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Sample records for acute myelogenous leukemias

  1. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    MedlinePlus

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  2. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  3. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leung WH, Pounds S, Cao X, e t al. Definition of cure in childhood acute myeloid leukemia. Cancer . 2014 Aug ... MD, Medical Oncologist, Fresno, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  5. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Epidemiology of childhood acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Neglia, J P

    1995-05-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the second most common leukemia in children, with approximately 400 new cases occurring annually in the United States. Worldwide, the highest rates of childhood AML occur in Asia and the lowest rates are reported from India and South America. Numerous genetic risk factors for childhood AML have been defined, including Down syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and Fanconi anemia. Research into environmental risk factors has been limited by the rarity of this disease; however, studies of AML in adults have implicated ionizing radiation, solvents, and petroleum products as potential etiologic agents. The largest analytic study of childhood AML found that occupational exposures of either parent to pesticides, paternal exposure to petroleum products, and postnatal exposures to pesticides are increased in children with AML. In addition, maternal use of marijuana during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of AML, especially the monocytic subtypes. Further study of childhood AML, including occurrence of the disease as a second malignancy, is needed in order to confirm these findings and to increase our understanding of this leukemia. PMID:7749772

  7. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  10. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  11. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Granulocytic Sarcoma in MLL-Positive Infant Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Dong Soon; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Chong Jai; Cho, Han Ik

    2001-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is considered to be rare and its frequent occurrence is associated with specific genetic changes such as t(8;21). To investigate an association between MLL (mixed lineage leukemia or myeloid-lymphoid leukemia) rearrangement and granulocytic sarcoma, we applied fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of the 11q23/MLL rearrangements on the bone marrow cells of 40 patients with childhood acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Nine (22.5%) of 40 patients exhibited MLL rearrangements. Three (33.3%) of these nine patients had granulocytic sarcoma and were younger than 12 months of age. Of these three patients one presented as granulocytic sarcoma of both testes with cerebrospinal fluid involvement, the second case presented in the form of an abdominal mass, and the third as a periorbital granulocytic sarcoma. On the other hand, no granulocytic sarcomas were found among MLL-negative patients. It is likely that MLL-positive infant AML may predispose granulocytic sarcoma. Regarding the findings of our study and those of other reports, we would guess that the incidence of granulocytic sarcoma in pediatric MLL-positive AML may be equal to or greater than the 18 to 24% described in AML with t(8;21). Further investigations designed to identify 11q23/MLL abnormalities of leukemic cells or extramedullary tumor may be helpful for the precise diagnosis of granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:11733351

  18. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Preferential eradication of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells by fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Fang, Hai; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Chun; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Minden, Mark; Yang, Wen-Tao; Wang, Huan-Wei; Li, Jun-Min; Xi, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhang, Ji; Chen, Zhu; Wang, Kan-Kan

    2013-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play important roles in leukemia initiation, progression, and relapse, and thus represent a critical target for therapeutic intervention. However, relatively few agents have been shown to target LSCs, slowing progress in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on in vitro and in vivo evidence, we report here that fenretinide, a well-tolerated vitamin A derivative, is capable of eradicating LSCs but not normal hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells at physiologically achievable concentrations. Fenretinide exerted a selective cytotoxic effect on primary AML CD34+ cells, especially the LSC-enriched CD34+CD38− subpopulation, whereas no significant effect was observed on normal counterparts. Methylcellulose colony formation assays further showed that fenretinide significantly suppressed the formation of colonies derived from AML CD34+ cells but not those from normal CD34+ cells. Moreover, fenretinide significantly reduced the in vivo engraftment of AML stem cells but not normal hematopoietic stem cells in a nonobese diabetic/SCID mouse xenotransplantation model. Mechanistic studies revealed that fenretinide-induced cell death was linked to a series of characteristic events, including the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of genes associated with stress responses and apoptosis, and repression of genes involved in NF-κB and Wnt signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the fenretinide–down-regulated genes were significantly correlated with the existing poor-prognosis signatures in AML patients. Based on these findings, we propose that fenretinide is a potent agent that selectively targets LSCs, and may be of value in the treatment of AML. PMID:23513221

  20. Inhibition of pentose phosphate pathway suppresses acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Xu, Qian; Ji, Dexiang; Wei, Yanlin; Chen, Huamei; Li, Tingting; Wan, Bolin; Yuan, Liya; Huang, Ruibin; Chen, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a metabolic pathway that generates NADPH and pentose. PPP genes have been reported to be primarily or secondarily upregulated in many cancers. We aimed to study the general alteration of PPP in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). We performed data mining and analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) AML dataset for genetic alteration of the PPP gene set. In vitro studies including proliferation, migration, and invasion assays, together with metabolite consumption and oxidation assays, were performed. PPP genes were upregulated in 61 % of patients with AML. The majority of altered cases were expression changes measured by RNA sequencing. Expressions of critical PPP genes such as G6PD, PFKL, PFKP, and PGLS were consistently upregulated in all altered cases. Altered PPP is not associated with survival or disease relapse. PPP inhibition using 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN) increases glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. 6AN decreased the glucose oxidation and increased fatty acid oxidation. Here, we showed that PPP inhibition increased glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. PPP inhibition suppressed growth, migration, and invasion of AML, but not colony formation. PPP plays an important role in AML. Our results could contribute to the development of novel targeted treatment. PMID:26596840

  1. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Liver infection caused by Coniothyrium fuckelii in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Polsky, B; Punithalingam, E; Edwards, F F; Brown, A E; Armstrong, D

    1987-01-01

    A case of liver infection caused by Coniothyrium fuckelii is described in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This fungus is found in the soil and can be a pathogen of plants. Coniothyrium spp. are members of the order Sphaeropsidales, an order composed of fungi whose conidiomata are usually pycnidia with the conidiogenous hymenium lining the walls of the locule. Coniothyrium spp. must be differentiated from Phoma spp. and Hendersonula spp., the two most commonly isolated members of the Sphaeropsidales. Images PMID:3480895

  5. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. RUNX1 amplification in lineage conversion of childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Podgornik, Helena; Debeljak, Marusa; Zontar, Darja; Cernelc, Peter; Prestor, Veronika Velensek; Jazbec, Janez

    2007-10-01

    Amplification of RUNX1 (alias AML1) is a recurrent karyotypic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that is generally associated with a poor outcome. It does not occur with other primary chromosomal abnormalities in acute ALL. AML1 amplification in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a rare secondary event described mainly in therapy-related cases. AML1 amplification was found in a 13-year-old patient with AML M4/M5 leukemia that occurred 5 years after she had been diagnosed with common B-cell ALL. Conventional cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and polymerase chain reaction methods revealed no other chromosomal change expected to occur in a disease that we assumed to be a secondary leukemia. Due to the lack of cytogenetic data from the diagnostic sample, we developed a new approach to analyze the archived bone marrow smear, which had been stained previously with May-Grünwald-Geimsa by the FISH method. This analysis confirmed that in addition to t(12;21), AML1 amplification and overexpression existed already at the time the diagnosis was made. The chromosomal changes, however, were found in different clones of bone marrow cells. While the first course of chemotherapy successfully eradicated the cell line with the t(12;21), the second cell line with AML1 amplification remained latent during the time of complete remission and reappeared with a different immunophenotype. PMID:17889714

  7. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  8. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  9. Esophageal aspergillosis in cytologic brushings: report of two cases associated with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Simon; Geisinger, Kim R

    2004-05-01

    Aspergillus, which commonly involves the sinonasal region and upper respiratory tract, is reported for the first time in esophageal brushings in two immunocompromised patients with a history of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Aspergillus species was identified in both cases in smears as scattered three-dimensional groups of fungi with 45 degrees angle branching. One case had a local esophageal noninvasive form, while the other, in addition to the esophagus, had disseminated to the spleen. Although Aspergillus is an uncommon cause of esophagitis in immunocompromised patients, its presence may be associated with an extremely poor prognosis as both expired shortly after detecting this fungus on esophageal brushings. PMID:15108234

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  11. Neural cell adhesion molecule (CD56)-positive acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mann, K P; DeCastro, C M; Liu, J; Moore, J O; Bigner, S H; Traweek, S T

    1997-06-01

    The CD56 antigen is normally expressed on natural-killer cells but has additionally been shown to be present on a variety of hematologic malignancies, including a subset of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). There is disagreement, however, about its prognostic significance and its association with specific cytogenetic abnormalities. All clinical samples from June 1994, through September 1995, with increased myeloblasts were analyzed by multiparameter flow cytometry for anomalous expression of CD56. Patients with CD56+ blast cells were selected, and morphologic review was performed. Clinical information was obtained, and cytogenetic data were reviewed. Southern blot analysis to detect rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene was performed when possible. The samples from 23 of 114 patients studied demonstrated anomalous expression of CD56 on myeloblasts, including patients with AML, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The samples from 10 of 15 patients with CD56+ AML demonstrated at least partial monocytic differentiation. Dysplastic features were displayed in the samples of 12 patients. Correlation with specific cytogenetic abnormalities was not found. The MLL gene was rearranged in five of 18 patients. Seventeen patients have died, with a median survival of 4.6 months for patients with AML. Three have sustained a complete remission. One has findings of high-grade myelodysplastic syndrome. Two were unavailable for follow-up. Expression of CD56 was found in 20% of patients with increased myeloblasts, including patients with high-grade MDS, chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis, and AML. This phenotype was associated with dysplasia, monocytic differentiation, and rearrangement of the MLL gene. PMID:9169661

  12. Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute myeloid leukemia with 11q23/MLL translocation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaitly, Vanya; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although defined by the presence of t(9;22), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can have other concurrent additional cytogenetic changes, especially during disease progression. Additional chromosomal changes (ACAs) in CML often occur in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive cells and are associated with disease acceleration and treatment resistance. Occasionally chromosomal changes occur in Ph-negative cells and this phenomenon is often transient and does not correlate with disease progression. Very rarely myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia can develop in Ph-negative cells. In this study, we report an unusual case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with 11q23/MLL translocation emerging from Ph-negative cells in a patient with CML. PMID:27358881

  13. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  14. Impact of genetic targets on cancer therapy in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mithun Vinod; Barochia, Amit; Loughran, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of the cells of myeloid origin. It can present at all ages, but is more common in adults. It is one of the most common leukemias in adults and continues to pose significant challenge in diagnosis and long-term management.AML is a disease at the forefront of genetic and genomic approaches to medicine. It is a disease that has witnessed rapid advances in terms of diagnosis, classification, prognosis and ultimately individualized therapy. Newly diagnosed AML patients are now routinely stratified according to cytogenetics and molecular markers which guides long-term prognosis and treatment. On the other hand, with few exceptions, the initial treatment (also known as induction treatment) of AML has been 'one-size-fits-all'. It remains a great challenge for patients and physicians to consolidate and translate these advances into eventual success in clinic [1, 2]. PMID:23288651

  15. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  16. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  17. Microenvironmental remodeling as a parameter and prognostic factor of heterogeneous leukemogenesis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-A; Shim, Jae-Seung; Lee, Ga-Young; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myungshin; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Chang-Ki; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-06-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of stem cell-like blasts in bone marrow (BM); however, their unique cellular interaction within the BM microenvironment and its functional significance remain unclear. Here, we assessed the BM microenvironment of AML patients and demonstrate that the leukemia stem cells induce a change in the transcriptional programming of the normal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). The modified leukemic niche alters the expressions of cross-talk molecules (i.e., CXCL12 and JAG1) in MSCs to provide a distinct cross-talk between normal and leukemia cells, selectively suppressing normal primitive hematopoietic cells while supporting leukemogenesis and chemoresistance. Of note, AML patients exhibited distinct heterogeneity in the alteration of mesenchymal stroma in BM. The distinct pattern of stromal changes in leukemic BM at initial diagnosis was associated with a heterogeneous posttreatment clinical course with respect to the maintenance of complete remission for 5 to 8 years and early or late relapse. Thus, remodeling of mesenchymal niche by leukemia cells is an intrinsic self-reinforcing process of leukemogenesis that can be a parameter for the heterogeneity in the clinical course of leukemia and hence serve as a potential prognostic factor. PMID:25791383

  18. Efficacy of an Fc-modified anti-CD123 antibody (CSL362) combined with chemotherapy in xenograft models of acute myelogenous leukemia in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Erwin M.; Yee, Dean; Busfield, Samantha J.; McManus, Julie F.; Cummings, Nik; Vairo, Gino; Wei, Andrew; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Powell, Jason A.; Lopez, Angel F.; Lewis, Ian D.; McCall, Martin N.; Lock, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of older patients with acute myelogenous leukemia is generally poor. The interleukin-3 receptor α-chain (CD123) is highly expressed on the surface of acute leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. CSL362 is a fully humanized, CD123-neutralizing monoclonal antibody containing a modified Fc structure, which enhances human natural killer cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Six continuous acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts established from patient explants and characterized by cell and molecular criteria, produced progressively lethal disease 42-202 days after transplantation. CSL362 alone reduced engraftment of one of four and three of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts in the bone marrow and peripheral organs, respectively. A cytarabine and daunorubicin regimen was optimized using this model to identify potentially synergistic interactions with CSL362. Cytarabine/daunorubicin improved the survival of mice engrafted with four of four acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts by 31–41 days. Moreover, CSL362 extended the survival of cytarabine/daunorubicin-treated mice for two of two acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts, while augmentation of natural killer cell-deficient NSG mice with adoptively transferred human natural killer cells improved survival against a single xenograft. Interestingly, this enhanced CSL362 efficacy was lost in the absence of chemotherapy. This study shows that acute myelogenous leukemia xenografts provide a platform for the evaluation of new therapeutics, simulating complex in vivo interactions, and that the in vivo efficacy of CSL362 supports continued clinical development of this drug. PMID:26130514

  19. Cutaneous infection caused by Cylindrocarpon lichenicola in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Iwen, P C; Tarantolo, S R; Sutton, D A; Rinaldi, M G; Hinrichs, S H

    2000-09-01

    Cylindrocarpon lichenicola is a saprophytic soil fungus which has rarely been associated with human disease. We report the first case of localized invasive cutaneous infection caused by this fungus in a 53-year-old male from the rural midwestern United States with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia. On admission for induction chemotherapy, the patient was noted to have an abrasive laceration between the fourth and fifth metacarpophalangeal joints and on the dorsum of the right hand, which progressed to frank ulceration following chemotherapy. A biopsy provided an initial diagnosis of an invasive fungal infection consistent with aspergillosis based on the histopathological appearance of the mold in tissue. Multiple positive fungal cultures which were obtained from the biopsied tissue were subsequently identified by microscopic and macroscopic characteristics to be C. lichenicola. The infection resolved following marrow regeneration, aggressive debridement of the affected tissue, and treatment with amphotericin B. This case extends the conditions associated with invasive disease caused by C. lichenicola. PMID:10970386

  20. Bone marrow transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia: factors associated with early mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Bortin, M.M.; Gale, R.P.; Kay, H.E.; Rimm, A.A.

    1983-03-04

    Comprehensive data were reported to the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry, Milwaukee, regarding 156 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who were treated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation between 1978 and 1980. The minimum observation period was 15 months after transplant and most deaths occurred within the first six months. Prognostic factors were evaluated for associations with early mortality or life-threatening complications. Most early deaths were due to infections, interstitial pneumonitis, and graft-v-host disease (GVHD). Multivariate analyses disclosed five factors with significant associations with early death or a major cause of early death: (1) disease status; (2) dose-rate of irradiation; (3) drug used to prevent GVHD; (4) severity of GVHD; and (5) dose of marrow cells.It is emphasized that several of the important prognostic factors are within the control of the referring physician or the transplant team.

  1. Phosphatidylserine index as a marker of the procoagulant phenotype of acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Recht, Olivia; Gruber, András; Levine, Ross L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are at risk for thrombotic complications. Risk to develop thrombosis is closely tied to leukemia subtype, and studies have shown an association between leukocytosis and thrombosis in AML M3. We evaluated the relative roles of cell count and the surface expression of tissue factor (TF) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in the procoagulant phenotype of AML cell lines. The TF-positive AML M3 cell lines, NB4 and HL60, and AML M2 cell line, AML14, exhibited both extrinsic tenase and prothrombinase activity in a purified system and promoted experimental thrombus formation. In contrast, the TF-negative AML cell line, HEL, exhibited only prothrombinase activity and did not affect the rate of occlusive thrombus formation. In plasma, NB4, HL60 and AML14 shortened clotting times in a cell-count, PS- and TF-dependent manner. Exposure of cultured NB4, HL60, and AML14 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin increased their extrinsic tenase activity and PS expression. Clot initiation time inversely correlated with logarithm of PS index, defined as the product of multiplying leukocyte count with cell surface PS exposure. We propose that leukemia cell PS index may serve as a biomarker for procoagulant activity.

  2. Tetraspanin 3 is Required for the Development and Propagation of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takahiro; Blevins, Allen; Konuma, Takaaki; Weeks, Joi; Lytle, Nikki K.; Koechlein, Claire S.; Rizzieri, David; Chuah, Charles; Oehler, Vivian G.; Sasik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary; Reya, Tannishtha

    2015-01-01

    Summary Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer that strikes both adults and children, and is frequently resistant to therapy. Thus, identifying signals needed for AML propagation is a critical step toward developing new approaches for treating this disease. Here we show that Tetraspanin3 is a target of the RNA binding protein Musashi2, which plays a key role in AML. We generated Tspan3 knockout mice which were born without overt defects. However, Tspan3 deletion impaired leukemia stem cell self-renewal and disease propagation, and markedly improved survival in mouse models of AML. Additionally, Tspan3 inhibition blocked growth of AML patient samples suggesting that Tspan3 is also important in human disease. As part of the mechanism, we show that Tspan3-deficiency disabled responses to CXCL12/SDF-1, and led to defects in AML localization within the niche. These identify Tspan3 as an important regulator of aggressive leukemias and highlight a role for Tspan3 in oncogenesis. PMID:26212080

  3. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy. PMID:19404024

  4. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  5. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Ryan, Terence E; Neufer, P Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N; Davis, Traci S; MacDougall, Matthew R; Fox, Todd E; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F; Barth, Brian M; Deering, Tye G; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the "Warburg effect" represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. PMID:27140664

  6. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  8. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-01

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  9. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  10. EphB1 Suppression in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Regulating the DNA Damage Control System

    PubMed Central

    Kampen, K.R.; Scherpen, F.J.G.; Garcia-Manero, G.; Yang, H.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Cloos, J.; Zwaan, C.M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M.; Kornblau, S.M.; De Bont, E.S.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of ephrin receptor (EphB1) expression may associate with aggressive cancer phenotypes; however, the mechanism of action remains unclear. To gain detailed insight into EphB1 function in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), comprehensive analysis of EphB1 transcriptional regulation was conducted. In AML cells, EphB1 transcript was inversely correlated with EphB1 promoter methylation. The presence of EphB1 allowed EfnB1 ligand–mediated p53 DNA binding, leading to restoration of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade by the activation of ATR, Chk1, p53, p21, p38, CDK1tyr15, and Bax, and downregulation of HSP27 and Bcl2. Comparatively, reintroduction of EphB1 expression in EphB1-methylated AML cells enhanced the same cascade of ATR, Chk1, p21, and CDK1tyr15, which consequently enforced programmed cell death. Interestingly, in pediatric AML samples, EphB1 peptide phosphorylation and mRNA expression were actively suppressed as compared with normal bone marrow, and a significant percentage of the primary AML specimens had EphB1 promoter hyper-methylation. Finally, EphB1 repression associated with a poor overall survival in pediatric AML. Combined, the contribution of EphB1 to the DDR system reveals a tumor-suppressor function for EphB1 in pediatric AML. Implications The tumor-suppressor function of EphB1 is clinically relevant across many malignancies, suggesting that EphB1 is an important regulator of common cancer cell trans forming pathways. PMID:25944917

  11. Outcomes after matched unrelated donor versus identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Saber, Wael; Opie, Shaun; Rizzo, J Douglas; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Horowitz, Mary M; Schriber, Jeff

    2012-04-26

    Approximately one-third of patients with an indication for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have an HLA-matched related donor (MRD) available to them. For the remaining patients, a matched unrelated donor (MUD) is an alternative. Prior studies comparing MRD and MUD HCT provide conflicting results, and the relative efficacy of MRD and MUD transplantation is an area of active investigation. To address this issue, we analyzed outcomes of 2223 adult acute myelogenous leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic HCT between 2002 and 2006 (MRD, n = 624; 8/8 HLA locus matched MUD, n = 1193; 7/8 MUD, n = 406). The 100-day cumulative incidence of grades B-D acute GVHD was significantly lower in MRD HCT recipients than in 8/8 MUD and 7/8 MUD HCT recipients (33%, 51%, and 53%, respectively; P < .001). In multivariate analysis, 8/8 MUD HCT recipients had a similar survival rate compared with MRD HCT recipients (relative risk [RR], 1.03; P = .62). 7/8 MUD HCT recipients had higher early mortality than MRD HCT recipients (RR, 1.40; P < .001), but beyond 6 months after HCT, their survival rates were similar (RR, 0.88; P = .30). These results suggest that transplantation from MUD and MRD donors results in similar survival times for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:22327226

  12. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. An unusual translocation t(5;21) (q13;q22) in a case of acute myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bellam, S.P.; da Costa, M.; Gogineni, S.K.

    1994-09-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a disease often characterized by consistant chromosomal aberrations in the bone marrow cells. When specific abnormalities are detected, a specific disease classification can be established. Often, however, disease presentation is confusing and aberrations are unusual. We report a case presenting with anemia and leukocytosis. Cytological markers were mixed lymphoid/myeloid; however, the majority of markers supported a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis with Q and G banding revealed an unusual t(5;21) translocation. Whole chromosome five-specific (Cambio, England) and whole chromosome 21-specific (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD) painting probes confirmed the involvement of each chromosome and established the breakpoints at band 5q13 and band 21q22. It is very rare for chromosome 5 to be in translocation with chromosome 21 and this appears to be the first time it has been reported with these two breakpoints. Although the translocation is unique, the breakpoints are common in AML: The 5q13 is associated with multiple classifications and the 21q22 is the same breakpoint in the t(8;21), the hallmark of the M2 classification. Thus, molecular cytogenetic techniques were able to support a diagnosis of AML.

  14. Frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization and infection in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia: different patterns in patients with acute myelogenous and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ford, Clyde D; Lopansri, Bert K; Haydoura, Souha; Snow, Greg; Dascomb, Kristin K; Asch, Julie; Bo Petersen, Finn; Burke, John P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization and infection in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. DESIGN Retrospective clinical study with VRE molecular strain typing. SETTING A regional referral center for acute leukemia. PATIENTS Two hundred fourteen consecutive patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia between 2006 and 2012. METHODS All patients had a culture of first stool and weekly surveillance for VRE. Clinical data were abstracted from the Intermountain Healthcare electronic data warehouse. VRE molecular typing was performed utilizing the semi-automated DiversiLab System. RESULTS The rate of VRE colonization was directly proportional to length of stay and was higher in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factors associated with colonization include administration of corticosteroids (P=0.004) and carbapenems (P=0.009). Neither a colonized prior room occupant nor an increased unit colonization pressure affected colonization risk. Colonized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia had an increased risk of VRE bloodstream infection (BSI, P=0.002). Other risk factors for VRE BSI include severe neutropenia (P=0.04) and diarrhea (P=0.008). Fifty-eight percent of BSI isolates were identical or related by molecular typing. Eighty-nine percent of bloodstream isolates were identical or related to stool isolates identified by surveillance cultures. VRE BSI was associated with increased costs (P=0.0003) and possibly mortality. CONCLUSIONS VRE colonization has important consequences for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia undergoing induction therapy. For febrile neutropenic patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, use of empirical antibiotic regimens that avoid carbapenems and include VRE coverage may be helpful in decreasing the risks associated with VRE BSI. PMID:25627761

  15. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra; Suttiarporn, Panawan; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body’s immune system. Methods and Findings The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS) and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E), suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax) and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the

  18. Genetic heterogeneity in familial acute myelogenous leukemia: evidence for a second locus at chromosome 16q21-23.2.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, M; Benson, K F; Li, F Q; Wolff, J; Leppert, M F; Hobson, L; Mangelsdorf, M; Yu, S; Hewett, D; Richards, R I; Raskind, W H

    1997-01-01

    The identification of genes responsible for the rare cases of familial leukemia may afford insight into the mechanism underlying the more common sporadic occurrences. Here we test a single family with 11 relevant meioses transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia for linkage to three potential candidate loci. In a different family with inherited AML, linkage to chromosome 21q22.1-22.2 was recently reported; we exclude linkage to 21q22.1-22.2, demonstrating that familial AML is a heterogeneous disease. After reviewing familial leukemia and observing anticipation in the form of a declining age of onset with each generation, we had proposed 9p21-22 and 16q22 as additional candidate loci. Whereas linkage to 9p21-22 can be excluded, the finding of a maximum two-point LOD score of 2.82 with the microsatellite marker D16S522 at a recombination fraction theta = 0 provides evidence supporting linkage to 16q22. Haplotype analysis reveals a 23.5-cM (17.9-Mb) commonly inherited region among all affected family members extending from D16S451 to D16S289. In order to extract maximum linkage information with missing individuals, incomplete informativeness with individual markers in this interval, and possible deviance from strict autosomal dominant inheritance, we performed nonparametric linkage analysis (NPL) and found a maximum NPL statistic corresponding to a P-value of .00098, close to the maximum conditional probability of linkage expected for a pedigree with this structure. Mutational analysis in this region specifically excludes expansion of the AT-rich minisatellite repeat FRA16B fragile site and the CAG trinucleotide repeat in the E2F-4 transcription factor. The "repeat expansion detection" method, capable of detecting dynamic mutation associated with anticipation, more generally excludes large CAG repeat expansion as a cause of leukemia in this family. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9382098

  19. Highly active combination of BRD4 antagonist and histone deacetylase inhibitor against human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, Warren; Sharma, Sunil; Qi, Jun; Valenta, John A; Schaub, Leasha J; Shah, Bhavin; Peth, Karissa; Portier, Bryce P; Rodriguez, Melissa; Devaraj, Santhana G T; Zhan, Ming; Sheng, Jianting; Iyer, Swaminathan P; Bradner, James E; Bhalla, Kapil N

    2014-05-01

    The bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein family members, including BRD4, bind to acetylated lysines on histones and regulate the expression of important oncogenes, for example, c-MYC and BCL2. Here, we demonstrate the sensitizing effects of the histone hyperacetylation-inducing pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor panobinostat on human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blast progenitor cells (BPC) to the BET protein antagonist JQ1. Treatment with JQ1, but not its inactive enantiomer (R-JQ1), was highly lethal against AML BPCs expressing mutant NPM1c+ with or without coexpression of FLT3-ITD or AML expressing mixed lineage leukemia fusion oncoprotein. JQ1 treatment reduced binding of BRD4 and RNA polymerase II to the DNA of c-MYC and BCL2 and reduced their levels in the AML cells. Cotreatment with JQ1 and the HDAC inhibitor panobinostat synergistically induced apoptosis of the AML BPCs, but not of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells. This was associated with greater attenuation of c-MYC and BCL2, while increasing p21, BIM, and cleaved PARP levels in the AML BPCs. Cotreatment with JQ1 and panobinostat significantly improved the survival of the NOD/SCID mice engrafted with OCI-AML3 or MOLM13 cells (P < 0.01). These findings highlight cotreatment with a BRD4 antagonist and an HDAC inhibitor as a potentially efficacious therapy of AML. PMID:24435446

  20. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2–M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:27563575

  1. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:27563575

  2. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase transforming into acute leukemia under treatment with dasatinib 4 months after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Tokita, Katsuya; Nagasawa, Fusako; Takahashi, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Sasaki, Ko; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2016-03-01

    We report a 64-year-old woman morphologically diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase. Despite having achieved a complete hematological response following treatment with dasatinib, she developed lymphoblastic crisis 4 months later. Blastic cells were in a CD45-negative and SSC-low fraction, and positive for CD10, CD19, CD34, and HLA-DR expression and rearrangement in the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. Chemotherapy using the HyperCVAD/MA regimen led to a complete cytogenetic response, and after cord blood transplantation, she obtained a complete molecular remission. However, the crisis recurred 6 months later. Another salvage therapy using L-AdVP regimen followed by nilotinib led to a complete molecular remission. Retrospective analyses using flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction revealed a minimal blastic crisis clone present in the initial marrow in chronic phase. This case is informative as it suggests that sudden blastic crisis may occur from an undetectable blastic clone present at initial diagnosis and that leukemic stem cells may survive cytotoxic chemotherapy that eliminates most of the blastic cells. PMID:26662559

  3. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  4. Delayed engraftment of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide-purged autologous bone marrow after induction treatment containing mitoxantrone for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Damon, L E; Rugo, H S; Ries, C A; Linker, C A

    1996-01-01

    We have previously documented that adults with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who are induced into first complete remission with mitoxantrone and high-dose cytarabine are more likely than those induced with daunorubicin and high-dose cytarabine to develop a bone marrow injury pattern with delayed cytopenias after achieving initial complete remission, a phenomenon we have termed post-remission cytopenia syndrome. We therefore retrospectively compared the engraftment kinetics of mitoxantrone and daunorubicin patients following 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) purged autologous bone marrow transplant (ABMT) with busulfan-etoposide conditioning. Despite equivalent graft colony forming units granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM), mitoxantrone patients (n = 13) took a median 7 weeks longer to achieve 1.0 x 10(9)/l granulocytes, 5 weeks longer to achieve platelet transfusion independence, and 10 weeks longer to achieve red blood cell transfusion independence, and required more platelet transfusions (P = 0.008), than daunorubicin patients (n = 13). Patients experiencing the post-remission cytopenia syndrome (n = 11) had significantly slower engraftment than those not experiencing the syndrome (n = 15; P < or = 0.04). Two mitoxantrone and five daunorubicin patients have relapsed after ABMT (P = 0.38). We conclude that the type of induction chemotherapy used in untreated adults with de novo AML can influence subsequent engraftment after 4HC-purged ABMT. We believe that mitoxantrone combined with high-dose cytarabine should be avoided as induction chemotherapy in patients for whom 4HC-purged ABMT is planned. PMID:8673063

  5. Early lymphocyte recovery after intensive timed sequential chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia: peripheral oligoclonal expansion of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanakry, Christopher G.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Thoburn, Christopher; Kos, Ferdynand; Meyer, Christian; Briel, Janet; Luznik, Leo; Smith, B. Douglas; Levitsky, Hyam; Karp, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    Few published studies characterize early lymphocyte recovery after intensive chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To test the hypothesis that lymphocyte recovery mirrors ontogeny, we characterized early lymphocyte recovery in 20 consecutive patients undergoing induction timed sequential chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. Recovering T lymphocytes were predominantly CD4+ and included a greatly expanded population of CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Recovering CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells were phenotypically activated regulatory T cells and showed suppressive activity on cytokine production in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Despite an initial burst of thymopoiesis, most recovering regulatory T cells were peripherally derived. Furthermore, regulatory T cells showed marked oligoclonal skewing, suggesting that their peripheral expansion was antigen-driven. Overall, lymphocyte recovery after chemotherapy differs from ontogeny, specifically identifying a peripherally expanded oligoclonal population of activated regulatory T lymphocytes. These differences suggest a stereotyped immunologic recovery shared by patients with newly diagnosed AML after induction timed sequential chemotherapy. Further insight into this oligoclonal regulatory T-cell population will be fundamental toward developing effective immunomodulatory techniques to improve survival for patients with AML. PMID:20935254

  6. Clinical activity of sequential flavopiridol, cytosine arabinoside, and mitoxantrone for adults with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Judith E; Blackford, Amanda; Smith, B Douglas; Alino, Katrina; Seung, Amy Hatfield; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Greer, Jacqueline M; Carraway, Hetty E; Gore, Steven D; Jones, Richard J; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Doyle, L Austin; Wright, John J

    2010-07-01

    Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is cytotoxic to leukemic blasts. In a Phase II study, flavopiridol 50 mg/m(2) was given by 1-h infusion daily x 3 beginning day 1 followed by 2 g/m(2)/72 h ara-C beginning day 6 and 40 mg/m(2) mitoxantrone on day 9 (FLAM) to 45 adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with multiple poor-risk features. Thirty patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (9%) died. Twelve (40%) received myeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first CR. Median OS and DFS are not reached (67% alive 12.5-31 months, 58% in CR 11.4-30 months), with median follow-up 22 months. Sixteen received FLAM in CR, with median OS and DFS 9 and 13.1 months, and 36% alive at 21-31 months. Short OS and DFS correlated with adverse cytogenetics, regardless of age or treatment in CR. The addition of allogeneic BMT in CR translates into long OS and DFS in the majority of eligible patients. PMID:19962759

  7. STAT5 is crucial to maintain leukemic stem cells in acute myelogenous leukemias induced by MOZ-TIF2.

    PubMed

    Tam, Winnie F; Hähnel, Patricia S; Schüler, Andrea; Lee, Benjamin H; Okabe, Rachel; Zhu, Nan; Pante, Saskia V; Raffel, Glen; Mercher, Thomas; Wernig, Gerlinde; Bockamp, Ernesto; Sasca, Daniel; Kreft, Andreas; Robinson, Gertraud W; Hennighausen, Lothar; Gilliland, D Gary; Kindler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MOZ-TIF2 is a leukemogenic fusion oncoprotein that confers self-renewal capability to hematopoietic progenitor cells and induces acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with long latency in bone marrow transplantation assays. Here, we report that FLT3-ITD transforms hematopoietic cells in cooperation with MOZ-TIF2 in vitro and in vivo. Coexpression of FLT3-ITD confers growth factor independent survival/proliferation, shortens disease latency, and results in an increase in the number of leukemic stem cells (LSC). We show that STAT5, a major effector of aberrant FLT3-ITD signal transduction, is both necessary and sufficient for this cooperative effect. In addition, STAT5 signaling is essential for MOZ-TIF2-induced leukemic transformation itself. Lack of STAT5 in fetal liver cells caused rapid differentiation and loss of replating capacity of MOZ-TIF2-transduced cells enriched for LSCs. Furthermore, mice serially transplanted with Stat5(-/-) MOZ-TIF2 leukemic cells develop AML with longer disease latency and finally incomplete penetrance when compared with mice transplanted with Stat5(+/+) MOZ-TIF2 leukemic cells. These data suggest that STAT5AB is required for the self-renewal of LSCs and represents a combined signaling node of FLT3-ITD and MOZ-TIF2 driven leukemogenesis. Therefore, targeting aberrantly activated STAT5 or rewired downstream signaling pathways may be a promising therapeutic option. PMID:23149921

  8. Identification of fungal pathogens in a patient with acute myelogenic leukemia using a pathogen detection array technology.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sagarika; Peck, Kristen N; Feldman, Michael D; Schuster, Mindy G; Alwine, James C; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-04-01

    Invasive zygomycosis in immunocompromised patients results in a high mortality rate, and early identification is crucial to optimize therapy and to reduce morbidity. However, diagnosing specific species of zygomycetes fungi possess challenge in the clinical laboratories. A need for a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for early recognition of a zygomycetes fungus in clinical samples to the species level will lead to prompt and accurate therapy and the PathoChip provides one such platform. We utilized a pathogen array technology referred to as PathoChip, comprised of oligonucleotide probes that can detect all the sequenced viruses as well as known pathogenic bacteria, fungi and parasites and family-specific conserved probes, thus providing a means for detecting previously uncharacterized members of a family. We rapidly identified a zygomycetous fungus, Rhizomucor pusillus, an otherwise challenge for the clinical laboratories, predominantly in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This report highlights the value of PathoChip as a diagnostic tool to identify micro-organisms to the species level, especially for those difficult to identify in most clinical laboratories. It will also help clinicians to obtain a critical snapshot of the infection profile of a patient to plan treatment strategies. PMID:26619325

  9. Definition of a possible genetic basis for susceptibility to acute myelogenous leukemia associated with the presence of a polymorphic Ia epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Seremetis, S; Cuttner, J; Winchester, R

    1985-01-01

    The polymorphic Ia epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody 109d6 is detectable on the leukemic cells of a significantly increased number of individuals with acute myelogenous leukemia, compared with its frequency in normal healthy control individuals. In control individuals, the presence of the 109d6 epitope is closely correlated with but not identical to the DRw53 allo-specificity. However, the frequency of particular conventional Ia allodeterminants, including DRw53, is not significantly elevated in the leukemia group. Considerable evidence supports the conclusion that the high frequency of the 109d6 epitope reflects an inherited basis for susceptibility to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia and not a differentiation event occurring in the leukemic lineage. The 109d6 determinant is expressed by leukemic myeloblasts as well as by homologous normal B cells and monocytes obtained from the same individuals during remission of the leukemia. Furthermore, in healthy family members the 109d6 epitope is encoded by Ia haplotypes that are shared with the patient. Of special interest, certain of these haplotypes have combinations of the 109d6 epitope and Ia specificities not commonly seen in normal individuals; here, also, healthy family members share these haplotypes. PMID:2414320

  10. Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndromes Patients ≥70 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Karamjeet S; Brunstein, Claudio; DeFor, Todd; Bejanyan, Nelli; Arora, Mukta; Warlick, Erica; Weisdorf, Daniel; Ustun, Celalettin

    2016-01-01

    The maximum age of patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) has been moving up over time. However, the availability of a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor may limit access of this patient population to alloHCT. We retrospectively investigated the outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) after reduced-intensity conditioning regimens in patients aged ≥70 years with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) between 2010 and 2014. During this period 70 patients with AML/MDS were referred to our center for alloHCT consideration. Twenty-two patients (33%) received alloHCT: 10 UCBT, 9 HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation, 2 haploidentical alloHCT, and 1 unrelated donor alloHCT. In UCBT, cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality and relapse were 20% and 30% at 2 years, respectively. The cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day +100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years was 10%. Seven patients had viral reactivation/infections. Rates of overall survival and disease-free survival were 60% and 50% at 2 years, respectively. Moreover, these outcomes seemed to be similar to that of patients aged 60 to 69 years receiving UCBT (n = 60) and patients aged ≥70 years receiving HLA full-matched sibling donor transplantation (n = 9). These results suggest that UCBT is feasible in selected AML/MDS patients aged ≥70 years. In fact, UCBT shortens the required time for an unrelated donor search and thus increases the chance of proceeding with alloHCT, which might contribute to higher rates of alloHCT in the referral group. Outcomes of UCBT are promising; however, larger studies with a longer follow-up are needed. PMID:26415559

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality. PMID:24316460

  12. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E; Haregewoin, A; Clark, J; Watson, P; Hughes, T; Dufva, I; Jimenez, J L; Mahon, F-X; Rousselot, P; Cortes, J; Martinelli, G; Papayannidis, C; Nagler, A; Giles, F J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the T315I mutation. Adults with Ph+ chronic phase (CP)-, accelerated phase (AP)- or blast phase (BP)-CML, or ALL and documented BCR-ABL T315I mutation were treated with a 5-day continuous infusion of MK-0457 administered every 14 days at 40 mg/m(2)/h, 32 mg/m(2)/h or 24 mg/m(2)/h. Fifty-two patients (CP, n=15; AP, n=14; BP, n=11; Ph+ ALL, n=12) were treated. Overall, 8% of patients achieved major cytogenetic response; 6% achieved unconfirmed complete or partial response; 39% had no response. Two patients (CP CML) achieved complete hematologic response. No patients with advanced CML or Ph+ ALL achieved major hematologic response. The most common adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (50%). The most common grade 3/4 AEs were neutropenia (46%) and febrile neutropenia (35%). MK-0457 demonstrated minimal efficacy and only at higher, intolerable doses; lower doses were tolerated and no unexpected toxicities were observed. These data will assist in the development of future aurora kinase inhibitors and in the selection of appropriate target patient populations. PMID:25127392

  13. Therapeutic potential of MEK inhibition in acute myelogenous leukemia: rationale for "vertical" and "lateral" combination strategies.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Scerpa, Maria Cristina; Bergamo, Paola; Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Chiaretti, Sabina; Tavolaro, Simona; Mascolo, Maria Grazia; Abrams, Stephen L; Steelman, Linda S; Tsao, Twee; Marchetti, Antonio; Konopleva, Marina; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Cognetti, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Andreeff, Michael; McCubrey, James A; Tafuri, Agostino; Milella, Michele

    2012-10-01

    In hematological malignancies, constitutive activation of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway is frequently observed, conveys a poor prognosis, and constitutes a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional effects of pharmacological MEK inhibition in cell line models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and freshly isolated primary AML samples. The small-molecule, ATP-non-competitive, MEK inhibitor PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of several AML cell lines and approximately 70 % of primary AML samples. Growth inhibition was due to G(1)-phase arrest and induction of apoptosis. Transformation by constitutively active upstream pathway elements (HRAS, RAF-1, and MEK) rendered FDC-P1 cells exquisitely prone to PD0325901-induced apoptosis. Gene and protein expression profiling revealed a selective effect of PD0325901 on ERK phosphorylation and compensatory upregulation of the RAF/MEK and AKT/p70( S6K ) kinase modules, potentially mediating resistance to drug-induced growth inhibition. Consequently, in appropriate cellular contexts, both "vertical" (i.e., inhibition of RAF and MEK along the MAPK pathway) and "lateral" (i.e., simultaneous inhibition of the MEK/ERK and mTOR pathways) combination strategies may result in synergistic anti-leukemic effects. Overall, MEK inhibition exerts potent growth inhibitory and proapoptotic activity in preclinical models of AML, particularly in combination with other pathway inhibitors. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of MEK inhibitors will likely translate into more effective targeted strategies for the treatment of AML. PMID:22399013

  14. DEK, an autoantigen involved in a chromosomal translocation in acute myelogenous leukemia, binds to the HIV-2 enhancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, G K; Grosveld, G; Markovitz, D M

    1997-03-01

    The product of the dek oncogene is the 43-kDa DEK nuclear protein. DEK was first identified in a fusion with the CAN nucleoporin protein in a specific subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia. DEK has also been shown to be an autoantigen in patients with pauciarticular onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Further, the last 65 amino acids of DEK can partially reverse the mutation-prone phenotype of cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia. However, in spite of these significant disease associations, the function of DEK has remained unclear. The HIV-2 peri-ets (pets) site is a TG-rich element found between the two Elf-1 binding sites in the HIV-2 enhancer. The pets element mediates transcriptional activation whether the enhancer is stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) alone, phytohemagluttinin (PHA) alone, PMA plus PHA, soluble antibodies to the T cell receptor, immobilized antibodies to the T cell receptor, or by antigen. Previously, we purified and characterized the pets factor, demonstrating that it is a 43-kDa nuclear protein. We now describe the identification of DEK as this 43-kDa pets factor. Using a modified Southwestern screening procedure, we find that DEK can recognize the pets element. We demonstrate the ability of recombinant DEK to bind specifically to the pets site using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting. "Supershift" EMSA further confirms that DEK is the dominant protein binding to the pets site in T cell extracts. Our findings show that DEK is a site-specific DNA binding protein that is likely involved in transcriptional regulation and signal transduction. This has implications for multiple pathogenic processes, including hematologic malignancies, arthritis, ataxia-telangiectasia, and AIDS caused by HIV-2. PMID:9050861

  15. Phase II Trial of Vorinostat With Idarubicin and Cytarabine for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Bekele, Nebiyou B.; Yang, Hui; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan M.; Konopleva, Marina Y.; Faderl, Stefan; Cortes, Jorge E.; Brandt, Mark; Hu, Yumin; McCue, Deborah; Newsome, Willie Mae; Pierce, Sherry R.; de Lima, Marcos; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat with idarubicin and ara-C (cytarabine) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated AML or higher-risk MDS age 15 to 65 years with appropriate organ function and no core-binding factor abnormality were candidates. Induction therapy was vorinostat 500 mg orally three times a day (days 1 to 3), idarubin 12 mg/m2 intravenously (IV) daily × 3 (days 4 to 6), and cytarabine 1.5 g/m2 IV as a continuous infusion daily for 3 or 4 days (days 4 to 7). Patients in remission could be treated with five cycles of consolidation therapy and up to 12 months of maintenance therapy with single-agent vorinostat. The study was designed to stop early if either excess toxicity or low probability of median event-free survival (EFS) of more than 28 weeks was likely. Results After a three-patient run-in phase, 75 patients were treated. Median age was 52 years (range, 19 to 65 years), 29 patients (39%) were cytogenetically normal, and 11 (15%) had FLT-3 internal tandem duplication (ITD). No excess vorinostat-related toxicity was observed. Induction mortality was 4%. EFS was 47 weeks (range, 3 to 134 weeks), and overall survival was 82 weeks (range, 3 to 134 weeks). Overall response rate (ORR) was 85%, including 76% complete response (CR) and 9% in CR with incomplete platelet recovery. ORR was 93% in diploid patients and 100% in FLT-3 ITD patients. Levels of NRF2 and CYBB were associated with longer survival. Conclusion The combination of vorinostat with idarubicin and cytarabine is safe and active in AML. PMID:22585696

  16. Cancer-associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate accumulates in acute myelogenous leukemia with isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Gross, Stefan; Cairns, Rob A; Minden, Mark D; Driggers, Edward M; Bittinger, Mark A; Jang, Hyun Gyung; Sasaki, Masato; Jin, Shengfang; Schenkein, David P; Su, Shinsan M; Dang, Lenny; Fantin, Valeria R; Mak, Tak W

    2010-02-15

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2), are present in most gliomas and secondary glioblastomas, but are rare in other neoplasms. IDH1/2 mutations are heterozygous, and affect a single arginine residue. Recently, IDH1 mutations were identified in 8% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. A glioma study revealed that IDH1 mutations cause a gain-of-function, resulting in the production and accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Genotyping of 145 AML biopsies identified 11 IDH1 R132 mutant samples. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolite screening revealed increased 2-HG levels in IDH1 R132 mutant cells and sera, and uncovered two IDH2 R172K mutations. IDH1/2 mutations were associated with normal karyotypes. Recombinant IDH1 R132C and IDH2 R172K proteins catalyze the novel nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG) to 2-HG. The IDH1 R132C mutation commonly found in AML reduces the affinity for isocitrate, and increases the affinity for NADPH and alpha-KG. This prevents the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to alpha-KG, and facilitates the conversion of alpha-KG to 2-HG. IDH1/2 mutations confer an enzymatic gain of function that dramatically increases 2-HG in AML. This provides an explanation for the heterozygous acquisition of these mutations during tumorigenesis. 2-HG is a tractable metabolic biomarker of mutant IDH1/2 enzyme activity. PMID:20142433

  17. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Fremin, Brayon J.; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Manzo, Veronica E.; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A.; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S.; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods. Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results. All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9–20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions. The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26269794

  18. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:26269794

  19. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Natural killer cell killing of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor-negative natural killer cells after NKG2A and LIR-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Godal, Robert; Bachanova, Veronika; Gleason, Michelle; McCullar, Valarie; Yun, Gong H; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; McGlave, Philip B; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    Although the study of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity has been dominated by studies of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), we hypothesized that NKG2A and LIR-1, present on 53% +/- 13% and 36% +/- 18% of normal NK cells, respectively, play roles in the NK cell killing of primary leukemia targets. KIR(-) cells, which compose nearly half of the circulating NK cell population, exhibit tolerance to primary leukemia targets, suggesting signaling through other inhibitory receptors. Both acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia targets were rendered susceptible to lysis by fresh resting KIR(-) NK cells when inhibitory receptor-major histocompatibility class I interactions were blocked by pan-HLA antibodies, demonstrating that these cells are functionally competent. Blockade of a single inhibitory receptor resulted in slightly increased killing, whereas combined LIR-1 and NKG2A blockade consistently resulted in increased NK cell cytotoxicity. Dual blockade of NKG2A and LIR-1 led to significant killing of targets by resting KIR(-) NK cells, demonstrating that this population is not hyporesponsive. Together these results suggest that alloreactivity of a significant fraction of KIR(-) NK cells is mediated by NKG2A and LIR-1. Thus strategies to interrupt NKG2A and LIR-1 in combination with anti-KIR blockade hold promise for exploiting NK cell therapy in acute leukemias. PMID:20139023

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome spanning the 8; 21 translocation breakpoint t(8; 21)(q22; q22. 3) in acute myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Jizong Gao; Erickson, P. ); Gardiner, K.; Patterson, D. ); Le Beau, M.M.; Diaz, M.O.; Rowley, J.D. ); Drabkin, H.A. Eleanor Roosevelt Inst. for Cancer Research, Denver, CO )

    1991-06-01

    The 8;21 translocation is one of the most common specific rearrangements in acute myelogenous leukemia. The authors have identified markers (D21S65 and a Not I boundary clone, Not-42, referred to as probe B) flanking the chromosome 21 translocation breakpoint (21q22.3) that demonstrate physical linkage in normal genomic DNA, by using at least three restriction endonucleases (Not I, Sac II, and BssHII), and that are located not more than 250-280 kilobases apart. Pulsed-field gel analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids containing the 8;21 translocation chromosomes demonstrates rearrangement of these markers. A 470-kilobase yeast artificial chromosome, YAC-Not-42, has been isolated that contains both probes. Mapping of {lambda} subclones constructed from YAC-Not-42 suggests that >95% of the yeast artificial chromosome DNA is located on the proximal (D21S65) side of the breakpoint. In situ hybridization studies using metaphase chromosomes from five acute myelogenous leukemia patients with the 8;21 translocation confirmed these results and demonstrated the translocation of probe B to the derivative chromosome 8. A chromosome walk of {approx} 39 kilobases from probe B has allowed identification of the breakpoint in DNA from a somatic cell hybrid containing the derivative chromosome 8. Since probe B contains conserved DNA sequences and is in close proximity to the translocation breakpoint, it may represent a portion of the involved gene on chromosome 21.

  3. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  4. A high BMI is a risk factor in younger patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crysandt, Martina; Kramer, Michael; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Serve, Hubert; Röllig, Christoph; Kaifie, Andrea; Jost, Edgar; Brummendorf, Tim H; Wilop, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Overweight and obese patients have an increased risk to develop several malignancies and, additionally, body mass index (BMI) impacts on outcome in several solid tumors. However, little is known for AML. We analyzed a cohort of 3526 patients with AML treated in three prospective multicenter trials within the German Study Alliance Leukemia. In multivariate analyses, we identified BMI as an independent risk factor for both DFS (HR 1.014, P = 0.0217) and OS (HR 1.015, P < 0.0036). Interestingly, overweight and obesity seemed to be a risk factor predominantly in patients with de novo AML younger than 65 yr with intermediate risk and adverse cytogenetics. Overweight with a BMI ≥25 kg/m² best discriminated the worse outcome and led to an absolute reduction in long-term survival of 5-7% in the group of all younger patients (3-yr OS 39.9% vs. 47.3%; 10-yr OS 28.7% vs. 33.8%, P = 0.0002). Additionally, response to induction therapy was significantly reduced in these patients (76.9% vs. 82.8%, P < 0.0001). Thus, in younger patients with de novo AML, overweight and obesity are risk factors for impaired response to induction therapy, DFS and OS. This effect is, in part but not fully, explained by dose reduction such as dose-capping at a body surface area of 2 m². PMID:26277604

  5. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. Granulocytic sarcoma with compressive myelopathy: a rare presentation of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ganapule, Abhijeet P; Viswabandya, Auro; Jasper, Anita; Patel, Palak; Kokil, Gautami

    2014-07-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma occurs most commonly in acute myelogenous leukemia. The appearance of granulocytic sarcoma in chronic myelogenous leukemia signals accelerated phase/ blast transformation. This is a rare case of undiagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia with granulocytic sarcoma causing cord compression, which went into tumour lysis syndrome requiring dialysis after starting of steroids and radiotherapy. A 43-year-old male presented in emergency department with acute onset of flaccid paralysis. On clinical examination, there was hepatosplenomegaly and lower motor neuron paralysis in the lower limbs. The peripheral smear was consistent with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase. The MRI spine revealed para-spinal and epidural masses causing cord compression and the biopsy from the paraspinal mass was consistent with granulocytic sarcoma. PMID:25177619

  7. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Demeter, Judit; Poros, Anna; Bödör, Csaba; Horváth, Laura; Masszi, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm caused by reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 9 and 22 resulting in the expression of a constitutively activated BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase that leads to the malignant transformation of the hematopoietic stem cells. The condition was previously known as a relentlessly progressive disease, but the treatment was revolutionalized by the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therapeutic success is thus currently determined by the depth of molecular response achieved on therapy. Multiple tyrosine kinase agents are available even for the first line treatment. This guideline summarizes current focal points of the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia specific to Hungary and provides definitions for optimal molecular responses in this condition. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1459-1468. PMID:27615196

  8. Randomized phase II study of two schedules of flavopiridol given as timed sequential therapy with cytosine arabinoside and mitoxantrone for adults with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Judith E.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Estey, Elihu H.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Smith, B. Douglas; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Drye, D. Michelle; Mackey, Karen; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Gore, Steven D.; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Pratz, Keith W.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Showel, Margaret M.; Othus, Megan; Doyle, L. Austin; Wright, John J.; Pagel, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Flavopiridol is a protein-bound, cytotoxic, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor. A phase II trial of flavopiridol followed by ara-C and mitoxantrone with flavopiridol given by 1-h bolus for adults with newly-diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia yielded 67% complete remission with median disease-free survival of 13.6 months. Design and Methods We compared bolus flavopiridol (50 mg/m2/day, Arm A) versus 'hybrid' flavopiridol (30 mg/m2 over 30 min followed by 40 mg/m2 over 4 h, Arm B) followed by ara-C and mitoxantrone in 78 patients (39 per arm) with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. To mitigate imbalance, patients were stratified by presence or absence of secondary leukemia and therapy for antecedent disorder. Results Death at or before Day 60 occurred in 8% of patients per arm. Complete remission plus complete remission with incomplete recovery was 68% (Arm A, 62%; Arm B, 74%) overall, and 65% or over in both arms for patients with secondary leukemia and leukemia with adverse genetics. In Arm A 91% and in Arm B 86% of patients received chemotherapy and/or allogeneic transplantation in complete remission. Median overall survival for all remission patients has not been reached for either arm, with median disease free survival of 13.6 months for Arm A and of 12.0 months for Arm B. Conclusions Both flavopiridol schedules produce comparably encouraging results in adults with poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. Given the greater ease of bolus administration, we are conducting a randomized phase II study of bolus flavopiridol followed by ara-c and mitoxantrone versus conventional induction therapy for patients aged 70 years and under with intermediate or poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT 00407966. PMID:22733022

  9. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8; 21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated

    SciTech Connect

    Drabkin, H.A.; Diaz, M.; Bradley, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Patterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, the authors constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. The authors isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. The authors used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  10. Human acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells are rare and heterogeneous when assayed in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Murphy, Kathleen; Perry, Robin; Sanchez, Patricia V.; Secreto, Anthony; Keefer, Cathy; Swider, Cezary R.; Strzelecki, Anne-Claire; Cavelier, Cindy; Récher, Christian; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Danet-Desnoyers, G.; Carroll, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Human leukemic stem cells, like other cancer stem cells, are hypothesized to be rare, capable of incomplete differentiation, and restricted to a phenotype associated with early hematopoietic progenitors or stem cells. However, recent work in other types of tumors has challenged the cancer stem cell model. Using a robust model of xenotransplantation based on NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice, we confirmed that human leukemic stem cells, functionally defined by us as SCID leukemia-initiating cells (SL-ICs), are rare in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). In contrast to previous results, SL-ICs were found among cells expressing lineage markers (i.e., among Lin+ cells), CD38, or CD45RA, all markers associated with normal committed progenitors. Remarkably, each engrafting fraction consistently recapitulated the original phenotypic diversity of the primary AML specimen and contained self-renewing leukemic stem cells, as demonstrated by secondary transplants. While SL-ICs were enriched in the Lin–CD38– fraction compared with the other fractions analyzed, SL-ICs in this fraction represented only one-third of all SL-ICs present in the unfractionated specimen. These results indicate that human AML stem cells are rare and enriched but not restricted to the phenotype associated with normal primitive hematopoietic cells. These results suggest a plasticity of the cancer stem cell phenotype that we believe has not been previously described. PMID:21157036

  11. Acute myelogenous leukaemia in Hurler's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, K T; McKenna, R W; Desnick, R J

    1978-06-01

    The occurrence of the Hurler syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia in a 2 1/2-year-old girl is described. This represents the first published report of the concurrence of these two diseases. PMID:97385

  12. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Management of chronic myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Amit; Rolen, Katrina; Shah, Binay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to improvement in survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. Many young CML patients encounter pregnancy during their lifetime. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors inhibit several proteins that are known to have important functions in gonadal development, implantation and fetal development, thus increasing the risk of embryo toxicities. Studies have shown imatinib to be embryotoxic in animals with varying effects in fertility. Since pregnancy is rare in CML, there are no randomized controlled trials to address the optimal management of this condition. However, there are several case reports and case series on CML in pregnancy. At the present time, there is no consensus on how to manage different pregnancy situations in CML. In this article, we review current literature on CML in pregnancy, discuss the effects of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors on fertility and pregnancy and suggest an evidence-based treatment of CML in pregnancy. PMID:25550528

  14. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vener, Tatiana I.; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gore, Steven D.; Morris, Lawrence E.; Feldman, Eric J.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E.; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Roboz, Gail R.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Wright, John J.; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771. PMID:22001391

  16. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in FLT3-ITD-Positive Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: The Role for FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Post-Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Gary J; Tuttle, Pamela; Desai, Pinkal

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has become increasingly common in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) due to improved donor availability and the use of nonmyeloablative regimens. However, despite the potential clinical gains with allo-HSCT, the post-transplantation outcomes for many patients, especially those with high-risk disease, remain dismal. Patients with AML who have internal tandem duplication mutations in the tyrosine kinase receptor FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) face particularly poor outcomes, even after allo-HSCT, which appears to only partially mitigate the poor prognosis associated with this mutation. Experimental treatments to reduce the likelihood of relapse and improve survival following allo-HSCT include maintenance with FLT3-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), several of which are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. Preliminary data and case reports suggest that FLT3 TKIs can be effective in the post-transplantation setting, particularly for patients with FLT3-ITD mutations. Improvements in donor matching, transplantation procedures, and supportive care have allowed a greater number of patients to undergo allo-HSCT than ever before. For these patients, it is essential to identify effective post-transplantation therapies to reduce the risk of relapse and improve disease-free survival. PMID:26785334

  17. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Judith E; Vener, Tatiana I; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K; Smith, B Douglas; Gore, Steven D; Morris, Lawrence E; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline M; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Roboz, Gail R; Gocke, Christopher D; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H; Wright, John J; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771. PMID:22001391

  18. Behenoyl cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, and prednisolone combination therapy for acute myelogenous leukemia in adults and prognostic factors related to remission duration and survival length.

    PubMed

    Ohno, R; Kato, Y; Nagura, E; Murase, T; Okumura, M; Yamada, H; Ogura, M; Minami, S; Suzuki, H; Morishima, Y

    1986-12-01

    Fifty-one consecutive previously untreated adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were treated with BHAC-DMP (N4-behenoyl-I-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-cytosine, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, and prednisolone) therapy. Forty-two patients (82.4%) achieved complete remission (CR). The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a probability for remaining in remission of 14% and for survival of 23% at 6 years. Pretreatment factors related to the achievement of CR, such as age, French-American-British (FAB) classification and WBC at the start of treatment, were not identified. Factors related to the CR duration and survival time of the patients who had achieved CR were first analyzed by a univariate analysis with the generalized Wilcoxon test. WBC count at the start of treatment, percent of blasts in the marrow at 1 and 2 weeks after the initiation of therapy, days required until CR, number of courses of induction therapy required until CR, and days required for the disappearance of circulating blasts were identified as statistically significant prognostic factors. When these characteristics were further analyzed by the Cox multivariate regression model, the percent of blasts in the bone marrow at 2 weeks was the most important prognostic factor with a statistical significance, and WBC count at the start of treatment and days required until CR (or number of courses required to achieve CR) were also important factors, with borderline significance. PMID:3465875

  19. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Comparison of allogeneic stem cell transplantation from familial-mismatched/haploidentical donors and from unrelated donors in adults with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Hee-Je

    2012-10-01

    To weigh the pros and cons of familial-mismatched/haploidentical transplantation (FMT) in patients with high-risk acute myelogenous leukemia, we assessed outcomes of 23 patients who underwent FMT, using reduced-intensity conditioning with total body irradiation 800 cGy/busulfan/fludarabine/antithymocyte globulin without ex vivo T cell depletion, compared to 33 patients who underwent well-matched unrelated donor transplantation (WM-UDT) and 13 who underwent partially matched unrelated donor transplantation (PM-UDT) during the same period. The FMT patients had not only a similar pattern of engraftment and immune reconstitution as the WM-UDT and PM-UDT patients but also comparable incidences and severity of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The FMT patients did not experience any form of engraftment failure. However, the cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus DNAemia was significantly higher in the FMT group compared with the other groups (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 28 months, overall survival, disease-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were 83%, 74%, 20%, and 7%, respectively, for WM-UDT; 51%, 51%, 31%, and 18% for PM-UDT; and 66%, 64%, 26%, and 10% for FMT. This demonstrates a trend for favorable survival outcomes of WM-UDT over FMT and of FMT over PM-UDT. However, we found no significant statistical differences in survival according to donor type. These data need to be interpreted cautiously because of limited power calculations due to the small number of each donor group. This pilot study suggests the feasibility of FMT using our novel regimen with careful evaluation of CMV DNAemia compared with WM-UDT and PM-UDT. Further trials with larger numbers of patients, comparing FMT directly with transplantation with other donor types, are needed. PMID:22516055

  1. Modification of sphingolipid metabolism by tamoxifen and N-desmethyltamoxifen in acute myelogenous leukemia – Impact on enzyme activity and response to cytotoxics

    PubMed Central

    Morad, Samy A. F.; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J.; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Barth, Brian M.; Fox, Todd E.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2015-01-01

    The triphenylethylene antiestrogen, tamoxifen, can be an effective inhibitor of sphingolipid metabolism. This off-target activity makes tamoxifen an interesting ancillary for boosting the apoptosis-inducing properties of ceramide, a sphingolipid with valuable tumor censoring activity. Here we show for the first time that tamoxifen and metabolite, N –desmethyltamoxifen (DMT) block ceramide glycosylation and inhibit ceramide hydrolysis (by acid ceramidase, AC) in human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lines and in AML cells derived from patients. Tamoxifen (1-10 μM) inhibition of AC in AML cells was accompanied by decreases in AC protein expression. Tamoxifen also depressed expression and activity of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), the enzyme catalyzing production of mitogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1-P). Results from mass spectroscopy showed that tamoxifen and DMT, i ) increased the levels of endogenous C16:0- and C24:1 ceramide molecular species, ii) nearly totally halted production of respective glucosylceramide (GC) molecular species, iii ) drastically reduced levels of sphingosine ( to 9% of control), and iv ) reduced levels of S1-P by 85%, in vincristine-resistant HL-60/VCR cells. Co-administration of tamoxifen with either N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a ceramide-generating retinoid, or a cell-deliverable form of ceramide, C6-ceramide, resulted in marked decreases in HL-60/VCR cell viability that far exceeded single agent potency. Combination treatments resulted in synergistic apoptotic cell death as gauged by increased Annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase-3. These results show the versatility of adjuvant triphenylethylene with ceramide-centric therapies for magnifying therapeutic potential in AML. Such drug regimens could serve as effective strategies, even in the multidrug resistant setting. PMID:25769964

  2. Evaluation of the clinical relevance of the expression and function of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein and lung resistance protein in patients with primary acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria; Paterakis, George; Androutsos, George; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Kalmantis, Themistoklis; Meletis, John; Rombos, Yiannis; Sagriotis, Alexandros; Symeonidis, Argyrios; Tiniakou, Maria; Zoumbos, Nikolaos; Yataganas, Xenophon

    2002-02-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter-proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) have been associated with treatment failure. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the clinical significance of expression and function of the MDR proteins, considering other prognostic factors, such as age, immunophenotype, and cytogenetics. Mononuclear cells of peripheral blood or bone marrow from 61 patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies JSB1, MRPm6 and LRP56 were used for expression studies. Accumulation and retention studies were performed using the substrates Daunorubicin, Calcein-AM, Rhodamine-123 and DiOC(2) in the presence or absence of the modifiers Verapamil, Genistein, Probenecid, BIBW22S and PSC833. Induction treatment consisted of a 3+7 combination of Ida/Ara-C for patients < or = 60 years of age and a 3+5 Ida/VP-16 combination per OS for patients >60. MDR function was expressed as the ratio of mean fluorescence intensity substrate in the presence of modifier over the substrate alone (resistance index, RI). Patients with advanced age, low CD15 expression and high RI for accumulation of DiOC(2) in the presence of BIBW22S had significantly lower complete remission (CR) rates. No factor was prognostic for event-free survival analysis, which was limited to remitters only. Overall survival was shorter in patients with advanced age, poor prognosis cytogenetics, high CD7 expression, and high RI for Daunorubicin efflux modulated by Verapamil. These results suggest that MDR transporter-proteins have a limited role in the treatment failure of patients treated with Idarubicin-based regimens. PMID:11755464

  3. Clofarabine Plus Cytarabine Compared With Cytarabine Alone in Older Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Results From the CLASSIC I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; Wetzler, Meir; Rizzieri, David; Schiller, Gary; Jagasia, Madan; Stuart, Robert; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Avigan, David; Craig, Michael; Collins, Robert; Maris, Michael; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Goldberg, Stuart; Seiter, Karen; Hari, Parameswaran; Greiner, Jochen; Vey, Norbert; Recher, Christian; Ravandi, Farhad; Wang, Eunice S.; Vasconcelles, Michael; Huebner, Dirk; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the receipt of clofarabine plus cytarabine (Clo+Ara-C arm) with cytarabine (Ara-C arm) in patients ≥ 55 years old with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to receive either clofarabine (Clo) 40 mg/m2 or a placebo followed by Ara-C 1 g/m2 for five consecutive days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included event-free survival (EFS), 4-month EFS, overall remission rate (ORR; complete remission [CR] plus CR with incomplete peripheral blood count recovery), disease-free survival (DFS), duration of remission (DOR), and safety. Results Among 320 patients with confirmed AML (median age, 67 years), the median OS was 6.6 months in the Clo+Ara-C arm and 6.3 months in the Ara-C arm (hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.28; P = 1.00). The ORR was 46.9% in the Clo+Ara-C arm (35.2% CR) versus 22.9% in the Ara-C arm (17.8% CR; P < .01). EFS (HR: 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.80; P < .01) and 4-month EFS (37.7% v 16.6%; P < .01) favored the Clo+Ara-C arm compared with Ara-C arm, respectively. DFS and DOR were similar in both arms. Overall 30-day mortality was 16% and 5% for CLO+Ara-C and Ara-C arms, respectively. In the Clo+Ara-C and Ara-C arms, the most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were febrile neutropenia (47% v 35%, respectively), hypokalemia (18% v 11%, respectively), thrombocytopenia (16% v 17%, respectively), pneumonia (14% v 10%, respectively), anemia (13% v 0%, respectively), neutropenia (11% v 9%, respectively), increased AST (11% v 2%, respectively), and increased ALT (10% v 3%, respectively). Conclusion Although the primary end point of OS did not differ between arms, Clo+Ara-C significantly improved response rates and EFS. Study follow-up continues, and the role of clofarabine in the treatment of adult patients with AML continues to be investigated. PMID:22585697

  4. Allogeneic Transplantation in First Remission Improves Outcomes Irrespective of FLT3-ITD Allelic Ratio in FLT3-ITD-Positive Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Oran, Betül; Cortes, Jorge; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; de Lima, Marcos; Patel, Keyur; Ravandi, Farhad; Wang, Xuemei; Brandt, Mark; Andersson, Borje S; Ciurea, Stefan; Santos, Fabio P; de Padua Silva, Leandro; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    The adverse prognosis of internal tandem duplication in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 gene(s) (FLT3-ITD) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) may depend on allelic burden. We compared postremission treatment with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 169 FLT3-ITDmut intermediate cytogenetic risk AML patients with allelic ratio evaluable at diagnosis who achieved first complete remission (CR1) with induction therapy. To minimize selection bias, the analysis was limited to patients who remained in CR1 for at least 4 months (median time to HSCT) after achieving CR1, and propensity score matching was implemented. Sensitivity analysis including patients who remained in CR1 for at least 3 months was applied as well. HSCT in CR1 was associated with longer relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS), with 3-year estimated rates of 18% and 24%, respectively (P < .001), for patients receiving chemotherapy and 46% and 54%, respectively (P < .001), for those undergoing HSCT. Multivariate regression models showed that HSCT remained statistically significant with improved RFS and OS independent of FLT3-ITD allelic ratio and NPM1 status. Irrespective of postremission therapy, relapse remains the main reason for treatment failure, with a 3-year incidence of 68% in chemotherapy recipients versus 41% in HSCT recipients. Allogeneic HSCT improved disease outcomes compared with chemotherapy after propensity score matching was applied. The improvement observed for RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; P = .09) and OS (HR, 0.58; P = .10) with HSCT as postremission therapy in patients who remained in CR1 for at least 4 months did not reach statistical significance; however, the sensitivity analyses including patients who remained in CR1 for at least 3 months showed significant improvement in both RFS (HR, 0.31; P = .002) and OS (HR, 0.27; P = .02) after propensity score matching. Our results indicate that HSCT in CR1 for AML FLT

  5. [Therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia following RFM therapy in a patient with follicular lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Shibazaki, Mio; Sumi, Masahiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kirihara, Takehiko; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Hiroshima, Yuki; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Mori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2014-08-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are increasingly being recognized as treatment complications in patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy for previous neoplasms. However, therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia is relatively rare. A 61-year-old woman with a history of radiation therapy for breast cancer had previously, in 2007, received 4 courses of chemotherapy (RFM: rituximab, fludarabine, and mitoxantrone) for follicular lymphoma. In 2010, she was diagnosed with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with Philadelphia chromosome but no other cytogenetic anomalies. Although a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved with imatinib therapy, she developed leukocytosis with lymphoblasts and lymphoid crisis was diagnosed in January 2013. G-banded karyotyping showed 45, XX, -7, t, (9;22)(q33;q11.2). Unrelated bone marrow stem cell transplantation was performed after she had achieved a CCyR with dasatinib therapy. Polymerase chain reaction detected no major bcr/abl transcript in her bone marrow 42 days after transplantation. The majority of secondary leukemias resulting from the use of cytotoxic drugs can be divided into two well-defined groups depending on whether the patient has received alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors. However, concerns regarding the leukemogenic potential of fludarabine-based chemotherapy are growing. The potential risk of therapy-related leukemias including CML needs to be considered following fludarabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:25186488

  6. Biosimilar Filgrastim (Tevagrastim, XMO2) for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danylesko, Ivetta; Sareli, Rina; Bloom-Varda, Nira; Yerushalmi, Ronit; Shem-Tov, Noga; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-02-01

    Human recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), filgrastim (Neupogen; Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA), has been widely used for the mobilization of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from healthy donors. The experience with biosimilar G-CSF agents in this area is limited. We performed a prospective study assessing Tevagrastim (biosimilar filgrastim, XMO2; Teva, Israel) for mobilization of CD34(+) peripheral blood HSC in HLA-matched healthy sibling donors for transplantation in 24 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) (NCT01542944). Results were compared to a historical control group of sibling donors who received filgrastim for stem cell mobilization for allogeneic stem cell transplantations in patients with AML and MDS. The healthy donors received Tevagrastim or filgrastim in a dose of 10 μg/kg body weight (BW) subcutaneously for 4 days. The target yields of CD34(+) cells was 5 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg BW of the recipient. A median 10.2 × 10(6) (range, 2.52 to 35.4) and 9.35 × 10(6) (range, 3.7 to 30.6) CD34(+) cells per kg BW were collected in the Tevagrastim and filgrastim groups, respectively. All patients promptly engrafted with a median day of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of >.5 × 10(9)/L and >1 × 10(9)/L of 13 days (range, 10 to 21) and 13.5 days (range, 10 to 22), respectively in the Tevagrastim group and 12 days (range, 10 to 18) and 13 days (range, 10 to 18) in the filgrastim group, respectively. Platelets reached counts of >20 × 10(9)/L and >50 × 10(9)/L within a median of 14 days (range, 11 to 33) and 17 days (range, 12 to 33) in the Tevagrastim group and 13 (range, 10 to 29) and 15 (range, 10 to 32) days in the filgrastim group, respectively. The donors developed only mild and transient side effects, which were not different between the Tevagrastim study group and the filgrastim historical control group. Similarly, the transplantation-related toxicities

  7. [Drug treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. Current options and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Telek, Béla; Rejtő, László; Batár, Péter; Miltényi, Zsófia; Reményi, Gyula; Simon, Zsófia; Ujj, Zsófia; Mezei, Gabriella; Szász, Róbert; Kiss, Attila; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Árpád

    2016-05-29

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is a heterogeneous disease. Recent molecular mutational analysis techniques have shed more light on different, genetically well characterised types of the disease. Treatment approach is uniform except for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Application of the "3 + 7" induction treatment has been the gold standard in the past 40 years. While the dose of cytarabine has not been changed, escalating daunorubicine dose in younger (<60 years) patients with good performance status to 90 mg/m(2) had a positive impact on overall survival. High dose chemotherapy is tolerated poorly in patients older than 60 years of age and, as treatment is not curative in the elderly, improvement of overall survival and quality of life remains the main goal of management in these patients. Low intensity treatment is beneficial and can provide additional advantage over supportive care. Innovative and targeted therapy approaches might give promise to better management of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:27211353

  8. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Edwin C.; Durie, Brian G. M.; Garewal, Harinder S.

    1987-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia frequently associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Data on 11 patients with APL treated at our institution were analyzed and compared with those of 147 published cases. Most had a bleeding diathesis at presentation and evidence of DIC eventually developed in all. Seven patients (64%) showed the t(15;17)(q22;q21) karyotype or a similar translocation. Using a chemotherapy induction regimen containing an anthracycline, complete remission, requiring a total of 14 courses of treatment, was achieved in six patients (55%). The median duration of response and median survival for complete responders were 10 and 15 months, respectively. Three patients (27%) died of bleeding complications during induction therapy. The tritiated-thymidine labeling index of leukemia cells predicted which patients would achieve a complete remission. Review of six studies of 147 patients with APL from the past 12 years supports the use of a chemotherapy induction regimen containing anthracycline or amsacrine and heparin for the treatment of DIC. PMID:3472414

  9. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Robert; Ettel, Mark; Cho, Margaret; Chan, Alexander; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Neto, Antonio G

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia. PMID:26989468

  10. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Bosutinib in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amsberg, Gunhild Keller-von; Schafhausen, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Bosutinib (SKI-606) is an orally available, once-daily dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adults with chronic, accelerated, or blast-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia who are intolerant of or resistant to first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Bosutinib effectively overcomes the majority of imatinib-resistance-conferring BCR-ABL mutations except V299L and T315I. In the Bosutinib Efficacy and Safety in chronic myeloid LeukemiA (BELA) trial, bosutinib attained a faster and deeper molecular response than imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Treatment-emergent adverse events are usually very manageable. Low grade, mostly self-limiting diarrhea represents the most frequently observed toxicity of bosutinib. Anti-diarrheal drugs, antiemetic agents, and/or fluid replacement should be used to treat these patients. The improved hematological toxicity of bosutinib compared with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been ascribed to its minimal activity against platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. In this review, we give an overview on the profile of bosutinib, the clinical potential and treatment-emergent adverse events. PMID:23674887

  12. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  15. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  16. Management of Advanced-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radich, Jerald P

    2016-05-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia represents the poster child of successful precision medicine in cancer, with amazing survival results achieved with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in many patients with chronic-phase disease. Unfortunately, however, this good news has not extended to patients in blast crisis, for whom survival has not clearly been improved with TKIs. During his presentation at the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, Jerald P. Radich, MD, briefly explored the biology behind advanced-stage disease and several of the molecular findings in disease progression. He also reviewed some of the therapeutic options in advanced disease, emphasizing that transplantation, although fraught with some difficulties, offers the best long-term prognosis for patients in blast crisis. PMID:27226510

  17. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  18. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  19. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jennifer L; Whittington, Julia K; Wilmes, Christine M; Messick, Joanne B

    2009-03-01

    A free-ranging adult female great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was presented to the Wildlife Medical Clinic at the University of Illinois after being observed with anorexia and decreased activity. A severe leukocytosis (212 400 cells/microl), primarily comprised of mature heterophils, was found at presentation. Results of various diagnostic tests including radiographs, Chlamydophila serologic testing, measurement of Aspergillus antibody and antigen titers, plasma protein electrophoresis, fecal culture and acid-fast staining, coelioscopy, endoscopy, tracheoscopy, exploratory coelomotomy, nuclear scintigraphy, tissue cultures, bone marrow biopsy, and histopathology revealed no underlying cause for the persistent leukocytosis. No response to treatment with antibiotics or antifungal agents was observed, although a transient, significant decrease in the leukocyte count (6200 cells/microl) was observed after treatment with fenbendazole. A presumptive diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia was made based on 3 factors: disease duration of greater than 3 months, a lack of identifiable foci of inflammation, and a lack of response to conventional therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed based on postmortem examination and testing 177 days after initial presentation. PMID:19530405

  20. Rho-signaling pathways in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, Katerina; Hrkal, Zbynēk

    2008-12-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a hematological malignancy that is characteristic by as expansion of myeloid cells and their premature release into the circulation. The molecular cause of CML is the fusion oncoprotein Bcr-Abl whose constitutive tyrosine-kinase (TK) activity maintains enhanced signaling through multiple signal transduction pathways and confers proliferative and survival advantage to CML cells. These effects can be largely suppressed by TK inhibitor Imatinib mesylate, currently the leading drug in CML treatment. However, Bcr-Abl contains also additional functional domains, in particular a DBL homology (DH) domain with guanine-exchange function (GEF) which can activate small GTPases of Rho family and a Src-homology3 (SH3) domain which recruits other proteins with GEF activity. Bcr-Abl affects among others the RhoA/ROCK/LIM/cofilin pathway that regulates the actin cytoskeleton assembly and thereby the cellular adhesion and migration. This review deals in detail with the known points of interference between Bcr-Abl and Rho kinase pathways and with the effects of Imatinib mesylate on Rho signaling and cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The potential protein targets related to Bcr-Abl non-kinase activity are discussed. PMID:19075636

  1. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  2. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, J R; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca(2+) influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  3. Functional characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor 2AT4 in human myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Brauhoff, P; Möllmann, M; Petersen, L; Göthert, JR; Schmiegel, W; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) family was found to be expressed mainly in the nasal epithelium. In the last two decades members of the OR family were detected to be functional expressed in different parts of the human body such as in liver, prostate or intestine cancer cells. Here, we detected the expression of several ORs in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cells of clinically diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients by RT-PCR and next-generation sequencing. With calcium-imaging, we characterized in greater detail the cell biological role of one OR (OR2AT4) in leukemia. In both cell systems, the OR2AT4 agonist Sandalore-evoked strong Ca2+ influx via the adenylate cyclase-cAMP-mediated pathway. The OR2AT4 antagonist Phenirat prevented the Sandalore-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase. Western blot and flow cytometric experiments revealed that stimulation of OR2AT4 reduced the proliferation by decreasing p38-MAPK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis via phosphorylation of p44/42-MAPK. Furthermore, Sandalore increased the number of hemoglobin-containing cells in culture. We described for the first time an OR-mediated pathway in CML and AML that can regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation after activation. This mechanism offers novel therapeutic options for the treatment of AML. PMID:27551494

  4. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Discovery of LY2457546: a multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitor with a novel spectrum of activity and exquisite potency in the acute myelogenous leukemia-Flt-3-internal tandem duplication mutant human tumor xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Timothy P; Clayton, Joshua R; Rempala, Mark E; Henry, James R; Knobeloch, John M; Mendel, David; McLean, Johnathan A; Hao, Yan; Barda, David A; Considine, Eileen L; Uhlik, Mark T; Chen, Yuefeng; Ma, Liandong; Bloem, Laura J; Akunda, Jacqueline K; McCann, Denis J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel; Clawson, David K; Lahn, Michael M; Starling, James J

    2012-06-01

    LY2457546 is a potent and orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases involved in angiogenic and tumorigenic signalling. In biochemical and cellular assays, LY2457546 demonstrates potent activity against targets that include VEGFR2 (KDR), PDGFRβ, FLT-3, Tie-2 and members of the Eph family of receptors. With activities against both Tie2 and Eph receptors, LY2457546 possesses an activity profile that distinguishes it from multikinase inhibitors. When compared head to head with sunitinib, LY2457546 was more potent for inhibition of endothelial tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis co-culture model with an intermittent treatment design. In vivo, LY2457546 inhibited VEGF-driven autophosphorylation of lung KDR in the mouse and rat in a dose and concentration dependent manner. LY2457546 was well tolerated and exhibited efficacy in a 13762 syngeneic rat mammary tumor model in both once and twice daily continuous dosing schedules and in mouse human tumor xenograft models of lung, colon, and prostate origin. Additionally, LY2457546 caused complete regression of well-established tumors in an acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) FLT3-ITD mutant xenograft tumor model. The observed efficacy that was displayed by LY2457546 in the AML FLT3-ITD mutant tumor model was superior to sunitinib when both were evaluated using equivalent doses normalized to in vivo inhibition of pKDR in mouse lung. LY2457546 was well tolerated in non-clinical toxicology studies conducted in rats and dogs. The majority of the toxicities observed were similar to those observed with other multi-targeted anti-angiogenic kinase inhibitors (MAKs) and included bone marrow hypocellularity, hair and skin depigmentation, cartilage dysplasia and lymphoid organ degeneration and necrosis. Thus, the unique spectrum of target activity, potent in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in a variety of rodent and human solid tumor models, exquisite potency against a clinically relevant model of AML, and non

  6. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Transient monosomy 7 in a chronic myelogenous leukemia patient during nilotinib therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Majd D; Go, Ronald S; Ketterling, Rhett P; Begna, Kebede H; Reichard, Kaaren K; Shi, Min

    2016-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated chronic myelogenous leukemia patients with monosomy 7 arising in Philadelphia chromosome negative (Ph-) cells tend to evolve into MDS/AML. However, monosomy 7 in Ph- cells can be a transient finding, and it is not an absolute indication of the emergence of a new myeloid malignancy. PMID:27014453

  8. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a. PMID:12790401

  10. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL–expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL–expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  11. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  12. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? What is acute lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... leukemias). The rest of this document focuses on acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in adults. For information on ALL in ...

  13. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyers, C.L.; Timson, L.; Clark, S.S.; Witte, O.N.; Champlin, R. ); Kawasaki, E.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction.

  14. Cytogenetic conversion following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for advanced chronic myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    McGlave, P.B.; Miller, W.J.; Hurd, D.D.; Arthur, D.C.; Kim, T.

    1981-11-01

    We performed a pilot study to test the effectiveness of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Five patients in the advanced stages of chronic myelogenous leukemia (four in blast crisis, one in accelerated phase) with abnormal chromosomes underwent matched-sibling allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after preparation with busulfan, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and fractionated total body irradiation. Engraftment and conversion to normal chromosome patterns after transplantation occurred in all five patients. None of the patients reverted to an abnormal chromosome pattern or demonstrated clinical or hematologic evidence of recurrent disease during the course of this study; however, longest survival from transplant was 248 days. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation can eradicate the abnormal clone even in far advanced chronic myelogenous leukemia and can provide normal hematopoiesis. We suggest that clinical complications of chemotherapeutic toxicity and infection were responsible for the short survival in this group of patients, and that these complications could be decreased by performing transplantation in the chronic phase or early accelerated phase of the disease.

  15. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial).

    PubMed

    Willemze, R; Suciu, S; Muus, P; Halkes, C J M; Meloni, G; Meert, L; Karrasch, M; Rapion, J; Vignetti, M; Amadori, S; de Witte, T; Marie, J P

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (median age 56 years) received 5 days of clofarabine as 1-h infusion (arm A) or push injection (arm B) at the dose level of 5 × 10 or 5 × 15 mg/m(2)/day in an algorithmic dose escalation 3 + 3 design. A consolidation course (intermediate dose cytosine arabinoside, idarubicin) was planned for patients in complete remission (CR). Primary endpoint was safety and tolerance as measured by dose limiting toxicity (DLT); secondary endpoints were response rate, other grade III/IV toxicities, and hematological recovery after induction and consolidation. Five DLTs were observed (in arm A: one DLT at 10 mg/m(2)/day, three at 15 mg/m(2)/day; in arm B: one DLT at 15 mg/m(2)/day). Three patients receiving 15 mg/m(2)/day were withdrawn due to adverse events not classified as DLT. Prolonged hypoplasia was observed in five patients. CR + complete remission with incomplete recovery were achieved in 21 patients (11/12 (92 %) receiving clofarabine 10 mg/m(2)/day; 10/13 (77 %) receiving clofarabine 15 mg/m(2)/day). Clofarabine, 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day, resulted in one DLT and no early treatment withdrawals. MTD of clofarabine combined with cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin is 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day. PMID:24682421

  16. Deletion of 3'-CBFB gene in association with an inversion (16)(p13q22) and a loss of the Y chromosome in a 2-year-Old child with acute myelogenous leukemia-M4.

    PubMed

    Batanian, J R; Huang, Y; Fallon, R

    2000-09-01

    Inversion 16(p13q22) is most commonly associated with acute myelomonocytic leukemia with abnormal eosinophils (M4). In association with this inversion, a proximal deletion at the 16p13 primary arm breakpoint occurs in 20% of cases. We report on a first case of inversion 16 with a distal deletion at the primary arm breakpoint 16q22, detected by using the fluorescent-labeled dual-color probe CBFB. PMID:11063812

  17. Erythrocyte survival studies in a rat myelogenous leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Derelanko, M.J.; Meagher, R.C.; Lobue, J.; Khouri, J.A.; Gordon, A.S.

    1982-11-01

    To determine the extent intrinsic erythrocyte defects and/or extrinsic factors were involved in anemia of rats bearing Shay chloroleukemia (SCL), survival of /sup 3/H-DFP labeled erythrocytes was studied in leukemic and nonleukemic hosts. Red blood cells labeled before induction of leukemia, were rapidly lost from the peripheral circulation of SCL rats in terminal stages of disease. However, labeled erythrocytes from terminal SCL animals displayed normal lifespans when transfused into nonleukemic controls. Thus the anemia of this leukemia probably resulted from extrinsic factors associated with the leukemic process. Hemorrhage appeared to be primarily responsible for the anemia of this disease.

  18. Epigenetic changes: a common theme in acute myelogenous leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Soraya E; Romero-Oliva, Francisco A

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rather common disease, characterized by the presence of a clonal population of hematopoietic progenitor cells with impaired differentiation. Although traditionally AML has been considered the result of genetic alterations, more recently experimental evidence have demonstrated that epigenetic modifications are important in development and maintenance of leukemia cells. In this review we summarize current scientific knowledge of epigenetic alterations involved in leukemogenesis. We also highlight the developing of new technological strategies that are based on epigenetic processes and have been registered as Patents of Inventions in the United Nations dependent World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO) and the main Patent offices worldwide. PMID:23938080

  19. Epigenetic changes: a common theme in acute myelogenous leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rather common disease, characterized by the presence of a clonal population of hematopoietic progenitor cells with impaired differentiation. Although traditionally AML has been considered the result of genetic alterations, more recently experimental evidence have demonstrated that epigenetic modifications are important in development and maintenance of leukemia cells. In this review we summarize current scientific knowledge of epigenetic alterations involved in leukemogenesis. We also highlight the developing of new technological strategies that are based on epigenetic processes and have been registered as Patents of Inventions in the United Nations dependent World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO) and the main Patent offices worldwide. PMID:23938080

  20. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  1. Altered microenvironmental regulation of leukemic and normal stem cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Ho, Yin Wei; Huang, Qin; Maeda, Takahiro; Lin, Allen; Lee, Sung-uk; Hair, Alan; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Huettner, Claudia; Bhatia, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Summary We characterized leukemia stem cells (LSC) in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using a transgenic mouse model. LSC were restricted to cells with long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) phenotype. CML LTHSC demonstrated reduced homing and retention in the bone marrow (BM), related to decreased CXCL12 expression in CML BM, resulting from increased G-CSF production by leukemia cells. Altered cytokine expression in CML BM was associated with selective impairment of normal LTHSC growth and a growth advantage to CML LTHSC. Imatinib (IM) treatment partially corrected abnormalities in cytokine levels and LTHSC growth. These results were validated using human CML samples and provide improved understanding of microenvironmental regulation of normal and leukemic LTHSC and their response to IM in CML. PMID:22516264

  2. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. The role of stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sawa

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), has largely replaced curative strategies based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, SCT still remains an option for accelerated/blastic-phase and selected chronic-phase CML. Transplant outcomes can be optimized by peritransplant TKIs, conditioning regimen, BCR-ABL monitoring, and relapse management. Controversies exist in transplant timing, pediatric CML, alternative donors, and economics. SCT continues to serve as a platform of “operational cure” for CML with TKIs and immunotherapies. PMID:25852053

  4. Recognizing Endocrinopathies Associated With Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Children With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samis, Jill; Lee, Paul; Zimmerman, Donald; Arceci, Robert J; Suttorp, Meinolf; Hijiya, Nobuko

    2016-08-01

    Side effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment vary in children and adults with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). As children have a much longer life expectancy than adults, TKI therapy may continue for decades and with long-term consequences that differ from adults. Children may develop endocrinopathies related to "off-target" effects of TKIs, such as delayed growth, changes in bone metabolism, thyroid abnormalities, and effects on puberty and fertility. These endocrinopathies present additional challenges for pediatric patients with CML. This review critically evaluates the literature on long-term endocrine side effects of TKIs in the pediatric CML population and provides suggested recommendations. PMID:27100618

  5. Blastoid mantle cell lymphoma occurring in a patient in complete remission of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Garzia, M; Sora, F; Teofili, L; Di Mario, A; Voso, M T; Rumi, C; La Rocca, L M; Sica, S; Zini, G

    2007-01-01

    The development of a de novo lymphoma in patients affected by chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a rare event. The introduction of new molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), allows a correct differential diagnosis between lymphoid blastic crisis and a blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), which shows an aggressive behavior and some molecular characteristics detectable by cytogenetics and immunohistochemistry. We report a case of a blastoid variant of MCL that developed in a patient with CML who achieved complete cytogenetic and molecular response to imatinib mesylate treatment. PMID:17353181

  6. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Zettner, Stephanie; Mistry, Sandeep G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding. PMID:26958483

  7. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  8. Regulation of c-Myc ubiquitination controls chronic myelogenous leukemia initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Reavie, Linsey; Buckley, Shannon M.; Loizou, Evangelia; Takeishi, Shoichiro; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Ibrahim, Sherif; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Aifantis, Iannis

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) function are of important clinical significance. We use chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as a model of LIC-dependent malignancy and identify the interaction between the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 and its substrate c-Myc as a regulator of LIC homeostasis. Deletion of Fbw7 leads to c-Myc overexpression, p53-dependent LIC-specific apoptosis and the eventual inhibition of tumor progression. Decrease of either c-Myc protein levels or attenuation of the p53 response rescues LIC activity and disease progression. Further experiments showed that Fbw7 expression is required for survival and maintenance of human CML LIC. These studies identify a ubiquitin ligase:substrate pair regulating LIC activity, suggesting that targeting of the Fbw7:c-Myc axis is an attractive therapy target in refractory CML. PMID:23518350

  9. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Structural Biology Contributions to the Discovery of Drugs to Treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    This case study illustrates how the determination of multiple co-crystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery efforts leading to the design of nilotinib, a newly approved therapy for imatinib-intolerant and - resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from the BCR-Abl onco-protein, which possesses a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although many chronic-phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent, durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail, or lose their response to therapy, often due to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 60 such point mutations have been detected in imatinib-resistant patients. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small molecule Abl inhibitors, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis for resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way this information is used to support drug discovery.

  11. [Expression of HoxA10 in acute leukemia and its significance].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Li, Wei-Jia; Wei, Cai-Xia; Zhou, Zhi; Nie, Bo

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the expression of HoxA(10) mRNA in acute leukemia patients and its significance, HoxA(10) level was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 50 patients with acute leukemias, 7 healthy volunteers and 3 patients with ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura). The regularity of the expression of HoxA(10) gene in acute leukemia and the relationship between HoxA(10) level and the prognosis of leukemia was explored. The results showed that HoxA(10) was expressed in all types of acute myelogenous leukemia; HoxA(10) message was also observed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and part of control groups. 3 normal donors were found not to express HoxA(10). The level of HoxA(10) mRNA of acute myelogenous leukemia patients was significantly higher than that of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and controls (P < 0.01). HoxA(10) gene appeared to be more strongly expressed in AML-M(1) and -M(2) subtypes than in AML-M(4) and -M(5) subtypes, and the gene was notable high expressed in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The number of blast and promyeloid cells in the bone marrow was positive related with the level of HoxA (r = 0.635, P < 0.01). The level of HoxA(10) of 9 non-responsive patients was higher than that of 8 remission patients, but there was no significant difference between them (P = 0.258). HoxA(10) was overexpressed in acute myelogenous leukemia. It is concluded that HoxA(10) is a major transcription factor regulating hematopoiesis and a mark to differentiate lymphoid leukemia and myelogenous leukemia, but not a specific gene of cancer. The level of HoxA(10) is related with load of leukemic cells and curative effect, and can affect occurrence and development of leukemia in combination with many cytokines, HoxA(10) may facilitate the leukemia progression with another cofactors. PMID:16403259

  12. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  14. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  16. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  17. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    PubMed Central

    Emole, Josephine; Talabi, Taiwo; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. PMID:27013862

  18. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia during the Treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with Imatinib Mesylate.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Kensuke; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Doki, Noriko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    This report describes three patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) during treatment with imatinib mesylate (IM). Cessation and/or switching from IM to nilotinib resulted in the alleviation of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and ectatic lesions. Furthermore, GI bleeding recurred after the re-administration of IM in one patient. Thus, we consider that the occurrence of GAVE in our patients was induced by IM. Although the precise mechanism of IM-GAVE is not understood, all patients took at least 400 mg/day of IM at the onset of GAVE. Thus, higher doses of IM (≥400 mg/day) may be a risk factor for IM-GAVE. PMID:26726089

  19. Using Functional Signatures to Identify Repositioned Drugs for Breast, Myelogenous Leukemia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Hu, Zhenjun; Hung, Jui-Hung; Huang, Chia-Ling; Wang, Yajie; DeLisi, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The cost and time to develop a drug continues to be a major barrier to widespread distribution of medication. Although the genomic revolution appears to have had little impact on this problem, and might even have exacerbated it because of the flood of additional and usually ineffective leads, the emergence of high throughput resources promises the possibility of rapid, reliable and systematic identification of approved drugs for originally unintended uses. In this paper we develop and apply a method for identifying such repositioned drug candidates against breast cancer, myelogenous leukemia and prostate cancer by looking for inverse correlations between the most perturbed gene expression levels in human cancer tissue and the most perturbed expression levels induced by bioactive compounds. The method uses variable gene signatures to identify bioactive compounds that modulate a given disease. This is in contrast to previous methods that use small and fixed signatures. This strategy is based on the observation that diseases stem from failed/modified cellular functions, irrespective of the particular genes that contribute to the function, i.e., this strategy targets the functional signatures for a given cancer. This function-based strategy broadens the search space for the effective drugs with an impressive hit rate. Among the 79, 94 and 88 candidate drugs for breast cancer, myelogenous leukemia and prostate cancer, 32%, 13% and 17% respectively are either FDA-approved/in-clinical-trial drugs, or drugs with suggestive literature evidences, with an FDR of 0.01. These findings indicate that the method presented here could lead to a substantial increase in efficiency in drug discovery and development, and has potential application for the personalized medicine. PMID:22346740

  20. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Re-evaluating the role of BCR/ABL in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Theodora S; Mgbemena, Victoria E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) requires the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase for disease onset and maintenance. As a result, CML can be successfully treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib. Most patients are maintained in a disease-suppressed state on daily TKI therapy for several years and in many cases this treatment prevents progression to the blast phase. If the TKI is discontinued, CML redevelops in 95% of patients as a result of persisting leukemia initiating cells (LICs). There are several hypotheses that describe the potential mechanism(s) responsible for LIC persistence in CML, but supporting evidence is limited. Furthermore, of the few patients who discontinue TKI therapy and are “cured” (i.e., in treatment-free remission), most have residual BCR/ABL-expressing cells in their hematopoietic tissues. There are also healthy individuals without a CML diagnosis who express the BCR/ABL mutation in a fraction of their hematopoietic cells. Finally, mice that express BCR/ABL from the Bcr locus as a knockin mutation do not develop CML. These mice have lower BCR/ABL levels than retroviral or transgenic models of BCR/ABL that do develop CML. Understanding why mice with BCR/ABL expressed from the Bcr locus and some people that express BCR/ABL are not afflicted with CML will provide insights into therapies to prevent or cure this disease. PMID:27308345

  4. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is acute lymphocytic leukemia treated? How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  5. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Monoclonal antibodies to treat acute lymphocytic leukemia Targeted therapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia In recent years, new ... These drugs are often referred to as targeted therapy. Some of these drugs can be useful in ...

  9. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. A Newborn with Congenital Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia After In Vitro Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Hacer; Özdemir, Özmert M A; Karaca, Abdullah; Türk, Nilay Şen; Düzcan, Füsun; Ergin, Şeniz; Kazancı, Elif; Vergin, Canan; Erbay, Ayşe

    2015-08-01

    Congenital leukemia is a rare disease. The majority of cases of this disease are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Congenital acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare and most often is of B cell lineage. Rarely, some cases have been designated biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). Herein, we report a preterm newborn referred to us as a result of the appearance of blue-violaceous dermal nodules on her body at birth. She was a twin and the product of an in vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancy. Physical examination showed jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, and peripheral facial nerve palsy in addition to dermal nodules. Bone marrow aspiration showed 40% blasts of lymphoid lineage; skin biopsy and its immunohistochemistry revealed myeloblastic infiltration of the dermis. Cytogenetic analysis (46,XX), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, and cranial magnetic resonance were normal. The patient was diagnosed with congenital MPAL, and an association between IVF and congenital leukemia was suggested. PMID:23639745

  13. Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps. PMID:27169456

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, F R; Rowe, J M; Radich, J; Dick, J E

    2001-01-01

    Through the hard work of a large number of investigators, the biology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is becoming increasingly well understood, and as a consequence, new therapeutic targets have been identified and new model systems have been developed for testing novel therapies. How these new therapies can be most effectively studied in the clinic and whether they will ultimately improve cure rates are questions of enormous importance. In this article, Dr. Jacob Rowe presents a summary of the current state-of-the-art therapy for adult AML. His contribution emphasizes the fact that AML is not a single disease, but a number of related diseases each distinguished by unique cytogenetic markers which in turn help determine the most appropriate treatment. Dr. Jerald Radich continues on this theme, emphasizing how these cytogenetic abnormalities, as well as other mutations, give rise to abnormal signal transduction and how these abnormal pathways may represent ideal targets for the development of new therapeutics. A third contribution by Dr. Frederick Appelbaum describes how AML might be made the target of immunologic attack. Specifically, strategies using antibody-based or cell-based immunotherapies are described including the use of unmodified antibodies, drug conjugates, radioimmunoconjugates, non-ablative allogeneic transplantation, T cell adoptive immunotherapy and AML vaccines. Finally, Dr. John Dick provides a review of the development of the NOD/SCID mouse model of human AML emphasizing both what it has taught us about the biology of the disease as well as how it can be used to test new therapies. Taken together, these reviews are meant to help us understand more about where we are in the treatment of AML, where we can go and how we might get there. PMID:11722979

  15. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... WBC) count Platelet count Bone marrow biopsy Lumbar puncture (spinal tap) to check for leukemia cells in ... home Managing your pets during chemotherapy Bleeding problems Dry mouth Eating enough calories Safe eating during cancer ...

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a low number of platelets. A white blood cell count ( WBC ) can be high, low, or normal. Bone ... and overall health How high your white blood cell count was Certain genetic changes in the leukemia cells ...

  20. Inhibition of crosstalk between Bcr-Abl and PKC signaling by PEITC, augments imatinib sensitivity in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhumita; Sarkar, Ruma; Mukherjee, Apurba; Mukherjee, Sutapa

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a clonal hyperproliferation of immature blood cells accounts for 20% of adult leukemia cases. Reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 9 and 22, results into Bcr-Abl fusion and is responsible for expression of a tyrosine kinase protein p210(bcr/abl), which mediates several survival pathways and confer therapeutic resistance. Protein kinase C (PKC), a family of serine threonine kinases play an important role in the process of leukemogenesis. A crosstalk between Bcr-Abl and PKC signaling has been documented. Therefore, targeting p210(bcr/abl) and its associated signaling proteins using non-toxic natural means will be an effective strategy for antileukemic therapy. Aim of the present study is to investigate whether PEITC, a natural isothiocyanate in combination with imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor could increase the therapeutic efficacy of IM by modulating the expression of p210(bcr/abl). Enhanced cytotoxic efficacy of IM by PEITC was further validated using another myelogenous leukemia cell line, KU812. It was observed that PEITC in combination with IM efficiently downregulated the expression of p210(bcr/abl) in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines (K-562). PEITC inhibited the expressions of PKCα, PKCβII and PKCζ (both phosphorylated and total form). Expression of Raf1 and ERK1/2, two important target proteins in PKC signaling cascade was diminished. The result indicated that PEITC ultimately reduced expression of Raf1 and ERK1/2 through Bcr-Abl and PKC inhibition. This result was further confirmed by UCN-01, a selective PKC inhibitor and IM; indicating an association between p210(bcr/abl) and PKC with Raf1 and ERK1/2. PEITC thus may have enormous potential in synergistic therapy of leukemia by enhancing drug efficacy. PMID:26456889

  1. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  2. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  4. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. Material/Methods Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. Results The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (p<0.05). Syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression was significantly increased across all 4 leukocyte types (p<0.05). The percentage of syncytin-1-expressing blasts was significantly greater in AML patients (p<0.05), with blasts showing the largest fold-change in syncytin-1 expression (p<0.05). M5, M5a, and M5b AML patients displayed significantly higher syncytin-1 surface expression relative to all other AML French-American-British (FAB) classifications (p<0.05). Conclusions These findings suggest leukocytic syncytin-1 expression may play a role in the development and/or maintenance of the AML phenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular. PMID:27393911

  5. New hope for chronic myelogenous leukemia patients: dasatinib offers better efficacy with shorter treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although the discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved the prognoses of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients, a cure has remained elusive. Unanswered questions include how long must a patient continue on TKI therapy, and how does a patient know when he/she can safely stop or finish this therapy? Imagawa et al. have carefully addressed these questions of safety and efficacy using a stop study of the second-generation TKI dasatinib. The results of a multicenter phase II trial termed the “dasatinib discontinuation” (DADI) trial indicated that 48% (30/63) of CML patients who had maintained a deep molecular response (DMR) to second-line or subsequent dasatinib therapy for at least for 1 year did not show any signs of disease relapse. Thus, even after it is stopped, dasatinib treatment may decrease the chance of disease relapse and provide a curative benefit to CML patients. This work by Imagawa et al. strongly supports the clinical utility of the second-generation TKI dasatinib for CML treatment. PMID:27488943

  6. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  7. Coexpression Pattern Analysis of NPM1-Associated Genes in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S. C. Cesar; Siu, Parco M.; Yung, Benjamin Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) plays an important role in ribosomal synthesis and malignancies, but NPM1 mutations occur rarely in the blast-crisis and chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. The NPM1-associated gene set (GCM_NPM1), in total 116 genes including NPM1, was chosen as the candidate gene set for the coexpression analysis. We wonder if NPM1-associated genes can affect the ribosomal synthesis and translation process in CML. Results. We presented a distribution-based approach for gene pair classification by identifying a disease-specific cutoff point that classified the coexpressed gene pairs into strong and weak coexpression structures. The differences in the coexpression patterns between the normal and the CML groups were reflected from the overall structure by performing two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Our developed method effectively identified the coexpression pattern differences from the overall structure: P  value = 1.71 × 10−22 < 0.05 for the maximum deviation D = 0.109. Moreover, we found that genes involved in the ribosomal synthesis and translation process tended to be coexpressed in the CML group. Conclusion. Our developed method can identify the coexpression difference between two different groups. Dysregulation of ribosomal synthesis and translation process may be related to the CML disease. Our significant findings may provide useful information for the novel CML mechanism exploration and cancer treatment. PMID:25961029

  8. Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension during oral dasatinib therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Sakura; Hagihara, Maki; Itabashi, Megumi; Ishii, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujisawa, Shin; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    We present a 36-year-old woman who had been taking oral dasatinib for 3 years for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Although adverse events such as thrombocytopenia and pleural effusion developed, she showed a major molecular response (MMR) 22 months after the initiation of oral dasatinib administration, and the therapy was thus continued. Approximately 34 months after oral dasatinib initiation, she developed severe exertional dyspnea and had to be urgently hospitalized. There was no apparent pleural effusion increase, and neither imaging nor blood test results suggested pneumonia or other infections. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was suspected on the basis of transthoracic echocardiography. PAH was then confirmed by right heart catheterization. Though dasatinib was discontinued on the day of hospitalization, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure progressed, and she did not respond to catecholamines or PDE5 (phosphodiesterase type 5) inhibitors. On the 4(th) hospital day, she experienced cardiopulmonary arrest and died 1 week later. Cases with PAH due to oral administration of dasatinib have been reported previously. However, cases showing the rapid progression documented in our patient are rare and we advocate that PAH be considered a potential adverse event associated with dasatinib therapy. PMID:27599415

  9. A mathematical model for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and T cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Helen; Li, Natasha K

    2004-04-21

    In this paper, we propose and analyse a mathematical model for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a cancer of the blood. We model the interaction between naive T cells, effector T cells, and CML cancer cells in the body, using a system of ordinary differential equations which gives rates of change of the three cell populations. One of the difficulties in modeling CML is the scarcity of experimental data which can be used to estimate parameters values. To compensate for the resulting uncertainties, we use Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) on large ranges of possible parameter values in our analysis. A major goal of this work is the determination of parameters which play a critical role in remission or clearance of the cancer in the model. Our analysis examines 12 parameters, and identifies two of these, the growth and death rates of CML, as critical to the outcome of the system. Our results indicate that the most promising research avenues for treatments of CML should be those that affect these two significant parameters (CML growth and death rates), while altering the other parameters should have little effect on the outcome. PMID:15038986

  10. Kaposi's sarcoma following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, B C; Rezuke, W N; Ricci, A; Tsongalis, G; Shen, P U; Bona, R D; Feingold, J M; Edwards, R L; Tutschka, P J; Bilgrami, S

    2000-01-01

    Unlike solid organ transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) occurs rarely following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In fact, only 5 cases of KS have been reported after allogeneic or autologous HSCT. The usual treatment combines a substantial decrease in, or elimination of, immunosuppressive therapy along with local measures such as surgical excision, cryotherapy or radiation therapy. A 46-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia who had received an allogeneic HSCT previously from an HLA-identical sibling, presented on day +814 with human herpes virus-8-associated KS involving her left lower extremity. She had been on continuous immunosuppressive therapy since her transplant because of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The intensity of immunosuppressive therapy was decreased once a diagnosis of KS had been established. However, the nodular lesions continued to progress in size and number. Therefore, a course of irradiation was administered to sites of bulk disease on her legs. Furthermore, thalidomide was initiated along with a topical retinoid, alitretinoin 0.1% gel applied twice daily to the nonirradiated lesions. This approach yielded a partial response in both irradiated and nonirradiated lesions over the course of the following 7 months. Both thalidomide and alitretinoin 0.1% gel appear to be beneficial in HSCT-associated KS and exhibit tolerable side effects. PMID:11154986

  11. Polyamine analog TBP inhibits proliferation of human K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells by induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QING; WANG, YAN-LIN; WANG, KAI; YANG, JIAN-LIN; CAO, CHUN-YU

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the novel polyamine analog tetrabutyl propanediamine (TBP) on the growth of K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells and the underlying mechanism of these effects. MTT was used for the analysis of cell proliferation and flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle distribution. DNA fragmentation analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining were used to identify apoptotic cells. The activity of the key enzymes in polyamine catabolism was detected using chemiluminescence. TBP can induce apoptosis and significantly inhibit K562 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. TBP treatment significantly induced the enzyme activity of spermine oxidase and acetylpolyamine oxidase in K562 cells, and also enhanced the inhibitory effect of the antitumor drug doxorubicin on K562 cell proliferation. As a novel polyamine analog, TBP significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in K562 cells by upregulating the activity of the key enzymes in the polyamine catabolic pathways. TBP also increased the sensitivity of the K562 cells to the antitumor drug doxorubicin. These data indicate an important potential value of TBP for clinical therapy of human CML. PMID:25435975

  12. The effects of 13-cis retinoic acid and interferon-alpha in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vivo in patients.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Hegde, U P; Kotelnikov, V M; Mundle, S D; Dong, L M; Burke, P; Rose, S; Hsu, W T; Gaskin, F; Raza, A; Preisler, H D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the administration of a 3-day course of 13-cis retinoic acid in combination with interferon a [RA/IFN] on the leukemia cells was measured in vivo in 43 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The administration of RA/IFN was associated with a significant fall in the white blood cell count of patients with chronic-phase disease and with a fall in the percentage S-phase cells in CML patients regardless of the stage of their leukemia. In two thirds of the patients studied the administration of RA/IFN was also associated with an increase in marrow apoptosis. The cytokine combination also suppressed bcl-2 and myc expression in a minority of patients and such expression appears to be associated with response to a treatment regimen which includes RA/IFN. These studies are the first to directly assess the effects of the combination of RA/IFN on chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vivo in patients. These effects, if seen in other malignant diseases, could account for the therapeutic benefit which has been associated with the administration of this combination of biological agents to patients with malignant disease. PMID:9444943

  13. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  19. Clonal evolution in Ph{prime}-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.H.; Gebre, W.; Kalavar, M. |

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) usually transforms into accelerated and/or blastic phases (ABP) in 2 to 6 years, and patients with CML often succumb to the disease with cytogenetic evolvement. This 43-year-old man was know for his CML for the last 6 years. He experienced clinical deterioration with massive splenomegaly and granulocytic sarcoma in the enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The white blood cell count was 132.2 x 10{sup 9}/L with 14% basophils and less than 5% myeloblasts in the blood and the marrow. The peripheral blood disclosed 46,XY,t(9;22)(q34;q11)[9]/48,XY,+8,t(9;22)(q34;q11),+22q{sup -}[11]. He was treated accordingly and succumbed to the disease 6 months later. In CML, the Ph{prime}-positive finding is present in about 95% of the patients. The remaining Ph{prime}-negative ones are either bcr-positive or bcr-negative. This group may comprise heterogenous myeloid disorders and shows more often RAS gene mutations than {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} CML. The common chromosomal abnormalities seen in ABP are an additional Ph{prime} chromosome, trisomy 8, isochrosome 17 and trisomy 19. Some 15-35% of patients in ABP show only Ph{prime} without additional mutation. Although overall survival is grim, patients with CML in ABP with additional chromosomal changes, regardless of the blastic natures, fare worse than those without. The presence of clonal evolution at the onset of ABP denotes clinical and hematologic deterioration and adversely effects patient`s survival.

  20. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26053950

  1. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  4. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  6. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  10. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  12. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  14. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  15. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandip N; Leng, Xiaohong; Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for acute myeloid leukemia? What are the key statistics about acute myeloid leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s ... myeloid leukemia .” Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  17. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about acute lymphocytic leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... answer many of your questions. What kind of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) do I have? Do I have any ...

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the key statistics about acute lymphocytic leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in the United States for 2016 (including ...

  19. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  20. Acute leukemias in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seewald, Laura; Taub, Jeffrey W; Maloney, Kelly W; McCabe, Edward R B

    2012-09-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) often present with hematopoietic abnormalities, and are at increased risk of developing leukemia. Specifically, 3-10% of newborns with DS are diagnosed with transient myeloproliferative disease, and children with DS are 500 times more likely to develop acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) and 20 times more likely to develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than typical children. This review examines the characteristics of these leukemias and their development in the unique genetic background of trisomy 21. A discussion is also provided for areas of future research and potential therapeutic development. PMID:22867885

  1. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  5. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  10. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era.

    PubMed

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L; Artz, Andrew; de Lima, Marcos; Pulsipher, Michael; Akpek, Gorgun; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell; Chen, Yi-Bin; Cooper, Brenda; Deol, Abhinav; Giralt, Sergio; Gupta, Vikas; Khoury, H Jean; Kohrt, Holbrook; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lewis, Ian; Olsson, Richard; Pidala, Joseph; Savani, Bipin N; Seftel, Matthew; Socié, Gerard; Tallman, Martin; Ustun, Celaettin; Vij, Ravi; Vindeløv, Lars; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2012-04-26

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research aged 40 years and older undergoing RIC/NMA HCT from 2001 to 2007: 117 (38%) aged 40 to 49 years, 119 (39%) 50 to 59 years, and 70 (23%) 60 years or older. The majority (74%) had treatment with imatinib before HCT. At HCT, most patients aged 40 to 49 years were in chronic phase (CP) 1 (74%), compared with 31% aged 60 years or older. Siblings were donors for 56% aged 40 to 49 years; older cohorts had more unrelated donors. The majority received peripheral blood grafts and RIC across all age groups. 3 year overall survival (54%, 52%, and 41%), day + 100 grade II-IV acute GVHD (26%, 32%, and 32%), chronic GVHD (58%, 51%, and 43%), and 1-year treatment-related mortality (18%, 20%, and 13%) were similar across ages. The 3-year relapse incidence (36%, 43%, and 66%) and disease-free survival (35%, 32%, and 16%) were inferior in the oldest cohort. Importantly, for CP1 patients, relapse and disease-free survival were similar across age cohorts. Allogeneic RIC HCT for older patients with CML can control relapse with acceptable toxicity and survival in TKI-exposed CML, especially if still in CP1. PMID:22408257

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  13. Effect of CD38 on the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    YALÇINTEPE, LEMAN; HALIS, EMRE; ULKU, SIBEL

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Alterations in the intracellular concentration and homeostasis of calcium (Ca2+) may contribute to the development of drug resistance. To investigate the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia, the present study rendered human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells resistant to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin by progressively adapting the sensitive parental K562 cells to doxorubicin. The resulting cells were termed K562/DOX. Subsequently, the expression of two multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), was analyzed in K562/DOX cells. In addition to P-gp and MRP1, these cells also expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)38 and its active enzyme adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyl cyclase. The present study also demonstrated that K562/DOX cells responded to cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that CD38 may participate in the development of drug resistance to doxorubicin in K562 cells. PMID:26998164

  14. Activation of a novel Bcr/Abl destruction pathway by WP1130 induces apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A.; Talpaz, Moshe; Kapuria, Vaibhav; Kong, Ling Yuan; Wang, Shimei; Estrov, Zeev; Priebe, Waldemar; Wu, Ji

    2007-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) is effective therapy against Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemia, but resistance develops in all phases of the disease. Bcr/Abl point mutations and other alterations reduce the kinase inhibitory activity of imatinib mesylate; thus, agents that target Bcr/Abl through unique mechanisms may be needed. Here we describe the activity of WP1130, a small molecule that specifically and rapidly down-regulates both wild-type and mutant Bcr/Abl protein without affecting bcr/abl gene expression in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells. Loss of Bcr/Abl protein correlated with the onset of apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of Bcr/Abl substrates. WP1130 did not affect Hsp90/Hsp70 ratios within the cells and did not require the participation of the proteasomal pathway for loss of Bcr/Abl protein. WP1130 was more effective in reducing leukemic versus normal hematopoietic colony formation and strongly inhibited colony formation of cells derived from patients with T315I mutant Bcr/Abl–expressing CML in blast crisis. WP1130 suppressed the growth of K562 heterotransplanted tumors as well as both wild-type Bcr/Abl and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl–expressing BaF/3 cells transplanted into nude mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that WP1130 reduces wild-type and T315I mutant Bcr/Abl protein levels in CML cells through a unique mechanism and may be useful in treating CML. PMID:17202319

  15. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  17. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  19. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  20. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS) assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively). Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. PMID:22913434

  2. Wogonin reverses multi-drug resistance of human myelogenous leukemia K562/A02 cells via downregulation of MRP1 expression by inhibiting Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Yi; Li, Wei; Miao, Hanchi; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Zhao, Li; Guo, Qinglong

    2014-11-15

    Constitutive NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in enhancing cell survival and resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. Previously, much effort has been devoted to the investigation of blocking Nrf2 function in cultured cells and cancer tissues, but few researches have been undertaken to evaluate the precise mechanism of flavonoids-induced sensitivity by inhibiting Nrf2. In this study, we investigated the reversal effect of Wogonin, a flavonoid isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, in resistant human myelogenous leukemia. Data indicated that Wogonin had strong reversal potency by inhibiting functional activity and expression of MRP1 at both protein and mRNA in adriamycin (ADR)-induced resistant human myelogenous leukemia K562/A02 cells. Consequently, the inhibition of MRP1 by Wogonin was dependent on Nrf2 through the decreased binding ability of Nrf2 to antioxidant response element (ARE). Further research revealed Wogonin modulated Nrf2 through the reduction of Nrf2mRNA at transcriptional processes rather than RNA degradation, which is regulated by the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, DNA-PKcs was found to be involved in the Wogonin-induced downregulation of Nrf2 mRNA at transcriptional levels. In summary, these results clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of using Wogonin via inhibiting Nrf2 to combat chemoresistance and suggested that Wogonin can be developed into an efficient natural sensitizer for resistant human myelogenous leukemia. PMID:25264278

  3. Identification of novel therapeutic targets in acute leukemias with NRAS mutations using a pharmacologic approach

    PubMed Central

    Nonami, Atsushi; Sattler, Martin; Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Jianming; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Christie, Amanda L.; Saur, Amy M.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Yoon, Hojong; Sim, Taebo; Griffin, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic forms of NRAS are frequently associated with hematologic malignancies and other cancers, making them important therapeutic targets. Inhibition of individual downstream effector molecules (eg, RAF kinase) have been complicated by the rapid development of resistance or activation of bypass pathways. For the purpose of identifying novel targets in NRAS-transformed cells, we performed a chemical screen using mutant NRAS transformed Ba/F3 cells to identify compounds with selective cytotoxicity. One of the compounds identified, GNF-7, potently and selectively inhibited NRAS-dependent cells in preclinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Mechanistic analysis revealed that its effects were mediated in part through combined inhibition of ACK1/AKT and of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 2 (germinal center kinase). Similar to genetic synthetic lethal approaches, these results suggest that small molecule screens can be used to identity novel therapeutic targets in cells addicted to RAS oncogenes. PMID:25833960

  4. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  7. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition. PMID:25052751

  16. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-22

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  20. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  2. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  3. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  4. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Actual biological diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, A; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Acute myeloblastic leukemia accounts for approximately 20% of acute leukemias in children. The days the microscope represented the main tool in the diagnosis and classification of Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia seem to be very far. This review summarizes the current diagnosis of this malignancy, where the morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular characterization represents the basement of a risk group related therapy. PMID:25408742

  6. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherief, Laila M.; Azab, Seham F.; Zakaria, Marwa M.; Kamal, M.; Elbasset Aly, Maha Abd; Ali, Adel; Alhady, Mohamed Abd

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 109/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 109/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup. PMID:26376384

  7. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Óscar; Martínez-Climent, José Ángel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis. PMID:24675889

  9. Novel structural co-expression analysis linking the NPM1-associated ribosomal biogenesis network to chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence WC; Lin, Xihong; Yung, Godwin; Lui, Thomas; Chiu, Ya Ming; Wang, Fengfeng; Tsui, Nancy BY; Cho, William CS; Yip, SP; Siu, Parco M.; Wong, SC Cesar; Yung, Benjamin YM

    2015-01-01

    Co-expression analysis reveals useful dysregulation patterns of gene cooperativeness for understanding cancer biology and identifying new targets for treatment. We developed a structural strategy to identify co-expressed gene networks that are important for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). This strategy compared the distributions of expressional correlations between CML and normal states, and it identified a data-driven threshold to classify strongly co-expressed networks that had the best coherence with CML. Using this strategy, we found a transcriptome-wide reduction of co-expression connectivity in CML, reflecting potentially loosened molecular regulation. Conversely, when we focused on nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) associated networks, NPM1 established more co-expression linkages with BCR-ABL pathways and ribosomal protein networks in CML than normal. This finding implicates a new role of NPM1 in conveying tumorigenic signals from the BCR-ABL oncoprotein to ribosome biogenesis, affecting cellular growth. Transcription factors may be regulators of the differential co-expression patterns between CML and normal. PMID:26205693

  10. Initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia based on quantification of M-BCR status using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, Helen Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-02-01

    Formed from a reciprocal translocation t(9:22)(q34;q11) of genetic material between the long arms of human chromosomes 9 and 22, the constitutively active breakpoint cluster region (BCR) Abelson 1 (ABL) tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is known to be causative of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In 98% of CML patients harboring the t(9:22)(q34;q11) translocation, known as the Philadelphia chromosome, the chimeric BCR-ABL oncogene is created through cleavage of the BCR gene within its major breakpoint region (M-BCR) and breakage of the ABL gene within a 100-kbp region downstream of exon 2a. Clinical detection of the fused BCR-ABL oncogene currently relies on direct visualization by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), a relatively tedious assay that typically offers a detection limit of ca. 2%. Here, we describe a novel assay that uses droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technology to reliably measure M-BCR status and the presence of BCR-ABL. When applied to cell-line models of CML, the assay accurately quantifies BCR-ABL frequency to a detection limit of 0.25%. It therefore offers improved specificity relative to FISH, and may allow identification of variant translocation patterns, including derivative chromosome 9 deletions. PMID:26631023

  11. Risk stratification of chromosomal abnormalities in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Tang, Guilin; Khoury, Joseph D; Wang, Sa; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; DiGiuseppe, Joseph A; Chen, Zi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2016-06-01

    Clonal cytogenetic evolution with additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is generally associated with decreased response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and adverse survival. Although ACAs are considered as a sign of disease progression and have been used as one of the criteria for accelerated phase, the differential prognostic impact of individual ACAs in CML is unknown, and a classification system to reflect such prognostic impact is lacking. In this study, we aimed to address these questions using a large cohort of CML patients treated in the era of TKIs. We focused on cases with single chromosomal changes at the time of ACA emergence and stratified the 6 most common ACAs into 2 groups: group 1 with a relatively good prognosis including trisomy 8, -Y, and an extra copy of Philadelphia chromosome; and group 2 with a relatively poor prognosis including i(17)(q10), -7/del7q, and 3q26.2 rearrangements. Patients in group 1 showed much better treatment response and survival than patients in group 2. When compared with cases with no ACAs, ACAs in group 2 conferred a worse survival irrelevant to the emergence phase and time. In contrast, ACAs in group 1 had no adverse impact on survival when they emerged from chronic phase or at the time of CML diagnosis. The concurrent presence of 2 or more ACAs conferred an inferior survival and can be categorized into the poor prognostic group. PMID:27006386

  12. Causes of resistance and treatment choices of second- and third-line treatment in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Andreas; Ernst, Thomas; Eigendorff, Ekkehard; La Rosée, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who fail first-line therapy, several factors should be considered for the decision of the next treatment option. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib offer improved potency and a high likelihood of success for these patients. Overall, efficacy data are comparable for these agents, and so physicians should consider the BCR-ABL1 mutation profile and the patient's history to make a decision on the best choice. Only a few BCR-ABL1 mutations seem to be less responsive to any of the three drugs, and it is recommended to choose the second-line TKI that has shown clinical activity against the specific mutation in these cases. For patients with all other mutations and for patients with no mutations, it is recommended to choose the second-generation TKI based on the patient's disease history. The third-generation TKI ponatinib is available after dasatinib or nilotinib failure or for patients with T315I mutations. However, optimal dose of ponatinib is still under investigation. Overall, it is recommended to select a drug that minimizes the likelihood of worsening the patient's past side effects or comorbid conditions. In any case, chance and risk of allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be compared with the long-term outcome of TKI therapy in patients eligible for this procedure. PMID:25814079

  13. Generation of chronic myelogenous leukemia-specific T cells in cytokine-modified autologous mixed lymphocyte/tumor cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Müller, L; Provenzani, C; Pawelec, G

    2001-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) may be amenable to cell-based adoptive immunotherapy, as suggested by the graft-versus-leukemia effect of bone marrow transplantation and the therapeutic benefit of donor leukocyte infusions. Specific adoptive immunotherapy without bone marrow transplantation might be more effective and less cost-intensive. Professional antigen-presenting cells, the dendritic cells, from patients with CML are derived from the malignant clone and may stimulate antileukemia T-cell responses. Autologous T cells may also be able to recognize tumor antigens on CML cells directly. Here, the authors show that CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to autologous CML cells can be generated in vitro rapidly and effectively by performing modified autologous mixed lymphocyte/tumor cell cultures (MLTC) in serum-free medium in the presence of cytokines known to support dendritic cell differentiation. MLTC-sensitized T cells secreted large amounts of the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma, as well as interleukin (IL)-2. However, they also secreted a variety of other cytokines, including the type 2-subtype cytokine IL-13 but not the classic type 2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10. Monoclonal populations of CML-specific CD4 cells could be derived from these lines in limited numbers but showed markedly enhanced reactivity. This suggests that CML-specific T cells are relatively rare in these autologous MTLC-derived sensitized populations, but that their isolation and propagation would yield much more potent antitumor effector cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy without the need for bone marrow transplantation. PMID:11759071

  14. Real-time analysis of imatinib- and dasatinib-induced effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia cell interaction with fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Obr, Adam; Röselová, Pavla; Grebeňová, Dana; Kuželová, Kateřina

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of stem leukemic cells to the bone marrow extracellular matrix increases their resistance to chemotherapy and contributes to the disease persistence. In chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the activity of the fusion BCR-ABL kinase affects adhesion signaling. Using real-time monitoring of microimpedance, we studied in detail the kinetics of interaction of human CML cells (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7) and of control BCR-ABL-negative leukemia cells (HEL, JURKAT) with fibronectin-coated surface. The effect of two clinically used kinase inhibitors, imatinib (a relatively specific c-ABL inhibitor) and dasatinib (dual ABL/SRC family kinase inhibitor), on cell binding to fibronectin is described. Both imatinib and low-dose (several nM) dasatinib reinforced CML cell interaction with fibronectin while no significant change was induced in BCR-ABL-negative cells. On the other hand, clinically relevant doses of dasatinib (100 nM) had almost no effect in CML cells. The efficiency of the inhibitors in blocking the activity of BCR-ABL and SRC-family kinases was assessed from the extent of phosphorylation at autophosphorylation sites. In both CML cell lines, SRC kinases were found to be transactivated by BCR-ABL. In the intracellular context, EC50 for BCR-ABL inhibition was in subnanomolar range for dasatinib and in submicromolar one for imatinib. EC50 for direct inhibition of LYN kinase was found to be about 20 nM for dasatinib and more than 10 µM for imatinib. Cells pretreated with 100 nM dasatinib were still able to bind to fibronectin and SRC kinases are thus not necessary for the formation of cell-matrix contacts. However, a minimal activity of SRC kinases might be required to mediate the increase in cell adhesivity induced by BCR-ABL inhibition. Indeed, active (autophosphorylated) LYN was found to localize in cell adhesive structures which were visualized using interference reflection microscopy. PMID:25198091

  15. Cardiac Manifestation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Werner, Rudolf A; Rudelius, Martina; Thurner, Annette; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lapa, Constantin

    2016-07-01

    Here, we report on a 38-year-old man with unclear right heart failure. Imaging with cardiac MRI and combined PET/CT with F-FDG revealed a hypermetabolic mass extending from the right ventricle to the atrium. In addition, intense glucose utilization throughout the bone marrow was noted. Biopsies of both bone marrow and cardiac mass were performed and revealed precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with gross leukemic infiltration of the myopericardium, a rare manifestation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia at initial diagnosis. PMID:27088389

  16. The biology of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Downing, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) comprises between 4% and 15% of newly diagnosed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients. AMKL in children with Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by a founding GATA1 mutation that cooperates with trisomy 21, followed by the acquisition of additional somatic mutations. In contrast, non–DS-AMKL is characterized by chimeric oncogenes consisting of genes known to play a role in normal hematopoiesis. CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is the most frequent chimeric oncogene identified to date in this subset of patients and confers a poor prognosis. PMID:26186939

  17. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Kendra; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Zhang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1) tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1) inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:25045255

  20. Discovery of imatinib-responsive FIP1L1-PDGFRA mutation during refractory acute myeloid leukemia transformation of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement results in constitutive activation of the tyrosine kinase PDGFRA. Neoplasms harboring this rearrangement are responsive to imatinib mesylate at doses much lower than those recommended for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Only a single report has described the identification of FIP1L1-PDGFRA in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Herein, we present a case report of a patient in whom the FIP1L1-PDGFRA was discovered as he evolved from CMML to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The presence of a dominant neoplastic clone with FIP1L1-PDGFRA rearrangement was suspected on the basis of sudden onset of peripheral and bone marrow eosinophilia and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular diagnostic tests. Whereas the patient was initially refractory to chemotherapy before the rearrangement was detected, subsequent therapy with imatinib led to complete remission. PMID:24669761

  1. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Eosinophilic presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rezamand, Azim; Ghorashi, Ziaaedin; Ghorashi, Sona; Nezami, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Primary Diagnosis: Rule-out appendicitis Co-existing Diseases: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Medication: Chemiotherapy Clinical Procedure: Chest CT • flow cytometry Specialty: Pediatrics’ oncology • infection diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Leukemias are among the most common childhood malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for 77% of all leukemias. In rare cases, ALL patients may present with eosinophilia. Case Report: Here, a 5-year old boy was admitted to our hospital with a possible diagnosis of appendicitis. This patient’s complete blood cell count demonstrated leukocytosis with severe eosinophilia. Following a 1-month clinical investigation, 2 bone marrow aspirations, and flow cytometry analysis, a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was proposed. Finally, the patient was transferred to the oncology ward to receive standard therapeutic protocol, which resulted in disease remission. After chemotherapy for 2 years, patient is successfully treated. Conclusions: ALL is diagnosed by eosinophilia in rare cases. These patients need immediate diagnosis and intensive therapy due to worsened prognosis of ALL presenting as hypereosinophilia. PMID:23869247

  3. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. Regulation of human RNase-L by the miR-29 family reveals a novel oncogenic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa Y; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Lapidus, Rena G; Scheibner, Kara A; Hassel, Bret A

    2013-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase-L is the terminal component of an interferon-regulated RNA decay pathway known as the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system, whose established functions include antimicrobial and tumor suppressive activities. RNase-L activity requires binding of the small molecule 2-5A, leading to RNase-L dimerization and cleavage of single-stranded RNA. RNase-L expression is controlled post-transcriptionally by its 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR), which exerts a strong negative effect on RNase-L levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that repress expression of target genes by binding to regions of complementarity often in the 3' UTR. The miR-29 family acts as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and has many oncogenic targets. We report that the miR-29 family represses RNase-L protein expression across several cell types. Using a luciferase reporter, we showed that miR-29 acts via 4 target sites within the RNASEL 3' UTR. Mutation of all sites is required for abrogation of miR-29 repression. In light of the reported tumor suppressive role of miR-29 in K562 CML cells and miR-29 repression of RNase-L in these cells, we generated K562 cells with stable RNase-L knockdown and demonstrated that loss of RNase-L inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as tumor growth in a xenograft model. Our findings identify a previously unknown miRNA regulator of RNase-L expression and support a novel oncogenic role for RNase-L in CML and potentially other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:23113544

  5. Why do chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells survive allogeneic stem cell transplantation or imatinib: does it really matter?

    PubMed

    Goldman, John; Gordon, Myrtle

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that allogeneic stem cell transplantation can 'cure' chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), although occasional patients relapse more than 10 years after the transplant procedure. Such cures presumably result from the combined effects of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) of the conditioning regimen and the graft-vs.-leukemia (GvL) effect mediated by donor-derived T lymphocytes. The advent of imatinib has revolutionized the management of patients with CML, but much evidence suggests that it does not eradicate all LSCs, which theoretically remain a potential source of relapse to chronic phase or advanced phase disease. Moreover, sub-clones of Philadelphia-positive cells bearing mutations that code for amino-acid substitutions in the Bcr-Abl kinase domain can be identified in patients receiving treatment with imatinib and are associated with varying degrees of resistance to this agent. In the present review, we postulate that LSCs, similar to their normal counterparts, may alternate between cycling and quiescent modes. In the cycling mode, they may express Bcr-Abl protein and be susceptible to the acquisition of additional mutations, whereas, in the quiescent mode, they may express little or no Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, cannot acquire additional mutations and are unaffected by imatinib. Thus, a patient who starts treatment early in the natural history of CML, and who responds to imatinib clinically, may not have had the opportunity to acquire additional mutations in LSCs. In this case, the persistence long-term of quiescent 'non-mutated' LSCs despite imatinib treatment might be consistent with freedom from relapse to chronic or advanced phase disease, provided that they remain vulnerable to imatinib when they are recruited into cycle. Conversely, when imatinib resistant Philadelphia-positive sub-clones predominate, this is likely to be due to the recruitment to hematopoiesis of quiescent stem cells that had been in cycle before administration of imatinib and

  6. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  7. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  8. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-01

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 6,590 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.4% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,430 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 77,855 people living with acute lymphocytic leukemia ...

  13. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Ixazomib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Valspodar in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Bortezomib, Daunorubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL. PMID:27149388

  2. Chromosome arm-specific long telomeres: a new clonal event in primary chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Samassekou, Oumar; Li, Huiyu; Hébert, Josée; Ntwari, Aimé; Wang, Haixia; Cliché, Catherine Grenier; Bouchard, Eric; Huang, Shiang; Yan, Ju

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs) for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32) of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp) with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation. PMID:21677878

  3. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Chronic myelogenous leukemia-like hematological malignancy with t(8;22) in a 26-year-old pregnant woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    QIN, YOU-WEN; YANG, YI-NING; BAI, PING; WANG, CHUN

    2016-01-01

    t(8;22)(p11;q11) is a rare but recurrent genetic alteration in various hematological disorders. Patients with t(8;22)(p11;q11) may be misdiagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), due to the similar clinical features. Thus, the current study presents a patient with t(8;22)(p11;q11) who was previously misdiagnosed with CML in the chronic phase. The current patient was a 26-year-old woman who was 4-weeks pregnant and in whom an increased white blood cell count (4.0×1010/l) was found upon physical examination. The patient had no history of hematological disease. Although cytogenetics showed a normal karyotype and no breakpoint cluster region/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (BCR/ABL) fusion gene was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was initially made according to the clinical and morphological features. Another 6 weeks later, t(8;22)(p11;q11) rearrangement was present in 9 out of 10 analyzed metaphases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated a negative result for the BCR/ABL fusion, but gave a positive result for the BCR-fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 fusion. A hematological diagnosis of atypical CML was again formed. PMID:27313753

  5. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Munker, Reinhold; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Hai Lin; de Lima, Marcos; Khoury, Hanna J; Gale, Robert Peter; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Weisdorf, Daniel; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Acute biphenotypic leukemias or mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) are rare and considered high risk. The optimal treatment and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) are unclear. Most prior case series include only modest numbers of patients who underwent transplantation. We analyzed the outcome of 95 carefully characterized alloHCT patients with MPAL reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2012. The median age was 20 years (range, 1 to 68). Among the 95 patients, 78 were in first complete remission (CR1) and 17 were in second complete remission (CR2). Three-year overall survival (OS) of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 76), leukemia-free survival of 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66), relapse incidence of 29% (95% CI, 20 to 38), and nonrelapse mortality of 15% (95% CI, 9 to 23) were encouraging. OS was best in younger patients (<20 years), but no significant differences were observed between those 20 to 40 years of age and those who were 40 years or older. A matched-pair analysis showed similar outcomes comparing MPAL cases to 375 acute myelogenous leukemia or 359 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. MPAL patients had more acute and a trend for more chronic graft-versus-host disease. No difference was observed between patients who underwent transplantation in CR1 versus those who underwent transplantation in CR2. AlloHCT is a promising treatment option for pediatric and adult patients with MPAL with encouraging long-term survival. PMID:26903380

  6. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to available tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nelarabine demonstrates activity as monotherapy in T-cell ALL and is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analogue approved in pediatric leukemia, has shown activity in adult acute leukemias including ALL and acute myeloid leukemia. The role of pegaspargase in adult ALL requires further investigation. The benefit of matched related-donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation is significant for standard-risk ALL but not for high-risk ALL. Development of new drugs and agents tailored to subset-specific cytogenetic-molecular characteristics remains vital to success in treating adult ALL. PMID:20425428

  8. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML. PMID:24212816

  9. Regulation of apoptosis by cyclic nucleotides in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells and human myelogenous leukemia (K-562) cells.

    PubMed

    Dittmar, Fanni; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2016-07-15

    The cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cCMP and cUMP have been recently identified in numerous mammalian cell lines, in primary cells and in intact organs, but very little is still known about their biological function. A recent study of our group revealed that the membrane-permeable cCMP analog cCMP-acetoxymethylester (cCMP-AM) induces apoptosis in mouse lymphoma cells independent of protein kinase A via an intrinsic and mitochondria-dependent pathway. In our present study, we examined the effects of various cNMP-AMs in human tumor cell lines. In HEL cells, a human erythroleukemia cell line, cCMP-AM effectively reduced the number of viable cells, effectively induced apoptosis by altering the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby caused changes in the cell cycle. cCMP itself was biologically inactive, indicating that membrane penetration is required to trigger intracellular effects. cCMP-AM did not induce apoptosis in K-562 cells, a human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, due to rapid export via multidrug resistance-associated proteins. The biological effects of cCMP-AM differed from those of other cNMP-AMs. In conclusion, cCMP effectively induces apoptosis in HEL cells, cCMP export prevents apoptosis of K-562 cells and cNMPs differentially regulate various aspects of apoptosis, cell growth and mitochondrial function. In a broader perspective, our data support the concept of distinct second messenger roles of cAMP, cGMP, cCMP and cUMP. PMID:27157412

  10. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphocytic leukemia? What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  12. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  13. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  18. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  20. An Adult Male Presenting with Concurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma Involving a CCND1-IGH Translocation and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with a Variant (9;22) Translocation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter M; Siangchin, Ken; Song, Sophie; Shabsovich, David; Naeini, Yalda; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) involving IGH and CCND1 a nd t(9;22) (q34;q11.2) involving BCR and ABL1 are common abnormalities in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), respectively. However, the concurrence of the two malignancies is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case of an 87-year-old male who presented with anemia and monocytosis. FISH studies on a bone marrow sample enriched for plasma cells detected a t(11;14) positive for IGH and CCND1 fusion in 92% of nuclei. However, cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) in 40% of the metaphases. Interphase and metaphase FISH studies on the sample confirmed the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion in 88% of nuclei but did not show any signals corresponding to the derivative 9, suggesting a variant t(9;22) with a deletion or additional material of unknown origin at the 9q34 band of the derivative 9 and a derivative 22 bearing the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. The concurrence of plasma cell myeloma and chronic myelogenous leukemia is extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported. The molecular pathway in which the multiple malignancies arise is still poorly understood, and this case provides insight into the concurrence of PCM and CML. PMID:27584682

  1. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  2. [Chronic myelogenous leukemia initially presenting with multiple subcutaneous tumors due to extramedullary hematopoiesis].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Shuhei; Doki, Noriko; Kaito, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Harada, Kaito; Hino, Yutaro; Yamamoto, Keita; Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Yosioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Senoo, Yasushi; Watakabe, Kyoko; Hagino, Takeshi; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-04-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted with right upper-extremity pain and multiple subcutaneous masses. Bone marrow aspirate showed hypercellular marrow with increased myeloid components at all stages of maturation. Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed 100% Philadelphia chromosome positivity along with BCR/ABL gene rearrangement, as demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A diagnosis of chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was therefore made. Biopsy of one of the subcutaneous masses showed proliferation of granulocytes in various stages of differentiation. There were also erythroid cells and megakaryocytes, without p53 and CD34-positive blasts. These results suggested that the subcutaneous masses had developed from extramedullary hematopoiesis, not blastomas. The patient was administered dasatinib (DA) 140 mg, combined with radiation therapy for pain and peripheral neuropathy from the right axial extramedullary tumor. The patient showed complete hematological remission and the subcutaneous masses had disappeared 1 month after starting administration of DA. Because the patient did not achieve a cytogenetic response, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib was administered. She will undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the near future. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML is uncommon. Our case emphasizes the need to elucidate the pathogenesis of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the early stages of CML. PMID:27169451

  3. Gene Network Exploration of Crosstalk between Apoptosis and Autophagy in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, William C. S.; Chan, Lawrence W. C.; Wong, S. C. Cesar; Tsui, Nancy B. Y.; Siu, Parco M.; Yip, S. P.; Yung, Benjamin Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gene expression levels change to adapt the stress, such as starvation, toxin, and radiation. The changes are signals transmitted through molecular interactions, eventually leading to two cellular fates, apoptosis and autophagy. Due to genetic variations, the signals may not be effectively transmitted to modulate apoptotic and autophagic responses. Such aberrant modulation may lead to carcinogenesis and drug resistance. The balance between apoptosis and autophagy becomes very crucial in coping with the stress. Though there have been evidences illustrating the apoptosis-autophagy interplay, the underlying mechanism and the participation of the regulators including transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) remain unclear. Results. Gene network is a graphical illustration for exploring the functional linkages and the potential coordinate regulations of genes. Microarray dataset for the study of chronic myeloid leukemia was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. The expression profiles of those genes related to apoptosis and autophagy, including MCL1, BCL2, ATG, beclin-1, BAX, BAK, E2F, cMYC, PI3K, AKT, BAD, and LC3, were extracted from the dataset to construct the gene networks. Conclusion. The network analysis of these genes explored the underlying mechanisms and the roles of TFs and miRNAs for the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:25821802

  4. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Early in the Disease Course: Lessons From Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Musa; Jabbour, Elias

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) management has changed with the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the BCR-ABL1 oncoprotein. Imatinib mesylate, followed by nilotinib and dasatinib, has been approved for newly diagnosed patients. Since none of these TKIs show survival superiority, the drug choice is a challenge. Even so, the rate of deeper and earlier responses is higher with second-generation TKIs than it is with imatinib, and, in general, better response is associated with a survival advantage, regardless of TKI type being used. Patients should be monitored carefully for response, and treatment failure should prompt a timely switch to another TKI. Side effect profile and drug cost are other important considerations in therapy choice. In several clinical studies, achieving undetectable and durable disease status allowed some patients to discontinue the TKI and enjoy long-term treatment-free remission. Cure for CML may be possible with TKIs alone or TKIs in combination with other investigational therapies. However, due to lack of long-term outcome data and absence of consensus for the definition of optimal response and time to stop TKIs, discontinuation is discouraged outside of a clinical trial. PMID:26615132

  5. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Acadesine Kills Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cells through PKC-Dependent Induction of Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Guillaume; Ben Sahra, Issam; Puissant, Alexandre; Colosetti, Pascal; Belhacene, Nathalie; Gounon, Pierre; Hofman, Paul; Bost, Fréderic; Cassuto, Jill-Patrice; Auberger, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11) translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside) a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL) was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients. PMID:19924252

  7. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  8. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  9. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts

  10. Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  11. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... and given back to the patient through an infusion . These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry ...

  15. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following bladder instillations with thiotepa.

    PubMed Central

    Easton, D. J.; Poon, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    A case of therapy-related leukemia is described. Other cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia have been associated with the intramuscular administration of thiotepa (an alkylating agent), but this patient received only intravesical instillations of the drug. The interval between the start of chemotherapy and the onset of leukemia was 56 months. PMID:6411320

  18. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Gene mutations and molecularly targeted therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Georgiou, Georgios; Benetatos, Leonidas; Briasoulis, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can progress quickly and without treatment can become fatal in a short period of time. However, over the last 30 years fine-tuning of therapeutics have increased the rates of remission and cure. Cytogenetics and mutational gene profiling, combined with the option of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offered in selected patients have further optimized AML treatment on a risk stratification basis in younger adults. However there is still an unmet medical need for effective therapies in AML since disease relapses in almost half of adult patients becoming refractory to salvage therapy. Improvements in the understanding of molecular biology of cancer and identification of recurrent mutations in AML provide opportunities to develop targeted therapies and improve the clinical outcome. In the spectrum of identified gene mutations, primarily targetable lesions are gain of function mutations of tyrosine kinases FLT3, JAK2 and cKIT for which specific, dual and multi-targeted small molecule inhibitors have been developed. A number of targeted compounds such as sorafenib, quizartinib, lestaurtinib, midostaurin, pacritinib, PLX3397 and CCT137690 are in clinical development. For loss-of-function gene mutations, which are mostly biomarkers of favorable prognosis, combined therapeutic approaches can maximize the therapeutic efficacy of conventional therapy. Apart from mutated gene products, proteins aberrantly overexpressed in AML appear to be clinically significant therapeutic targets. Such a molecule for which targeted inhibitors are currently in clinical development is PLK1. We review characteristic gene mutations, discuss their biological functions and clinical significance and present small molecule compounds in clinical development, which are expected to have a role in treating AML subtypes with characteristic molecular alterations. PMID:23358589

  20. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  1. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... one form of a cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow) called acute myeloid leukemia. In ... 1 link) PubMed Sources for This Page Döhner H. Implication of the molecular characterization of acute myeloid ...

  3. Should persons with acute myeloid leukemia have a transplant in first remission?

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Wiernik, P H; Lazarus, H M

    2014-10-01

    Despite more than 40 years of extensive study, it remains uncertain which individuals, if any, with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first remission should receive a blood cell or bone marrow transplant versus post-remission chemotherapy (or both). Nevertheless, there is a recent trend toward recommending more transplants in this setting. We consider four myths underlying this recommendation: (1) only individuals achieving second remission benefit from a transplant; (2) there is no effective therapy for relapse other than an allotransplant; (3) we can accurately predict which individuals with AML in first remission need a transplant; and (4) detection of minimal residual disease in first remission will resolve this controversy. We discuss these misconceptions and suggest approaches to resolve this issue. PMID:24727674

  4. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride or Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Targeting the Microenvironment in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Armin; Uy, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays a critical role in the development, progression, and relapse of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Similar to normal hematopoietic stem cells, AML blasts express receptors on their surface, allowing them to interact with specific components of the marrow microenvironment. These interactions contribute to both chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse. Preclinical studies and early phase clinical trials have demonstrated the potential for targeting the tumor-microenvironment interactions in AML. Agents currently under investigation include hypoxia-inducible agents and inhibitors of CXCR4 and adhesion molecules such as VLA-4 and E-selectin. PMID:25921388

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Saultz, Jennifer N.; Garzon, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by immature myeloid cell proliferation and bone marrow failure. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain a critical prognostic tool for post induction treatment. Despite rapid advances in the field including new drug targets and increased understanding of the biology, AML treatment remains unchanged for the past three decades with the majority of patients eventually relapsing and dying of the disease. Allogenic transplant remains the best chance for cure for patients with intermediate or high risk disease. In this review, we discuss the landmark genetic studies that have improved outcome prediction and novel therapies. PMID:26959069

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia: advances in diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Hasserjian, R P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm characterized by ≥20% myeloblasts in the blood or bone marrow. Current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia are based on both patient-related parameters such as age and performance status as well as the intrinsic characteristics of particular disease subtypes. Subtyping of acute myeloid leukemia requires an integration of information from the patient's clinical history (such as any prior preleukemic myeloid neoplasm or cytotoxic potentially leukemogenic therapy), the leukemia morphology, cytogenetic findings, and the mutation status of particular genes (NPM1, FLT3, and CEBPA). In recent years, a barrage of information has become available regarding gene mutations that occur in acute myeloid leukemia and their influence on prognosis. Future therapies for acute myeloid leukemia will increasingly rely on the genetic signatures of individual leukemias and will adjust therapy to the predicted disease aggressiveness as well as employ therapies targeted against particular deregulated genetic pathways. This article reviews current standards for diagnosing and classifying acute myeloid leukemia according to the 2008 WHO Classification. Data that have subsequently accumulated regarding newly characterized gene mutations are also presented. It is anticipated that future leukemia classifications will employ a combination of karyotypic features and the gene mutation pattern to stratify patients to increasingly tailored treatment plans. PMID:23590662

  10. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  11. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... The only known cure for CML is a bone marrow transplant , or stem cell transplant. Most patients, though, do ... years while on this medicine. Stem cell or bone marrow transplant is usually considered in persons whose disease comes ...

  13. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ways to give How your gift saves lives Donate cord blood Cord blood is changing lives Federal cord blood ... Cord blood options Sibling directed donation How to donate cord blood Participating hospitals Cord blood FAQs Learn if you ...

  14. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. [Leukemia research in Germany: the Competence Network Acute and Chronic Leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kossak-Roth, Ute; Saußele, Susanne; Aul, Carlo; Büchner, Thomas; Döhner, Hartmut; Dugas, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Gökbuget, Nicola; Griesshammer, Martin; Hasford, Jörg; Heuser, Michael; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Reiter, Andreas; Röllig, Christoph; Hehlmann, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network "Acute and Chronic Leukemias" was founded in 1997 by the consolidation of the leading leukemia study groups in Germany. Key results are the development of new trials and cooperative studies, the setup of patient registries and biobanking facilities, as well as the improvement of study infrastructure. In 2003, the concept of the competence network contributed to the foundation of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN). Synergy with the ELN resulted in cooperation on a European and international level, standardization of diagnostics and treatment, and recommendations for each leukemia and interdisciplinary specialty. The ultimate goal of the network is the cure of leukemia through cooperative research. PMID:26979719

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. [Cytosine-arabinoside in high doses in refractory acute granulocytic leukemia. Apropos of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Jouet, J P; Simon, M; Fenaux, P; Pollet, J P; Bauters, F

    1985-01-01

    A total of 17 patients, 6 female and 11 male (age range 13 to 56 years), received high dose Ara-C for treatment of refractory acute myelogenous leukemia. Ara-C was given at 3 g/m2 twice daily for 6 days as a 1 infusion. 1 patient (with induced acute leukemia) was treated directly, two after failure of a chemotherapy schedule containing the usual dose Ara-C, 12 for first relapse and 2 for subsequent relapse. Maximum follow up is 16 months. Beside hematological toxicity, systemic tolerance was good with no neurological of cutaneous effects. Despite preventive corticoid eyewash, ocular complications occurred in 6 cases, mild and resolvable in 5 of them. The immediate results were as follows: 3 deaths during induction (18%); 6 failures (35%); 8 complete remissions (CR) (47%). After primary chemo-resistance (two cases) failure was always noted. In 3 cases, after less than 12 infusions had been given, 2 failures and 1 very short CR were noted. In 2 patients, when doxorubicin was added to Ara-C, we observed 1 death during induction and 1 failure. Of the patients achieving CR 8 were treated by periodic courses with high dose Ara-C and 4 of them relapsed. The longest failure free duration was 11 months. Median survival duration of the 17 patients is 5 months. PMID:3862072

  19. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  20. MEK Inhibitor MEK162, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. The -137G/C Polymorphism in Interleukin-18 Gene Promoter Contributes to Chronic Lymphocytic and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Risk in Turkish Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Serap; Mutlu, Pelin; Çetin, Türker; Sarper, Meral; Özgür, Gökhan; Avcu, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 superfamily and is secreted by various immune and nonimmune cells. Evidence has shown that IL-18 has both anticancer and procancer effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between IL-18 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to chronic lymphocytic leukemias (CLL) and chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML) in Turkish patients. Materials and Methods: The frequencies of polymorphisms (rs61667799(G/T), rs5744227(C/G), rs5744228(A/G), and rs187238(G/C)) were studied in 20 CLL patients, 30 CML patients, and 30 healthy individuals. The genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing analysis. Results: Significant associations were detected between the IL-18 rs187238(G/C) polymorphism and chronic leukemia. A higher prevalence of the C allele was found in CML cases with respect to controls. The GC heterozygous and CC homozygous genotypes were associated with risk of CML when compared with controls. However, prevalence of the C allele was not significantly high in CLL cases with respect to controls. There was only a significant difference between the homozygous CC genotype of CLL patients and the control group; thus, it can be concluded that the CC genotype may be associated with the risk of CLL. Based on our data, there were no significant associations between the IL-18 rs61667799(G/T), rs5744227(C/G), or rs5744228(A/G) polymorphisms and CLL or CML. Conclusions: IL-18 gene promoter rs187238(G/C) polymorphism is associated with chronic leukemia in the Turkish population. However, due to the limited number of studied patients, these are preliminary results that show the association between -137G/C polymorphism and patients (CLL and CML). Further large-scale studies combined with haplotype and expression analysis are required to validate the current findings. PMID:26376814

  4. Varicella zoster immune status in children treated for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Soonie R; Bate, Jessica; Maple, Peter A C; Brown, Kevin; Breuer, Judith; Heath, Paul T

    2014-11-01

    Children treated for acute leukemia are at increased risk of severe infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). We studied the VZV sero-status of children with acute leukemia prior to starting chemotherapy and after completion of chemotherapy. VZV sero-status was assessed using time resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA) before starting treatment and 6 months after completion of treatment. Prior to starting treatment for acute leukemia, a significant proportion of children (35%) are VZV seronegative. On completion of treatment most patients maintained protective VZV antibody levels; however, 35% had reduced/loss VZV antibody to a level considered non-protective and susceptible to VZV infection. PMID:24789692

  5. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cannizzo, Elisa; Carulli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Azzarà, Antonio; Galimberti, Sara; Ottaviano, Virginia; Preffer, Frederic; Petrini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL) is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated. PMID:22937302

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia in the vascular niche.

    PubMed

    Cogle, Christopher R; Bosse, Raphael C; Brewer, Takae; Migdady, Yazan; Shirzad, Reza; Kampen, Kim Rosalie; Saki, Najmaldin

    2016-10-01

    The greatest challenge in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is refractory disease. With approximately 60-80% of AML patients dying of relapsed disease, there is an urgent need to define and target mechanisms of drug resistance. Unfortunately, targeting cell-intrinsic resistance has failed to improve clinical outcomes in AML. Emerging data show that cell-extrinsic factors in the bone marrow microenvironment protect and support AML cells. The vascular niche, in particular, regulates AML cell survival and cell cycling by both paracrine secretion and adhesive contact with endothelial cells. Moreover, AML cells can functionally integrate within vascular endothelia, undergo quiescence, and resist cytotoxic chemotherapy. Together, these findings support the notion of blood vessels as sanctuary sites for AML. Therefore, vascular targeting agents may serve to remit AML. Several early phase clinical trials have tested anti-angiogenic agents, leukemia mobilizing agents, and vascular disrupting agents in AML patients. In general, these agents can be safely administered to AML patients and cardiovascular side effects were reported. Response rates to vascular targeting agents in AML have been modest; however, a majority of vascular targeting trials in AML are monotherapy in design and indiscriminate in patient recruitment. When considering the chemosensitizing effects of targeting the microenvironment, there is a strong rationale to build upon these early phase clinical trials and initiate phase IB/II trials of combination therapy where vascular targeting agents are positioned as priming agents for cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:25963886

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    With modern intensive combination polychemotherapy, the complete response (CR) rate in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is 80% to 90%, and the cure rate is 40% to 50%. Hence, there is a need to develop effective salvage therapies and combine novel agents with standard effective chemotherapy. ALL leukemic cells express several surface antigens amenable to target therapies, including CD20, CD22, and CD19. Monoclonal antibodies target these leukemic surface antigens selectively and minimize off-target toxicity. When added to frontline chemotherapy, rituximab, an antibody directed against CD20, increases cure rates of adults with Burkitt leukemia from 40% to 80% and those with pre-B ALL from 35% to 50%. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, a CD22 monoclonal antibody bound to calicheamicin, has resulted in marrow CR rates of 55% and a median survival of 6 to 7 months when given to patients with refractory-relapsed ALL. Blinatumomab, a biallelic T cell engaging the CD3-CD19 monoclonal antibody, also resulted in overall response rates of 40% to 50% and a median survival of 6.5 months in a similar refractory-relapsed population. Other promising monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) or CD19 or CD20 and bound to different cytotoxins or immunotoxins are under development. Combined modalities of chemotherapy and the novel monoclonal antibodies are under investigation. PMID:25999456

  8. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia Presenting as Mediastinal Mass-2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Vardhan, Rig; Kotwal, Jyoti; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Ahmed, Rehan; Sharma, Ajay; Singh, Jasjit

    2016-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia symbolizes a very small subset of acute leukemia that simply cannot be allocated as lymphoid or myeloid lineage. The 2008 World Health Organisation classification established stringent standard for diagnosis of mixed phenotype acute leukemia, accentuating myeloperoxidase for myeloid lineage, cytoplasmic CD3 for T lineage and CD19 with other B markers for B lineage obligation. Mixed phenotype leukemia is rare and 3-5 % of acute leukmias of all age groups, is associated with poor outcome with overall survival of 18 months. We wish to present two cases of mixed phenotypic acute leukemia who presented with mediastinal masses, were suspected to be T cell lymphoma/leukemia clinically and radiologically. In one case, tissue diagnosis was given as lymphoma for which treatment was given. These cases show that patients diagnosed as lymphoma on histopathology can be cases of mixed phenotype acute leukemia and varying specific treatment protocols and follow up are required. Awareness of these entities will help in proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27408360

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  10. Comparative proteomics in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Kaźmierczak, Maciej; Hadschuh, Luiza; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2012-01-01

    The term proteomics was used for the first time in 1995 to describe large-scale protein analyses. At the same time proteomics was distinguished as a new domain of the life sciences. The major object of proteomic studies is the proteome, i.e. the set of all proteins accumulating in a given cell, tissue or organ. During the last years several new methods and techniques have been developed to increase the fidelity and efficacy of proteomic analyses. The most widely used are two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). In the past decade proteomic analyses have also been successfully applied in biomedical research. They allow one to determine how various diseases affect the pattern of protein accumulation. In this paper, we attempt to summarize the results of the proteomic analyses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. They have increased our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying AML development and contributed to progress in AML diagnostics and treatment. PMID:23788862

  11. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ajoy; Kenderian, Saad J; Westin, Gustavo F; Litzow, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy cures only a minority of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In addition, relapsed ALL has a poor outcome with 5-year survival as low as 7 %. Hence, there is a need to develop effective therapies to treat relapsed disease and to combine these agents with chemotherapy to improve outcomes in newly diagnosed patients. ALL cells express several antigens amenable to target therapies including CD19, CD20, CD22, and CD52. Over the last decade, there has been a surge in the development of immune therapies which target these receptors and that have induced robust responses. In this manuscript, we review these novel immune agents in the treatment of B-ALL. As these new therapies mature, the challenge going forward will be to find safe and effective combinations of these agents with chemotherapy and to determine their place in the current treatment schema. PMID:27101015

  12. Aspergillus osteoarthritis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gunsilius, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Mur, E; Gabl, C; Gastl, G; Petzer, A L

    1999-11-01

    We report an unusual case of arthritis of the right wrist due to Aspergillus fumigatus without evidence for a generalized infection, following chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis was made by surgical biopsy. Amphotericin-B (Am-B) was not tolerated by the patient. Liposomal preparations of Am-B penetrate poorly into bone and cartilage. Therefore, oral itraconazole was given; the arthritis improved and chemotherapy was continued without infectious complications. Two weeks after complete hematopoietic recovery, an intracranial hemorrhage from a mycotic aneurysm of a brain vessel occurred, although the patient was still receiving itraconazole. We emphasize the importance of prompt and thorough efforts to identify the causative agent in immunocompromised patients with a joint infection. Itraconazole is effective in Aspergillus osteoarthritis but, due to its poor penetration into the brain, the combination with a liposomal formulation of Am-B is recommended. PMID:10602898

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Merlin; AlGherbawe, Mushtak

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with fever, cough, anorexia, weight loss, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Blood investigations revealed severe neutropenia with monocytosis. Chest imaging showed bilateral reticular infiltrates with mediastinal widening. Bronchoalveolar lavage culture and molecular test were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol was started. Although pulmonary tuberculosis could explain this clinical presentation we suspected associated blood dyscrasias in view of significant monocytosis and mild splenomegaly. Bone marrow aspiration revealed acute myeloid leukemia. Thereafter the patient received induction chemotherapy and continued antituberculous treatment. After first induction of chemotherapy patient was in remission and successfully completed 6 months antituberculosis therapy without any complications. To our knowledge there has been no such case reported from the State of Qatar to date. PMID:24987539

  14. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  15. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Long-term Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, M. Jennifer; Hourigan, Christopher S.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The number of leukemia patients and survivors is growing. This review summarizes what is known regarding the health related quality of life (HRQOL) and medical complications associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) disease and treatment and highlights understudied aspects of adult AML survivorship care, and potential novel areas for intervention. PMID:25243197

  17. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  20. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers with the potential to i

  1. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  2. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Treatment in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment in adults (Beyond the Basics) Author Richard ... the content. Appropriately referenced content is required of all authors and must conform to UpToDate standards of ...

  3. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-Ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  4. Splenic actinomycotic abscess in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y; Chen, Y-C; Tang, J-L; Lin, W-C; Su, I-J; Tien, H-F

    2002-09-01

    Actinomycosis is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium. Actinomyces organisms are important constituents of the normal flora of mucous membranes and are considered opportunistic pathogens. The three major clinical presentations of actinomycosis include the cervicofacial, thoracic, and abdominopelvic regions. Actinomycosis infection in patients with febrile neutropenia is uncommon and actinomycosis splenic involvement in acute leukemia patients is very rare. We describe a man with acute myeloid leukemia and splenic actinomycotic abscess that developed after chemotherapy following prolonged neutropenia. PMID:12373356

  5. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  6. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p < 0.001) were included in biological function categories involving cancer, cell development, cell growth and proliferation, cell signaling, inflammatory response, and cell death and survival. Further pathway analysis revealed upregulation of c-Fos and genes involved in chemotaxis such as CXCL16. AML-derived endothelial cells are similar in phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. PMID:26851308

  8. Pyrrolo[1,2-b][1,2,5]benzothiadiazepines (PBTDs): A new class of agents with high apoptotic activity in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and in cells from patients at onset and who were imatinib-resistant.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Romano; Marfè, Gabriella; Artico, Marino; La Regina, Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Morgante, Emanuela; Morgante, Manuela; Di Stefano, Carla; Catalano, Gianfranco; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Russo, Matteo Antonio; Amadori, Sergio; Cirilli, Roberto; La Torre, Francesco; Sinibaldi Salimei, Paola

    2006-09-21

    Pyrrolo[1,2-b][1,2,5]benzothiadiazepine 5,5-dioxides (PBTDs) induced apoptosis in human BCR-ABL-expressing leukemia cells. The apoptotic activity was also observed in primary leukemic blasts, obtained from chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients at onset or from patients in blast crisis and who were imatinib-resistant. Compounds 5 and 14 induced apoptosis before BCR-ABL protein expression and tyrosin phosphorylation were affected and activated different caspases in the apoptotic pathway. PBTDs are a new class of valid candidates for the treatment of CML. PMID:16970408

  9. Novel and Emerging Drugs for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, E.M.; Tallman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a challenging disease to treat with the majority of patients dying from their illness. While overall survival has been markedly prolonged in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), survival in younger adults with other subtypes of AML has only modestly improved over the last twenty years. Physicians who treat AML eagerly await drugs like Imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, Cladribine for hairy cell leukemia, and Rituximab for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma which have had an important impact on improving outcome. Recent research efforts have focused on refining traditional chemotherapeutic agents to make them more active in AML, targeting specific genetic mutations in myeloid leukemia cells, and utilizing novel agents such as Lenalidomide that have shown activity in other hematologic malignancies. Here, we focus on reviewing the recent literature on agents that may assume a role in clinical practice for patients with AML over the next five years. PMID:22483153

  10. Leukemia-associated phenotypes: their characteristics and incidence in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Babusíková, O; Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Kusenda, J

    1996-01-01

    Leukemia-associated phenotypes have been suggested to be a valuable tool for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute leukemia patients, as they allow to distinguish leukemic blasts from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. The aim of the present study was to analyze the proportion of acute leukemia patients (both with lymphoid and myeloid leukemias) in which the immunological detection of leukemia-associated phenotypes was convenient for the distinction of leukemic and normal cells. For this purpose we have studied the blast cells from 186 acute leukemia patients at diagnosis with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies by flow cytometry using double staining combinations. From aberrant phenotypes on blast cells we followed lineage infidelity (coexpression of myeloid markers in lymphoid leukemia cells and vice versa, as well as the simultaneous expression of both, T and B cell markers in one lymphoid blast cell) and asynchronous marker expression (simultaneous expression of early and late markers in one cell). One hundred and five of the 186 acute leukemia cases analyzed (56%) showed the presence of leukemia-associated phenotypes. In 41 of the 90 ALL cases followed (46%) and in 40 of the 96 AML cases studied (42%) lineage infidelity was observed. Asynchronous antigen expression was detected in 24 followed cases (13%). Evaluation of the cell marker density by means of calibration microbeads demonstrated abnormal mean channel immunofluorescence and molecules of equivalent soluble fluorescein for CD8 in two patients with T cell malignancies at diagnosis. Abnormal CD8 density might thus represent a characteristic feature of malignant CD8-positive T cell clone. Quantitative marker evaluation therefore seems to be another important mean for the detection of aberrant phenotypes on leukemia cells suitable for the detection of minimal residual disease. PMID:8996560

  11. Bosutinib in the treatment of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) chronic myelogenous leukemia: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ann Q.; Wilson, Nicole M.; Gleason, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Bosutinib is an orally bioavailable SRC/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against all phases of resistant chronic myeloid leukemia that do not express the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. Bosutinib has a unique toxicity profile that is manageable. This paper provides an overview of bosutinib, covering pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties, results of treatment in newly diagnosed and previously treated chronic myeloid leukemia patients, as well as common side effects. PMID:24490020

  12. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia developing in patients with autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Safaa M.; Fouad, Tamer M; Summa, Valentina; Hasan, Syed KH; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia is an unfortunate complication of cancer treatment, particularly for patients with highly curable primary malignancies and favorable life expectancy. The risk of developing therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia also applies to patients with non-malignant conditions, such as autoimmune diseases treated with cytotoxic and/or immunosuppressive agents. There is considerable evidence to suggest that there is an increased occurrence of hematologic malignancies in patients with autoimmune diseases compared to the general population, with a further increase in risk after exposure to cytotoxic therapies. Unfortunately, studies have failed to reveal a clear correlation between leukemia development and exposure to individual agents used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Given the dismal outcome of secondary acute myeloid leukemia and the wide range of available agents for treatment of autoimmune diseases, an increased awareness of this risk and further investigation into the pathogenetic mechanisms of acute leukemia in autoimmune disease patients are warranted. This article will review the data available on the development of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with autoimmune diseases. Possible leukemogeneic mechanisms in these patients, as well as evidence supporting the association of their primary immunosuppressive status and their exposure to specific therapies, will also be reviewed. This review also supports the idea that it may be misleading to label leukemias that develop in patients with autoimmune diseases who are exposed to cytotoxic agents as ‘therapy-related leukemias’. A better understanding of the molecular defects in autoimmune disease patients who develop acute leukemia will lead to a better understanding of the association between these two diseases entities. PMID:22180424

  14. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  18. Epigenetic deregulation in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, Zac; Morenos, Leah; Mechinaud, Francoise; Ashley, David M; Craig, Jeffrey M; Sexton-Oates, Alexandra; Halemba, Minhee S; Parkinson-Bates, Mandy; Ng, Jane; Morrison, Debra; Carroll, William L; Saffery, Richard; Wong, Nicholas C

    2014-01-01

    Similar to most cancers, genome-wide DNA methylation profiles are commonly altered in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, recent observations highlight that a large portion of malignancy-associated DNA methylation alterations are not accompanied by related gene expression changes. By analyzing and integrating the methylome and transcriptome profiles of pediatric B-cell ALL cases and primary tissue controls, we report 325 genes hypermethylated and downregulated and 45 genes hypomethylated and upregulated in pediatric B-cell ALL, irrespective of subtype. Repressed cation channel subunits and cAMP signaling activators and transducers are overrepresented, potentially indicating a reduced cellular potential to receive and propagate apoptotic signals. Furthermore, we report specific DNA methylation alterations with concurrent gene expression changes within individual ALL subtypes. The ETV6-RUNX1 translocation was associated with downregulation of ASNS and upregulation of the EPO-receptor, while Hyperdiploid patients (>50 chr) displayed upregulation of B-cell lymphoma (BCL) members and repression of PTPRG and FHIT. In combination, these data indicate genetically distinct B-cell ALL subtypes contain cooperative epimutations and genome-wide epigenetic deregulation is common across all B-cell ALL subtypes. PMID:24394348

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  1. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  2. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise sub-classification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  3. New developments in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Douer, Dan; Thomas, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs in both children and adults. Significant improvements in survival outcomes have been realized over the last decade for all age groups with de novo ALL. Frontline treatment incorporates a tailored approach, based on factors such as the patient’s age and the disease subtype. Children, adolescents, and young adults are likely to receive intensifying or deintensifying chemotherapy regimens using standard chemotherapeutics (eg, anthracyclines, vincristine, asparaginase) based on risk stratification. Older adults appear to benefit from reduced-intensity chemotherapy regimens, which incorporate targeted therapy (eg, monoclonal antibodies). New data suggest that a more intensive pediatric protocol might be feasible in adult patients. More than half of ALL patients relapse, and their limited survival has led to the development of novel approaches. Recently approved chemotherapeutic agents include clofarabine, nelarabine, asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi, and vincristine sulfate liposome injection, a novel formulation that permits administration of a higher dosage of vincristine than that used in standard regimens. Approaches under investigation include cell therapy using autologous T-cell technologies, antibody-drug conjugates, and agents targeting common gene mutations. Many novel agents are undergoing evaluation in both the frontline and relapsed settings. PMID:25768275

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    PubMed

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  5. Genomic characterization of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy and a leading case of childhood cancer death. The last decade has witnessed a transformation in our understanding of the genetic basis of ALL due to detailed integrative genomic profiling of large cohorts of childhood ALL. Initially using microarray based approaches, and more recently with next-generation sequencing, these studies have enabled more precise subclassification of ALL, and have shown that each ALL entity is characterized by constellations of structural and sequence mutations that typically perturb key cellular pathways including lymphoid development, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, Ras- and tyrosine kinase-driven signaling, and epigenetic regulation. Importantly, several of the newly identified genetic alterations have entered the clinic to improve diagnosis and risk stratification, and are being pursued as new targets for therapeutic intervention. Studies of ALL have also led the way in dissecting the subclonal heterogeneity of cancer, and have shown that individual patients commonly harbor multiple related but genetically distinct subclones, and that this genetically determined clonal heterogeneity is an important determinant of relapse. In addition, genome-wide profiling has identified inherited genetic variants that influence ALL risk. Ongoing studies are deploying detailed integrative genetic transcriptomic and epigenetic sequencing to comprehensively define the genomic landscape of ALL. This review describes the recent advances in our understanding of the genetics of ALL, with an emphasis on those alterations of key pathogenic or therapeutic importance. PMID:24246699

  6. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Investigation of the bovine leukemia virus proviral DNA in human leukemias and lung cancers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jehoon; Kim, Yonggoo; Kang, Chang Suk; Cho, Dae Hyun; Shin, Dong Hwan; Yum, Young Na; Oh, Jae Ho; Kim, Sheen Hee; Hwang, Myung Sil; Lim, Chul Joo; Yang, Ki Hwa; Han, Kyungja

    2005-08-01

    The bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. This study investigated the presence of the BLV in leukemia (179 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 292 acute myeloid leukemia and 46 chronic myelogenous leukemia cases) and 162 lung cancer patients (139 adenocarcinoma, 23 squamous cell carcinoma) to determine if the BLV is a causative organism of leukemia and lung cancer in Koreans. A BLV infection was confirmed in human cells by PCR using a BLV-8 primer combination. All 517 cases of human leukemia and 162 lung cancer were negative for a PCR of the BLV proviral DNA. In conclusion, although meat has been imported from BLV endemic areas, the BLV infection does not appear to be the cause of human leukemia or lung cancer in Koreans. These results can be used as a control for further studies on the BLV in Koreans. PMID:16100451

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  9. Clinical and Pathologic Features of Secondary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Amy S.; Aoki, Joseph; Levis, Mark; Cowan, Kathleen; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Vuica-Ross, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a relatively common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that has an excellent prognosis. In contrast, secondary acute myeloid leukemias, including therapy-related AML and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes, have a relatively poor prognosis. We identified 9 cases of APL at our institution in which there was a history of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chronic immunosuppression, or antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. The clinical and pathologic findings in these cases of secondary APL were compared with the clinical and pathologic findings in cases of de novo APL. We found that secondary and de novo APL had abnormal promyelocytes with similar morphologic and immunophenotypic features, comparable cytogenetic findings, comparable rates of FMS-like tyrosine kinase mutations, and similar rates of recurrent disease and death. These data suggest that secondary APL is similar to de novo APL and, thus, should be considered distinct from other secondary acute myeloid neoplasms. PMID:22338051

  10. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mark D.; van den Berg, Patrick R.; Russell, James L.; Singh, Prashant K.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J.

    2015-01-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:26117541

  11. Extramedullary Involvement by Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia in Five Patients With Unusual Clinicopathologic Features: A Review of the Effectiveness of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Soni, Abha; Paluri, Ravikumar; Deal, Taylor; Peker, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) is associated with BCR-ABL1 fusion gene leading to an abnormal tyrosine kinase molecule. The accepted first-line treatment is imatinib mesylate (IM). CML uncommonly occurs in the extramedullary sites at initial presentation or relapse. Here we report five adult patients with CML who developed myeloid sarcoma (MS) while on treatment with IM. A retrospective medical chart analysis was performed to identify CML patients with MS who were diagnosed and treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The age ranged between 21 and 36 years (median: 28.5) with a male to female ratio of 4:1. All of the patients were diagnosed with CML in chronic phase with initial treatment including IM. The median interval period between the initial diagnosis of CML and MS was 27 months (range 7 - 60 months). The sites of extramedullary involvement included lymph nodes (n = 2), central nervous system (n = 2) and hepatobiliary organs (n = 1). All patients were treated with either induction therapy or stem cell transplant (SCT) following the diagnosis of MS. The median survival was 16 months (range 1 - 72 months). The longest survival was observed in a patient who successfully received SCT therapy. IM is frequently used as the first therapeutic choice in new diagnosed CML; however, its penetration and effectiveness in extramedullary tissue is still unclear. The current report also supports the literature with less favorable prognosis of CML in younger individuals. PMID:27222678

  12. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  13. Extramedullary Involvement by Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia in Five Patients With Unusual Clinicopathologic Features: A Review of the Effectiveness of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Abha; Paluri, Ravikumar; Deal, Taylor; Peker, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogeneous leukemia (CML) is associated with BCR-ABL1 fusion gene leading to an abnormal tyrosine kinase molecule. The accepted first-line treatment is imatinib mesylate (IM). CML uncommonly occurs in the extramedullary sites at initial presentation or relapse. Here we report five adult patients with CML who developed myeloid sarcoma (MS) while on treatment with IM. A retrospective medical chart analysis was performed to identify CML patients with MS who were diagnosed and treated at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The age ranged between 21 and 36 years (median: 28.5) with a male to female ratio of 4:1. All of the patients were diagnosed with CML in chronic phase with initial treatment including IM. The median interval period between the initial diagnosis of CML and MS was 27 months (range 7 - 60 months). The sites of extramedullary involvement included lymph nodes (n = 2), central nervous system (n = 2) and hepatobiliary organs (n = 1). All patients were treated with either induction therapy or stem cell transplant (SCT) following the diagnosis of MS. The median survival was 16 months (range 1 - 72 months). The longest survival was observed in a patient who successfully received SCT therapy. IM is frequently used as the first therapeutic choice in new diagnosed CML; however, its penetration and effectiveness in extramedullary tissue is still unclear. The current report also supports the literature with less favorable prognosis of CML in younger individuals. PMID:27222678

  14. Bcl-2 and c-myc expression, cell cycle kinetics and apoptosis during the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia from diagnosis to blastic phase.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Hegde, U P; Kotelnikov, V M; Mundle, S D; Dong, L M; Burke, P; Rose, S; Gaskin, F; Raza, A; Preisler, H D

    1997-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has a progressive course but little is known about the biologic characteristics of disease progression. This study was designed to assess the changes in cell proliferative characteristics, apoptosis, the expression of the bcl-2 and c-myc genes between the time of initial diagnosis and entrance into the blastic phase of the disease. We observed that the rate of cell proliferation decreased and the cell death rate did not significantly change as the disease accelerated. The level of bcl-2 expression was significantly higher in accelerated/blastic phase cells than in the chronic phase cells in the population as a whole, however, the bcl-2 expression level did not change in blast cell subpopulation. c-myc Expression was significantly higher in the blast cell subpopulation of accelerated/blastic phase than in that of earlier phases of the disease. In conclusion, the characteristics of CML cells, namely proliferation rate, c-myc and bcl-2 change during the course of the disease. It is possible that the change in c-myc expression plays a causative role in evolution of the blastic phase from the chronic phase. PMID:9279359

  15. Nilotinib rapidly reverses breakpoint cluster region-Abelson oncogene fusion gene and M244V mutations in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, XULIANG; ZHANG, MEIXIANG; SHEN, YIFAN; SHI, WENZHI; LIU, WEI; WEI, WU

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a condition characterized by a balanced genetic translocation, t (9;22) (q34;q11.2), which leads to a fusion of the Abelson oncogene (ABL) from chromosome 9q34 with the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) gene on chromosome 22q11.2. This rearrangement is referred to as the Philadelphia chromosome. At a molecular level, this translocation results in the formation of the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene, which translates into a BCR-ABL oncoprotein. Imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib are three tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients diagnosed with CML in the chronic phase (CML-CP). The present study describes the case of a patient with imatinib-resistant CML who, following two months of treatment with nilotinib, no longer exhibited detectable BCR-ABL fusion genes or M244V mutations. This suggests that nilotinib may be effective for treating CML cases in which the BCR-ABL fusion protein has an M244V mutation. PMID:26622510

  16. Optimization of radotinib doses for the treatment of Asian patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia based on dose-response relationship analyses.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hayeon; Park, Min Soo; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Oh, Suk Joong; Zang, Dae Young; Park, Hye Lin; Cho, Dae Jin; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jangik I

    2016-08-01

    A fixed dose regimen for tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is postulated to be responsible for variable safety outcomes in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The objective of this study was to explore an optimal dosing regimen for a TKI, radotinib, to improve its safety profile. Clinical data were obtained from a Phase 2 study of fixed-dose radotinib in 77 Asian patients with CML. The magnitude of radotinib dose adjusted for patient's body weight (Dose/BW) and the probability of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) demonstrated a positive association (Logit[P] = 0.86*[Dose/BW]-4.45, p = 0.001). There was a significant difference in the Kaplan-Meier curves for time to first DLT between the patient subgroups of Dose/BW <6 and ≥6 mg/kg (259 versus 83 days). Consequently, a two-tier weight-based dosing regimen may improve the safety of radotinib: 300 mg or 400 mg twice daily for patients weighing ≤65 or >65 kg, respectively. PMID:26666371

  17. Interferon-alpha suppresses proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells K562 by extending cell cycle S-phase without inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Grebenová, Dana; Kuzelová, Katerina; Fuchs, Ota; Halada, Petr; Havlícek, Vladimír; Marinov, Iuri; Hrkal, Zbynĕk

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment on the growth, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptotic parameters as well as adhesive properties and proteome of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived K562 cells. IFN-alpha treatment (200 to 600 U/ml, 24 to 72 h) suppressed growth and caused accumulation of K562 cells in the S-phase of cell cycle (increase in S-phase cells by up to 52% in comparison with the untreated controls) at the expenses of cells in G1-phase. No transition of cells to G0-phase occurred as followed from Ki-67 protein determination. Although the level of chimeric gene product, BCR-ABL mRNA coding for BCR-ABL protein with anti-apoptotic properties, decreased by 30%, apoptosis was not triggered as judged from Annexin-V, APO2.7, and TUNEL assays. Adhesion of K562 cells to fibronectin-coated surfaces increased by up to 52% as determined by calcein assay. The proteomic analysis (2-D electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry, MALDI-MS) revealed a single protein, ubiquitine cross-reactive protein (UBCR), whose level markedly increased due to IFN-alpha treatment. The ubiquitination-like directed degradation processes may thus play a role in the mechanism of IFN-alpha antiproliferative effects. PMID:14757443

  18. Postmenopausal bleeding as first sign of an acute myelogenous leukaemia: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Henes, M; Nauth, A; Staebler, A; Becker, S; Henes, J C

    2010-09-01

    Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) can have various causes and malignancy must always be excluded. Extramedullary manifestations of a haematological disease in the female genital tract are rare. We present the case of a woman with PMB as the first sign of an acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML). An 81-year-old patient presented with PMB. Manual and colposcopic examination raised suspicion of a cervical carcinoma, but histopathology and cervical Pap smear altered the diagnosis to granulocytic sarcoma (GS), an extramedullary manifestation of AML. The patient had a normal blood count 2 weeks prior to the examination, but at the time of presentation her leukocytes had risen to 116000/microl. The patient died 3 days later due to a pulmonary embolism, most probably as a result of leukostasis. In this case, GS of the cervix was the first sign of the AML with simultaneous appearance of leukocytosis and peripheral blasts. PMB was the reason for presentation. GS of the female genital tract is very rare and diagnosis is challenging, especially on the basis of the Pap smear. Abnormal inflammatory cells must be a warning sign and an indication for further examinations. GS as the presenting sign of AML has a poor prognosis with only 6% of patients surviving for more than 2 years. PMID:19763918

  19. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1–0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1–4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 PMID:26069293

  1. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  2. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for acute lymphocytic leukemia What’s new in acute lymphocytic leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... have the Philadelphia chromosome. Gene expression profiling This new lab technique is being studied to help identify ...

  3. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images (MRI) and electrophysiologic study, a provisional diagnosis of brachial plexus neuritis was done and hence steroid pulse therapy was carried out. Three months later the patient presented epigastric pain. After upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, myeloid sarcoma of gastrointestinal tract was confirmed pathologically. Moreover, 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed a fusiform shaped mass lesion at the brachial plexus overlapping with previous high signal lesion on the MRI. Therefore, we concluded the final diagnosis as brachial plexopathy due to myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23705126

  4. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-05

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  5. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    PubMed

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  6. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known. PMID:26800008

  7. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  8. Chromosome Arm-Specific Long Telomeres: A New Clonal Event in Primary Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Samassekou, Oumar; Li, Huiyu; Hébert, Josée; Ntwari, Aimé; Wang, Haixia; Cliché, Catherine Grenier; Bouchard, Eric; Huang, Shiang; Yan, Ju

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that critically shortened telomere lengths correlate with the chromosome instability in carcinogenesis. However, little has been noticed regarding the correlation of long telomeres at specific chromosomes with malignant disorders. We studied relative telomere lengths (RTLs) for individual chromosomes using the quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in a cohort of 32 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 32 normal samples. We found that telomeres at some specific chromosome arms remain well maintained or even lengthened in a high frequency (27/32) of leukemia cases. In particular, 10 chromosome arms, 4q, 5p, 7q, 11p, 13p, 13q, 14p, 15p, 18p, and Xp, with long telomeres were consistently identified in different samples, and six of them (4q, 5p, 13p, 13q, 14p, and Xp) with relatively long telomeres were also observed in normal samples, but they appeared in lower occurrence rate and shorter RTL than in CML samples. Our results strongly indicate the presence of a special leukemia cell population, or a clone, originated from a common progenitor that is characterized with chromosome arm-specific long telomeres. We suggest that relatively long telomeres located at key chromosomes could be preferentially maintained or further elongated during the early stage of malignant transformation. PMID:21677878

  9. Medullary allotransplant in acute myeloblastic leukemia in a child

    PubMed Central

    Buga Corbu, V; Glűck, R; Arion, C

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) is more resistant to chemotherapy than acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), significant progresses have been achieved over the last 20 years with an improvement in the long-term survival up to 50-60%. This may be attributed to the intensification of chemotherapy, including the increased use of stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in well-defined subgroups. Allo-HSCT represents an extremely effective alternative in pediatric AML treatment panel, but its efficiency is limited both by the toxic effects and by the difficulty of finding a matched HLA donor. PMID:25408774

  10. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  12. Cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia following durable complete molecular response: a single center facing the dilemma.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, Theodoros; Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Zervakis, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulou, Nefeli; Tilimidos, Gerassimos; Angelopoulou, Maria; Siakantaris, Marina P; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Mantzourani, Marina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora Athina

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely imatinib mesylate (IM) and recently approved second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently considered the treatment of choice for newly-diagnosed chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Although treatment with TKIs has not yet been proven curative, it certainly accomplishes a sustained control of the disease in the vast majority of patients. More than a decade after the successful launching of IM in first-line treatment of CP-CML and the subsequent introduction of second-generation TKIs in this setting, the question of the possibility of TKI cessation in a specific subset of patients has emerged. Side-effects of TKIs, along with some patients' wish to abandon the drugs and the rising financial burden upon healthcare systems, have led to the dilemma whether IM can be safely withdrawn after achieving deep molecular remissions and which patients are suitable for this discontinuation. We examined the data of our patients with CML in search of potential canditates for cessation of TKI therapy and identified their characteristics. We also performed a thorough review of the relevant literature. Eight out of fifty patients were discriminated on grounds of sustained complete molecular response (CMR) exceeding 12 months, most of them with a low or intermediate Sokal score at diagnosis. The median interval from IM initiation to CMR was almost 2 years and the median duration of detected CMR reached 6.5 years. Based on the promising results of prospective clinical trials reporting successful cessation of treatment with TKIs on selected subgroups of patients, we decided to proceed to interruption of therapy in the specific subset of our patients and closely monitor their response. PMID:23898127

  13. Resveratrol induces apoptosis of human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro through p38 and JNK-regulated H2AX phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin-pin; Xiong, Min; Xu, Cheng-shan; Duan, Lian-ning; Dong, Ya-qiong; Luo, Yuan; Niu, Tian-hui; Lu, Cheng-rong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a novel tumor suppressor protein, is involved in regulation of cancer cell apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether H2AX phosphorylation was required for resveratrol-induced apoptosis of human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells in vitro. Methods: K562 cells were tested. Cell apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry, and the phosphorylation of H2AX and other signaling proteins was examined with Western blotting. To analyze the signaling pathways, the cells were transfected with lentiviral vectors encoding H2AX-wt or specific siRNAs. Results: Treatment of K562 cells with resveratrol (20–100 μmol/L) induced apoptosis and phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 in time- and dose-dependent manners, but reduced phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10. Resveratrol treatment activated two MAPK family members p38 and JNK, and blocked the activation of another MAPK family member ERK. Pretreatment with the p38 inhibitor SB202190 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125 dose-dependently reduced resveratrol-induced phosphorylation of H2AX, which were also observed when the cells were transfected with p38- or JNK-specific siRNAs. Overexpression of H2AX in K562 cells markedly increased resveratrol-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of H2AX-139m (Ser139 was mutated to block phosphorylation) inhibited resveratrol-induced apoptosis. K562 cells transfected with H2AX-specific siRNAs were resistant to resveratrol-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 in human CML cells, which is regulated by p38 and JNK, is essential for resveratrol-induced apoptosis. PMID:25619392

  14. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  15. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. Acquired copy number alterations of miRNA genes in acute myeloid leukemia are uncommon

    PubMed Central

    Ramsingh, Giridharan; Jacoby, Meagan A.; Shao, Jin; De Jesus Pizzaro, Rigoberto E.; Shen, Dong; Trissal, Maria; Getz, Angela H.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and has been implicated in leukemic transformation. Whether somatic copy number alterations (CNAs) are a frequent cause of altered miRNA gene expression is largely unknown. Herein, we used comparative genomic hybridization with a custom high-resolution miRNA-centric array and/or whole-genome sequence data to identify somatic CNAs involving miRNA genes in 113 cases of AML, including 50 cases of de novo AML, 18 cases of relapsed AML, 15 cases of secondary AML following myelodysplastic syndrome, and 30 cases of therapy-related AML. We identified a total of 48 somatic miRNA gene-containing CNAs that were not identified by routine cytogenetics in 20 patients (18%). All these CNAs also included one or more protein coding genes. We identified a single case with a hemizygous deletion of MIR223, resulting in the complete loss of miR-223 expression. Three other cases of AML were identified with very low to absent miR-223 expression, an miRNA gene known to play a key role in myelopoiesis. However, in these cases, no somatic genetic alteration of MIR223 was identified, suggesting epigenetic silencing. These data show that somatic CNAs specifically targeting miRNA genes are uncommon in AML. PMID:24009227

  17. Comparative Analysis of Busulfan and Cyclophosphamide versus Cyclophosphamide and Total Body Irradiation in Full Intensity Unrelated Marrow Donor Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Uberti, Joseph P.; Agovi, Manza-A.; Tarima, Sergey; Haagenson, Michael; Gandham, Sharavi; Anasetti, Claudio; Baker, K. Scott; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bornhauser, Martin; Chan, Ka Wah; Copelan, Edward; Davies, Stella M.; Finke, Juergen; Hale, Gregory A.; Kollman, Craig; McCarthy, Philip L.; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Ringdén, Olle; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively compared clinical outcomes in 1593 T-repleted URD marrow transplant recipients with AML, MDS and CML who received myeloablative conditioning regimens of either busulfan and cyclophosphamide (BuCy), standard-dose Cy/TBI (1,000-1,260 cGy) or high-dose Cy/TBI (1,320-1,500 cGy). Subjects were drawn from patients transplanted between 1991 and 1999 facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). Patients who received high-dose Cy/TBI regimens were slightly younger, more likely to receive a mismatched transplant and to have intermediate or advanced disease compared to patients in the BuCy or standard-dose TBI group. Neutrophil recovery was significantly higher in the standard dose CY/TBI group compared to the high-dose Cy/TBI or BuCy group. Patients who received the high-dose Cy/TBI regimen had an increased risk of developing grade III-IV aGVHD when compared to the control group who received BuCy (p=0.011). Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), transplant-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were not significantly different between any of the regimens. We conclude that BuCy, standard-dose and high dose Cy/TBI regimens have equivalent efficacy profiles for OS, DFS, TRM and relapse risk in patients undergoing T-replete URD marrow transplantation for AML, CML and MDS. PMID:20400989

  18. Acute promyelocytic leukemia presenting as a paraspinal mass.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirav N; Stonecypher, Mark; Gopal, Pallavi; Luger, Selina; Bagg, Adam; Perl, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a distinct subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is characterized by a balanced translocation between chromosomes 15 and 17 [t(15;17)], which results in the fusion of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and retinoic acid receptor α (RARA) genes. Historically, APL was a fatal disease because of the high relapse rates with cytotoxic chemotherapy alone and a significant bleeding risk secondary to disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). However, APL is now one of the most curable hematological malignancies because of molecularly targeted therapies. With the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) containing chemotherapy regimens, rates of complete remission and long-term, disease-free survival have improved dramatically. More recently, regimens incorporating both ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) have allowed a substantial number of patients to be treated with little or no additional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:27058871

  19. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    PubMed Central

    Langabeer, Stephen E.; Haslam, Karl; O'Brien, David; Kelly, Johanna; Andrews, Claire; Ryan, Ciara; Flavin, Richard; Hayden, Patrick J.; Bacon, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known. PMID:26904322

  20. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  1. Epidemiology and Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Rego, E.M.; Jácomo, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    Distinct epidemiological characteristics have been described in Acute Promielocytic Leukemia (APL). Populations from Latin America have a higher incidence of APL and in some geographic areas a distinct distribution of the PML-RARA isoforms is present. Here, we review the main differences in APL epidemilogy in Latin America as well as treatment outcomes. PMID:22110899

  2. Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia following multimodality therapy for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Ortega, J.A.; Ying, K.L.

    1985-02-01

    The genetic form of retinoblastoma carries a high risk of secondary malignant neoplasm, apparently not related to the use of chemotherapy. A child with unilateral non-genetic retinoblastoma who had received chemotherapy and radiation therapy and developed acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) is reported. The occurrence of ANLL and retinoblastoma has not been previously reported.

  3. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Clonal evolution and devolution after chemotherapy in adult acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, Brian; Ouillette, Peter; Li, Yifeng; Keller, Jennifer; Lam, Cindy; Roulston, Diane; Li, Cheng; Shedden, Kerby

    2013-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of persistent or relapsed disease after induction chemotherapy in AML necessitates a better understanding of the clonal relationship of AML in various disease phases. In this study, we used SNP 6.0 array-based genomic profiling of acquired copy number aberrations (aCNA) and copy neutral LOH (cnLOH) together with sequence analysis of recurrently mutated genes to characterize paired AML genomes. We analyzed 28 AML sample pairs from patients who achieved complete remission with chemotherapy and subsequently relapsed and 11 sample pairs from patients with persistent disease after induction chemotherapy. Through review of aCNA/cnLOH and gene mutation profiles in informative cases, we demonstrate that relapsed AML invariably represents re-emergence or evolution of a founder clone. Furthermore, all individual aCNA or cnLOH detected at presentation persisted at relapse indicating that this lesion type is proximally involved in AML evolution. Analysis of informative paired persistent AML disease samples uncovered cases with 2 coexisting dominant clones of which at least one was chemotherapy sensitive and one resistant, respectively. These data support the conclusion that incomplete eradication of AML founder clones rather than stochastic emergence of fully unrelated novel clones underlies AML relapse and persistence with direct implications for clinical AML research. PMID:23175688

  5. Antiproliferative effect of H2O2 against human acute myelogenous leukemia KG1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Oraki Kohshour, Mojtaba; Najafi, Leila; Heidari, Maryam; Ghaffari Sharaf, Mehdi

    2013-06-01

    It has clearly been established that oxidative stress leads to perturbation of various cellular processes resulting in either inhibition of cell proliferation or cell death. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are required as signal molecules that regulate different physiological processes including survival or death. Free radicals, particularly ROS, have been proposed as general mediators for apoptosis and recent studies have established that the mode of cell death depends on the severity of the oxidative damage. In this study, we determined the effect of oxidative stress on cell proliferation and characterization of cell death in human KG1 cells treated with H2O2. Our results indicated that oxidative stress leads to a significant decrease in cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, our study suggests that antiproliferative and apoptotic cell death effects of H2O2 took place via activation of caspase-3, affecting the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax (an antiapoptotic and a proapoptotic factor, respectively), and through deactivation of catalase enzyme, leading to accumulation of intracellular ROS and depletion of intracellular ATP level. PMID:23787282

  6. ENHANCED AND SELECTIVE KILLING OF CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA CELLS WITH AN ENGINEERED BCR-ABL BINDING PROTEIN AND IMATINIB

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E.; Woessner, David W.; Matissek, Karina J.; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl stimulates pro-survival pathways and suppresses apoptosis from its exclusively cytoplasmic locale, but when targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of leukemia cells, Bcr-Abl was potently cytotoxic. Therefore, we designed a protein construct to act as a mitochondrial chaperone to move Bcr-Abl to the mitochondria. The chaperone (i.e., the 43.6 kDa intracellular cryptic escort (iCE)) contains an EGFP tag and two previously characterized motifs: 1) An optimized Bcr-Abl binding motif that interacts with the coiled-coil domain of Bcr (ccmut3; 72 residues), and 2) A cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal (cMTS; 51 residues) that selectively targets the mitochondria in oxidatively stressed cells (i.e., Bcr-Abl positive leukemic cells) via phosphorylation at a key residue (T193) by protein kinase C. While the iCE colocalized with Bcr-Abl it did not re-localize to the mitochondria. However, the iCE was selectively toxic to Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells as compared to Bcr-Abl negative Cos-7 fibroblasts and 1471.1 murine breast cancer cells. The toxicity of the iCE to leukemic cells was equivalent to 10μM imatinib at 48 hours and the iCE combined with imatinib potentiated cell death beyond imatinib or the iCE alone. Substitution of either the ccmut3 or the cMTS with another Bcr-Abl binding domain (derived from Ras/Rab interaction protein 1 (RIN1; 295 residues)) or MTS (i.e., the canonical IMS derived from Smac/Diablo; 49 residues) did not match the cytotoxicity of the iCE. Additionally, a phosphorylation null mutant of the iCE also abolished the killing effect. The mitochondrial toxicity of Bcr-Abl and the iCE in Bcr-Abl positive K562 leukemia cells was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of 7-AAD, TUNEL, and annexin-V staining. DNA segmentation and cell viability were assessed by microscopy. Subcellular localization of constructs was determined using confocal microscopy (including statistical colocalization analysis). Overall, the iCE was highly

  7. Stem Cell Modeling of Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Even though clonally originated from a single cell, acute leukemia loses its homogeneity soon and presents at clinical diagnosis as a hierarchy of cells endowed with different functions, of which only a minority possesses the ability to recapitulate the disease. Due to their analogy to hematopoietic stem cells, these cells have been named “leukemia stem cells,” and are thought to be chiefly responsible for disease relapse and ultimate survival after chemotherapy. Core Binding Factor (CBF) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is cytogenetically characterized by either the t(8;21) or the inv(16)/t(16;16) chromosomal abnormalities, which, although being pathognomonic, are not sufficient per se to induce overt leukemia but rather determine a preclinical phase of disease when preleukemic subclones compete until the acquisition of clonal dominance by one of them. In this review we summarize the concepts regarding the application of the “leukemia stem cell” theory to the development of CBF AML; we will analyze the studies investigating the leukemogenetic role of t(8;21) and inv(16)/t(16;16), the proposed theories of its clonal evolution, and the role played by the hematopoietic niches in preserving the disease. Finally, we will discuss the clinical implications of stem cell modeling of CBF AML for the therapy of the disease. PMID:26880987

  8. Leukemia-associated marker combinations in acute leukemia suitable for detection of minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Babusíková, O; Mesárosová, A; Koníková, M; Kusenda, J; Glasová, M; Klobusická, M

    1993-01-01

    In the absence of truly leukemia-specific antigen, antigen combinations were identified in leukemia cells that are absent or extremely rare among normal hemopoietic cells. Some of the studied combinations related to the simultaneous surface and cytoplasmic marker expression, others, expressed mainly on cell surface membrane, represented atypical or aberrant combinations. Comparing membrane (m) and cytoplasmic (c) antigen expression (followed in 23 acute leukemia cases), we observed that CD3 could be detected in cytoplasm in the majority of T-ALL cells, while was absent on cell surface membrane where simultaneous expression of more immature T cell markers, such as CD7 and CD5, could be detected. Combination of mCD7/cCD3 could be regarded as a suitable marker of individual T-ALL cells. In cases of B-precursors of acute leukemia cells, leukemia-related combination of mCD19/cCD22 was found, which could characterize a single leukemia cell. The cells in one of 11 AML followed cases were positive for CD13 in cytoplasm, but not on cell surface membrane, where CD33 and other myeloid antigens were expressed. The cells in another two AML cases were positive for CD11 in cytoplasm but not on cell surface membrane, where CD13 or CD33 were expressed. Again, marker combinations of mCD33/cCD13 and mCD13 or mCD33/cCD11, respectively, represent a leukemia-related feature, suitable for tracing single leukemia cells in double immunofluorescence. Acute leukemia defined by the coexpression on most blast cells of antigens classically attributed to different lineages (referred as atypical/aberrant marker combinations) remains a rare event. We isolated a series of 27 (12%) such cases of 225 acute leukemia patients whose cells were immunophenotyped at diagnosis. Myeloid markers were present in T-ALL of two cases, T and B markers were coexpressed in 13 cases, markers of B and myeloid lineage were associated in one case, and T cell and myeloid antigens were found in 10 AML cases; in one AML

  9. BCL11A expression in acute phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jiawei; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Huiquan; Ma, Xiao; Su, Guangsong; Xie, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhongjuan; Zheng, Yanwen; Liu, Hong; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei Jenny; Wang, Zhiwei; Chang, Weirong; Gale, Robert Peter; Wu, Depei; Yin, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has chronic and acute phases. In chronic phase myeloid differentiation is preserved whereas in acute phase myeloid differentiation is blocked. Acute phase CML resembles acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Chronic phase CML is caused by BCR-ABL1. What additional mutation(s) cause transition to acute phase is unknown and may differ in different persons with CML. BCL11A encodes a transcription factor and is aberrantly-expressed in several haematological and solid neoplasms. We analyzed BCL11A mRNA levels in subjects with chronic and acute phase CML. BCL11A transcript levels were increased in subjects with CML in acute phase compared with those in normals and in subjects in chronic phase including some subjects studied in both phases. BCL11A mRNA levels were correlated with percent bone marrow blasts and significantly higher in lymphoid versus myeloid blast crisis. Differentiation of K562 with butyric acid, a CML cell line, decreased BCL11A mRNA levels. Cytology and flow cytometry analyses showed that ectopic expression of BCL11A in K562 cells blocked differentiation. These data suggest BCL11A may operate in transformation of CML from chronic to acute phase in some persons. PMID:27285855

  10. Growth factors in the management of adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, S H

    1993-02-01

    This review has explored the various ways that growth factors may be used in the management of adult acute leukemia. Growth factors have the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality of both induction and postremission therapy by enhancing hematopoietic recovery or, when used as an adjunct to standard antimicrobial therapy, reducing the infectious complications of chemotherapy. In addition, they may have favorable effects on the biology of leukemia either by recruitment of leukemic progenitors into cycle, rendering them more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy, or by inducing the terminal differentiation of the leukemic clone. Finally, disruption of aberrant growth factor networks, thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of leukemia, may be a therapeutic strategy now that soluble receptors and receptor antagonists to such growth factors as IL-1 are available. Whether growth factors used in such ways will have beneficial, or in fact adverse, effects on the treatment outcome for acute leukemia is not yet known. As such, the use of growth factors in the management of adults with acute leukemia is still experimental and needs to be studied in the context of clinical trials. Perhaps the ultimate benefit to be derived from the study of these growth factors will be a deeper understanding of the genetic perturbations that define the leukemic state. The development of molecular therapeutic techniques, such as gene transfer technology and the use of antisense oligonucleotides, has paralleled our increasing knowledge of cytokines. The hope is that as we come to understand leukemia at the molecular level, we will be able to develop the new therapeutic tools necessary to increase the numbers of patients cured. PMID:8449861

  11. t(3;21)(q26;q22): a recurring chromosomal abnormality in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rubin, C M; Larson, R A; Anastasi, J; Winter, J N; Thangavelu, M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D; Le Beau, M M

    1990-12-15

    We have identified an identical reciprocal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 3 and 21 with breakpoints at bands 3q26 and 21q22, [t(3;21)(q26;q22)], in the malignant cells from five adult patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Primary diagnoses were Hodgkin's disease in two patients and ovarian carcinoma, breast cancer, and polycythemia vera in one patient each. Patients had been treated with chemotherapy including an alkylating agent for their primary disease 1 to 18 years before the development of t-MDS or t-AML. We have not observed the t(3;21) in over 1,500 patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia arising de novo or in over 1,000 patients with lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported that the t(3;21) occurs in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Thus, the t(3;21) appears to be limited to t-MDS/t-AML and CML, both of which represent malignant disorders of an early hematopoietic precursor cell. These results provide a new focus for the study of therapy-related leukemia at the molecular level. PMID:2265251

  12. Unilateral Eye Findings: A Rare Herald of Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avni V.; Miller, John B.; Nath, Rajneesh; Shih, Helen A.; Yoon, Michael K.; Freitag, Suzanne K.; Papaliodis, George; Chen, Teresa C.; Eliott, Dean; Kim, Ivana K.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Unilateral choroidal infiltration as the initial manifestation of leukemic relapse in adults is rare, particularly after an extended period of remission. This report describes this unique ophthalmic presentation, highlights the associated diagnostic challenges, and reviews the literature. Methods Two cases are described and an extensive literature review was conducted. Results A 59-year-old male with acute lymphoid leukemia, in remission for 18 months, presented with unilateral scleritis, exudative retinal detachment, and choroidal thickening. A 57-year-old male with a history of acute myeloid leukemia, in remission for 4 years, presented with unilateral choroidal thickening leading to secondary angle closure. In both cases, there was a significant lag from the onset of eye symptoms to establishing a systemic diagnosis of acute leukemia, leading to a delay in definitive systemic treatment, despite a high suspicion of disease based on ophthalmic findings. Conclusions These two cases illustrate the fundus findings consistent with leukemic choroidal infiltration that can represent the first sign of relapsed leukemia. The successful treatment of these patients hinges on collaboration between ophthalmologists and oncologists to optimize patient outcomes, highlighting the need for both groups to be aware of this rare ophthalmic presentation. PMID:27239459

  13. Leukostasis in adult acute hyperleukocytic leukemia: a clinician's digest.

    PubMed

    Ali, Alaa M; Mirrakhimov, Aibek E; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F

    2016-06-01

    Leukostasis is a poorly understood and life-threatening complication of acute hyperleukocytic leukemia. The incidence of hyperleukocytosis and leukostasis differs among various subtypes of leukemias. While the pathophysiology of leukostasis is not fully understood, recent research has elucidated many novel pathways that may have therapeutic implications in the future. Respiratory and neurological compromise represents the classical clinical manifestations of leukostasis. If it is not diagnosed and treated rapidly, the one-week mortality rate is approximately 40%. Targeted induction chemotherapy is an important component of the successful treatment of leukostasis, although other modalities of cytoreduction are being used and investigated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27018197

  14. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  15. Murine models of acute leukemia: important tools in current pediatric leukemia research.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Chien, Christopher D; Fry, Terry J

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia remains the most common diagnosis in pediatric oncology and, despite dramatic progress in upfront therapy, is also the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Much of the initial improvement in outcomes for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was due to identification of cytotoxic agents that are active against leukemia followed by the recognition that combination of these cytotoxic agents and prolonged therapy are essential for cure. Recent data demonstrating lack of progress in patients for whom standard chemotherapy fails suggests that the ability to improve outcome for these children will not be dramatically impacted through more intensive or newer cytotoxic agents. Thus, much of the recent research focus has been in the area of improving our understanding of the genetics and the biology of leukemia. Although in vitro studies remain critical, given the complexity of a living system and the increasing recognition of the contribution of leukemia extrinsic factors such as the bone marrow microenvironment, in vivo models have provided important insights. The murine systems that are used can be broadly categorized into syngeneic models in which a murine leukemia can be studied in immunologically intact hosts and xenograft models where human leukemias are studied in highly immunocompromised murine hosts. Both of these systems have limitations such that neither can be used exclusively to study all aspects of leukemia biology and therapeutics for humans. This review will describe the various ALL model systems that have been developed as well as discuss the advantages and disadvantages inherent to these systems that make each particularly suitable for specific types of studies. PMID:24847444

  16. Murine Models of Acute Leukemia: Important Tools in Current Pediatric Leukemia Research

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Elad; Chien, Christopher D.; Fry, Terry J.

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia remains the most common diagnosis in pediatric oncology and, despite dramatic progress in upfront therapy, is also the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Much of the initial improvement in outcomes for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was due to identification of cytotoxic agents that are active against leukemia followed by the recognition that combination of these cytotoxic agents and prolonged therapy are essential for cure. Recent data demonstrating lack of progress in patients for whom standard chemotherapy fails suggests that the ability to improve outcome for these children will not be dramatically impacted through more intensive or newer cytotoxic agents. Thus, much of the recent research focus has been in the area of improving our understanding of the genetics and the biology of leukemia. Although in vitro studies remain critical, given the complexity of a living system and the increasing recognition of the contribution of leukemia extrinsic factors such as the bone marrow microenvironment, in vivo models have provided important insights. The murine systems that are used can be broadly categorized into syngeneic models in which a murine leukemia can be studied in immunologically intact hosts and xenograft models where human leukemias are studied in highly immunocompromised murine hosts. Both of these systems have limitations such that neither can be used exclusively to study all aspects of leukemia biology and therapeutics for humans. This review will describe the various ALL model systems that have been developed as well as discuss the advantages and disadvantages inherent to these systems that make each particularly suitable for specific types of studies. PMID:24847444

  17. Ovarian Reserve in Women Treated for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia or Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Chemotherapy, but Not Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Missmer, Stacey; Correia, Katharine F.; Wadleigh, Martha; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. It is well known that chemotherapy regimens may have a negative effect on ovarian reserve, leading to amenorrhea or premature ovarian failure. There are little data regarding the effects of leukemia chemotherapy on ovarian reserve, specifically in women who received the chemotherapy as adults and are having regular menstrual periods. Our primary objective was to determine if premenopausal women with a history of chemotherapy for leukemia, without subsequent stem cell transplantation, have decreased ovarian reserve. Materials and Methods. We measured ovarian reserve in five women who had been treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared them to age-matched control women without a history of chemotherapy. Results. There appeared to be a trend towards lower antimullerian hormone and antral follicle counts and higher follicle-stimulating hormone levels in the leukemia group. Conclusion. Our results indicate that chemotherapy for AML or ALL without stem cell transplantation may compromise ovarian reserve. Although our results should be confirmed by a larger study, oncologists, infertility specialists, and patients should be aware of the potential risks to ovarian function and should be counseled on options for fertility preservation. PMID:23050166

  18. STING Pathway Activation Stimulates Potent Immunity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Curran, Emily; Chen, Xiufen; Corrales, Leticia; Kline, Douglas E; Dubensky, Thomas W; Duttagupta, Priyanka; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kline, Justin

    2016-06-14

    Type I interferon (IFN), essential for spontaneous T cell priming against solid tumors, is generated through recognition of tumor DNA by STING. Interestingly, we observe that type I IFN is not elicited in animals with disseminated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Further, survival of leukemia-bearing animals is not diminished in the absence of type I IFN signaling, suggesting that STING may not be triggered by AML. However, the STING agonist, DMXAA, induces expression of IFN-β and other inflammatory cytokines, promotes dendritic cell (DC) maturation, and results in the striking expansion of leukemia-specific T cells. Systemic DMXAA administration significantly extends survival in two AML models. The therapeutic effect of DMXAA is only partially dependent on host type I IFN signaling, suggesting that other cytokines are important. A synthetic cyclic dinucleotide that also activates human STING provided a similar anti-leukemic effect. These data demonstrate that STING is a promising immunotherapeutic target in AML. PMID:27264175

  19. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  20. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. PMID:25361367

  1. Leukemia Cutis: An Unusual Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia; Wang, Weixia; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis (LC) is a nonspecific word used for cutaneous infiltration of leukemia, which is a rare presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and always a harbinger of poor prognosis. We report a case of LC in a 5-year-old boy with a past medical history of ALL (L1) presented with multiple asymptomatic oval or annular red patches and plaques on his thighs, buttocks and back waist, and part of them were scaling lesions. A biopsy was performed and histopathological examination showed that medium-sized atypical cells with round to oval contours, scant cytoplasm, and finely dispersed chromatin infiltrated into the dermis and subcutis, and the perivascular and periadnexal areas were involved. Immunophenotyping showed that the atypical cells were positive for CD45, CD3ε, CD99, and Ki67 (about 70%). Considering the patient's medical history and the histopathology, the patient was diagnosed with LC. PMID:26677299

  2. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia in children: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 25% of pediatric leukemia and affects approximately 180 patients annually in Japan. The treatment outcome for pediatric AML has improved through advances in chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), supportive care, and optimal risk stratification. Currently, clinical pediatric AML studies are conducted separately according to the AML subtypes: de novo AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and myeloid leukemia with Down syndrome (ML-DS). Children with de novo AML are treated mainly with anthracyclines and cytarabine, in some cases with HSCT, and the overall survival (OS) rate now approaches 70%. Children with APL are treated with an all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-combined regimen with an 80-90% OS. Children with ML-DS are treated with a less intensive regimen compared with non-DS patients, and the OS is approximately 80%. HSCT in first remission is restricted to children with high-risk de novo AML only. To further improve outcomes, it will be necessary to combine more accurate risk stratification strategies using molecular genetic analysis with assessment of minimum residual disease, and the introduction of new drugs in international collaborative clinical trials. PMID:26645706

  4. Acute parotitis during induction therapy including L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Pagano, L; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1994-02-01

    In a patient affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and subjected to therapy with Erwinia L-asparaginase, acute parotitis was observed. Microbiological studies excluded any infectious etiology. Regression of parotitis was spontaneous. This complication has not been previously reported and could be due to the same mechanism of pancreatic injury. The occurrence of acute parotitis needs to be promptly recognized in order to avoid the continuation of L-asparaginase. PMID:8148421

  5. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia for Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prebet, Thomas; Gore, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a remarkable disease in which leukemogenesis is driven by the PML-RARα oncogene and for which targeted treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–based therapy allows substantial chance of cure. APL is seen in a small subset of older patients, with age representing one of the most important prognostic factors for outcome of treatment. Unlike other acute leukemias, the inferior outcomes for APL in older patients relates less to changes in disease biology and more to increased toxicity of ATRA and chemotherapy combination regimens used to induce hematologic and molecular responses. Risk-adapted strategies that use less-toxic agents, such as arsenic trioxide, allow treatment of older patients, with greater efficiency and better chances of cure. PMID:21393443

  6. 'Acute myeloid leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2016 update'.

    PubMed

    De Kouchkovsky, I; Abdul-Hay, M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 20 000 cases per year in the United States alone. Large chromosomal translocations as well as mutations in the genes involved in hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation result in the accumulation of poorly differentiated myeloid cells. AML is a highly heterogeneous disease; although cases can be stratified into favorable, intermediate and adverse-risk groups based on their cytogenetic profile, prognosis within these categories varies widely. The identification of recurrent genetic mutations, such as FLT3-ITD, NMP1 and CEBPA, has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in supportive care, the backbone of therapy remains a combination of cytarabine- and anthracycline-based regimens with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens, and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of AML. PMID:27367478

  7. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  8. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with increased hematogones in children.

    PubMed

    Anton-Harisi, Marieta; Douna, Varvara; Baka, Margarita; Servitzoglou, Marina; Kosmidis, Helen V; Georgouli, Helen; Anastasiou, Theodora

    2012-11-01

    We describe 2 patients, a 4-month-old male and a 17-month-old female, with de novo acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with increased number of hematogones at diagnosis. Both children were admitted in the hospital with thrombocytopenia. The bone marrow smears in the first child revealed the presence of 60% cells with morphologic features consistent with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. In the other, the initial bone marrow aspirate was dry tap but on the following aspirate 10% cells with lymphoblastic morphology could be seen. The bone marrow flow cytometry showed the presence of hematogones-38% in the first case and 20% in the second-with absence of blasts. Repeated bone marrow aspirates, trephines, and immunophenotypic as well as molecular studies, confirmed the diagnosis of M7. Both children were treated according to the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster 2004 protocol. PMID:22983420

  9. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  10. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tannir, N M; Kantarjian, H

    2001-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. It is a universal side effect of dose-intensive regimens employed in the treatment of adult ALL. In patients with ALL who achieve remission, thrombocytopenia frequently indicates relapse. We report three adult patients successfully treated for ALL who developed thrombocytopenia and were found to have immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP). Possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association of ALL and ITP are discussed. PMID:11342378

  11. [Massive bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage revealing acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Taamallah-Malek, I; Chebbi, A; Bouladi, M; Nacef, L; Bouguila, H; Ayed, S

    2013-03-01

    We report the case of 20-year-old patient who presented in emergency with bilateral massive, spontaneous subconjunctival hemorrhage. Clinical findings suggested a blood dyscrasia, which was confirmed by blood cell count. The patient was urgently referred to hematology where the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made. This case highlights the importance of working up any unusual subconjunctival hemorrhage, as it may reveal, in certain cases, a severe life-threatening disease. PMID:23122838

  12. Massive Pulmonary Embolism at the Onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorà, Federica; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Laurenti, Luca; Autore, Francesco; Giammarco, Sabrina; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE) successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) obtaining complete remission. PMID:27413520

  13. Anticipation in familial leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, M.; Goode, E. L.; Jarvik, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. PMID:8900225

  14. Intracellular markers in acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koníková, E; Glasová, M; Kusenda, J; Babusíková, O

    1998-01-01

    In our study we used a new proposed system of CD45 monoclonal antibody in combination with the side scatter (SSC) parameter as a very useful gating method allowing myeloblast detection especially in cases with low blasts percentage in examined samples. Immunological demonstration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the cytoplasm of AML blasts is considered to be a reliable and highly sensitive marker. Using a direct single and double immunofluorescence staining method and flow cytometry we evaluated the intracellular expression of two granular constituents of myeloid cells--MPO and lactoferrin (LF) in leukemia cells from 18 patients at AML diagnosis, two patients in remission after allogenic bone marrow transplantation and in six controls. Two different fixation/permeabilization techniques were used: Fix&Perm, paraformaldehyde and saponin prior to monoclonal antibody staining in order to verify the sensitivity of two labeling methods for MPO. Although both reagents used in this study proved to be efficient tools for the fixation and permeabilization of leukemia cells, the second one was characterized by higher sensitivity in detection of MPO. By double staining of MPO and LF we were able to distinguish undifferentiated cells from the granulomonocytic maturation compartments in bone marrow, since LF is proposed to be selectively expressed from the myelocyte stage of differentiation onward. Cytoplasmic CD13 expression was detectable in AML blasts after their buffered-formaldehyde-acetone fixation/permeabilization. According to our results the detection of MPO and CD13 markers in the cytoplasm of leukemia cells is of great importance in the definition of FAB M0-M1 subtype of AML. Furthermore we described overexpression of CD34 antigen in AML and revealed the characteristic marker combination when CD34 was studied simultaneously with MPO. This finding also coincided with some atypical phenotypic features (CD15/MPO, CD7/cCD13, CD2/cCD13, CD33/cCD13, MPO/cCD13) contributing to

  15. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  16. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-30

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Acute promyelocytic leukemia transformation in a patient with aplastic anemia: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Yuan, Tingting; Wang, Wenjuan; Chen, Limei; Wang, Huaiyu; Liu, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a hematological disorder presenting with pancytopenia in peripheral blood and hypocellularity in bone marrow. AA patients with immunosuppressive therapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment have a risk of development of acute leukemia including acute myeloid leukemia (M0, M1, M2, M4, M5, M6) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, AA with transformation to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has never been reported. Here, we reported a patient initially diagnosed with AA. while 19 years later, PML/RAR αfusion gene were detected and the patient was eventually diagnosed as APL. The diagnosis and management of this interesting case are discussed. PMID:26884990

  18. Clofarabine for the treatment of adult acute lymphoid leukemia: the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia intergroup.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Rousselot, Philippe; Vey, Norbert; Pigneux, Arnaud; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analog displaying potent inhibition of DNA synthesis and favorable pharmacologic profile, is approved for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after failure of at least two previous regimens in patients up to 21 years of age at diagnosis. Good neurologic tolerance, synergy with alkylating agents, management guidelines defined through pediatric ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia, have also prompted its administration in more than 100 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative B lineage and T lineage ALL, as single agent (40 mg/m(2)/ day for 5 days), or in combination. In a Group for Research on Adult Acute Lympho- blastic Leukemia (GRAALL) retrospective study of two regimens (clofarabine ± cyclophosphamide + / - etoposide (ENDEVOL) ± mitoxantrone ± asparaginase ± dexamethasone (VANDEVOL)), remission was achieved in 50% of 55 relapsed/refractory patients, and 17-35% could proceed to allogeneic stem cell. Clofarabine warrants further exploration in advanced ALL treatment and bridge-to-transplant. PMID:24996442

  19. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  2. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  3. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  4. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zwaan, C Michel; Kolb, Edward A; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S J M; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E S; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Smith, Owen P; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2015-09-20

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML--supportive care--and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  5. Aggressive chemotherapy for acute leukemia relapsed after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sica, S; Salutari, P; Di Mario, A; D'Onofrio, G; Etuk, B; Leone, G

    1994-09-01

    Bone marrow transplantation procedure has emerged as an effective treatment for hematological malignancies. However, recurrence of leukemia is still the major cause of treatment failure. Subsequent treatment in this category of patients, generally considered incurable, has not been yet standardized. At our institution, 13 patients, 7 with acute non lymphoid leukemia (ANLL) and 6 with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), were treated at relapse after bone marrow transplantation either autologous or allogeneic (AuBMT 8, ABMT 4) performed in complete remission (CR). The interval between BMT and relapse was less than 9 months in 6 patients (2 ABMT and 4 AuBMT) and more than 9 months in 7 patients. Early relapsed patients showed no response to treatment and died at a median of 5.5 months (range 1-13) after relapse. Late relapse after BMT was characterized by a high percentage of response (5 CR and 1 PR), particularly after intensive chemotherapy and by a longer survival (median 14 months; range 2-36). Chemotherapy after transplantation should be carefully evaluated in patients relapsed after BMT in order to select a population that can achieve long term disease free survival. PMID:7858490

  6. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY) has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects. PMID:27110243

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Quintanilla-Flores, Dania Lizet; Flores-Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Tamez-Pérez, Héctor Eloy; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification. PMID:24716037

  8. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer1,2. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males3. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is significantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20228800

  9. Mechanisms of clonal evolution in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ford, Anthony; Kweon, Soo-Mi; Trageser, Daniel; Hasselfeld, Brian; Henke, Nadine; Mooster, Jana; Geng, Huimin; Schwarz, Klaus; Kogan, Scott C.; Casellas, Rafael; Schatz, David G.; Lieber, Michael R; Greaves, Mel F.; Müschen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia can often be retraced to a pre-leukemic clone carrying a prenatal genetic lesion. Postnatally acquired mutations then drive clonal evolution towards overt leukemia. RAG1-RAG2 and AID enzymes, the diversifiers of immunoglobulin genes, are strictly segregated to early and late stages of B-lymphopoiesis, respectively. Here, we identified small pre-BII cells as a natural subset of increased genetic vulnerability owing to concurrent activation of these enzymes. Consistent with epidemiological findings on childhood ALL etiology, susceptibility to genetic lesions during B-lymphopoiesis at the large to small pre-BII transition is exacerbated by abnormal cytokine signaling and repetitive inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that AID and RAG1-RAG2 drive leukemic clonal evolution with repeated exposure to inflammatory stimuli, paralleling chronic infections in childhood. PMID:25985233

  10. ACER3 supports development of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Yin, Yancun; Li, Chunling; Chen, Jinliang; Xie, Jingjing; Lu, Zhigang; Li, Minjing; Wang, Yuesi; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2016-09-01

    No new therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been approved for more than 30 years. To effectively treat AML, new molecular targets and therapeutic approaches must be identified. In silico analysis of several databases of AML patients demonstrated that the expression of alkaline ceramidase 3 (ACER3) significantly inversely correlates with the overall survival of AML patients. To determine whether ACER3 supports AML development, we employed an shRNA-encoding lentivirus system to inhibit acer3 expression in human AML cells including NB4, U937, and THP-1 cells. The ACER3 deficiency resulted in decreased cell growth and colony formation, elevated apoptosis, and lower AKT signaling of leukemia cells. Our study indicates that ACER3 contributes to AML pathogenesis, and suggests that alkaline ceramidase inhibition is an option to treat AML. PMID:27470583

  11. THE GENOMIC LANDSCAPE OF HYPODIPLOID ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Wei, Lei; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Walsh, Michael; Zhang, Jinghui; Ding, Li; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Andersson, Anna; Chen, Shann-Ching; McCastlain, Kelly; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Patel, Samir N.; Heatley, Susan L.; Phillips, Letha A.; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Parker, Matthew; Chen, Xiang; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Hedlund, Erin; Drenberg, Christina; Baker, Sharyn; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Huether, Robert; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Tabib, Yashodhan; Dooling, David J.; Ochoa, Kerri; Minden, Mark; Lewis, Ian D.; To, L. Bik; Marlton, Paula; Roberts, Andrew W.; Raca, Gordana; Stock, Wendy; Neale, Geoffrey; Drexler, Hans G.; Dickins, Ross A.; Ellison, David W.; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Carroll, Andrew J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a subtype of ALL characterized by aneuploidy and poor outcome, is unknown. Genomic profiling of 124 hypodiploid ALL cases, including whole genome and exome sequencing of 40 cases, identified two subtypes that differ in severity of aneuploidy, transcriptional profile and submicroscopic genetic alterations. Near haploid cases with 24–31 chromosomes harbor alterations targeting receptor tyrosine kinase- and Ras signaling (71%) and the lymphoid transcription factor IKZF3 (AIOLOS; 13%). In contrast, low hypodiploid ALL with 32–39 chromosomes are characterized by TP53 alterations (91.2%) which are commonly present in non-tumor cells, and alterations of IKZF2 (HELIOS; 53%) and RB1 (41%). Both near haploid and low hypodiploid tumors exhibit activation of Ras- and PI3K signaling pathways, and are sensitive to PI3K inhibitors, indicating that these drugs should be explored as a new therapeutic strategy for this aggressive form of leukemia. PMID:23334668

  12. Functional heterogeneity of genetically defined subclones in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klco, Jeffery M.; Spencer, David H.; Miller, Christopher A.; Griffith, Malachi; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Fulton, Robert S.; Eades, William C.; Link, Daniel C.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The relationships between clonal architecture and functional heterogeneity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples are not yet clear. We used targeted sequencing to track AML subclones identified by whole genome sequencing using a variety of experimental approaches. We found that virtually all AML subclones trafficked from the marrow to the peripheral blood, but some were enriched in specific cell populations. Subclones showed variable engraftment potential in immunodeficient mice. Xenografts were predominantly comprised of a single genetically-defined subclone, but there was no predictable relationship between the engrafting subclone and the evolutionary hierarchy of the leukemia. These data demonstrate the importance of integrating genetic and functional data in studies of primary cancer samples, both in xenograft models and in patients. PMID:24613412

  13. Pharmacogenetics of alkylator-associated acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Eric; McLeod, Howard L; Graubert, Timothy A

    2006-07-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a lethal late complication of alkylator chemotherapy. The genetic basis of susceptibility to t-AML is poorly understood. Both t-AML and de novo AML are complex genetic diseases, requiring cooperating mutations in interacting pathways for disease initiation and progression. Germline variants of these 'leukemia pathway' genes may cooperate with somatic mutations to induce both de novo and therapy-related AML. Several cancer susceptibility syndromes have been identified that cause an inherited predisposition to de novo and t-AML. The genes responsible for these syndromes are also somatically mutated in sporadic AML. We reason that germline polymorphism in any gene somatically mutated in AML could contribute to t-AML risk in the general population. Identification of these susceptibility alleles should help clinicians develop tailored therapies that reduce the relative risk of t-AML. PMID:16886897

  14. Update on developmental therapeutics for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Malcolm A

    2009-07-01

    This is an exciting time in drug development for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A confluence of trends makes it likely that highly effective new agents for ALL will be identified in the coming decade. One contributory factor is the development of more representative preclinical models of ALL for testing and prioritizing novel agents. Another important trend in ALL drug development is the increasing understanding at the molecular level of the genomic changes that occur in B-precursor and T-cell ALL. A final important trend is the increasing availability of new agents against relevant molecular targets. Molecularly targeted agents of interest discussed in this review include novel antibody-based drugs targeted against leukemia surface antigens, proteasome inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, JAK inhibitors, Aurora A kinase inhibitors, and inhibitors of Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:20425431

  15. Targeting survivin overcomes drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Gang, Eun Ji; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Schaefer, Paul; Chae, Sanna; Klemm, Lars; Huantes, Sandra; Loh, Mignon; Conway, Edward M.; Kang, Eun-Suk; Hoe Koo, Hong; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Heisterkamp, Nora; Pelus, Louis; Keerthivasan, Ganesan; Crispino, John; Kahn, Michael; Müschen, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Relapse of drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with increased expression of survivin/BIRC5, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein, suggesting a survival advantage for ALL cells. In the present study, we report that inhibition of survivin in patient-derived ALL can eradicate leukemia. Targeting survivin with shRNA in combination with chemotherapy resulted in no detectable minimal residual disease in a xenograft model of primary ALL. Similarly, pharmacologic knock-down of survivin using EZN-3042, a novel locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide, in combination with chemotherapy eliminated drug-resistant ALL cells. These findings show the importance of survivin expression in drug resistance and demonstrate that survivin inhibition may represent a powerful approach to overcoming drug resistance and preventing relapse in patients with ALL. PMID:21715311

  16. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

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  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  18. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  19. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  20. Comprehensive mutational profiling of core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Duployez, Nicolas; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Boissel, Nicolas; Petit, Arnaud; Bucci, Maxime; Geffroy, Sandrine; Lapillonne, Hélène; Renneville, Aline; Ragu, Christine; Figeac, Martin; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Lacombe, Catherine; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Cornillet, Pascale; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Leverger, Guy; Jourdan, Eric; Preudhomme, Claude

    2016-05-19

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) or inv(16) have been recognized as unique entities within AML and are usually reported together as core binding factor AML (CBF-AML). However, there is considerable clinical and biological heterogeneity within this group of diseases, and relapse incidence reaches up to 40%. Moreover, translocations involving CBFs are not sufficient to induce AML on its own and the full spectrum of mutations coexisting with CBF translocations has not been elucidated. To address these issues, we performed extensive mutational analysis by high-throughput sequencing in 215 patients with CBF-AML enrolled in the Phase 3 Trial of Systematic Versus Response-adapted Timed-Sequential Induction in Patients With Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Treating Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Interleukin-2 trials (age, 1-60 years). Mutations in genes activating tyrosine kinase signaling (including KIT, N/KRAS, and FLT3) were frequent in both subtypes of CBF-AML. In contrast, mutations in genes that regulate chromatin conformation or encode members of the cohesin complex were observed with high frequencies in t(8;21) AML (42% and 18%, respectively), whereas they were nearly absent in inv(16) AML. High KIT mutant allele ratios defined a group of t(8;21) AML patients with poor prognosis, whereas high N/KRAS mutant allele ratios were associated with the lack of KIT or FLT3 mutations and a favorable outcome. In addition, mutations in epigenetic modifying or cohesin genes were associated with a poor prognosis in patients with tyrosine kinase pathway mutations, suggesting synergic cooperation between these events. These data suggest that diverse cooperating mutations may influence CBF-AML pathophysiology as well as clinical behavior and point to potential unique pathogenesis of t(8;21) vs inv(16) AML. PMID:26980726