Science.gov

Sample records for acute myelogenous leukemias

  1. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Acute myelogenous leukemia and glycogen storage disease 1b.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Maury; Burzynski, Jeffrey; Yhap, Margaret; Fraser, Robert B; Cummings, Brian; Ste-Marie, Micheline

    2002-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease 1b (GSD 1b) is caused by a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and the intracellular accumulation of glycogen. The disease presents with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, as well as neutropenia causing increased susceptibility to pyogenic infections. We present a case of a young woman with GSD 1b who developed acute myelogenous leukemia while on long-term granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy. The presence of two rare diseases in a single patient raises suspicion that GSD 1b and acute myelogenous leukemia are linked. Surveillance for acute myelogenous leukemia should become part of the long-term follow-up for GSD 1b.

  4. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  8. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  11. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Vancomycin-resistant Aureobacterium species cellulitis and bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Arnold, K E; Sweat, H; Winton, E F; Funke, G

    1996-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with acute myelogenous leukemia and concomitant porphyria cutanea tarda was admitted to the hospital for consolidation chemotherapy of his leukemia. During his hospitalization, he developed cellulitis of the left hand and persistent bacteremia with a yellow-pigmented, nonfermenting coryneform bacterium that was identified as Aureobacterium sp. The portal of entry for the Aureobacterium infection was probably through the skin lesions due to porphyria cutanea tarda. The infection developed while the patient was receiving vancomycin prophylaxis, and the vancomycin MIC for the isolate was 32 micrograms/ml. PMID:8818896

  15. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  17. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  18. Fatal Breakthrough Mucormycosis in an Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patient while on Posaconazole Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Seon; Bae, Myoung Nam; Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kwan Yong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole is a new oral triazole with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Posaconazole has also shown a significant advantage of preventing invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole or itraconazole in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Indeed, posaconazole has been commonly used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing remission induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We experienced a case of fatal mucormycosis despite posaconazole prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal breakthrough mucormycosis in a patient receiving posaconazole prophylaxis during remission induction chemotherapy in Korea. This case demonstrated that breakthrough fungal infection can occurs in patients receiving posaconazole prophylaxis because of its limited activity against some mucorales.

  19. Giardiasis in a patient undergoing chemotherapy for retinoblastoma and acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Sakaki-Nakatsubo, Hisano; Taneichi, Hiromichi; Nomura, Keiko; Miyawaki, Toshio; Tokoro, Masaharu; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2013-08-01

    Giardiasis is a common cause of diarrhea in undeveloped countries, but is very rare in developed countries. A patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and retinoblastoma presented with a high fever and severe watery diarrhea during induction chemotherapy. On microscopy, cysts were seen in her stool, suggesting Giardia intestinalis, which was confirmed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). G. intestinalis was also detected in the patient's asymptomatic parents, who may have transmitted it to the patient. Giardiasis should be tested for in patients with severe and persistent diarrhea during chemotherapy, when other etiologies have been excluded. PCR used to amplify the DNA of G. intestinalis is rapid and sensitive.

  20. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  1. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  4. Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) inactivates C/EBPalpha and causes acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; He, Yiping; Wouters, Bas J.; Shestova, Olga; Xu, Lanwei; Sai, Hong; Rodriguez, Carlos G.; Maillard, Ivan; Tobias, John W.; Valk, Peter; Carroll, Martin; Aster, Jon C.; Delwel, Ruud; Pear, Warren S.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Tribbles homolog 2 (Trib2) was identified as a down-regulated transcript in leukemic cells undergoing growth arrest. To investigate the effects of Trib2 in hematopoietic progenitors, mice were reconstituted with hematopoietic stem cells retrovirally expressing Trib2. Trib2-transduced bone marrow cells exhibited a growth advantage ex vivo and readily established factor-dependent cell lines. In vivo, Trib2-reconstituted mice uniformly developed fatal transplantable acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In mechanistic studies, we found that Trib2 associated with and inhibited C/EBPα. Furthermore, Trib2 expression was elevated in a subset of human AML patient samples. Together, our data identify Trib2 as an oncogene that induces AML through a mechanism involving inactivation of C/EBPα. PMID:17097562

  5. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  6. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E; Klepin, Heidi D

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥ 4 versus ≤ 1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18-84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15-3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML.

  7. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15–3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML. PMID:25127690

  8. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy.

  9. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  10. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Identification of ins(8;21) with AML1/ETO fusion in acute myelogenous leukemia M2 by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Mateo, M S; Martínez, P; Contra, T; Benítez, J

    2002-02-01

    A high percentage of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) of the M2 subtype show a rearrangement between the AML1 and ETO genes. The detection of the AML1/ETO fusion has clinical relevance because patients with this subtype have a good prognosis. We present the results of conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia French-American-British M2 classification, who had a complex karyotype involving chromosomes 8 and 21. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the AML1/ETO probe demonstrated a recombination of both genes on an add(8) chromosome. The use of other FISH probes (CEP8, c-myc and TEL21) and spectral karyotyping indicated that AML1/ETO fusion occurred as a consequence of a previously undescribed ins(8;21)(q22;q22.1q22.3).

  12. Antineoplastic effects and mechanisms of micheliolide in acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui-er; Song, He-nan; Yang, Ming; Liu, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Zi-xiang; Li, Ying-hui; Gao, Ying-dai

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) greatly contribute to the initiation, relapse, and multidrug resistance of leukemia. Current therapies targeting the cell cycle and rapidly growing leukemic cells, including conventional chemotherapy, have little effect due to the self-renewal and differentiated malignant cells replenishment ability of LSCs despite their scarce supply in the bone marrow. Micheliolide (MCL) is a natural guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone (GSL) which was discovered in michelia compressa and michelia champaca plants, and has been shown to exert selective cytotoxic effects on CD34+CD38− LSCs. In this study, we demonstrate that DMAMCL significantly prolongs the lifespan of a mouse model of human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Mechanistic investigations further revealed that MCL exerted its cytotoxic effects via inhibition of NF-κB expression and activity, and by generating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying MCL-induced cytotoxicity of LSCs, and support further preclinical investigations of MCL-related therapies for the treatment of AML. PMID:27542251

  13. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  14. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  15. Conditioning with targeted busulfan for autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in an XYY male.

    PubMed

    Sada, Eriko; Henzan, Hideho; Ohtani, Ryoko; Takase, Ken; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Fukuda, Takahiro; Nagafuji, Koji; Yamauchi, Keita; Takamatsu, Yasushi; Inaba, Shoichi; Harada, Mine

    2005-01-01

    We report herein a 19-year-old Japanese male with XYY syndrome who developed acute myelogenous leukemia. During three courses of cytotoxic chemotherapy, he suffered repeated hepatic and renal insufficiencies, possibly related to latent dysfunction from the XYY syndrome. The patient was treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor combined with etoposide, cytarabine, and busulfan (the latter adjusted to a targeting dose) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. He had no severe regimen-related toxicities and is now free of leukemia.

  16. MLN4924 induces Noxa upregulation in acute myelogenous leukemia and synergizes with Bcl-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Knorr, K L B; Schneider, P A; Meng, X W; Dai, H; Smith, B D; Hess, A D; Karp, J E; Kaufmann, S H

    2015-12-01

    MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an inhibitor of the Nedd8 activating enzyme (NAE), has exhibited promising clinical activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Here we demonstrate that MLN4924 induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and clinical samples via a mechanism distinct from those observed in other malignancies. Inactivation of E3 cullin ring ligases (CRLs) through NAE inhibition causes accumulation of the CRL substrate c-Myc, which transactivates the PMAIP1 gene encoding Noxa, leading to increased Noxa protein, Bax and Bak activation, and subsequent apoptotic changes. Importantly, c-Myc knockdown diminishes Noxa induction; and Noxa siRNA diminishes MLN4924-induced killing. Because Noxa also neutralizes Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 paralog often upregulated in resistant AML, further experiments have examined the effect of combining MLN4924 with BH3 mimetics that target other anti-apoptotic proteins. In combination with ABT-199 or ABT-263 (navitoclax), MLN4924 exerts a synergistic cytotoxic effect. Collectively, these results provide new insight into MLN4924-induced engagement of the apoptotic machinery that could help guide further exploration of MLN4924 for AML.

  17. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; P<0.01). On the other hand, inhibition of Leo1 reverses PRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  18. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  19. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  20. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mielógena crónica About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  1. Elevated calpain activity in acute myelogenous leukemia correlates with decreased calpastatin expression

    PubMed Central

    Niapour, M; Farr, C; Minden, M; Berger, S A

    2012-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular cysteine proteases that have crucial roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Elevated calpain activity has been associated with many pathological states. Calpain inhibition can be protective or lethal depending on the context. Previous work has shown that c-myc transformation regulates calpain activity by suppressing calpastatin, the endogenous negative regulator of calpain. Here, we have investigated calpain activity in primary acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blast cells. Calpain activity was heterogeneous and greatly elevated over a wide range in AML blast cells, with no correlation to FAB classification. Activity was particularly elevated in the CD34+CD38− enriched fraction compared with the CD34+CD38+ fraction. Treatment of the cells with the specific calpain inhibitor, PD150606, induced significant apoptosis in AML blast cells but not in normal equivalent cells. Sensitivity to calpain inhibition correlated with calpain activity and preferentially targeted CD34+CD38− cells. There was no correlation between calpain activity and p-ERK levels, suggesting the ras pathway may not be a major contributor to calpain activity in AML. A significant negative correlation existed between calpain activity and calpastatin, suggesting calpastatin is the major regulator of activity in these cells. Analysis of previously published microarray data from a variety of AML patients demonstrated a significant negative correlation between calpastatin and c-myc expression. Patients who achieved a complete remission had significantly lower calpain activity than those who had no response to treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate elevated calpain activity in AML, anti-leukemic activity of calpain inhibition and prognostic potential of calpain activity measurement. PMID:22829235

  2. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  3. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. An unusual translocation t(5;21) (q13;q22) in a case of acute myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bellam, S.P.; da Costa, M.; Gogineni, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a disease often characterized by consistant chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells. When specific abnormalities are detected, a specific disease classification can be established. Often, however, disease presentation is confusing and aberrations are unusual. We report a case presenting with anemia and leukocytosis. Cytological markers were mixed lymphoid/myeloid; however, the majority of markers supported a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis with Q and G banding revealed an unusual t(5;21) translocation. Whole chromosome five-specific (Cambio, England) and whole chromosome 21-specific (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD) painting probes confirmed the involvement of each chromosome and established the breakpoints at band 5q13 and band 21q22. It is very rare for chromosome 5 to be in translocation with chromosome 21 and this appears to be the first time it has been reported with these two breakpoints. Although the translocation is unique, the breakpoints are common in AML: The 5q13 is associated with multiple classifications and the 21q22 is the same breakpoint in the t(8;21), the hallmark of the M2 classification. Thus, molecular cytogenetic techniques were able to support a diagnosis of AML.

  5. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body’s immune system. Methods and Findings The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. [Induction and maintenance treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in adults by sequential use of combination chemotherapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fülle, H H

    1977-04-15

    The therapeutic regimens for acute myelogenous leukemia in 2 different periods of time will be described with comparison of their results. A. 28 adults were treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine only. Thereby, 28% complete and 16% partial remissions were achieved. The mean duration of the complete remissions was 23 weeks. The mean survival time of the patients with complete remission amounted to 53 weeks B. 46% complete and 12% partial remissions were obtained in 37 patients treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine doubling the dosage of the above mentioned regimen followed by 3 cycles of TRAP (and COAP). Using a maintenance therapy with modified TRAP, COAP, and POMP cycles the complete remissions lasted 47 weeks at an average. The mean survival time of patients with complete remission was 87 weeks after start of treatment.

  8. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  9. CD34⁺/CD38⁻ acute myelogenous leukemia cells aberrantly express Aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Nishioka, Chie; Nobumoto, Atsuya; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-12-01

    We previously showed that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is aberrantly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells when compared to bone marrow mononuclear cells isolated from healthy volunteers. We have also shown that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, one of compartments enriched for leukemia stem cells in most leukemia subgroups, were relatively resistant to cytarabine-mediated growth inhibition when compared to their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts. Our study attempted to identify therapeutic targets in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells and found that CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells isolated from patients (n = 26) expressed larger amounts of AURKA than their CD34(+) /CD38(+) counterparts and CD34(+) normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells isolated from healthy volunteers (n = 6), as measured by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Blockade of AURKA by the specific inhibitor MLN8237 or a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AURKA significantly inhibited proliferation, impaired self-renewal capability and induced apoptosis of CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells, in association with modulation of levels of Bcl-2 family member proteins. Importantly, inhibition of AURKA in CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells by MLN8237 or an shRNA significantly impaired engraftment of these cells in severely immunocompromised mice and appeared to prolong their survival. These results suggest that AURKA is a promising molecular target to eliminate chemotherapy-resistant CD34(+) /CD38(-) AML cells.

  10. High frequency of clonal immunoglobulin or T cell receptor gene rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia expressing terminal deoxyribonucleotidyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Ig and T cell receptor rearrangements have been used as irreversible markers of lineage and clonality in the study of B- and T-lymphoid populations. We have addressed the issue of lymphoid lineage specificity of these rearrangements by analyzing a panel of 25 TdT- acute myelogenous leukemias, 13 TdT+ AMLs, and 4 TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. We report that while gene rearrangements represent extremely rare events in classical TdT- AML (less than 8%), rearrangements of either the Ig or T beta locus or both were detectable in the majority of the TdT+ AMLs (greater than 60%), and rearrangements of both loci were detectable in all of the TdT+ undifferentiated leukemias. These data demonstrate a significant association between TdT expression and Ig or T beta gene rearrangements even outside the lymphoid lineage, further supporting a role for TdT in Ig and T cell receptor gene assembly. These data also indicate that a coordinated program of lymphoid gene expression involving TdT-CD7-expression and Ig/T beta rearrangements can be activated before myeloid commitment. Whether the activation of this program represents a normal, albeit rare, event in early myelopoiesis or a transformation-related event present only in leukemic cells remains to be determined. PMID:3473183

  11. An orally bioavailable parthenolide analog selectively eradicates acute myelogenous leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Monica L.; Rossi, Randall M.; Neelakantan, Sundar; Li, Xiaojie; Corbett, Cheryl A.; Hassane, Duane C.; Becker, Michael W.; Bennett, John M.; Sullivan, Edmund; Lachowicz, Joshua L.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Matthews, William; Carroll, Martin; Liesveld, Jane L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of acute leukemia and likely contribute to both disease initiation and relapse. Therefore, identification of agents that target LSCs is an important consideration for the development of new therapies. To this end, we have previously demonstrated that the naturally occurring compound parthenolide (PTL) can induce death of human LSCs in vitro while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. However, PTL has relatively poor pharmacologic properties that limit its potential clinical use. Consequently, we generated a family of PTL analogs designed to improve solubility and bioavailability. These studies identified an analog, dimethylamino-parthenolide (DMAPT), which induces rapid death of primary human LSCs from both myeloid and lymphoid leukemias, and is also highly cytotoxic to bulk leukemic cell populations. Molecular studies indicate the prevalent activities of DMAPT include induction of oxidative stress responses, inhibition of NF-κB, and activation of p53. The compound has approximately 70% oral bioavailability, and pharmacologic studies using both mouse xenograft models and spontaneous acute canine leukemias demonstrate in vivo bioactivity as determined by functional assays and multiple biomarkers. Therefore, based on the collective preclinical data, we propose that the novel compound DMAPT has the potential to target human LSCs in vivo. PMID:17804695

  12. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  13. Efficacy and Biological Correlates of Response in a Phase II Study of Venetoclax Monotherapy in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Konopleva, Marina; Pollyea, Daniel A; Potluri, Jalaja; Chyla, Brenda; Hogdal, Leah; Busman, Todd; McKeegan, Evelyn; Salem, Ahmed Hamed; Zhu, Ming; Ricker, Justin L; Blum, William; DiNardo, Courtney D; Kadia, Tapan; Dunbar, Martin; Kirby, Rachel; Falotico, Nancy; Leverson, Joel; Humerickhouse, Rod; Mabry, Mack; Stone, Richard; Kantarjian, Hagop; Letai, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    We present a phase II, single-arm study evaluating 800 mg daily venetoclax, a highly selective, oral small-molecule B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (BCL2) inhibitor in patients with high-risk relapsed/refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or unfit for intensive chemotherapy. Responses were evaluated following revised International Working Group (IWG) criteria. The overall response rate was 19%; an additional 19% of patients demonstrated antileukemic activity not meeting IWG criteria (partial bone marrow response and incomplete hematologic recovery). Twelve (38%) patients had isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutations, of whom 4 (33%) achieved complete response or complete response with incomplete blood count recovery. Six (19%) patients had BCL2-sensitive protein index at screening, which correlated with time on study. BH3 profiling was consistent with on-target BCL2 inhibition and identified potential resistance mechanisms. Common adverse events included nausea, diarrhea and vomiting (all grades), and febrile neutropenia and hypokalemia (grade 3/4). Venetoclax demonstrated activity and acceptable tolerability in patients with AML and adverse features.

  14. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2–M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:27563575

  15. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  16. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  17. Identification of fungal pathogens in a patient with acute myelogenic leukemia using a pathogen detection array technology

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sagarika; Peck, Kristen N.; Feldman, Michael D.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Alwine, James C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasive zygomycosis in immunocompromised patients results in a high mortality rate, and early identification is crucial to optimize therapy and to reduce morbidity. However, diagnosing specific species of zygomycetes fungi possess challenge in the clinical laboratories. A need for a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for early recognition of a zygomycetes fungus in clinical samples to the species level will lead to prompt and accurate therapy and the PathoChip provides one such platform. We utilized a pathogen array technology referred to as PathoChip, comprised of oligonucleotide probes that can detect all the sequenced viruses as well as known pathogenic bacteria, fungi and parasites and family-specific conserved probes, thus providing a means for detecting previously uncharacterized members of a family. We rapidly identified a zygomycetous fungus, Rhizomucor pusillus, an otherwise challenge for the clinical laboratories, predominantly in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This report highlights the value of PathoChip as a diagnostic tool to identify micro-organisms to the species level, especially for those difficult to identify in most clinical laboratories. It will also help clinicians to obtain a critical snapshot of the infection profile of a patient to plan treatment strategies. PMID:26619325

  18. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  19. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2017-03-01

    Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:840-850.

  20. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients Aged ≥70 Years.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Karamjeet S; Brunstein, Claudio; DeFor, Todd; Bejanyan, Nelli; Arora, Mukta; Warlick, Erica; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ustun, Celalettin

    2016-02-01

    The maximum age of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) has been moving up over time. However, the availability of a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor may limit access of this patient population to alloHCT. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) after reduced-intensity conditioning regimens in patients aged ≥70 years with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) between 2010 and 2014. During this period 70 patients with AML/MDS were referred to our center for alloHCT consideration. Twenty-two patients (33%) received alloHCT: 10 UCBT, 9 HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation, 2 haploidentical alloHCT, and 1 unrelated donor alloHCT. In UCBT, cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality and relapse were 20% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day +100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years was 10%. Seven patients had viral reactivation/infections. Rates of overall survival and disease-free survival were 60% and 50% at 2 years, respectively. Moreover, these outcomes seemed to be similar to that of patients aged 60 to 69 years receiving UCBT (n = 60) and patients aged ≥70 years receiving HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 9). These results suggest that UCBT is feasible in selected AML/MDS patients aged ≥70 years. In fact, UCBT shortens the required time for an unrelated donor search and thus increases the chance of proceeding with alloHCT, which might contribute to higher rates of alloHCT in the referral group. Outcomes of UCBT are promising; however, larger studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  2. Age and Modified European LeukemiaNet Classification to Predict Transplant Outcomes: An Integrated Approach for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oran, Betül; Jimenez, Antonio M; De Lima, Marcos; Popat, Uday R; Bassett, Roland; Andersson, Borje S; Borthakur, Gautam; Bashir, Qaiser; Chen, Julianne; Ciurea, Stefan O; Jabbour, Elias; Cortes, Jorge; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa F; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Ravandi, Farhad; Rondon, Gabriela; Lu, Xinyan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the prognostic significance of a modified European LeukemiaNet (ELN) classification for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) while in first complete remission (CR1). We analyzed 464 AML patients with matched related (n = 211, 45.5%), matched unrelated (n = 176, 37.9%), and mismatched donors (n = 77, 16.6%). Patients were classified into 4 modified ELN risk groups (favorable, intermediate-I, intermediate-II, and adverse) separately for 354 patients age < 60 years and 110 patients age ≥ 60 years. In this modified version of ELN classification, patients with normal cytogenetic were classified by FLT3-ITD mutational status: favorable risk if FLT3-ITDwild and intermediate-I if FLT3-ITDmut. The best outcomes occurred in the ELN favorable and intermediate-II groups in younger AML patients and in the favorable and intermediate-I groups in older AML patients. Older AML patients had worse transplant outcomes within each modified ELN risk group except intermediate-I when compared with younger patients; leukemia-free survival at 3 years was 67.8% versus 49.8% in favorable, 53.4% versus 50.7% in intermediate-I, 65.7% versus 20.2% in intermediate-II, and 44.6% versus 23.8% in adverse group younger and older patients, respectively. Among lesion-specific abnormalities, del5q/-5 and abnl(17p) had the worse transplant outcomes, with 3-year leukemia-free survival rates of 18.4% and 20% in younger CR1 patients. In conclusion, the modified ELN prognostic classification developed for chemotherapy outcomes also identifies prognostic groups for HSCT, which is useful for a selection of patients for post-transplant strategies to improve outcomes.

  3. WP1066 disrupts Janus kinase-2 and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Van, Quin; Koch, Patricia; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Wang, Yongtao; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Priebe, Waldemar; Estrov, Zeev

    2007-12-01

    Several cytokines and growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells transduce their signals by activating the transcription factor Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2). Accordingly, the inhibition of JAK2 or of its downstream signaling pathways suppresses the proliferation of AML cells. Because (E)-3(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-((S0-1-phenylethyl)acrylamide) (WP1066) is a novel analogue of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, we tested its activity in AML cells and investigated its mechanism of action. Using clonogenic assays, we found that although WP1066 had a marginal effect on normal marrow progenitors, it inhibited the proliferation of AML colony-forming cells obtained from patients with newly diagnosed AML and that of the AML cell lines OCIM2 and K562. WP1066 inhibited OCIM2 cell multiplication by inducing accumulation of cells at the G(0)-G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Similar to its parent compound AG490, WP1066 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2, but unlike AG490, WP1066 also degraded JAK2 protein, thereby blocking its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathways. These effects resulted in the activation of the caspase pathway. Incubation of both OCIM2 and K562 cells with WP1066 activated caspase-3, induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caused caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Thus, WP1066 is a potent JAK2 inhibitor whose effects in AML and other hematologic malignancies merit further investigation.

  4. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts.

  5. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  9. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemical exposure. Exposure to certain chemicals, such as benzene, is linked to greater risk of AML. Smoking. AML is linked to cigarette smoke, which contains benzene and other known cancer-causing chemicals. Other blood ...

  11. [Changes of ADAMTS13 activity and vWF antigen level in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and their significance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; Han, Yue; Ma, Zhen-Ni; Wang, Qian; Tang, Ya-Qiong; Wang, Jie; Su, Jian; Sun, Ai-Ning; Wang, Zhao-Yue; Ruan, Chang-Geng; Wu, De-Pei

    2014-12-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the changes of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) activity and vWF antigen level in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) before and after treatment and evaluate their clinical significance. Seventy-three AML patients were enrolled in this study, the sodium citrate anticoagulated plasma was collected before and after their induction chemotherapy. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer substrate vWF73 (FRETS-vWF73) assay was established to detect the plasma ADAMTS13 activity while vWF antigen level was measured by ELISA. The results showed that the ADAMTS13 activity in newly diagnosed patients with AML before induction therapy was obviously lower than that in normal controls (63.3 ± 25.5)% vs (105.1 ± 37.7)(P < 0.01), while the vWF antigen level was higher than that in normal controls (226.6 ± 127.0)% vs (111.4 ± 39.7)% (P < 0.01). After standard induction chemotherapy, the ADAMTS13 activity of AML patients in complete remission period was higher than that in AML patients before therapy (P < 0.01), and was not significant difference with that in normal controls; the vWF antigen was significantly lower than that in AML patients before therapy (P < 0.01), but it still was higher than that in controls (P < 0.05). The ADAMTS13 activity in newly diagnosed AML patients complicated with infection before therapy was obviously lower than that in AML patients without infection (52.2 ± 20.6)% vs (73.9 ± 24.7)% (P < 0.01), while the vWF antigen level was significantly higher than that in AML patients without infection (262.2 ± 135.7)% vs (193.8 ± 110.2)% (P < 0.05). The ADAMTS13 activity in AML patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) was significantly lower than that in AML patients without DIC (42.0 ± 14.5)% vs (73.4 ± 22.7)% (P < 0.01), while the vWF antigen level was obviously higher that in AML patients without DIC (274.2 ± 140.0)% vs (204.7 ± 115.5)% (P < 0.01). It is concluded

  12. c-myc amplification in a preleukemia patient with trisomy 4 and double minutes: review of the unique coexistence of these two chromosome abnormalities in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K S; Sulcova, V

    1997-06-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow from a woman with preleukemia showed an aberrant clone with trisomy 4, double minutes, and a translocation t(8;9)(q21;q34). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated that the double minutes were c-myc amplifications. A review of six cases in the literature and the present case with trisomy 4 and double minutes showed a preponderance of females and that the patients were mostly elderly. The acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in these patients was either FAB subtype M2 or M4. In two out of seven cases, the double minutes were c-myc amplicons. The patients responded to treatment and there was karyotypic normalization during remission. There was no strong evidence of exposure to genotoxic agents.

  13. Acute myelogenous leukemia associated with extreme symptomatic thrombocytosis and chromosome 3q translocation: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Aviv, Hana; Howard, Leslie M; Padberg, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Acute leukemias with thrombocytosis have been recently linked with structural abnormalities of the short arm of chromosome 3. A 46-year-old man with a 2-month history of recurrent transient ischemic attacks and abdominal pain developed an ischemic left foot and a gangrenous toe as his initial symptoms. Platelet count was 3.5 x 10(6)/microL, and despite plateletpheresis, the patient required left-leg amputation. Pathologic examination was remarkable for arterial thrombosis in the absence of atherosclerotic lesions. A diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia with a novel translocation between chromosomes 3q21, 16, and 7 was made. Induction therapy was unsuccessful, and the patient died of overwhelming sepsis within 5 weeks of diagnosis. The striking features of this case were extreme symptomatic thrombocytosis, peripheral gangrene without atherosclerosis, and a novel three-way chromosomal translocation involving chromosome 3q21.

  14. Classification of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML M2 and AML M3) using Momentum Back Propagation from Watershed Distance Transform Segmented Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, Esti; Wiharto; Palgunadi, Sarngadi; Nurcahya Pradana, TP

    2017-01-01

    This study uses image processing to analyze white blood cell with leukemia indicated that includes the identification, analysis of shapes and sizes, as well as white blood cell count indicated the symptoms of leukemia. A case study in this research was blood cells, from the type of leukemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), M2 and M3 in particular. Image processing operations used for segmentation by utilizing the color conversion from RGB (Red, Green dab Blue) to obtain white blood cell candidates. Furthermore, the white blood cells candidates are separated by other cells with active contour without edge. WBC (White Blood Cell) results still have intersected or overlap condition. Watershed distance transform method can separate overlap of WBC. Furthermore, the separation of the nucleus from the cytoplasm using the HSI (Hue Saturation Intensity). The further characteristic extraction process is done by calculating the area WBC, WBC edge, roundness, the ratio of the nucleus, the mean and standard deviation of pixel intensities. The feature extraction results are used for training and testing in determining the classification of AML: M2 and M3 by using the momentum backpropagation algorithm. The classification process is done by testing the numeric data input from the feature extraction results that have been entered in the database. K-Fold validation is used to divide the amount of training data and to test the classification of AML M2 and M3. The experiment results of eight images trials, the result, was 94.285% per cell accuracy and 75% per image accuracy

  15. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8; 21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated

    SciTech Connect

    Drabkin, H.A.; Diaz, M.; Bradley, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Patterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, the authors constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. The authors isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. The authors used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  16. The pharmacologic basis for the efficacy of high-dose Ara-C and sequential asparaginase in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, R. L.; White, C.

    1988-01-01

    Dose-related effects of ara-C include overcoming a relative transport impediment in human leukemia cells. This result then allows intracellular metabolism and incorporation into DNA to proceed to the maximum extent possible. In addition, the increased synthesis of ara-CDP-choline associated with these high doses may serve as an alternate substrate for phosphatidyl choline synthesis, which may contribute to membrane fragility and cell lysis. HiDAC also serves as a "prodrug" for high concentrations of ara-U, which in turn diminishes ara-C catabolism with a prolonged gamma phase of systemic clearance and also causes cytostasis in S-phase with enhanced anabolism and cytotoxicity of subsequent doses of ara-C. This metabolite/drug interaction could be termed "self-potentiation," a feature which contributes to the overall activity of HiDAC. Asparaginase enhances these effects in a schedule-dependent fashion by lowering the cellular pool size of dCTP and consequent enhanced metabolism of ara-C. The therapeutic benefit of these pharmacologic manipulations has been verified in a randomized clinical trial in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:3163212

  17. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8;21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, H A; Diaz, M; Bradley, C M; Le Beau, M M; Rowley, J D; Patterson, D

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, we constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. We isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. We used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  18. t(8;21) (q22;q22) acute myelogenous leukemia in Mexico: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Morales-Toquero, Amelia; Manzano, Carlos; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Jaramillo, Patricia; Gonzalez-Carrillo, Martha L; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia

    2006-08-01

    We analyze the prevalence and clinical features of a group of patients with t(8;21) (q22;q22) acute myeloblastic leukemia, identified in a single institution in México over a 10-year period. Fifteen patients presented at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla from February 1995 to August 2005; only nine were treated and followed in the institution. Median age was 24 years, (range 7-49); there was only one male. According to the French-American-British (FAB) morphological classification of leukemia, the morphology was M2 in four cases, M4 in three cases, M3 in one case and M0 in one. In addition to the myeloid markers, lymphoid markers were identified in 6 patients. Patients were induced to remission with combined chemotherapy and three subsequently underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The median overall and disease-free survival has not been reached, being above 3390 days, the probability of survival at this time was 73%. In this single-center experience in México, we found that the t(8;21) (q22;q22) variant of leukemia was more frequent than in Caucasian populations, that the co-expression of lymphoid markers in the blast cells is very frequent and that this malignancy is associated with a relatively good prognosis.

  19. Are Results of Targeted Gene Sequencing Ready to Be Used for Clinical Decision Making for Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Arati V.; Smith, B. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in the US, which despite recent advances, continues to have a high mortality rate. It is a biologically active disease characterized by numerous cytogenetic abnormalities and multiple genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing will perhaps not reveal all the factors that make AML a complex disease, but does have the potential to impact the diagnosis and risk-stratification of AML patients and allow for more personalized therapy. AML cells are easy to access from the patient and samples are only minimally contaminated with normal cells, which makes it an attractive cancer to study. Several studies have now demonstrated that the majority of AML patients are cytogenetically normal and the genome of these patients may contain fewer mutations than cancer genomes that are highly aneuploidy, suggesting that mutations in diploid genomes are more likely to be pathogenetically relevant. Whole-genome, exome, transcriptome, and targeted gene sequencing studies have been conducted successfully in AML and have provided us with valuable information. The challenges for the future include: reducing the cost of sequencing, understanding epigenetic changes, managing data across various platforms, separating the driver mutations from the sea of passenger mutations and finally, educating future generations to allow a better understanding and easy availability of these complex methodologies. PMID:23595294

  20. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. A phase 2 study of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in poor-risk and elderly patients with previously untreated acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lancet, Jeffrey E; Gojo, Ivana; Gotlib, Jason; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline; Liesveld, Jane L; Bruzek, Laura M; Morris, Lawrence; Park, Youn; Adjei, Alex A; Kaufmann, Scott H; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Peter L; Wright, John J; Karp, Judith E

    2007-02-15

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are poor due to both disease and host-related factors. In this phase 2 study, we tested the oral farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in 158 older adults with previously untreated, poor-risk AML. The median age was 74 years, and a majority of patients had antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 22 patients (14%); partial remission or hematologic improvement occurred in 15 patients, for an overall response rate of 23%. The median duration of CR was 7.3 months and the median survival of complete responders was 18 months. Adverse karyotype, age 75 years or older, and poor performance status correlated negatively with survival. Early death in the absence of progressive disease was rare, and drug-related nonhematologic serious adverse events were observed in 74 patients (47%). Inhibition of farnesylation of the surrogate protein HDJ-2 occurred in the large majority of marrow samples tested. Baseline levels of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT did not correlate with clinical response. Tipifarnib is active and well tolerated in older adults with poor-risk AML and may impart a survival advantage in those patients who experience a clinical response.

  2. A role for BMP-induced homeobox gene MIXL1 in acute myelogenous leukemia and identification of type I BMP receptor as a potential target for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Aaron; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong; Wei, Ciamaio; Guindani, Michele; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; St. John, Lisa S.; Molldrem, Jeff; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-01-01

    Mesoderm Inducer in Xenopus Like1 (MIXL1), a paired-type homeobox transcription factor induced by TGF-β family of ligands is required for early embryonic specification of mesoderm and endoderm. Retrovirally transduced Mixl1 is reported to induce acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with a high penetrance. But the mechanistic underpinnings of MIXL1 mediated leukemogenesis are unknown. Here, we establish the protooncogene c-REL to be a transcriptional target of MIXL1 by genome wide chromatin immune precipitation. Accordingly, expression of c-REL and its downstream targets BCL2L1 and BCL2A2 are elevated in MIXL1 expressing cells. Notably, MIXL1 regulates c-REL through a zinc finger binding motif, potentially by a MIXL1–Zinc finger protein transcriptional complex. Furthermore, MIXL1 expression is detected in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) AML samples in a pattern mutually exclusive from that of HOXA9, CDX2 and HLX suggesting the existence of a core, yet distinct HOX transcriptional program. Finally, we demonstrate MIXL1 to be induced by BMP4 and not TGF-β in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Consequently, MIXL1 expressing AML cells are preferentially sensitive to the BMPR1 kinase inhibitor LDN-193189. These findings support the existence of a novel MIXL1-c REL mediated survival axis in AML that can be targeted by BMPR1 inhibitors. (MIXL1- human gene, Mixl1- mouse ortholog, MIXL1- protein) PMID:25544748

  3. Epidemiology, outcomes, and risk factors of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia after induction chemotherapy☆,☆☆,★,★★

    PubMed Central

    Neofytos, Dionissios; Lu, Kit; Hatfield-Seung, Amy; Blackford, Amanda; Marr, Kieren A.; Treadway, Suzanne; Ostrander, Darin; Nussenblatt, Veronique; Karp, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This is a retrospective, single-center study of adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who received intensive induction timed sequential chemotherapy from 1/2005 to 6/2010. Among 254 consecutive AML patients, 123 (48.4%) developed an invasive fungal infection (IFI): 14 (5.5%) patients with invasive candidiasis (IC) and 108 (42.5%) patients with invasive mould infections (IMI). Among 108 IMI identified, 4 (3.7%) were proven, 1 (0.9%) probable, and 103 (95.4%) were possible, using current definitions. Overall, 6-month mortality was 23.7% (27/114) and 20.6% (26/126) for patients with and without an IFI, respectively. Older age (≥50 years; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.5, P < 0.001), female gender (HR: 1.7, P = 0.006), and baseline renal and/or liver dysfunction (HR: 2.4, P < 0.001) were the strongest mortality predictors. We report relatively low rates of IC despite lack of routine primary antifungal prophylaxis, albeit associated with poor long-term survival. High rates of IMI, the vast majority with a possible diagnosis, were observed. Host-related variables (demographics and baseline organ dysfunction) were identified as the most significant risk factors for IFI and mortality predictors in this series. PMID:23142166

  4. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vener, Tatiana I.; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gore, Steven D.; Morris, Lawrence E.; Feldman, Eric J.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E.; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Roboz, Gail R.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Wright, John J.; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771. PMID:22001391

  5. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Judith E; Vener, Tatiana I; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K; Smith, B Douglas; Gore, Steven D; Morris, Lawrence E; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline M; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Roboz, Gail R; Gocke, Christopher D; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H; Wright, John J; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-05

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771.

  6. Immunotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Powles, R. L.; Crowther, D.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; McElwain, T. J.; Russell, J.; Lister, T. A.; Whitehouse, J. M. A.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Pike, M.; Alexander, P.; Fairley, G. Hamilton

    1973-01-01

    One hundred and seven untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were admitted to St Bartholomew's Hospital between 10 October 1970 and 31 January 1973. Before receiving drugs to induce remission they were allocated alternatively into 2 groups to decide their remission treatment—a group to receive chemotherapy alone and a group to receive the same chemotherapy with immunotherapy. The patients were then given induction chemotherapy and 45 of them attained complete remission. All patients in remission then received chemotherapy consisting of 5 days treatment every 28 days. Patients receiving immunotherapy were also given multiple weekly intradermal injections of irradiated stored AML cells and Glaxo B.C.G. using a Heaf gun. There were 19 patients in the group which received only chemotherapy during remission; 7 of these patients remain alive (median survival after attaining remission 303 days) and only 5 are still in their first remission (median remission length 188 days). Twenty-three patients were allocated to receive immunotherapy during remission in addition to chemotherapy and 16 remain alive (median 545 days) and 8 are in their first remission (median 312 days). The difference in survival of the two groups is significant with a P value of 0·003. PMID:4271320

  7. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  9. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse <12 months, including refractory patients), FLT3-ITD-positive status and high-risk cytogenetics were the three strongest independent adverse prognostic factors for OS and EFS in this series. We then defined three subgroups with striking different outcomes at 2 years: no adverse factor (favourable, N=36): OS 58%, EFS 45%; one adverse factor (intermediate, N=54): OS 37%, EFS 31%; two or three adverse factors (poor, N=43): OS 12%, EFS 12% (P<10(-4), P=0.001). This new simplified Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  10. Mapping of four distinct BCR-related loci to chromosome region 22q11: order of BCR loci relative to chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Croce, C.M.; Huebner, K.; Isobe, M.; Fainstain, E.; Lifshitz, B.; Shtivelman, E.; Canaani, E.

    1987-10-01

    A probe derived from the 3' region of the BCR gene (breakpoint cluster region gene) detects four distinct loci in the human genome. One of the loci corresponds to the complete BCR gene, whereas the other contain a 3' segment of the gene. After HindIII cleavage of human DNA, these four loci are detected as 23-, 19-, 13-, and 9-kikobase-pair fragments, designated BCR4, BCR3, BCR2, and BCR1, respectively, with BCR1 deriving from the original complete BCR gene. All four BCR loci segregate 100% concordantly with human chromosome 22 in a rodent-human somatic cell hybrid panel and are located at chromosome region 22q11.2 by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The BCR2 and BCR4 loci are amplified in leukemia cell line K562 cells, indicating that they fall within the amplification unit that includes immunoglobulin lambda light chain locus (IGL) and ABL locus on the K562 Philadelphia chromosome (Ph/sup 1/). Similarly, in mouse-human hybrids retaining a Ph/sup 1/ chromosome derived from an acute lymphoblastic leukemia-in the absence of the 9q/sup +/ and 22, only BCR2 and BCR4 loci are retained. Thus, the order of loci on chromosome 22 is centromere ..-->.. BCR2, BCR4, and IGL ..-->.. BCR1 ..-->.. BCR3 ..-->.. SIS, possibly eliminating BCR2 and BCR4 loci as candidate targets for juxtaposition to the ABL gene in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia Ph/sup 1/ chromosome.

  11. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Subsequent primary malignancies and acute myelogenous leukemia transformation among myelodysplastic syndrome patients treated with or without lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Rollison, Dana E; Shain, Kenneth H; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Hampras, Shalaka S; Fulp, William; Fisher, Kate; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Lancet, Jeffrey; Xu, Qiang; Olesnyckyj, Martha; Kenvin, Laurie; Knight, Robert; Dalton, William; List, Alan; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-07-01

    The few studies that have examined rates of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation in lenalidomide-treated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have been limited to deletion 5q MDS. The association between lenalidomide and subsequent primary malignancies (SPMs) in MDS patients has not been evaluated previously. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of both SPM and AML in association with lenalidomide. A cohort of MDS patients (n = 1248) treated between 2004 and 2012 at Moffitt Cancer Center were identified, and incident cases of SPM and AML transformation were ascertained. Using a nested case-control design, MDS controls were 1:1 matched to SPM (n = 41) and AML (n = 150) cases, on age and date of MDS diagnosis, gender, follow-up time, IPSS, and del (5q). Associations between lenalidomide and (1) SPM incidence and (2) AML transformation were estimated with hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the cohort and odds ratios (OR) in the case-control analysis. SPM incidence did not differ significantly between cohort MDS patients treated with (0.7 per 100 person-years) or without lenalidomide (1.4 per 100 person-years) (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.40-2.74), whereas a significantly reduced SPM risk was observed in the case-control sample (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = <0.01-0.63). Lenalidomide was not associated with AML transformation in the cohort analysis (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.44-1.27) or in the case-control analyses (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.52-2.56), after adjustment for potential confounders. Lenalidomide was not associated with increased risk of SPM or AML transformation in a large cohort of MDS patients mostly including nondeletion 5q MDS.

  13. Modification of sphingolipid metabolism by tamoxifen and N-desmethyltamoxifen in acute myelogenous leukemia--Impact on enzyme activity and response to cytotoxics.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F; Loughran, Thomas P; Barth, Brian M; Fox, Todd E; Cabot, Myles C

    2015-07-01

    The triphenylethylene antiestrogen, tamoxifen, can be an effective inhibitor of sphingolipid metabolism. This off-target activity makes tamoxifen an interesting ancillary for boosting the apoptosis-inducing properties of ceramide, a sphingolipid with valuable tumor censoring activity. Here we show for the first time that tamoxifen and metabolite, N-desmethyltamoxifen (DMT), block ceramide glycosylation and inhibit ceramide hydrolysis (by acid ceramidase, AC) in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines and in AML cells derived from patients. Tamoxifen (1-10 μM) inhibition of AC in AML cells was accompanied by decreases in AC protein expression. Tamoxifen also depressed expression and activity of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), the enzyme-catalyzing production of mitogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1-P). Results from mass spectroscopy showed that tamoxifen and DMT (i) increased the levels of endogenous C16:0 and C24:1 ceramide molecular species, (ii) nearly totally halted production of respective glucosylceramide (GC) molecular species, (iii) drastically reduced levels of sphingosine (to 9% of control), and (iv) reduced levels of S1-P by 85%, in vincristine-resistant HL-60/VCR cells. The co-administration of tamoxifen with either N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a ceramide-generating retinoid, or a cell-deliverable form of ceramide, C6-ceramide, resulted in marked decreases in HL-60/VCR cell viability that far exceeded single agent potency. Combination treatments resulted in synergistic apoptotic cell death as gauged by increased Annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase-3. These results show the versatility of adjuvant triphenylethylene with ceramide-centric therapies for magnifying therapeutic potential in AML. Such drug regimens could serve as effective strategies, even in the multidrug-resistant setting.

  14. Coexpression of Tim-3 and PD-1 identifies a CD8+ T-cell exhaustion phenotype in mice with disseminated acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E; Veenstra, Rachelle G; Weigel, Brenda J; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Munn, David H; Murphy, William J; Azuma, Miyuki; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-04-28

    Tumor-associated immune suppression can lead to defective T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Here, we identified a unique phenotype of exhausted T cells in mice with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). This phenotype is characterized by the coexpression of Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD8(+) T cells in the liver, the major first site of AML metastases. PD-1 and Tim-3 coexpression increased during AML progression. PD-1(+)Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were deficient in their ability to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 in response to PD-1 ligand (PDL1) and Tim-3 ligand (galectin-9) expressing AML cells. PD-1 knockout (KO), which were partially resistant to AML challenge, up-regulated Tim-3 during AML progression and such Tim-3(+)PD-1- KO CD8(+) T cells had reduced cytokine production. Galectin-9 KO mice were more resistant to AML, which was associated with reduced T-regulatory cell accumulation and a modest induction of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression on CD8(+) T cells. Whereas blocking the PD-1/PDL1 or Tim-3/galectin-9 pathway alone was insufficient to rescue mice from AML lethality, an additive effect was seen in reducing-albeit not eliminating-both tumor burden and lethality when both pathways were blocked. Therefore, combined PD-1/PDL1 and Tim-3/galectin-9 blockade may be beneficial in preventing CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion in patients with hematologic malignancies such as advanced AML.

  15. Modification of sphingolipid metabolism by tamoxifen and N-desmethyltamoxifen in acute myelogenous leukemia – Impact on enzyme activity and response to cytotoxics

    PubMed Central

    Morad, Samy A. F.; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J.; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Barth, Brian M.; Fox, Todd E.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2015-01-01

    The triphenylethylene antiestrogen, tamoxifen, can be an effective inhibitor of sphingolipid metabolism. This off-target activity makes tamoxifen an interesting ancillary for boosting the apoptosis-inducing properties of ceramide, a sphingolipid with valuable tumor censoring activity. Here we show for the first time that tamoxifen and metabolite, N –desmethyltamoxifen (DMT) block ceramide glycosylation and inhibit ceramide hydrolysis (by acid ceramidase, AC) in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines and in AML cells derived from patients. Tamoxifen (1-10 μM) inhibition of AC in AML cells was accompanied by decreases in AC protein expression. Tamoxifen also depressed expression and activity of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), the enzyme catalyzing production of mitogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1-P). Results from mass spectroscopy showed that tamoxifen and DMT, i ) increased the levels of endogenous C16:0- and C24:1 ceramide molecular species, ii) nearly totally halted production of respective glucosylceramide (GC) molecular species, iii ) drastically reduced levels of sphingosine ( to 9% of control), and iv ) reduced levels of S1-P by 85%, in vincristine-resistant HL-60/VCR cells. Co-administration of tamoxifen with either N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a ceramide-generating retinoid, or a cell-deliverable form of ceramide, C6-ceramide, resulted in marked decreases in HL-60/VCR cell viability that far exceeded single agent potency. Combination treatments resulted in synergistic apoptotic cell death as gauged by increased Annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase-3. These results show the versatility of adjuvant triphenylethylene with ceramide-centric therapies for magnifying therapeutic potential in AML. Such drug regimens could serve as effective strategies, even in the multidrug resistant setting. PMID:25769964

  16. Midostaurin, a Novel Protein Kinase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Insights from Human Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion Studies of a BDDCS II Drug.

    PubMed

    He, Handan; Tran, Phi; Gu, Helen; Tedesco, Vivienne; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Wen; Gatlik, Ewa; Klein, Kai; Heimbach, Tycho

    2017-03-07

    The absorption, metabolism and excretion of midostaurin, a potent class III tyrosine protein kinase inhibitor for acute myelogenous leukemia, were evaluated in healthy subjects. A microemulsion formulation was chosen to optimize absorption. After a 50 mg [14C]midostaurin dose, oral absorption was high (> 90%) and relatively rapid. In plasma, the major circulating components were midostaurin (22%), CGP52421 (32.7%), and CGP62221 (27.7%). Long plasma half-lives were observed for midostaurin (20.3 h), CGP52421 (495 h), and CGP62221 (33.4 h). Through careful mass-balance study design, the recovery achieved was good (81.6%), despite the long radioactivity half-lives. Most of the radioactive dose was recovered in feces (77.6%) mainly as metabolites; as only 3.43% was unchanged, suggesting mainly hepatic metabolism. Renal elimination was minor (4%). Midostaurin metabolism pathways involved hydroxylation, O demethylation, amide hydrolysis and N demethylation. High plasma CGP52421 and CGP62221 exposures in humans, along with relatively potent cell-based IC50 for FLT3-ITD inhibition, suggested that the antileukemic activity in AML patients may also be maintained by the metabolites. Very high plasma protein binding (>99%) required equilibrium gel filtration to identify differences between humans and animals. As midostaurin, CGP52421 and CGP62221 are metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 and are inhibitors/inducers for CYP3A, potential drug-drug interactions with mainly CYP3A4 modulators/CYP3A substrates could be expected. Given its low aqueous solubility, high oral absorption and extensive metabolism (> 90%), midostaurin is a BCS/BDDCS class II drug in human, consistent with rat BDDCS in vivo data showing high absorption (>90%) and extensive metabolism (>90%).

  17. Induction chemotherapy with idarubicin plus N4-behenoyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine in acute myelogenous leukemia: a newly designed induction regimen--a prospective, cooperative multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Park, H S; Kim, D W; Kim, C C; Kim, H K; Kim, J S; Hwang, T J; Kim, H J; Kim, H S; Song, H S; Park, J W; Ahn, H S; Chung, T J; Cho, K S; Lee, K S; Choi, Y M

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the results of induction chemotherapy with idarubicin (IDA) plus N4-behenoyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (BH-AC), a newly designed induction regimen, in cases of previously untreated acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The study was conducted by the Multicenter Clinical Study Group of the Korean Biologic Response Modifier Society (KBRMS). From March 1994 through January 1995, 40 patients were treated. The median age was 30 years (range, 15 months to 65 years), with a distribution according to the French-American-British (FAB) classification of one MO, nine MI, 15 M2, six M3, four M4, and five M5 patients. Remission induction therapy consisted of IDA 12 mg/m2 intravenously (i.v.) over 30 minutes daily on days 1 to 3, in combination with BH-AC 300 mg/m2 over 4 hours daily on days 1 to 7 (in patients aged 41 to 65 years, BH-AC dosage was decreased to 200 mg/m2/d). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 30 patients (75%), 22 by the first induction therapy and eight by the second induction therapy. Ten patients (25%) failed to respond to therapy, six due to resistant disease and four due to death caused by aplasia. The time to CR was 30 days, the median granulocytopenic period was 19 days, and the thrombocytopenic period was 24 days. All nonhematologic side effects such as nausea, vomiting, mucositis, skin eruption, liver and cardiac dysfunction, and neurotoxicity, were transient and tolerable. These data indicate an efficacy comparable to that of other combinations of IDA (or other anthracyclines) with cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) for remission induction in AML.

  18. Evidence for a graft-versus-leukemia effect after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning in acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Martino, Rodrigo; Caballero, María Dolores; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Simón, José Antonio Pérez; Canals, Carmen; Solano, Carlos; Urbano-Ispízua, Alvaro; Bargay, Joan; Léon, Angel; Sarrá, Josep; Sanz, Guillermo F; Moraleda, José María; Brunet, Salut; San Miguel, Jesús; Sierra, Jorge

    2002-09-15

    We report the results of a prospective study of a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen followed by allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical sibling in 37 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 17) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 20). The median age was 57 years, and 22 (59%) were beyond the early phase of their disease. The incidence of grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 19% (5% grade III-IV), and the 1-year incidence of chronic extensive GVHD was 46%. With a median follow-up of 297 days (355 days in 24 survivors), the 1-year probability of transplant-related mortality was 5%, and the 1-year progression-free survival was 66%. The 1-year incidence of disease progression in patients with and without GVHD was 13% (95% CI, 4%-34%) and 58% (95% CI, 36%-96%), respectively (P =.008). These results suggest that a graft-versus-leukemia effect plays a crucial role in reducing the risk of relapse after a RIC allograft in AML and MDS.

  19. Beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in acute myelogenous leukemia may be mediated by lipopolysaccharides, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-10-01

    Post-transfusional hepatitis is often a complication in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in whom survival is paradoxically prolonged. The etiology is unknown. In previous studies, we showed that impaired hepatic endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) clearance in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B, or C versus controls results in endotoxemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release. TNF-alpha mediates anti-proliferative and differentiating effects in AML cell lines. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) released in acute viral hepatitis, acts in synergy with TNF-alpha. HL60, KG1, and U937 AML cells treated 3, 6, and 9 days with physiologically attainable TNF-alpha (10 U/ml), IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) and LPS (10 ng/ml) levels, have significantly diminished viability and cell growth versus controls. Treatment of HL60 AML cells with LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma also resulted in significantly increased monocytic pathway differentiation not seen with KG1 or U937 AML cells. HL60 AML cells treated with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma for 6 days released endogenous TNF-alpha (1.57 U/10(6) cells) upon LPS stimulation compared to less than 0.01 U/10(6) cells in non-LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-treated cells or untreated cells (p less than 0.0001). Untreated HL60 AML cells co-cultured with HL60 cells pretreated for 6 days with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma and then subjected to LPS stimulation had significantly diminished cell growth compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). This effect could be reversed with anti-TNF-alpha antibody, supporting the concept that endogenous TNF-alpha release by LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma treated HL60 AML cells may act by paracrine means to suppress growth of other AML cells. The beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in AML patients may be mediated via LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced AML cell growth suppression and/or terminal differentiation in which AML cells participate by releasing TNF-alpha after being acted upon by LPS

  20. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  1. Resveratrol Sensitizes Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Activation of the Extrinsic Apoptotic PathwayS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Alae; Chen, Shuang; Hock, Stefanie; Rosato, Roberto; Dent, Paul; Dai, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) activate the prosurvival nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway by hyperacetylating RelA/p65, whereas the chemopreventive agent resveratrol inhibits NF-κB by activating the class III histone deacetylase Sirt1. Interactions between resveratrol and pan-HDACIs (vorinostat and panobinostat) were examined in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells. Pharmacologically achievable resveratrol concentrations (25–50 μM) synergistically potentiated HDACI lethality in AML cell lines and primary AML blasts. Resveratrol antagonized RelA acetylation and NF-κB activation in HDACI-treated cells. However, short hairpin RNA Sirt1 knockdown failed to modify HDACI sensitivity, which suggests that factors other than or in addition to Sirt1 activation contribute to resveratrol/HDACI interactions. These interactions were associated with death receptor 5 (DR5) up-regulation and caspase-8 activation, whereas cells expressing dominant-negative caspase-8 were substantially protected from resveratrol/HDACI treatment, which suggests a significant functional role for the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in lethality. Exposure to resveratrol with HDACI induced sustained reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was accompanied by increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, as reflected in γH2A.X and comet assays. The free radical scavenger Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride blocked ROS generation, DR5 up-regulation, caspase-8 activation, DNA damage, and apoptosis, which indicates a primary role for oxidative injury in lethality. Analyses of cell-cycle progression and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation through flow cytometry revealed that resveratrol induced S-phase accumulation; this effect was abrogated by HDACI coadministration, which suggests that cells undergoing DNA synthesis may be particularly vulnerable to HDACI lethality. Collectively, these findings indicate that resveratrol interacts synergistically with HDACIs in

  2. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Updated by: Adam S. Levy, MD, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. ...

  3. Severe palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia and aplasia in an adult undergoing re-induction treatment with high-dose cytarabine for acute myelogenous leukemia: a possible drug interaction between posaconazole and cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Alzghari, Saeed K; Seago, Susan E; Cable, Christian T; Herrington, Jon D

    2016-08-16

    High-dose cytarabine is recommended for re-induction chemotherapy in patients less than 60 years of age with acute myelogenous leukemia. This case describes a patient receiving high-dose cytarabine for re-induction and subsequently developed tingling and numbness in her hands and feet followed by severe pain, swelling, and erythema consistent with a diagnosis of palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. Furthermore, the patient's hemoglobin, platelets, and neutrophils did not recover after over 30 days post high-dose cytarabine. The patient was concurrently receiving posaconazole for fungal prophylaxis which was initiated after the induction therapy. We speculate that posaconazole may inhibit the cytarabine efflux through P-glycoprotein inhibition leading to the patient's palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia and subsequent aplasia. Future pharmacokinetic studies need to be conducted to ascertain if posaconazole does influence the pharmacokinetics of cytarabine.

  4. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  7. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  9. Management of Adult Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, D.; Powles, R. L.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; Gauci, C. L.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Malpas, J. S.; Fairley, G. Hamilton; Scott, Ronald Bodley

    1973-01-01

    Consecutive adult patients admitted to St. Bartholomew's Hospital with acute myelogenous leukaemia have been treated with a remission induction drug schedule consisting of daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside. Intermittent five-day courses were used in 72 patients, and a complete remission was obtained in 39 patients (54%). An alternative drug schedule in 22 patients resulted in fewer remissions but this may have been due to age differences in the two groups. Age and initial platelet count were found to be important factors in determining the success of remission induction therapy; the older patients and those with low platelet counts responded less well. A series of 23 patients who achieved remissions was divided into two groups; one received intermittent combination chemotherapy as the only form of maintenance, and the other was given weekly immunotherapy in addition to the chemotherapy. The immunotherapy consisted of irradiated allogeneic leukaemic cells and B.C.G. Eight of the 10 patients on chemotherapy alone have already relapsed compared with five out of 13 patients in the immunotherapy group. It is hoped that these promising initial results with this form of maintenance will be confirmed as more patients enter the maintenance trials. PMID:4513355

  10. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. [Clinical study on regimen cyclophosphamide, Ara-C and topotecan (CAT) in treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Qin, Tie-Jun; Xu, Ze-Feng; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Jian

    2009-10-01

    Up to now, no consensus has been reached on the standard salvage regimen for patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study was purposed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination chemotherapy composing of cyclophosphamide (Cy), cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) and topotecan (CAT regimen) for 37 refractory or relapsed AML patients. The dosing regimen was as follows: Cy 300 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion, every 12 hours on days 1-3, topotecan 1.25 mg/m2 by intravenous continuous infusion over 6 hours daily on days 2 to 6, Ara-C 500 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 days on days 2-6. The results showed that all patients completed one cycle of chemotherapy. 12 patients (32.4%) achieved complete remission (CR), 2 (5.4%) achieved partial remission (PR), and the 23 remaining patients achieved no remission (NR). The overall response rate (RR) was 37.8%. Among 18 relapsed cases, 6 cases had CR (33.3%), 2 cases achieved PR (11.1%), and 10 cases were with NR (55.6%). Among 19 refractory cases, 6 had CR (31.6%), and 13 (68.4%) were with NR. There was no statistically significant difference in RR between refractory and relapsed groups (31.6% and 44.4%, respectively) (p=0.42). Myelosuppression was universal. Mild non-hematologic toxicities were mainly gastrointestinal, as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. The incidence of severe (grade III-IV) non-hematologic toxicity, such as oral mucositis and infection was 37.8% and 86.5% respectively. Only one patient died of severe infection during the observation (within 28 days from start of chemotherapy). The time of median follow-up was 4 (0-33) months, the median overall survival (OS) was 4 (1.8-6.2) months. The median OS for responders was longer than that for non-responders (9 vs 2 months respectively, p=0.00). In conclusion, the CAT regimen of lower dose is well tolerated and has certain anti-leukemia effect, and worthy to be further investigated.

  12. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  13. Results of Phase II Randomized Study of Low-Dose Decitabine with or without Valproic Acid in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Jean Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypomethylating agents have shown activity in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pre-clinical and single-arm trials have suggested that adding histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may synergize the epigenetic modulation of hypomethylating agents and improve treatment results. Study Aim To evaluate the possible benefit of adding valproic acid, an HDAC inhibitor, to decitabine, in the treatment of MDS and AML. Methods Patients with higher risk MDS or with AML and age 60 years or older were eligible. Patients were randomized in a Bayesian response-adaptive design to decitabine 20mg/m2 intravenously (IV) daily for 5 days or to decitabine with valproic acid 50mg/1kg orally daily for 7 days. Courses were repeated every 4 to 6 weeks. A maximum of 150 patients were to be treated. Results A total of 149 patients were treated on study, including 87 patients with MDS and 62 patients with AML. The median age was 69 years (range 20 to 89 years; 42% ≥ 70 years). Overall, 34% of patients achieved CR and 55% had an objective response. The median survival was 11.9 months and the estimated 2-year survival rate was 27%. Outcome was not different with the addition of valproic acid to decitabine versus decitabine alone in relation to CR, overall response, or survival. Subset analyses did not demonstrate a benefit within the MDS or AML categories. Toxicities were higher with the combination, in particular neurotoxicity. Conclusions Adding valproic acid to decitabine was not associated with improved outcome in the treatment of MDS or elderly AML. Future therapies may consider combining hypomethylating agents with better HDAC inhibitors and using different schedules. PMID:25336333

  14. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  15. Comparison of the Effects of the US Clean Air Act and of Smoking Prevention and Cessation Efforts on the Risk of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Felicia; Lioy, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We used 2 approaches based on published information to compare the impacts on leukemia incidence and benzene exposure of the 1990 US Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments and smoking prevention and cessation efforts. Methods. We extrapolated leukemia mortality related to community air pollution levels and to cigarette smoking from data from the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Surgeon General. We also estimated relative decline in total exposures to benzene (a known human leukemogen) owing to the CAA amendments and to smoking prevention and cessation efforts. Results. We estimated that because of the CAA, there will be approximately 300 fewer leukemia deaths in the United States during the period 2000 through 2020. During the closest comparable period (1987–2007), we estimated that decline in cigarette smoking led to 7120 fewer leukemia deaths, of which 1282 to 3702 were attributable to benzene. Similarly, the decline in smoking led to about a tenfold greater decrease in total-population benzene exposure than did the 1990 CAA amendments. Conclusions. Both the CAA and smoking cessation activities contribute to a decrease in leukemia incidence. Smoking cessation activities have had a greater effect in the past. PMID:22021318

  16. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  17. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  20. A BCR-ABL Kinase Activity-Independent Signaling Pathway in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    leukemia (CML), but does not cure mice with BCR-ABL-induced acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), similar to CML lymphoid blast crisis. The inability... leukemia or Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia who develop imatinib (STI571) resistance. Blood. 2002;99:3472-3475. 9. von Bubnoff N, Schneller F...the blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Philadelphia chromosome. N Engl J Med. 2001;344:1038-1042. 11

  1. Cytomegalovirus sinusitis in a child with chronic myelogenous leukemia following bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Ahmad; Sahni, Kiren; Hanna, Christian; Suryadevara, Manika; Goyal, Parul; Cherrick, Irene

    2011-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common opportunistic pathogen. CMV sinusitis has been described in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, but not in other immune compromising conditions. In this report, we describe CMV sinusitis in a child with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) following bone marrow transplantation.

  2. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a.

  5. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  7. beta-Glucuronidase is an optimal normalization control gene for molecular monitoring of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Won; Chen, Qiaofang; Knowles, Daniel M; Cesarman, Ethel; Wang, Y Lynn

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative monitoring of breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson kinase (ABL) transcripts has become indispensable in the clinical care of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because quantity and quality of RNA in clinical samples are highly variable, a suitable internal normalization control is required for accurate BCR-ABL quantification. However, few studies have examined suitability of the control genes using criteria relevant to residual disease testing. In this study, we evaluated a number of control genes with the application of several novel criteria, including control gene performance on serial patient sample testing and in a residual disease model. We also examined expression of the control genes in BCR-ABL-positive K562 cells in response to Gleevec treatment. We found that beta-glucuronidase is the best control gene among those studied. Importantly, ABL, a widely used control gene, generates misleading BCR-ABL changes that potentially affect the clinical management of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

  8. A BCR-ABL Kinase Activity-Independent Signaling Pathway in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    myeloproliferative disease in mice receiving P210 bcr/abl-transduced bone marrow. Blood. 1998;92:3780-3792. 17. Zhang X, Ren R. Bcr-Abl efficiently induces a... myeloproliferative disease and production of excess interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in mice: a novel model for chronic...Xu L, et al. Efficient and rapid induction of a chronic myelogenous leukemia-like myeloproliferative disease in mice receiving P210 bcr/abl-transduced

  9. Inhibition of Rac GTPases in the Therapy of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    reported data and different outcome definitions, we could not perform a meta - analysis and thus, a final judgment about the influence of corticosteroids...myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disease (MPD) characterized by the expression of the p210-BCR/ABL fusion gene [1]. This gene...components downstream of BCR/ABL. During the first year of this award, we reported our progress on the analysis of the role of Rac GTPases in

  10. Response of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients to COAP-splenectomy. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Hester, J P; Waddell, C C; Coltman, C A; Morrison, F S; Stephens, R L; Balcerzak, S P; Baker, L H; Chen, T T

    1984-11-01

    Eighty-seven patients from 18 institutions with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia were registered on a Southwest Oncology Group protocol for multiagent induction and single-agent maintenance chemotherapy, with randomization to an immunotherapy arm. Elective surgical splenectomy was performed for 42 patients at the completion of 3 months of induction therapy. Final analysis of the study revealed statistically significant survival advantages were correlated with age, splenectomy, the absence of hepatic leukemic infiltrate at the time of splenectomy, and race.

  11. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) inhibits Stat5 signaling associated with apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Williams, Ann; Vultur, Adina; List, Alan; Bhalla, Kapil; Smith, David; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a novel, oral, potent, multi-targeted kinase inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and Src family kinases (SFK) and is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Preclinical data indicate that dasatinib is 325-fold more potent than imatinib against cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl, and that dasatinib is active against 18 of 19 Bcr-Abl mutations known to cause imatinib resistance. Phase I clinical data show that dasatinib is well tolerated and highly effective for the treatment of imatinib-resistant/imatinib-intolerant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the molecular mechanism of action of dasatinib is not fully understood. In this study, we confirm that dasatinib inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of SFKs, including Src, Hck, and Lyn, in K562 human CML cells. Significantly, downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) signaling is also blocked by dasatinib as shown by decreases in levels of phosphorylated Stat5 and Stat5 DNA-binding activities. In addition, dasatinib down-regulates expression of Stat5 target genes, including Bcl-x, Mcl-1, and cyclin D1. Consistent with these results, blockade of Stat5 signaling by dasatinib is accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Surprisingly, Stat5 DNA-binding activities are enhanced with increasing cell density, which is associated with resistance to apoptosis by dasatinib. Our findings indicate that inhibition of Stat5 signaling downstream of Bcr-Abl/SFKs contributes to the action of dasatinib, and, conversely, that increasing cell density up-regulates Stat5 activation and confers resistance to dasatinib. Moreover, the level of phosphorylated Stat5 in CML cells represents a mechanistically relevant biomarker for monitoring inhibition of Bcr-Abl signaling by dasatinib in CML patients using convenient immunocytochemical assays.

  12. Mechanisms of Disease Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    SG, Guilhot F, Larson RA, et al. Imatinib compared with interferon and low-dose cytarabine for newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia...plus cytarabine in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia. N Engl J Med. 2003;349:1423-1432. 3. Bhatia R, Holtz M, Niu N, et al. Persistence of

  13. Erythrocyte survival studies in a rat myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Derelanko, M.J.; Meagher, R.C.; Lobue, J.; Khouri, J.A.; Gordon, A.S.

    1982-11-01

    To determine the extent intrinsic erythrocyte defects and/or extrinsic factors were involved in anemia of rats bearing Shay chloroleukemia (SCL), survival of /sup 3/H-DFP labeled erythrocytes was studied in leukemic and nonleukemic hosts. Red blood cells labeled before induction of leukemia, were rapidly lost from the peripheral circulation of SCL rats in terminal stages of disease. However, labeled erythrocytes from terminal SCL animals displayed normal lifespans when transfused into nonleukemic controls. Thus the anemia of this leukemia probably resulted from extrinsic factors associated with the leukemic process. Hemorrhage appeared to be primarily responsible for the anemia of this disease.

  14. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. Heralding Extramedullary Blast Crisis: Horner's Syndrome with Brachial Plexopathy in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sadanand I.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) blast crisis is an ominous clinical event that is challenging to treat. This can develop at extramedullary sites rarely and is defined as the infiltration of blasts outside the bone marrow irrespective of proliferation of blasts within the bone marrow. We aim to report an unusual clinical presentation characterized by Horner's syndrome, ipsilateral arm weakness, and cervical lymphadenopathy as the first signs of extramedullary blast crisis in a CML patient. To the best of our knowledge, the extramedullary locations involving the brachial plexus along with cervicothoracic paraspinal chloroma have not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:28096817

  16. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  17. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  19. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse Presenting With Central Nervous System Blast Crisis and Bilateral Optic Nerve Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Abdel Fattah, Maaly; Al Nounou, Randa M; Chebbo, Wahiba; Dogar, Mohammed Asif

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral, simultaneous optic nerve sheath infiltration as a manifestation of leukemia relapse is very rare. A 45-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia was successfully treated to cytogenetic bone marrow remission 1 year previously and maintained on imatinib. She developed total bilateral blindness with marked, bilateral optic disc edema and evidence of bilateral optic nerve infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology confirmed central nervous system (CNS) blast crisis. She recovered visual acuity of 20/20 in the right eye, and 20/25 in the left eye with salvage systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Our report underscores the importance of timely and aggressive intervention of blast crisis of the CNS and the need for CNS penetrating induction and maintenance therapy.

  20. Induction of differentiation of myelogenous leukemia cells by humulone, a bitter in the hop.

    PubMed

    Honma, Y; Tobe, H; Makishima, M; Yokoyama, A; Okabe-Kado, J

    1998-07-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. VD3 mobilizes calcium stores from bone by inducing the dissolution of bone mineral and matrix. We have recently found that humulone, a bitter in the hop extract for beer brewing, effectively inhibits bone resorption. In this study we examined the effect of humulone on the differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cells. Humulone alone inhibited the growth of monoblastic leukemia U937 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Humulone effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing action of VD3. Other myelomonocytic leukemia cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by humulone. Since humulone is a less-toxic inhibitor of bone resorption, the combination of humulone and VD3 may be useful in differentiation therapy of myelomonocytic leukemia.

  1. Structural Biology Contributions to the Discovery of Drugs to Treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    This case study illustrates how the determination of multiple co-crystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery efforts leading to the design of nilotinib, a newly approved therapy for imatinib-intolerant and - resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from the BCR-Abl onco-protein, which possesses a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although many chronic-phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent, durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail, or lose their response to therapy, often due to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 60 such point mutations have been detected in imatinib-resistant patients. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small molecule Abl inhibitors, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis for resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way this information is used to support drug discovery.

  2. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  3. Del(15q) is a recurrent “minor route” cytogenetic abnormality in the clonal evolution of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, C. Cameron; Abruzzo, Lynne V.; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Apostolidou, Effrosyni; Cortes, Jorge E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Lu, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Del(15q) is known to occur in acute leukemias, but has been described rarely in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We describe five cases of CML associated with del(15q). There were four men and one woman. Bone marrow aspirate smears demonstrated increased blasts in all cases at the time of del(15q) detection, showing accelerated phase in two and myeloid blast phase in three. Conventional cytogenetic analysis showed t(9;22) and del(15q), as well as other inconsistent clonal abnormalities. All patients received imatinib mesylate, four received additional chemotherapy, and two underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). For the three patients who did not receive ASCT, one died, one was in persistent blast phase, and one was in clinical remission with molecular evidence of residual disease, 16, 6, and 34 months after identification of del(15q), respectively. For the two patients who underwent ASCT, one died and one was in clinical remission with molecular evidence of disease, 15 and 64 months after identification of del(15q), respectively. Our findings indicate that del(15q) is a recurrent cytogenetic abnormality that may be seen either at initial presentation of advanced disease or emerge during disease progression. Del(15q) appears to be associated with a poor prognosis in CML. PMID:19480932

  4. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Risk Factors for Acute Leukemia in Children: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Belson, Martin; Kingsley, Beverely; Holmes, Adrianne

    2007-01-01

    Although overall incidence is rare, leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It accounts for 30% of all cancers diagnosed in children younger than 15 years. Within this population, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) occurs approximately five times more frequently than acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and accounts for approximately 78% of all childhood leukemia diagnoses. Epidemiologic studies of acute leukemias in children have examined possible risk factors, including genetic, infectious, and environmental, in an attempt to determine etiology. Only one environmental risk factor (ionizing radiation) has been significantly linked to ALL or AML. Most environmental risk factors have been found to be weakly and inconsistently associated with either form of acute childhood leukemia. Our review focuses on the demographics of childhood leukemia and the risk factors that have been associated with the development of childhood ALL or AML. The environmental risk factors discussed include ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation, hydrocarbons, pesticides, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and illicit drug use. Knowledge of these particular risk factors can be used to support measures to reduce potentially harmful exposures and decrease the risk of disease. We also review genetic and infectious risk factors and other variables, including maternal reproductive history and birth characteristics. PMID:17366834

  7. [Undifferentiated blastic cell crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic tumor in the skin].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Kiyosaki, M; Amaya, H; Nakamaki, T; Hino, K; Tomoyasu, S

    2000-04-01

    A 54-year-old female, who had been treated for 4 years in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was admitted for management of a CML blastic crisis. Blast cells showed strong positive expression of CD7 and HLA-DR, and weakly expressed CD2, CD5 and CD10, as well. The cells were peroxidase negative in peripheral blood and bone marrow. An undifferentiated blastic crisis was diagnosed and she was treated with Interferon-alpha and VP(vincristine 2 mg/week; prednisolone 30 mg/day). A 5-7 mm in diameter tumor in the skin of the anterior right chest appeared one week after VP therapy. The tumor consisted of blasts which were CD13, CD33 and peroxidase positive, unlike the peripheral undifferentiated blasts. This is a rare case of mixed blast crisis with an increase in undifferentiated blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and myeloblastic tumor formation in the skin.

  8. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Emole, Josephine; Talabi, Taiwo; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. PMID:27013862

  9. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  10. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: a multivariate analysis of the associations of patient characteristics and therapy with survival.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, H M; Smith, T L; McCredie, K B; Keating, M J; Walters, R S; Talpaz, M; Hester, J P; Bligham, G; Gehan, E; Freireich, E J

    1985-12-01

    The prognostic importance of patient pretreatment clinical and laboratory features was investigated in a group of 303 patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive benign-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia. Intensive chemotherapy was given to 97 patients, and 78 underwent an early elective splenectomy. The overall median survival time, dated from hospital admission, was 39 months. Patient characteristics associated with shortened survival were age 60 years or older, black race, the presence of hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, symptoms, weight loss, and poor performance status. Adverse blood and bone marrow parameters were anemia, thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia, a high proportion of peripheral blasts plus promyelocytes or of basophils, a high proportion of marrow blasts or basophils, decreased marrow megakaryocytes, and cytogenetic abnormalities in addition to the Philadelphia chromosome. Several of these factors were interrelated. A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the combination blood basophilia, race, additional cytogenetic abnormalities, age and marrow basophilia had the strongest predictive relationship to survival time. This resulted in a model segregating patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, with median survivals of 53, 39, and 25 months, respectively. Another model was derived that did not include the marrow features and identified splenomegaly and platelet counts as adding to the prognosis prediction by blood basophilia, race, and age. Evaluation of the effect of therapy, after adjusting for differences in prognostic characteristics, showed that intensive chemotherapy was associated with survival prolongation among patients at intermediate and high risk of death. We conclude that a combination of pretreatment factors identifies different risk subcategories in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and is helpful in assessing overall prognosis and treatment effect.

  11. Can clues to the molecular defects in chronic myelogenous leukemia come from genetic studies on the Abelson tyrosine kinase in fruit flies?

    PubMed

    Comer, A R; Liebl, E C; Hoffmann, F M

    1995-06-01

    Translocations affecting the structure of the c-abl proto-oncogene are involved in the development or progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Leukemic cells from patients with CML show alterations in adhesive properties that may play a part in the pathology of these diseases. Mutations in the Drosophila Abl homolog are lethal and indicate that Abl may mediate processes involving differential cell adhesion. These observations suggest that Abl may regulate similar adhesive processes in human beings and Drosophila. Genetic analysis of Abl function in Drosophila has identified novel proteins that function in Abl-related processes. Analysis of the functions of these new molecules may provide insight into mechanisms by which oncogenic abl proteins participate in the etiology of CML and ALL.

  12. Discontinuation of Hypomethylating Agent Therapy in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Complete Remission or Partial Response: Retrospective Analysis of Survival after Long-term Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Cabrero, Monica; Jabbour, Elias; Ravandi, Farhad; Bohannan, Zach; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Hypomethylating agents (HMA), such as 5-azacitidine or decitabine, are currently used to treat patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) until treatment failure. However, the outcomes for patients who discontinue therapy after achieving partial response (PR) or complete remission (CR) but before treatment failure have not been reported. We present a series of 16 patients with higher-risk MDS (n=5; 31%) or AML (n=11; 69%) who achieved PR (n=1) or CR (n=15) and stopped HMA therapy while in response in the context of clinical trials. They received a median of 12 courses (range 1–24) and achieved response after a median of 1 course of therapy (1–4). Loss of response after discontinuation of therapy was rapid, with a median progression-free survival of 4 months (95% CI: 2–6). Median overall survival (OS) from the time of therapy discontinuation was 15 months (95% CI: 6–24). Patients who received 12 cycles of therapy or more had significantly better OS (median: 20 months [95% CI: 12–27]) than those who received fewer than 12 cycles (median: 4 months [95% CI: 1–8]) (p= 0.043). Poor-risk cytogenetics were also associated with lower 1-year OS (33% versus 69%; p= 0.046). According to these results and considering the poor prognosis after HMA failure, HMA interruption should be avoided once a sustained response has been achieved. PMID:25828745

  13. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  14. Low risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease and relapse associated with T cell-depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission: results of the blood and marrow transplant clinical trials network protocol 0303.

    PubMed

    Devine, Steven M; Carter, Shelly; Soiffer, Robert J; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Stein, Anthony; Lazarus, Hillard M; Linker, Charles; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Alyea, Edwin P; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn A; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2011-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is most effectively prevented by ex vivo T cell depletion (TCD) of the allograft, but its role in the treatment of patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) remains unclear. We performed a phase 2 single-arm multicenter study to evaluate the role of TCD in AML patients in CR1 or CR2 up to age 65 years. The primary objective was to achieve a disease-free survival (DFS) rate of >75% at 6 months posttransplantation. A total of 44 patients with AML in CR1 (n = 37) or CR2 (n = 7) with a median age of 48.5 years (range, 21-59 years) received myeloablative chemotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (1375 cGy) followed by immunomagnetically selected CD34-enriched, T cell‒depleted allografts from HLA-identical siblings. No pharmacologic GVHD prophylaxis was given. All patients engrafted. The incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV was 22.7%, and the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was 6.8% at 24 months. The relapse rate for patients in CR1 was 17.4% at 36 months. With a median follow-up of 34 months, DFS for all patients was 82% at 6 months, and DFS for patients in CR1 was 72.8% at 12 months and 58% at 36 months. HCT after myeloablative chemoradiotherapy can be performed in a multicenter setting using a uniform method of TCD, resulting in a low risk of extensive chronic GVHD and relapse for patients with AML in CR1.

  15. IRF8 Regulates Acid Ceramidase Expression to Mediate Apoptosis and Suppresses Myelogeneous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaolin; Yang, Dafeng; Zimmerman, Mary; Liu, Feiyan; Yang, Jine; Kannan, Swati; Burchert, Andreas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Ozato, Keiko; Bhalla, Kapil; Liu, Kebin

    2011-01-01

    IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a key transcription factor for myeloid cell differentiation and its expression is frequently lost in hematopoietic cells of human myeloid leukemia patients. IRF8-deficient mice exhibit uncontrolled clonal expansion of undifferentiated myeloid cells that can progress to a fatal blast crisis, thereby resembling human chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML). Therefore, IRF8 is a myeloid leukemia suppressor. While the understanding of IRF8 function in CML has recently improved, the molecular mechanisms underlying IRF8 function in CML is still largely unknown. In this study, we identified acid ceramidase (A-CDase) as a general transcription target of IRF8. We demonstrated that IRF8 expression is regulated by IRF8 promoter DNA methylation in myeloid leukemia cells. Restoration of IRF8 expression repressed A-CDase expression, resulting in C16 ceramide accumulation and increased sensitivity of CML cells to FasL-induced apoptosis. In myeloid cells derived from IRF8-deficient mice, A-CDase protein level was dramatically increased. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IRF8 directly bind to the A-CDase promoter. At the functional level, inhibition of A-CDase activity, silencing A-CDase expression or application of exogenous C16 ceramide sensitized CML cells to FasL-induced apoptosis, whereas, overexpression of A-CDase decreased CML cells sensitivity to FasL-induced apoptosis. Consequently, restoration of IRF8 expression suppressed CML development in vivo at least partially through a Fas-dependent mechanism. In summary, our findings determine the mechanism of IRF8 downregulation in CML cells and they determine a primary pathway of resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis and disease progression. PMID:21487040

  16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia- Initiating Cells Require Polycomb Group Protein EZH2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huafeng; Peng, Cong; Huang, Jialiang; Li, Bin E; Kim, Woojin; Smith, Elenoe C; Fujiwara, Yuko; Qi, Jun; Cheloni, Giulia; Das, Partha P; Nguyen, Minh; Li, Shaoguang; Bradner, James E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have revolutionized chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) management. Disease eradication, however, is hampered by innate resistance of leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) to TKI-induced killing, which also provides the basis for subsequent emergence of TKI-resistant mutants. We report that EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), is overexpressed in CML LICs and required for colony formation and survival and cell-cycle progression of CML cell lines. A critical role for EZH2 is supported by genetic studies in a mouse CML model. Inactivation of Ezh2 in conventional conditional mice and through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing prevents initiation and maintenance of disease and survival of LICs, irrespective of BCR-ABL1 mutational status, and extends survival. Expression of the EZH2 homolog EZH1 is reduced in EZH2-deficient CML LICs, creating a scenario resembling complete loss of PRC2. EZH2 dependence of CML LICs raises prospects for improved therapy of TKI-resistant CML and/or eradication of disease by addition of EZH2 inhibitors.

  17. A clinical observation of Chinese chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chen; Meng, Li; Li, Chunrui; Luo, Yi; Wang, Hongxiang; Li, Weiming; Wang, Jue; Cheng, Fanjun; Guo, Anyuan; Liu, Songya; Jin, Caibao; Zhu, Xiaojian; You, Yong; Zou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Whether tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be safely discontinued is a key focus of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) at present. We report a clinical observation of TKIs cessation in Chinese CML patients and a probable connection between CML leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and relapse. In all, 22 of 1057 patients consented to participate in this observation. The average time of complete molecular response was 12.73 months after TKI withdrawal. LSCs could be flow cytometrically detected in most of the patients. However, the number of LSCs did not differ between the relapsers and non-relapsers. We evaluated the leukemogenetic ability of the LSCs by transplanting bone marrow into irradiated NOD/SCID mice. The results indicated that part of the bone marrow from the relapsers lead to leukemogensis in the mice. Besides, we found that LSCs-derived microvesicles might serve as a novel factor for the stratification of undetectable minimal residual disease and an early warning sign of relapse. In summary, post-TKI cessation relapse seems to show none association with the number of LSCs. A mouse xenograft model would provide a novel and useful method of analyzing LSCs function and predicting relapse. Microvesicles may provide important information about optimal molecular monitoring schedules in TKI discontinuation strategies. PMID:27533462

  18. Identification of ILK as a novel therapeutic target for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Weisberg, Ellen; Muz, Barbara; Nonami, Atsushi; Luderer, Micah; Stone, Richard M; Melo, Junia V; Griffin, James D; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-09

    Current treatment options as well as clinical efficacy are limited for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In response to the pressing need for more efficacious treatment approaches and strategies to override drug resistance in advanced stage CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML, we investigated the effects of inhibition of ILK as a potentially novel and effective approach to treatment of these challenging malignancies. Using the small molecule ILK inhibitor, Cpd22, and ILK knockdown, we investigated the importance of ILK in the growth and viability of leukemia. Our results suggest that the ILK inhibition may be an effective treatment for CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML as a single therapy, with ILK expression levels positively correlating with the efficacy of ILK inhibition. The identification of ILK as a novel target for leukemia therapy warrants further investigation as a therapeutic approach that could be of potential clinical benefit in both acute and chronic myeloid leukemias.

  19. Dangerous and cancer-causing properties of products and chemicals in the oil refining and petrochemical industries. Part XXX: Causal relationship between chronic myelogenous leukemia and benzene-containing solvents.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Myron A

    2006-09-01

    Benzene and benzene-containing products and solvents have long been associated with bone marrow toxicity. Both animal studies and human epidemiological studies have shown statistically significant increases of leukemia and other lymphohematopoietic cancers in workers exposed to benzene. The most common leukemia that has been associated with benzene exposure, also called benzene poisoning, is acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). A review of the epidemiological literature on workers exposed to benzene or benzene-containing solvents and products shows, without question, that this exposure is significantly related to other types of leukemia and lymphoma. In this article, we review the literature on the relationship between benzene exposure and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and find that benzene and benzene-containing products are significantly related to morbidity and mortality from CML.

  20. [Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps.

  1. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for leukemia in ... Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  4. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  5. Primary hepatic aspergillosis following induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chasan, R; Patel, G; Malone, A; Finn, M; Huprikar, S

    2013-10-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) contributes significantly to the burden of infectious complications in heavily immunosuppressed patients with acute leukemia. The infection is typically acquired via inhalation into the respiratory tract, and the lungs are most commonly involved. However, disseminated disease may occur and reports of isolated extrapulmonary infection suggest the gastrointestinal tract is likely an additional portal of entry for this organism. We describe a case of primary hepatic aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The patient did not respond to medical therapy with antifungals and ultimately required surgical exploration and drainage. IA should be considered in an immunosuppressed patient with hepatic abscesses and may require a combined surgical and medical approach to therapy.

  6. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  10. High imatinib dose overcomes insufficient response associated with ABCG2 haplotype in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Delord, Marc; Rousselot, Philippe; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Sigaux, François; Guilhot, Joëlle; Preudhomme, Claude; Guilhot, François; Loiseau, Pascale; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Geromin, Daniela; Génin, Emmanuelle; Calvo, Fabien; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic studies in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) typically use a candidate gene approach. In an alternative strategy, we analyzed the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug transporter genes on the molecular response to imatinib, using a DNA chip containing 857 SNPs covering 94 drug transporter genes. Two cohorts of CML patients treated with imatinib were evaluated: an exploratory cohort including 105 patients treated at 400 mg/d and a validation cohort including patients sampled from the 400 mg/d and 600 mg/d arms of the prospective SPIRIT trial (n=239). Twelve SNPs discriminating patients according to cumulative incidence of major molecular response (CI-MMR) were identified within the exploratory cohort. Three of them, all located within the ABCG2 gene, were validated in patients included in the 400 mg/d arm of the SPIRIT trial. We identified an ABCG2 haplotype (define as G-G, rs12505410 and rs2725252) as associated with significantly higher CI-MMR in patients treated at 400 mg/d. Interestingly, we found that patients carrying this ABCG2 “favorable” haplotype in the 400 mg arm reached similar CI-MMR rates that patients randomized in the imatinib 600 mg/d arm. Our results suggest that response to imatinib may be influenced by constitutive haplotypes in drug transporter genes. Lower response rates associated with “non-favorable” ABCG2 haplotypes may be overcome by increasing the imatinib daily dose up to 600 mg/d. PMID:24123600

  11. [Economic burden for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia--healthcare economics and medical governance of cancer].

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuko; Kami, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Due to the recent economic downturn, the economic burden of cancer patients has been further worsened. Specifically for chronic myelogenous leukemia patients, their annual income has decreased by 1, 500, 000 yen from 2000 to 2008, while the cost of their medications has increased from 1,000,000 yen to 1,200,000 yen due the advent of the new drug, Glivec, which was approved in 2001. The scores for psychological burden have increased 30% over the past 8 years before Glivec became available. The economic crisis among cancer patients is a consequence of structural problems with many anticancer drugs and cancer treatment. Especially, problems involving the cost of medical care and the system of drug pricing should be resolved by thorough discussion not only with cancer patients but also with the entire population. Discussion on the medical expense burden for CML patients has flourished through patients' spontaneous activities and information disclosure to a wider population through the internet. This methodology will be significant in establishing medical governance in cancer treatment in Japan.

  12. Clinical roundtable monograph: Unmet needs in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias J; Bixby, Dale; Akard, Luke P

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are diagnosed each year in the United States. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved survival time for many CML patients. Current first-line treatment options include imatinib and the second-generation agents nilotinib and dasatinib. Second- and third-line agents include nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and the new agent ponatinib. Despite the effectiveness of TKIs, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to these agents. A number of mutations of the BCR-ABL gene have been identified and are associated with TKI resistance. Patients may benefit from switching to a second-line TKI, undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or receiving newly emerging agents. Although early response is associated with improved patient outcome, clinicians lack tests that can determine which patients will benefit from which therapies. To ensure adequate response, patients should be monitored by both polymerase chain reaction and cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow. This roundtable monograph reviews key unmet needs in patients with CML related to disease management and treatment options.

  13. It’s About Time: Lessons For Solid Tumors From Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Jason R.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-01-01

    The use of imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) transformed the disease, rapidly changing the median survival from 4 years to at least 20 years. In this review, we outline the causes of this revolution, including the identification of a critical driving molecular aberration--BCR-ABL--and the development of a potent and specific inhibitor--imatinib. Equally important was the timing of the targeted therapy, specifically its administration to patients with newly diagnosed disease. In solid tumors, targeted therapies are often both developed and used in metastatic malignancies after conventional approaches have failed. We postulate that this strategy is similar to using imatinib in blast crisis CML, where response rates are <15%, all patients relapse, and median survival remains only about one year. We hypothesize that the imatinib-led revolution in CML, including the critically important factor of timing, may be applicable to other cancers as well. Therefore, it will be important to utilize promising targeted therapies in the earliest phases of biomarker-defined solid tumors, prior to metastatic progression, to determine if outcomes can be significantly improved, and hence establish if the success of imatinib in CML is an anomaly or a paradigm. PMID:23204432

  14. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  15. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms might suggest that ... of samples used to test for acute myeloid leukemia If signs and symptoms and/or the results ...

  16. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  17. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Pax5 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglan; Lin, Zhenhua; Kim, Insun

    2003-12-01

    The Pax5 gene encodes the B-cell-specific activator protein which is a key regulator in development and differentiation of B-cell. We studied the expression of Pax5 in hematologic malignancies to evaluate the diagnostic utility as a B cell marker. Materials included 70 B cell lymphomas, 26 T cell lymphomas, 53 acute leukemias, and 6 multiple myelomas (MMs). Representative areas from the paraffin embedded tissues were selected for tissue microarray, and the expressions of Pax5 was immunohistochemically evaluated. Pax5 was strongly expressed in most of the B cell lymphomas; 44 of 47 diffuse large B cell lymphomas (93.6%), 15 of 16 marginal zone B cell lymphomas (93.8%), all 3 mantle cell lymphomas, 2 follicular lymphomas, and 2 Burkitt's lymphomas (100%). However, Pax5 was expressed in only one of 26 T cell lymphomas. Among leukemias, it was expressed in 10 of the 14 B acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALLs) (72.4%), but also in 3 of the 6 T ALLs (50%), 13 of the 26 acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) (50%) and in all 3 ALL arising in chronic myelogenous leukemias and 4 mixed B ALL and AML. In MMs, Pax5 was negative in all cases. We concluded that Pax5 is very useful B cell marker in classification of lymphomas, but not of acute leukemias.

  19. Pax5 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and acute leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglan; Lin, Zhenhua; Kim, Insun

    2003-01-01

    The Pax5 gene encodes the B-cell-specific activator protein which is a key regulator in development and differentiation of B-cell. We studied the expression of Pax5 in hematologic malignancies to evaluate the diagnostic utility as a B cell marker. Materials included 70 B cell lymphomas, 26 T cell lymphomas, 53 acute leukemias, and 6 multiple myelomas (MMs). Representative areas from the paraffin embedded tissues were selected for tissue microarray, and the expressions of Pax5 was immunohistochemically evaluated. Pax5 was strongly expressed in most of the B cell lymphomas; 44 of 47 diffuse large B cell lymphomas (93.6%), 15 of 16 marginal zone B cell lymphomas (93.8%), all 3 mantle cell lymphomas, 2 follicular lymphomas, and 2 Burkitt's lymphomas (100%). However, Pax5 was expressed in only one of 26 T cell lymphomas. Among leukemias, it was expressed in 10 of the 14 B acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALLs) (72.4%), but also in 3 of the 6 T ALLs (50%), 13 of the 26 acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) (50%) and in all 3 ALL arising in chronic myelogenous leukemias and 4 mixed B ALL and AML. In MMs, Pax5 was negative in all cases. We concluded that Pax5 is very useful B cell marker in classification of lymphomas, but not of acute leukemias. PMID:14676435

  20. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Print A A A What's in this article? ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) A A A What's in this article? About ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of leukemia, including AML: Blood disorders, including polycythemia vera , essential thrombocythemia , and myelodysplasia Certain chemicals (for ... More Anemia Bone marrow transplant Chemotherapy Immunodeficiency disorders Polycythemia vera Patient Instructions Bone marrow transplant - discharge Review ...

  4. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  5. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Indirubin derivatives induce apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells involving inhibition of Stat5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Scuto, Anna; Yang, Fan; Chen, Wenyong; Park, Sungman; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Konig, Heiko; Bhatia, Ravi; Cheng, Xinlai; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Jove, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Indirubin is the major active anti-tumor component of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). While previous studies indicate that indirubin is a promising therapeutic agent for CML, the molecular mechanism of action of indirubin is not fully understood. We report here that indirubin derivatives (IRDs) potently inhibit Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (Stat5) protein in CML cells. Compound E804, which is the most potent in this series of IRDs, blocked Stat5 signaling in human K562 CML cells, imatinib-resistant human KCL-22 CML cells expressing the T315I mutant Bcr-Abl (KCL-22M), and CD34-positive primary CML cells from patients. Autophosphorylation of Src family kinases (SFKs) was strongly inhibited in K562 and KCL-22M cells at 5 μM E804, and in primary CML cells at 10 μM E804, although higher concentrations partially inhibited autophosphorylation of Bcr-Abl. Previous studies indicate that SFKs cooperate with Bcr-Abl to activate downstream Stat5 signaling. Activation of Stat5 was strongly blocked by E804 in CML cells. E804 down-regulated expression of Stat5 target proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1, associated with induction of apoptosis. In sum, our findings identify IRDs as potent inhibitors of the SFK/Stat5 signaling pathway downstream of Bcr-Abl, leading to apoptosis of K562, KCL-22M and primary CML cells. IRDs represent a promising structural class for development of new therapeutics for wild type or T315I mutant Bcr-Abl-positive CML patients.

  7. Genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, Heriberto; González, Juan R.; Sigaux, François; Villoutreix, Bruno O.; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Guilhot, Joëlle; Preudhomme, Claude; Guilhot, François; Poyet, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about inherited factors associated with the risk of developing chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We used a dedicated DNA chip containing 16 561 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering 1 916 candidate genes to analyze 437 CML patients and 1 144 healthy control individuals. Single SNP association analysis identified 139 SNPs that passed multiple comparisons (1% false discovery rate). The HDAC9, AVEN, SEMA3C, IKBKB, GSTA3, RIPK1 and FGF2 genes were each represented by three SNPs, the PSM family by four SNPs and the SLC15A1 gene by six. Haplotype analysis showed that certain combinations of rare alleles of these genes increased the risk of developing CML by more than two or three-fold. A classification tree model identified five SNPs belonging to the genes PSMB10, TNFRSF10D, PSMB2, PPARD and CYP26B1, which were associated with CML predisposition. A CML-risk-allele score was created using these five SNPs. This score was accurate for discriminating CML status (AUC: 0.61, 95%CI: 0.58–0.64). Interestingly, the score was associated with age at diagnosis and the average number of risk alleles was significantly higher in younger patients. The risk-allele score showed the same distribution in the general population (HapMap CEU samples) as in our control individuals and was associated with differential gene expression patterns of two genes (VAPA and TDRKH). In conclusion, we describe haplotypes and a genetic score that are significantly associated with a predisposition to develop CML. The SNPs identified will also serve to drive fundamental research on the putative role of these genes in CML development. PMID:26474455

  8. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dan; Liu, Yan; Xi, Ronggang; Zou, Wei; Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiran; Liu, Zhongyang; Qu, Chao; Xu, Baoli; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11)-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during realgar NP treatment, a Cav-1 overexpression cell model was established by using transient transfection. The results indicated that Cav-1 overexpression inhibited K562 cell proliferation, promoted endogenic autophagy, and increased the sensitivity of K562 cells to realgar NPs. Therefore, the results demonstrated that realgar NPs degraded Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, while the underlying mechanism might be related to apoptosis and autophagy, and Cav-1 might be considered as a

  9. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  10. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... made. Life-threatening symptoms can occur as normal blood counts drop. Causes Most of the time, no clear cause can be found for ALL. The following factors may play a role in the development of all types of leukemia: Certain chromosome problems Exposure to radiation, ...

  14. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  16. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Successful combined use of tranexamic acid and unfractionated heparin for life-threatening bleeding associated with intravascular coagulation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Mihoko; Asada, Noboru; Uryu, Hidetaka; Takeuchi, Masami; Asakura, Hidesaku; Matsue, Kosei

    2007-12-01

    The current therapeutic strategy for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is limited to control of the underlying disease, and methods for the effective management of DIC have not been established. We report the successful use of tranexamic acid (TA) combined with unfractionated heparin in a patient with life-threatening bleeding from the sigmoid colon caused by DIC. A 35-year-old man who had undergone allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia was referred for relapse of his leukemia. The patient was first treated with imatinib at 600 mg/day. Although the disappearance of leukemic cells and a decrease in the BCR/ABL fusion gene were observed, he developed massive bleeding from the sigmoid colon after defecation. A laboratory diagnosis of DIC with prominent fibrinolysis was based on elevated levels of both plasmin-alpha2-plasmin inhibitor complex and thrombin-antithrombin III complex. Despite vigorous supportive therapy, including multiple transfusions and aggressive fluid resuscitation, the patient developed hypovolemic shock due to the uncontrollable bleeding. TA combined with unfractionated heparin was instituted to inhibit excessive fibrinolysis. A prompt response was observed soon after the commencement of therapy. No organ dysfunction was observed throughout TA and heparin use. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe successful treatment with TA combined with heparin for life-threatening intestinal bleeding due to acute DIC associated with hematologic malignancy.

  18. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  20. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Wogonin reversed resistant human myelogenous leukemia cells via inhibiting Nrf2 signaling by Stat3/NF-κB inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Lin; Liu, Yicheng; Huang, Shaoliang; Lu, Lu; Kong, Lingyi; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Zhao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Constitutive NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) activation has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in enhancing cell survival and resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. Wogonin had strong reversal potency via reduction of Nrf2 mRNA in Adriamycin (ADR)-induced resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/A02, but the mechanism of reduction of Nrf2 mRNA was still unclear. In this study, we aimed to delineate the mechanism by which Wogonin suppressed transcription of Nrf2 in resistant CML cells and further evaluate the reversal effects of Wogonin on the established animal models. Data indicated that Wogonin suppressed transcription of Nrf2 by NF-κB inactivation. Wogonin inhibited the binding of p65 to Nrf2 by suppression of the κB-binding activity. Further research revealed the κB2 site was responsible for the decreased Nrf2 by Wogonin in resistant K562 cells. Furthermore, reduction of pY705-Stat3 was involved in inhibition of the binding of p65 to Nrf2 by Wogonin. In vivo, Wogonin potentiated the inhibitory effect of ADR on leukemia development by suppressing pY705-Stat3 and Nrf2 signaling. In summary, these results demonstrated Wogonin could combat chemoresistance effectively through inhibiting Nrf2 via Stat3/NF-κB signaling, and supported that Wogonin can be developed into an efficient natural sensitizer for resistant human myelogenous leukemia. PMID:28150717

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  7. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  9. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  10. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  11. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Presence of Additional Cytogenetic Abnormality of t(1;15) at Diagnosis of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia-Chronic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ji, Misuk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hyeong Nyeon; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo-Min; Kim, Sung-Yong; Han, Sung-Hee

    2016-05-01

    At diagnosis, fewer than 10% of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients have additional cytogenetic abnormalities (ACAs), which are frequently found in transformation to blast crisis. We report a case of CML-chronic phase (CML-CP) that showed t(1;15) at diagnosis. A 64-year-old man presented with sustained leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. His bone marrow (BM) was hypercellular with 2.5% blasts and BCR-ABL1 rearrangement. The karyotype in the BM was 46,XY,t(1;15)(q32;p13),t(9;22)(q34;q11.2)[20], while the karyotype in the peripheral blood was 46,XY[20]. This is the first report on the presence of t(1;15) at diagnosis of CML-CP, and its clinical significance remains unclear.

  13. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in plasma/serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Narita, Miwako; Saito, Anri; Kojima, Aya; Iwabuchi, Minami; Satoh, Naoya; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Yamahira, Akie; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule) was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  14. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  16. Induction treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient with intramarrow injection/administration of cytarabine: first report of a case.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anwarul

    2015-12-01

    We have used intramarrow injection/administration of cytarabine (Ara-C) instead of conventional intravenous approach to induce remission in an elderly patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. We show for the first time that the intramarrow injection of chemotherapeutic agents such as Ara-C can be used safely and effectively.

  17. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  18. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  19. [Cord blood transplantation after successful treatment of brain abscess caused by Bacillus cereus in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Hideyuki; Kawano, Tomoko; Tanaka, Masatugu; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Okabe, Gaichi; Maruta, Atsuo; Nagao, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hiraku

    2006-11-01

    Central nervous system infection caused by Bacillus cereus is a rare condition, which often progresses rapidly and is fatal in immunocompromised patients. A 54-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia fell into a coma with high fever during severe neutropenia while undergoing chemotherapy. A blood culture demonstrated the presence of B. cereus and magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple abnormal lesions in her brain. The patient was treated with meropenem and vancomycin, and recovered from the coma in a week. Antibiotic therapy was administered for seven weeks, and then she underwent cord blood transplantation for refractory acute myelogenous leukemia with successful engraftment without exacerbation of the brain abscess. This case demonstrates that brain abscess caused by B. cereus can be treated without surgical treatment.

  20. Donor Atorvastatin Treatment in Preventing Severe Acute GVHD After Nonmyeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-13

    Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Aggressive Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Activation of a novel Bcr/Abl destruction pathway by WP1130 induces apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A; Talpaz, Moshe; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Kong, Ling Yuan; Wang, Shimei; Estrov, Zeev; Priebe, Waldemar; Wu, Ji; Donato, Nicholas J

    2007-04-15

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is effective therapy against Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia, but resistance develops in all phases of the disease. Bcr/Abl point mutations and other alterations reduce the kinase inhibitory activity of imatinib mesylate; thus, agents that target Bcr/Abl through unique mechanisms may be needed. Here we describe the activity of WP1130, a small molecule that specifically and rapidly down-regulates both wild-type and mutant Bcr/Abl protein without affecting bcr/abl gene expression in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Loss of Bcr/Abl protein correlated with the onset of apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of Bcr/Abl substrates. WP1130 did not affect Hsp90/Hsp70 ratios within the cells and did not require the participation of the proteasomal pathway for loss of Bcr/Abl protein. WP1130 was more effective in reducing leukemic versus normal hematopoietic colony formation and strongly inhibited colony formation of cells derived from patients with T315I mutant Bcr/Abl-expressing CML in blast crisis. WP1130 suppressed the growth of K562 heterotransplanted tumors as well as both wild-type Bcr/Abl and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl-expressing BaF/3 cells transplanted into nude mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that WP1130 reduces wild-type and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl protein levels in CML cells through a unique mechanism and may be useful in treating CML.

  2. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS) assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively). Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. PMID:22913434

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  10. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Rapid improvement of disseminated intravascular coagulation by donor leukocyte infusions in a patient with promyelocytic crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation from an HLA 2-antigen-mismatched mother.

    PubMed

    Matsue, Kosei; Yamada, Konagi; Takeuchi, Masami; Tabayashi, Takayuki

    2003-05-01

    Donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) is recognized as effective therapy for relapse after stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). However, the clinical efficacy of DLI in the advanced phase of CML or other types of leukemia has not been clearly defined because of its varying degree of success. We describe a 22-year-old male patient with promyelocytic crisis of CML who had a relapse after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, under reduced-intensity conditioning, from his HLA 2-antigen-mismatched mother. Complete hematologic remission was obtained after transplantation. However, a relapse that occurred on day 66 posttransplantion was characterized by an increase in number of leukemic promyelocytes with simultaneous exacerbation of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The patient received DLI containing 1 x 10(7)/kg CD3+ cells on day 73. Because rapid improvement of DIC paralleled the decrease in leukemic cells and because it was observed soon after DLI and before the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we hypothesized that leukemia-specific cells other than natural killer cells or cytotoxic T-cells unrelated to GVHD played a role in the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed in our patient. In addition, this may be the first report of effective correction of DIC by DLI after stem cell transplantation.

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

  13. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Implication of the Autologous Immune System in BCR-ABL Transcript Variations in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; El Cheikh, Raouf; Bernard, Samuel; Ruby, Jérémy; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML); however, most patients are not cured. Deeper mechanistic understanding may improve TKI combination therapies to better control the residual leukemic cell population. In analyzing our patients' data, we found that many patients who otherwise responded well to imatinib therapy still showed variations in their BCR-ABL transcripts. To investigate this phenomenon, we applied a mathematical model that integrates CML and an autologous immune response to the patients' data. We define an immune window or a range of leukemic loads for which the autologous immune system induces an improved response. Our modeling results suggest that, at diagnosis, a patient's leukemic load is able to partially or fully suppress the autologous immune response developed in a majority of patients, toward the CML clone(s). Imatinib therapy drives the leukemic population into the "immune window," allowing the patient's autologous immune cells to expand and eventually mount an efficient recognition of the residual leukemic burden. This response drives the leukemic load below this immune window, allowing the leukemic population to partially recover until another weaker immune response is initiated. Thus, the autologous immune response may explain the oscillations in BCR-ABL transcripts regularly observed in patients on imatinib.

  15. Upregulating miR-146a by physcion reverses multidrug resistance in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; He, Juan; Yang, Yiling; Guo, Qulian; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of miR-146a in the drug resistance of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (K562/ADM) and to investigate the reversal effect of physcion, a natural compound, on the multidrug-resistance in CML. Our results showed that miR-146a was significantly downregulated in drug-resistant K562 cells and the overexpression of miR-146a in K562/ADM cells could restore the sensitivity to adriamycin (ADM). In addition, our results showed that the downregulation of miR-146a was associated with increase in CXCR4 expression, which was a direct target of miR-146a. Moreover, our findings also provided experimental evidence that physcion could enhance the anti-proliferative effect of ADM in K562/ADM cells by upregulating miR-146a. In conclusion, this present study showed that miR-146a conferred ADM resistance in CML cells and physcion could improve the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells by enhancing apoptosis via upregulating miR-146a. PMID:27904770

  16. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  17. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  18. The venom of the spider Macrothele raveni induces apoptosis in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jing; Xu, Shiyan; Liu, Changjun; Zhu, Yanghui; Liang, Songping

    2012-08-01

    Spider venoms are a rich source of bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. In traditional Chinese medicine, spiders and spider venoms have been used in the treatment of various ailments. In the present study, the venom of the spider Macrothele raveni potently suppressed cell growth in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line in a dose and time-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 5.1 μg/mL. The venom also had a low inhibitory effect on human lymphocytes with an IC(50) of approximately 36.4 μg/mL, indicating that the venom is relatively selective for leukemic cells. Venom treated K562 cells showed typical morphological indicators of apoptosis including condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of DNA. Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dual staining further demonstrated that the venom had potent apoptogenic activity. Venom treatment induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 activation in K562 cells and promoted PARP cleavage. The present results indicate that the venom of the spider M. raveni potently and selectively suppresses the growth of K562 cells by inducing apoptosis via caspase 3 and caspase 8 mediated signaling pathways.

  19. Constitutively activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase primes platelets from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia for thrombopoietin-induced aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Tanaka, T; Ohnishi, H; Kitanaka, A; Okutani, Y; Taminato, T; Ishida, T; Kamano, H

    2004-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the aggregation of platelets from 40 patients with myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including 17 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP), 10 with polycythemia vera, 10 with essential thrombocythemia, and three with myelofibrosis. TPO by itself dose-dependently induced the aggregation of platelets from patients with CML-CP but not from those with other MPDs or with CML-CP in cytogenetical complete remission. The expression of CD63 in CML-CP platelets was induced by TPO treatment. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) was constitutively activated in CML-CP platelets. Pretreatment with PI3-kinase inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002) dose-dependently inhibited TPO-induced aggregation of CML-CP platelets. The Abl kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate and the Jak inhibitor AG490 suppressed TPO-induced aggregation of CML-CP platelets. Pretreatment with imatinib mesylate, but not with AG490, inhibited the activity of PI3-kinase in CML-CP platelets. In addition, tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak2 was undetected in CML-CP platelets before TPO treatment. These findings indicate that the constitutive activation of PI3-kinase primes CML-CP platelets for the aggregation induced by TPO, and that Bcr-Abl, but not Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, are involved in the constitutive activation of PI3-kinase in CML-CP platelets.

  20. C(5) modified uracil derivatives showing antiproliferative and erythroid differentiation inducing activities on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breveglieri, Giulia; Accetta, Alessandro; Corradini, Roberto; Manicardi, Alex; Borgatti, Monica; Canella, Alessandro; Multineddu, Chiara; Marchelli, Rosangela; Gambari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The K562 cell line has been proposed as a useful experimental system to identify anti-tumor compounds acting by inducing terminal erythroid differentiation. K562 cells exhibit a low proportion of hemoglobin-synthesizing cells under standard cell growth conditions, but are able to undergo terminal erythroid differentiation when treated with a variety of anti-tumor compounds. In this paper we report a screening study on a set of different modified C(5) uracil derivatives for the evaluation of their antiproliferative effect in connection with erythroid differentiation pathways, and for defining a new class of drug candidates for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Activity of the derivatives tested can be classified in two effect: an antiproliferative effect linked to a high level of erythroid differentiation activity and an antiproliferative effect without activation of gamma globin genes The highest antiproliferative effect and erythroid induction was shown by compound 9, a thymine derivative bearing a n-octyl chain on nitrogen N(1), whereas thymine did not show any effect, suggesting the importance of the linear alkyl chain in position N(1). To our knowledge this compound should be considered among the most efficient inducers of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. This work is the starting point for the quest of more effective and specific drugs for the induction of terminal erythroid differentiation, for leading new insights in the treatment of neoplastic diseases with molecules acting by inducing differentiation rather than by simply exerting cytotoxic effects. PMID:21958870

  1. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  2. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  5. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  8. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  9. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  10. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  6. Discovery of imatinib-responsive FIP1L1-PDGFRA mutation during refractory acute myeloid leukemia transformation of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement results in constitutive activation of the tyrosine kinase PDGFRA. Neoplasms harboring this rearrangement are responsive to imatinib mesylate at doses much lower than those recommended for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Only a single report has described the identification of FIP1L1-PDGFRA in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Herein, we present a case report of a patient in whom the FIP1L1-PDGFRA was discovered as he evolved from CMML to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The presence of a dominant neoplastic clone with FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement was suspected on the basis of sudden onset of peripheral and bone marrow eosinophilia and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular diagnostic tests. Whereas the patient was initially refractory to chemotherapy before the rearrangement was detected, subsequent therapy with imatinib led to complete remission. PMID:24669761

  7. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  8. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Heterogeneity of genomic fusion of BCR and ABL in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, C.M.; Carrino, J.J.; Dickler, M.N.; Leibowitz, D.; Smith, S.D.; Westbrook, C.A.

    1988-04-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia occurs in two molecular forms, those with and those without rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region on chromosome 22. The molecular abnormality in the former group is similar to that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. To characterize the abnormality in the breakpoint cluster region-unrearranged form, the authors have mapped a 9; 22 translocation from the Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line SUP-B13 by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and have cloned the DNA at the translocation junctions. They demonstrate a BCR-ABL fusion gene on the Philadelphia chromosome. The exons from ABL are the same. Analysis of leukemic cells from four other patients with breakpoint cluster region-unrearranged Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia revealed a rearrangement on chromosome 22 close to the breakpoint in SUP-B13 in only one patient. These data indicate that breakpoints do not cluster tightly in this region but are scattered, possibly in a large intron. Given the large size of BCR and the heterogeneity in breakpoint location, detection of BCR rearrangement by standard Southern blot analysis is difficult. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis should allow detection at the DNA level in every patient and thus will permit clinical correlation of the breakpoint location with prognosis.

  12. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. The biology of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Downing, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) comprises between 4% and 15% of newly diagnosed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients. AMKL in children with Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by a founding GATA1 mutation that cooperates with trisomy 21, followed by the acquisition of additional somatic mutations. In contrast, non–DS-AMKL is characterized by chimeric oncogenes consisting of genes known to play a role in normal hematopoiesis. CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is the most frequent chimeric oncogene identified to date in this subset of patients and confers a poor prognosis. PMID:26186939

  14. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. Predictors of Neuropsychological Change in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Chang, Grace; Jones, Jennifer A.; Antin, Joseph R.; Orav, E. John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the course of neuropsychological functioning in patients with chronic myelogeous leukemia (n = 91) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 15) who underwent standard treatment for their disease or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months post-treatment. At baseline, 23% of the participants (n = 75) in the longitudinal sample had Z-scores on at least one of the neuropsychological tests that were <1.4. Participants in the study showed improvement over baseline at the 12 and 18 months assessments. The average Z-scores for the six cognitive domains in the longitudinal data set over the course of the study ranged from −0.89 to 0.59. Significant predictors of change in neuropsychological test scores included age, with older participants showing less improvement over time. Other predictors included baseline cognitive domains (language, memory, and attention), previous cocaine use, disease status, intelligence quotient, and quality of life measures. Findings support previous studies in patients with hematological malignancies who showed cognitive impairments at baseline prior to HSCT. However, there was little evidence for further cognitive decline over the course of 18 months. PMID:23391504

  18. Gadd45a deficiency accelerates BCR-ABL driven chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Sha, Xiaojin; Magimaidas, Andrew; Maifrede, Silvia; Skorski, Tomasz; Bhatia, Ravi; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2017-01-10

    The Gadd45a stress sensor gene is a member in the Gadd45 family of genes that includes Gadd45b & Gadd45g. To investigate the effect of GADD45A in the development of CML, syngeneic wild type lethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with either wild type or Gadd45a null myeloid progenitors transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the 210-kD BCR-ABL fusion oncoprotein. Loss of Gadd45a was observed to accelerate BCR-ABL driven CML resulting in the development of a more aggressive disease, a significantly shortened median mice survival time, and increased BCR-ABL expressing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (GFP+Lin- cKit+Sca+). GADD45A deficient progenitors expressing BCR-ABL exhibited increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis relative to WT counterparts, which was associated with enhanced PI3K-AKT-mTOR-4E-BP1 signaling, upregulation of p30C/EBPα expression, and hyper-activation of p38 and Stat5. Furthermore, Gadd45a expression in samples obtained from CML patients was upregulated in more indolent chronic phase CML samples and down regulated in aggressive accelerated phase CML and blast crisis CML. These results provide novel evidence that Gadd45a functions as a suppressor of BCR/ABL driven leukemia and may provide a unique prognostic marker of CML progression.

  19. Acute myelocytic leukemia after exposure to asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, T.; Ono, T.; Okada, K.

    1988-08-15

    While the carcinogenicity of asbestos has been established in malignant mesotheliomas and lung cancers, and has recently been suspected in several other types of cancer, asbestos has not been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute leukemias. This article includes two cases of acute myelocytic leukemia in individuals with a long history of exposure to asbestos. Significant numbers of asbestos bodies were detected in specimens of their lungs and bone marrow. In addition, the kind of asbestos in both organs was crocidolite, which is implicated in carcinogenesis. No asbestos bodies were detected in the bone marrow specimens from a control group consisting of ten patients with lung cancer with similar occupational histories. The role of asbestos exposure in the development of leukemia requires further study.

  20. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  1. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  2. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  6. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  7. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  14. Important milestones in acute leukemia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2013-09-01

    This year marked the occurrence of several important milestones in the treatment of acute leukemias. First, the standard 7 + 3 protocol for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was developed 40 years ago, and with some adaptations, has stood the test of time. Second, the 1 millionth hematopoietic cell transplant was recorded this year. Stem cell transplant, the first reported by Dr E. Donnall Thomas in 1957, had been considered a rare procedure until about a decade ago. Today, it has become a proven and often life-saving therapy for patients with acute leukemia. Advances in the treatment of patients with AML continue to take place, many of which relate to an increased understanding of the clinical heterogeneity of known subtypes. Forty years ago, the regimen that has come to be known as 7+3 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was born [1,2]. Cytosine arabinoside, or arabinosylcytosine as it was then called, was given as a continuous intravenous infusion of 100 mg/m(2) for 7 days, and the anthracycline, daunorubicin, was administered at 45 mg/m(2) intravenously for 3 days. Sixteen patients were originally treated on this protocol, and 5 of 8 previously untreated and 2 of 8 previously treated patients achieved a complete response (CR). This regimen has withstood the test of time. Attempts to add or substitute other agents have not yielded superior results. The only major contemporary change is that a higher dose of daunorubicin is safe and has become the standard of care [3].

  15. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  16. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. [Oncogenes and the origin of leukemia. Acute avian leukemia viruses].

    PubMed

    Graf, T

    1988-03-01

    Oncogenes have been intimately associated with the genesis of human neoplasms. A particularly useful system to study the mechanism of tumorigenesis is a small group of avian retroviruses that carry two oncogenes. These viruses causes acute leukemias and can transform hematopoietic cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which viral oncogenes affect the growth control and differentiation of their target cells is now understood in fair detail for two of these virus strains. In the avian erythroblastosis virus AEV, the v-erbB oncogene deregulates the growth control of erythroid precursors, while verbA blocks their terminal differentiation into erythrocytes. Based on the findings that v-erbB oncogene corresponds to a mutated growth factor receptor gene and that v-erbA corresponds to a mutated hormone receptor gene, models have been developed that explain the function of these two oncogenes on a molecular basis. The myelomonocytic leukemia virus MH2 acts by a completely different mechanism. In this case, the v-myc oncogene stimulates the proliferation of macrophage-like cells, while the v-mil gene stimulates them to produce their own growth factor, thus leading to autocrine growth. It will be interesting to determine whether the type of mechanisms of oncogene cooperativity elucidated for acute leukemia viruses are also operative during leukemogenesis in humans.

  18. Population-based Testing and Treatment Characteristics for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Styles, Timothy; Wu, Manxia; Wilson, Reda; Babcock, Frances; Butterworth, David; West, Dee W.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction National and International Hematology/Oncology Practice Guidelines recommend testing for the BCR-ABL mutation for definitive diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to allow for appropriate treatment with a Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI). The purpose of our study was to describe population-based testing and treatment practice characteristics for patients diagnosed with CML. Methods We analyzed cases of CML using 2011 data from 10 state registries which are part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Program of Cancer Registries. We describe completeness of testing for the BCR-ABL gene and availability of outpatient treatment with TKIs and associated characteristics. Results A total of 685 cases of CML were identified; 55% (374) had a documented BCR-ABL gene test with 96% (360) of these being positive for the BCR-ABL gene and the remaining 4% (14) either testing negative or had a missing result. Registries were able to identify the use of TKIs in 54% (369) of patients, though only 43% (296) had a corresponding BCR-ABL gene test documented. One state registry reported a significantly lower percentage of patients being tested for the BCR-ABL gene (25%) and receiving TKI treatment (21%). Limiting analysis to CML case reports from the remaining nine CER registries, 78% (305) patients had a documented BCR-ABL gene test and 79% (308) had documented treatment with a TKI. Receipt of testing or treatment for these nine states did not vary by sex, race, ethnicity, census tract poverty level, census tract urbanization, or insurance status; BCR-ABL testing varied by state of residence and BCR-ABL testing and TKI therapy occurred less often with increasing age (OR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.95–0.99; OR: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.96–0.99 respectively). Conclusions Collection of detailed CML data vary significantly by states. A majority of the case patients had appropriate testing for the BCR-ABL gene and treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  19. Prevalence of Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog-breakpoint cluster region fusions and correlation with peripheral blood parameters in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Ali Asghar; Shahsavar, Farhad; Gorji, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Kolsoum; Nazarabad, Vahideh Heydari; Bahmani, Banafsheh

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a chronic malignancy of myeloid linage associated with a significant increase in granulocytes in bone marrow and peripheral blood. CML diagnosis is based on detection of Philadelphia chromosome and “Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog” (ABL)-“breakpoint cluster region protein” fusions (ABL-BCR fusions). Aims: In this study, patients with CML morphology were studied according to ABL-BCR fusions and the relationship between the fusions and peripheral blood cell changes was examined. Materials and Methods: All patients suspected to chronic myeloproliferative disorders in Lorestan Province visiting subspecialist hematology clinics who were confirmed by oncologist were studied over a period of 5 years. After completing basic data questionnaire, blood samples were obtained with informed consent from the patients. Blood cell count and morphology were investigated and RNA was extracted from blood samples. cDNA was synthesized from RNA and ABL-BCR fusions including b3a2 and b2a2 (protein 210 kd or p210), e1a2 (protein 190 kdor p190), and e19a2 (protein 230 kdor p230) were studied by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) fusions was also studied. The prevalence of mutations and their correlation with the blood parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Of 58 patients positive for ABL-BCR fusion, 18 (30.5%) had b2a2 fusion, 37 (62.71%) had b3a2 fusion and three (3.08%) had e1a2 fusion. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) was not observed. There was no significant correlation between ABL-BCR fusions and white blood cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobin concentration. Conclusions: The ABL-BCR fusions in Lorestan Province were similar to other studies in Iran, and b3a2 fusion had the highest prevalence in the studied patients studied. PMID:27857896

  20. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. [Presence of B cell clones in acute myelomonocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Novoa, Viviana; Nuñez, Neri; Cervellini, Mirta; Starosta, Aida; Carballo, Orlando G

    2010-01-01

    The coexistence of acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the same patient is rare. The majority of the cases correspond to patients that developed acute leukemia during the evolutionary course of a chronic lymphatic leukemia following treatment with chemotherapy drugs. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia concurrent with untreated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in which the use of flow cytometry analysis with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies, allowed the demonstration of different pathological populations and determine immunophenotyping patterns. Published cases of simultaneous chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute leukemia are reviewed. The use of multiparametric flow cytometry to differentiate the populations demonstrates the utility of this technology in the diagnosis of these hematological malignancies.

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... and given back to the patient through an infusion . These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry ...

  4. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  5. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Acute lymphoid leukemia following polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Camós, M; Cervantes, F; Montoto, S; Hernández-Boluda, J C; Villamor, N; Montserrat, E

    1999-01-01

    The tendency to evolve into acute leukemia is a well-known characteristic of polycythemia vera (PV), which is shared with the remaining chronic myeloproliferative disorders and increases after the administration of cytotoxic agents. Acute transformation is usually of myeloid phenotype, whereas acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) following PV is seldom observed. A 63-year-old woman is described who developed ALL at 6 years from the initial diagnosis of PV, for which she had received radioactive phosphorus and hydroxyurea. The ALL was of B-cell type, corresponding to the L-3 subtype of the FAB classification. Despite the administration of combination chemotherapy the patient died shortly after the diagnosis of acute leukemia. The present case adds to seven previously described patients with the above association, all of whom had received cytotoxic therapy for PV. Median interval from PV to ALL diagnosis was 10 years, and there was a predominance of the B-cell phenotype. The prognosis was poor since all but one of the patients had a short survival after ALL diagnosis. The possible etiological and pathogenetic link between PV and the subsequent ALL is discussed.

  10. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  13. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells.

  14. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  15. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  19. Overcoming psychosocial and developmental barriers to blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in an adolescent/young adult (AYA) transgender patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khazal, Sajad; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kapoor, Neena; Mahadeo, Kris M

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents/young adults (AYAs) afflicted with cancer face unique barriers to potentially standard curative therapies, such as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). Transgender AYAs face additional barriers and there is a dearth of published literature regarding their oncology-related experience. We present the case of an AYA male-to-female (MTF) transgender patient on cross-sex hormone therapy, with a history of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) and significant psychosocial barriers, which initially served as a barrier to BMT at two different centers; we modified our standard consent and education process and was able to successfully proceed with BMT and subsequently cure her CML. Despite unique challenges, AYA and transgender patients with significant psychosocial barriers may achieve successful outcomes with BMT. Research is needed regarding guidelines for cross-sex hormone therapy administration for patients undergoing BMT and other issues, which may be unique to the transgender experience.

  20. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  1. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  3. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  5. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Diagnosis of Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient Previously Treated for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Namdaroglu, Sinem; Kayikci, Omur; Kaygusuz, Gülsah; Demiriz, Itir; Cinarsoy, Murat; Tekgunduz, Emre; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24416499

  8. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Philadelphia Chromosome Negative; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Primary antifungal prophylaxis in acute myeloblastic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome--still an open question?

    PubMed

    Rüping, Maria J G T; Vehreschild, Jörg J; Cornely, Oliver A

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we aim to compare different early treatment strategies of invasive fungal diseases in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Three treatment approaches--prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive treatment--are subject to continuous discussion among physicians treating patients at risk. Considering the available clinical basis of evidence, we opt for antifungal prophylaxis with posaconazole 200 mg tid po as our primary prophylactic strategy, while the employment of preemptive treatment should be delayed until more accurate diagnostic tools become available. In addition to antifungal prophylaxis, empiric treatment with caspofungin or L-AmB may be administered to patients with fever resistant to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and without radiographic findings typical of invasive fungal disease.

  11. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  12. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  13. Localization of preferential sites of rearrangement within the BCR gene in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, C.T.; Shah, N.P.; Ogden, S.; Willman, C.; McConnell, T.; Crist, W.; Carroll, A.; Witte, O.N. )

    1989-06-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been linked to a hybrid BCR/ABL protein product that differs from that found in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This implies that the molecular structures of the two chromosomal translocations also differ. Localization of translocation breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL has been impeded due to the only partial characterization of the BCR locus. The authors have isolated the entire 130-kilobase BCR genomic locus from a human cosmid library. They have demonstrated that these breakpoints are all located at the 3{prime} end of the intron around an unusual restriction fragment length polymorphism caused by deletion of a 1-kilobase fragment containing Alu family reiterated sequences. This clustering is unexpected in light of previous theories of rearrangement in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia that would have predicted a random dispersion of breakpoints in the first intron in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL. The proximity of the translocation breakpoints to this constitutive deletion may indicate shared mechanisms of rearrangement or that such polymorphisms mark areas of the genome prone to recombination.

  14. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  16. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... one form of a cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow) called acute myeloid leukemia. In ... 1 link) PubMed Sources for This Page Döhner H. Implication of the molecular characterization of acute myeloid ...

  18. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Clinical Safety and Efficacy of Nilotinib or Dasatinib in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Pre-existing Liver and/or Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Koji; Lahoti, Amit; Jabbour, Elias; Jain, Preetesh; Pierce, Sherry; Borthakur, Gautam; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND The safety and efficacy of frontline nilotinib and dasatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-CP) patients with pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction are unknown. PATIENTS and METHODS We analyzed adverse event rates, response rates, and survival rates of 215 CML-CP patients with or without renal and/or liver dysfunction who were treated with front-line nilotinib (108 patients) or dasatinib (107 patients). RESULTS Overall median follow-up was 49 months. At baseline, 6 (6%) dasatinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction and 13 (12%) had mild liver dysfunction. Eight (7%) nilotinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction, 1 (1%) had moderate renal dysfunction, and 9 (8%) mild liver dysfunction. There were no significant differences in the rates of complete cytogenetic response, major molecular response, or MR4.5 between organ function cohorts. Dasatinib- or nilotinib- treated patients with baseline renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of transient reversible acute kidney injury (p=0.011; p<0.001), and nilotinib-treated patients with renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of bleeding (p<0.001). CONCLUSION CML-CP patients with mild to moderate renal or liver dysfunction can be safely treated with frontline dasatinib or nilotinib and can achieve response rates similar to those of CML-CP patients with normal organ function. PMID:26796981

  1. Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Leukemia Diagnosed in the First Year of Life: Outcomes and Risk Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Annalisa; Volt, Fernanda; Locatelli, Franco; Michel, Gerard; Diaz de Heredia, Cristina; Abecasis, Manuel; Zecca, Marco; Vora, Ajay; Yakouben, Karima; O'Brien, Tracey A; Giardino, Stefano; Cornish, Jacqueline; Rocha, Vanderson; Peters, Christina; Bader, Peter; Gluckman, Eliane; Dalle, Jean Hugues

    2017-01-01

    Infant acute leukemia still has a poor prognosis, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is indicated in selected patients. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an attractive cell source for this population because of the low risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the strong graft-versus-leukemia effect, and prompt donor availability. This retrospective, registry-based study reported UCB transplantation (UCBT) outcomes in 252 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 157) or acute myelogenous leukemia (AML; n = 95) diagnosed before 1 year of age who received a single-unit UCBT after myeloablative conditioning between 1996 and 2012 in European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers. Median age at UCBT was 1.1 years, and median follow-up was 42 months. Most patients (57%) received a graft with 1 HLA disparity and were transplanted in first complete remission (CR; 55%). Cumulative incidence function (CIF) of day 100 acute GVHD (grades II to IV) was 40% ± 3% and of 4-year chronic GVHD was 13% ± 2%. CIF of 1-year transplant-related mortality was 23% ± 3% and of 4-year relapse was 27% ± 3%. Leukemia-free-survival (LFS) at 4 years was 50% ± 3%; it was 40% and 66% for those transplanted for ALL and AML, respectively (P = .001). LFS was better for patients transplanted in first CR, regardless of diagnosis. In multivariate model, diagnosis of ALL (P = .001), advanced disease status at UCBT (<.001), age at diagnosis younger than 3 months (P = .012), and date of transplant before 2004 were independently associated with worse LFS. UCBT is a suitable option for patients diagnosed with infant acute leukemia who achieve CR. In this cohort, patients with AML had better survival than those with ALL.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Christopher D; Bagg, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukemia is multifaceted, requiring the integration of a variety of laboratory findings, with genetic approaches now firmly established as a central component. Molecular genetic technologies continue to evolve and provide additional tiers of both clarity and complexity. Many have rapidly moved into clinical laboratories; others remain as relevant discovery tools, while some are poised to take their place in diagnostic testing menus. Here, we attempt to synthesize the role of various testing modalities and exciting nascent fundamental discoveries, with a view as to how these might be integrated into the contemporary and future evaluation of this group of aggressive hematologic malignancies.

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Saultz, Jennifer N.; Garzon, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by immature myeloid cell proliferation and bone marrow failure. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain a critical prognostic tool for post induction treatment. Despite rapid advances in the field including new drug targets and increased understanding of the biology, AML treatment remains unchanged for the past three decades with the majority of patients eventually relapsing and dying of the disease. Allogenic transplant remains the best chance for cure for patients with intermediate or high risk disease. In this review, we discuss the landmark genetic studies that have improved outcome prediction and novel therapies. PMID:26959069

  4. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: the first 48 hours.

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Q S; Doll, D C

    1990-08-01

    The initial care of patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia can be lifesaving. Such patients are most often treated at tertiary care centers where resident physicians, working under the supervision of a subspecialist, are responsible for the diagnosis and initial treatment. During the first 48 hours, the house officer must recognize and understand the management of perilous complications such as hyperleukocytosis, hemorrhage, and infection. Specific lifesaving measures will grant the patient and his physicians sufficient time to reach a decision regarding the initiation of curative induction chemotherapy.

  5. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission. PMID:28127141

  6. Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation. PMID:22778276

  7. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  8. Cutaneous presentation preceding acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xianhua; Li, Fuqiu; Li, Xue; Zhu, Wenjing; Mou, Yan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Huanyu; Gao, Wei; Xia, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cutaneous presentation preceding acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rare, and the prognosis is poor. Patient concerns: We report 4 cases of AML cutis, where skin infiltration precedes any blood or bone marrow evidence of leukemia. We also reviewed 13 cases reported in English and Chinese literature. The 4 cases all presented typical cutaneous lesions without any systemic evidence of leukemia. Histopathological examination found that dense monomorphous cell infiltration involved the dermis. Some cells surrounded blood vessels and skin appendages in a concentric manner or showed single-row arrangement in the collagen fiber bundles. Uninvolved papillary dermis was found to separate normal epidermis from dermal infiltration. Minor cells had a large kidney-shaped or oval nucleus with nucleoli and slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for CD4, CD56, while CD123 was negative in all cases. Diagnoses: AML-M5. Interventions: 2 patients received chemotherapy ,but others rejected treatment. Outcomes: Most patients died within 1 year after the onset of skin lesions. Lessons: These findings suggest that skin infiltration of AML may precede any systemic evidence, and typical cutaneous lesions in elderly individuals may be indicative for AML. PMID:28272239

  9. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Cyclophosphamide, ara-C and topotecan (CAT) for patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cortes, J; Estey, E; Beran, M; O'Brien, S; Giles, F; Koller, C; Keating, M; Kantarjian, H

    2000-02-01

    Topotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor with significant activity in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Pre-clinical data suggest a synergistic activity with DNA damaging agents such as cyclophosphamide, where topotecan might prevent the repair of cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage. We thus designed a combination including cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 every 12 hours given on days 1 to 3; topotecan 1.25 mg/m2/day by continuous infusion on days 2 to 6, and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) 2 g/m2 over 4 hours daily for 5 days on days 2 to 6 (CAT). Sixty six (63 evaluable) patients were treated. Fifty two patients had refractory (n=12) or relapsed (n=40) acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and eleven had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) (refractory n=3, relapsed n=8); their median age was 57 years (range, 18 to 79 years). Eleven patients (17%) achieved a complete remission (CR), and two patients (3%) had a hematologic improvement (HI; met all criteria for CR except for platelets < 100x10(9)/L), for an overall response rate of 20%. Responses occurred in 12 of 52 AML patients (23%), including 10 CR (19%) and 2 HI (4%), and in 1 of 11 patients with ALL (9%). Myelosuppression was universal; there were 23 episodes of pneumonia or sepsis and 18 episodes of fever of unknown origin complicating 74 courses of CAT. Non-hematologic toxicity was mostly gastrointestinal, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and mucositis, but was severe in only 8%. In summary, the CAT regimen is well tolerated and has significant anti-leukemia activity which warrants further investigation.

  11. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Histiocytic differentiation in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yong-xin; Dong, Shu-xu; Zhao, Shi-xuan; Liang, Hao-yue; Wang, Hui-jun; Hu, Xiao; Mi, Ying-chang; Wang, Jian-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid histocytes of dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), and macrophages in varied tissues, as leukemic blasts in acute monoblastic and monocytic leukemia (AML-M5a and M5b), are derived from monocyte progenitors in bone marrow. Based on DC induction from hematopoietic stem cells, myeloid progenitors, and monocytes, and occasional expressions of histocyte-related antigens (HRAs) in M5, we presume some M5 cases share histiocytic phenotypes originally. To clarify the conception, 93 M5 cases were tested with antibodies for HRAs, CD1a, CD163, S100, fascin, and langerin by immunostaining, and their morphologic characteristics were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. The study revealed that 23 M5 cases were positive for two or more kinds of HRAs and shared a serial of histocytic immunophenotype and morphologic features, which were closely associated with M5b subtype and expression of CD14 in M5.

  16. Precision medicine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints.

  17. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  19. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  20. Pneumomediastinum after acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Portelles, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema are frequently benign and most commonly result from air escaping from the upper respiratory tract, intrathoracic airways, or gastrointestinal tract. Gas can also be generated by certain infections or reach the mediastinal space from outside air after trauma or surgery. In the article presented by Showkat et al a 14-year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) under chemotherapy developed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema. In the author’s opinion, these complications were caused by ALL or chemotherapy that progressed to severe respiratory failure until the patient finally died in the intensive care unit. I would like to underline some important points, which have been raised following a paper published in the October issue of World Journal of Clinical Cases. PMID:24868520

  1. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  4. Acute erythroid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Dariush; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Seddigh, Hamideh Salari; Fathi, Ezzatollah

    2011-04-01

    Dysplastic features of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages were observed in a cat with acute erythroid leukemia. We demonstrated that flow cytometry analysis of the expression of glycophorin A and CD71 by neoplastic cells can be helpful in the diagnosis of this type of feline leukemia.

  5. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Long, Mark D; van den Berg, Patrick R; Russell, James L; Singh, Prashant K; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-09-03

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib.

  7. CBL, CBLB, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH1/2 mutations and additional chromosomal aberrations constitute molecular events in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Makishima, Hideki; Jankowska, Anna M.; McDevitt, Michael A.; O'Keefe, Christine; Dujardin, Simon; Cazzolli, Heather; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Prince, Courtney; Nicoll, John; Siddaiah, Harish; Shaik, Mohammed; Szpurka, Hadrian; Hsi, Eric; Advani, Anjali; Paquette, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) to accelerated (AP) and blast phase (BP) is because of secondary molecular events, as well as additional cytogenetic abnormalities. On the basis of the detection of JAK2, CBL, CBLB, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH1/2 mutations in myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, we hypothesized that they may also contribute to progression in CML. We screened these genes for mutations in 54 cases with CML (14 with chronic phase, 14 with AP, 20 with myeloid, and 6 with nonmyeloid BP). We identified 1 CBLB and 2 TET2 mutations in AP, and 1 CBL, 1 CBLB, 4 TET2, 2 ASXL1, and 2 IDH family mutations in myeloid BP. However, none of these mutations were found in chronic phase. No cases with JAK2V617F mutations were found. In 2 cases, TET2 mutations were found concomitant with CBLB mutations. By single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, uniparental disomy on chromosome 5q, 8q, 11p, and 17p was found in AP and BP but not involving 4q24 (TET2) or 11q23 (CBL). Microdeletions on chromosomes 17q11.2 and 21q22.12 involved tumor associated genes NF1 and RUNX1, respectively. Our results indicate that CBL family, TET2, ASXL1, and IDH family mutations and additional cryptic karyotypic abnormalities can occur in advanced phase CML. PMID:21346257

  8. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-09-15

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study.

  9. Safranal, a Crocus sativus L constituent suppresses the growth of K-562 cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In silico and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Papadopoulos, Theophanis; Sahpazidou, Despina; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Crocin, a main constituent of Crocus sativus L (saffron), has been found to inhibit the growth of K-562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells expressing Bcr-Abl protein tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the ability of the bioactive saffron's constituents, crocin (CRC) and safranal (SFR), to inhibit the Bcr-Abl protein activity employing an in silico approach, as well as the in vitro effect of these compounds on K-562 growth and gene expression of Bcr-Abl. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that mostly SFR can be attached to Bcr-Abl protein, positioned inside the protein's binding cavity at the same place with the drug used in the treatment of CML, imatinib mesylate (IM). The predicted polar interactions and hydrophobic contacts constructing a hydrophobic cavity inside the active site, explain the observed inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that SFR and CRC mediate cytotoxic response to K562 cells. In vitro studies on the expression of Bcr-Abl gene revealed that SFR and in a lesser degree IM inhibited the expression of the gene, while in contrast CRC induced an increase. The ultimate goal was to evaluate the existence of a potential antitumor activity of saffron's constituents SFR and CRC.

  10. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar;49(3):237-41. doi: 10.1002/gcc. ... EBPalpha), in acute myeloid leukemia. Nat Genet. 2001 Mar;27(3):263-70. Citation on PubMed Renneville ...

  12. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  13. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  14. Abnormal expression of FLI1 protein is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Singh, Neera; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; York, Heather; Qutub, Amina A.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Watson, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), an Ets transcription factor family member, is linked to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by chromosomal events at the FLI1 locus, but the biologic impact of FLI1 expression on AML is unknown. FLI1 protein expression was measured in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients. Expression was similar in peripheral blood (PB) and BM and higher at diagnosis than at relapse (P = .02). Compared with normal CD34+ cells, expression in AML was above or below normal in 32% and 5% of patients, respectively. Levels were negatively correlated with an antecedent hematologic disorder (P = .002) but not with age or cytogenetics. Mutated NPM1 (P = .0007) or FLT3-ITD (P < .02) had higher expression. FLI1 levels were negatively correlated with 10 of 195 proteins associated with proliferation and stromal interaction, and positively correlated (R > 0.3) with 19 others. The FLI1 level was not predictive of remission attainment, but patients with low or high FLI1 expression had shorter remission duration (22.6 and 40.3 vs 51.1 weeks, respectively; P = .01) and overall survival (45.2 and 35.4 vs 59.4 weeks, respectively; P = .03). High FLI1 levels were adverse in univariate and multivariate analysis. FLI1 expression is frequently abnormal and prognostically adverse in AML. FLI1 and/or its response genes may be therapeutically targetable to interfere with AML cell biology. PMID:21917756

  15. Abnormal expression of FLI1 protein is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kornblau, Steven M; Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Singh, Neera; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; York, Heather; Qutub, Amina A; Coombes, Kevin R; Watson, Dennis K

    2011-11-17

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), an Ets transcription factor family member, is linked to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by chromosomal events at the FLI1 locus, but the biologic impact of FLI1 expression on AML is unknown. FLI1 protein expression was measured in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients. Expression was similar in peripheral blood (PB) and BM and higher at diagnosis than at relapse (P = .02). Compared with normal CD34(+) cells, expression in AML was above or below normal in 32% and 5% of patients, respectively. Levels were negatively correlated with an antecedent hematologic disorder (P = .002) but not with age or cytogenetics. Mutated NPM1 (P = .0007) or FLT3-ITD (P < .02) had higher expression. FLI1 levels were negatively correlated with 10 of 195 proteins associated with proliferation and stromal interaction, and positively correlated (R > 0.3) with 19 others. The FLI1 level was not predictive of remission attainment, but patients with low or high FLI1 expression had shorter remission duration (22.6 and 40.3 vs 51.1 weeks, respectively; P = .01) and overall survival (45.2 and 35.4 vs 59.4 weeks, respectively; P = .03). High FLI1 levels were adverse in univariate and multivariate analysis. FLI1 expression is frequently abnormal and prognostically adverse in AML. FLI1 and/or its response genes may be therapeutically targetable to interfere with AML cell biology.

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia fusion proteins deregulate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Meani, Natalia; Gelmetti, Vania; Fantozzi, Anna; Fagioli, Marta; Orleth, Annette; Riganelli, Daniela; Sebastiani, Carla; Cappelli, Enrico; Casciari, Cristina; Sciurpi, Maria Teresa; Mariano, Angela Rosa; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Luzi, Lucilla; Muller, Heiko; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Frosina, Guido; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) are genetically heterogeneous and characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that produce fusion proteins with aberrant transcriptional regulatory activities. Expression of AML fusion proteins in transgenic mice increases the risk of myeloid leukemias, suggesting that they induce a preleukemic state. The underlying molecular and biological mechanisms are, however, unknown. To address this issue, we performed a systematic analysis of fusion protein transcriptional targets. We expressed AML1/ETO, PML/RAR, and PLZF/RAR in U937 hemopoietic precursor cells and measured global gene expression using oligonucleotide chips. We identified 1,555 genes regulated concordantly by at least two fusion proteins that were further validated in patient samples and finally classified according to available functional information. Strikingly, we found that AML fusion proteins induce genes involved in the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and repress DNA repair genes, mainly of the base excision repair pathway. Functional studies confirmed that ectopic expression of fusion proteins constitutively activates pathways leading to increased stem cell renewal (e.g., the Jagged1/Notch pathway) and provokes accumulation of DNA damage. We propose that expansion of the stem cell compartment and induction of a mutator phenotype are relevant features underlying the leukemic potential of AML-associated fusion proteins. PMID:14660751

  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  19. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  20. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  1. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: new issues on pathogenesis and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vitoux, Dominique; Nasr, Rihab; de The, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia appears to be one of the best understood among human malignancies. The ability of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide to directly target the oncogenic promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic receptor A (PML-RARA) fusion protein also made this disease the first model for oncogene-targeted therapies. A set of recent data has significantly increased the complexity of our view of acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis, as well as of therapeutic response. This review summarizes and discusses these findings, which yield novels questions and models.

  2. Evaluation of the G-quadruplex Binding Drug Telomestatin as an Inhibitor of c-myb in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    growth of these CML xenografts. To determine the in vivo mechanism of action of telomestatin, tumors will be harvested and analyzed by standard...cells and undetectable levels in differentiated cells (4). c-Myb is overexpressed in many leukemias and some solid tumors , and plays a critical role in...essential for the ME1a1-mediated expression of the c-myc gene during neuroectodermal differentiation of P19 cells. Oncogene, 15, 1123-1131. 39

  3. How I treat hematologic emergencies in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Ganzel, Chezi; Tallman, Martin S; Rowe, Jacob M

    2012-09-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia remain devastating diseases. Only approximately 40% of younger and 10% of older adults are long-term survivors. Although curing the leukemia is always the most formidable challenge, complications from the disease itself and its treatment are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Such complications, discussed herein, include tumor lysis, hyperleukocytosis, cytarabine-induced cellebellar toxicity, acute promyelocytic leukemia differentiation syndrome, thrombohemorrhagic syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia, L-asparaginase-associated thrombosis, leukemic meningitis, neutropenic fever, neutropenic enterocolitis, and transfussion-associated GVHD. Whereas clinical trials form the backbone for the management of acute leukemia, emergent clinical situations, predictable or not, are common and do not readily lend themselves to clinical trial evaluation. Furthermore, practice guidelines are often lacking. Not only are prospective trials impractical because of the emergent nature of the issue at hand, but clinicians are often reluctant to randomize such patients. Extensive practical experience is crucial and, even if there is no consensus, management of such emergencies should be guided by an understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  4. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  5. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  11. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  12. [Prognostic factors in acute nonlymphoid leukemias].

    PubMed

    Capelli, D; Tedeschi, A; Montillo, M; Corvatta, L; Bartocci, C; Montroni, M; Leoni, P

    1996-10-01

    Our retrospective study was aimed at assessing parameters affecting the prognosis of acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL). Since 1988 to 1994 we observed 84 patients: 52 males, 32 females. For each patient we considered at diagnosis: age, fever, performance status, platelets, hemoglobin and white blood cell count, extramidollary disease, bone marrow blastosis, phenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities of blasts cells. All the parameters listed above were correlated with the time to achieve the complete remission (CR), CR duration and the overall survival. Statistical tests as t-student and chi square test were used. Statistical analysis of the parameters considered revealed that the only value affecting the achievement of a CR was the age. The prognostic significance of immunophenotyping in ANLL has been a controversial issue, with a number of conflicting reports. In our study only the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase was significantly associated with prognosis. Our study, as data reported in literature, confirms that the prognostic impact of the various parameters in ANLL is controversial. The study of prognostic factors and of the immunophenotype is important to identify the clinical and the biologic profile of the disease and to evaluate the optimal post-remission treatment.

  13. Speed of leukemia development and genetic diversity in xenograft models of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Poglio, Sandrine; Lewandowski, Daniel; Calvo, Julien; Caye, Aurélie; Gros, Audrey; Laharanne, Elodie; Leblanc, Thierry; Landman-Parker, Judith; Baruchel, André; Soulier, Jean; Ballerini, Paola; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Pflumio, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) develops through accumulation of multiple genomic alterations within T-cell progenitors resulting in clonal heterogeneity among leukemic cells. Human T-ALL xeno-transplantation in immunodeficient mice is a gold standard approach to study leukemia biology and we recently uncovered that the leukemia development is more or less rapid depending on T-ALL sample. The resulting human leukemia may arise through genetic selection and we previously showed that human T-ALL development in immune-deficient mice is significantly enhanced upon CD7+/CD34+ leukemic cell transplantations. Here we investigated the genetic characteristics of CD7+/CD34+ and CD7+/CD34− cells from newly diagnosed human T-ALL and correlated it to the speed of leukemia development. We observed that CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− T-ALL cells that promote leukemia within a short-time period are genetically similar, as well as xenograft-derived leukemia resulting from both cell fractions. In the case of delayed T-ALL growth CD7+/CD34+ or CD7+/CD34− cells were either genetically diverse, the resulting xenograft leukemia arising from different but branched subclones present in the original sample, or similar, indicating decreased fitness to mouse micro-environment. Altogether, our work provides new information relating the speed of leukemia development in xenografts to the genetic diversity of T-ALL cell compartments. PMID:27191650

  14. H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells induced by imatinib.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yaqiong; Xiong, Min; Duan, Lianning; Liu, Ze; Niu, Tianhui; Luo, Yuan; Wu, Xinpin; Xu, Chengshan; Lu, Chengrong

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that histone H2AX plays a critical role in regulation of tumor cell apoptosis and acts as a novel human tumor suppressor protein. However, the action of H2AX in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells is unknown. The detailed mechanism and epigenetic regulation by H2AX remain elusive in cancer cells. Here, we report that H2AX was involved in apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of H2AX increased apoptotic sensitivity of CML cells (K562) induced by imatinib. However, overexpression of Ser139-mutated H2AX (blocking phosphorylation) decreased sensitivity of K562 cells to apoptosis. Similarly, knockdown of H2AX made K562 cells resistant to apoptotic induction. These results revealed that the function of H2AX involved in apoptosis is strictly related to its phosphorylation (Ser139). Our data further indicated that imatinib may stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family member p38, and H2AX phosphorylation followed a similar time course, suggesting a parallel response. H2AX phosphorylation can be blocked by p38 siRNA or its inhibitor. These data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation was regulated by p38 MAPK pathway in K562 cells. However, the p38 MAPK downstream, mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase-1 and -2, which phosphorylated histone H3, were not required for H2AX phosphorylation during apoptosis. Finally, we provided epigenetic evidence that H2AX phosphorylation regulated apoptosis-related gene Bim expression. Blocking of H2AX phosphorylation inhibited Bim gene expression. Taken together, these data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in CML cells induced by imatinib.

  15. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a pygmy hippopotamus (Hexaprotodon liberiensis).

    PubMed

    McCurdy, Paul; Sangster, Cheryl; Lindsay, Scott; Vogelnest, Larry

    2014-12-01

    A captive, 31-yr-old, intact male pygmy hippopotamus presented with nonspecific signs of weight loss, inappetence, diarrhea, and lethargy. After 5 wk of diagnostic investigation and symptomatic treatment, an acute leukemic process with concurrent polycystic kidney disease was suspected. The animal's condition continued to deteriorate prompting euthanasia. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical examination confirmed acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia and polycystic kidneys. Acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia has not previously been documented in this species; however, polycystic kidney disease has been reported. This case report adds to the increasing number of pygmy hippopotamuses diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease and describes acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia, a previously unreported disease of this species.

  17. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  18. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  19. Pattern of subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in India.

    PubMed

    Kamat, D M; Gopal, R; Advani, S H; Nair, C N; Kumar, A; Saikia, T; Nadkarni, J J; Nadkarni, J S

    1985-01-01

    Leukemic cells from 124 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 31 chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) were examined for sheep erythrocyte receptor (E), surface immunoglobulin (SIg) and their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing specific surface antigens including pan-T, Common ALL and Ia antigens. In acute lymphatic leukemia, 33% of patients reveal T-cell receptor associated with higher age group, mediastinal mass and high WBC count. Common ALL was predominant between 2 and 9-yr age group. Among chronic lymphatic leukemia, 2 patients were found to be T-CLL while 29 revealed presence of SIg. Ia antigen was detected in 44.4% of ALL and 64% fo CLL patients. The pattern of surface marker observed in our series may be related to our life style, socio-economic and environmental factors.

  20. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  1. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What’s New in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... have the Philadelphia chromosome. Gene expression profiling This new lab technique is being studied to help identify ...

  2. Eosinophilia in a cat with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gilroy, Cornelia; Forzán, María; Drew, Anne; Vernau, William

    2011-09-01

    A 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthaired cat with a history of vomiting and anorexia was diagnosed with leukemia with marked hepatic and splenic infiltration and concurrent eosinophilia with marked tissue infiltration. Despite thorough immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the cell lineage of the leukemia was not identified.

  3. Eosinophilia in a cat with acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Cornelia; Forzán, María; Drew, Anne; Vernau, William

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year-old castrated male domestic shorthaired cat with a history of vomiting and anorexia was diagnosed with leukemia with marked hepatic and splenic infiltration and concurrent eosinophilia with marked tissue infiltration. Despite thorough immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical immunophenotyping, the cell lineage of the leukemia was not identified. PMID:22379202

  4. Acute monoblastic leukemia in a FeLV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Prihirunkit, Kreangsak; Narkkong, Nual Anong; Apibal, Suntaree

    2008-03-01

    A 1.6-year-old male domestic short hair cat was brought to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kasetsart University, with signs of severe anemia, depression, and general lymph node enlargement. Complete blood count revealed leukocytosis and massive undifferentiated blasts. Testing for antibodies specific to feline leukemia virus (FeLV) was positive, and FeLV nucleic acid was confirmed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Base on cytochemistry and ultrastructure, the cat was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia.

  5. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  6. Mutational analysis of DNMT3A gene in acute leukemias and common solid cancers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min S; Kim, Yoo R; Yoo, Nam J; Lee, Sug H

    2013-02-01

    DNMT3A, a DNA methyltransferase that functions for de novo methylation, is important in development and many cellular processes related to tumorigenesis. Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene, including recurrent mutations in its Arg-882, were recently reported in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), strongly suggesting its role in development of AML. To see whether DNMT3A mutation occurs in other malignancies as well, we analyzed DNMT3A in 916 cancer tissues from 401 hematologic malignancies (AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL), multiple myelomas and lymphomas) and 515 carcinomas (lung, breast, prostate, colorectal and gastric carcinomas) using a single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay. We identified DNMT3A mutations, especially the Arg-882 mutations, in adulthood AML (9.4%). In addition, we found DNMT3A mutations in pre-B-ALL and three lung cancers at lower frequencies. Allelic loss of DNMT3A was frequently observed in most cancer types analyzed, including lymphomas (48.1%), gastric cancers (23.5%) and lung cancers (18.3%) irrespective of DNMT3A mutation. Also, loss of DNMT3A expression was common in lung cancers (46.4%), and was associated with the allelic loss. Our data indicate that DNMT3A gene is mutated mainly in AML, but it occurs in other cancers, such as ALL and lung cancer, despite the lower incidences. Also, the data suggest that DNMT3A is altered in many cancer types by various ways, including somatic mutations, allelic loss and loss of expression that might play roles in tumorigenesis.

  7. Cytarabine syndrome despite corticosteroid premedication in an adult undergoing induction treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jirasek, Matthew A; Herrington, Jon D

    2016-12-01

    Cytarabine syndrome is a rare clinical condition characterized by fever, malaise, myalgia, arthralgia, and/or rash that occurs after receipt of cytarabine. Our patient developed fever, malaise, and diffuse body pain shortly following cytarabine initiation despite receiving prophylactic dexamethasone. The patient's discomfort was treated with intravenous morphine and her other symptoms were controlled with a higher dose of dexamethasone. Although the exact cause is not fully understood, cytarabine syndrome is hypothesized to be an immune-mediated response following cytarabine-induced apoptosis that results in a rapid increase in proinflammatory cytokines. While there is no standard therapy for cytarabine syndrome, corticosteroids appear to play a role in the treatment and prevention of the condition by suppressing the proinflammatory response. Since our case describes the development of cytarabine syndrome despite dexamethasone, clinicians should monitor for this adverse event if patients begin exhibiting characteristics of this syndrome.

  8. Methylation level of CpG islands in GGH gene promoter in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huihui; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Li, Changgang; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-01-01

    Background γ-Glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) regulates intracellular folates and antifolates such as methotrexate (MTX) for proper nucleotide biosynthesis and antifolate-induced cytotoxicity, respectively. In addition to genetic polymorphism and karyotypic abnormalities, methylation of CpG island 1 (CpG1) in the promoter region is found to modulate GGH activity by reducing GGH mRNA expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We aim to investigate methylation status of two CpG islands (CpG1 and CpG2) in the GGH promoter region in pediatric patients with ALL and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Methods 70B-ALL, 29 AML, 10 ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) and 40 healthy children are recruited in the present study. MS-HRM (methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP) are used to detect methylation change and its level in CpG1 and CpG2 in the GGH promoter region. GGH mRNA expression is quantified by real-time PCR. Correlation between CpG island methylation and GGH mRNA expression is assessed by statistical software. Results Methylations of CpG1 are detected in leukemia cells samples obtained from 30.9% (21/68) of patients with ALL and 20.7% (6/29) of patients with AML. These methylations are not detected in the controls. Methylations of CpG2 are detected in leukemia cell samples obtained from 44.1% (30/68) of the ALL patients and 37.9% (11/29) of the AML patients. These percentages are significantly higher than that observed in the control cell samples: 6.0% (3/50) (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.000). The abundance of CpG1 methylation in all leukemia cell samples is classified as Grade I (methylation level is less than 10%) and the abundance of CpG2 methylation in leukemia cell samples is classified in separate grades. Our results indicate that methylation of CpG1 or hypermethylation (the methylation level is greater than 10%) of CpG2 could significantly reduce GGH mRNA expression in leukemia cells from the ALL and AML

  9. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  10. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hanna A.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body’s own immune system to fight leukemic cells. PMID:25981611

  11. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Hanna A; Kanakry, Christopher G; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body's own immune system to fight leukemic cells.

  12. Three hematologic malignancies in the same patient: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fattizzo, Bruno; Radice, Tommaso; Cattaneo, Daniele; Pomati, Mauro; Barcellini, Wilma; Iurlo, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The co-existence of both chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. We report an unusual case of three he-matological malignancies in the same patient: CLL, CML, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). None of the three malignancies shared the same origin, since the marrow sample was negative for BCR-ABL1 transcript at the time of CLL diagnosis, CLL was in remission at CML diagnosis, and CML was in complete cytogenetic response at AML onset, indicating that this was not a blast crisis. Background: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common proliferative disorders in Western countries, with an incidence of 4.2/100,000/year and 1-1.5/100,000/year, respectively. The co-existence of both CML and CLL is an extremely rare event, even if it has been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. Above all, the presence of more than two different hematologic neoplasms has not been described in literature so far. In the present study we report a particular case of a CLL patient, who first developed CML and then acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  13. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  14. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  16. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (acute 'malignant' myelofibrosis): An unusual cause of osteosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Karasick, S.; Karasick, D.; Schilling, J.

    1982-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia or acute 'malignant' myelosclerosis is an acute and rapidly progressive myeloproliferative syndrome characterized by minimal or absent splenomegaly, pancytopenia, diffuse marrow fibrosis, and circulating blasts of megakaryocytic origin. The disease must be differentiated from other hematologic malignancies especially myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. The radiographic changes of osteosclerosis in our patient have not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  19. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  20. Dendritic cells generated from blood precursors of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients carry the Philadelphia translocation and can induce a CML-specific primary cytotoxic T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Eibl, B; Ebner, S; Duba, C; Böck, G; Romani, N; Erdel, M; Gächter, A; Niederwieser, D; Schuler, G

    1997-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells specialized in the initiation of primary immune responses. We were interested to know whether mature DC can be grown in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and whether they carry the Philadelphia (Ph) translocation. Using a method recently described, DC were generated from PBMC precursors of 12 patients with CML using GM-CSF, IL-4, and monocyte-conditioned medium. DC exhibited the typical morphology with thin cytoplasmatic processes and expressed high levels of MHC class II, CD86, and CD83 typical for mature DC. After sorting with the monoclonal antibody CD83, a cell population of more than 95% CD83 positive cells was obtained. The presence of the Ph translocation was analyzed in these cells, in PBMC, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T blasts from the same patients by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In contrast to all other cells analyzed, the vast majority of DC (95.9 +/- 0.7%) displayed the Ph translocation, irrespective of disease stage or therapy. PBMC were predominantly positive for the Ph chromosome (67.6 +/- 7.3%), whereas only 11.4 +/- 1% of the B cells and 4.4 +/- 1.1% of the PHA blasts carried the Ph translocation. Using such leukemic DC as antigen-presenting cells, a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro was obtained, as shown by the specific recognition of Ph chromosome positive cells. We conclude that DC can be generated from blood progenitors of CML patients in vitro and exhibit, to a large extent, the Ph translocation. Such DC, which in a preliminary experiment have been able to induce a primary CML-directed cytotoxic immune response in vitro, might be ideal candidates for adoptive immunotherapy either by direct transfer of DC for in vivo generation of a T-cell response or by in vitro generation of CML-specific cytotoxic autologous or HLA

  1. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Chiara F.; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Attianese, Greta M.P. Giordano; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:27323395

  2. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Chiara F; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Giordano Attianese, Greta M P; Cooper, Laurence J N; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-08-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy.

  3. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  4. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. Blast cell aggregates simulating metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Rivera, G; Mirro, J; Stass, S; Peiper, S; Murphy, S B

    1985-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is a rare leukemia that can present diagnostic problems. We describe two children who have this disease and had clumps of blast cells in their bone marrow, a finding usually attributed to metastatic tumor. The megakaryocytic origin of the cells was supported by their cytochemical staining pattern (positive alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase resistant to sodium fluoride inhibition and negative alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase) and by the presence of factor VIII-related antigen. Ultrastructural studies of blast cells from one patient demonstrated platelet peroxidase. The mechanism of blast cell clump formation in these cases is unknown; nevertheless, awareness that this feature can occur in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia may avoid a misdiagnosis of metastatic solid tumor.

  6. Relapse of Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia as a Breast Mass

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In acute leukemia, leukemic infiltration of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) that presented as a breast mass. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of a right breast mass with nipple discharge and easy fatigue. She had received chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for BAL and had been in complete remission for the last 2 years. Core needle biopsy of the breast mass revealed monomorphous infiltrates of blast cells with round nuclei and fine chromatin, consistent with leukemic infiltration. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy showed diffuse infiltration of immature cells. However, bone marrow karyotyping showed 46, XY, suggesting complete engraftment of transplanted donor cells. This is the report of BAL recurring as a breast mass. In the differential diagnosis of a breast mass, extramedullary relapse should be considered when the patient has a history of leukemia. PMID:28053635

  7. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  8. Ultrastructural observations on a variant of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Djaldetti, M; Gardyn, J; Maran, R; Floru, S; Mittelman, M

    1993-03-01

    A patient with acute leukemia is presented in whom the leukemic cells, as seen by light microscopy were typical promyelocytes. The cells had normal or slightly invaginated nuclei with typical cytoplasmic granules and the diagnosis was confirmed by cytochemistry. The clinical course was rapid and the patient died of disseminated intravascular coagulation and urosepsis within a few days of diagnosis. However, electron microscopic examination showed cells with extremely convoluted and lobulated nuclei with nuclear pockets and cytoplasmic bridges as well as the complete absence of cytoplasmic granules in the majority of the cells. Furthermore, the urine lysozyme (muramidase) was elevated. These findings suggest that the leukemia in this patient may be classified as a hypogranular variant of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with monocytoid ultrastructural appearances.

  9. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Antibodies: Immunoconjugates and autologous cellular therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Advani, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Using a case study of a 57-year-old man with relapsed/refractory precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this review discusses treatment with immunoconjugates and autologous therapy in acute ALL. Three therapies--blinatumomab, inotuzumab, and CAR T cells--are considered here, each with advantages in specific clinical situations. These therapies represent some of the exciting advances that have been made in the treatment of ALL over the last several years.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia therapeutics: CARs in the driver's seat.

    PubMed

    Mardiros, Armen; Brown, Christine E; Budde, L Elizabeth; Wang, Xiuli; Forman, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure and novel therapeutic approaches are needed. To this end, we developed CD123 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected T cells which exhibited potent antileukemic activity. We discuss what we learned during the development of CD123 CARs and future directions for this immunotherapy.

  12. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  13. Reasons for optimism in the therapy of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    Distinct progress has been made in recent years in the therapy of acute leukemia. For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), this progress has been anchored in the increased understanding of genomic complexity. Multiple targets and the relationships among them pose new challenges along with new possibilities for the development of targeted therapies. A number of new drugs are in early clinical development for AML, one of which centers on the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in malignancy. Epigenetic modulation, intracellular pathways, and the microenvironment are all being explored for possible therapies to treat AML. Dramatic clinical progress has also been made in therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the rapid approval of blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager antibody. Yet caution must also be exercised-not every mutation is an epigenetic target and early publication of clinical data is often misleading. Until the survival outcome for adult patients with acute leukemia improves, further inquiry into the biology of the disease and progress in the development of new therapies are needed.

  14. A screening-based approach to circumvent tumor microenvironment-driven intrinsic resistance to BCR-ABL+ inhibitors in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpreet; Shelat, Anang A; Singh, Amandeep; Boulos, Nidal; Williams, Richard T; Guy, R Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    Signaling by the BCR-ABL fusion kinase drives Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Despite their clinical activity in many patients with CML, the BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors (BCR-ABL-KIs) imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib provide only transient leukemia reduction in patients with Ph+ ALL. While host-derived growth factors in the leukemia microenvironment have been invoked to explain this drug resistance, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Using genetically defined murine Ph+ ALL cells, we identified interleukin 7 (IL-7) as the dominant host factor that attenuates response to BCR-ABL-KIs. To identify potential combination drugs that could overcome this IL-7-dependent BCR-ABL-KI-resistant phenotype, we screened a small-molecule library including Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs. Among the validated hits, the well-tolerated antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) displayed potent activity in vitro and modest in vivo monotherapy activity against engineered murine BCR-ABL-KI-resistant Ph+ ALL. Strikingly, cotreatment with DHA and dasatinib in vivo strongly reduced primary leukemia burden and improved long-term survival in a murine model that faithfully captures the BCR-ABL-KI-resistant phenotype of human Ph+ ALL. This cotreatment protocol durably cured 90% of treated animals, suggesting that this cell-based screening approach efficiently identified drugs that could be rapidly moved to human clinical testing.

  15. Mutational analysis of NOTCH1, 2, 3 and 4 genes in common solid cancers and acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Jeong, Eun Goo; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2007-12-01

    NOTCH proteins (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4) play crucial roles in embryonic development. Also, mounting evidence indicates that NOTCH contributes to the pathogenesis of hematopoietic and solid malignancies. Recent studies reported a high incidence of gain-of-function mutations of the NOTCH1 gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). To see whether NOTCH1 mutation occurs in other malignancies, we analyzed NOTCH1 for the detection of somatic mutations in 334 malignancies, including 48 lung, 48 breast, 48 colorectal and 48 gastric carcinomas, and 142 acute leukemias (105 acute myelogenous leukemias, 32 B-ALLs and 4 T-ALLs) by single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. Also, to see whether other NOTCH genes harbor somatic mutations, we analyzed NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4 genes in the same tissue samples. Overall, we detected three NOTCH mutations in the cancers, which consisted of one NOTCH1 mutation in the T-ALLs (25.0%), one NOTCH2 mutation in the breast carcinomas (2.1%), and one NOTCH3 mutation in the colorectal carcinomas (2.0%). There was no NOTCH mutation in other malignancies analyzed. Our data indicate that NOTCH1 is mutated in T-ALL, but not in other common human cancers, and that NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTH4 genes are rarely mutated in common human cancers. Despite the importance of NOTCH activation in many types of human cancers, mutation of NOTCH genes, except for NOTCH1 mutation in T-ALL, may not play an important role in the tumorigenesis of common cancers.

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  17. Expression of cellular oncogenes in primary cells from human acute leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, F; Sposi, N M; Petrini, M; Bottero, L; Marinucci, M; De Rossi, G; Amadori, S; Mandelli, F; Peschle, C

    1986-01-01

    The structure and the expression of 11 cellular oncogenes (protooncogenes) were analyzed in primary cells from 20 acute lymphocytic (ALL) and 31 acute myelogenous (AML) leukemia patients. Neoplastic cells, obtained prior to initiation of therapy, were purified and classified, on the basis of both surface antigen pattern and morphology, into pre-B, B, and T ALL and M1-M5 AML. RNA was extracted and analyzed for expression of cellular oncogenes coding for nuclear proteins (c-myc, c-myb, c-fos), the beta-chain of platelet-derived growth factor (c-sis), growth factor receptors or related proteins (c-src, c-abl, c-fes, c-erbB), or putative intermediate transducers of mitogenic signals (c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-N-ras). Quantitative analysis of total RNA was carried out by dot blot hybridization to specific cDNA or genomic probes. Number and size of transcripts were evaluated by blot hybridization of electrophoretically fractionated poly(A)+ RNA. Expression of c-myc and c-myb was detected in all leukemic cells at variable levels and was characterized by well-defined patterns within ALL subtypes. Conversely, significant levels of c-fos transcripts were detected only in myelomonocytic (M4) and monocytic (M5) leukemias. Among the "src-family," c-fes was expressed more in AML than ALL, and c-abl was expressed at variable but not elevated levels in all leukemia types. c-Ha-ras was uniformly expressed at low levels, as in non-neoplastic cells. c-Ki-ras transcription was detected only in T ALL; N-ras expression was barely demonstrable. The structure of these protooncogenes was not grossly modified, as evaluated by Southern analysis, except for c-myc rearrangement in B ALL. These studies indicate that cellular oncogene expression in specific subtypes of leukemic cells may relate to either the proliferative activity (c-myc, c-myb) or the differentiation state (c-fos) of the cells, or possibly to expression of receptors for putative hemopoiesis-related growth factors (c-fes, c

  18. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  19. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  20. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved.

  1. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  2. Multifaceted approach to the diagnosis and classification of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    McKenna, R W

    2000-08-01

    Until recently, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemias was based almost exclusively on well-defined morphologic criteria and cytochemical stains. Although most cases can be diagnosed by these methods, there is only modest correlation between morphologic categories and treatment responsiveness and prognosis. The expansion of therapeutic options and improvement in remission induction and disease-free survival for both AML and ALL have stimulated emphasis on defining good and poor treatment response groups. This is most effectively accomplished by a multifaceted approach to diagnosis and classification using immunophenotyping, cytogenetics, and molecular analysis in addition to the traditional methods. Immunophenotyping is important in characterizing morphologically poorly differentiated acute leukemias and in defining prognostic categories of ALL. Cytogenetic and molecular studies provide important prognostic information and are becoming vitally important in determining the appropriate treatment protocol. With optimal application of these techniques in the diagnosis of acute leukemias, treatment strategies can be more specifically directed and new therapeutic approaches can be evaluated more effectively.

  3. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood vessel in the chest. Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is a cancer treatment that may be ... given to the patient through one or more infusions. The lymphocytes see the patient’s cancer cells as ...

  4. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child with Fanconi's anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Naureen; Wali, Rabia; Fadoo, Zehra; Saleem, Ali Faisal

    2012-07-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with progressive bone marrow failure, associated congenital malformation and solid and haematological malignancies. Acute myeloid leukemia is the commonest haematological malignancy followed by myelodysplastic syndrome in children with FA. FA transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare phenomenon and one of the rarest haematological malignancies associated with this disorder. We are reporting a 13 years old girl with FA and positive chromosomal breakage. She required regular blood product transfusion. She was planned for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) but the sibling-matched donor was found to have chromosomal breaks as well. Later on, her peripheral smear showed blast cell. Bone marrow showed pre-B ALL. She was started on chemotherapy but died shortly due to complications of the treatment. For this rare condition conservative management is indeed essential, however, safe and appropriate chemotherapy regimen is needed.

  6. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bilateral serous macular detachment.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luisa; Silva, Nuno Aguiar; Medeiros, Marco Dutra; Flores, Rita; Maduro, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant hematopoietic neoplasia, which is rare in adults. Although ocular fundus alterations may be commonly observed in the course of the disease, such alterations are rarely the presenting signs of the disease. Here we describe the case of a patient with painless and progressive loss of visual acuity (right eye, 2/10; left eye, 3/10) developing over two weeks, accompanied by fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fundus examination showed bilateral macular serous detachment, which was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescent pinpoints in the posterior poles. The limits of the macular detachment were revealed in the late phase of the angiogram. The results of blood count analysis triggered a thorough, systematic patient examination. The diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia B (CD10+) was established, and intensive systemic chemotherapy was immediately initiated. One year after the diagnosis, the patient remains in complete remission without any ophthalmologic alterations.

  7. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  8. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL.

  9. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  10. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and loss of the RUNX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Berger, Roland; Busson, Maryvonne; Dastugue, Nicole; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Michaux, Lucienne; Hagemeijer, Anne; Quilichini, Benoît; Benattar, Laurence; Bernard, Olivier; Romana, Serge P

    2006-01-01

    Since the RUNX1 gene contributes to megakaryopoiesis and acquired trisomy 21 is the most frequent numerical chromosome anomaly in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMLK), a systematic study of RUNX1 abnormalities was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridization in AMLK patients. Four abnormalities were detected among 15 patients. One copy of RUNX1 was completeley or partially lost in three patients and translocated onto Xq24 in the fourth. The possible consequences of RUNX1 haploinsufficiency are discussed.

  11. Beating the Clock in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William L; Aifantis, Iannis; Raetz, Elizabeth

    2017-02-15

    CDK4/6 inhibition was synergistic with dexamethasone and everolimus but antagonistic with conventional chemotherapy in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) preclinical models. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition in combination with glucocorticoids and mTOR inhibition offers a unique therapeutic opportunity in T-ALL. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 873-5. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Pikman et al., p. 1012.

  12. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission.

  13. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  14. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  15. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  16. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  17. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Acute myocardial infarction as a finding of acute promyelocytic leukemia-related coagulation disorder.

    PubMed

    Özkurt, Zübeyde N; Aypar, Eda; Sarifakiogullari, Serpil; Taçoy, Gülten; Özdag, Murat; Kahraman, Seda; Çengel, Atiye

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has one of the most favorable prognoses among other leukemia subtypes. However, the major cause of mortality in APL is disseminated intravascular coagulation at the presentation. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) at the time of APL diagnosis before treatment. The patient suffered from chest pain, sweating and giddiness. He was hypoxic, hypotensive and bradycardic. ECG showed inferior MI. Unfractioned heparin infusion (850 U/h) was started and 5 min after the previous ECG showed total ST resolution. We suggest that in this case, MI was not related to atherosclerotic plaque rupture but related to DIC manifestation.

  20. French registry of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Age distribution and hemogram analysis of the 4496 cases recorded during 1982-1983 and classified according to FAB criteria. Groupe Francais de Morphologie Hematologique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-15

    During 1982 and 1983, 4496 new cases were recorded in the French Registry of acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes by the French Group of Hematologic Morphology. This cooperative group associated members of 37 university centers spread throughout France; these centers handle the overwhelming majority of acute leukemias diagnoses. The cases were all classified according to FAB guidelines. Two thousand four hundred ninety-nine cases of acute myeloid leukemia were recorded, with similar total recruitment and distribution by cytologic subclass for both years. Hemogram data analysis revealed significant differences between different classes for certain parameters, particularly leukocytosis. A greater proportion of the acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) secondary to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy (n = 145) were unclassifiable according to the French-American-British (FAB) system than the de novo AMLs (n = 1954). Eight hundred twenty cases of myelodysplastic syndromes were analyzed. Their frequency was underestimated due to optional reporting during the first year and the less favorable position of the university centers for recruiting these syndromes. The characteristics of the hemograms were established for acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (n = 107), refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) (n = 329), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 129) and RAEB in transformation (n = 65). Analysis of the 1177 acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) recorded showed good stability from one year to the next in terms of numbers of cases and distribution in the subclasses L1, L2, and L3. The distribution among these three subclasses by age also was determined. For L1 and L2 the hemogram data were examined separately for adults and children. The study of 74 cases of type L3 ALL enabled us to detail the hematologic presentation of this rare form of leukemia.

  1. Delirium in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated neuropsychiatric complication most commonly observed in terminally ill cancer patients. To our knowledge this is the first report describing delirium in two patients aged less than 60 years and enrolled in an intensive chemotherapeutic protocol for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Case presentation Two female Caucasian acute promyelocytic leukemia patients aged 46 and 56 years developed delirium during their induction treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. In both cases symptoms were initially attributed to all-trans retinoic acid that was therefore immediately suspended. In these two patients several situations may have contribute to the delirium: in patient 1 a previous psychiatric disorder, concomitant treatments with steroids and benzodiazepines, a severe infection and central nervous system bleeding while in patient 2 steroid treatment and isolation. In patient 1 delirium was treated with short-term low-doses of haloperidol while in patient 2 non-pharmacologic interventions had a beneficial role. When the diagnosis of delirium was clear, induction treatment was resumed and both patients completed their therapeutic program without any relapse of the psychiatric symptoms. Both patients are alive and in complete remission as far as their leukemia is concerned. Conclusions We suggest that patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia eligible to intensive chemotherapy should be carefully evaluated by a multisciplinary team including psychiatrists in order to early recognize symptoms of delirium and avoid inadequate treatments. In case of delirium, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions may be considered. PMID:24237998

  2. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  3. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.

  4. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  5. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Precursor-B-cell-ALL leukemia cutis resembling lipomas: an atypical presentation of a rare entity and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan Yu Michael; Liu, Melinda; Ruth, Jennifer S; Potenziani, Silvia; Hsu, Sylvia

    2017-03-15

    Leukemia cutis (LC) is an extramedullary manifestationof leukemia owing to cutaneous infiltration ofneoplastic cells resulting in characteristic firm,erythematous nodules. Most cases of LC occur inpatients with acute myelogenous leukemia andchronic myelogenous leukemia. However in rarecases, LC has presented in patients with acutelymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In these rare ALLassociatedcases, only 10 cases of precursor-B-ALL(pre-B-ALL) have been described in the literature.We report a case of a 22-year-old man with relapsingpre-B-ALL who presented with a 4-day history ofmultiple asymptomatic, soft, dome-shaped, lipomalikemounds on his scalp and chin, which exhibitedcutaneous involvement by leukemic cells. To date, thisis the first case of pre-B-ALL associated leukemia cutispresenting as soft, dome-shaped mounds resemblinglipomas.

  7. T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia resembling Burkitt leukemia cell morphology: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YUE, QINGFANG; LIU, XINYUE; CHEN, LEI; LIU, ZHONGPING; CHEN, WANXIN

    2015-01-01

    Biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) is an uncommon type of cancer, which accounts for <5% of all adult ALs. Based upon a previously described scoring system, the European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) proposed a set of diagnostic criteria for BAL. This scoring system is based upon the number and degree of specificity of several markers for myeloid or T/B-lymphoid blasts. The present study describes a case of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with Burkitt-like cytology, which according to the French-American-British classification, corresponded to a diagnosis of Burkitt type L3 ALL. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that the blasts were positive for T-lymphoid markers, cytoplasmic cluster of differentiation (CD)3, CD7 and CD56, and myeloid markers, CD13, CD33 and CD15. At first, a diagnosis of BAL was suggested by the EGIL score, however, according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria, a case of T-ALL with aberrant myeloid markers was established. The study also reviewed the literature and discussed the limitations of the EGIL scoring system in clinical decision making, to aid in the selection of an appropriate therapeutic regimen. PMID:25663889

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mussai, Francis; De Santo, Carmela; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Booth, Sarah; Quek, Lynn; McEwen-Smith, Rosanna M.; Qureshi, Amrana; Dazzi, Francesco; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and the second most common frequent leukemia of childhood. Patients may present with lymphopenia or pancytopenia at diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms by which AML causes pancytopenia and suppresses patients’ immune response. This study identified for the first time that AML blasts alter the immune microenvironment through enhanced arginine metabolism. Arginase II is expressed and released from AML blasts and is present at high concentrations in the plasma of patients with AML, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation. We extended these results by demonstrating an arginase-dependent ability of AML blasts to polarize surrounding monocytes into a suppressive M2-like phenotype in vitro and in engrafted nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In addition, AML blasts can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of murine granulocyte-monocyte progenitors and human CD34+ progenitors. Finally, the study showed that the immunosuppressive activity of AML blasts can be modulated through small-molecule inhibitors of arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in AML. The results strongly support the hypothesis that AML creates an immunosuppressive microenvironment that contributes to the pancytopenia observed at diagnosis. PMID:23733335

  9. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  10. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  11. Challenges in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eleni, Lagadinou D.; Nicholas, Zoumbos C.; Alexandros, Spyridonidis

    2010-01-01

    Whereas in younger patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is straightforward and the goal is cure, the optimal treatment decision for older adults remains highly controversial. Physicians need to determine whether palliation, “something” beyond palliation, intensive therapy, or an investigational therapy is the most appropriate treatment option. This requires understanding of the biology and risk profile of the AML, clinical judgment in evaluating the functional status of the patient, communication skills in understanding the patient's wishes and social background, and medical expertise in available therapies. The physician has to accurately inform the patient about (a) the unique biological considerations of his leukemia and his prognosis; (b) the risks and benefits of all available treatment options; (c) novel therapeutic approaches and how the patient can get access to these treatments. Last but not least, he has to recommend a treatment. This paper tries to discuss each of these issues. PMID:20628485

  12. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-04-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is importantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  14. Reprint of: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  15. [Development of acute myeloid leukemia from donor cells after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a female patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Development of leukemia from donor cells is a rare complication of allogeneic blood stem cells (BSC). The paper describes a case of evolving acute myeloid leukemia of a graft in a patient with resistant acute monoblastic leukemia after related allogeneic peripheral BSC transplantation. The rarity of this complication, difficulties in providing evidence for the donor origin of a leukemic clone demonstrate a need for all-round careful dynamic assessment of the hematopoietic system after allogeneic transplantation, by applying the current cytogenetic (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and molecular (hypervariable genomic region amplification test using the polymerase chain reaction, hypervariable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), and short number of tandem repeats (STR)) techniques, which permits errors to be avoided in the assessment of a clinical situation and in the diagnosis of leukemia from donor cells. There is no developed policy for treatment of acute graft-versus-leukemia.

  16. Acute leukemia occurring after radiotherapy and chemotherapy with a nitrosourea, PCNU.

    PubMed

    Shepard, K V; Larson, R; Le Beau, M M; Leichman, L; Levin, B

    1988-06-01

    Secondary acute leukemias can occur in patients who have been treated with chemotherapy. Several reports have shown that treatment with nitrosoureas can result in secondary leukemia, but this is the first report implicating the investigational drug PCNU as a cause. This case is unique because of the cytogenetic findings, the short latency period between the chemotherapy and the diagnosis of leukemia, and the successful treatment of the leukemia with high-dose cytarabine (ara-C).

  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  18. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  19. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  20. Application of simplified bioclean apparatuses for treatment of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, H; Horiuchi, A

    1983-01-01

    We used a portable horizontal laminar-air-flow clean bed and an open horizontal laminar-air-flow fan (clean wall unit) for treating patients with acute leukemia. The level of cleanliness as shown in the nonviable and viable particle counts was class 100 and class 1,000 at the head and foot, respectively, of the bed in the clean-bed rooms, while it was class 100 and class 10,000 respectively, in the clean-wall-unit rooms. The level of cleanliness in the open wards, on the other hand, was class 1,000,000. The incidence of infectious complications in the clean-bed rooms was 3.1/100 days when the granulocyte count was 1,000/mm3 or less, 3.9/100 days when the count was 500/mm3 or less and 6.1/100 days when it was 100/mm3 or less. In the clean-wall-unit rooms, these values were 3.1, 3.7 and 7.1, respectively, while in the open wards they were 4.6, 6.1 and 15.0. Thus, it was ascertained that, as the granulocyte count decreased, the incidence of infectious complications became significantly higher in the open wards than in the clean-bed rooms or the clean-wall-unit rooms. No complication of pneumonia was found in 37 patients with acute leukemia in the clean-bed rooms or in 40 in the clean-wall-unit rooms. Among 36 patients treated in the open wards, on the other hand, the complication of pneumonia was found in four. From the above results, it is believed that the use of clean-bed rooms or clean-wall-unit rooms is an extremely effective supplementary treatment method for preventing respiratory tract infection complications in patients with acute leukemia.

  1. The Prospective Collection, Storage and Reporting of Data on Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Utilizing a Standard Preparative Regimen

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Germ Cell Neoplasms; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Immunodeficiency Diseases

  2. Trial of Donor Lymphocyte Infusion (DLI) and Activated DLI Following Relapse After Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  3. Basiliximab #2: In-Vivo Activated T-Cell Depletion to Prevent Graft-Versus_Host Disease (GVHD) After Nonmyeloablative Allotransplantation for the Treatment of Blood Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelofibrosis; Anemia, Aplastic; Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal

  4. In-Vivo Activated T-Cell Depletion to Prevent GVHD

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-26

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplasia; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelofibrosis

  5. Safety and Efficacy of Pentostatin and Low Dose TBI With Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-02

    Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Multiple Myeloma; Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma; Hodgkins Disease; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

  6. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Subcutaneous Plerixafor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Related Donors Donating PBSC to a Family Member; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  7. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  8. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  9. [Effect of Ikaros in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Ying; Bai, Hai

    2015-08-01

    The Ikaros - a DNA-binding zinc finger protein, acting as a regulator of chromatin remodeling and gene transcription, is crucial for regulating the development and function of the immune system and acting as a master regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Function-loss mutations of IKZF1, gene encoding Ikaros are frequent in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and are associated with a poor prognosis. This review briefly summarizes the available data regarding the structure and function of Ikaros, the role of Ikaros as a tumor suppressor in B-ALL, and its regulation mechanism.

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  11. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  12. Unexpected heterogeneity of BCR-ABL fusion mRNA detected by polymerase chain reaction in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hooberman, A.L.; Carrino, J.J.; Leibowitz, D.; Rowley, J.D.; Le Beau, M.M.; Arlin, Z.A.; Westbrook, C.A. )

    1989-06-01

    The Philadelphia (Ph{sup 1}) chromosome results in a fusion of portions of the BCR gene from chromosome 22 and the ABL gene from chromosome 9, producing a chimeric BCR-ABL mRNA and protein. In lymphoblastic leukemias, there are two molecular subtypes of the Ph{sup 1} chromosome, one with a rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region (bcr) of the BCR gene, producing the same 8.5-kilobase BCR-ABL fusion mRNA seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the other, without a bcr rearrangement, producing a 7.0-kilobase BCR-ABL fusion mRNA that is seen only in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors studied the molecular subtype of the Ph{sup 1} chromosome in 11 cases of Ph{sup 1}-positive ALL, including 2 with a previous diagnosis of CML, using a sensitive method to analyze the mRNA species based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). They observed unexpected heterogeneity in BCR-ABL mRNA in this population. They conclude that the PCR gives additional information about the Ph{sup 1} chromosome gene products that cannot be obtained by genomic analysis, but that it cannot be used as the sole means of detection of this chromosomal abnormality in ALL because of the high incidence of false negative results.

  13. Co-operative leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia reveals C/EBPα as a common target of TRIB1 and PML/RARA

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; Vieugué, Pauline; Chaudhury, Shahzya; Rishi, Loveena; Gaillard, Coline; Liang, Lu; Garcia, Elaine; Nakamura, Takuro; Omidvar, Nader; Kogan, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The PML/RARA fusion protein occurs as a result of the t(15;17) translocation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia subtype of human acute myeloid leukemia. Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia. We previously demonstrated that gain of chromosome 8-containing MYC is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the role of the nearby TRIB1 gene has not been experimentally addressed in this context. We have now tested the hypothesis that both MYC and TRIB1 have functional roles underlying leukemogenesis of trisomy 8 by using retroviral vectors to express MYC and TRIB1 in wild-type bone marrow and in marrow that expressed a PML/RARA transgene. Interestingly, although MYC and TRIB1 readily co-operated in leukemogenesis for wild-type bone marrow, TRIB1 provided no selective advantage to cells expressing PML/RARA. We hypothesized that this lack of co-operation between PML/RARA and TRIB1 reflected a common pathway for their effect: both proteins targeting the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα. In support of this idea, TRIB1 expression abrogated the all-trans retinoic acid response of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data delineate the common and redundant inhibitory effects of TRIB1 and PML/RARA on C/EBPα providing a potential explanation for the lack of selection of TRIB1 in human acute promyelocytic leukemia, and highlighting the key role of C/EBPs in acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis and therapeutic response. In addition, the co-operativity we observed between MYC and TRIB1 in the absence of PML/RARA show that, outside of acute promyelocytic leukemia, gain of both genes may drive selection for trisomy 8. PMID:27390356

  14. ACUTE HEPATITIS ASSOCIATED WITH MOUSE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, John B.

    1953-01-01

    The hepatitis of Princeton weanlings was not prevented by the prior injection of terramycin nor was the virus inactivated by exposure to room temperature. Eperythrozoon coccoides was not demonstrable in blood films from Swiss and Princeton mice infected with the corresponding type of hepatitis virus. Combined infection with this virus and eperythrozoa, originally obtained by Dr. R. B. McGhee from mice in association with Plasmodium berghei, was attended by the appearance of numerous organisms in the blood. The development of eperythrozoa in dually infected Princeton mice had no effect on the outcome of the hepatitis. In Swiss mice, animals with high natural resistance to hepatitis virus, the pathogenicity of this agent was markedly enhanced by combined infection with eperythrozoa. Eperythrozoa were maintained throughout 18 successive passages in normal Princeton and Swiss weanlings with intact spleens. The combined infection of Princeton mice with eperythrozoa and the virus component of Gledhill, Dick, and Andrewes, which is nearly inactive when injected alone, resulted in acute hepatitis with fatal outcome. PMID:13109101

  15. Novel drugs for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Montalban-Bravo, G; Garcia-Manero, G

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia and the most frequent cause of leukemia-related deaths in the United States. The incidence of AML increases with advancing age and the prognosis for patients with AML worsens substantially with increasing age. Many older patients are ineligible for intensive treatment and require other therapeutic approaches to optimize clinical outcome. To address this treatment gap, novel agents with varying mechanisms of action targeting different cellular processes are currently in development. Hypomethylating agents (azacitidine, decitabine, SGI-110), histone deacetylase inhibitors (vorinostat, pracinostat, panobinostat), FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 inhibitors (quizartinib, sorafenib, midostaurin, crenolanib), cytotoxic agents (clofarabine, sapacitabine, vosaroxin), cell cycle inhibitors (barasertib, volasertib, rigosertib) and monoclonal antibodies (gentuzumab ozogamicin, lintuzumab-Ac225) represent some of these promising new treatments. This review provides an overview of novel agents that have either completed or are currently in ongoing phase III trials in patients with previously untreated AML for whom intensive treatment is not an option. Other potential drugs in earlier stages of development will also be addressed in this review.

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tara L.; Levy, M. Yair

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, particularly the elderly. Novel agents and treatment approaches are needed in the induction, post-remission and relapsed settings. The additions of clofarabine for relapsed or refractory disease and the hypomethylating agents represent recent advances. Clinical trials of FLT3 inhibitors have yielded disappointing results to date, with ongoing collaborations attempting to identify the optimal role for these agents. Potential leukemia stem cell targeted therapies and treatments in the setting of minimal residual disease are also under investigation. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in AML treatment and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22654526

  17. NUP98-MLL fusion in human acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Sophie; Soler, Gwendoline; Barin, Carole; Gervais, Carine; Bernard, Olivier A; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Romana, Serge P

    2010-09-30

    Posttranscriptional modifications of histones play important roles in the control of chromatin structure and transcription. H3K4 (histone H3 lysine 4) methylation by the SET domain of the trithorax-group protein MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) is important for the control of homeobox (HOX) gene expression during development. MLL is tethered to the HOXA locus through interaction of its amino-terminus with menin. MLL fusion proteins associated with human leukemia contain the menin interaction peptide and frequently recruit H3K79 (histone H3 lysine 79) methylation activity. This allows sustained expression of HOXA genes important for cellular transformation. We have characterized a novel recurrent chromosomal aberration, inv(11)(p15q23), as an isolated chromosomal abnormality in 2 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This aberration is predicted to result in the expression of an NUP98 (nucleoporin 98 kDa)-MLL fusion protein that is unable to interact with menin. As expected, low levels of HOXA gene expression were observed in the patients' samples. This fusion protein is predicted to participate in cellular transformation by activating MLL targets other than HOXA genes.

  18. Physiologically based toxicokinetic modeling of secondary acute myelolytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Manas Kumar; Nath, Debjani

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, designated as environmental and occupational carcinogen and hematotoxin, has been associated with secondary leukemia. To develop a toxicokinetic model of AML, benzene can be used as leukemogenic agent. The aim of the present study was to optimize the dose, period and time of cumulative benzene exposure of Swiss Albino mice and to analyze survival rate; alteration in cell cycle regulation and other clinical manifestations in mice exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 h/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks, i.e., 9000(a)ppm cumulative dose. Analyzing physiological parameters like plasma enzyme profile, complete hematology (Hb %, RBC indices and WBC differentials), hematopoietic cells morphology, expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, tissue histology and analysis of DNA fragmentation, optimum conditions were established. Down regulation of p53 and p21 and up regulation of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and E in this exposed group were marked as the optimum conditions of cellular deregulation for the development of secondary AML. Elevated level of Plasma AST/ALT with corresponding changes in liver histology showing extended sinusoids within the hepatocytic cell cords in optimally exposed animals also confirmed the toxicokinetic relation of benzene with leukemia. It can be concluded from the above observations that the 9000(a)ppm exposed animals can serve as the induced laboratory model of secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. Lithium Carbonate in Treating Patients With Acute Intestinal Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD) After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Breakpoint Cluster Region-abl Translocation (BCR-ABL) Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrointestinal Complications; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α regulates a pro-invasive phenotype in acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Migliavacca, Jessica; Percio, Stefano; Valsecchi, Roberta; Ferrero, Elisabetta; Spinelli, Antonello; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Tresoldi, Cristina; Pattini, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIFs) are the main regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxia and are often activated in solid tumors, but their role in leukemia is less clear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), in particular, controversial new findings indicate that HIF-1α can act either as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor gene, and this may depend on the stage of leukemia development and/or the AML sub-type. In this study, we find that HIF-1α promotes leukemia progression in the acute monocytic leukemia sub-type of AML through activation of an invasive phenotype. By applying a list of validated HIF-1α-target genes to different AML sub-types, we identified a HIF-1α signature that typifies acute monocytic leukemia when compared with all other AML sub-types. We validated expression of this signature in cell lines and primary cells from AML patients. Interestingly, this signature is enriched for genes that control cell motility at different levels. As a consequence, inhibiting HIF-1α impaired leukemia cell migration, chemotaxis, invasion and transendothelial migration in vitro, and this resulted in impaired bone marrow homing and leukemia progression in vivo. Our data suggest that in acute monocytic leukemia an active HIF-1α-dependent pro-invasive pathway mediates the ability of leukemic cells to migrate and invade extramedullary sites and may be targeted to reduce leukemia dissemination. PMID:27447550