae and that early production of IFN-γ regulates bacterial clearance. IFN-γ production by neutrophils requires Rac2, Hck/Lyn/Fgr Src family tyrosine kinases, and NADPH oxidase. Our current studies examined the mechanisms that regulate IFN-γ production by lung neutrophils during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice and its function. We demonstrate that IFN-γ production by neutrophils is a tightly regulated process that does not require IL-12. The adaptor molecule MyD88 is critical for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor CalDAG-GEFI modulates IFN-γ production. The CD11/CD18 complex, CD44, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, TRIF, and Nrf2 are not required for IFN-γ production by neutrophils. The recently described neutrophil–dendritic cell hybrid cell, identified by its expression of Ly6G and CD11c, is present at low numbers in pneumonic lungs and is not a source of IFN-γ. IFN-γ produced by neutrophils early during acute S. pneumoniae pneumonia induces transcription of target genes in the lungs, which are critical for host defense. These studies underline the complexity of the neutrophil responses during pneumonia in the acute inflammatory response and in subsequent resolution or initiation of immune responses. PMID:25100610

  5. Mycoplasma gallopavonis in eastern wild turkeys.

    PubMed

    Luttrell, M P; Eleazer, T H; Kleven, S H

    1992-04-01

    Serum samples and tracheal cultures were collected from eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo sylvestris) trapped for relocation in South Carolina (USA) during 1985 to 1990. Sera were tested for Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae by the rapid plate agglutination and hemagglutination inhibition tests and were found to be negative. Tracheal cultures were negative for all pathogenic Mycoplasma spp., including M. gallisepticum, M. synoviae, M. meleagridis, and M. iowae. However, M. gallopavonis was isolated from every group of wild turkeys tested in 1986 to 1990. These data suggest that M. gallopavonis, which is generally considered nonpathogenic, may be a common microorganism in eastern wild turkeys.

  6. Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov., a fast growing Mycoplasma species isolated from wild Caprinae.

    PubMed

    Jores, Joerg; Fischer, Anne; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thomann, Andreas; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Schnee, Christiane; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Heller, Martin; Frey, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Five Mycoplasma strains from wild Caprinae were analyzed: four from Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) which died at the Berlin Zoo between 1993 and 1994, one from a Rocky Mountain goat collected in the USA prior to 1987. These five strains represented a population different from the populations belonging to the 'Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' as tested using multi locus sequence typing, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), genomic sequence based in silico as well as laboratory DNA-DNA hybridization, and the analysis of phenotypic traits in particular their exceptionally rapid growth all confirmed that they do not belong to any Mycoplasma species described to date. We therefore suggest these strains represent a novel species, for which we propose the name Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov. The type strain is G5847(T) (=DSM 26019(T)=NCTC 13622(T)) [corrected]. PMID:24016869

  7. Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov., a fast growing Mycoplasma species isolated from wild Caprinae.

    PubMed

    Jores, Joerg; Fischer, Anne; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thomann, Andreas; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Schnee, Christiane; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Heller, Martin; Frey, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Five Mycoplasma strains from wild Caprinae were analyzed: four from Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) which died at the Berlin Zoo between 1993 and 1994, one from a Rocky Mountain goat collected in the USA prior to 1987. These five strains represented a population different from the populations belonging to the 'Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' as tested using multi locus sequence typing, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), genomic sequence based in silico as well as laboratory DNA-DNA hybridization, and the analysis of phenotypic traits in particular their exceptionally rapid growth all confirmed that they do not belong to any Mycoplasma species described to date. We therefore suggest these strains represent a novel species, for which we propose the name Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov. The type strain is G5847(T) (=DSM 26019(T)=NCTC 13622(T)) [corrected].

  8. Microorganisms associated with pneumonia in slaughter weight swine.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, R B; Pijoan, C; Hilley, H D; Rapp, V

    1985-01-01

    The lungs of 334 pigs were obtained from two slaughter plants in Minnesota and examined in detail. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation, direct fluorescence for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and bacterial culture were done on all of them and a subsample of 50 were selected for virus culture. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida and Haemophilus spp. were detected in 24.0%, 34.1% and 27.0% of the lungs, commonly in conjunction with each other. One isolate of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 was detected and this represents the first report of its presence in the United States. No virus was detected in any of the lungs. Lungs with both M. hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida had the greatest amount of macroscopic pneumonia (9.8% of the lung). Lungs with M. hyopneumoniae or P. multocida alone had 4.9% and 5.2% of the lung involved with pneumonia respectively. Lungs with Haemophilus sp. Taxon "minor group" had 3.8% of the lung involved which was not significantly different from lungs with none of these organisms being detected (1.6%). There was a positive correlation between the extent of M. hyopneumoniae infection, as scored by FAT and the amount of macroscopic pneumonia present (r = 0.46; P less than 0.001). Likewise, there was a positive correlation between the estimated concentration of P. multocida present, as scored by the relative number of colonies on blood agar and the amount of macroscopic pneumonia present (r = 0.60; P less than 0.001). Microscopically, the amount of lymphoreticular proliferation, polymorphonuclear cells and alveolar macrophages were evaluated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4016578

  9. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  10. Conditions for growing Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Sotomayor, P

    1990-07-01

    Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum were cultured in a serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin, cholesterol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid in order to avoid the addition of horse serum. Growth was detected by measurement of A640 and by colony formation. The level of growth attained in this medium was less than that obtained in the horse serum-supplemented media, but colonies retained their distinctive morphology. PMID:2202260

  11. Conditions for growing Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Sotomayor, P

    1990-07-01

    Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum were cultured in a serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin, cholesterol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid in order to avoid the addition of horse serum. Growth was detected by measurement of A640 and by colony formation. The level of growth attained in this medium was less than that obtained in the horse serum-supplemented media, but colonies retained their distinctive morphology.

  12. Conditions for growing Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, G; Sotomayor, P

    1990-01-01

    Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum were cultured in a serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin, cholesterol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid in order to avoid the addition of horse serum. Growth was detected by measurement of A640 and by colony formation. The level of growth attained in this medium was less than that obtained in the horse serum-supplemented media, but colonies retained their distinctive morphology. Images PMID:2202260

  13. Entry and intracellular location of Mycoplasma hominis in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Vancini, Ricardo Gomes; Benchimol, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    The parasite Trichomonas vaginalis causes one of the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infections in humans. The coexistence of different sexually transmitted diseases in the same individual is very common, such as vaginal infections by T. vaginalis in association with Mycoplasma fermentans or Mycoplasma hominis. However, the consequences and behavior of mycoplasma during trichomonad infections are virtually unknown. This study was undertaken to elucidate whether mycoplasmas enter and leave trichomonad cells and if so how. M. hominis was analyzed in different trichomonad isolates and the process of internalization and the pathway within the parasite was studied. Parasites naturally and experimentally infected with mycoplasmas were used and transmission electron microscopy, cytochemistry and PCR analyses were performed. The results show that: (1) M. hominis enters T. vaginalis cells by endocytosis; (2) some mycoplasmas use a terminal polar tip as anchor to the trichomonad plasma membrane; (3) some trichomonad isolates are able to digest mycoplasmas, mainly when the trichomonads are experimentally infected; (4) some fresh virulent isolates are able to maintain mycoplasmas as cohabitants in the cell's interior; (5) some mycoplasmas are able to escape from the vacuole to the trichomonad cytosol, and trichomonad plasma membrane budding suggested that mycoplasmas could leave the parasite cell. PMID:17710384

  14. Identification and Subtyping of Clinically Relevant Human and Ruminant Mycoplasmas by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Renaudin, H.; Cauvin, E.; Del Prá Netto Machado, L.; Tricot, A.; Benoit, F.; Treilles, M.; Bébéar, C.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) recently emerged as a technology for the identification of bacteria. In this study, we aimed to evaluate its applicability to human and ruminant mycoplasmal identification, which can be demanding and time-consuming when using phenotypic or molecular methods. In addition, MALDI-TOF MS was tested as a subtyping tool for certain species. A total of 29 main spectra (MSP) from 10 human and 13 ruminant mycoplasma (sub)species were included in a mycoplasma MSP database to complete the Bruker MALDI Biotyper database. After broth culture and protein extraction, MALDI-TOF MS was applied for the identification of 119 human and 143 ruminant clinical isolates that were previously identified by antigenic or molecular methods and for subcultures of 73 ruminant clinical specimens that potentially contained several mycoplasma species. MALDI-TOF MS resulted in accurate (sub)species-level identification with a score of ≥1.700 for 96% (251/262) of the isolates. The phylogenetically closest (sub)species were unequivocally distinguished. Although mixtures of the strains were reliably detected up to a certain cellular ratio, only the predominant species was identified from the cultures of polymicrobial clinical specimens. For typing purposes, MALDI-TOF MS proved to cluster Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma agalactiae isolates by their year of isolation and genome profiles, respectively, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates by their adhesin P1 type. In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective method for the routine identification of high-density growing mycoplasmal species and shows promising prospects for its capacity for strain typing. PMID:23903545

  15. DNA repair in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA repair is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all living beings. Genome size as well as the repertoire and abundance of DNA repair components may vary among prokaryotic species. The bacteria of the Mollicutes class feature a small genome size, absence of a cell wall, and a parasitic lifestyle. A small number of genes make Mollicutes a good model for a “minimal cell” concept. Results In this work we studied the DNA repair system of Mycoplasma gallisepticum on genomic, transcriptional, and proteomic levels. We detected 18 out of 22 members of the DNA repair system on a protein level. We found that abundance of the respective mRNAs is less than one per cell. We studied transcriptional response of DNA repair genes of M. gallisepticum at stress conditions including heat, osmotic, peroxide stresses, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin treatment, stationary phase and heat stress in stationary phase. Conclusions Based on comparative genomic study, we determined that the DNA repair system M. gallisepticum includes a sufficient set of proteins to provide a cell with functional nucleotide and base excision repair and mismatch repair. We identified SOS-response in M. gallisepticum on ciprofloxacin, which is a known SOS-inducer, tetracycline and heat stress in the absence of established regulators. Heat stress was found to be the strongest SOS-inducer. We found that upon transition to stationary phase of culture growth transcription of DNA repair genes decreases dramatically. Heat stress does not induce SOS-response in a stationary phase. PMID:24148612

  16. Development of fluorescence expression tools to study host-mycoplasma interactions and validation in two distant mycoplasma clades.

    PubMed

    Bonnefois, Tiffany; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Rodrigues, Valérie; Totté, Philippe; Puech, Carinne; Ripoll, Chantal; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2016-10-20

    Fluorescence expression tools for stable and innocuous whole mycoplasma cell labelling have been developed. A Tn4001-derivative mini-transposon affording unmarked, stable mutagenesis in mycoplasmas was modified to allow the constitutive, high-level expression of mCherry, mKO2 and mNeonGreen. These tools were used to introduce the respective fluorescent proteins as chromosomal tags in the phylogenetically distant species Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma bovis. The production, selection and characterisation of fluorescent clones were straightforward and resulted in the unprecedented observation of red and green fluorescent mycoplasma colonies in the two species, with no apparent cytotoxicity. Equivalent fluorescence expression levels were quantified by flow cytometry in both species, suggesting that these tools can be broadly applied in mycoplasmas. A macrophage infection assay was performed to assess the usefulness of mNeonGreen-expressing strains for monitoring mycoplasma infections, and notably cell invasion. The presence of fluorescent mycoplasmas inside live phagocytic cells was detected and quantified by flow cytometry and corroborated by confocal microscopy, which allowed the identification of individual mycoplasmas in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The fluorescence expression tools developed in this study are suitable for host-pathogen interaction studies and offer innumerable perspectives for the functional analysis of mycoplasmas both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27497759

  17. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  18. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Mycoplasma isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazuhiro; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Iwakuma, Akihiro; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Hayashi, Tomohito; Nagahata, Hajime; Oshida, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp. are highly contagious pathogens and intramammary Mycoplasma infection is a serious issue for the dairy industry. As there is no effective vaccine for Mycoplasma infection, control depends on good husbandry and chemo-antibiotic therapy. In this study, antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains recently isolated from cases of bovine mastitis in Japan was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All Mycoplasma bovis strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin and enrofloxacin, but not kanamycin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin or tylosin. M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin and tylosin, but not to kanamycin. This is the first report to describe the MIC of major antimicrobial agents for Mycoplasma species isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan. PMID:24261609

  20. Role of carriers in the transmission of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Bindu; Erickson, Kayla; Kugadas, Abirami; Batra, Sai A.; Call, Douglas R.; Davis, Margaret A.; Foreyt, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the absence of livestock contact, recurring lamb mortality in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) populations previously exposed to pneumonia indicates the likely presence of carriers of pneumonia-causing pathogens, and possibly inadequate maternally derived immunity. To investigate this problem we commingled naïve, pregnant ewes (n=3) with previously exposed rams (n=2). Post-commingling, all ewes and lambs born to them acquired pneumonia-causing pathogens (leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae), with subsequent lamb mortality between 4-9 weeks of age. Infected ewes became carriers for two subsequent years and lambs born to them succumbed to pneumonia. In another experiment, we attempted to suppress the carriage of leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae by administering an antibiotic to carrier ewes, and evaluated lamb survival. Lambs born to both treatment and control ewes (n=4 each) acquired pneumonia and died. Antibody titers against leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae in all eight ewes were ‘protective’ (>1:800 and no apparent respiratory disease); however their lambs were either born with comparatively low titers, or with high (but non-protective) titers that declined rapidly within 2-8 weeks of age, rendering them susceptible to fatal disease. Thus, exposure to pneumonia-causing pathogens from carrier ewes, and inadequate titers of maternally derived protective antibodies, are likely to render bighorn lambs susceptible to fatal pneumonia. PMID:27185269

  1. Role of carriers in the transmission of pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Bindu; Erickson, Kayla; Kugadas, Abirami; Batra, Sai A; Call, Douglas R; Davis, Margaret A; Foreyt, William J; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of livestock contact, recurring lamb mortality in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) populations previously exposed to pneumonia indicates the likely presence of carriers of pneumonia-causing pathogens, and possibly inadequate maternally derived immunity. To investigate this problem we commingled naïve, pregnant ewes (n=3) with previously exposed rams (n=2). Post-commingling, all ewes and lambs born to them acquired pneumonia-causing pathogens (leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae), with subsequent lamb mortality between 4-9 weeks of age. Infected ewes became carriers for two subsequent years and lambs born to them succumbed to pneumonia. In another experiment, we attempted to suppress the carriage of leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae by administering an antibiotic to carrier ewes, and evaluated lamb survival. Lambs born to both treatment and control ewes (n=4 each) acquired pneumonia and died. Antibody titers against leukotoxin-producing Pasteurellaceae in all eight ewes were 'protective' (>1:800 and no apparent respiratory disease); however their lambs were either born with comparatively low titers, or with high (but non-protective) titers that declined rapidly within 2-8 weeks of age, rendering them susceptible to fatal disease. Thus, exposure to pneumonia-causing pathogens from carrier ewes, and inadequate titers of maternally derived protective antibodies, are likely to render bighorn lambs susceptible to fatal pneumonia. PMID:27185269

  2. Isolation of mycoplasmas from a buzzard, falcons and vultures.

    PubMed

    Poveda, J B; Giebel, J; Kirchhoff, H; Fernandez, A

    1990-10-01

    Thirteen mycoplasmas were isolated from a peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), two saker falcons (Falco cherrug), a buzzard (Buteo buteo), a black vulture (Aegypius monachus), and two griffon vultures (Gypsfuhus). Six of them could be identified: Mycoplasma gallinarum (three isolates), M. columborale (two isolates) and M. anatis (one isolate). The remaining seven isolates did not react with antisera against the known avian mycoplasma species in the indirect immunofluorescence and growth inhibition tests. They may represent new species.

  3. Therapeutic strategies in pneumonia: going beyond antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger; Lienau, Jasmin; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the innate immune system drives lung injury and its systemic sequelae due to breakdown of vascular barrier function, harmful hyperinflammation and microcirculatory failure, which contribute to the unfavourable outcome of patients with severe pneumonia. A variety of promising therapeutic targets have been identified and numerous innovative therapeutic approaches demonstrated to improve lung injury in experimental preclinical studies. However, at present specific preventive or curative strategies for the treatment of lung failure in pneumonia in addition to antibiotics are still missing. The aim of this mini-review is to give a short overview of some, but not all, adjuvant therapeutic strategies for pneumonia and its most important complications, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and briefly discuss future perspectives.

  4. Air pollution and infant mortality from pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Penna, M.L.; Duchiade, M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    This study examines the relationship between air pollution, measured as concentration of suspended particulates in the atmosphere, and infant mortality due to pneumonia in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. Multiple linear regression (progressive or stepwise method) was used to analyze infant mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, and all causes in 1980, by geographic area, income level, and degree of contamination. While the variable proportion of families with income equivalent to more than two minimum wages was included in the regressions corresponding to the three types of infant mortality, the average contamination index had a statistically significant coefficient (b = 0.2208; t = 2.670; P = 0.0137) only in the case of mortality due to pneumonia. This would suggest a biological association, but, as in any ecological study, such conclusions should be viewed with caution. The authors believe that air quality indicators are essential to consider in studies of acute respiratory infections in developing countries.

  5. Aggressive Cunninghamella pneumonia in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Malkan, Alpin D; Wahid, Fazal N; Rao, Bhaskar N; Sandoval, John A

    2014-10-01

    Children with hematologic malignancies may be challenged with life-threatening, invasive fungal infections by organisms that would otherwise have a low potential for virulence in healthy hosts. Presented is a case of a 15-year-old adolescent with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who was receiving steroids and chemotherapy. He developed cough associated with left chest pain with suspicion for fungal pneumonia. He began systemic antifungal therapy, underwent computed tomography of the chest demonstrating a large cavitary lesion (reversed halo sign) in the left lung. Over a 48-hour period the patient clinically deteriorated with worsening pneumonia and required left thoracotomy with nonanatomic pulmonary resection. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of Cunninghamella pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies, and the multidisciplinary approach required to have the greatest possible outcome. PMID:25089609

  6. [Chlamydia pneumoniae infections--diagnostic methods].

    PubMed

    Stepień, Ewa; Pieniazek, Piotr; Branicka, Agnieszka; Bozek, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria Chlamydia pneumonia was found in 1989 to cause acute and chronic respiratory tract infections. This agent has been as well associated with other disease: atherogenesis and coronary heart disease. This study is aimed both at making an introduction to the issues related to C. pneumoniae diagnosis and presenting contemporary laboratory methods. Given the limitations of traditional diagnostics methods, serodiagnosis (EIA) and nucleic acids amplification (PCR, hybridisation) provide the most convincing evidence of C. pneumoniae infections. Culture and direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) may be useful in confirming these results. A variety of methods applied can provide an opportunity to detect bacteria in different clinical samples--incl. sputum, nasopharyngeal and throat swabs, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and tissues from biopsy and autopsy. PMID:12184026

  7. A novel medium devoid of ruminant peptone for high yield growth of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiren; Mackintosh, David; Ayling, Roger D; Nicholas, Robin A J; Fielder, Mark D

    2008-03-18

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is considered an emerging veterinary pathogen causing pneumonia in sheep and goats worldwide. Currently it has not been possible to define a growth medium that yields the maximum growth of M. ovipneumoniae within a short incubation period. Growth yields of M. ovipneumoniae in Eaton's medium are variable and not as consistently high as those seen with other Mycoplasma spp. This study investigated the ability of different M. ovipneumoniae field strains to grow in various media formulations, where PPLO broth was replaced by a vegetable protein source, and comparisons were made in terms of strain viability in Eaton's medium. Studies were also conducted to determine the optimal carbohydrate source for use in the M. ovipneumoniae medium. Generally, it was found that different strains showed good growth in all media tested, with growth yields at 24h in TSB-1 medium higher than those observed with Eaton's medium. Growth yields reached 10(8) to 10(9)cfu ml(-1) within 24h for particular field strains, with all strains achieving this growth level within 48-72h.

  8. Serological and molecular survey of sheep infected with Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Jun, Qiao; Qingling, Meng; Zhengxiang, Hu; Yu, Ma; Xuepeng, Cai; Zibing, Cheng; Jinsheng, Zhang; Zaichao, Zhang; Kuojun, Cai; Chuangfu, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumonia is one of the most important infectious diseases that threaten sheep production. In order to investigate the epidemic status of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae infection in sheep, indirect hemagglutination assay was used to analyze 1679 serum samples collected from four different breeds of sheep (Kazak sheep, Hu sheep, Merino sheep, and Duolang sheep) in six regions in Xinjiang between 2012 and 2014. One thousand one hundred sixty-nine sheep nasal swabs and 180 lungs were PCR analyzed. The results showed that the average positive rates of the serum samples were 17.75 %. The positive rates were between 9.76 and 30.61 % in the four breeds. Among them, the Hu sheep had a significantly higher rate than other breeds (P < 0.05). The average positive rates of nasal swabs and lungs were 10.18 and 28.89 %, respectively. Based on the phylogenetic trees of 16S RNA gene, the isolates were closest to those strains isolated from inland areas of China, indicating that these epidemic isolates came from the trans-province introductions. Our survey suggests that quarantine is necessary for sheep imported from inland, and effective immunization should be implemented in sheep susceptible to M. ovipneumoniae in Xinjiang, China.

  9. A replicating plasmid-based vector for GFP expression in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Ishag, H Z A; Liu, M J; Yang, R S; Xiong, Q Y; Feng, Z X; Shao, G Q

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) causes porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP) that significantly affects the pig industry worldwide. Despite the availability of the whole genome sequence, studies on the pathogenesis of this organism have been limited due to the lack of a genetic manipulation system. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to generate a general GFP reporter vector based on a replicating plasmid. Here, we describe the feasibility of GFP reporter expression in M. hyopneumoniae (strain 168L) controlled by the p97 gene promoter of this mycoplasma. An expression plasmid (pMD18-TOgfp) containing the p97 gene promoter, and origin of replication (oriC) of M. hyopneumoniae, tetracycline resistant marker (tetM), and GFP was constructed and used to transform competent M. hyopneumoniae cells. We observed green fluorescence in M. hyopneumoniae transformants under fluorescence microscopy, which indicates that there was expression of the GFP reporter that was driven by the p97 gene promoter. Additionally, an electroporation method for M. hyopneumoniae with an efficiency of approximately 1 x 10(-6) transformants/μg plasmid DNA was optimized and is described herein. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the susceptibility of M. hyopneumoniae to genetic manipulation whereby foreign genes are expressed. This work may encourage the development of genetic tools to manipulate the genome of M. hyopneumoniae for functional genomic analyses. PMID:27173288

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from veal calves and dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Heuvelink, Annet; Reugebrink, Constance; Mars, Jet

    2016-06-30

    Control of Mycoplasma bovis infections depends on good husbandry practices and antibiotic treatment. To allow more prudent use of antimicrobial drugs, there is a need for information on the susceptibility profile of this pathogen. The objective of the present study was to analyse the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical M. bovis isolates in the Netherlands. The collection comprised 95 bovine isolates, originating from lungs (n=56), mastitis milk (n=27), and synovial fluid (n=12), collected between 2008 and 2014. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were assessed by broth microdilution, both by using in-house prepared MIC plates and by using commercially available MIC plates. For each antimicrobial agent, the range of MIC results, the MIC50, and MIC90 values were calculated. M. bovis strains recently isolated in the Netherlands appeared to be characterized by relatively high MIC values for antimicrobial agents that, until now, have been recommended by the Dutch Association of Veterinarians for treating pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma species. Fluoroquinolones appeared to be the most efficacious in inhibiting M. bovis growth, followed by tulathromycin and oxytetracycline. The highest MIC values were obtained for erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin. Future studies should be done on determining M. bovis specific clinical breakpoints, standardization of methods to determine MIC values as well as molecular studies on detection of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of M. bovis isolates to develop PCR assays for determining resistance.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from veal calves and dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Heuvelink, Annet; Reugebrink, Constance; Mars, Jet

    2016-06-30

    Control of Mycoplasma bovis infections depends on good husbandry practices and antibiotic treatment. To allow more prudent use of antimicrobial drugs, there is a need for information on the susceptibility profile of this pathogen. The objective of the present study was to analyse the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical M. bovis isolates in the Netherlands. The collection comprised 95 bovine isolates, originating from lungs (n=56), mastitis milk (n=27), and synovial fluid (n=12), collected between 2008 and 2014. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were assessed by broth microdilution, both by using in-house prepared MIC plates and by using commercially available MIC plates. For each antimicrobial agent, the range of MIC results, the MIC50, and MIC90 values were calculated. M. bovis strains recently isolated in the Netherlands appeared to be characterized by relatively high MIC values for antimicrobial agents that, until now, have been recommended by the Dutch Association of Veterinarians for treating pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma species. Fluoroquinolones appeared to be the most efficacious in inhibiting M. bovis growth, followed by tulathromycin and oxytetracycline. The highest MIC values were obtained for erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin. Future studies should be done on determining M. bovis specific clinical breakpoints, standardization of methods to determine MIC values as well as molecular studies on detection of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of M. bovis isolates to develop PCR assays for determining resistance. PMID:27259820

  12. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  13. Pulmonary migratory infiltrates due to mycoplasma infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    You, Wenjie; Chen, Bi; Li, Jing; Shou, Juan; Xue, Shan; Liu, Xueqing; Jiang, Handong

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary migratory infiltrates (PMI) are observed in a few diseases. We report here a case of PMI attributed to Mycoplasma pneumonia (Mp) infection. The patient's past medical history was characterized by fleeting and/or relapses of patchy opacification or infiltrates of parenchyma throughout the whole lung field except for left lower lobe radiographically. Serological assays revealed an elevation of IgG antibody specific to Mp and its fourfold increase in convalescent serum. Histopathological findings showed polypoid plugs of fibroblastic tissue filling and obliterating small air ways and interstitial infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the vicinal alveolar septa. The patient was treated with azithromycin which resulted in a dramatic improvement clinically and imageologically. In spite of the increasing incidence of Mp, the possible unusual imaging manifestation and underlying mechanism haven't attracted enough attention. To our knowledge, there are rare reports of such cases. PMID:27293865

  14. [Case of multiple pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas detected during treatment for severe pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Kyoraku, Yuka; Ashitani, Jun-Ichi; Imazu, Yoshifumi; Fukuyama, Chikara; Miyoshi, Kahori; Kodama, Tsuyoshi; Yanagi, Shigehisa; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2008-09-01

    A 55-year-old woman who developed severe hypoxemia associated with severe pneumonia was admitted to our hospital for mechanical ventilation. She was treated with antibiotics under a diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia. Although most clinical findings improved, hypoxemia remained. As a chest CT film showed multiple nodules and an enhanced CT film revealed arterial filling in the nodules, multiple pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas (PAVFs) were considered to be an underlying cause of hypoxemia. Transcatheter coil embolization for 5 PAVFs, significantly ameliorated hypoxemia in the patient. PAVF is a congenital desease, and in many cases, is asymptomatic. Therefore, it was rare for PAVFs to be detected in a middle-aged patient with prolonged hypoxemia associated with pneumonia. PMID:18939419

  15. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented? Pneumonia can be very serious and ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal Pneumonia Vaccine A vaccine is available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  16. An epizootic of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae infection in captive Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli).

    PubMed

    Black, S R; Barker, I K; Mehren, K G; Crawshaw, G J; Rosendal, S; Ruhnke, L; Thorsen, J; Carman, P S

    1988-10-01

    In late spring of 1986, 10 of 23 Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the Metropolitan Toronto Zoo were moved to a new exhibit, where all developed severe respiratory signs refractory to anthelmintic and antibiotic therapy. In July, two animals died with chronic active bronch-pneumonia, and a third was euthanized because of pneumonia several months later. Bacteria were not isolated from the lungs of the first, steptococci and Pasteurella hemolytica were isolated from the other two, respectively; Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae was isolated from both. Pulmonary lesions in all three sheep were consistent with Mycoplasma sp. infection. Nasal swabs of the remaining animals yielded no consistent bacterial isolates; however, four of eight sheep were positive for M. ovipneumoniae. Viral cultures yielded an as yet unidentified herpesvirus. Sheep in the original and new herds had no serologic titers to parainfluenza-3, equine viral rhinopneumonitis, or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, and had variable titers against bovine respiratory syncytial virus. No titers against M. ovipneumoniae were present in 13 sheep still in the original exhibit, but titers varied from 1:32 to 1:256 in eight pneumonic sheep. Sera taken from three sheep before or early in the outbreak were all negative for antibody to M. ovipneumoniae. Two of the affected Dall's sheep had been in contact with domestic sheep in the winter of 1985-1986, and M. ovipneumoniae was subsequently cultured from the domestic flock. Exposure to a new pathogen, and environmental and social stress in a new exhibit may have resulted in this severe disease in Dall's sheep.

  17. [Histopathological classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Povýsil, Ctibor

    2010-01-01

    [LIP] is currently viewed as a pattern of diffuse reactive pulmonary hyperplasia associated in most cases with EB virus, immunosuppression, or a connective tissue disorder. Malignant transformation may rarely occur. A dense mixed interstitial lymphoid infiltrate is a typical histological finding. Diffuse alveolar damage [DAD] from unknown causes is termed acute interstitial pneumonia [AIP], and is synonymous with cases of Hamman-Rich disease. Hyaline membranes in the exsudative phase and marked expansion of the interstitium later are present.

  18. Proteomic characterization of pleural effusion, a specific host niche of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from cattle with contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

    PubMed

    Weldearegay, Yenehiwot B; Pich, Andreas; Schieck, Elise; Liljander, Anne; Gicheru, Nimmo; Wesonga, Hezron; Thiaucourt, Francois; Kiirika, Leonard M; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Jores, Joerg; Meens, Jochen

    2016-01-10

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a severe pleuropneumonia in cattle. The abnormal accumulation of pleural fluid, called pleural effusion (PE), is one of the characteristics of this disease. We performed a proteomic analysis of seven PE samples from experimentally infected cattle and characterized their composition with respect to bovine and Mmm proteins. We detected a total of 963 different bovine proteins. Further analysis indicated a strong enrichment of proteins involved in antigen processing, platelet activation and degranulation and apoptosis and an increased abundance of acute phase proteins.With regard to the pathogen, up to 108 viable mycoplasma cells per ml were detected in the PE supernatant. The proteomic analysis revealed 350 mycoplasma proteins, including proteins involved in virulence-associated processes like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and capsule synthesis. The bovine proteins detected will aid to characterize the inflammasome during an acute pleuropneumonia in cattle and the identified mycoplasma proteins will serve as baseline data to be compared with in vitro studies to improve our understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Based on our results, we named the pleural effusion an “in vivo niche” of Mmm during the acute phase of CBPP. Biological significance: This is the first study on bovine pleural effusions derived from an infectious disease and the first approach to characterize the proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides in vivo. This study revealed a high number of viable Mmm cells in the pleural effusion. The bovine pleural effusion proteome during Mmm infection is qualitatively similar to plasma, but differs with respect to high abundance of acute phase proteins. On the other hand,Mmm in its natural host produces proteins involved in capsule synthesis, H2O2 production and induction of inflammatory response, supporting previous knowledge on mechanisms underlying

  19. Proteomic characterization of pleural effusion, a specific host niche of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from cattle with contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP).

    PubMed

    Weldearegay, Yenehiwot B; Pich, Andreas; Schieck, Elise; Liljander, Anne; Gicheru, Nimmo; Wesonga, Hezron; Thiaucourt, Francois; Kiirika, Leonard M; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Jores, Joerg; Meens, Jochen

    2016-01-10

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm) is the causative agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), a severe pleuropneumonia in cattle. The abnormal accumulation of pleural fluid, called pleural effusion (PE), is one of the characteristics of this disease. We performed a proteomic analysis of seven PE samples from experimentally infected cattle and characterized their composition with respect to bovine and Mmm proteins. We detected a total of 963 different bovine proteins. Further analysis indicated a strong enrichment of proteins involved in antigen processing, platelet activation and degranulation and apoptosis and an increased abundance of acute phase proteins.With regard to the pathogen, up to 108 viable mycoplasma cells per ml were detected in the PE supernatant. The proteomic analysis revealed 350 mycoplasma proteins, including proteins involved in virulence-associated processes like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and capsule synthesis. The bovine proteins detected will aid to characterize the inflammasome during an acute pleuropneumonia in cattle and the identified mycoplasma proteins will serve as baseline data to be compared with in vitro studies to improve our understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Based on our results, we named the pleural effusion an “in vivo niche” of Mmm during the acute phase of CBPP. Biological significance: This is the first study on bovine pleural effusions derived from an infectious disease and the first approach to characterize the proteome of Mycoplasma mycoides in vivo. This study revealed a high number of viable Mmm cells in the pleural effusion. The bovine pleural effusion proteome during Mmm infection is qualitatively similar to plasma, but differs with respect to high abundance of acute phase proteins. On the other hand,Mmm in its natural host produces proteins involved in capsule synthesis, H2O2 production and induction of inflammatory response, supporting previous knowledge on mechanisms underlying

  20. An epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Mason, S J; Maiers, J D

    1984-01-01

    A major epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum occurred in the Monroe, North Carolina, area between January and June of 1983. The outbreak involved 304,000 turkeys of various ages, which were slaughtered in the eradication program at a cost of more than $550,000 to growers and poultry companies. An infected peafowl was the likely source of infection on the first farm. Traffic between farms by growers and company personnel was theorized to be the means of further spread.

  1. An epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Mason, S J; Maiers, J D

    1984-01-01

    A major epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum occurred in the Monroe, North Carolina, area between January and June of 1983. The outbreak involved 304,000 turkeys of various ages, which were slaughtered in the eradication program at a cost of more than $550,000 to growers and poultry companies. An infected peafowl was the likely source of infection on the first farm. Traffic between farms by growers and company personnel was theorized to be the means of further spread. PMID:6487195

  2. Electrical Properties and Ultrastructure of Mycoplasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Edwin L.; Maniloff, Jack; Einolf, Charles W.

    1971-01-01

    Mycoplasma, in particular species laidlawii and gallisepticum, are found to have a very small, low frequency conductivity as would be predicted by the dielectric model for bacteria and their apparent lack of cell wall structure. Membrane capacitance values for the two organisms are both about 0.9 μF/cm2, although electron micrographs show that the membrane of M. gallisepticum is 20-40 A thicker than that of M. laidlawii. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:5089915

  3. Immunohistochemical demonstration of Mycoplasma gallinarum and Mycoplasma gallinaceum in naturally infected hen oviducts.

    PubMed

    Martin de las Mulas, J; Fernández, A; Sierra, M A; Poveda, J B; Carranza, J

    1990-11-01

    Using indirect immunoperoxidase (IIP), peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP) and avidin biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) immunohistochemical methods, Mycoplasma gallinarum and M gallinaceum antigens were demonstrated in ethanol-fixed paraffin-embedded oviduct sections from hens the eggs from which showed suboptimal hatchability. Specific immunoperoxidase staining was detected at the mucosa in the magnum portion of the oviduct. Optimal staining was achieved by applying the ABC method, though both IIP and PAP methods can also be used for diagnosis. Isolation and identification techniques gave similar results for the species of avian mycoplasmas involved.

  4. Mycoplasmas and cancer: focus on nucleoside metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The standard of care for patients suffering cancer often includes treatment with nucleoside analogues (NAs). NAs are internalized by cell-specific nucleobase/nucleoside transporters and, after enzymatic activation (often one or more phosphorylation steps), interfere with cellular nucleo(s)(t)ide metabolism and DNA/RNA synthesis. Therefore, their efficacy is highly dependent on the expression and activity of nucleo(s)(t)ide-metabolizing enzymes, and alterations thereof (e.g. by down/upregulated expression or mutations) may change the susceptibility to NA-based therapy and/or confer drug resistance. Apart from host cell factors, several other variables including microbial presence may determine the metabolome (i.e. metabolite concentrations) of human tissues. Studying the diversity of microorganisms that are associated with the human body has already provided new insights in several diseases (e.g. diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease) and the metabolic exchange between tissues and their specific microbiota was found to affect the bioavailability and toxicity of certain anticancer drugs, including NAs. Several studies report a preferential colonization of tumor tissues with some mycoplasma species (mostly Mycoplasma hyorhinis). These prokaryotes are also a common source of cell culture contamination and alter the cytostatic activity of some NAs in vitro due to the expression of nucleoside-catabolizing enzymes. Mycoplasma infection may therefore bias experimental work with NAs, and their presence in the tumor microenvironment could be of significance when optimizing nucleoside-based cancer treatment. PMID:26417262

  5. Influenza A (H1N1) organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Torrego, Alfons; Pajares, Virginia; Mola, Anna; Lerma, Enrique; Franquet, Tomás

    2010-04-27

    In November 2009, countries around the world reported confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1, including over 6000 deaths. No peak in activity has been seen. The most common causes of death are pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with organising pneumonia associated with influenza A (H1N1) infection confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. Organising pneumonia should also be considered as a possible complication of influenza A (H1N1) infection, given that these patients can benefit from early diagnosis and appropriate specific management.

  6. Fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia: Don't forget Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Cristina; Pravinkumar, Egbert; Balachandran, Dave; Schneider, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia secondary to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. S. maltophilia is commonly a non-virulent pathogen. However, in the immunocompromised, it is generally associated with bacteremia after central venous catheter placement or pneumonia. Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a rare presentation of this bacteria, with only 31 cases reported in the literature, and has 100% mortality within 72 hours. Rapid recognition and early suspicion should be key in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27358764

  7. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cordier, J-F

    2006-08-01

    Organising pneumonia is defined histopathologically by intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue, consisting of intermixed myofibroblasts and connective tissue. Although nonspecific, this histopathological pattern, together with characteristic clinical and imaging features, defines cryptogenic organising pneumonia when no cause or peculiar underlying context is found. Rapid clinical and imaging improvement is obtained with corticosteroid treatment, but relapses are common after stopping treatment.

  8. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... produced from in vitro living cell cultures, and prior to inactivation in the case of inactivated virus vaccines produced from such living cell cultures, each virus harvest pool and control fluid pool shall...

  9. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  10. Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia requiring admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Klimek, J J; Ajemian, E; Fontecchio, S; Gracewski, J; Klemas, B; Jimenez, L

    1983-06-01

    Patients who develop bacterial pneumonia in the community often require admission to acute-care hospitals. Knowledge of the incidence of pneumonia due to different pathogens that are brought into an institution from the community may play a role in determining the patterns of infecting organisms responsible for hospital-acquired pneumonia. For 1 year, we prospectively reviewed the records of patients admitted to our 1000-bed community hospital with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients had clinical signs and symptoms, positive radiologic findings, and pure cultures of potential pathogens from sputum, blood, pleural fluid, lung aspirate, lung biopsy, or transtracheal aspirate. Pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila was diagnosed by serum indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) titer greater than or equal to 1:256 and clinical signs and symptoms along with response to erythromycin. Of 204 patients with bacterial pneumonia, the following pathogens were implicated: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus species, L. pneumophila, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, oral anaerobic bacteria, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and others. Most patients were more than 50 years of age and many had evidence of underlying pulmonary disease. The etiology of CABP may not be as predictable as in the past. Empiric antimicrobial therapy for CABP should include agents with activity against the pathogens prevalent in the community.

  11. Predictors of aspiration pneumonia: how important is dysphagia?

    PubMed

    Langmore, S E; Terpenning, M S; Schork, A; Chen, Y; Murray, J T; Lopatin, D; Loesche, W J

    1998-01-01

    Aspiration pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly who are hospitalized or in nursing homes. Multiple risk factors for pneumonia have been identified, but no study has effectively compared the relative risk of factors in several different categories, including dysphagia. In this prospective outcomes study, 189 elderly subjects were recruited from the outpatient clinics, inpatient acute care wards, and the nursing home care center at the VA Medical Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. They were given a variety of assessments to determine oropharyngeal and esophageal swallowing and feeding status, functional status, medical status, and oral/dental status. The subjects were followed for up to 4 years for an outcome of verified aspiration pneumonia. Bivariate analyses identified several factors as significantly associated with pneumonia. Logistic regression analyses then identified the significant predictors of aspiration pneumonia. The best predictors, in one or more groups of subjects, were dependent for feeding, dependent for oral care, number of decayed teeth, tube feeding, more than one medical diagnosis, number of medications, and smoking. The role that each of the significant predictors might play was described in relation to the pathogenesis of aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia was concluded to be an important risk for aspiration pneumonia, but generally not sufficient to cause pneumonia unless other risk factors are present as well. A dependency upon others for feeding emerged as the dominant risk factor, with an odds ratio of 19.98 in a logistic regression model that excluded tube-fed patients.

  12. Ventilator-associated Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, Kala; James, Ebor Jacob G; Michael, Joy Sarojini; Kang, Gagandeep; Verghese, Valsan Philip

    2011-12-01

    We report an outbreak of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in 6 infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection. Non-bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage isolated A. baumannii in all these infants. Environmental microbiological survey of the Pediatric intensive care unit and pediatric wards identified oxygen humidifying chambers as the source of Acinetobacter. Practices of cleaning and changing of the humidifiers were reviewed and the outbreak was controlled with new recommendations.

  13. Lung pathology and infectious agents in fatal feedlot pneumonias and relationship with mortality, disease onset, and treatments.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Blood, K Shawn; Panciera, Roger J; Payton, Mark E; Ridpath, Julia F; Confer, Anthony W; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Burge, Lurinda T; Welsh, Ronald D; Johnson, Bill J; Reck, Amy

    2009-07-01

    This study charted 237 fatal cases of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) observed from May 2002 to May 2003 in a single Oklahoma feed yard. Postmortem lung samples were used for agent identification and histopathology. Late in the study, 94 skin samples (ear notches) were tested for Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Bovine respiratory disease morbidity was 14.7%, and the mortality rate of all causes was 1.3%, with more than half (53.8%) attributed to BRD (0.7% total of all causes). The agents isolated were the following: Mannheimia haemolytica (25.0%), Pasteurella multocida (24.5%), Histophilus somni (10.0%), Arcanobacterium pyogenes (35.0%), Salmonella spp. (0.5%), and Mycoplasma spp. (71.4%). Viruses recovered by cell culture were BVDV-1a noncytopathic (NCP; 2.7%), BVDV-1a cytopathic (CP) vaccine strain (1.8%), BVDV-1b NCP (2.7%), BVDV-2a NCP (3.2%), BVDV-2b CP (0.5%), and Bovine herpesvirus 1 (2.3%). Gel-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were 4.6% positive for Bovine respiratory syncytial virus and 10.8% positive for Bovine coronavirus. Bovine viral diarrhea virus IHC testing was positive in 5.3% of the animals. The mean values were determined for the treatment data: fatal disease onset (32.65 days), treatment interval (29.15 days), number of antibiotic treatments (2.65), number of different antibiotics (1.89), and day of death (61.81 days). Lesions included the following: 1) duration: acute (21%), subacute (15%), chronic (40.2%), healing (2.8%), normal (18.1%), and autolyzed (2.8%); 2) type of pneumonia: lobar bronchopneumonia (LBP; 27.1%), LBP with pleuritis (49.1%), interstitial pneumonia (5.1%), bronchointerstitial pneumonia (1.4%), septic (0.9%), embolic foci (0.5%), other (2.8%), normal (10.3%), and autolyzed (2.8%); and 3) bronchiolar lesions: bronchiolitis obliterans (39.7%), bronchiolar necrosis (26.6%), bronchiolitis obliterans/bronchiolar necrosis (1.4%), other bronchiolar lesions (6.5%), and bronchiolar lesion

  14. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method.

  15. Comparative antibiotic eradication of mycoplasma infections from continuous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2002-02-01

    Accumulating data implicate mycoplasma contamination as the single biggest problem in the culture of continuous cell lines. Mycoplasma infection can affect virtually every parameter and functional activity of the eukaryotic cells. A successful alternative to discarding infected cultures is to attempt to eliminate the contaminants by treatment with specific and efficient antimycoplasma antibiotics. The addition of antibiotics to the culture medium during a limited period of time (1-3 wk) is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating continuous cell lines. Here, we examined the effectiveness of several antibiotic treatment protocols that we have employed routinely in our cell lines bank. On an aggregate, 673 cultures from 236 chronically mycoplasma-positive cell lines were exposed to one of the following five antibiotic regimens: mycoplasma removal agent (quinolone; a 1-wk treatment), enrofloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), sparfloxacin (quinolone; 1 wk), ciprofloxacin (quinolone; 2 wk), and BM-Cyclin (alternating tiamulin and minocycline; 3 wk). The mycoplasma infection was permanently (as determined by three solid mycoplasma detection assays) eliminated by the various antibiotics in 66-85% of the cultures treated. Mycoplasma resistance was seen in 7-21%, and loss of the culture as a result of cytotoxically caused cell death occurred in 3-11% of the cultures treated. Overall, 223 of the 236 mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured in a first round of antibiotic treatment with at least one regimen. Taken together, 95% of the mycoplasma-infected cell lines were permanently cleansed of the contaminants by antibiotic treatment, which validates this approach as an efficient and technically simple mycoplasma eradication method. PMID:11929000

  16. Hemotropic mycoplasmas in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemotropic mycoplasmas are epicellular erythrocytic bacteria that can cause infectious anemia in some mammalian species. Worldwide, hemotropic mycoplasmas are emerging or re-emerging zoonotic pathogens potentially causing serious and significant health problems in wildlife. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with and without Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destrucans, the causative agent of white nose syndrome (WNS) that causes significant mortality events in bats. Methods In order to establish the prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma species in a population of 68 little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with (n = 53) and without (n = 15) white-nose syndrome (WNS), PCR was performed targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Results The overall prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasmas in bats was 47%, with similar (p = 0.5725) prevalence between bats with WNS (49%) and without WNS (40%). 16S rDNA sequence analysis (~1,200 bp) supports the presence of a novel hemotropic Mycoplasma species with 91.75% sequence homology with Mycoplasma haemomuris. No differences were found in gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals. Conclusions Gene sequences generated from WNS and non-WNS animals suggest that little brown bats could serve as a natural reservoir for this potentially novel Mycoplasma species. Currently, there is minimal information about the prevalence, host-specificity, or the route of transmission of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. among bats. Finally, the potential role of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. as co-factors in the development of disease manifestations in bats, including WNS in Myotis lucifugus, remains to be elucidated. PMID:24655520

  17. Atypical mycoplasmas from sheep in Great Britain and Australia identified as Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Leach, R H; Cottew, G S; Andrews, B E; Powell, D G

    1976-05-01

    Representative strains of "lacy-colony" mycoplasmas isolated from sheep in Great Britain and Victoria (Australia) were classified as M ovipneumoniae following comparison with strain Y98 of this species. The taxonomic description of M ovipneumoniae is extended and Y98 is proposed as the type strain. A brief description is given of the isolation of M ovipneumoniae from sheep in East Anglia.

  18. Mycoplasma Contamination Revisited: Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Harboring Mycoplasma hyorhinis Potently Inhibit Lymphocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Wang, Meng-Yu; Gaustad, Peter; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Rolstad, Bent; Vaage, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have important immunomodulatory effects that can be exploited in the clinical setting, e.g. in patients suffering from graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In an experimental animal model, cultures of rat T lymphocytes were stimulated in vitro either with the mitogen Concanavalin A or with irradiated allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions, the latter to simulate allo-immunogenic activation of transplanted T cells in vivo. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of rat bone marrow-derived MSC subsequently found to be infected with a common mycoplasma species (Mycoplasma hyorhinis) on T cell activation in vitro and experimental graft-versus-host disease in vivo. Principal Findings We found that M. hyorhinis infection increased the anti-proliferative effect of MSC dramatically, as measured by both radiometric and fluorimetric methods. Inhibition could not be explained solely by the well-known ability of mycoplasmas to degrade tritiated thymidine, but likely was the result of rapid dissemination of M. hyorhinis in the lymphocyte culture. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potent inhibitory effect exerted by M. hyorhinis in standard lymphocyte proliferation assays in vitro. MSC are efficient vectors of mycoplasma infection, emphasizing the importance of monitoring cell cultures for contamination. PMID:21264307

  19. Emergence of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate highly resistant to telithromycin and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Faccone, Diego; Andres, Patricia; Galas, Marcelo; Tokumoto, Marta; Rosato, Adriana; Corso, Alejandra

    2005-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major pathogen causing community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis. Macrolides, fluoroquinolones (FQs), and, recently, telithromycin (TEL) constitute primary therapeutic options, and rare cases of resistance have been reported. In this report, we describe the emergence of an S. pneumoniae clinical isolate with high-level TEL resistance (MIC, 256 microg/ml) and simultaneous resistance to FQs. Ongoing studies are oriented to elucidate the precise mechanism of resistance to TEL.

  20. Use of tylvalosin in the control of porcine enzootic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pallarés, F. J.; Lasa, C.; Roozen, M.; Ramis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of tylvalosin (Aivlosin Water Soluble Granules, ECO Animal Health) in drinking water for control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M hyo) on a farm with chronic enzootic pneumonia (EP) problems and high prevalence of mycoplasma-like lesions at slaughter. Design On a 4000-sow farm in the southeast of Spain, 1500 animals of same age were randomly divided into two groups: 900 pigs in the treated group (TG) and 600 pigs in the non-treated control group (CG). TG was medicated for seven days with tylvalosin in drinking water (2.5 mg tylvalosin/kg bodyweight (BW)) at weaning (from 21st to 28th day of life) and a second treatment when moved to finisher barn (from 63rd to 70th day of life). Results In the TG, there was a significant reduction in the severity (P<0.001) and number of animals with lung lesions (P<0.001) compared with CG. TG had an increased average daily gain and decreased average number of days in finishing. TG had a lower average carcase weight, but improved homogeneity. M hyo was not detected by q-PCR in samples, taken from lungs with characteristic EP lesions in the TG (0/9), in contrast to the CG (8/9 positive). Conclusions A strategic medication with Aivlosin at 2.5 mg tylvalosin/kg BW in drinking water for seven days at weaning and when moved to finisher barn significantly reduces mycoplasma-like lung lesions and improves productivity parameters. PMID:26392896

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  3. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by Air Sampling with a Nested PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stärk, Katharina D. C.; Nicolet, Jacques; Frey, Joachim

    1998-01-01

    This article describes the first successful detection of airborne Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae under experimental and field conditions with a new nested PCR assay. Air was sampled with polyethersulfone membranes (pore size, 0.2 μm) mounted in filter holders. Filters were processed by dissolution and direct extraction of DNA for PCR analysis. For the PCR, two nested pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed by using an M. hyopneumoniae-specific DNA sequence of a repeated gene segment. A nested PCR assay was developed and used to analyze samples collected in eight pig houses where respiratory problems had been common. Air was also sampled from a mycoplasma-free herd. The nested PCR was highly specific and 104 times as sensitive as a one-step PCR. Under field conditions, the sampling system was able to detect airborne M. hyopneumoniae on 80% of farms where acute respiratory disease was present. No airborne M. hyopneumoniae was detected on infected farms without acute cases. The chance of successful detection was increased if air was sampled at several locations within a room and at a lower air humidity. PMID:9464391

  4. [Features of morbidity community-acquired pneumonia among young recruits].

    PubMed

    Serdukov, D U; Gordienko, A V; Kozlov, M S; Mikhailov, A A; Davydov, P A

    2015-10-01

    Were examined 3338 military personnel of the combined training center. 183 of them diagnosed community-acquired pneumonia, in 3155 focal and infiltrative changes in lung tissue were not identified. The analisys of prevalence been made among young recruits of the acute respiratory illness before arriving in part and at the assembly point, foci of chronic infection, smoking, low body weight. 511 military personnel arrived at the training center in the disease state with symptoms of acute respiratory illness. Examined the relationship these risk factor to the development of community-acquired pneumonia in this category of servicemen. PMID:26827502

  5. Use of gallium scanning in predicting resolution of Legionnaires' pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriano, L.J.; Mandel, P.R.; Cordaro, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    The value of Ga-67 scanning to detect acute infectious lung disease has been described. We present a patient who apparently improved both clinically and radiographically after acute Legionnaires' pneumonia. Five months later a relapse developed. During his relapse the pulmonary uptake of Ga-67 and the appearance of chest x-rays were disparate. We suggest that pulmonary Ga-67 uptake may be a more sensitive indicator of the resolution of pneumonia than is chest radiography. Therapeutic success may be assumed when pulmonary Ga-67 uptake is absent.

  6. Validation of a mycoplasma molecular diagnostic test and distribution of mycoplasma species in bovine milk among New York State dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Gioia, G; Werner, B; Nydam, D V; Moroni, P

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma mastitis is a contagious and costly disease of dairy cattle that significantly affects animal health and milk productivity. Mycoplasma bovis is the most prevalent and invasive agent of mycoplasma mastitis in dairy cattle, and early detection is critical. Other mycoplasma have been isolated from milk; however, the role and prevalence of these species as mastitis pathogens are poorly understood. Routine screening of milk for mycoplasma by bacteriological culture is an important component of a farm control strategy to minimize a herd mycoplasma outbreak, but phenotypic methods have limited ability to speciate mycoplasma, affecting how farms and practitioners can understand the role and effect of species other than M. bovis in herd health. Fastidious mycoplasma culture can be lengthy and inconclusive, resulting in delayed or false negative reports. We developed and validated a multitarget PCR assay that can in the same day confirm or reject a presumptive positive mycoplasma culture found upon bacteriological testing of clinical specimens, further discriminate between Acholeplasma and Mycoplasma, and identify M. bovis. Coupled with sequence analysis isolates can be further identified as bovine mycoplasma Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma alkalescens, Mycoplasma canadense, Mycoplasma bovirhinis, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Mycoplasma californicum, Acholeplasma laidlawii, and Acholeplasma oculi. Assay validation included analysis of 845 mycoplasma representing these species and 30 additional bacterial species obtained from routine milk submissions to the Quality Milk Production Services from New York State farms and veterinary clinics between January 2012 and December 2015. Among 95 herds, we found 8 different Mycoplasma species and 3 different Acholeplasma species, with an overall prevalence of M. bovirhinis of 1%, A. oculi of 2%, M. arginini of 2%, M. californicum of 3%, M. canadense of 10%, M. bovigenitalium of 10%, A. laidlawii of 11%, M. alkalescens of 17

  7. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison.

    PubMed

    Register, Karen B; Thole, Luke; Rosenbush, Ricardo F; Minion, F Chris

    2015-01-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex. Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necrotic pharyngitis, pneumonia, dystocia and abortion. Whether isolates from cattle and bison comprise genetically distinct populations is unknown. This study describes the development of a highly discriminatory multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) method for M. bovis and its use to investigate the population structure of the bacterium. Genome sequences from six M. bovis isolates were used for selection of gene targets. Seven of 44 housekeeping genes initially evaluated were selected as targets on the basis of sequence variability and distribution within the genome. For each gene target sequence, four to seven alleles could be distinguished that collectively define 32 sequence types (STs) from a collection of 94 cattle isolates and 42 bison isolates. A phylogeny based on concatenated target gene sequences of each isolate revealed that bison isolates are genetically distinct from strains that infect cattle, suggesting recent disease outbreaks in bison may be due to the emergence of unique genetic variants. No correlation was found between ST and disease presentation or geographic origin. MLST data reported here were used to populate a newly created and publicly available, curated database to which researchers can contribute. The MLST scheme and database provide novel tools for exploring the population structure of M. bovis and tracking the evolution and spread of strains.

  8. [Influenza outbreak in weaners with involvement of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Christine; Wöchtl, Bettina; Spergser, Joachim; Brunthaler, Rene; Untersperger, Matthias; Lillie-Jaschniski, Kathrin; Dürrwald, Ralf; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel

    2016-08-17

    In a closed farrow-to-finish piglet producing farm 80% of 7-week-old piglets displayed respiratory disease with a 5% mortality rate. In addition to purulent bronchopneumonia in combination with interstitial pneumonia predominantly in the apical and middle lobes, fibrinous serositis was present in the thoracic and abdominal cavities. Further investigations succeeded in confirming the non-pandemic strain of porcine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) subtype H1avN1. The molecular genetic studies on Mycoplasma (M.) hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus were negative, whereas M. hyorhinis and Haemophilus parasuis were isolated from serous membranes. The possible importance of the underrated M. hyorhinis as a cofactor for viral infections should be emphasized and we demonstrated that the cause of apical lobe pneumonia is not restricted to M. hyopneumoniae. Mother pigs had been vaccinated with an influenza vaccine covering the subtype H1avN1. Only 33% of the examined piglets had maternal antibodies in the 7th week of life. The difficulty of prophylaxis of infections by FLUAVsw in weaners due to lack of vaccine authorization for piglets before their 56th day is reflected by this observation. PMID:27273027

  9. Prevalence of mycoplasma antibodies in lesser prairie-chicken sera.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Christian A; Crupper, Scott S; Applegate, Roger D; Robel, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Serologic testing by the serum plate agglutination (SPA) procedure was performed to detect the presence of cross-reacting antibodies to Mycoplasma meleagridis, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum in lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) trapped over a 2-yr period in Finney and Kearny counties of southwestern Kansas. Sera examined from birds (n = 50) obtained in March-April 2000 tested positive for M meleagridis, M. synoviae, and M. gallisepticum at levels of 6%, 10%, and 10%, respectively, for the population examined. Mycoplasma meleagridis antibodies were detected in 3 samples (2.7%), M. synoviae antibodies in 2 samples (1.7%), and M. gallisepticum antibodies in 3 samples (2.7%) from birds (n = 112) collected in March-April 2001. Data obtained by SPA can result in false positives and should be verified by additional procedures such as the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Low amounts of sera prohibited this additional testing. Thus, the positive SPA results should be considered presumptive for the presence of Mycoplasma antibodies. Although Mycoplasma antibodies have been detected in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from Kingman and Butler counties in Kansas, this report is the first of possible mycoplasmosis in Finney and Kearny counties, Kansas. All birds testing positive by this procedure should be considered as potential carriers of Mycoplasma and should not be used in relocation efforts.

  10. Pneumonia caused by Aeromonas species in Taiwan, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tsai, H Y; Wu, C J; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with pneumonia caused by Aeromonas species. Patients with pneumonia caused by Aeromonas species during the period 2004 to 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 84 patients with pneumonia due to Aeromonas species, possible Aeromonas pneumonia was diagnosed in 58 patients, probable Aeromonas pneumonia was diagnosed in 18 patients, and pneumonia due to Aeromonas was conclusively diagnosed in 8 patients. Most of the cases of Aeromonas pneumonia developed in men and in patients of advanced age. A. hydrophila (n = 50, 59.5 %) was the most common pathogen, followed by A. caviae (n = 24, 28.6 %), A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 7, 8.3 %), and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 3, 3.6 %). Cancer (n = 37, 44.0 %) was the most common underlying disease, followed by diabetes mellitus (n = 27, 32.1 %). Drowning-associated pneumonia developed in 6 (7.1 %) patients. Of 47 patients who were admitted to the intensive care ward, 42 patients developed acute respiratory failure and 24 of those patients died. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was significantly associated with liver cirrhosis, cancer, initial presentation of shock, and usage of mechanical ventilation. In conclusion, Aeromonas species should be considered as one of the causative pathogens of severe pneumonia, especially in immunocompromised patients, and should be recognized as a cause of drowning-associated pneumonia. Cirrhosis, cancer, and shock as the initial presenting symptom are associated with poor outcome.

  11. [THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF MODERN METHODS OF MICROBIOLOGICAL VERIFICATION OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN CLINICAL PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Mavzyutova, G A; Kuzovkina, O Z; Mirsayapova, I A

    2015-12-01

    The study was carried out to determine etiological structure and informativeness of different methods of detection of agents of community-acquired pneumonia, the sampling included 274 examined patients aged from 16 to 80 years with community-acquired pneumonia of different degree of severity and being under hospital treatment. Besides of standard laboratory and clinical methods of examination ofpatients with community-acquired pneumonia special techniques of etiological verification were applied: molecular genetic analysis (polymerase chain reaction) of phlegm, qualitative detection of antigen Legionella pneumophila of serogroup 1 and antigen Streptococcus pneumoniae in samples of urine using quick immune chromatographic test, detection of level of serum specific immunoglobulines class M and G to Chlamidophilia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pListeria monocytogenes in dynamics using immunoenzyme technique. The etiological structure of community-acquired pneumonia was established based of study results. The analysis of informativeness of different methods of etiological verification of diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia demonstrated that combination ofpolymerase chain reaction and serological method is the optimal one. PMID:27032250

  12. [THE DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF MODERN METHODS OF MICROBIOLOGICAL VERIFICATION OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN CLINICAL PRACTICE].

    PubMed

    Mavzyutova, G A; Kuzovkina, O Z; Mirsayapova, I A

    2015-12-01

    The study was carried out to determine etiological structure and informativeness of different methods of detection of agents of community-acquired pneumonia, the sampling included 274 examined patients aged from 16 to 80 years with community-acquired pneumonia of different degree of severity and being under hospital treatment. Besides of standard laboratory and clinical methods of examination ofpatients with community-acquired pneumonia special techniques of etiological verification were applied: molecular genetic analysis (polymerase chain reaction) of phlegm, qualitative detection of antigen Legionella pneumophila of serogroup 1 and antigen Streptococcus pneumoniae in samples of urine using quick immune chromatographic test, detection of level of serum specific immunoglobulines class M and G to Chlamidophilia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pListeria monocytogenes in dynamics using immunoenzyme technique. The etiological structure of community-acquired pneumonia was established based of study results. The analysis of informativeness of different methods of etiological verification of diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia demonstrated that combination ofpolymerase chain reaction and serological method is the optimal one.

  13. [Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Vivero, F; Ciocchini, C; Gandini, M J; Wehbe, L

    2012-03-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is part of Pulmonary Eosinophilic Syndroms. It is presented a 33-years old man, Asmathic, with dry cough, fever, night sweats and fatigue of several weeks. The chest X-ray showed opacity in the right hemithorax. He was treated with antibiotics without response. A chest TC showed multifocal involvement. The patient refused bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) so treatment antituberculostatic was started. Despite treatment the symptoms worsened. The Chest X-ray showed migration of the infiltrates and the blood smear marked eosinophilia. Finally, bronchoalveolar lavage was carried out and it showed a high percentage of eosinophils (over 50%). The patient was treated with inmmunosuppresive doses of corticosteroids with excellent response. The blood smear in Nonresolving pneumonia is key to consider eosinophilic pneumonia, an uncommon pathology but amenable to treatment.

  14. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  15. Pneumonia in adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 69. Mandell LA. Streptococcus pneumoniae infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer ...

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Prina, Elena; Ranzani, Otavio T; Torres, Antoni

    2015-09-12

    Community-acquired pneumonia causes great mortality and morbidity and high costs worldwide. Empirical selection of antibiotic treatment is the cornerstone of management of patients with pneumonia. To reduce the misuse of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, and side-effects, an empirical, effective, and individualised antibiotic treatment is needed. Follow-up after the start of antibiotic treatment is also important, and management should include early shifts to oral antibiotics, stewardship according to the microbiological results, and short-duration antibiotic treatment that accounts for the clinical stability criteria. New approaches for fast clinical (lung ultrasound) and microbiological (molecular biology) diagnoses are promising. Community-acquired pneumonia is associated with early and late mortality and increased rates of cardiovascular events. Studies are needed that focus on the long-term management of pneumonia.

  17. [Decontamination of continual cell lines spontaneously infected with mycoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Machatková, M; Jurmanová, K; Snejdar, V

    1986-07-01

    The continual cell lines of bovine kidneys MDBK and AUBEK, and porcine kidneys RPD and IBRS, spontaneously infected with Mycoplasma arginini and Acholeplasma laidlawii, were decontaminated by the method of selective elimination. Two elimination procedures were modified to be used for the decontamination: one based on the reduction of infection by the light treatment of the cultures, the other based on the selection of mycoplasma-free cell population through cell clonation. On the basis of a long-continued control of the cell clones a methodical procedure of the preparation of mycoplasma-free cell lines was worked out. PMID:3090766

  18. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Children

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M.; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Self, Wesley H.; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D.; Kaufman, Robert A.; Kan, J. Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R.; Haynes, Lia M.; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. incidence estimates of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates with radiographic confirmation and current laboratory diagnostics are needed. Methods We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children <18 years in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization and severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection by multiple modalities. Chest radiographs were independently reviewed by study radiologists. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations, overall and by age and pathogen. Results From January 2010-June 2012, we enrolled 2638 (69%) of 3803 eligible children; 2358 (89%) had radiographic pneumonia. Median age was 2 years (interquartile range 1-6); 497 (21%) children required intensive care, and three (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a viral and/or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%); ≥1 virus in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and bacterial-viral co-detection in 155 (7%). Annual pneumonia incidence was 15.7/10,000 children [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-16.5], with highest rates among children <2 years [62.2/10,000 (CI 57.6-67.1)]. Respiratory syncytial virus (37% vs. 8%), adenovirus (15% vs. 3%), and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%) were more commonly detected in children <5 years compared with older children; Mycoplasma pneumoniae (19% vs. 3%) was more common in children ≥5 years. Conclusions Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia hospitalization burden was highest among the very young, with respiratory viruses most commonly detected. PMID:25714161

  19. Lung VITAL: Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of an ancillary study evaluating the effects of vitamin D and/or marine omega-3 fatty acid supplements on acute exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease, asthma control, pneumonia and lung function in adults.

    PubMed

    Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Manson, JoAnn E; Buring, Julie E; Lee, I-Min; Gordon, David; Walter, Joseph; Friedenberg, Georgina; Hankinson, John L; Copeland, Trisha; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory and observational research studies suggest that vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids may reduce risk for pneumonia, acute exacerbations of respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) or asthma, and decline of lung function, but prevention trials with adequate dosing, adequate power, and adequate time to follow-up are lacking. The ongoing Lung VITAL study is taking advantage of a large clinical trial-the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL)--to conduct the first major evaluation of the influences of vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on pneumonia risk, respiratory exacerbation episodes, asthma control and lung function in adults. VITAL is a 5-year U.S.-wide randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial trial of supplementation with vitamin D3 ([cholecalciferol], 2000 IU/day) and marine omega-3 FA (Omacor® fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]+docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], 1g/day) for primary prevention of CVD and cancer among men and women, at baseline aged ≥50 and ≥55, respectively, with 5107 African Americans. In a subset of 1973 participants from 11 urban U.S. centers, lung function is measured before and two years after randomization. Yearly follow-up questionnaires assess incident pneumonia in the entire randomized population, and exacerbations of respiratory disease, asthma control and dyspnea in a subpopulation of 4314 randomized participants enriched, as shown in presentation of baseline characteristics, for respiratory disease, respiratory symptoms, and history of cigarette smoking. Self-reported pneumonia hospitalization will be confirmed by medical record review, and exacerbations will be confirmed by Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services data review.

  20. Mycoplasma biofilms ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Warren L; Dybvig, Kevin

    2009-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that are encased in polymeric matrixes and grow attached to biotic or abiotic surfaces. Despite their enhanced ability to resist antimicrobials and components of the immune system in vitro, few studies have addressed the interactions of biofilms with the host at the organ level. Although mycoplasmas have been shown to form biofilms on glass and plastic surfaces, it has not been determined whether they form biofilms on the tracheal epithelium. We developed a tracheal organ-mounting system that allowed the entire surface of the tracheal lumen to be scanned using fluorescence microscopy. We observed the biofilms formed by the murine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis on the epithelium of trachea in tracheal organ culture and in experimentally infected mice and found similar structure and biological characteristics as biofilms formed in vitro. This tracheal organ-mounting system can be used to study interactions between biofilms formed by respiratory pathogens and the host epithelium and to identify the factors that contribute to biofilm formation in vivo.