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Sample records for acute myelomonocytic leukaemia

  1. Spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome secondary to the transformation of chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia into acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Alexander; Musgrave, Kathryn; Upadhye, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old man, with a 6-year history of stable chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML), presented with general deterioration and worsening pancytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy showed that his disease had transformed into acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). He was started on a supportive transfusion regimen and did not receive any chemotherapy or corticosteroids. Several weeks later, he developed acute renal failure and was admitted to a medical admissions ward. Spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome (sTLS, grade 1) was diagnosed, as per the Cairo and Bishop criteria. He was treated with intravenous fluids, rasburicase and allopurinol. His renal function improved and he recovered from the sTLS. The authors believe that this is the first published case of sTLS occurring as a result of CMML transforming into AML; it highlights the importance of recognising sTLS as a cause of renal failure and electrolyte disturbance before cancer treatment begins. PMID:26961554

  2. A case of mandibular osteomyelitis in a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Yuki; Ishigami, Takashi; Akiba, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMMoL) in a 68-year-old man who developed osteomyelitis of the mandible. At the initial visit, he reported uncontrolled gingival bleeding, despite self-administered haemostasis. He complained of severe pain in the socket, despite potent opioid analgesia. After consultation with the internal medicine specialists, we undertook a surgical anti-inflammatory approach that included sequestrectomy with massive blood transfusion. His physical condition was ameliorated after the surgical procedure, and he was discharged from the hospital. However, 3 months later, he died because of cardiac arrest after haemorrhagic shock and cardiovascular failure because his CMMoL had developed to an acute blastic crisis. This experience demonstrates that the most important goal in such cases is to alleviate a patient's discomfort by applying minimally invasive actions to eliminate infection and improve the quality of life without causing deterioration in the CMMoL status. PMID:27572681

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Greaves, Mel; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is seen in both children and adults, but its incidence peaks between ages 2 and 5 years. The causation of ALL is considered to be multi-factorial, including exogenous or endogenous exposures, genetic susceptibility, and chance. The survival rate of paediatric ALL has improved to approximately 90% in recent trials with risk stratification by biologic features of leukaemic cells and response to therapy, therapy modification based on patient pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenomics, and improved supportive care. However, innovative approaches are needed to further improve survival while reducing adverse effects. While most children can be cured, the prognosis of infants and adults with ALL remains poor. Recent genome-wide profiling of germline and leukaemic cell DNA has identified novel submicroscopic structural genetic alterations and sequence mutations that contribute to leukaemogenesis, define new ALL subtypes, influence responsiveness to treatment, and may provide novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets for personalized medicine. PMID:23523389

  4. Mutation allele burden remains unchanged in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia responding to hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Merlevede, Jane; Droin, Nathalie; Qin, Tingting; Meldi, Kristen; Yoshida, Kenichi; Morabito, Margot; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; de Botton, Stéphane; Quesnel, Bruno; Commes, Thérèse; Jourdan, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Bernard, Olivier; Pata-Merci, Noemie; Solier, Stéphanie; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Dinger, Marcel E; Cowley, Mark J; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Meyer, Vincent; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Preudhomme, Claude; Stratton, Michael R; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Padron, Eric; Ogawa, Seishi; Koscielny, Serge; Figueroa, Maria; Solary, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The cytidine analogues azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) are commonly used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes, with or without a myeloproliferative component. It remains unclear whether the response to these hypomethylating agents results from a cytotoxic or an epigenetic effect. In this study, we address this question in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape of these tumours, combining whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. We identify an average of 14±5 somatic mutations in coding sequences of sorted monocyte DNA and the signatures of three mutational processes. Serial sequencing demonstrates that the response to hypomethylating agents is associated with changes in DNA methylation and gene expression, without any decrease in the mutation allele burden, nor prevention of new genetic alteration occurence. Our findings indicate that cytosine analogues restore a balanced haematopoiesis without decreasing the size of the mutated clone, arguing for a predominantly epigenetic effect.

  5. Mutation allele burden remains unchanged in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia responding to hypomethylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Merlevede, Jane; Droin, Nathalie; Qin, Tingting; Meldi, Kristen; Yoshida, Kenichi; Morabito, Margot; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; de Botton, Stéphane; Quesnel, Bruno; Commes, Thérèse; Jourdan, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Bernard, Olivier; Pata-Merci, Noemie; Solier, Stéphanie; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Dinger, Marcel E.; Cowley, Mark J.; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Meyer, Vincent; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Preudhomme, Claude; Stratton, Michael R.; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Padron, Eric; Ogawa, Seishi; Koscielny, Serge; Figueroa, Maria; Solary, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The cytidine analogues azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) are commonly used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes, with or without a myeloproliferative component. It remains unclear whether the response to these hypomethylating agents results from a cytotoxic or an epigenetic effect. In this study, we address this question in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape of these tumours, combining whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. We identify an average of 14±5 somatic mutations in coding sequences of sorted monocyte DNA and the signatures of three mutational processes. Serial sequencing demonstrates that the response to hypomethylating agents is associated with changes in DNA methylation and gene expression, without any decrease in the mutation allele burden, nor prevention of new genetic alteration occurence. Our findings indicate that cytosine analogues restore a balanced haematopoiesis without decreasing the size of the mutated clone, arguing for a predominantly epigenetic effect. PMID:26908133

  6. Mutation allele burden remains unchanged in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia responding to hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Merlevede, Jane; Droin, Nathalie; Qin, Tingting; Meldi, Kristen; Yoshida, Kenichi; Morabito, Margot; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; de Botton, Stéphane; Quesnel, Bruno; Commes, Thérèse; Jourdan, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Bernard, Olivier; Pata-Merci, Noemie; Solier, Stéphanie; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Dinger, Marcel E; Cowley, Mark J; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Meyer, Vincent; Artiguenave, François; Deleuze, Jean-François; Preudhomme, Claude; Stratton, Michael R; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Padron, Eric; Ogawa, Seishi; Koscielny, Serge; Figueroa, Maria; Solary, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The cytidine analogues azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) are commonly used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes, with or without a myeloproliferative component. It remains unclear whether the response to these hypomethylating agents results from a cytotoxic or an epigenetic effect. In this study, we address this question in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape of these tumours, combining whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. We identify an average of 14±5 somatic mutations in coding sequences of sorted monocyte DNA and the signatures of three mutational processes. Serial sequencing demonstrates that the response to hypomethylating agents is associated with changes in DNA methylation and gene expression, without any decrease in the mutation allele burden, nor prevention of new genetic alteration occurence. Our findings indicate that cytosine analogues restore a balanced haematopoiesis without decreasing the size of the mutated clone, arguing for a predominantly epigenetic effect. PMID:26908133

  7. Mutation allele burden remains unchanged in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia responding to hypomethylating agents

    DOE PAGES

    Merlevede, Jane; Droin, Nathalie; Qin, Tingting; Meldi, Kristen; Yoshida, Kenichi; Morabito, Margot; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Fenaux, Pierre; Braun, Thorsten; et al

    2016-02-24

    The cytidine analogues azacytidine and 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (decitabine) are commonly used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes, with or without a myeloproliferative component. It remains unclear whether the response to these hypomethylating agents results from a cytotoxic or an epigenetic effect. In this study, we address this question in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We describe a comprehensive analysis of the mutational landscape of these tumours, combining whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing. We identify an average of 14 ± 5 somatic mutations in coding sequences of sorted monocyte DNA and the signatures of three mutational processes. Serial sequencing demonstrates that the response to hypomethylating agents ismore » associated with changes in DNA methylation and gene expression, without any decrease in the mutation allele burden, nor prevention of new genetic alteration occurence. Lastly, our findings indicate that cytosine analogues restore a balanced haematopoiesis without decreasing the size of the mutated clone, arguing for a predominantly epigenetic effect.« less

  8. Haemophagocytic syndrome complicating acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, R.; Manoharan, A.

    1989-01-01

    A 41 year old female developed reactive haemophagocytic histiocytosis secondary to herpes simplex infection, during remission induction for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. She recovered fully with acyclovir and supportive treatment. Previous publications on the association between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and haemophagocytic syndrome are reviewed, and the nature of the haemophagocytic disorder is discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2687829

  9. [Lineage switch - conversion of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to acute myeloid leukaemia in 4 years old girl].

    PubMed

    Szpecht, Dawid; Derwich, Katarzyna; Wachowiak, Jacek; Konatkowska, Benigna; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-year-old girl with diagnosed proB acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with co-expression CD33 antigen, treated according to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Intercontinental - Berlin Frankfurt Münster 2002 (ALL-IC BFM 2002) protocol for standard risk group. Haematological remission was obtained on day 33 of induction treatment (on time). During induction and consolidation therapy there were no early serious adverse effects. The late isolated bone marrow relapse of acute myeloid leukaemia, type 7 was noted in our patient. We recognized this case as a lineage switch acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to acute myeloid leukaemia. In spite of Ida Flag regimen and following Acute Myeloid Leukaemia - Berlin Frankfurt Münster 2004 (AML-BFM 2004) protocol were administered, the clinical and haematological remission was not achieved and the patient died because of disease progression (circulatory and respiratory insufficiency).

  10. Significance of Phi bodies in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Cardullo, L de S; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1981-01-01

    Material from 39 patients with acute leukaemia was investigated with the peroxidase cytochemical reaction using 3,3'diaminobenzidine (DAB) and other substrates in order to test their sensitivity in detecting myeloid differentiation. The proportion of positive blasts and of cases with Auer rods in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) was significantly greater with DAB than with benzidine. In addition, Phi bodies were demonstrated in AML blasts only when DAB was used; Phi bodies were also observed in two out of seven cases of chronic granulocytic leukaemia in "myeloid" blast crisis but were not seen in any case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Phi bodies were more numerous when the reaction was carried out at pH 9.7, and their number was significantly reduced in the presence of 3-amino 1,2,4-triazole. Both findings suggest that the Phi bodies derive from catalase-containing granules (microperoxisomes) and are distinct from Auer rods, which derive from peroxidase-containing (primary) granules. Like Auer rods, Phi bodies appear to be characteristics of immature myeloid cells in leukaemia but are seen with a higher frequency than Auer rods in acute myeloid leukemia. Images p154-a PMID:6262384

  11. Erythema nodosum and granulomatous lesions preceding acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anan, Takashi; Imamura, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2004-09-01

    A 65-year-old female with a one-month history of painful eruptions on her lower extremities was admitted to our hospital. Histological examination revealed erythema nodosum (EN), and the patient was treated with oral prednisolone (PSL; 20 mg daily). The eruptions subsided in two weeks. One month later, painful reddish eruptions recurred on her upper limbs and abdomen in addition to her lower extremities. A skin biopsy from an abdominal erythematous plaque revealed a non-caseating granuloma without microorganisms or foreign-body materials. These eruptions also disappeared with treatment with oral PSL (20 mg daily). No underlying disease, including sarcoidosis, diabetes mellitus, or rheumatoid arthritis, was found. However, five months later, the patient developed conspicuous leukocytosis. She was diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (M4) and treated with chemotherapy. After complete remission had been achieved, the EN reappeared, in association with an increase in blastic cells in the bone marrow. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta, which are thought to be essential for granuloma formation and induction of EN, were markedly elevated. Physicians must remember that recurrent EN and granulomatous lesions can be a prodromal sign of leukemia.

  12. Biochemical enzyme analysis in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, H G; Gaedicke, G; Minowada, J

    1985-01-01

    This report summarises the current knowledge regarding the clinical utility of biochemical enzyme markers for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in acute leukaemia. The enzymes studied most extensively in this field are terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and acid phosphatase, esterase, hexosaminidase isoenzymes. For each enzyme, the quantitative and qualitative characteristics in various immunologically defined subclasses of acute leukaemia are described. The quantitative evaluation of enzyme activities represents an adjunctive classification technique which should be incorporated into the multivariate analysis, the "multiple marker analysis." By qualitative characterisation pronounced heterogeneity of leukaemia subsets is uncovered. The application of 2'-deoxycoformycin, a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, and the potential usefulness of two other enzymes as targets for treatment with selective agents is discussed. The concept that gene products expressed at certain developmental stages of normal cells can similarly be detected in leukaemic cells (which therefore seem to be "frozen" or "arrested" at this particular maturation/differentiation stage) is supported by the results obtained in enzyme studies. Besides their practical clinical importance for classification and treatment of acute leukaemias, biochemical enzyme markers constitute a valuable research tool to disclose biological properties of leukaemic cells. PMID:2981904

  13. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Loss of variation of state detected in soybean metabolic and human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional networks under external stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Katsumi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Okumura, Jun; Ishige, Kentaro; Suzuki, Harukazu; Nakamura, Takuji; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is sensitive to flooding stress, and flood damage at the seedling stage is a barrier to growth. We constructed two mathematical models of the soybean metabolic network, a control model and a flooded model, from metabolic profiles in soybean plants. We simulated the metabolic profiles with perturbations before and after the flooding stimulus using the two models. We measured the variation of state that the system could maintain from a state–space description of the simulated profiles. The results showed a loss of variation of state during the flooding response in the soybean plants. Loss of variation of state was also observed in a human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional network in response to a phorbol-ester stimulus. Thus, we detected a loss of variation of state under external stimuli in two biological systems, regardless of the regulation and stimulus types. Our results suggest that a loss of robustness may occur concurrently with the loss of variation of state in biological systems. We describe the possible applications of the quantity of variation of state in plant genetic engineering and cell biology. Finally, we present a hypothetical “external stimulus-induced information loss” model of biological systems. PMID:27775018

  15. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:24932421

  16. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Mohren, M; Markmann, I; Jentsch-Ullrich, K; Koenigsmann, M; Lutze, G; Franke, A

    2006-01-01

    Patients with malignancies have an increased risk for venous thromboembolisms (VTE), but data on patients with acute leukaemia are very limited so far. We found VTE in 12% of 455 patients with acute leukaemia, half of which occurred in association with central venous catheters, with equal risk of ALL and AML. PMID:16421591

  17. Independent prognostic variables in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew L; Hills, Robert K; Grimwade, David

    2011-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is one of the most common haematological malignancies and is increasing in frequency due to an ageing population. Whilst remission will be achieved in up to 80% of those receiving intensive chemotherapy, the main variables precluding cure are the treatment-related mortality and relapse rates. Decisions on intensification, de-escalation and allografting rely on the ability to divide an apparently homogeneous group according to risk. A wide range of clinical, cytogenetic and molecular variables may be used to inform this task. Cytogenetic and molecular characterisation has already identified subgroups, such as acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) with t(15;17)/PML-RARA and AML with FLT3 mutation for which targeted therapies are available, and further molecularly defined groups who may be potential candidates for this approach are likely to be identified in the future. This review examines the range of established clinical and diagnostic parameters that should be used in assessing prognosis for a patient with AML and looks ahead to an expanding repertoire of potential variables that are currently under evaluation.

  18. Distribution of ABO blood groups in acute leukaemias and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Murali K; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Solomon, John; Rajaseharan, Annabelle

    2004-09-01

    We studied the distribution of ABO blood groups in Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, in children up to the age of 12 years, in a hospital-based retrospective study. Blood group data were recorded from the case records of all the patients in a tertiary care centre with the diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, during the period 1987-1997. There were 63 Hodgkin's lymphoma, 78 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 116 acute myeloid leukaemia and 522 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients. We assessed the distribution of ABO blood groups and the difference in the distribution from the source population. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, there were 45.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8-84.5] more patients with B blood group. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, there were 14.3% (95% CI: 3.2-25.2) more patients with O blood group. In Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, there were 56.5% (95% CI: 19.9-85.4) and 52.9% (95% CI: 18.1-82.6) less patients with A blood group, respectively. This shows that the relationship between the ABO blood groups and haematological malignancies merits further investigation in a population-based prospective study. This is the first study of its kind in any Indian population. PMID:15175895

  19. Leukaemias into the 21st century: part 1: the acute leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M S; Larsen, S R; Iland, H J; Joshua, D E; Gibson, J

    2012-11-01

    The leukaemias are a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of malignancies, which manifest as clonal expansions of a single cell at different stages of lympho-haemopoietic development. The transformed cell acquires an unrestrained capacity for self-renewal and, in the case of the acute leukaemias, also fails to differentiate into functional mature cells. Historically leukaemias were classified using a combination of clinical and (presumed) cell lineage criteria. Thus, the four major subgroups of acute and chronic myeloid leukaemia and acute and chronic lymphoid leukaemia were recognised. Up until the last 10-15 years, patients within each major subgroup were treated along broadly similar lines. Genetic abnormalities have been recognised in certain leukaemias for over 50 years; however, the recent explosion in our understanding of the frequency and complexity of molecular abnormalities in the leukaemias has 'opened the door' for the design of more targeted therapies with the expectation that their incorporation into therapeutic regimens will be associated with greater efficacy and less off-target toxicity.

  20. Serum enzyme and ferritin concentrations in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stark, A N; Gailor, K; Langdale, P I; Roberts, B E; Scott, C S

    1987-03-01

    Serum ferritin concentrations were determined in 142 untreated cases of acute leukaemia. No correlation between type of leukaemia as defined by morphology and immunology and the level of serum ferritin was found. Samples were also tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), phosphohexose isomerase (PHI), B-glucuronidase (B-gluc), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Serum ferritin was significantly correlated with serum PHI, LAP, and LDH concentrations but not with leukaemic mass as assessed by total white blood cell count (WBC). Ferritin and CRP levels were also significantly correlated suggesting that ferritin may behave to some extent like an acute phase reactant in acute leukaemia. PMID:3502981

  1. [Vaccination of chickenpox in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Navajas, A; Astigarraga, I; Fernández-Teijeiro, A; Aga, M; Redondo, M L; Roig, A; Corral, J

    1999-04-01

    Varicella vaccine has shown its efficacy to prevent the disease and complications in healthy and immunodeficient children. In this article the authors evaluate the immunologic status of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at diagnosis and at follow up and the development of chickenpox and/or herpes zoster. Children with negative serology and continuous complete remission of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia for one year were vaccinated. Of 71 children diagnosed of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia from 1983 to 1996, 25 received the vaccine and seroconversion was obtained in 76% after one dose and 92% after the second dose. Vaccine tolerance was adequate. The incidence of herpes zoster infection was decreased in vaccinated children during chemotherapy compared to the wild-virus infected ones. Nowadays that vaccine for healthy children is recommended, we consider a priority to protect from chickenpox the children affected by leukaemia that are in continuous complete remission of the disease.

  2. Secondary pure erythroid leukaemia in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: lineage switch or chemotherapy effect?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Rajive; Chharchhodawala, Taher; Kumar, Lalit

    2014-05-19

    Pure erythroid leukaemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and its occurrence at acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) relapse has not been reported earlier. A 39-year-old man received chemotherapy for Philadelphia-negative B cell ALL. Subsequently, he developed pure erythroid leukaemia with >80% immature erythroid precursors in bone marrow showing block positivity on periodic acid-Schiff stain, expressing CD71, CD34 but lacking CD235a. The interval between exposure to multidrug chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide and AML diagnosis was 2 years and 9 months. No cytogenetic abnormality was detected at the time of relapse. The patient died 2 weeks after starting AML chemotherapy. The relatively narrow time interval (usually 5-10 years) between chemotherapy and AML development and normal karyotype at relapse raises a possibility of lineage switch besides therapy-related AML as the likely pathogenesis. Further exploration of such cases may unravel the pathways responsible for lineage assignment in pluripotent stem cells.

  3. Clinical characteristics of 15 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia who developed blast crisis: MDS Committee of Japanese Society of Paediatric Haematology/Oncology.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuko; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Zaike, Yuji; Masunaga, Atsuko; Yoshimi, Ayami; Kojima, Seiji; Ito, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Manabe, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is a rare haematopoietic stem cell disease of early childhood, which can progress to blast crisis in some children. A total of 153 children diagnosed with JMML were reported to the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Committee in Japan between 1989 and 2007; 15 of them (9·8%) had 20% or more blasts in the bone marrow (blast crisis) during the disease course. Blast crisis occurred during observation without therapy (n = 3) or with oral 6-mercaptopurine treatment (n = 9) and in relapse after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; n = 3). Six patients had a complex karyotype (5 including monosomy 7) and an additional three patients had isolated monosomy 7 at blast crisis. Seven patients received HSCT after blast crisis and four of them achieved remission. Eleven out of the 15 patients died; the cause of death was disease progression in 10 patients and transplant-related complication in one patient. In summary, patients with blast crisis have poor prognosis and can be cured only by HSCT. The emergence of monosomy 7 and complex karyotype may be characteristic of blast crisis in a substantial subset of children.

  4. RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 in acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Cho, Young-Uk; Lee, Je-Hwan; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Lee, Jin-Ok; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Il; Huh, Jooryung; Seo, Eul-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) is located on chromosome 2p23; the chromosomal rearrangements of this gene are common genetic alterations, resulting in the creation of multiple fusion genes involved in tumorigenesis. However, the presence of an ALK fusion in myeloid malignancies is extremely rare. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia in a 31-year-old woman with an unusual rearrangement between RAN-binding protein 2 (RANBP2) and ALK and a karyotype of 45,XX,inv(2)(p23q21),-7[20]. We detected an ALK rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization, identified the ALK fusion partner by using RNA transcriptome sequencing, and demonstrated the RANBP2-ALK fusion transcript by reverse transcriptase--PCR and Sanger sequencing. Immunohistochemistry for ALK showed strong staining of the nuclear membrane in leukemic cells. The patient had an unfavorable clinical course. Our results, together with a literature review, suggest the RANBP2-ALK fusion combined with monosomy 7 may be related to a unique clonal hematologic disorder of childhood and adolescence, characterized by myelomonocytic leukemia and a poor prognosis.

  5. Acute basophilic leukaemia in a three-month-old calf.

    PubMed

    Laabs, Eva-Maria; Mischke, Reinhard; Dziallas, Peter; Maiolini, Arianna; Tipold, Andrea; Raddatz, Barbara; Puff, Christina; Rehage, Jürgen

    2015-09-03

    A three-month-old female Holstein-Friesian calf was presented with acute tetraparesis. After neurological examination a multifocal lesion in the central nervous system was suspected with the most pronounced lesions between the third thoracic and the third lumbar vertebrae. Haematological examination revealed moderate anaemia as well as severe thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and leucocytosis. A blood smear and bone marrow aspirate exhibited predominantly blasts with basophilic granulation leading to a diagnosis of acute (myeloid) leukaemia with involvement of the basophilic lineage or an acute basophilic leukaemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed spinal cord compression; at necropsy, extensive localised haemorrhages extending into the thoracic vertebral canal were found. Histopathology revealed a large population of blast cells in several tissues including the meninges. Due to multifocal detection of neoplastic cells in the vascular system, neoplasia of the haematopoietic system was assumed in agreement with haematological findings. Signs of paresis could be explained by intramedullary spinal cord haemorrhage and myeloid infiltrations of meningeal vessels. In conclusion, despite its rarity, acute myeloid leukaemia with involvement of the basophilic lineage may be considered in diagnosing calves with progressive deteriorating general condition, paresis, leucocytosis with moderate basophilic differentiation or haemorrhagic disorders.

  6. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. The acute promyelocytic leukaemia success story: curing leukaemia through targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Rice, K L; de Thé, H

    2014-07-01

    The recent finding that almost all patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) may be cured using a combination of retinoic acid (RA) and arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) (N Engl J Med, 369, 2013 and 111) highlights the progress made in our understanding of APL pathogenesis and therapeutic approaches over the past 25 years. The study of APL has revealed many important lessons related to transcriptional control, nuclear organization, epigenetics and the role of proteolysis in biological control. Even more important has been the clinical demonstration that molecularly targeted therapy can eradicate disease.

  8. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  9. Peripheral ulcerative keratitis as a complication of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morjaria, Rupal; Barge, Tom; Mordant, David; Elston, John

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare presentation of acute bilateral peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) in a patient with a new diagnosis of untreated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of PUK associated with untreated AML and we stress the importance of a rapid and thorough testing to exclude other diagnoses. The patient lost his vision within 10 days to counting fingers. Rapid diagnosis allowed a good visual recovery following prompt treatment with oral steroids and systemic chemotherapy treatment for the AML. PMID:25362188

  10. Inotuzumab ozogamicin in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Morley, N J; Marks, D I

    2016-01-01

    Whilst most adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia will go into remission with standard induction chemotherapy, many will relapse. Response rates to standard salvage chemotherapy regimens are low and the outlook on relapse is very poor and associated with significant morbidity and mortality hence the need for newer targeted approaches. Inotuzumab ozogamicin (previously known as CMC-544) is an antibody-drug conjugate and consists of a monoclonal anti-CD22 antibody bound to calicheamicin. The target, CD22, is widely expressed on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells making it a potential therapeutic target. The calicheamicin is delivered intracellularly and causes leukaemia cell apoptosis. Overall response rates of 57% were observed in a Phase II study and the final results of a Phase III randomised controlled trial comparing this drug to the investigator choice 'standard of care' chemotherapy are eagerly awaited. Whilst initial results are promising, there have been concerns regarding liver toxicity and the incidence of veno-occlusive disease of the liver especially in patients who have previously received or go on to allogeneic stem cell transplant.

  11. Disseminated fungal infection complicated with pulmonary haemorrhage in a case of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, S; Sharma, S; Das, P; Kumar, L

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary haemorrhage is a common necropsy finding in acute leukaemia, however, it is rarely diagnosed during life. A man with acute myeloid leukaemia is reported who presented with disseminated fungal infection, anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and subconjuctival and petechial haemorrhages. During the course of the patient's illness, the chest infection was complicated with bilateral pulmonary haemorrhage. The diagnosis of pulmonary haemorrhage was based on characteristic clinical and radiological findings. The patient improved on treatment.


Keywords: leukaemia; pulmonary infiltrate; haemorrhage PMID:11060145

  12. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Vincristine and Prednisone for the Induction of Remissions in Acute Childhood Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hardisty, R. M.; McElwain, T. J.; Darby, Caryl W.

    1969-01-01

    A total of 65 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and seven with other types of acute leukaemia received treatment with a combination of vincristine and prednisone. In all 122 courses of treatment were given. Of 22 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who received this as their first treatment, all achieved complete remission. The complete remission rates were 82% for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in their first relapse, 63% in the second relapse, and much lower in subsequent relapses and in the patients with other types of acute leukaemia. Alopecia and gastrointestinal and neuromuscular toxicity occurred respectively in 51%, 29%, and 21% of instances, only the last of these side-effects of vincristine being dose-related. Most of the complete remissions were obtained with a total dose of vincristine which carried only a low risk of neurotoxicity. PMID:5254045

  14. Incomplete Reiter's syndrome following chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Dharmasena, F.; Englert, H.; Catovsky, D.; Galton, D. A.; Drysdale, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome and other reactive arthritides have been described following infection with various organisms although they can occur in unusual circumstances without an obvious infectious precipitant. We have recently witnessed two attacks of reactive arthritis and keratoderma blenorrhagica occurring in an HLA B27 adult male following chemotherapy on two separate occasions with the same drugs for acute myeloid leukaemia. No attacks occurred before or following the cessation of these drugs. This supports the view that in Reiter's syndrome a common pathogenic pathway is triggered by an 'arthritogenic factor' which in this case appears to have been chemical. PMID:3476917

  15. Abnormalities in the erythrocyte membrane in acute lymphoid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, M; Basu, J; Chakrabarti, P; Rakshit, M M

    1989-01-01

    Erythrocytes from patients suffering from acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) show decreased proportions of spectrin tetrameters and altered spatial distribution of band 4.1 and ankyrins. These abnormalities of the cytoskeleton are probably responsible for altered membrane fluidity and transbilayer distribution of phosphatidylethanolamine in ALL. ALL is associated with severe anaemia and usually, but not always, with overproduction of lymphocytes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of abnormalities in the erythrocyte membrane in ALL which may, in part, be responsible for the observed anaemia. PMID:2730573

  16. Case report: Concomitant Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Cytogenetically Normal de novo Acute Leukaemia in a Patient.

    PubMed

    Kajtár, Béla; Rajnics, Péter; Egyed, Miklós; Alizadeh, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of acute myeloid leukaemia with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who was evaluated for macrocytic anaemia. Based on the morphology and immunophenotyping analysis of peripheral blood, a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was established. Subsequently, the bone marrow examination revealed the presence of two distinct, coexisting CLL and AML clones. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis detected deletion 13q14.3 and unmutated immunoglobulin variable heavy-chain in the CLL clone, only. The AML and CLL clones did not share clonality, and the AML did not involve the peripheral blood. A diagnosis of cytogenetically normal de novo AML occurring concurrently with untreated CLL has not been reported previously in English literature.

  17. Antibody-based treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mulford, Deborah A; Jurcic, Joseph G

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become an important treatment modality in cancer therapy. Genetically engineered chimaeric and humanised antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumours. Whereas the humanised anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease detectable by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in acute promyelocytic leukaemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with beta-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukaemic therapy before bone marrow transplantation. Conversely, alpha-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumour cell kill while sparing surrounding normal cells. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33-calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions as a single agent in patients with relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy in the treatment of newly diagnosed AML. PMID:14680472

  18. Oral manifestations as an early clinical sign of acute myeloid leukaemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guan, G; Firth, N

    2015-03-01

    Leukaemia is the most common malignancy in children and one of the most common malignancies in young adults. Acute myeloid leukaemia is often associated with early oral manifestations. The purpose of this study is to report the case of a 49-year-old male with spontaneous gingival bleeding for over two years with undiagnosed leukaemia. Haematological investigation was instigated and on referral to the Haematology Department at Dunedin Public Hospital, the diagnosis of an acute myeloid leukaemia was confirmed. Since oral lesions can be one of the early events of acute myeloid leukaemia, they may be considered as an important diagnostic indicator for oral health practitioners, and their roles in diagnosing and treating such patients.

  19. Current standard treatment of adult acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lo-Coco, Francesco; Cicconi, Laura; Breccia, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has dramatically improved over the last two decades, due to the introduction of combined all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy regimens and, more recently, to the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO). ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy remains a widely used strategy, providing cure rates above 80%, but it is associated with risk of severe infections and occurrence of secondary leukaemias. ATO is the most effective single agent in APL and, used alone or in combination with ATRA or ATRA and reduced-intensity chemotherapy, results in greater efficacy with considerably less haematological toxicity. The toxic profile of ATO includes frequent, but manageable, QTc prolongation and increase of liver enzymes. Two large randomized studies have shown that ATRA + ATO is superior to ATRA + chemotherapy for newly diagnosed low-risk APL resulting in 2-4 year event-free survival rates above 90% and very few relapses. According to real world data, the spectacular progress in APL outcomes reported in clinical trials has not been paralleled by a significant improvement in early death rates, this remains the most challenging issue for the final cure of the disease.

  20. Current standard treatment of adult acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lo-Coco, Francesco; Cicconi, Laura; Breccia, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has dramatically improved over the last two decades, due to the introduction of combined all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy regimens and, more recently, to the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO). ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy remains a widely used strategy, providing cure rates above 80%, but it is associated with risk of severe infections and occurrence of secondary leukaemias. ATO is the most effective single agent in APL and, used alone or in combination with ATRA or ATRA and reduced-intensity chemotherapy, results in greater efficacy with considerably less haematological toxicity. The toxic profile of ATO includes frequent, but manageable, QTc prolongation and increase of liver enzymes. Two large randomized studies have shown that ATRA + ATO is superior to ATRA + chemotherapy for newly diagnosed low-risk APL resulting in 2-4 year event-free survival rates above 90% and very few relapses. According to real world data, the spectacular progress in APL outcomes reported in clinical trials has not been paralleled by a significant improvement in early death rates, this remains the most challenging issue for the final cure of the disease. PMID:26687281

  1. RUNX3 promoter hypermethylation is frequent in leukaemia cell lines and associated with acute myeloid leukaemia inv(16) subtype.

    PubMed

    Estécio, Marcos R H; Maddipoti, Sirisha; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; DiNardo, Courtney D; Yang, Hui; Wei, Yue; Kondo, Kimie; Fang, Zhihong; Stevenson, William; Chang, Kun-Sang; Pierce, Sherry A; Bohannan, Zachary; Borthakur, Gautam; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Correlative and functional studies support the involvement of the RUNX gene family in haematological malignancies. To elucidate the role of epigenetics in RUNX inactivation, we evaluated promoter DNA methylation of RUNX1, 2, and 3 in 23 leukaemia cell lines and samples from acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) and myelodysplatic syndromes (MDS) patients. RUNX1 and RUNX2 gene promoters were mostly unmethylated in cell lines and clinical samples. Hypermethylation of RUNX3 was frequent among cell lines (74%) and highly variable among patient samples, with clear association to cytogenetic status. High frequency of RUNX3 hypermethylation (85% of the 20 studied cases) was found in AML patients with inv(16)(p13.1q22) compared to other AML subtypes (31% of the other 49 cases). RUNX3 hypermethylation was also frequent in ALL (100% of the six cases) but low in MDS (21%). In support of a functional role, hypermethylation of RUNX3 was correlated with low levels of protein, and treatment of cell lines with the DNA demethylating agent, decitabine, resulted in mRNA re-expression. Furthermore, relapse-free survival of non-inv(16)(p13.1q22) AML patients without RUNX3 methylation was significantly better (P = 0·016) than that of methylated cases. These results suggest that RUNX3 silencing is an important event in inv(16)(p13.1q22) leukaemias.

  2. Current status of gene expression profiling in the diagnosis and management of acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Ulrike; Kohlmann, Alexander; Haferlach, Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) enables the simultaneous investigation of the expression of tens of thousands of genes and was successfully introduced in leukaemia research a decade ago. Aiming to better understand the diversity of genetic aberrations in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), pioneer studies investigated and confirmed the predictability of many cytogenetic and molecular subclasses in AML and ALL. In addition, GEP can define new prognostic subclasses within distinct leukaemia subgroups, as illustrated in AML with normal karyotype. Another approach is the development of treatment-specific sensitivity assays, which might contribute to targeted therapy studies. Finally, GEP might enable the detection of new molecular targets for therapy in patients with acute leukaemia. Meanwhile, large multicentre studies, e.g. the Microarray Innovations in LEukaemia (MILE) study, prepare for a standardised introduction of GEP in leukaemia diagnostic algorithms, aiming to translate this novel methodology into clinical routine for the benefit of patients with the complex disorders of AML and ALL.

  3. Vaccination and the risk of childhood acute leukaemia: the ESCALE study (SFCE)

    PubMed Central

    Mallol-Mesnard, Nathalie; Menegaux, Florence; Auvrignon, Anne; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Bertrand, Yves; Nelken, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Michel, Gérard; Margueritte, Geneviève; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Bordigoni, Pierre; Leverger, Guy; Baruchel, André; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Background In 2002, a poster alerted the French health authorities to the possibility that the risk of childhood leukaemia might be increased by hepatitis B vaccination. Elucidating the role of vaccination in the etiology of childhood acute leukaemia was therefore included in the objectives of an ongoing national study. Methods The ESCALE study was a French national population-based case-control study conducted in France in 2003 and 2004 in order to investigate the role of infectious, environmental and genetic factors in 4 childhood neoplastic diseases (leukaemia, lymphoma, neuroblastoma, and brain tumor). The controls were randomly selected from the French population and age and gender frequency matched with the cases. A total of 776 cases of acute leukaemia (91% of the eligible cases) and 1681 controls (69% of the eligible controls) were included. In a specific standardized telephone interview, which was the same for both the cases and controls, each mother was asked to read out her child’s complete vaccination record. Results No association between vaccination and the risk of childhood acute leukaemia (ALL or AML) was observed. No relationship between the risk of leukaemia and the type of vaccine, number of doses of each vaccine, total number of injections, total number of vaccine doses or number of early vaccinations was evidenced. No confounding factor was observed. Conclusion The study did not show any evidence of a role of vaccination in the etiology of childhood leukaemia. PMID:17227780

  4. Oral complications and dental care in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Valéra, Marie-Cécile; Noirrit-Esclassan, Emmanuelle; Pasquet, Marléne; Vaysse, Fréderic

    2015-08-01

    Acute leukaemia is the most common type of childhood cancer, the acute lymphoblastic type accounting for the majority of cases. Children affected by leukaemia receive various forms of treatments including chemotherapeutic agents and stem cell transplants. Leukaemia and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health and further dental treatments. The oral complications include mucositis, opportunistic infections, gingival inflammation and bleeding, xerostomia and carious lesions. An additional consideration in children is the impact of the treatments on the developing dentition and on orofacial growth. The aim of this review is to describe the oral complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and the methods of prevention and management before, during and after the cancer treatment.

  5. In vitro stimulation of cell-mediated cytotoxicity by acute leukaemias.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Acute leukaemias stimulated proliferative and cell-mediated cytotoxic (CMC) responses in vitro in normal (unprimed) lymphocytes. Proliferation was detected by increases in viable cell counts and [3H]dT incorporation in mixed lymphocyte-leukaemia-cell cultures. CMC detected on cultured cell-line targets (CCL) including K562 was generally much stronger than on fresh leukaemia cells, and correlated with stimulation of [3H]dT uptake in the responding lymphocytes. Leukaemias which were resistant as targets to CMC were able competitively to inhibit CMC on K562, though not as efficiently as blocking by K562 itself. With one leukaemia, blocking of CMC increased as the level of CMC on K562 was amplified by greater numbers of stimulating cells in the sensitization phase. This suggests that in certain cases blocking of effector cells by acute-leukaemia cells may depend upon the state of activation of the effector cells. Lymphocytes from a leukaemia patient in remission, treated with allogeneic leukaemia-cell immunotherapy and stimulated in vitro with immunizing leukaemia cells, developed strong anti-leukaemic CMC. A non-immunized patient's lymphocytes did not respond in this way, despite comparable levels of CMC on K562 in both patients. Dual stimulation of unprimed normal lymphocytes and remission lymphocytes with allogeneic or autologous leukaemias and various cell lines, amplified anti-leukaemic CMC, but did not markedly alter CMC or CCL. These data do not formally exclude the mediation of in vitro-stimulated anti-leukaemic CMC by NK-like cells, but suggest that such effector cells differ qualitatively from NK-like cells detected in the absence of anti-leukaemic CMC. PMID:6451236

  6. Association of a murine leukaemia stem cell gene signature based on nucleostemin promoter activity with prognosis of acute myeloid leukaemia in patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohamed A E; Naka, Kazuhito; Yoshida, Akiyo; Fuse, Kyoko; Kasada, Atsuo; Hoshii, Takayuki; Tadokoro, Yuko; Ueno, Masaya; Ohta, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Chiaki; Hirao, Atsushi

    2014-07-18

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous neoplastic disorder in which a subset of cells function as leukaemia-initiating cells (LICs). In this study, we prospectively evaluated the leukaemia-initiating capacity of AML cells fractionated according to the expression of a nucleolar GTP binding protein, nucleostemin (NS). To monitor NS expression in living AML cells, we generated a mouse AML model in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed under the control of a region of the NS promoter (NS-GFP). In AML cells, NS-GFP levels were correlated with endogenous NS mRNA. AML cells with the highest expression of NS-GFP were very immature blast-like cells, efficiently formed leukaemia colonies in vitro, and exhibited the highest leukaemia-initiating capacity in vivo. Gene expression profiling analysis revealed that cell cycle regulators and nucleotide metabolism-related genes were highly enriched in a gene set associated with leukaemia-initiating capacity that we termed the 'leukaemia stem cell gene signature'. This gene signature stratified human AML patients into distinct clusters that reflected prognosis, demonstrating that the mouse leukaemia stem cell gene signature is significantly associated with the malignant properties of human AML. Further analyses of gene regulation in leukaemia stem cells could provide novel insights into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to AML.

  7. [Necrotizing tonsillitis and renal vein thrombosis due to acute myeloid leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Akram, Javed; Josefsson, Pernilla; Rømeling, Frans

    2012-09-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with severe tonsillitis with unilateral necrotizing tonsillitis. She suddenly got fever, malaise, difficulties swallowing, pain in the throat and deterioration despite four days of penicillin treatment. During hospitalisation, she experienced abdominal pain, and blood tests showed pancytopenia. She was transferred to a haematological department, where a bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukaemia. Subsequently, an abdominal computed tomography with intravenous contrast revealed bilateral renal vein thrombosis, probably because of coagulopathy due to leukaemia.

  8. Review: Aberrant EVI1 expression in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Hinai, Adil A; Valk, Peter J M

    2016-03-01

    Deregulated expression of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene is the molecular hallmark of therapy-resistant myeloid malignancies bearing chromosomal inv(3)(q21q26·2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26·2) [hereafter referred to as inv(3)/t(3;3)] abnormalities. EVI1 is a haematopoietic stemness and transcription factor with chromatin remodelling activity. Interestingly, the EVI1 gene also shows overexpression in 6-11% of adult acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cases that do not carry any 3q aberrations. Deregulated expression of EVI1 is strongly associated with monosomy 7 and 11q23 abnormalities, which are known to be associated with poor response to treatment. However, EVI1 overexpression has been revealed as an important independent adverse prognostic marker in adult AML and defines distinct risk categories in 11q23-rearranged AML. Recently, important progress has been made in the delineation of the mechanism by which EVI1 becomes deregulated in inv(3)/t(3;3) as well as the cooperating mutations in this specific subset of AML with dismal prognosis.

  9. Is this acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Chellam; Scott, Julius Xavier; Ebenezer, Sam

    2011-08-01

    Arthritis could be a presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and could be wrongly diagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Clinical and laboratory parameters might differentiate ALL and JRA in children who present with arthritis. Out of a total of 250 children of ALL, 10 were referred to the department of child health and paediatric haemato-oncology of Christian Medical College, Vellore during 1990-2002. They were compared with 10 age-matched children who had systematic onset of JRA. The age groups in ALL and JRA were 6.05 +/- 2.45 years and 5.47 +/- 4.4 years respectively. Severe pain as evidenced by inability to walk was found in children but one child with JRA was unable to walk (p < 0.05). Lymphocytosis was noticed in 7 children (70%) with ALL whereas none had in JRA group. ESR was elevated in all cases in both the groups. One case in each group had antinuclear antibody positivity. It can be concluded that ALL can masquerade as systematic onset of JRA. So paediatricians should be careful enough while diagnosing the disease process.

  10. Economic evaluation of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rae, C; Furlong, W; Jankovic, M; Moghrabi, Albert; Naqvi, A; Sala, A; Samson, Y; DePauw, S; Feeny, D; Barr, R

    2014-11-01

    Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) consortia's treatment strategies for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children are widely used. We compared the health effects and monetary costs of hospital treatments for these two strategies. Parents of children treated at seven centres in Canada, Italy and the USA completed health-related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during four active treatment phases and at 2 years after treatment. Mean HRQL scores were used to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for a period of 5 years following diagnosis. Total costs of treatment were determined from variables in administrative databases in a universally accessible and publicly funded healthcare system. Valid HRQL assessments (n = 1200) were collected for 307 BFM and 317 DFCI patients, with costs measured for 66 BFM and 28 DFCI patients. QALYs per patient were <1.0% greater for BFM than DFCI. Median HRQL scores revealed no difference in QALYs. The difference in mean total costs for BFM (US$88 480) and DFCI (US$93 026) was not significant (P = 0.600). This study provides no evidence of superiority for one treatment strategy over the other. Current BFM or DFCI strategies should represent conventional management for the next economic evaluation of treatments for ALL in childhood. PMID:24393150

  11. Somatic PTPN11 mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Marco; Martinelli, Simone; Iavarone, Ivano; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Spinelli, Monica; Giarin, Emanuela; Petrangeli, Valentina; Carta, Claudio; Masetti, Riccardo; Aricò, Maurizio; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Sorcini, Mariella; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    Somatic mutations in PTPN11, the gene encoding the transducer SHP-2, have emerged as a novel class of lesions that upregulate RAS signalling and contribute to leukaemogenesis. In a recent study of 69 children and adolescents with de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), we documented a non-random distribution of PTPN11 mutations among French-American-British (FAB) subtypes. Lesions were restricted to FAB-M5 cases, where they were relatively common (four of 12 cases). Here, we report on the results of a molecular screening performed on 181 additional unselected patients, enrolled in participating institutions of the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica-AML Study Group, to provide a more accurate picture of the prevalence, spectrum and distribution of PTPN11 mutations in childhood AML and to investigate their clinical relevance. We concluded that PTPN11 defects do not represent a frequent event in this heterogeneous group of malignancies (4.4%), although they recur in a considerable percentage of patients with FAB-M5 (18%). PTPN11 lesions rarely occur in other subtypes. Within the FAB-M5 group no clear association of PTPN11 mutations with any clinical variable was evident. Nearly two third of the patients with this subtype were found to harbour an activating mutation in PTPN11, NRAS, KRAS2 or FLT3.

  12. Acute myeloid leukaemia: optimal management and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Villela, Luis; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2011-08-20

    The current treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia yields poor results, with expected cure rates in the order of 30-40% depending on the biological characteristics of the leukaemic clone. Therefore, new agents and schemas are intensively studied in order to improve patients' outcomes. This review summarizes some of these new paradigms, including new questions such as which anthracycline is most effective and at what dose. High doses of daunorubicin have shown better responses in young patients and are well tolerated in elderly patients. Monoclonal antibodies are promising agents in good risk patients. Drugs blocking signalling pathways could be used in combination with chemotherapy or in maintenance with promising results. Epigenetic therapies, particularly after stem cell transplantation, are also discussed. New drugs such as clofarabine and flavopiridol are reviewed and the results of their use discussed. It is clear that many new approaches are under study and hopefully will be able to improve on the outcomes of the commonly used '7+3' regimen of an anthracycline plus cytarabine with daunorubicin, which is clearly an ineffective therapy in the majority of patients.

  13. The role of multiparametric flow cytometry in the detection of minimal residual disease in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denise; Grigoriadis, George; Westerman, David

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry is the most accessible method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection due to its availability in most haematological centres. Using a precise combination of different antibodies, immunophenotypic detection of MRD in acute leukaemia can be performed by identifying abnormal combinations or expressions of antigens on malignant cells at diagnosis, during and post treatment. These abnormal phenotypes, referred to as leukaemia-associated immunophenotypes (LAIPs) are either absent or expressed at low frequency in normal bone marrow (BM) cells and are used to monitor the behaviour and quantitate the amount of residual disease following treatment. In paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the level of MRD by multiparametric flow cytometry (MPFC) during therapy is recognised as an important predictor of outcome. Although less extensively studied, adult ALL and adult and paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) have also demonstrated similar findings. The challenge now is incorporating this information for risk-stratification so that therapy can be tailored individually and ultimately improve outcome while also limiting treatment-related toxicity. In this review we will elaborate on the current and future role of MPFC in MRD in acute leukaemia while also addressing its limitations.

  14. Higher risk for acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia in Swedish population centres 1973-94

    PubMed Central

    Hjalmars, U; Gustafsson, G

    1999-01-01

    A population-based sample of acute childhood leukaemia cases in Sweden 1973–94 was analysed by a geographical information system (GIS) for spatial leukaemia distribution in relation to population density. The annual incidence rate for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 3.6, and for acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL) 0.7, cases per 100 000 children. Incidence rates in population centres, constituting 1.3% of Sweden's land area and approximately 80% of the population, compared with the rest of Sweden showed a statistically significant excess of ALL [odds ratio (OR) 1.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.44–1.95], but not ANLL (OR 1.13; 95% CI 0.98–1.32). An increasing trend, however not statistically significant, was found for ALL incidence with both increasing population density in parishes and increasing degree of urbanity in municipalities. These findings support the theories that some environmental factors associated with high population density, such as infectious agents, may be of aetiological importance for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408689

  15. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  16. The distribution of MLL breakpoints correlates with outcome in infant acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Emerenciano, Mariana; Meyer, Claus; Mansur, Marcela B; Marschalek, Rolf; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2013-04-01

    Acute leukaemia in early childhood - and mainly infant leukaemia (IL) - is characterized by acquired genetic alterations, most commonly by the presence of distinct MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this study was to investigate possible correlations between clinical features and molecular analyses of a series of 545 childhood leukaemia (≤24 months of age) cases: 385 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 160 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The location of the genomic breakpoints was determined in a subset of 30 MLL-r cases. The overall survival of the investigated cohort was 60·5%, as determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Worse outcomes were associated with age at diagnosis ≤6 months (P < 0·001), high white blood cell count (P = 0·001), and MLL-r (P = 0·002) in ALL, while children with AML displayed a poorer outcome (P = 0·009) regardless of their age strata. Moreover, we present first evidence that MLL-r patients with poor outcome preferentially displayed chromosomal breakpoints within MLL intron 11. Based on the literature, most MLL-r IL display a breakpoint localization towards intron 11, which in turn may explain their worse clinical course. In summary, the MLL breakpoint localization is of clinical importance and should be considered as a novel outcome predictor for MLL-r patients.

  17. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  18. Multiple major cerebral artery thromboses with profound thrombocytopenia in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sims, D G; Scott, D J; Noble, T C

    1976-01-01

    A child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated by prolonged gastrointestinal and skin haemorrhages due to profound thrombocytopenia finally died of thrombotic occlusions of major cerebral arteries due to mucormycosis. Biopsy of any suspect lesion is needed urgently before prolonged therapy with amphotericin B is started. So far there have been no cures in childhood.

  19. Towards an understanding of the biology and targeted treatment of paediatric relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A E

    2016-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is the most common childhood cancer and for those children who relapse, prognosis is poor and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Recurrent pathways implicated in relapse include RAS, JAK STAT, cell cycle, epigenetic regulation, B cell development, glucocorticoid response, nucleotide metabolism and DNA repair. Targeting these pathways is a rational therapeutic strategy and may deliver novel, targeted therapies into the clinic. Relapse often stems from a minor clone present at diagnosis and thus analysis of persisting leukaemia during upfront therapy may allow targeted drug intervention to prevent relapse.

  20. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of peripheral blood cultural characteristics in adult acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Balkwill, F. R.; Oliver, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A simple liquid culture technique has been used to study peripheral blood from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia. Evidence is presented that cells from morphologically identical types of leukaemia have differing capacity for "differentiation" from free floating blast cells into plastic-adherent phagocytic, trypsin-resistant macrophage-like cells with Fc and C3 receptors. Preliminary analysis suggests that patients whose cells have the greatest capacity for "differentiation" have a better chance of achieving complete remission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1063591

  1. Encephalopathy in Acute Leukaemia Associated with Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, H. E. M.; Knapton, P. J.; O'Sullivan, J. P.; Wells, D. G.; Harris, Ruth F.; Innes, Elizabeth M.; Stuart, J.; Schwartz, F. C. M.; Thompson, Eileen N.

    1972-01-01

    Seven patients are described in whom dementia developed during treatment with methotrexate for meningeal leukaemia. The patients presented with confusion, tremor, ataxia, irritability, and somnolence. There were major epileptic fits in two cases and in one case there was progression to coma and death. Necropsy findings in the latter showed infarcted areas in the temporal and parietal lobes, with no evidence of active leukaemic disease or of viral encephalitis. The condition has not responded to radiotherapy and no positive evidence of viral encephalitis has been obtained. On the other hand, when treated with folinic and folic acid the deterioration has been arrested and there has been some improvement; thus the condition appears to be due to methotrexate. The occurrence of so many cases within the past year of a condition not previously described is probably attributable to the introduction of intensive cytotoxic therapy directed against meningeal leukaemia. ImagesFIG. 2.FIG. 3.FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4504035

  2. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  3. Synergistic targeted therapy for acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a model of translational research in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Mi, J-Q; Chen, S-J; Zhou, G-B; Yan, X-J; Chen, Z

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), the M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia, was once a lethal disease, yet nowadays the majority of patients with APL can be successfully cured by molecularly targeted therapy. This dramatic improvement in the survival rate is an example of the advantage of modern medicine. APL is characterized by a balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation fusing the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) gene on chromosome 15 with the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) gene on chromosome 17. It has been found that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or arsenic trioxide (ATO) alone exerts therapeutic effect on APL patients with the PML-RARα fusion gene, and the combination of both drugs can act synergistically to further enhance the cure rate of the patients. Here, we provide an insight into the pathogenesis of APL and the mechanisms underlying the respective roles of ATRA and ATO. In addition, treatments that lead to more effective differentiation and apoptosis of APL cells, including leukaemia-initiating cells, and more thorough eradication of the disease will be discussed. Moreover, as a model of translational research, the development of a cure for APL has followed a bidirectional approach of 'bench to bedside' and 'bedside to bench', which can serve as a valuable example for the diagnosis and treatment of other malignancies.

  4. Geographical and ecological analyses of childhood acute leukaemias and lymphomas in north-west England.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J Q; Alston, Robert D; Cairns, Donal P; Eden, Osborn B; Birch, Jillian M

    2003-10-01

    Childhood leukaemias and lymphomas have been associated with exposure to environmental factors, including infections, which show geographical variation. This study examined the geographical distribution of the incidence of acute leukaemia and lymphoma using Manchester Children's Tumour Registry (MCTR) data 1976-2000. A total of 910 children were included, all of whom had histologically and/or cytologically verified leukaemia or lymphoma. At the time of their diagnoses, all the children were aged 0-14 years and were resident in the counties of Greater Manchester or Lancashire. Standardized morbidity ratios were calculated. Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between incidence rates and small-area (census ward) population density, ethnic composition and deprivation index. There was a monotonic relationship between acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) incidence and population density (P = 0.05). Higher rates were seen in more densely populated areas. There was evidence for a monotonic relationship between the incidence of the mixed cellularity subtype of Hodgkin's disease (HD) and the Townsend deprivation score (P = 0.001). Markedly higher incidence was associated with greater levels of unemployment and household overcrowding. The results for ALL and mixed cellularity HD support the involvement of environmental factors, such as infections, in disease aetiology.

  5. Haematopoietic cell transplantation for acute leukaemia and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome in Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Richard; Wagner, John E; Hirsch, Betsy; DeFor, Todd E; Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2014-02-01

    Acute leukaemia or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS ≥ 5% blasts) in Fanconi anaemia (FA) patients is associated with a poor prognosis. We report 21 FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS who underwent haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at the University of Minnesota between 1988 and 2011. Six patients had biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Eight patients received pre-transplant cytoreduction, with 3 achieving complete remission. HCT donor source included human leucocyte antigen-matched sibling (n = 2) or alternative donors (n = 19). Neutrophil engraftment was 95% for the entire cohort, and the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease was 19%. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 33%, with a relapse rate of 24%, with similar OS in patients with biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Our study supports the use of HCT in the treatment of FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS, however, the role of chemotherapy prior to HCT remains unclear for this population. FA patients with biallelic BRCA2 are unique and may benefit from higher dose chemotherapy relative to other complementation groups.

  6. Acute childhood leukaemia and environmental exposure to potential sources of benzene and other hydrocarbons; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, C; Auclerc, M; Auvrignon, A; Baruchel, A; Kebaili, K; Lambilliotte, A; Leverger, G; Sommelet, D; Vilmer, E; Hemon, D; Clavel, J

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the association between potential environmental exposure to hydrocarbons and the risk of acute childhood leukaemia. Methods: A hospital based multicentre case control study, stratified on centre, age, and sex, with 280 leukaemia cases and 285 controls was carried out. Data were collected by a standardised interview of the mothers. Results: No clear association was seen between maternal occupational exposure to hydrocarbons during pregnancy and leukaemia, or between residential traffic density and leukaemia. There was an association between dwellings neighbouring a petrol station or a repair garage during childhood and the risk of childhood leukaemia (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.5 to 10.3), with a duration trend. The association, which appeared particularly strong for acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (OR 7.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 34.3), was not altered by adjustment for potential confounding factors. Conclusions: Results showed an association between acute childhood leukaemia and dwellings neighbouring auto repair garages and petrol stations, which are benzene emitting sources. These findings could be due to chance, although the strength of the association and the duration trend are arguments for a causal association. PMID:15317919

  7. Unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Jain, S; Tarai, B; Tuli, P; Das, P

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in a patient of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 62-year-old male who presented with complaints of 'off and on' fever with decreased oral intake. On evaluation, haemogram showed low platelet count and 68% blast cells in peripheral blood. On flow cytometry of peripheral blood, the gated blasts (approximately 55%) highly express CD45, CD10, CD19, CD22 and condition was diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He was started on standard induction treatment along with supportive therapies. During the course of treatment, two sets of paired blood cultures were sent 48 h apart. All of blood cultures were done on Bac-T alert 3D system. All of them yielded fungus. The fungus was then grown on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar media. It was identified as A. alternata. The patient condition worsened and later had cardiac arrest in ICU and could not be revived.

  8. FLT3 inhibition: a moving and evolving target in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Leung, A Y H; Man, C-H; Kwong, Y-L

    2013-02-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene is a gain-of-function mutation common in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It is associated with inferior prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Single base mutations at the FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) also leads to a gain of function, although its prognostic significance is less well defined because of its rarity. The clinical benefits of FLT3 inhibition are generally limited to AML with FLT3-ITD. However, responses are transient and leukaemia progression invariably occurs. There is compelling evidence that leukaemia clones carrying both ITD and TKD mutations appear when resistance to FLT3 inhibitors occurs. Interestingly, the emergence of double ITD and TKD mutants can be recapitulated in vitro when FLT3-ITD+ leukaemia cell lines are treated with mutagens and FLT3 inhibitors. Furthermore, murine xenotransplantation models also suggest that, in some cases, the FTL3-ITD and TKD double mutants actually exist in minute amounts before treatment with FLT3 inhibitors, expand under the selection pressure of FLT3 inhibition and become the predominant resistant clone(s) during the drug-refractory phase. On the basis of this model of clonal evolution, a multipronged strategy using more potent FLT3 inhibitors, and a combinatorial approach targeting both FLT3-dependent and FLT3-independent pathways, will be needed to improve outcome.

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Diagnosed by Intra-Oral Myeloid Sarcoma. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Papamanthos, Mattheos K.; Skulakis, Haralampos E.; Fericean, Angela-Monika A.; Zorba, Matina T.; Matiakis, Apostolos T.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare extramedullary malignant tumor composed of immature myeloid cells. It is strongly associated with a well known or covert acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloproliferative diseases or myelodysplastic syndromes. Intraoral MS scarcely occurs. An unusual case of acute myeloid leukaemia, which was diagnosed by mandibular MS that was developed in the alveolar socket after a dental extraction, is reported. The histological examination (including immunohistochemical analysis) of a subsequent biopsy showed infiltration of the oral mucosa by neoplastic cells. This lesion was therefore classified as acute myeloid leukaemia. The patient was referred to oncologists that confirmed the initial diagnosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy and the mandibular tumor disappeared. Forty days later, a relapse of the disease, which appeared as a great-ulcerated lesion, was developed in the hard palate. Thirty days after the second chemotherapy had finished, a new intraoral tumor was developed in the vestibular maxillary gingiva. Review of the literature shows no report of intraoral relapse and particularly multiple relapse of a MS that involves the oral cavity. Even though MS is encountered infrequently in the oral cavity, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conditions (especially tumors) with a similar clinical appearance. PMID:20512638

  10. Crystal structure of Auer rods in acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AMyL).

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, E C

    1986-01-01

    Ultrathin sections containing Auer rods from cases of acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AMyL) were tilted in the goniometer stage of the electron microscope and the resulting series of electronmicrographs analysed in an optical diffractometer illuminated by laser. The results showed that Auer rods of AMyL show a truly three dimensional crystal structure. Measurements from the optical diffraction patterns were consistent with a monoclinic unit cell, the unit cell edge lengths a, b, and c being 6.6 [SD) 0.5) nm, 8.6 (0.2) nm, and 9.6 (1.0) nm, respectively; the angle between a and c being 120 (7) degrees. This structure was quite distinct from the "tubular" substructure reported by others in the Auer rods of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), although it was consistent with periodicities measured by others in Auer rods of AMyL. A complete understanding of the three dimensional structures of Auer rods in the different types of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) could well prove to be of considerable diagnostic importance. Images PMID:3013944

  11. Cell viability of acute myeloid leukaemia blasts in culture correlates with treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Maha, Abdullah; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Leong, Chooi-Fun; Seow, Heng-Fong

    2008-02-01

    Despite the advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the cure rate for acute myeloid leukaemia patients remains low. Cytogenetic abnormalities and age are the prognostic factors that guide treatment decisions. However, many AML patients still die. The biological factors that influence treatment outcome are largely unknown. Thus, the objective of our study was to use the in vitro viability test to correlate with treatment outcome. Acute myeloid leukaemia blasts demonstrated differing ability to survive in culture. Our examination of blast phenotype at various days in culture showed two possible growth directions. First, cells underwent maturation by increased expression of CD16 and down-regulated CD34 (a haemopoietic stem cell marker). These cells also appeared to have undergone apoptosis. Alternatively, cells continued to survive in culture and maintained high expression of CD34. An MTT assay was carried out to determine viability after three days of culture. Lower optical density values were obtained for samples that underwent apoptosis and higher values were obtained for samples that survived in culture. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. A comparison between results of MTT assay and duration of disease free survival revealed that a higher viability in vitro correlated significantly with shorter survival duration in the patient (R -0.761, p=0.002, n=13). Thus, this study further supports the hypothesis that AML patients with poor survival may be related to having blasts with a biologically more immature or stem cell-like nature.

  12. Risk of acute myeloid leukaemia and multiple myeloma in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and multiple myeloma in a cohort of workers exposed to benzene. The results were used to show the importance of taking specificity of disease into consideration in causation analysis. METHODS--Data were derived from a cohort of workers employed at two Goodyear plants in Ohio in the manufacture of Pliofilm. Based on data in the Pliofilm study, several papers that examined the relation between exposure to benzene and leukaemia (all cell types combined) have been published. In the current analyses based on updated data in the study, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for AML and multiple myeloma by cumulative exposure to benzene. The results based on AML were compared with those for leukaemia (all cell types combined) published previously. RESULTS--An exposure response relation was shown between cumulative exposure to benzene and AML. No increased risk of AML was detected for cumulative exposure to benzene below 200 ppm-years (SMR 0.91). Above 200 ppm-years, risk of AML rose drastically; reaching a significant SMR of 98.37 for > 400 ppm-years. For multiple myeloma, no relation with exposure to benzene was detected. CONCLUSION--Analysis specific to AML shows the importance of taking specificity of disease into consideration in causation analysis. This investigation shows that previous analyses based on all leukaemia cell types combined have incorrectly set the estimated threshold too low, and have underestimated risk above the threshold. Current regulatory policies that rely on previous analyses based on all leukaemia cell types combined should be re-examined. PMID:7627314

  13. Long-term in vitro maintenance of clonal abundance and leukaemia-initiating potential in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pal, D; Blair, H J; Elder, A; Dormon, K; Rennie, K J; Coleman, D J L; Weiland, J; Rankin, K S; Filby, A; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J

    2016-01-01

    Lack of suitable in vitro culture conditions for primary acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells severely impairs their experimental accessibility and the testing of new drugs on cell material reflecting clonal heterogeneity in patients. We show that Nestin-positive human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) support expansion of a range of biologically and clinically distinct patient-derived ALL samples. Adherent ALL cells showed an increased accumulation in the S phase of the cell cycle and diminished apoptosis when compared with cells in the suspension fraction. Moreover, surface expression of adhesion molecules CD34, CDH2 and CD10 increased several fold. Approximately 20% of the ALL cells were in G0 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that MSCs may support quiescent ALL cells. Cellular barcoding demonstrated long-term preservation of clonal abundance. Expansion of ALL cells for >3 months compromised neither feeder dependence nor cancer initiating ability as judged by their engraftment potential in immunocompromised mice. Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of this co-culture approach for the investigation of drug combinations with luciferase-expressing primograft ALL cells. Taken together, we have developed a preclinical platform with patient-derived material that will facilitate the development of clinically effective combination therapies for ALL. PMID:27109511

  14. Treatment of acute myeloblastic leukaemia in a patient with Bombay blood type: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Tsuda, T; Matsunami, M; Hirose, T; Sakaguchi, R; Katayama, N; Ota, K

    2001-01-01

    A 62-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with suspected acute leukaemia and after investigation we diagnosed acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML-M1). The patient's blood type was found to be the very rare Bombay type and surveillance of her relatives showed the same blood type in her male cousin on her mother's side. Alongside chemotherapy the patient received 4000 ml of frozen Bombay-type red cells, 1400 ml of concentrated red cells in manitol adenine phosphate solutions and 360 units of type O concentrated platelets without marked effects. The anti-H antibody was initially at 128 dilution but for unknown reasons increased to 2048 dilution after remission of AML-M1. About 3 months after hospitalization the patient died of Cryptococcus neoformans pneumonia despite strict precautions against infection. Although AML-M1 is a common adult leukaemia and is chemosensitive to anti-leukaemic drugs, neither AML-M1 in a patient with Bombay-type red cells nor its treatment with chemotherapy and transfusion with type Oh frozen red cells have previously been reported.

  15. DNMT3A: the DioNysian MonsTer of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Emma Conway; Brewin, John

    2014-01-01

    In the mythology of Ancient Greece, there was often a creative tension between the opposing forces of the gods Apollo and Dionysius, the two sons of Zeus. The Apollonian force was considered to be rational and lifegiving, whilst Dionysian forces were chaotic and elemental. Acute myeloid leukaemia is characterised by the clash of these forces: the chaotic proliferation of immature myeloid cells in the bone marrow overcomes the normal, orderly production of healthy blood cells. DNMT3A mutations occur early in the leukaemogenic process and may even act as “founder” mutations – the first step in a pathway towards malignant transformation. As such, these mutations may represent a Dionysian agent of disorder, inciting the chaotic myeloid proliferation and arrest of differentiation which are hallmarks of AML. This review will focus on the role of DNMT3A mutations in leukaemia pathogenesis, their influence on prognosis, and the potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:25469209

  16. Advances in therapy for Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Kirsten; Schrappe, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The presence of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a rare finding and has been an adverse prognostic factor associated with a high risk of therapeutic failure. The current key components of treatment are intensive polychemotherapy and a BCR/ABL1 kinase domain inhibitor. This treatment approach has been applied in a few clinical trials by paediatric leukaemia study groups. Thus, this subtype of ALL serves as the first model system for truly targeted treatment. The role of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly called into question, at least in a favourable, though not yet clearly defined, subset of patients. Currently, the choice of the most effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor is not yet settled, in particular, in view of potential reduction of overall treatment intensity.

  17. Acute sinusitis and blindness as the first presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, K H; Thomas, G; van Beers, E J; Hosman, A E; Mourits, M P; van Noesel, C J M; Kater, A P; Reinartz, S M

    2014-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most frequent form of leukaemia among adults in the Western world, presenting at a median age of 65 years. The diagnosis is usually made incidentally during routine blood examination while the disease is still in its early phase. We report a case of blindness of 24 hours due to acute sinusitis based on CLL localisation in a patient with undiagnosed CLL. Emergency endoscopic sinus surgery and intra- and extra-ocular orbital decompression were performed. The sinusitis resolved after surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Her vision improved within 24 hours and eventually recovered completely after six months. Her CLL remained in an indolent state, needing no active treatment. This case illustrates that blindness from a lymphoproliferative disorder may be treated with emergency endoscopic sinus surgery instead of conventional chemotherapy in order to salvage the vision first, even if the vision is lost for more than 24 hours.

  18. Out come of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Begum, M; Jahan, S; Tawfique, M; Mannan, M A

    2012-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood leukaemia. On the other hand under-nutrition is a common problem in our country. This prospective study was conducted to see the outcome of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This study was carried out in the department of Paediatric hematology and oncology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during the period from November 2002 to October 2004. A total of sixty (60) children who were diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 1 to 15 years of age were included in this study. But the children with previous history of congenital disease and that of chemotherapy or steroid were excluded from this study. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of Z score of weight for age. Thirty (30) children those with Z score- 2 or less were classified as undernourished and was labeled as Group A and another thirty (30) patient those Z score above-2 were classified as well nourished and was placed in Group B, After inclusion into the study, completion of induction of remission was monitored by physical examination and laboratory investigations. The result showed that mean age in Group A was 77.16 ± 7.07 months and that in Group B was 74.13 ± 5.09 months with male preponderance in both the groups. Mean body weight in Group A was 14.55 ± 0.76 Kg and that in Group B was 21.40 ± 1.05 kg (p<0.001). Children in Group A required 39.06 ± 0.72 days to complete induction but in Group B it required 31.63 ± 0.17 days (p<0.04). Hospital stay in Group A children was 52.10 ± 1.08 days and in Group B 42.37 ± 0.50 (p<0.002). The result suggested that under nutrition has an influence on the out come of induction of remission in undernourished children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. So appropriate measures are essential to improve nutritional status of children for successful management of ALL in children.

  19. Day-care, early common infections and childhood acute leukaemia: a multicentre French case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Perrillat, F; Clavel, J; Auclerc, M F; Baruchel, A; Leverger, G; Nelken, B; Philippe, N; Schaison, G; Sommelet, D; Vilmer, E; Hémon, D

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a case–control study to investigate the role of early infections in the aetiology of childhood acute leukaemias. The study included 280 incident cases (240 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and 40 acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia) and 288 hospital controls, frequency matched by age, gender, hospital, catchment area of the hospital and ethnic origin. Data were obtained from standardised face-to-face interviews of the mothers. The interviews included questions on early common infections, day-care attendance, breast-feeding, birth order and infantile diseases. Odds ratios were estimated using an unconditional regression model including the stratification variables, parental socio-economic status and perinatal characteristics. Birth order was not associated with childhood leukaemia (acute lymphoblastic or acute non-lymphoblastic). A statistically-significant inverse association was observed between childhood leukaemia and day-care attendance (odds ratio=0.6, 95% Confidence Interval=(0.4–1.0)), repeated early common infections (⩾4 per year before age two, odds ratio=0.6 (0.4–1.0)), surgical procedures for ear–nose–throat infections before age two (odds ratio=0.5 (0.2–1.0)) and prolonged breast-feeding (⩾6 months, odds ratio=0.5 (0.2–1.0)). In the multivariate model including day-care attendance, early common infections and breast-feeding, results concerning breast-feeding remained unchanged. A statistically significant interaction between day-care attendance and repeated early common infections was observed. When the interaction was taken into account, the simple effects of day-care and early common infections disappeared (odds ratio=1.1 (0.5–2.3) and odds ratio=0.8 (0.5–1.3), respectively) while the joint effect of day-care attendance and early common infections was negatively associated with childhood leukaemia (odds ratio=0.3 (0.1–0.8)). All the above associations were observed both for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute non

  20. CD45RA, a specific marker for leukaemia stem cell sub-populations in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Bas; Valkering, Matthijs; Wouters, Rolf; van Amerongen, Rosa; Hanekamp, Diana; Kwidama, Zinia; Valk, Peter; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Zeijlemaker, Wendelien; Kaspers, Gertjan; Cloos, Jacqueline; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy resistant leukaemic stem cells (LSC) are thought to be responsible for relapses after therapy in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Flow cytometry can discriminate CD34(+) CD38(-) LSC and normal haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) by using aberrant expression of markers and scatter properties. However, not all LSC can be identified using currently available markers, so new markers are needed. CD45RA is expressed on leukaemic cells in the majority of AML patients. We investigated the potency of CD45RA to specifically identify LSC and HSC and improve LSC quantification. Compared to our best other markers (CLL-1, also termed CLEC12A, CD33 and CD123), CD45RA was the most reliable marker. Patients with high percentages (>90%) of CD45RA on CD34(+) CD38(-) LSC have 1·69-fold higher scatter values compared to HSC (P < 0·001), indicating a more mature CD34(+) CD38(-) phenotype. Patients with low (<10%) or intermediate (10-90%) CD45RA expression on LSC showed no significant differences to HSC (1·12- and 1·15-fold higher, P = 0·31 and P = 0·44, respectively). CD45RA-positive LSC tended to represent more favourable cytogenetic/molecular markers. In conclusion, CD45RA contributes to more accurate LSC detection and is recommended for inclusion in stem cell tracking panels. CD45RA may contribute to define new LSC-specific therapies and to monitor effects of anti-LSC treatment.

  1. Treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia with a triple cytotoxic regime: DAT.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, J. K.; Sandler, R. M.; Challener, J.; Hayhoe, F. G.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were treated with a combination of chemotherapy which included daunorubicin, cytosine arabino-side and 6-thioguanine (DAT). The complete remission rate was 85% and was achieved, in responsive cases, after an average of 2 courses of therapy. Patients remained in hospital for an average of 37.5 days during remission-induction therapy and 3.7 days per month thereafter. The median remission period was 48 weeks and median survival was 70 weeks. A disappointing feature was the high relapse rate. This feature of the results re-affirms the need for a more effective form of remission therapy. PMID:271512

  2. Treatment-related deaths in second complete remission in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Möttönen, Merja; Glosli, Heidi; Jónmundsson, Guðmundur K; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Hasle, Henrik

    2011-03-01

    The frequency and causes of treatment-related deaths (TRD) in second complete remission (CR2) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were investigated in a historical, prospective cohort study of 429 children included in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO)-AML-88 and -93 trials. Relapse occurred in 158 children (39%). Seventeen (18%) of the 96 patients entering CR2 suffered TRD. The main causes were infection (59%) and complications from graft-versus-host disease (22%). Fourteen (82%) of 17 TRDs occurred in children undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCT). Optimal supportive care after HSCT is essential, and studies on risk factors for TRD are needed.

  3. Visuomotor function in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with chemotherapy only.

    PubMed

    Knight, Sarah; McCarthy, Maria; Anderson, Vicki; Hutchinson, Esther; De Luca, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate visuomotor function in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The performance of 64 children, 1-7 years post-chemotherapy for ALL, was compared to that of their healthy peers (n = 56) on visuomotor integration (VMI) and motor coordination (MC) tasks. Children posttreatment for ALL displayed significantly reduced VMI, but not MC, performances as compared to controls. Children treated on chemotherapy-only ALL regimes are at heightened risk for visuomotor integration deficits. Monitoring of visuomotor skills and implementation of appropriate interventions targeting higher level visuomotor integration skills should form an important component of any ALL long-term effects program. PMID:24571929

  4. A case of acute myelogenous leukaemia characterised by the BCR-FGFR1 translocation

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Oikonomopoulou, Dimitra; Bakiri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The 8p11 myeloproliferative syndrome is a rare atypical disorder defined by the presence of rearrangements between the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and 1 of 13 partner genes described to date, including the BCR gene on chromosome 22. The disease characterised by the BCR-FGFR1 fusion gene has distinct biological and clinical features, with significant diversity among the published cases. We report a case of BCR-FGFR1 disease which was presented as acute myeloid leukaemia with an aggressive clinical course and we review all the adult cases published in the literature. PMID:23519513

  5. Factors influencing prognosis in adults with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, D.; Beard, M. E.; Bateman, C. J.; Sewell, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the thymidine labelling index (TLI) of bone marrow blast cells in 58 untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukemia showed no correlation with remission rate but there was a strong correlation between labelling index and remission length in the 21 patients who achieved remission. The median remission length of the patients was 33 weeks. Of the 12 patients with initial labelling indices greater than 10%, only 2 had remissions longer than 33 weeks whereas 8 of the 9 patients with labelling indices less than 10% had remissions longer than 33 weeks. No correlation could be found between the degree of cytological differentiation and remission induction, remission length or survival. No correlation was found between the TLI and the degree of cytological differentiation. Age and initial platelet count were confirmed to be important factors influencing complete remission rate, but these factors did not correlate with remission length. Sixteen patients had their pretreatment sera assayed for mouse marrow colony stimulating activity and inhibitor levels but there was no correlation with subsequent response to treatment, although the number of patients examined was clearly too small for any definite conclusions to be drawn. PMID:1082343

  6. Rise and fall of subclones from diagnosis to relapse in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    There is incomplete understanding of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution during cancer progression. Here we use deep whole-exome sequencing to describe the clonal architecture and evolution of 20 pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias from diagnosis to relapse. We show that clonal diversity is comparable at diagnosis and relapse and clonal survival from diagnosis to relapse is not associated with mutation burden.

  7. Revaccination of children after completion of standard chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a pilot study comparing different schedules.

    PubMed

    Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Schubert, Ralf; Allwinn, Regina; Dogan, Kader; Koehl, Ulrike; Grüttner, Hans-Peter

    2011-03-01

    Given that a significant proportion of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) lose immune protection to tetanus, diphtheria, and poliomyelitis, revaccination is indicated after chemotherapy. Our randomized pilot study comparing different revaccination schedules suggests that children with ALL might be revaccinated with non-live vaccines as early as 3 months after chemotherapy.

  8. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  9. A novel zinc finger gene, ZNF465, is inappropriately expressed in acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Collin, Joseph F; Wells, James W; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Lyne, Linden; Duriez, Patrick J; Banham, Alison H; Mufti, Ghulam J; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-05-01

    To increase our knowledge of leukaemia-associated antigens, especially in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) M4, we prepared a phage display cDNA library using mRNA from the bone marrow cells of a patient with AML M4 at diagnosis. We immunoscreened 10(6) pfu with autologous sera and identified an antigen which we named GKT-AML8. The cDNA showed more than 99% similarity to a sequence on 2q21.2 and 95% sequence similarity to a sequence on 19q13.3. These genes were named ZNF465 and ZNF466, respectively, following HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) guidelines. Expressed sequence tag data suggests that both genes are transcriptionally active. ZNF465 and ZNF466 encode a 5' krüppel associated box domain typical of negative regulators of gene transcription. We have confirmed the translational start site in the +1 frame in a near-Kozak sequence that produces a 102 amino acid polypeptide from ZNF465. The high level of sequence similarity between ZNF465 and ZNF466 makes their transcripts almost indistinguishable by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, GKT-AML8 showed most sequence similarity to ZNF465 and no transcript matching the 3' ZNF466 sequence could be detected in patient samples or healthy volunteers. ZNF465/466 expression was detectable in 12/13 AML and 10/14 chronic myeloid leukaemia patients' samples but not in normal donor peripheral blood (0/8) or 0/3 bone marrow samples which had been separated into CD34(+) and CD34(-) samples. The altered expression of ZNF465/466 in patients' samples and its absence in healthy donor haematopoietic samples indicate that ZNF465 is overexpressed in early myeloid disease and as such may represent a promising target for immunotherapy.

  10. Influence of radiation quality on mouse chromosome 2 deletions in radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Natalie; Finnon, Rosemary; Manning, Grainne; Bouffler, Simon; Badie, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    Leukaemia is the prevailing neoplastic disorder of the hematopoietic system. Epidemiological analyses of the survivors of the Japanese atomic bombings show that exposure to ionising radiation (IR) can cause leukaemia. Although a clear association between radiation exposure and leukaemia development is acknowledged, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A hemizygous deletion on mouse chromosome 2 (del2) is a common feature in several mouse strains susceptible to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). The deletion is an early event detectable 24h after exposure in bone marrow cells. Ultimately, 15-25% of exposed animals develop AML with 80-90% of cases carrying del2. Molecular mapping of leukaemic cell genomes identified a minimal deleted region (MDR) on chromosome 2 (chr2) in which a tumour suppressor gene, Sfpi1 is located, encoding the transcription factor PU.1, essential in haematopoiesis. The remaining copy of Sfpi1 has a point mutation in the coding sequence for the DNA-binding domain of the protein in 70% of rAML, which alters a single CpG sequence in the codon for arginine residue R235. In order to identify chr2 deletions and Sfpi.1/PU.1 loss, we performed array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) on a unique panel of 79rAMLs. Using a custom made CGH array specifically designed for mouse chr2, we analysed at unprecedentedly high resolution (1.4M array- 148bp resolution) the size of the MDR in low LET and high-LET induced rAMLs (32 X-ray- and 47 neutron-induced). Sequencing of Sfpi1/PU.1DNA binding domain identified the presence of R235 point mutations, showing no influence of radiation quality on R235 type or frequency. We identified for the first time rAML cases with complex del2 in a subset of neutron-induced AMLs. This study allowed us to re-define the MDR to a much smaller 5.5Mb region (still including Sfpi1/PU.1), identical regardless of radiation quality.

  11. ZBTB7A mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia with t(8;21) translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Luise; Dutta, Sayantanee; Opatz, Sabrina; Vosberg, Sebastian; Reiter, Katrin; Leubolt, Georg; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Herold, Tobias; Bamopoulos, Stefanos A.; Bräundl, Kathrin; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Ksienzyk, Bianka; Konstandin, Nikola P.; Schneider, Stephanie; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Middeke, Jan Moritz; Stölzel, Friedrich; Thiede, Christian; Wolf, Stephan; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Preiss, Caroline; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Wichmann, Christian; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Büchner, Thomas; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Wörmann, Bernhard J.; Braess, Jan; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten; Greif, Philipp A.

    2016-01-01

    The t(8;21) translocation is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and results in the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 rearrangement. Despite the causative role of the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion gene in leukaemia initiation, additional genetic lesions are required for disease development. Here we identify recurring ZBTB7A mutations in 23% (13/56) of AML t(8;21) patients, including missense and truncating mutations resulting in alteration or loss of the C-terminal zinc-finger domain of ZBTB7A. The transcription factor ZBTB7A is important for haematopoietic lineage fate decisions and for regulation of glycolysis. On a functional level, we show that ZBTB7A mutations disrupt the transcriptional repressor potential and the anti-proliferative effect of ZBTB7A. The specific association of ZBTB7A mutations with t(8;21) rearranged AML points towards leukaemogenic cooperativity between mutant ZBTB7A and the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion. PMID:27252013

  12. Genetic hierarchy and temporal variegation in the clonal history of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Pierre; Zhang, Yanyan; Tang, Ruoping; Joulin, Virginie; Boutroux, Hélène; Pronier, Elodie; Moatti, Hannah; Flandrin, Pascale; Marzac, Christophe; Bories, Dominique; Fava, Fanny; Mokrani, Hayat; Betems, Aline; Lorre, Florence; Favier, Rémi; Féger, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Douay, Luc; Legrand, Ollivier; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystèle; Louache, Fawzia; Delhommeau, François

    2016-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) initiating pre-leukaemic lesions can be identified through three major hallmarks: their early occurrence in the clone, their persistence at relapse and their ability to initiate multilineage haematopoietic repopulation and leukaemia in vivo. Here we analyse the clonal composition of a series of AML through these characteristics. We find that not only DNMT3A mutations, but also TET2, ASXL1 mutations, core-binding factor and MLL translocations, as well as del(20q) mostly fulfil these criteria. When not eradicated by AML treatments, pre-leukaemic cells with these lesions can re-initiate the leukaemic process at various stages until relapse, with a time-dependent increase in clonal variegation. Based on the nature, order and association of lesions, we delineate recurrent genetic hierarchies of AML. Our data indicate that first lesions, variegation and treatment selection pressure govern the expansion and adaptive behaviour of the malignant clone, shaping AML in a time-dependent manner. PMID:27534895

  13. Precocious and premature puberty associated with treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Leiper, A D; Stanhope, R; Kitching, P; Chessells, J M

    1987-11-01

    Early puberty in 28 children (23 girls, five boys) treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at a mean age of 4.0 years (range 1.4-7.8) is described. All but one had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (1800-2400 cGy) and three children had received additional cranial or craniospinal irradiation as treatment for relapse of their leukaemia. Mean age for the onset of puberty was 8.8 (SD 0.8) years in the girls and 9.3 (0.8) years in the boys; this is greater than two standard deviations from the mean for normal girls and boys. Five children (three girls, two boys) had precocious puberty. The onset of puberty occurred at greater than two standard deviations from the mean for normal girls and boys in 14(13%) girls and 4(3%) boys treated at less than eight years of age between 1970 and 1985. In a group of 55 girls treated for ALL who had survived in first remission for six years or more from diagnosis, there was a relation between young age at onset of treatment and early menarche. We suggest that premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis occurs as a consequence of hypothalamic dysfunction due to cranial irradiation. Precocious and premature puberty in children treated for ALL may be an important factor in contributing to short stature.

  14. Rise and fall of subclones from diagnosis to relapse in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaotu; Edmonson, Michael; Yergeau, Donald; Muzny, Donna M.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Rusch, Michael; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Harvey, Richard C.; Wheeler, David A.; Ma, Jing; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Wu, Gang; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Carroll, William L.; Chen, I-Ming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Relling, Mary V.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Auvil, Jaime M. Guidry; Downing, James R.; Loh, Mignon L.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    There is incomplete understanding of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution during cancer progression. Here we use deep whole-exome sequencing to describe the clonal architecture and evolution of 20 pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias from diagnosis to relapse. We show that clonal diversity is comparable at diagnosis and relapse and clonal survival from diagnosis to relapse is not associated with mutation burden. Six pathways were frequently mutated, with NT5C2, CREBBP, WHSC1, TP53, USH2A, NRAS and IKZF1 mutations enriched at relapse. Half of the leukaemias had multiple subclonal mutations in a pathway or gene at diagnosis, but mostly with only one, usually minor clone, surviving therapy to acquire additional mutations and become the relapse founder clone. Relapse-specific mutations in NT5C2 were found in nine cases, with mutations in four cases being in descendants of the relapse founder clone. These results provide important insights into the genetic basis of treatment failure in ALL and have implications for the early detection of mutations driving relapse. PMID:25790293

  15. Evidence that continued remission in patients treated for acute leukaemia is dependent upon autologous natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lowdell, Mark W; Craston, Rose; Samuel, David; Wood, Marion E; O'Neill, Elena; Saha, Vaskar; Prentice, H Grant

    2002-06-01

    Although it has been known for more than 40 years that allogeneic immune responses cure leukaemias after bone marrow transplantation, autologous leukaemia-specific immunity remains controversial and its impact upon survival has not been established. Here we have tested 25 patients with de novo acute leukaemias, while in remission at completion of their anti-leukaemia therapy, for evidence of autologous cytolytic immunity to their leukaemic cells taken and cryopreserved at disease presentation. We have measured this degree of cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and termed it "leukaemia cytolytic activity" (LCA). Patients whose disease ultimately relapsed had significantly lower LCA than those who remained in remission beyond 2 years (P < 0.001); the absence of LCA when in remission predicted subsequent relapse within 2 years with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 77%. LCA was mediated in vitro by CD56+/CD8alpha+/CD3- natural killer cells. We propose that it is this immune response, rather than the chemotherapy per se, which is responsible for continued remission and that measurement of LCA in patients at completion of therapy may be used as an indicator of risk of subsequent relapse. Patients lacking this response will require further treatment, either with an allogeneic donor transplant or an alternative immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:12060116

  16. GATA2 mutations in sporadic and familial acute myeloid leukaemia patients with CEBPA mutations.

    PubMed

    Green, Claire L; Tawana, Kiran; Hills, Robert K; Bödör, Csaba; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Inglott, Sarah; Ancliff, Phil; Burnett, Alan K; Linch, David C; Gale, Rosemary E

    2013-06-01

    GATA2 mutations have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients with CEBPA-double mutations. To explore their impact on this favourable-risk disease, we determined GATA2 status in 153 sporadic AML patients and three members of a germ-line CEBPA-mutant family at AML presentation. Overall, 27% (15/55) CEBPA-double, 16% (7/43) CEBPA-single and 0% (0/55) normal karyotype/CEBPA-wild-type patients were GATA2-mutant. All familial AML patients acquired both a second CEBPA and a GATA2 mutation. CEBPA and GATA2 mutant levels indicated that both mutations were likely to be early events in leukaemogenesis. GATA2 status did not impact on the favourable outcome of CEBPA-double/FLT3-inernal tandem duplication-negative patients.

  17. Natural killer cell immunosenescence in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: new targets for immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Morgado, Sara; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2016-04-01

    Several age-associated changes in natural killer (NK) cell phenotype have been reported that contribute to the defective NK cell response observed in elderly patients. A remodelling of the NK cell compartment occurs in the elderly with a reduction in the output of immature CD56(bright) cells and an accumulation of highly differentiated CD56(dim) NK cells. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is generally a disease of older adults. NK cells in AML patients show diminished expression of several activating receptors that contribute to impaired NK cell function and, in consequence, to AML blast escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. In AML patients, phenotypic changes in NK cells have been correlated with disease progression and survival. NK cell-based immunotherapy has emerged as a possibility for the treatment of AML patients. The understanding of age-associated alterations in NK cells is therefore necessary to define adequate therapeutic strategies in older AML patients.

  18. Fatal disseminated fusarium infection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Austen, B; McCarthy, H; Wilkins, B; Smith, A; Duncombe, A

    2001-01-01

    Fusarium species are increasingly recognised as serious pathogens in the immunocompromised. The outcome in the context of persistent severe neutropenia has been almost universally fatal. However, there have been several case reports of successful treatment if neutrophil recovery can be achieved. This report presents the case of a fatality that occurred despite neutrophil recovery. A 67 year old man developed disseminated fusariosis during the neutropenic phase of induction chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium dimerum was isolated from blood cultures. This species is highly unusual and very few case reports exist in the literature. An initial response to amphotericin treatment coincided with neutrophil recovery but a subsequent relapse occurred, despite adequate neutrophil counts, which proved fatal. It is postulated that reseeding of the blood from an occult site, namely the right vitreum in this case, led to this secondary relapse despite achieving complete leukaemic remission. Key Words: fusarium • disseminated • neutropenia • remission PMID:11376027

  19. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  20. Involvement of a common progenitor cell in core binding factor acute myeloid leukaemia associated with mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Edouard; Dumézy, Florent; Roumier, Christophe; Lepelley, Pascale; Jouy, Nathalie; Philippe, Nathalie; Renneville, Aline; Berthon, Céline; Nelken, Brigitte; Quesnel, Bruno; Preudhomme, Claude

    2012-11-01

    In core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), realtime quantitative PCR is useful to quantify the fusion transcript ratio (CBFβ-MYH11 and AML1-ETO, in case of inv(16) and t(8;21) respectively) in peripheral blood and bone marrow during the courses of chemotherapy, in order to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD). In two cases of CBF AML associated with systemic mastocytosis (SM), the persistence of mast cells and the detection of a high ratio of fusion transcript, in bone marrow, during the courses of chemotherapy, led us to determine whether the mast cell component of the disease carried the same molecular alterations as leukaemic blasts. We demonstrate that sorted mast cells carried CBF abnormality. These observations point out the lack of specificity of MRD monitoring by RQ-PCR in these exceptional AML cases with SM. Moreover, this suggests that leukaemic blasts and mast cells derive from a common malignant progenitor.

  1. Correlations between nuclear morphology and bundles of cytoplasmic fibrils in 50 cases of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, E C

    1986-01-01

    An electron microscopic examination was carried out of peripheral blood or bone marrow samples, or both, from 50 patients entered into the Medical Research Council 9th Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Trial. The results showed a striking correlation between the presence of conspicuous bundles of fibrils within the cytoplasm of the leukaemic cells and the degree of convolution or lobulation of the nuclei. In none of the samples were predominantly convoluted or lobed nuclei observed in the absence of prominent fibrillar bundles and in only two cases were nuclei of a more regular outline seen in association with many conspicuous bundles of cytoplasmic fibrils. No correlation was found between the apparent degree of maturity of the nuclei, as assessed by the degree of chromatin condensation, and the absence or abundance of fibrillar bundles. Images PMID:3456357

  2. Invasive fungal infection of the central nervous system in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Janik-Moszant, Anna; Matyl, Aleksander; Rurańska, Iwona; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka; Kluczewska, Ewa; Szczepański, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Although the new intensive chemotherapeutic programs introduced recently into hematooncological therapies have led to a higher number of recoveries, persistent neutropenia favours the spread of severe infections, frequently fungal infections. Systemic fungal infections in patients treated for proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system are characterised by a severe, progressing course and high morbidity. Case Reports: We present a case report that demonstrates the diagnostic problem of lesions in the central nervous system which developed following the fourth block of chemotherapy in an eight-year-old boy treated for acute myeloid leukaemia. The risk factors, high values of the inflammatory parameters and imaging results enabled us to diagnose a fungal infection of the central nervous system. Results: A fast improvement in the clinical condition of the patient after the applied antifungal therapy and the regression of lesions in the central nervous system shown in the imaging studies confirmed our final diagnosis. PMID:22802867

  3. Monitoring minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukaemia: a review of the current evolving strategies.

    PubMed

    Ommen, Hans Beier

    2016-02-01

    Several disease-monitoring techniques are available for the physician treating acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Besides immunohistochemistry assisted light microscopy, the past 20 years have seen the development and preclinical perfection of a number of techniques, most notably quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multicolor flow cytometry. Late additions to the group of applicable assays include next generation sequencing and digital PCR. In this review the principles of use of these modalities at three different time points during the AML disease course are discussed, namely at the time of treatment evaluation, pretransplantation and postconsolidation. The drawbacks and pitfalls of each different technique are delineated. The evidence or lack of evidence for minimal residual disease guided treatment decisions is discussed. Lastly, future strategies in the MRD field are suggested and commented upon.

  4. Acquired trisomy 12 and absent Y chromosome in a patients with acute undifferentiated leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Najfeld, V; Thorning, D; Doney, K C; Fialkow, P J

    1981-02-01

    A 60-year-old man developed pancytopenia and then acute leukaemia. The neoplastic cells in marrow were undifferentiated by electron microscopy and by immunological and cytochemical markers. The only other cells present in marrow were lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages and non-haematopoietic elements. Prior to chemotherapy, cytogenetic analysis of marrow cells showed two karyotypically distinct cell populations, one with 45,X,--Y and the other with a 46,X,--Y,+12 karyotype. All marrow cells stimulated by protein-A from staphylococcus aureus were 46,X,--Y,+12. Phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated cells were normal, 46,XY. These findings suggest strongly that most of the undifferentiated leukaemic cells were missing the Y chromosome. A subpopulation of these leukaemic cells also had trisomy 12. These observations and previously published findings suggest that trisomy 12 occurs non-randomly in haematological disorders, and in particular, may be associated with B-lymphoid malignancy. PMID:7256211

  5. Clonal evolution of aplastic anaemia to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukaemia and paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Tooze, J A; Marsh, J C; Gordon-Smith, E C

    1999-04-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) is a non-malignant haemopoietic disorder characterised by peripheral blood pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Successful management of acquired AA including treatment with immunosuppressive agents, mainly antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporin or allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation, has resulted in long-term survival of many patients. The later evolution of complicating clonal disorders such as paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukaemia in patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy may be a manifestation of the natural history of the aplasia, the development of which may or may not be increased by immunosuppressive therapy. A persistent, profound deficiency and/or defect in the stem cell compartment, despite haematological recovery after immunosuppressive therapy, may create an unstable situation which predisposes to later clonal disorders. A review of the progression of AA to clonal disorders is now outlined.

  6. Considerations and challenges for patients with refractory and relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kell, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in understanding the complexities of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the treatment of refractory or relapsed AML (rrAML) remains a daunting clinical challenge. Numerous clinical trials have failed to identify new treatments or combinations of existing therapies that substantially improve outcomes and survival. This may be due, at least in part, to heterogeneity among study patients with respect to multiple inter-related factors that have been shown to affect treatment outcomes for patients with rrAML; such factors include age, cytogenetics, immunophenotypic changes, and (in the case of relapsed AML) duration of first complete remission, or if the patient has had a previous blood and marrow transplant (BMT). A clear understanding of disease characteristics and patient-related factors that influence treatment response, as well as expected outcomes with existing and emerging therapies, can aid clinicians in helping their patients navigate through this complex disease state.

  7. Clinical and haemato-pathological characteristics of adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Islam, N; Rahman, M M; Aziz, M A; Begum, M; Ferdous, J; Rahman, M J

    2014-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous group of disorders. It varies with respect to the morphologic, cytogenetic, molecular and immunologic features of the neoplastic cells reflecting the variable clinical-pathologic presentations and outcome of the patients. The aim of the study was to observe the clinical and haemato-pathological characteristics in newly diagnosed adult ALL patients. A total number of 61 patients morphologically diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aged 15 and above assigned for this observational study. The study was carried out in the Department of Haematology, BSMMU from January 2007 to December 2008. Among 61 patients, aged 15 to 80 years with median age 25 years, 79% were male and 21% were female. Most of the patients presented with anaemia (67%), fever (66%), lymphadenopathy (64%) and splenomegaly (57%). Other common clinical findings were hepatomegaly (39%), bone tenderness (44%) and bleeding manifestations (34%). Among haemato-pathological findings 67% patients had Hb level ≤10gm/dl, 46% patients had WBC count ≥30×10⁹/L, 67% patients had platelet count ≤100×10⁹/L, 93% patients had blast in peripheral blood and 61% patients had ≥90 % blasts in the bone marrow at the time of diagnosis. In this study adult ALL patients were analyzed only for their clinical and haemato-pathological characteristics. But their biologic characteristics were not analyzed due to lack of availability of facility. A progressive understanding of the biologic and genetic characteristics of ALL will allow us to identify different prognostic subgroups with specific molecular and cellular features. All the necessary measures have to be developed in our country in order to identify prognostically distinct subgroups of patients.

  8. A phase I trial of the aurora kinase inhibitor, ENMD-2076, in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen W L; Chen, Hsiao-Wei T; Hedley, David W; Chow, Sue; Brandwein, Joseph; Schuh, Andre C; Schimmer, Aaron D; Gupta, Vikas; Sanfelice, Deborah; Johnson, Tara; Le, Lisa W; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R; Sidor, Carolyn; Minden, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel, orally-active molecule that inhibits Aurora A kinase, as well as c-Kit, FLT3 and VEGFR2. A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and toxicities of ENMD-2076 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Patients received escalating doses of ENMD-2076 administered orally daily [225 mg (n = 7), 375 mg (n = 6), 325 mg (n = 9), or 275 mg (n = 5)]. Twenty-seven patients were treated (26 AML; 1 CMML-2). The most common non-hematological toxicities of any grade, regardless of association with drug, were fatigue, diarrhea, dysphonia, dyspnea, hypertension, constipation, and abdominal pain. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) consisted of grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 typhilitis, grade 3 syncope and grade 3 QTc prolongation). Of the 16 evaluable patients, one patient achieved a complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), three experienced a morphologic leukemia-free state (MLFS) with a major hematologic improvement in platelets (HI-P), and 5 other patients had a reduction in marrow blast percentage (i.e. 11-65 %). The RP2D in this patient population is 225 mg orally once daily. PMID:27406088

  9. RNAi screen identifies Brd4 as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Rappaport, Amy R.; Herrmann, Harald; Sison, Edward A.; Magoon, Daniel; Qi, Jun; Blatt, Katharina; Wunderlich, Mark; Taylor, Meredith J.; Johns, Christopher; Chicas, Agustin; Mulloy, James C.; Kogan, Scott C.; Brown, Patrick; Valent, Peter; Bradner, James E.; Lowe, Scott W.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic pathways can regulate gene expression by controlling and interpreting chromatin modifications. Cancer cells are characterized by altered epigenetic landscapes, and commonly exploit the chromatin regulatory machinery to enforce oncogenic gene expression programs1. Although chromatin alterations are, in principle, reversible and often amenable to drug intervention, the promise of targeting such pathways therapeutically has been limited by an incomplete understanding of cancer-specific dependencies on epigenetic regulators. Here we describe a non-biased approach to probe epigenetic vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), an aggressive haematopoietic malignancy that is often associated with aberrant chromatin states2. By screening a custom library of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting known chromatin regulators in a genetically defined AML mouse model, we identify the protein bromodomain-containing 4 (Brd4) as being critically required for disease maintenance. Suppression of Brd4 using shRNAs or the small-molecule inhibitor JQ1 led to robust antileukaemic effects in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by terminal myeloid differentiation and elimination of leukaemia stem cells. Similar sensitivities were observed in a variety of human AML cell lines and primary patient samples, revealing that JQ1 has broad activity in diverse AML subtypes. The effects of Brd4 suppression are, at least in part, due to its role in sustaining Myc expression to promote aberrant self-renewal, which implicates JQ1 as a pharmacological means to suppress MYC in cancer. Our results establish small-molecule inhibition of Brd4 as a promising therapeutic strategy in AML and, potentially, other cancers, and highlight the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) screening for revealing epigenetic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for direct pharmacological intervention. PMID:21814200

  10. TESTIN Induces Rapid Death and Suppresses Proliferation in Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Robert J.; Ludgate, Jackie L.; LeMée, Gwenn; Morison, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Despite high cure rates, side effects and late consequences of the intensive treatments are common. Unquestionably, the identification of new therapeutic targets will lead to safer, more effective treatments. We identified TES promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing as a very common molecular abnormality in childhood ALL, irrespective of molecular subtype. The aims of the present study were to demonstrate that TES promoter methylation is aberrant, to determine the effects of TES re-expression in ALL, and to determine if those effects are mediated via TP53 activity. Methods Normal fetal and adult tissue DNA was isolated and TES promoter methylation determined by Sequenom MassARRAY. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot were used to confirm re-expression of TES in ALL cell lines after 5’-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (decitabine) exposure or transfection with TES expression plasmids. The effects of TES re-expression on ALL cells were investigated using standard cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle assays. Results In this study, we confirm that the TES promoter is unmethylated in normal adult and fetal tissues. We report that decitabine treatment of ALL cell lines results in demethylation of the TES promoter and attendant expression of TES mRNA. Re-expression of TESTIN protein in ALL cells using expression plasmid transfection results in rapid cell death or cell cycle arrest independent of TP53 activity. Conclusions These results suggest that TES is aberrantly methylated in ALL and that re-expression of TESTIN has anti-leukaemia effects which point to novel therapeutic opportunities for childhood ALL. PMID:26985820

  11. Light scatter characteristics of blast cells in acute myeloid leukaemia: association with morphology and immunophenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Vidriales, M B; Orfao, A; López-Berges, M C; González, M; López-Macedo, A; García, M A; Galende, J; San Miguel, J F

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To analyse the forward scatter/side scatter (FSC/SSC) distribution of acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) blast cells in order to assess whether it correlates with their morphology, immunophenotype, and clinical and biological disease characteristics. METHODS--FSC/SSC patterns were established upon taking into account the localisation of the residual T lymphocytes in the FSC/SSC dot plot as an internal biological standard. One hundred and seventy one newly diagnosed AML patients were analysed and five different FSC/SSC patterns were established. These five patterns could be grouped into two major categories taking into account the FSC/SSC distribution of normal cells in a bone marrow aspirate: immature patterns (1 and 2) and mature patterns (3, 4, and 5). These FSC/SSC patterns were correlated with different clinical and biological characteristics of AML patients. RESULTS--No significant associations were detected in relation to the clinical and haematological disease characteristics and the prognosis of these patients. By contrast there was a significant correlation between the FSC/SSC pattern of the AML blast cells and the FAB classification. An increased reactivity for the antigens associated with myeloid differentiation such as CD13, CD33, CD11b, CD15, CD14, CD4, CD56, and/or CD16 was detected among cases showing a mature FSC/SSC pattern (3, 4, and 5), both in the whole series and even within each of the FAB AML subtypes. By contrast, the reactivity for the CD34 precursor cell associated antigen was higher among those cases displaying an immature FSC/SSC pattern, this being observed even within each FAB subgroup. CONCLUSIONS--The FSC/SSC pattern distribution of AML blast cells not only provides an additional objective and reproductible system for the classification of these leukaemias but it may also represent a connection between the FAB morphological groups and the immunophenotypic classification of AML patients. Images PMID:7629293

  12. Clinico-pathological profile of acute promyelocytic leukaemia at Al-Amal Oncology-Haematology Centre, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, F A; Yassin, M A; El-Ayoubi, H R; Alhiji, I A; Albinali, A S; Almansour, S M; Qafoud, F M

    2010-09-01

    This cases series describes the profile of adult patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APt) at a referral hospital in Qatar. Of 34 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cases diagnosed, 11(32%) were classified as APt. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was common at presentation (91%). Severe thrombocytopenia was seen in 73%, leukocytosis in 55% and severe anaemia in 45%. Only 2 patients were of the classic hypergranular type. In the remaining 9 patients, 3 morphological subtypes were recognized: microgranular variant (6 patients), hyperbasophilic (2 patients) and regular nuclear outline M3r (1 patient). Translocation t(15;17) was detected in 63% of cases. APL constitutes a high proportion of AML cases in Qatar, with considerable morphological heterogeneity and a oredominance of APL variants with unfavourable oresenting features. PMID:21218723

  13. The effect of dietary intake changes on nutritional status in acute leukaemia patients after first induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Malihi, Z; Kandiah, M; Chan, Y M; Esfandbod, M; Vakili, M; Hosseinzadeh, M; Zarif Yeganeh, M

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate how changes in dietary intake among acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloid leukaemia (ALL and AML) patients affect nutritional status after the first induction chemotherapy. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h recall and a 136-item food frequency questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed by Patients Subjective Global Assessment questionnaire before starting induction therapy and again after 1 month. All newly diagnosed acute leukaemia patients aged 15 years old and older who attended three referral hospitals for initiation of their induction chemotherapy were included in the sample selection provided that they gave informed consent. A total of 30 AML and 33 ALL patients participated in the study. Dietary intake and nutritional status worsened after the chemotherapy treatment. Dietary intake in terms of macronutrients, micronutrients, food variety and diet diversity score changed significantly after the induction chemotherapy. No significant relationship was found between the changes in dietary indices and nutritional status. Chemotherapy-related side effects as an additional factor to cancer itself could affect dietary intake of leukaemia patients. The effectiveness of an early assessment of nutritional status and dietary intake should be further investigated in order to deter further deterioration.

  14. Clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia and hyperleucocytosis.

    PubMed

    Daver, Naval; Kantarjian, Hagop; Marcucci, Guido; Pierce, Sherry; Brandt, Mark; Dinardo, Courtney; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Verstovsek, Srdan; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Anderlini, Paolo; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-03-01

    The clinical characteristics, treatment options and outcomes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) and hyperleucocytosis remain poorly defined. This study reviewed 242 consecutive patients with APL; 29 patients (12%) had a white blood cell count (WBC) ≥ 50 × 10(9) /l at presentation (median WBC 85·5 × 10(9) /l). Patients with hyperleucocytosis had inferior complete remission (CR) rates (69% vs. 88%; P = 0·004) and higher 4-week mortality (24% vs. 9%; P = 0·018) compared to patients without hyperleucocytosis. We noted a trend towards inferior 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) (69% vs. 80%; P = 0·057) and inferior 3-year overall survival (OS) (74% vs. 92%; P = 0·2) for patients with hyperleucocytosis. Leukapheresis was performed in 11 (38%) of the 29 patients with hyperleucocytosis. CR rate and 3-year OS were not significantly improved in patients who received leukapheresis. CR rate and 3-year OS for the 15 patients with hyperleucocytosis treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plus arsenic trioxide (ATO) plus cytotoxic therapy (idarubicin or gemtuzumab ozogamicin) combinations were 100% and 100% vs. 57% and 35% for the 14 patients treated with non-ATRA/ATO combinations (P = 0·004 and P = 0·002). Leukapheresis does not improve the outcomes in patients with APL presenting with hyperleucocytosis. ATRA/ATO-based combinations are superior to other regimens in these patients. PMID:25312977

  15. Noma in a child with acute leukaemia: when the 'face of poverty' finds an ally.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amitabh; Mandal, Anirban; Seth, Rachna; Kabra, Sushil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-6-month old, appropriately immunised, well-thriving boy, symptomatic for the past 6 months, presented with recurrent fever, progressive pallor, lymphadenopathy and a raw area on the right cheek, with discharging sinus. The necrotising infection of the face developed after one and half months of febrile illness. This febrile illness with bicytopaenia was diagnosed as enteric fever and treated with antibiotics. Skin grafting was performed for the full-thickness defect of the face. The patient continued to have a non-healing oral ulcer with progressive pallor and was finally diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Immunodeficiency was ruled out by appropriate investigations. Noma is an indirect measure of extreme poverty, but malignancy is known to predispose to this debilitating condition. The worldwide incidence of Noma is reported to be 30,000-140,000, with a preponderance in sub-Saharan Africa. This case emphasises the need for a thorough search for the underlying illness predisposing to a rare opportunistic infection such as Noma in a well-thriving child. PMID:26740267

  16. Multiple cotton wool spots following bone marrow transplantation for treatment of acute lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gloor, B; Gratwohl, A; Hahn, H; Kretzschmar, S; Robert, Y; Speck, B; Daicker, B

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia developed visual impairment due to occlusion of small retinal vessels with multiple cotton wool spots after treatment which included whole body and skull irradiation followed by bone marrow transplantation and cyclosporin A. Withdrawal of cyclosporin A and treatment with corticosteroids was followed by recovery of visual acuity. This retinopathy and the retinal changes seen in the immunodeficiency syndrome are thought to be closely related. The possible role of cyclosporin A is discussed, though cotton wool spots and retinal haemorrhages have never been described in renal transplant patients during treatment with this drug. Withdrawal of cyclosporin A, which is highly effective in preventing graft-versus-host disease, can be fatal. Irradiation of the skull prior to bone marrow transplantation and intrathecal administration of methotrexate may be the most important factors causing the retinal ischaemic signs described here. The inclusion of an ophthalmologist in the team monitoring transplant patients would lead to increased documentation and a better understanding of this disease. Images PMID:3888252

  17. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26271029

  18. The pre-B-cell receptor checkpoint in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, J; Sinclair, P; Heidenreich, O; Irving, J; Russell, L J; Hall, A; Calado, D P; Harrison, C J; Vormoor, J

    2015-08-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) and its immature form, the precursor-BCR (pre-BCR), have a central role in the control of B-cell development, which is dependent on a sequence of cell-fate decisions at specific antigen-independent checkpoints. Pre-BCR expression provides the first checkpoint, which controls differentiation of pre-B to immature B-cells in normal haemopoiesis. Pre-BCR signalling regulates and co-ordinates diverse processes within the pre-B cell, including clonal selection, proliferation and subsequent maturation. In B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL), B-cell development is arrested at this checkpoint. Moreover, malignant blasts avoid clonal extinction by hijacking pre-BCR signalling in favour of the development of BCP-ALL. Here, we discuss three mechanisms that occur in different subtypes of BCP-ALL: (i) blocking pre-BCR expression; (ii) activating pre-BCR-mediated pro-survival and pro-proliferative signalling, while inhibiting cell cycle arrest and maturation; and (iii) bypassing the pre-BCR checkpoint and activating pro-survival signalling through pre-BCR independent alternative mechanisms. A complete understanding of the BCP-ALL-specific signalling networks will highlight their application in BCP-ALL therapy.

  19. A comparative assessment of the curative potential of reduced intensity allografts in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Russell, N H; Kjeldsen, L; Craddock, C; Pagliuca, A; Yin, J A; Clark, R E; Howman, A; Hills, R K; Burnett, A K

    2015-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) provides the best mechanism of preventing relapse in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However non-relapse mortality (NRM) negates this benefit in older patients. Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) permits SCT with reduced NRM, but its contribution to cure is uncertain. In the MRC AML15 Trial, patients in remission without favourable risk disease could receive SCT from a matched sibling or unrelated donor (MUD). If aged >45 years, a RIC was recommended and in patients aged 35-44 years, either RIC or myeloablative conditioning was permitted. The aim was to determine which approach improved survival and within which prespecified cytogenetic groups. RIC transplants significantly reduced relapse (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.66 (0.50-0.85), P=0.002) compared to chemotherapy The 5-year overall survival from a sibling RIC (61%) was superior to a MUD RIC (37%; adjusted HR 1.50 (1.01-2.21), P=0.04) due to lower NRM (34 vs 14%, P=0.002) In adjusted analyses, there was a survival benefit for sibling RIC over chemotherapy (59 vs 49%, HR 0.75 (0.57-0.97), P=0.03), with consistent results in intermediate and adverse-risk patients. In patients aged 35-44 years, best outcomes were seen with a sibling RIC transplant, although a comparison with chemotherapy and myeloablative transplant was not significant in adjusted analyses (P=0.3).

  20. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants.

  1. A critical review of which children with acute myeloid leukaemia need stem cell procedures.

    PubMed

    Hasle, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    The last decades have seen parallel improvements in chemotherapy-based and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) regimens for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in children. There has been no consensus on indication for HSCT. Reserving HSCT for high-risk and relapsed patients spare many patients from the long-term toxicity of this treatment. The results of matched unrelated donor HSCT equal family donor transplantation and the presence of a matched sibling should no longer be a transplant indication. Minimal residual disease measured by flow cytometry may identify poor responders benefitting from HSCT in first complete remission (CR1) and those with a favourable response to induction therapy who do not need HSCT even with adverse cytogenetic aberrations. FLT3-internal tandem duplication without NPM1 mutation has a very high relapse rate despite favourable response and HSCT is indicated in CR1 in these cases. Finding the optimal indications for HSCT is a delicate balance between risk of relapse and late effects.

  2. Longitudinal assessment of nutritional status in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Cuba.

    PubMed

    González, A; Cortina, L; González, P; González, C; García, T; de Svarch, E G

    2004-05-01

    Malnutrition has a deleterious effect on the results of therapy for malignant diseases in childhood. The impact of radiotherapy on growth is well known but the impact of cytotoxic drugs on nutritional status is more controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the nutritional status of a cohort of children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Cuba. The study involved 49 children admitted to a single center and treated with a Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster-based protocol. Nutritional assessment included measurements of height, weight, body mass index and skin-fold thickness, made at diagnosis, after the intensive phase of treatment and at the end of therapy. Z-scores were used for height and comparison of percentiles for the rest of the variables. All the patients were above the third percentile in all the measurements. There were no statistically significant differences between the results at diagnosis, after intensive therapy and at the end of treatment. Although the sample was small, there was no demonstrable effect of chemotherapy on nutritional status in this Cuban paediatric population, in contrast to that reported in children with ALL in other developing countries.

  3. Identification of pre-leukaemic haematopoietic stem cells in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Shlush, Liran I; Zandi, Sasan; Mitchell, Amanda; Chen, Weihsu Claire; Brandwein, Joseph M; Gupta, Vikas; Kennedy, James A; Schimmer, Aaron D; Schuh, Andre C; Yee, Karen W; McLeod, Jessica L; Doedens, Monica; Medeiros, Jessie J F; Marke, Rene; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Lee, Kwon; McPherson, John D; Hudson, Thomas J; Brown, Andrew M K; Yousif, Fouad; Trinh, Quang M; Stein, Lincoln D; Minden, Mark D; Wang, Jean C Y; Dick, John E

    2014-02-20

    In acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the cell of origin, nature and biological consequences of initiating lesions, and order of subsequent mutations remain poorly understood, as AML is typically diagnosed without observation of a pre-leukaemic phase. Here, highly purified haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), progenitor and mature cell fractions from the blood of AML patients were found to contain recurrent DNMT3A mutations (DNMT3A(mut)) at high allele frequency, but without coincident NPM1 mutations (NPM1c) present in AML blasts. DNMT3A(mut)-bearing HSCs showed a multilineage repopulation advantage over non-mutated HSCs in xenografts, establishing their identity as pre-leukaemic HSCs. Pre-leukaemic HSCs were found in remission samples, indicating that they survive chemotherapy. Therefore DNMT3A(mut) arises early in AML evolution, probably in HSCs, leading to a clonally expanded pool of pre-leukaemic HSCs from which AML evolves. Our findings provide a paradigm for the detection and treatment of pre-leukaemic clones before the acquisition of additional genetic lesions engenders greater therapeutic resistance.

  4. Noma in a child with acute leukaemia: when the 'face of poverty' finds an ally.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amitabh; Mandal, Anirban; Seth, Rachna; Kabra, Sushil Kumar

    2016-01-06

    A 2-year-6-month old, appropriately immunised, well-thriving boy, symptomatic for the past 6 months, presented with recurrent fever, progressive pallor, lymphadenopathy and a raw area on the right cheek, with discharging sinus. The necrotising infection of the face developed after one and half months of febrile illness. This febrile illness with bicytopaenia was diagnosed as enteric fever and treated with antibiotics. Skin grafting was performed for the full-thickness defect of the face. The patient continued to have a non-healing oral ulcer with progressive pallor and was finally diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Immunodeficiency was ruled out by appropriate investigations. Noma is an indirect measure of extreme poverty, but malignancy is known to predispose to this debilitating condition. The worldwide incidence of Noma is reported to be 30,000-140,000, with a preponderance in sub-Saharan Africa. This case emphasises the need for a thorough search for the underlying illness predisposing to a rare opportunistic infection such as Noma in a well-thriving child.

  5. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  6. Distinctive genotypes in infants with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Marcela B; van Delft, Frederik W; Colman, Susan M; Furness, Caroline L; Gibson, Jane; Emerenciano, Mariana; Kempski, Helena; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cave, Hélène; Soulier, Jean; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Greaves, Mel; Ford, Anthony M

    2015-11-01

    Infant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (iT-ALL) is a very rare and poorly defined entity with a poor prognosis. We assembled a unique series of 13 infants with T-ALL, which allowed us to identify genotypic abnormalities and to investigate prenatal origins. Matched samples (diagnosis/remission) were analysed by single nucleotide polymorphism-array to identify genomic losses and gains. In three cases, we identified a recurrent somatic deletion on chromosome 3. These losses result in the complete deletion of MLF1 and have not previously been described in T-ALL. We observed two cases with an 11p13 deletion (LMO2-related), one of which also harboured a deletion of RB1. Another case presented a large 11q14·1-11q23·2 deletion that included ATM and only five patients (38%) showed deletions of CDKN2A/B. Four cases showed NOTCH1 mutations; in one case FBXW7 was the sole mutation and three cases showed alterations in PTEN. KMT2A rearrangements (KMT2A-r) were detected in three out of 13 cases. For three patients, mutations and copy number alterations (including deletion of PTEN) could be backtracked to birth using neonatal blood spot DNA, demonstrating an in utero origin. Overall, our data indicates that iT-ALL has a diverse but distinctive profile of genotypic abnormalities when compared to T-ALL in older children and adults. PMID:26205622

  7. Hospital environment fungal contamination and aspergillosis risk in acute leukaemia patients in Sousse (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Gheith, Soukeina; Ranque, Stéphane; Bannour, Wadiaa; Ben Youssef, Yosra; Khelif, Abderrahim; Ben Said, Moncef; Njah, Mansour; Saghrouni, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    Hospital environment is considered the main source of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in leukemic patients. This study aimed to describe Aspergillus colonisation in leukemic patients and their hospital environment and to test whether Aspergillus environmental contamination was associated with IA. For a 2-year period including 14-month renovation work, 91 acute leukaemia inpatients at the hematology department of University hospital in Sousse (Tunisia) were prospectively included. The incidence of probable IA (EORTC/MSG criteria) was 9.9%. Fifty-six Aspergillus were isolated from 53 (6.5%) of 811 sputa collected from 35 (38.5%) patients. Aspergillus spp. were isolated in 59.7% of 494 air samples and in 52.8% of 1579 surface samples taken in the patients' room. Aspergillus section Nigri (72.7%) was the most frequent. Aspergillus contamination peaked in autumn and winter on surface and in summer and autumn in air samples and was higher (P = 0.03) during the renovation work period. Multivariate analysis showed that for each Aspergillus section Nigri CFU airborne contamination IA risk increased by 1.05 (P = 0.04). In Tunisia, Aspergillus section Nigri and Flavi, but not Fumigati, are chiefly involved in IA. Our findings support swift implementation of airborne fungal contamination control measures in areas where immunocompromised patient are hospitalised.

  8. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene polymorphism decreases the risk of childhood acute lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Franco, R F; Simões, B P; Tone, L G; Gabellini, S M; Zago, M A; Falcão, R P

    2001-12-01

    We have determined the prevalence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations C677T and A1298C in 71 children (< or = 15 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and in 71 control subjects. Odds ratio (OR) for ALL linked to MTHFR C677T was 0.4 (95% CI 0.2-0.8); for heterozygotes it was 0.5 (95% CI 0.2-0.9) and for homozygotes it was 0.3 (95%CI 0.09-0.8). MTHFR A1298C yielded an overall OR for ALL of 1.3 (95% CI: 0.7-2.6); for heterozygotes it was 1.3 (95% CI: 0.7-7.6) and for homozygotes it was 2.8 (95% CI 0.5-15.6). In conclusion, MTHFR C677T was linked to a significant 2.4-fold decreased risk of developing childhood ALL, whereas MTHFR A1298C did not significantly affect the risk of ALL in our population. PMID:11736945

  9. Cytogenetic risk stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Costa, Dolors; Solé, Francesc; Vallespí, Teresa; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Calasanz, María J.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Nomdedeu, Benet; Mallo, Mar; Carbonell, Felix; Bueno, Javier; Ardanaz, María T.; Ramos, Fernando; Tormo, Mar; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Gómez, Valle; Marco, Victor; Xicoy, Blanca; Bonanad, Santiago; Pedro, Carmen; Bernal, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo F.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of cytogenetic findings in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the independent prognostic impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in a large series of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia included in the database of the Spanish Registry of Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Design and Methods We studied 414 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia according to WHO criteria and with a successful conventional cytogenetic analysis at diagnosis. Different patient and disease characteristics were examined by univariate and multivariate methods to establish their relationship with overall survival and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Results Patients with abnormal karyotype (110 patients, 27%) had poorer overall survival (P=0.001) and higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution (P=0.010). Based on outcome analysis, three cytogenetic risk categories were identified: low risk (normal karyotype or loss of Y chromosome as a single anomaly), high risk (presence of trisomy 8 or abnormalities of chromosome 7, or complex karyotype), and intermediate risk (all other abnormalities). Overall survival at five years for patients in the low, intermediate, and high risk cytogenetic categories was 35%, 26%, and 4%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that this new CMML-specific cytogenetic risk stratification was an independent prognostic variable for overall survival (P=0.001). Additionally, patients belonging to the high-risk cytogenetic category also had a higher risk of acute myeloid leukemia evolution on univariate (P=0.001) but not multivariate analysis. Conclusions Cytogenetic findings have a strong prognostic impact in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. PMID:21109693

  10. Management of adult and paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines from the Asian Oncology Summit 2013

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Allen EJ; Tan, Daryl; Li, Chi-Kong; Hori, Hiroki; Tse, Eric; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    The survival rates for both adult and children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have improved substantially in recent years with wider use of improved risk-directed therapy and supportive care. In nearly all developed countries, clinical practice guidelines have been formulated by multidisciplinary panels of leukaemia experts, with the goal of providing recommendations on standard treatment approaches based on current evidence. However, those guidelines do not take into account resource limitations in low-income countries, including financial and technical challenges. In Asia, there are huge disparities in economy and infrastructure among the countries, and even among different regions in some large countries. This review summarizes the recommendations developed for Asian countries by a panel of adult and paediatric leukaemia therapists, based on the availability of financial, skill and logistical resources, at a consensus session held as part of the 2013 Asian Oncology Summit in Bangkok, Thailand. The management strategies described here are stratified by a four-tier system (basic, limited, enhanced and maximum) based on the resources available to a particular country or region. PMID:24176570

  11. miR-22 has a potent anti-tumour role with therapeutic potential in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi; Hu, Chao; Arnovitz, Stephen; Bugno, Jason; Yu, Miao; Zuo, Zhixiang; Chen, Ping; Huang, Hao; Ulrich, Bryan; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Weng, Hengyou; Strong, Jennifer; Wang, Yungui; Li, Yuanyuan; Salat, Justin; Li, Shenglai; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Yang, Yang; Neilly, Mary Beth; Larson, Richard A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Herold, Tobias; Bohlander, Stefan K; Liu, Paul P; Zhang, Jiwang; Li, Zejuan; He, Chuan; Jin, Jie; Hong, Seungpyo; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are subject to precise regulation and have key roles in tumorigenesis. In contrast to the oncogenic role of miR-22 reported in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and breast cancer, here we show that miR-22 is an essential anti-tumour gatekeeper in de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) where it is significantly downregulated. Forced expression of miR-22 significantly suppresses leukaemic cell viability and growth in vitro, and substantially inhibits leukaemia development and maintenance in vivo. Mechanistically, miR-22 targets multiple oncogenes, including CRTC1, FLT3 and MYCBP, and thus represses the CREB and MYC pathways. The downregulation of miR-22 in AML is caused by TET1/GFI1/EZH2/SIN3A-mediated epigenetic repression and/or DNA copy-number loss. Furthermore, nanoparticles carrying miR-22 oligos significantly inhibit leukaemia progression in vivo. Together, our study uncovers a TET1/GFI1/EZH2/SIN3A/miR-22/CREB-MYC signalling circuit and thereby provides insights into epigenetic/genetic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of AML, and also highlights the clinical potential of miR-22-based AML therapy. PMID:27116251

  12. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry.

  13. Extreme hyperferritinemia in the setting of acute myeloid leukaemia: a case report of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Denimal, Damien; Ménégaut, Louise; Rossi, Cédric; Duvillard, Laurence; Masson, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Major hyperferritinemia is a rare feature in clinical laboratories associated with a wide variety of disorders, including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The diagnosis of HLH is based on clinical and biological criteria, such as those proposed by the Histiocyte Society. However, several of these criteria are not relevant in the specific setting of hematologic malignancies. Materials and methods A 69-year-old male was treated for an acute myeloid leukaemia. On day 15 after the start of chemotherapy, he developed severe sepsis with high fever, low blood pressure and hepatosplenomegaly. Results Blood tests were marked by extreme hyperferritinemia (191,000 µg/L, reference range: 26-388 µg/L) with increased C-reactive protein (87.0 mg/L) and procalcitonin (1.94 µg/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (499 U/L 37 °C) in the setting of chemotherapy-induced aplasia. This unusual extreme ferritinemia led to suspect HLH triggered by an invasive infection. Under intensive treatment, the clinical status improved and ferritin levels significantly decreased. Conclusions The diagnosis of HLH is usually based on clinical and biological criteria, mainly fever, splenomegaly, cytopenias, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia, hemophagocytosis and hyperferritinemia. In this patient, the diagnosis of HLH was challenging because several criteria, such as hypertriglyceridemia, hemophagocytosis and hypofibrinogenemia, were absent. In addition, some criteria of HLH are not relevant in the setting of hematologic malignancy, in which fever, splenomegaly, cytopenias and elevated lactate dehydrogenase are commonly observed independently of HLH. This unusual case of extremely high ferritinemia emphasizes the important weight of the ferritin level for the diagnosis of HLH in adult patients in the setting of hematologic malignancies. PMID:27346972

  14. Clinical relevance of molecular aberrations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia at first relapse.

    PubMed

    Bachas, Costa; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Creutzig, Ursula; Kwidama, Zinia J; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; De Bont, Evelina S J M; Elitzur, Sarah; Rizzari, Carmelo; de Haas, Valérie; Zimmermann, Martin; Cloos, Jacqueline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2014-09-01

    Outcome for relapsed paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remains poor. Strong prognostic factors at first relapse are lacking, which hampers optimization of therapy. We assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations (FLT3, NRAS, KRAS, KIT, WT1 and NPM1 genes) at first relapse in a large set (n = 198) of relapsed non-French-American-British M3, non-Down syndrome AML patients that received similar relapse treatment. We correlated molecular aberrations with clinical and biological factors and studied their prognostic relevance. Hotspot mutations in the analysed genes were detected in 92 out of 198 patients (46·5%). In 72 of these 92 patients (78%), molecular aberrations were mutually exclusive for the currently analysed genes. FLT3-internal tandem repeat (ITD) (18% of total group) mutations were most frequent, followed by NRAS (10·2%), KRAS (8%), WT1 (8%), KIT (8%), NPM1 (5%) and FLT3-tyrosine kinase domain (3%) mutations. Presence of a WT1 aberration was an independent risk factor for second relapse (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 2·74, P = 0·013). In patients who achieved second complete remission (70·2%), WT1 and FLT3-ITD aberrations were independent risk factors for poor overall survival (HR = 2·32, P = 0·038 and HR = 1·89, P = 0·045 respectively). These data show that molecular aberrations at first relapse are of prognostic relevance and potentially useful for risk group stratification of paediatric relapsed AML and for identification of patients eligible for personalized treatment. PMID:24962064

  15. Conventional chemotherapy or hypomethylating agents for older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia?

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Felicetto

    2014-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is the second more frequent hematologic malignancy in developed countries and primarily affects older adults with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Given the progressive ageing of the general population, the incidence of the disease in elderly people is expected to further increase in the years to come. Along with cytogenetics at diagnosis, age represents the most relevant prognostic factor in AML, in that the outcome steadily declines with increasing age. Reasons for poor prognosis include more frequent unfavourable karyotype and other adverse biologic characteristics, such as high rates of expression of genes drug resistance related and high prevalence of secondary AML. Noticeably, as compared with young adults, poorer results in elderly patients have been reported within any cytogenetic and molecular prognostic subgroup, because of frequent comorbid diseases, which render many patients ineligible to intensive chemotherapy. Therefore, predictive models have been developed with the aim of achieving best therapeutic results avoiding unnecessary toxicity. Following conventional induction therapy, older AML patients have complete remission rates in the range of 45-65%, and fewer than 10% of them survive for a minimum of 5 years. On the other hand, hypomethylating agents, such as azacytidine and decitabine offer the possibility of long-term disease control without necessarily achieving complete remission and can represent a reasonable alternative to intensive chemotherapy. Either intensive chemotherapy or hypomethylating agents have lights and shadows, and the therapeutic selection is often influenced by physician's and patient's attitude rather than definite criteria. Research is progress in order to assess predictive biologic factors, which would help clinicians in the selection of patients who can take actual benefit from different therapeutic options.

  16. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  17. Molecular analysis of the leukaemic B cell in adult and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Coyle, L A; Papaioannou, M; Yaxley, J C; Chim, J S; Attard, M; Hoffbrand, A V; Foroni, L

    1996-09-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH gene) rearrangements are found in the majority of cases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We have examined bone marrow samples taken at presentation or relapse from 109 patients (79 adults and 30 children) and have performed sequence analysis of the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) on 65 alleles from 54 patients. We aimed to define immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) variable segment family use and investigate biological and structural features of the B cell in adult and childhood ALL. Using the FR1 fingerprinting method, a rearranged band was identified in 70 (89%) of 79 adult ALL and in 29 (97%) of 30 childhood ALL. This study found no preferential use or selection of IgH VH genes and no statistically significant structural differences between normal and leukaemic B cells in either adult and childhood ALL. An equal proportion of amplifiable cases of adult and childhood ALL uses more than one VH family gene (24/70, 34%, and 8/29, 27.5%, respectively). There were no significant differences in the structure or size of the CDR3 region and the variable (V) or joining (J) segment use in ALL patients compared to normal B cells. We observed that the N2 region was shorter than N1 in children whereas the opposite was observed in adults (not statistically significant). The J4 segment was a more common rearrangement in children than in adults, and in both groups J4 was more frequently associated with multiple D segment VDJ rearrangements. An increase in VH6 use in leukaemic alleles compared to normal B lymphocytes (2%) was observed but it was not statistically significant in our group of patients. Amongst children and adults, in-frame CDR3 junctions occurred in 78% and 64% of rearranged alleles, respectively, compared to 75% of in-frame sequences reported by others to occur among normal B cells.

  18. Amino-acid substitutions at codon 13 of the N-ras oncogene in human acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Johannes L.; Toksoz, Deniz; Marshall, Christopher J.; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Veeneman, Gerrit H.; van der Eb, Alex J.; van Boom, Jacques H.; Janssen, Johannes W. G.; Steenvoorden, Ada C. M.

    1985-06-01

    DNAs from four out of five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) tested by an in vivo selection assay in nude mice using transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells were found to contain an activated N-ras oncogene. Using a set of synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we have detected a mutation at codon 13 in all four genes. The same codon is mutated in an additional AML DNA that is positive in the focus-formation assay on 3T3 cells. DNA from the peripheral blood of one patient in remission does not contain a codon 13 mutation.

  19. Alternating hemiparesis and orolingual apraxia as manifestations of methotrexate neurotoxicity in a paediatric case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Yap, Siew Mei; MacEneaney, Peter; Ryan, Clodagh; O'Toole, Orna

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a recent diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was admitted to hospital with pancytopaenia after having received high-dose intrathecal methotrexate 1 day prior. During the next week she had intermittent episodes of alternating hemiparesis associated with speech arrest lasting minutes to hours at a time. The episodes were not associated with altered level of consciousness or headache. MRI of the brain showed features consistent with methotrexate encephalopathy. This report discusses the typical clinical and radiological features of methotrexate neurotoxicity in addition to differential diagnoses and the proposed pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:27113788

  20. Lack of expression of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan neuron-glial antigen 2 on candidate stem cell populations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia/abn(11q23) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia/t(4;11).

    PubMed

    Neudenberger, J; Hotfilder, M; Rosemann, A; Langebrake, C; Reinhardt, D; Pieters, R; Schrauder, A; Schrappe, M; Röttgers, S; Harbott, J; Vormoor, J

    2006-05-01

    It has increasingly been acknowledged that only a few leukaemic cells possess the capability to renew themselves and that only these self-renewing leukaemic stem cells are able to initiate relapses. Therefore, these leukaemic stem cells should be the target cells for therapy and for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection. Because of its presence on blasts of 11q23-rearranged high-risk leukaemic patients, neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) is thought to be a valuable marker for detecting leukaemic stem cells. Six acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)/abn(11q23) and three acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)/t(4;11) samples were analysed by four-colour flow cytometry for NG2 expression on primitive cell populations. Candidate leukaemic cell populations were defined by the antigen profiles CD34+CD38- in AML and CD34+CD19-CD117+ in ALL. Surprisingly, in all patients these candidate stem cell populations were shown to lack expression of NG2. Instead, a correlation between the expression of the myeloid differentiation marker CD33 and increasing levels of NG2 on maturing cells could be demonstrated. Similarly, in ALL patients CD34+CD19+ cells showed a higher expression of NG2 mRNA compared with CD34+CD19-. Thus, NG2 appears to be upregulated with differentiation and not to be expressed on primitive disease-maintaining cells. This hampers the clinical use of NG2 as a therapeutic target and as a sensitive marker for MRD detection.

  1. Allergy and acute leukaemia in children with Down syndrome: a population study. Report from the Mexican inter-institutional group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Enríquez, J C; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Buchán-Durán, E P; Bernáldez-Ríos, R; Medina-Sansón, A; Jiménez-Hernández, E; Amador-Sanchez, R; Peñaloza-Gonzalez, J G; Paredes-Aguilera, R; Alvarez-Rodriguez, F J; Bolea-Murga, V; de Diego Flores-Chapa, J; Flores-Lujano, J; Bekker-Mendez, V C; Rivera-Luna, R; del Carmen Rodriguez-Zepeda, M; Rangel-López, A; Dorantes-Acosta, E M; Núñez-Villegas, N; Velazquez-Aviña, M M; Torres-Nava, J R; Reyes-Zepeda, N C; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Flores-Villegas, L V; Martinez-Avalos, A; Salamanca-Gómez, F; Gorodezky, C; Arellano-Galindo, J; Mejía-Aranguré, J M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Allergies have been described as protective factors against the development of childhood acute leukaemia (AL). Our objective was to investigate the associations between allergy history and the development of AL and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: A case–control study was performed in Mexico City. The cases (n=97) were diagnosed at nine public hospitals, and the controls (n=222) were recruited at institutions for children with DS. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated. Results: Asthma was positively associated with AL development (OR=4.18; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–11.87), whereas skin allergies were negatively associated (OR=0.42; 95% CI: 0.20–0.91). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that allergies and AL in children with DS share biological and immune mechanisms. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting associations between allergies and AL in children with DS. PMID:23695017

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of femoral marrow predicts outcome in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shojiro; Tanaka, Osamu

    2002-04-01

    Accurate assessment of residual disease is important for the prediction of outcome in patients with acute leukaemia in complete remission (CR). To investigate whether abnormalities on magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral marrow in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in CR can predict outcome, 28 newly diagnosed patients with AML underwent MR imaging when bone marrow aspiration or biopsy was performed to verify the state of CR after induction therapy. MR abnormalities on short TI (inversion time) inversion recovery (STIR) techniques persisted in all four patients who did not achieve CR. In 13 CR patients abnormalities on STIR images resolved, to result in normal appearance at the time CR was achieved. All 13 patients remained in CR for 3-104 months (median, 73 months). In the other 11 CR patients, STIR abnormalities persisted at the time CR was achieved. Seven of them relapsed between 1 and 28 months (median, 3 months) after MR evaluation. Disease-free survival of patients with persistent abnormal STIR images was significantly shorter than that of patients with normal STIR images (P < 0.01). MR imaging of femoral marrow may predict outcome in adult patients with AML in CR. PMID:11918535

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of femoral marrow predicts outcome in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shojiro; Tanaka, Osamu

    2002-04-01

    Accurate assessment of residual disease is important for the prediction of outcome in patients with acute leukaemia in complete remission (CR). To investigate whether abnormalities on magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral marrow in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in CR can predict outcome, 28 newly diagnosed patients with AML underwent MR imaging when bone marrow aspiration or biopsy was performed to verify the state of CR after induction therapy. MR abnormalities on short TI (inversion time) inversion recovery (STIR) techniques persisted in all four patients who did not achieve CR. In 13 CR patients abnormalities on STIR images resolved, to result in normal appearance at the time CR was achieved. All 13 patients remained in CR for 3-104 months (median, 73 months). In the other 11 CR patients, STIR abnormalities persisted at the time CR was achieved. Seven of them relapsed between 1 and 28 months (median, 3 months) after MR evaluation. Disease-free survival of patients with persistent abnormal STIR images was significantly shorter than that of patients with normal STIR images (P < 0.01). MR imaging of femoral marrow may predict outcome in adult patients with AML in CR.

  4. Treatment and long-term results in children with acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AIEOP AML protocols.

    PubMed

    Pession, A; Rondelli, R; Basso, G; Rizzari, C; Testi, A M; Fagioli, F; De Stefano, P; Locatelli, F

    2005-12-01

    Since 1982, four consecutive studies on childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (namely LAM-82, -87, -87M and -92) have been conducted in Italy by the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) group. The induction therapy of the first three studies consisted of daunorubicin and cytarabine structured in a 3+7 backbone. In the most recent protocol (LAM92), patients received two induction courses including idarubicin, cytarabine and etoposide. Patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (20% of diagnoses) were included in LAM-87 and 87M studies. Postremissional therapy significantly changed over time, with an ever-increasing role given to stem cell transplantation (SCT). The long-term outcome of patients enrolled in the LAM-82, 87 and 87M studies was comparable, whereas that of children treated according to LAM-92 study was significantly better (P<0.005). Either allogeneic or autologous SCT was employed as consolidation therapy in more than 75% of cases enrolled in this latter study. Patients enrolled in the LAM-92 study were stratified in standard and high-risk groups with different outcome (67 vs 47%, respectively, P=0.04). Altogether, the results obtained in these four studies have permitted a progressive refinement of treatment, contributing to the structure of the ongoing LAM-2002 protocol that stratifies patients according to the presence of definite genetic anomalies and response to induction therapy.

  5. Leukaemias into the 21st century. Part 2: the chronic leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J; Iland, H J; Larsen, S R; Brown, C M S; Joshua, D E

    2013-05-01

    Like the acute leukaemias, the chronic leukaemias are broadly classified according to their cell lineage of origin. Chronic myeloid leukaemia and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia are the most common disease entities within the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, although several less common entities are well recognised within each broad subgroup. In common with the dramatic progress in the acute leukaemias, there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the biology and molecular genetics of the chronic leukaemias that is now being translated into significant therapeutic advances.

  6. The human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 mediates in vitro cytarabine sensitivity in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hubeek, I; Stam, R W; Peters, G J; Broekhuizen, R; Meijerink, J P P; Wering, E R van; Gibson, B E S; Creutzig, U; Zwaan, C M; Cloos, J; Kuik, D J; Pieters, R; Kaspers, G J L

    2005-01-01

    Cytarabine (ara-C) is the most effective agent for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Aberrant expression of enzymes involved in the transport/metabolism of ara-C could explain drug resistance. We determined mRNA expression of these factors using quantitative-real-time-PCR in leukemic blasts from children diagnosed with de novo AML. Expression of the inactivating enzyme pyrimidine nucleotidase-I (PN-I) was 1.8-fold lower in FAB-M5 as compared to FAB-M1/2 (P=0.007). In vitro sensitivity to deoxynucleoside analogues was determined using the MTT-assay. Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) mRNA expression and ara-C sensitivity were significantly correlated (rp=−0.46; P=0.001), with three-fold lower hENT1 mRNA levels in resistant patients (P=0.003). hENT1 mRNA expression also seemed to correlate inversely with the LC50 values of cladribine (rp=−0.30; P=0.04), decitabine (rp=−0.29; P=0.04) and gemcitabine (rp=−0.33; P=0.02). Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and cytidine deaminase (CDA) mRNA expression seemed to correlate with in vitro sensitivity to gemcitabine (rp=−0.31; P=0.03) and decitabine (rp=0.33; P=0.03), respectively. The dCK/PN-I ratio correlated inversely with LC50 values for gemcitabine (rp=−0.45, P=0.001) and the dCK/CDA ratio seemed to correlate with LC50 values for decitabine (rp=−0.29; 0.04). In conclusion, decreased expression of hENT1, which transports ara-C across the cell membrane, appears to be a major factor in ara-C resistance in childhood AML. PMID:16333246

  7. Core binding factor acute myeloid leukaemia and c-KIT mutations.

    PubMed

    Riera, Ludovica; Marmont, Filippo; Toppino, Daniela; Frairia, Chiara; Sismondi, Francesca; Audisio, Ernesta; Di Bello, Cristiana; D'Ardia, Stefano; Di Celle, Paola Francia; Messa, Emanuela; Inghirami, Giorgio; Vitolo, Umberto; Pich, Achille

    2013-05-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) represents 5-8% of all AMLs and has a relatively favourable prognosis. However, activating c-KIT mutations are reported to be associated with higher risk of relapse and shorter survival. To verify the incidence and prognostic value of c-KIT mutations in CBF AML, we retrospectively analysed bone marrow samples of 23 consecutive adult patients with de novo CBF AML [14 inv(16) and 9 t(8;21)] treated at a single institution from 2000 to 2011. All patients received standard induction chemotherapy with cytarabine, idarubicin and etoposide; 13 underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. c-KIT mutations in exons 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14 and 17 were assessed by PCR amplification in combination with direct sequencing. c-KIT mutations (3 in exon 10 and 4 in exon 17) were detected in 7/23 (30.4%) patients, 3 with t(8;21) and 4 with inv(16). No difference in c-KIT mutation status was observed between cases with inv(16) or t(8;21) alone and cases with additional cytogenetic abnormalities. No association between gender, age, white blood cell and platelet count, peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cells at diagnosis, achievement of complete remission, cytogenetic risk groups and Wilms tumour gene 1 (WT1) levels was found. On the contrary, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) values were higher in mutated than in non-mutated patients (p=0.01). Overall survival (OS) rates were longer in CBF compared to the other types of AML and disease-free survival (DFS) was longer in inv(16) than in t(8;21) AML. OS and DFS were similar in mutated and non-mutated CBF AML patients. Our results confirm a better prognosis for CBF AML than all other AML categories, and for inv(16) than t(8;21) AML. However, no prognostic value for c-KIT mutational status was found in our series. The association between LDH levels and c-KIT mutation would indicate a more active proliferation for mutated CBF AML. PMID:23467883

  8. Molecular analysis of HLA-DQB1 alleles in childhood common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, S. P.; Taylor, G. M.; Gokhale, D. A.; Robinson, M. D.; Thompson, W.; Ollier, W.; Binchy, A.; Birch, J. M.; Stevens, R. F.; Carr, T.; Bardsley, W. G.

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that childhood common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (c-ALL) may be the rare outcome of early post-natal infection with a common infectious agent. One of the factors that may determine whether a child succumbs to c-ALL is how it responds to the candidate infection. Since immune responses to infection are under the partial control of (human leucocyte antigen) HLA genes, an association between an HLA allele and c-ALL could provide support for an infectious aetiology. To define the limit of c-ALL susceptibility within the HLA region, we have compared HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies in a cohort of 62 children with c-ALL with 76 newborn controls, using group-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. We find that a significant excess of children with c-ALL type for DQB1*05 [relative risk (RR): 2.54, uncorrected P=0.038], and a marginal excess with DQB1*0501 (RR: 2.18; P=0.095). Only 3 of the 62 children with c-ALL have the other susceptibility allele, DPB1*0201 as well as DQB1*0501, whereas 15 had one or the other allele. This suggests that HLA-associated susceptibility may be determined independently by at least two loci, and is not due to linkage disequilibrium. The combined relative risk of the two groups of children with DPB1*0201 and/or DQB1*0501 is 2.76 (P=0.0076). Analysis of amino acids encoded by exon 2 of DQB1 reveal additional complexity, with significant (P<0.05) or borderline-significant increases in Gly26, His30, Val57, Glu66-Val67 encoding motifs in c-ALL compared with controls. Since these amino acids are not restricted to DQB1*0501, our results suggest that, as with DPB1, the increased risk of c-ALL associated with DQB1 is determined by specific amino acid encoding motifs rather than by an individual allele. These results also suggest that HLA-associated susceptibility to c-ALL may not be restricted to the region bounded by DPB1 and DQB1. Images Figure 2

  9. Quantitative evaluation of monocyte differentiation by electron microscopy: impairment of differentiation ability in monocytes from children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, M; Hara, Y; Sugiyama, H; Yoda, S; Hara, T; Komiyama, A; Akabane, T

    1985-05-01

    The differentiation of monocytes was evaluated quantitatively by electron microscopy and was analyzed in relation to the clinical features of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The monocyte cellular size increased and cell organellae became mature after a 72-h culture. Phagolysosome formation developed markedly- and the nucleus became circular--accompanied by chromatin deconcentration. The differentiation degree of the cell organellae was indexed and classified as mature by electron microscopy. The indexes of nuclear shape, chromatin deconcentration, cytoplasmonuclear ratio and vacuole formation increased with time. The total index increased linearly with time dependence. These results indicate that the ultrastructural parameters and indexes allowed a quantitative assessment of cell organellae and cellular differentiation of the monocyte. At the acute phase of ALL, the degrees of cell organnellae and cellular differentiation were significantly lower than the control. The above findings suggest that monocytes from children with ALL have impaired differentiation ability, which results in defective function of macrophages.

  10. Results of a prospective multicentre myeloablative double-unit cord blood transplantation trial in adult patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Juliet N; Fei, Mingwei; Karanes, Chatchada; Horwitz, Mitchell; Devine, Steven; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Holter, Jennifer; Adams, Alexia; Logan, Brent; Navarro, Willis H; Riches, Marcie

    2015-02-01

    Double-unit cord blood (CB) grafts may improve engraftment and relapse risk in adults with haematological malignancies. We performed a prospective high-dose myeloablative double-unit CB transplantation (CBT) trial in adults with high-risk acute leukaemia or myelodysplasia (MDS) between 2007 and 2011. The primary aim was to establish the 1-year overall survival in a multi-centre setting. Fifty-six patients (31 acute myeloid leukaemia, 19 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 4 other acute leukaemias, 2 myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS]) were transplanted at 10 centres. The median infused total nucleated cell doses were 2·62 (larger unit) and 2·02 (smaller unit) x 10(7) /kg. The cumulative incidence of day 100 neutrophil engraftment was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 80-96). Day 180 grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence was 64% (95%CI: 51-76) and 36% (95%CI: 24-49) of patients had chronic GVHD by 3-years. At 3-years post-transplant, the transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 39% (95%CI: 26-52), and the 3-year relapse incidence was 11% (95%CI: 4-21). With a median 37-month (range 23-71) follow-up of survivors, the 3-year disease-free survival was 50% (95%CI: 37-63). Double-unit CBT is a viable alternative therapy for high-risk acute leukaemia/ MDS in patients lacking a matched unrelated donor. This is especially important for minority patients. The relapse incidence was low but strategies to ameliorate TRM are needed.

  11. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-07-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ~ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ~ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ~ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ~ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ~ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ~ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ~ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  12. Chilblain-like leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Chi; McEwen, Gary; Fraga, Garth Robert

    2016-01-01

    Chilblain, also known as pernio, is an abnormal inflammatory response to cold, moist environmental conditions. Persistent or atypical lesions should prompt investigation to exclude underlying systemic illness. We describe a case of acute myeloid leukaemia that presented with chilblain-like leukaemia cutis. PMID:27095810

  13. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  14. Genome-scale definition of the transcriptional programme associated with compromised PU.1 activity in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sive, J I; Basilico, S; Hannah, R; Kinston, S J; Calero-Nieto, F J; Göttgens, B

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional dysregulation is associated with haematological malignancy. Although mutations of the key haematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 are rare in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), they are common in murine models of radiation-induced AML, and PU.1 downregulation and/or dysfunction has been described in human AML patients carrying the fusion oncogenes RUNX1-ETO and PML-RARA. To study the transcriptional programmes associated with compromised PU.1 activity, we adapted a Pu.1-mutated murine AML cell line with an inducible wild-type PU.1. PU.1 induction caused transition from leukaemia phenotype to monocytic differentiation. Global binding maps for PU.1, CEBPA and the histone mark H3K27Ac with and without PU.1 induction showed that mutant PU.1 retains DNA-binding ability, but the induction of wild-type protein dramatically increases both the number and the height of PU.1-binding peaks. Correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Seq with gene expression data, we found that PU.1 recruitment coupled with increased histone acetylation induces gene expression and activates a monocyte/macrophage transcriptional programme. PU.1 induction also caused the reorganisation of a subgroup of CEBPA binding peaks. Finally, we show that the PU.1 target gene set defined in our model allows the stratification of primary human AML samples, shedding light on both known and novel AML subtypes that may be driven by PU.1 dysfunction.

  15. Fathers' views and understanding of their roles in families with a child with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Karalyn; Higgins, Aiveen; Dempster, Martin; McCarthy, Anthony

    2009-11-01

    This study explored how fathers of children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) perceived and understood the roles they had within their family over the course of their child's illness and treatment. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with five fathers. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). The major themes that emerged were: adjusting to the diagnosis; the experience of maternal gate-keeping; striving for normalization; experiences of giving and receiving support. Overall, the fathers perceived themselves as having significant responsibility in helping their child and family cope with the illness experience. Clinical implications, including the need for professionals to recognize and more openly acknowledge the father's position, are considered.

  16. Multifocal epilepsy: the role of palliative resection - intractable frontal and occipital lobe epilepsy secondary to radiotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Harvey, A Simon; Flanagan, Danny; Fitt, Gregory; Berlangieri, Sam; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2008-12-01

    Patients with multifocal epilepsy are often considered unsuitable for epilepsy surgery. We report an adolescent with intractable frontal and occipital lobe seizures, secondary to complications of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia as a young child. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were complicated by bilateral, posterior leukoencephalopathy and later an acquired frontal cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM). Detailed electro-clinical and imaging studies showed multiple, frontal lobe seizures per day with less frequent and non-debilitating, simple, occipital lobe seizures. Focal resection of the frontal CCM abolished the socially-disabling seizures with resultant marked improvement in the patient's quality of life at 12 months. Careful analysis of the type and impact of focal seizures in the setting of multifocal epilepsy may demonstrate that one seizure type is more deleterious to quality of life and may be amenable to surgery. In this situation, the patient may benefit significantly from surgery to resect the more active epileptic focus.

  17. French “real life” experience of clofarabine in children with refractory or relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clofarabine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide has shown a good efficacy and a tolerable toxicity profile in previous studies of children with relapsed or refractory leukaemia. This report describes a retrospective study of 38 French patients who received clofarabine as a monotherapy or in combination for relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) outside of clinical trials after marketing authorization. Methods We retrospectively analysed data for 38 patients, up to 21 years old, attending 17 French centres. Thirty patients received clofarabine alone or in combination for a bone marrow relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or refractory disease and eight patients for a high level of minimal residual disease (MRD). Survival and response durations were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results For the 30 patients who received clofarabine for a bone marrow relapse of ALL (number of relapse, 1-3; median, 1), the overall remission rate (ORR) was 37%: eight complete remission (CR) and three complete remission without platelet recovery (CRp). Ten of the 11 responding patients subsequently underwent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Only four of the eight patients who received clofarabine while in remission for a high level of MRD, showed a moderate improvement of MRD. Seven of these eight patients received HSCT and six of them were alive at the end of the study. One other patient was alive without receiving HSCT. However, clofarabine treatment was associated with a high risk of infection and hepatotoxicity. Febrile neutropenia grade ≥ 3 was reported in 79% of patients and documented infections grade ≥ 3 occurred in nine patients (24%). Hepatotoxicity grade 3 was reported in nine patients (24%). We observed four deaths related to treatment. Conclusion In our experience, the efficacy of clofarabine is poorer than previously reported. Its toxicity is high and can be life threatening

  18. Dose intensification in acute myeloid leukaemia: greater effectiveness at lower cost. Principal report of the Medical Research Council's AML9 study. MRC Leukaemia in Adults Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Wheatley, K

    1996-07-01

    Between 1984 and 1990, 972 patients aged 1-79 years with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), from 85 British hospitals, were entered into the MRC's 9th AML trial. Patients were randomized between DAT 1 + 5 (daunorubicin for 1 d, with cytarabine and 6-thioguanine for 5 d) and DAT 3 + 10 (same dose drugs for 3 and 10 d respectively) as induction therapy. The 63% who achieved complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive two courses of DAT 2 + 7 alternating with two courses of either MAZE (m-AMSA, 5-azacytidine, etoposide) or COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, prednisone). Finally, those still in CR were randomized to receive either 1 year of maintenance treatment with eight courses of cytarabine and thioguanine followed by four courses of COAP, or no further cytotoxic therapy. Resistance to induction therapy was less common with the DAT 3 + 10 regimen than with DAT 1 + 5 (13% v 23%; P = 0.0001) and hence, despite a 5% increase in the risk of induction death, the CR rate was higher (66% v 61%; P = 0.15). Moreover, CR was achieved more rapidly with DAT 3 + 10 (median 34 v 46 d; P < 0.0001) and thus patients required less time in hospital (mean 20 v 29 d) and less blood product support. 5-year relapse-free survival (28% v 23%; P = 0.05) and survival (23% v 18%; P < 0.05) were also better with DAT 3 + 10. Post-remission intensification of therapy with MAZE resulted in fewer relapses (66% v 74% at 5 years; P = 0.03) but patients allocated MAZE required considerably more supportive care and 14 (4.5%) died following 312 MAZE courses, whereas no deaths occurred following COAP. 5-year survival was not significantly higher with MAZE (37% v 31%). Finally, although 1 year of outpatient maintenance treatment appeared to delay, but not prevent, recurrence it did not improve 5-year survival which was non-significantly worse for those allocated maintenance treatment (41% v 44%). We conclude that the more intensive induction regimen, DAT 3 + 10, is not only more

  19. Subsequent leukaemia in autoimmune disease patients.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Försti, Asta; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients diagnosed with some autoimmune (AI) diseases are at an increased risk of leukaemia but limited data are available on survival. We systematically analysed the risks (standardized incidence ratio, SIR) and survival (hazard ratio, HR) in nine types of leukaemia among 402 462 patients hospitalized for any of 33 AI diseases and compared to persons not hospitalized for AI diseases. Risk for all leukaemia was increased after 13 AI diseases and survival was decreased after six AI diseases. SIRs were increased after all AI diseases for seven types of leukaemia, including SIR 1·69 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1·29-2·19) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 1·85 (95% CI: 1·65-2·07) for acute myeloid leukaemia, 1·68 (95% CI: 1·37-2·04) for chronic myeloid leukaemia, 2·20 (95% CI: 1·69-2·81) for 'other myeloid leukaemia', 2·45 (95% 1·99-2·98) for 'other and unspecified leukaemia', 1·81 (95% CI: 1·11-2·81) for monocytic leukaemia, and 1·36 (95% CI: 1·08-1·69) for myelofibrosis. The HRs were increased for four types of leukaemia, most for myelofibrosis (1·74, 95% CI: 1·33-2·29) and ALL (1·42, 95% CI: 1·03-1·95). Some AI diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, were associated with increased SIRs and HRs in many types of leukaemia. The present data showed increases in risk and decreases in survival for many types of leukaemia after various AI diseases. Leukaemia is a rare complication in AI disease but findings about this comorbidity at the time of leukaemia diagnosis may help to optimize the treatment and improve survival.

  20. The Genomic Landscape of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tiffany Y.; Gelston, Laura C.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Mazor, Tali; Esquivel, Emilio; Yu, Ariel; Seepo, Sara; Olsen, Scott; Rosenberg, Mara; Archambeault, Sophie L.; Abusin, Ghada; Beckman, Kyle; Brown, Patrick A.; Briones, Michael; Carcamo, Benjamin; Cooper, Todd; Dahl, Gary V.; Emanuel, Peter D.; Fluchel, Mark N.; Goyal, Rakesh K.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hitzler, Johann; Hugge, Christopher; Liu, Y. Lucy; Messinger, Yoav H.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Monteleone, Philip; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Roehrs, Philip A.; Schore, Reuven J.; Stine, Kimo C.; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Costello, Joseph F.; Olshen, Adam B.; Stewart, Chip; Li, Yongjin; Ma, Jing; Gerbing, Robert B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Getz, Gad; Gruber, Tanja; Golub, Todd; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Loh, Mignon L.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of childhood with a poor prognosis. Mutations in NF1, NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11 and CBL occur in 85% of patients, yet there are currently no risk stratification algorithms capable of predicting which patients will be refractory to conventional treatment and therefore be candidates for experimental therapies. In addition, there have been few other molecular pathways identified aside from the Ras/MAPK pathway to serve as the basis for such novel therapeutic strategies. We therefore sought to genomically characterize serial samples from patients at diagnosis through relapse and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia in order to expand our knowledge of the mutational spectrum in JMML. We identified recurrent mutations in genes involved in signal transduction, gene splicing, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and transcription. Importantly, the number of somatic alterations present at diagnosis appears to be the major determinant of outcome. PMID:26457647

  1. The genomic landscape of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Elliot; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Chang, Tiffany Y; Gelston, Laura C; Wang, Yong-Dong; Mazor, Tali; Esquivel, Emilio; Yu, Ariel; Seepo, Sara; Olsen, Scott R; Rosenberg, Mara; Archambeault, Sophie L; Abusin, Ghada; Beckman, Kyle; Brown, Patrick A; Briones, Michael; Carcamo, Benjamin; Cooper, Todd; Dahl, Gary V; Emanuel, Peter D; Fluchel, Mark N; Goyal, Rakesh K; Hayashi, Robert J; Hitzler, Johann; Hugge, Christopher; Liu, Y Lucy; Messinger, Yoav H; Mahoney, Donald H; Monteleone, Philip; Nemecek, Eneida R; Roehrs, Philip A; Schore, Reuven J; Stine, Kimo C; Takemoto, Clifford M; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Costello, Joseph F; Olshen, Adam B; Stewart, Chip; Li, Yongjin; Ma, Jing; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Getz, Gad; Gruber, Tanja A; Golub, Todd R; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Loh, Mignon L

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of childhood with a poor prognosis. Mutations in NF1, NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11 or CBL occur in 85% of patients, yet there are currently no risk stratification algorithms capable of predicting which patients will be refractory to conventional treatment and could therefore be candidates for experimental therapies. In addition, few molecular pathways aside from the RAS-MAPK pathway have been identified that could serve as the basis for such novel therapeutic strategies. We therefore sought to genomically characterize serial samples from patients at diagnosis through relapse and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia to expand knowledge of the mutational spectrum in JMML. We identified recurrent mutations in genes involved in signal transduction, splicing, Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and transcription. Notably, the number of somatic alterations present at diagnosis appears to be the major determinant of outcome. PMID:26457647

  2. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in a patient with Crohn's disease and exposure to infliximab: a rare clinical presentation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Farhan; Vivekanandarajah, Abhirami; Haddad, Housam; Shutty, Christopher M; Hurford, Matthew T; Dai, Qun

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of potent immunosuppressive and chemotherapeutic medications for various diseases, there is an increased incidence of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms. They are the result of mutational rearrangement and historically, have a grave prognosis compared with de novo myeloid neoplasms. We did a short review on various types of myeloid leukaemias reported after therapy with antitumour necrosis factor and also report, to the best of our knowledge, one among the very few cases of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukaemia in a patient on infliximab therapy for refractory Crohn's disease. The patient responded well to the traditional treatment and is in complete remission for more than 5 years. PMID:24842356

  3. Co-Incidence or Co-Existence? Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in HbE-alpha Thalassaemia: A Case Report with Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Rithika; Rajendran, Aruna; Scott, Julius Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Haemoglobin E (HbE) is a Haemoglobin variant that commonly occurs in many places in Asia. As β thalassaemia and α thalassaemia also occur in the same regions, the co-inheritance of these conditions leads to various phenotypic forms. HbE α thalassaemia is less common and of a milder phenotype than HbE β thalassaemia. Though malignancies are one of the complications in thalassaemia, occurrence of leukaemia is a rare event. Here we present a case of a two-year-old male child co-presenting with pre B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangement and HbE alpha thalassaemia. The child is on remission 12 months post-therapy with standard ALL high risk protocol with no minimal residual disease (MRD). Haematological and oncological conditions coexisting at presentation is a challenge to therapy. This case is described for its rarity. Informed consent has been obtained from the parents. PMID:26672845

  4. Quantification of TEL-AML1 transcript for minimal residual disease assessment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Drunat, S; Olivi, M; Brunie, G; Grandchamp, B; Vilmer, E; Bièche, I; Cavé, H

    2001-08-01

    Strategies currently used for residual disease detection in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) rely on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor rearrangements. The TEL-AML1 fusion transcript, which is associated with t(12;21) (p13;q22), is found in 25% of childhood B-cell precursor ALL, and represents an interesting alternative target. We compared two methods for quantitating TEL-AML1 fusion transcripts: competitive PCR and real-time PCR. These techniques showed similar sensitivity (5 x 10(-5)) and reproducibility. Giving highly correlated results, both techniques can be conveniently used for TEL-AML1 transcript quantification. The constancy of TEL-AML1 expression was evaluated by measuring TEL-AML1 transcripts at different steps of the cell cycle, and in 21 cases of ALL at diagnosis. No major variation in TEL-AML1 expression was observed during the cell cycle or in 20/21 of the ALL patients. Residual disease was then determined after completion of induction therapy in 20 patients with a TEL-AML1-positive ALL. Seven patients out of 20 (35%) were still positive, including two patients with high level of residual blasts (close to or beyond 10(-2)). When comparison was possible, results obtained using TEL-AML1 quantification were in accordance with those obtained using T-cell receptor rearrangements analysis.

  5. PKCζ and PKMζ are overexpressed in TCF3-rearranged paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and are associated with increased thiopurine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hartsink-Segers, S A; Beaudoin, J J; Luijendijk, M W J; Exalto, C; Pieters, R; Den Boer, M L

    2015-02-01

    Both tumour suppressor and oncogenic functions have been ascribed to the atypical zeta isoform of protein kinase C (PKCζ), whereas its constitutively active form PKMζ is almost exclusively expressed in the brain where it has a role in long-term memory. Using primers unique for either isoform, we found that both PKCζ and PKMζ were expressed in a subset of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cases carrying a TCF3 (E2A) chromosomal rearrangement. Combined PKCζ and PKMζ (PKC/Mζ) protein as well as phosphorylation levels were elevated in ALL cases, especially TCF3-rearranged precursor B-ALL cases, compared with normal bone marrow (P<0.01). Furthermore, high PKC/Mζ expression in primary ALL cells was associated with increased sensitivity to 6-thioguanine and 6-mercaptopurine (P<0.01), thiopurines used in ALL treatment. PKCζ is believed to stabilize mismatch-repair protein MSH2, facilitating thiopurine responsiveness in T-ALL. However, PKC/Mζ knockdown in a TCF3-rearranged cell line model decreased MSH2 expression but did not induce thiopurine resistance, indicative that the link between high PKC/Mζ levels and thiopurine sensitivity in paediatric precursor B-ALL is not directly causal. Collectively, our data indicate that thiopurine treatment may be effective, especially in paediatric TCF3-rearranged ALL and other patients with a high expression of PKC/Mζ.

  6. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse <12 months, including refractory patients), FLT3-ITD-positive status and high-risk cytogenetics were the three strongest independent adverse prognostic factors for OS and EFS in this series. We then defined three subgroups with striking different outcomes at 2 years: no adverse factor (favourable, N=36): OS 58%, EFS 45%; one adverse factor (intermediate, N=54): OS 37%, EFS 31%; two or three adverse factors (poor, N=43): OS 12%, EFS 12% (P<10(-4), P=0.001). This new simplified Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  7. Event-free survival and cost-effectiveness in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission treated with allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Orsi, C; Bartolozzi, B; Messori, A; Bosi, A

    2007-10-01

    Allogeneic transplantation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission (ALL-CR1) has been studied in several clinical trials. However, no pooled survival analysis has yet been done. We conducted a survival meta-analysis to compare allogeneic transplantation vs chemotherapy or autologous transplantation using an intention-to-treat approach. Our study included the controlled clinical trials, wherein allocation to allogeneic transplant was based on donor availability. The event-free individual survival data were reconstructed on the basis of published information and Kaplan-Meier graphs. We then generated the meta-analytic event-free survival curves for the two treatments. The mean survival gain per patient was estimated and a simplified cost-effectiveness assessment was carried out. In the allogeneic transplantation group, 293 patients were examined and 479 as controls (four trials). The event-free survival difference was statistically significant (P=0.011). The relative risk for event occurrence was 0.79 for the experimental group vs the controls (95% CI: 0.66-0.96; P=0.017). The mean survival gain was 1 year per patient. The cost per life-year gained was less than the conventional threshold of 50,000 euros. Allogeneic transplantation in ALL-CR1 improves event-free survival as compared to chemotherapy or autologous transplantation. Its cost-effectiveness profile is acceptable. PMID:17660839

  8. A phase 1 clinical trial of vorinostat in combination with decitabine in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Mark; Gojo, Ivana; Goldberg, Stuart L; Bredeson, Christopher; Kujawski, Lisa A; Yang, Allen; Marks, Peter; Frankel, Paul; Sun, Xing; Tosolini, Alessandra; Eid, Joseph E; Lubiniecki, Gregory M; Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) may respond to treatment with epigenetic-modifying agents. Histone deacetylase inhibitors may synergize with hypomethylating agents. This phase 1 dose-escalation study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose, recommended phase 2 dose, safety and tolerability of vorinostat plus decitabine in patients with relapsed/refractory AML, newly-diagnosed AML, or intermediate- to high-grade MDS. Thirty-four patients received concurrent therapy with decitabine plus vorinostat and 37 received sequential therapy with decitabine followed by vorinostat. Twenty-nine patients had relapsed/refractory AML, 31 had untreated AML and 11 had MDS. The target maximum administered dose (MAD) of decitabine 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 d plus vorinostat 400 mg/d for 14 d was achieved for concurrent and sequential schedules, with one dose-limiting toxicity (Grade 3 QTc prolongation) reported in the sequential arm. Common toxicities were haematological and gastrointestinal. Responses were observed more frequently at the MAD on the concurrent schedule compared with the sequential schedule in untreated AML (46% vs. 14%), relapsed/refractory AML (15% vs. 0%) and MDS (60% vs. 0%). Decitabine plus vorinostat given concurrently or sequentially appears to be safe and well-tolerated. Concurrent therapy shows promising clinical activity in AML or MDS, warranting further investigation.

  9. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M.; Fountaine, Thomas J.; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D.; Seif, Alix E.; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K.; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal L.; Gardner, Rebecca A.; Jensen, Michael C.; Shern, Jack F.; Fry, Terry J.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  10. Early and treatment-related deaths in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia in the Nordic countries: 1984-2003.

    PubMed

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Möttönen, Merja; Glosli, Heidi; Jónmundsson, Guðmundur K; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Hasle, Henrik

    2010-12-01

    Despite major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), 5-15% of patients still die from treatment-related complications. In a historical prospective cohort study, we analysed the frequency, clinical features and risk factors for early deaths (ED) and treatment-related deaths (TRD) in 525 children included in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO)-AML-84, -88 and -93 trials. Seventy patients (13%) died before starting treatment or from treatment-related complications. The death rate rose from 11% in NOPHO-AML-84 to 29% in -88, but then fell to 8% in -93. Sixteen patients (3%) died within the first 2 weeks, mainly from bleeding or leucostasis. Hyperleucocytosis, age <2 or ≥10 years were risk factors. After day 15, 10% of patients died from treatment-related complications with infection as the main cause of death. Risk factors were age <2 or ≥10 years and treatment according to the NOPHO-AML-88 protocol. The number of EDs and TRDs in AML is high. Therefore optimal antifungal prophylaxis is essential, and studies on the benefit of antibacterial prophylaxis and individual risk factors for ED and TRD are needed.

  11. JNK and NFκB dependence of apoptosis induced by vinblastine in human acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Eva; Tejedor, M Cristina; Sancho, Pilar; Herráez, Angel; Diez, José C

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between the mitogen-activated protein kinase response, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) expression and the apoptosis in human acute promyelocytic leukaemia NB4 cells treated with vinblastine was investigated in this work. Cell viability, subdiploid DNA and cell cycle were analysed by propidium iodide permeability and flow cytometry analyses. Apoptosis was determined by annexin V-Fluorescein isothiocyanate assays. Western-blot analysis was used for determination of expression levels of apoptotic factors (p53, Bax and Bcl2), intracellular kinases [serine/threonine-specific protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)], NFκB factor and caspases. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was usefully applied to study DNA-NFκB interaction. In NB4 cells, vinblastine produces alteration of p53 and DNA fragmentation. Vinblastine treatment had an antiproliferative effect via the induction of apoptosis producing Bax/Bcl-2 imbalance. Vinblastine treatment suppressed NFκB expression and depressed NFκB-DNA binding activity while maintaining JNK activation that subsequently resulted in apoptotic response through caspase-dependent pathway. Our study provides a possible anti-cancer mechanism of vinblastine action on NB4 cells by deregulation of the intracellular signalling cascade affecting to JNK activation and NFκB expression. Moreover, JNK activation and NFκB depression can be very significant factors in apoptosis induction by vinblastine. PMID:25914345

  12. Pulmonary fungal infections in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: is it the time to revise the radiological diagnostic criteria?

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Francesca; Vetere, Simone; De Felice, Carlo; Al Ansari, Najwa; Micozzi, Alessandra; Gentile, Giuseppe; Foà, Robin; Girmenia, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    The definition of pulmonary fungal infections (PFI) according to the EORTC-MSG criteria may lack diagnostic sensitivity due to the possible presentation of PFI with different radiological pictures. We evaluated the hypothesis to apply less restrictive radiological criteria to define PFI in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) submitted to chemotherapy. Overall, 73 consecutive episodes of pulmonary infiltrates associated to positive serum galactomannan test or fungal isolation or galactomannan detection from respiratory specimens were considered. CT scans acquired at the onset of symptoms (time-0) and within 4 weeks (time-1) were analysed to identify specific (group A) or aspecific radiological signs (group B). Pulmonary infiltrates fulfilled the EORTC-MSG criteria in 49 patients (group A), whereas in 24 patients (group B) they did not reach the criteria due to aspecific CT findings at time-0. Eleven of 21 (52.4%) patients of the group B evaluable for the evolution of the radiological findings fulfilled EORTC-MSG criteria at time-1. All the analysed clinical and mycological characteristics, response to antifungal therapy and survival were comparable in the two groups. Our study seems to confirm the possibility to extend the radiological suspicion of PFI to less restrictive chest CT findings when supported by microbiological criteria in high-risk haematological patients. PMID:26865204

  13. TP53 mutation in patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukaemia treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Middeke, Jan M; Herold, Sylvia; Rücker-Braun, Elke; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Stelljes, Matthias; Kaufmann, Martin; Schäfer-Eckart, Kerstin; Baldus, Claudia D; Stuhlmann, Reingard; Ho, Anthony D; Einsele, Hermann; Rösler, Wolf; Serve, Hubert; Hänel, Mathias; Sohlbach, Kristina; Klesse, Christian; Mohr, Brigitte; Heidenreich, Falk; Stölzel, Friedrich; Röllig, Christoph; Platzbecker, Uwe; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Thiede, Christian; Schetelig, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Treatment success in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is heterogeneous. Cytogenetic and molecular alterations are strong prognostic factors, which have been used to individualize treatment. Here, we studied the impact of TP53 mutations on the outcome of AML patients with adverse cytogenetic risk treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Samples of 97 patients with AML and adverse-risk cytogenetics who had received a HSCT within three randomized trials were analysed. Complete sequencing of the TP53 coding region was performed using next generation sequencing. The median age was 51 years. Overall, TP53 mutations were found in 40 patients (41%). With a median follow up of 67 months, the three-year probabilities of overall survival (OS) and event-free survival for patients with TP53 wild type were 33% [95% confidence interval (CI), 21% to 45%] and 24% (95% CI, 13% to 35%) compared to 10% (95% CI, 0% to 19%) and 8% (95% CI, 0% to 16%) (P = 0·002 and P = 0·007) for those with mutated TP53, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the TP53-mutation status had a negative impact on OS (Hazard Ratio = 1·7; P = 0·066). Mutational analysis of TP53 might be an important additional tool to predict outcome after HSCT in patients with adverse karyotype AML.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism in IL1B is associated with infection risk in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, L; Dix, D; Cellot, S; Gillmeister, B; Ethier, M C; Roslin, N M; Johnston, D L; Feusner, J; Mitchell, D; Lewis, V; Aplenc, R; Yanofsky, R; Portwine, C; Price, V; Zelcer, S; Silva, M; Bowes, L; Michon, B; Stobart, K; Traubici, J; Allen, U; Beyene, J; den Hollander, N; Paterson, A D

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with infection risk in children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We conducted a multicentre, prospective cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. DNA was isolated from blood lymphocytes or buccal swabs, and candidate gene SNP analysis was conducted. Primary outcome was the occurrence of microbiologically documented sterile site infection during chemotherapy. Secondary outcomes were Gram-positive and -negative infections, viridans group streptococcal infection and proven/probable invasive fungal infection. Interpretation was guided by consistency in risk alleles and microbiologic agent with previous literature. Over the study period 254 children and adolescents with AML were enrolled. Overall, 190 (74.8%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. Among the 172 with inferred European ancestry and DNA available, nine significant associations were observed; two were consistent with previous literature. Allele A at IL1B (rs16944) was associated with decreased microbiologically documented infection, and allele G at IL10 (rs1800896) was associated with increased risk of Gram-positive infection. We identified SNPs associated with infection risk in paediatric AML. Genotype may provide insight into mechanisms of infection risk that could be used for supportive-care novel treatments.

  15. Interleukin-18 produced by bone marrow-derived stromal cells supports T-cell acute leukaemia progression

    PubMed Central

    Uzan, Benjamin; Poglio, Sandrine; Gerby, Bastien; Wu, Ching-Lien; Gross, Julia; Armstrong, Florence; Calvo, Julien; Cahu, Xavier; Deswarte, Caroline; Dumont, Florent; Passaro, Diana; Besnard-Guérin, Corinne; Leblanc, Thierry; Baruchel, André; Landman-Parker, Judith; Ballerini, Paola; Baud, Véronique; Ghysdael, Jacques; Baleydier, Frédéric; Porteu, Francoise; Pflumio, Francoise

    2014-01-01

    Development of novel therapies is critical for T-cell acute leukaemia (T-ALL). Here, we investigated the effect of inhibiting the MAPK/MEK/ERK pathway on T-ALL cell growth. Unexpectedly, MEK inhibitors (MEKi) enhanced growth of 70% of human T-ALL cell samples cultured on stromal cells independently of NOTCH activation and maintained their ability to propagate in vivo. Similar results were obtained when T-ALL cells were cultured with ERK1/2-knockdown stromal cells or with conditioned medium from MEKi-treated stromal cells. Microarray analysis identified interleukin 18 (IL-18) as transcriptionally up-regulated in MEKi-treated MS5 cells. Recombinant IL-18 promoted T-ALL growth in vitro, whereas the loss of function of IL-18 receptor in T-ALL blast cells decreased blast proliferation in vitro and in NSG mice. The NFKB pathway that is downstream to IL-18R was activated by IL-18 in blast cells. IL-18 circulating levels were increased in T-ALL-xenografted mice and also in T-ALL patients in comparison with controls. This study uncovers a novel role of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18 and outlines the microenvironment involvement in human T-ALL development. PMID:24778454

  16. CD19 CAR immune pressure induces B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia lineage switch exposing inherent leukaemic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Nguyen, Sang M; Fountaine, Thomas J; Welp, Kathryn; Gryder, Berkley; Qin, Haiying; Yang, Yinmeng; Chien, Christopher D; Seif, Alix E; Lei, Haiyan; Song, Young K; Khan, Javed; Lee, Daniel W; Mackall, Crystal L; Gardner, Rebecca A; Jensen, Michael C; Shern, Jack F; Fry, Terry J

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) expressing T cells targeting the CD19 B lineage receptor has demonstrated marked success in relapsed pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Persisting CAR-T cells generate sustained pressure against CD19 that may drive unique mechanisms of resistance. Pre-B ALL originates from a committed pre-B cell or an earlier progenitor, with potential to reprogram into other hematopoietic lineages. Here we report changes in lineage markers including myeloid conversion in patients following CD19 CAR therapy. Using murine ALL models we study the long-term effects of CD19 CAR-T cells and demonstrate partial or complete lineage switch as a consistent mechanism of CAR resistance depending on the underlying genetic oncogenic driver. Deletion of Pax5 or Ebf1 recapitulates lineage reprogramming occurring during CD19 CAR pressure. Our findings establish lineage switch as a mechanism of CAR resistance exposing inherent plasticity in genetic subtypes of pre-B-cell ALL. PMID:27460500

  17. Outcome after cessation of therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Jankovic, M; Fraschini, D; Amici, A; Aricò, M; Arrighini, A; Basso, G; Colella, R; DiTullio, M T; Haupt, R; Macchia, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 2192 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who had reached cessation of therapy in complete remission were followed for a median time of 52 months after treatment suspension. Of the 485 relapses observed, 62.3% occurred in the first year off therapy and 68.9% involved the bone marrow. Eight relapses were reported more than 5 years (62-143 months) after treatment withdrawal. Males fared worse than females consistently, experiencing 1.5 times more relapses (P < 0.0001). Thirteen patients died in continuous complete remission, 5 because of non-neoplastic central nervous system complications. There were 11 second solid malignancies, 8 of them in the central nervous system; 9 subjects presented an haematopoietic malignancy after ALL. The projected event-free survival at 8 years is 73%. Twenty-two of the 171 young adults (age > 20 years) were married and 16 have had 21 healthy children. Twenty-four per cent of patients experienced an unfavourable event. Relapses accounted for 93% of failures. Central nervous system late effects and second malignancies were the major causes of non-leukaemic morbidity and mortality.

  18. Inherited coding variants at the CDKN2A locus influence susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Wenjian; Yadav, Rachita; Morrison, Alanna C.; Qian, Maoxiang; Devidas, Meenakshi; Liu, Yu; Perez-Andreu, Virginia; Zhao, Xujie; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Lupo, Philip J.; Neale, Geoff; Raetz, Elizabeth; Larsen, Eric; Bowman, W. Paul; Carroll, William L.; Winick, Naomi; Williams, Richard; Hansen, Torben; Holm, Jens-Christian; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Pui, Ching-Hon; Zhang, Jinghui; Mullighan, Charles G.; Evans, William E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Gupta, Ramneek; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Loh, Mignon L.; Relling, Mary V.; Yang, Jun J.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence from genome-wide association studies for a strong inherited genetic basis of susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children, yet the effects of protein-coding variants on ALL risk have not been systematically evaluated. Here we show a missense variant in CDKN2A associated with the development of ALL at genome-wide significance (rs3731249, P=9.4 × 10−23, odds ratio=2.23). Functional studies indicate that this hypomorphic variant results in reduced tumour suppressor function of p16INK4A, increases the susceptibility to leukaemic transformation of haematopoietic progenitor cells, and is preferentially retained in ALL tumour cells. Resequencing the CDKN2A–CDKN2B locus in 2,407 childhood ALL cases reveals 19 additional putative functional germline variants. These results provide direct functional evidence for the influence of inherited genetic variation on ALL risk, highlighting the important and complex roles of CDKN2A–CDKN2B tumour suppressors in leukaemogenesis. PMID:26104880

  19. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and <0.01), with a 5-year RFS of 38%, 50% and 71%, respectively (p=0.002). Cytogenetics is the most relevant prognosis factor in AML, however intermediate risk cytogenetics represent a grey zone that require other biomarkers for risk stratification, and we show that MRD evaluation discriminate three prognostic subgroups (p=0.03). Also, MRD assessments yielded relevant information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics. PMID:26598032

  20. Minimal residual disease evaluation by flow cytometry is a complementary tool to cytogenetics for treatment decisions in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Vidriales, María-Belén; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Pegenaute, Carlota; Castellanos, Marta; Pérez, José-Juan; Chandía, Mauricio; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Rayón, Consuelo; de Las Heras, Natalia; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Cabezudo, Miguel; de Coca, Alfonso García; Alonso, Jose M; Olivier, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Montesinos, Pau; Fernández, Rosa; García-Suárez, Julio; García, Magdalena; Sayas, María-José; Paiva, Bruno; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-01-01

    The clinical utility of minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not yet defined. We analysed the prognostic impact of MRD level at complete remision after induction therapy using multiparameter flow cytometry in 306 non-APL AML patients. First, we validated the prognostic value of MRD-thresholds we have previously proposed (≥ 0.1%; ≥ 0.01-0.1%; and <0.01), with a 5-year RFS of 38%, 50% and 71%, respectively (p=0.002). Cytogenetics is the most relevant prognosis factor in AML, however intermediate risk cytogenetics represent a grey zone that require other biomarkers for risk stratification, and we show that MRD evaluation discriminate three prognostic subgroups (p=0.03). Also, MRD assessments yielded relevant information on favourable and adverse cytogenetics, since patients with favourable cytogenetics and high MRD levels have poor prognosis and patients with adverse cytogenetics but undetectable MRD overcomes the adverse prognosis. Interestingly, in patients with intermediate or high MRD levels, intensification with transplant improved the outcome as compared with chemotherapy, while the type of intensification therapy did not influenced the outcome of patients with low MRD levels. Multivariate analysis revealed age, MRD and cytogenetics as independent variables. Moreover, a scoring system, easy in clinical practice, was generated based on MRD level and cytogenetics.

  1. High event-free survival rate with minimum-dose-anthracycline treatment in childhood acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a nationwide prospective study by the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Yuza, Yuki; Moritake, Hiroshi; Terui, Kiminori; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Nakayama, Hideki; Shimada, Akira; Kudo, Kazuko; Taki, Tomohiko; Yabe, Miharu; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuka; Koike, Kazutoshi; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Taga, Takashi; Saito, Akiko M; Horibe, Keizo; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Miyachi, Hayato; Tawa, Akio; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of treatment using reduced cumulative doses of anthracyclines in children with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-P05 study. All patients received two and three subsequent courses of induction and consolidation chemotherapy respectively, consisting of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), cytarabine and anthracyclines, followed by maintenance therapy with ATRA. Notably, a single administration of anthracyclines was introduced in the second induction and all consolidation therapies to minimize total doses of anthracycline. The 3-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival rates for 43 eligible children were 83·6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 68·6-91·8%] and 90·7% (95% CI: 77·1-96·4%), respectively. Although two patients died of intracranial haemorrhage or infection during induction phases, no cardiac adverse events or treatment-related deaths were observed during subsequent phases. Patients not displaying M1 marrow after the first induction therapy, or those under 5 years of age at diagnosis, showed inferior outcomes (3-year EFS rate; 33·3% (95% CI: 19·3-67·6%) and 54·6% (95% CI: 22·9-78·0%), respectively). In conclusion, a single administration of anthracycline during each consolidation phase was sufficient for treating childhood APL. In younger children, however, conventional ATRA and chemotherapy may be insufficient so that alternative therapies should be considered.

  2. Outcome in 146 patients with paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AML99 protocol in the period 2003-06 from the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Kanai, Rie; Shimada, Akira; Terui, Kiminori; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Tawa, Akio; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Hori, Hiroki; Horibe, Keizo; Oda, Megumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2012-10-01

    The acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 99 trial conducted previously in Japan for the treatment of de novo paediatric AML showed excellent results, with a 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of 75·6% and 61·6%, respectively. To examine reproducibility of these results in another cohort, the outcome of 146 newly diagnosed AML paediatric patients prospectively registered in the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study (JACLS) from 2003 to 2006 was compared to that of 240 patients in the original AML 99 clinical trial. The 5-year EFS and OS achieved in the new cohort was 66·7 ± 4·0% and 77·7 ± 8·0% respectively, which were comparable to those obtained in the original AML 99 clinical trial, although less frequent core-binding factor (CBF) AML (29·5% vs. 37%) and an almost equal frequency of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) during first complete remission (16·5% vs. 19%) were observed. The 5-year EFS in patients with a normal karyotype (NK) (n = 35, 54·9 ± 15·1%) was inferior in the present cohort when compared to the original AML99 trial. This study confirmed the excellent outcome of the original AML99 protocol.

  3. Aetiology of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Eden, Tim

    2010-06-01

    The acute leukaemias account for about 30% of all malignancy seen in childhood across the Western world. A peak incidence of precursor B cell ALL has emerged as socio-economic conditions have improved in countries worldwide. From twin studies and the use of neonatal blood spots it has been possible to back track the first initiating genetic events within critical haemopoietic cells to foetal development in utero for most precursor B cell ALL and some cases of AML. These events may occur as part of normal foetal development. Whether other factors (environmental or constitutional) are involved to increase the chance of these first genetic changes happening is unclear. For some leukaemias (e.g. infant MLL positive ALL) the first event appears adequate to create a malignant clone but for the majority of ALL and AML further 'genetic' changes are required, probably postnatal. Many environmental factors have been proposed as causative for leukaemia but only ionising irradiation and certain chemicals, e.g. benzene and cytotoxics (alkylators and topoisomerase II inhibitors) have been confirmed and then principally for acute myeloid leukaemia. It appears increasingly likely that delayed, dysregulated responses to 'common' infectious agents play a major part in the conversion of pre-leukaemic clones into overt precursor B cell ALL, the most common form of childhood leukaemia. Constitutional polymorphic alleleic variants in immune response genes (especially the HLA Class II proteins) and cytokines may play a role in determining the type of immune response. High penetrance germ-line mutations are involved in only about 5% of childhood leukaemias (more in AML than ALL). There is little evidence to support any role of viral transformation in causation, unlike in animals. Other environmental factors for which some evidence exists include non-ionising electromagnetic radiation and electric fields, although their mode of action in leukaemogenesis remains unclear. There is no single

  4. [Drug treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. Current options and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Telek, Béla; Rejtő, László; Batár, Péter; Miltényi, Zsófia; Reményi, Gyula; Simon, Zsófia; Ujj, Zsófia; Mezei, Gabriella; Szász, Róbert; Kiss, Attila; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Árpád

    2016-05-29

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is a heterogeneous disease. Recent molecular mutational analysis techniques have shed more light on different, genetically well characterised types of the disease. Treatment approach is uniform except for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Application of the "3 + 7" induction treatment has been the gold standard in the past 40 years. While the dose of cytarabine has not been changed, escalating daunorubicine dose in younger (<60 years) patients with good performance status to 90 mg/m(2) had a positive impact on overall survival. High dose chemotherapy is tolerated poorly in patients older than 60 years of age and, as treatment is not curative in the elderly, improvement of overall survival and quality of life remains the main goal of management in these patients. Low intensity treatment is beneficial and can provide additional advantage over supportive care. Innovative and targeted therapy approaches might give promise to better management of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.

  5. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn++-chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4– but not (R)-2 – caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  6. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vanna, R; Ronchi, P; Lenferink, A T M; Tresoldi, C; Morasso, C; Mehn, D; Bedoni, M; Picciolini, S; Terstappen, L W M M; Ciceri, F; Otto, C; Gramatica, F

    2015-02-21

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducible. Therefore, the development of subjective and potentially automatable methods for the recognition of typical AML/MDS cells is necessary. Here we have used Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing myeloblasts, promyelocytes, abnormal promyelocytes and erhytroblasts, which have to be counted for a correct diagnosis and morphological classification of AML and MDS. BM samples from patients affected by four different AML subtypes, mostly characterized by the presence of the four subpopulations selected for this study, were analyzed. First, each cell was scanned by acquiring 4096 spectra, thus obtaining Raman images which demonstrate an accurate description of morphological features characteristic of each subpopulation. Raman imaging coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the automatic discrimination and localization of the nucleus, the cytoplasm, myeloperoxidase containing granules and haemoglobin. Second, the averaged Raman fingerprint of each cell was analysed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis) in order to study the typical vibrational features of each subpopulation and also for the automatic recognition of cells. The leave-one-out cross validation of a Raman-based classification model demonstrated the correct classification of myeloblasts, promyelocytes (normal/abnormal) and erhytroblasts with an accuracy of 100%. Normal and abnormal promyelocytes were distinguished with 95% accuracy. The overall classification accuracy considering the four subpopulations was 98%. This proof-of-concept study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy could be a valid approach for developing label-free, objective and automatic

  7. Minimal residual disease assessed by multi-parameter flow cytometry is highly prognostic in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ravandi, Farhad; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; O'Brien, Susan M; Jabbour, Elias; Thomas, Deborah A; Borthakur, Gautam; Garris, Rebecca; Huang, Xuelin; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Burger, Jan A; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William; Kadia, Tapan; Jain, Nitin; Wang, Sa A; Konoplev, Sergei; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; McCue, Deborah; Estrov, Zeev; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2016-02-01

    The prognostic value of minimal residual disease (MRD) assessed by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was investigated among 340 adult patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) treated between 2004 and 2014 using regimens including the hyperCVAD (hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone, methotrexate, cytarabine) backbone. Among them, 323 (95%) achieved complete remission (CR) and were included in this study. Median age was 52 years (range, 15-84). Median white blood cell count (WBC) was 9·35 × 10(9) /l (range, 0·4-658·1 ×1 0(9) /l). MRD by MFC was initially assessed with a sensitivity of 0·01%, using a 15-marker, 4-colour panel and subsequently a 6-colour panel on bone marrow specimens obtained at CR achievement and at approximately 3 month intervals thereafter. MRD negative status at CR was associated with improved disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) (P = 0·004 and P = 0·03, respectively). Similarly, achieving MRD negative status at approximately 3 and 6 months was associated with improved DFS (P = 0·004 and P < 0·0001, respectively) and OS (P = 0·004 and P < 0·0001, respectively). Multivariate analysis including age, WBC at presentation, cytogenetics (standard versus high risk) and MRD status at CR, 3 and 6 months, indicated that MRD negative status at CR was an independent predictor of DFS (P < 0·05). Achievement of an MRD negative state assessed by MFC is an important predictor of DFS and OS in adult patients with ALL.

  8. Prospective molecular monitoring of BCR/ABL transcript in children with Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia unravels differences in treatment response.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Lanciotti, Marina; Rossi, Vincenzo; Di Martino, Daniela; Aricò, Maurizio; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Basso, Giuseppe; Masera, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Biondi, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    Children with Philadelphia-chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) represent a subgroup at very high risk for treatment failure, despite intensive chemotherapy. However, recent retrospective studies showed that Ph+ childhood ALL is a heterogeneous disease with regard to treatment response. We have prospectively monitored, by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) during follow-up, the presence of the BCR/ABL fusion transcript in Ph+ ALL children diagnosed in the Italian multicentre Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica ALL-AIEOP-95 therapy protocol. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) in childhood Ph+ ALL prospectively enrolled in an intensive, Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM)-type treatment protocol. Twenty-seven of 36 (75.0%) Ph+ patients consecutively enrolled into the high-risk group of the AIEOP-ALL protocol between May 1995 and October 1999 were successfully analysed. Twenty were good responders to the pre-phase of prednisone/intrathecal methotrexate treatment (PGR) and seven were poor responders (PPR). Within the PPR group, the RT-PCR monitoring constantly showed positivity for the BCR/ABL fusion transcript and all the patients died of disease progression. In contrast, highly sensitive qualitative RT-PCR monitoring revealed heterogeneity within the PGR group of Ph+ childhood ALL patients. Three different subgroups could be defined, according to the clearance of Ph+ cells within the first 5 months of treatment. This provides useful information on the capability of chemotherapy to reduce the leukaemic clone, with prognostic implications.

  9. Clinical characteristics, outcome and early induction deaths in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a five-year experience at a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Farheen; Shaikh, Usman; Adil, Salman Naseem; Khurshid, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a distinct clinical and biological subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia. APL is notorious for causing early death during induction therapy, resulting in induction failure. The aim of our study was to report the clinical characteristics, outcome and early induction deaths with regard to patients with APL seen at our hospital. METHODS This was a retrospective study carried out at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Patients aged > 15 years diagnosed with APL within the period September 2007–September 2012 were included in the study. RESULTS Within the study period, 26 patients were diagnosed with APL based on morphology and the detection of t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) and promyelocytic leukaemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML-RARA). The male to female ratio was 1:1. The median age of the patients was 41 (range 16–72) years. In all, there were 13 (50.0%) high-risk patients, and early induction death rate was 61.5%. Causes of early induction deaths (n = 16) included haemorrhage in 7 (43.8%) patients, differentiation (ATRA) syndrome in 7 (43.8%) and infection in 2 (12.5%). The survival rate among patients who survived the early period was 70% at 42 months. The relapse rate was 30%. CONCLUSION Early induction death rate was very high in patients with APL. The most common cause of early induction death in our study was haemorrhage. Outcome among patients with APL was found to be better among those who survived the initial period. PMID:25189308

  10. Second allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed acute and chronic leukaemias for patients who underwent a first allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: a survey of the Société Française de Greffe de moelle (SFGM).

    PubMed

    Michallet, M; Tanguy, M L; Socié, G; Thiébaut, A; Belhabri, A; Milpied, N; Reiffers, J; Kuentz, M; Cahn, J Y; Blaise, D; Demeocq, F; Jouet, J P; Michallet, A S; Ifrah, N; Vilmer, E; Molina, L; Michel, G; Lioure, B; Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Pico, J L; Sadoun, A; Guyotat, D; Attal, M; Curé, H; Bordigoni, P; Sutton, L; Buzyn-Veil, A; Tilly, M; Keoirruer, N; Feguex, N

    2000-02-01

    Although recurrent malignancy is the most frequent indication for second stem cell transplantation (2nd SCT), there are few reports that include sufficiently large numbers of patients to enable prognostic factor analysis. This retrospective study includes 150 patients who underwent a 2nd SCT for relapsed acute myeloblastic leukaemia (n = 61), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 47) or chronic myeloid leukaemia (n = 42) after a first allogeneic transplant (including 26 T-cell-depleted). The median interval between the first transplant and relapse, and between relapse and second transplant was 17 months and 5 months respectively. After the 2nd SCT, engraftment occurred in 93% of cases, 32% of patients developed acute graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) >/= grade II and 38% chronic GVHD. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival were 32 +/- 8% and 30 +/- 8%, respectively, with a risk of relapse of 44 +/- 12% and a transplant-related mortality of 45 +/- 9%. In a multivariate analysis, five factors were associated with a better outcome after 2nd SCT: age < 16 years at second transplant; relapse occurring more than 12 months after the first transplant; transplantation from a female donor; absence of acute GVHD; and the occurrence of chronic GVHD. The best candidates for a second transplant are likely to be patients with acute leukaemia in remission before transplant, in whom the HLA-identical donor was female and who relapsed more than 1 year after the first transplant.

  11. Oxindole alkaloids from Uncaria tomentosa induce apoptosis in proliferating, G0/G1-arrested and bcl-2-expressing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Nicole; Tiefenthaler, Martin; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Ausserlechner, Michael J; Kofler, Reinhard; Konwalinka, Günther

    2006-03-01

    Natural products are still an untapped source of promising lead compounds for the generation of antineoplastic drugs. Here, we investigated for the first time the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of highly purified oxindole alkaloids, namely isopteropodine (A1), pteropodine (A2), isomitraphylline (A3), uncarine F (A4) and mitraphylline (A5) obtained from Uncaria tomentosa, a South American Rubiaceae, on human lymphoblastic leukaemia T cells (CCRF-CEM-C7H2). Four of the five tested alkaloids inhibited proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Furthermore, the antiproliferative effect of the most potent alkaloids pteropodine (A2) and uncarine F (A4) correlated with induction of apoptosis. After 48 h, 100 micromol/l A2 or A4 increased apoptotic cells by 57%. CEM-C7H2 sublines with tetracycline-regulated expression of bcl-2, p16ink4A or constitutively expressing the cowpox virus protein crm-A were used for further studies of the apoptosis-inducing properties of these alkaloids. Neither overexpression of bcl-2 or crm-A nor cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase by tetracycline-regulated expression of p16INK4A could prevent alkaloid-induced apoptosis. Our results show the strong apoptotic effects of pteropodine and uncarine F on acute leukaemic lymphoblasts and recommend the alkaloids for further studies in xenograft models.

  12. The genetic landscape of paediatric de novo acute myeloid leukaemia as defined by single nucleotide polymorphism array and exon sequencing of 100 candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Linda; Zettermark, Sofia; Biloglav, Andrea; Castor, Anders; Behrendtz, Mikael; Forestier, Erik; Paulsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of a consecutive series of 67 paediatric (median age 8 years; range 0-17) de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients revealed aberrations in 55 (82%) cases. The most common subgroups were KMT2A rearrangement (29%), normal karyotype (15%), RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (10%), deletions of 5q, 7q and/or 17p (9%), myeloid leukaemia associated with Down syndrome (7%), PML-RARA (7%) and CBFB-MYH11 (5%). Single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) analysis and exon sequencing of 100 genes, performed in 52 and 40 cases, respectively (39 overlapping), revealed ≥1 aberration in 89%; when adding cytogenetic data, this frequency increased to 98%. Uniparental isodisomies (UPIDs) were detected in 13% and copy number aberrations (CNAs) in 63% (median 2/case); three UPIDs and 22 CNAs were recurrent. Twenty-two genes were targeted by focal CNAs, including AEBP2 and PHF6 deletions and genes involved in AML-associated gene fusions. Deep sequencing identified mutations in 65% of cases (median 1/case). In total, 60 mutations were found in 30 genes, primarily those encoding signalling proteins (47%), transcription factors (25%), or epigenetic modifiers (13%). Twelve genes (BCOR, CEBPA, FLT3, GATA1, KIT, KRAS, NOTCH1, NPM1, NRAS, PTPN11, SMC3 and TP53) were recurrently mutated. We conclude that SNP-A and deep sequencing analyses complement the cytogenetic diagnosis of paediatric AML.

  13. The genetic landscape of paediatric de novo acute myeloid leukaemia as defined by single nucleotide polymorphism array and exon sequencing of 100 candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Linda; Zettermark, Sofia; Biloglav, Andrea; Castor, Anders; Behrendtz, Mikael; Forestier, Erik; Paulsson, Kajsa; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of a consecutive series of 67 paediatric (median age 8 years; range 0-17) de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients revealed aberrations in 55 (82%) cases. The most common subgroups were KMT2A rearrangement (29%), normal karyotype (15%), RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (10%), deletions of 5q, 7q and/or 17p (9%), myeloid leukaemia associated with Down syndrome (7%), PML-RARA (7%) and CBFB-MYH11 (5%). Single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) analysis and exon sequencing of 100 genes, performed in 52 and 40 cases, respectively (39 overlapping), revealed ≥1 aberration in 89%; when adding cytogenetic data, this frequency increased to 98%. Uniparental isodisomies (UPIDs) were detected in 13% and copy number aberrations (CNAs) in 63% (median 2/case); three UPIDs and 22 CNAs were recurrent. Twenty-two genes were targeted by focal CNAs, including AEBP2 and PHF6 deletions and genes involved in AML-associated gene fusions. Deep sequencing identified mutations in 65% of cases (median 1/case). In total, 60 mutations were found in 30 genes, primarily those encoding signalling proteins (47%), transcription factors (25%), or epigenetic modifiers (13%). Twelve genes (BCOR, CEBPA, FLT3, GATA1, KIT, KRAS, NOTCH1, NPM1, NRAS, PTPN11, SMC3 and TP53) were recurrently mutated. We conclude that SNP-A and deep sequencing analyses complement the cytogenetic diagnosis of paediatric AML. PMID:27022003

  14. The Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitor NMS-P937 is effective in a new model of disseminated primary CD56+ acute monoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Casolaro, Alessia; Golay, Josee; Albanese, Clara; Ceruti, Roberta; Patton, Veronica; Cribioli, Sabrina; Pezzoni, Alice; Losa, Marco; Texido, Gemma; Giussani, Ursula; Marchesi, Francesco; Amboldi, Nadia; Valsasina, Barbara; Bungaro, Silvia; Cazzaniga, Gianni; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Pesenti, Enrico; Alzani, Rachele

    2013-01-01

    CD56 is expressed in 15-20% of acute myeloid leukaemias (AML) and is associated with extramedullary diffusion, multidrug resistance and poor prognosis. We describe the establishment and characterisation of a novel disseminated model of AML (AML-NS8), generated by injection into mice of leukaemic blasts freshly isolated from a patient with an aggressive CD56(+) monoblastic AML (M5a). The model reproduced typical manifestations of this leukaemia, including presence of extramedullary masses and central nervous system involvement, and the original phenotype, karyotype and genotype of leukaemic cells were retained in vivo. Recently Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) has emerged as a new candidate drug target in AML. We therefore tested our PLK1 inhibitor NMS-P937 in this model either in the engraftment or in the established disease settings. Both schedules showed good efficacy compared to standard therapies, with a significant increase in median survival time (MST) expecially in the established disease setting (MST = 28, 36, 62 days for vehicle, cytarabine and NMS-P937, respectively). Importantly, we could also demonstrate that NMS-P937 induced specific biomarker modulation in extramedullary tissues. This new in vivo model of CD56(+) AML that recapitulates the human tumour lends support for the therapeutic use of PLK1 inhibitors in AML.

  15. PIM and AKT kinase inhibitors show synergistic cytotoxicity in acute myeloid leukaemia that is associated with convergence on mTOR and MCL1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Meja, Koremu; Stengel, Chloe; Sellar, Rob; Huszar, Dennis; Davies, Barry R; Gale, Rosemary E; Linch, David C; Khwaja, Asim

    2014-10-01

    PIM kinases (PIM1, 2 and 3) are involved in cell proliferation and survival signalling and are emerging targets for the therapy of various malignancies. We found that a significant proportion of primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples showed PIM1 and PIM2 expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a novel ATP-competitive pan-PIM inhibitor, AZD1897, on AML cell growth and survival. PIM inhibition showed limited single agent activity in AML cell lines and primary AML cells, including those with or without FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. However, significant synergy was seen when AZD1897 was combined with the Akt inhibitor AZD5363, a compound that is in early-phase clinical trials. AML cells from putative leukaemia stem cell subsets, including CD34+38- and CD34+38+ fractions, were equivalently affected by dual PIM/Akt inhibition when compared with bulk tumour cells. Analysis of downstream signalling pathways showed that combined PIM/Akt inhibition downregulated mTOR outputs (phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and S6) and markedly reduced levels of the anti-apoptotic protein MCL1. The combination of PIM and Akt inhibition holds promise for the treatment of AML. PMID:24975213

  16. Second reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplant as a rescue strategy for acute leukaemia patients who relapse after an initial RIC allogeneic transplantation: analysis of risk factors and treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vrhovac, R; Labopin, M; Ciceri, F; Finke, J; Holler, E; Tischer, J; Lioure, B; Gribben, J; Kanz, L; Blaise, D; Dreger, P; Held, G; Arnold, R; Nagler, A; Mohty, M

    2016-02-01

    Limited therapeutic options are available after relapse of acute leukaemia following first reduced intensity conditioning haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (RIC1). A retrospective study on European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry data was performed on 234 adult patients with acute leukaemia who received a second RIC transplantation (RIC2) from 2000 to 2012 as a salvage treatment for relapse following RIC1. At the time of RIC2, 167 patients (71.4%) had relapsed or refractory disease, 49 (20.9%) were in second CR and 18 (7.7%) in third or higher CR. With a median follow-up of 21 (1.5-79) months after RIC2, 51 patients are still alive. At 2 years, the cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse incidence (RI), leukaemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were 22.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 17-28.4), 63.9% (56.7-70.1), 14.6% (8.8-18.5) and 20.5% (14.9-26.1), respectively. In patients with acute myelogenous, biphenotypic and undifferentiated leukaemia (representing 89.8% of all patients), duration of remission following RIC1 >225 days, presence of CR at RIC2, patient's Karnofsky performance status >80 at RIC2 and non-myeloablative conditioning were found to be the strongest predictors of patients' favourable outcome.

  17. Peripheral blood CD5-positive B lymphocytes (B-1a cells) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; de Sabata, Donata; Ledro, Silvia; Vella, Antonio; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Benedetti, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Only few data are available in literature regarding the reconstitution of B-1a cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation performed for haematological malignancies. Methods In this study we used flow cytometry to assess the reconstitution of the peripheral blood B-1a cell compartment after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cytometric analyses were performed over time on 11 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in our Haematology Unit and the results were compared with available data regarding B-1a cell reconstitution after allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Results In spite of an earlier recovery of B-1a cells in the peripheral blood after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the reconstitution of this B-cell subset was similar, regardless of the source of stem cells employed. Conclusions Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the origin of B-1a cells in humans in health and illness. PMID:19112737

  18. The outcomes and treatment burden of childhood acute myeloid leukaemia in Australia, 1997-2008: A report from the Australian Paediatric Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Foresto, Steven A; Youlden, Danny R; Baade, Peter D; Hallahan, Andrew R; Aitken, Joanne F; Moore, Andrew S

    2015-09-01

    Childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) requires intensive therapy and is associated with survival rates that are substantially inferior to many other childhood malignancies. We undertook a retrospective analysis of Australian Paediatric Cancer Registry data from 1997 to 2008 together with a single-centre audit during the same period assessing burden on service delivery at a tertiary children's hospital (Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane). Although survival improved from 54.3% (1997-2002) to 69.2% (2003-2008), childhood AML caused a disproportionate number of childhood cancer deaths, accounting for 5.5% of all childhood cancer diagnoses yet 7.9% of all childhood cancer mortality. Furthermore, treatment was associated with significant toxicity requiring intensive use of local health resources. Novel therapeutic strategies aimed at improving survival and reducing toxicity are urgently required.

  19. Identification of ETV6-RUNX1-like and DUX4-rearranged subtypes in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Henningsson, Rasmus; Hyrenius-Wittsten, Axel; Olsson, Linda; Orsmark-Pietras, Christina; von Palffy, Sofia; Askmyr, Maria; Rissler, Marianne; Schrappe, Martin; Cario, Gunnar; Castor, Anders; Pronk, Cornelis J. H.; Behrendtz, Mikael; Mitelman, Felix; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa; Andersson, Anna K.; Fontes, Magnus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2016-01-01

    Fusion genes are potent driver mutations in cancer. In this study, we delineate the fusion gene landscape in a consecutive series of 195 paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP ALL). Using RNA sequencing, we find in-frame fusion genes in 127 (65%) cases, including 27 novel fusions. We describe a subtype characterized by recurrent IGH-DUX4 or ERG-DUX4 fusions, representing 4% of cases, leading to overexpression of DUX4 and frequently co-occurring with intragenic ERG deletions. Furthermore, we identify a subtype characterized by an ETV6-RUNX1-like gene-expression profile and coexisting ETV6 and IKZF1 alterations. Thus, this study provides a detailed overview of fusion genes in paediatric BCP ALL and adds new pathogenetic insights, which may improve risk stratification and provide therapeutic options for this disease. PMID:27265895

  20. Treatment outcome of CRLF2-rearranged childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a comparative analysis of the AIEOP-BFM and UK NCRI-CCLG study groups.

    PubMed

    Attarbaschi, Andishe; Morak, Maria; Cario, Gunnar; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Ensor, Hannah M; te Kronnie, Truus; Bradtke, Jutta; Mann, Georg; Vendramini, Elena; Palmi, Chiara; Schwab, Claire; Russell, Lisa J; Schrappe, Martin; Conter, Valentino; Mitchell, Christopher D; Strehl, Sabine; Zimmermann, Martin; Pötschger, Ulrike; Harrison, Christine J; Stanulla, Martin; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Haas, Oskar A; Moorman, Anthony V

    2012-09-01

    The prognostic relevance of CRLF2 -rearrangements in childhood acute B-cell precursor lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), was assessed by a comparative analysis of 114 non-Down-syndrome patients (99 P2RY8-CRLF2+ , 15 IGH@-CRLF2+ ), 76 from the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000 and 38 from the MRC ALL97 trials. The 6-year cumulative relapse incidence of P2RY8-CRLF2+ patients treated on the two trials was not statistically different: 0·37 ± 0·06 vs. 0·25 ± 0·08 (P = 0·194). In contrast, 0/9 IGH@-CRLF2+ AIEOP-BFM, but 5/6 ALL97 patients relapsed. Conclusively, P2RY8-CRLF2+ patients had an intermediate protocol-independent outcome while the different prognosis of IGH@-CRLF2+ patients could be related to the different structures of the applied treatment protocols.

  1. Conventional and high-dose daunorubicin and idarubicin in acute myeloid leukaemia remission induction treatment: a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of 7258 patients.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Leo; Morais, Vinícius Daudt; Lima, Karine Margarites; Onsten, Tor Gunnar Hugo; Ziegelmann, Patrícia Klarmann; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini

    2015-12-01

    Previous meta-analyses suggested that acute myeloid leukaemia induction regimens containing idarubicin (IDA) or high-dose daunorubicin (HDD) induce higher rates of complete remission (CR) than conventional-dose daunorubicin (CDD), with a possible benefit in overall survival. However, robust comparisons between these regimens are still lacking. We conducted a mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis regarding these three regimens. Mixed treatment comparison is a statistical method of data summarization that aggregates data from both direct and indirect effect estimates. Literature search strategy included MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Scielo and LILACS, from inception until August 2013 and resulted in the inclusion of 17 trials enrolling 7258 adult patients. HDD [relative risk (RR) 1.13; 95% credible interval (CrI) 1.02-1.26] and IDA (RR 1.13; 95% CrI 1.05-1.23) showed higher CR rates than CDD. IDA also led to lower long-term overall mortality rates when compared with CDD (RR 0.93, 95% CrI 0.86-0.99), whereas HDD and CDD were no different (RR 0.94, 95% CrI 0.85-1.02). HDD and IDA comparison did not reach statistically significant differences in CR (RR 1.00; 95% CrI 0.89-1.11) and in long-term mortality (RR 1.01, 95% CrI 0.91-1.11). IDA and HDD are consistently superior to CDD in inducing CR, and IDA was associated with lower long-term mortality. On the basis of these findings, we recommend incorporation of IDA and HDD instead of the traditional CDD as standard treatments for acute myeloid leukaemia induction. The lack of HDD benefit on mortality, when compared with CDD in this study, should be cautiously addressed, because it may have been susceptible to underestimation because of statistical power limitations.

  2. Urokinase receptor and CXCR4 are regulated by common microRNAs in leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Daniela; Gorrasi, Anna; Li Santi, Anna; Ricci, Patrizia; Montuori, Nunzia; Selleri, Carmine; Ragno, Pia

    2015-09-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) focuses uPA proteolytic activity on the cell membrane, promoting localized degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM), and binds vitronectin (VN), mediating cell adhesion to the ECM. uPAR-bound uPA and VN induce proteolysis-independent intracellular signalling, regulating cell adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation. uPAR cross-talks with CXCR4, the receptor for the stroma-derived factor 1 chemokine. CXCR4 is crucial in the trafficking of hematopoietic stem cells from/to the bone marrow, which involves also uPAR. Both uPAR and CXCR4 are expressed in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), with a lower expression in undifferentiated and myeloid subsets, and higher expression in myelomonocytic and promyelocytic subsets. We hypothesized a microRNA (miR)-mediated co-regulation of uPAR and CXCR4 expression, which could allow their cross-talk at the cell surface. We identified three miRs, miR-146a, miR-335 and miR-622, regulating the expression of both uPAR and CXCR4 in AML cell lines. Indeed, these miRs directly target the 3'untranslated region of both uPAR- and CXCR4-mRNAs; accordingly, uPAR/CXCR4 expression is reduced by their overexpression in AML cells and increased by their specific inhibitors. Overexpression of all three miRs impairs migration, invasion and proliferation of myelomonocytic cells. Interestingly, we observed an inverse relationship between uPAR/CXCR4 expression and miR-146a and miR-335 levels in AML blasts, suggesting their possible role in the regulation of uPAR/CXCR4 expression also in vivo.

  3. Urokinase receptor and CXCR4 are regulated by common microRNAs in leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Daniela; Gorrasi, Anna; Li Santi, Anna; Ricci, Patrizia; Montuori, Nunzia; Selleri, Carmine; Ragno, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) focuses uPA proteolytic activity on the cell membrane, promoting localized degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM), and binds vitronectin (VN), mediating cell adhesion to the ECM. uPAR-bound uPA and VN induce proteolysis-independent intracellular signalling, regulating cell adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation. uPAR cross-talks with CXCR4, the receptor for the stroma-derived factor 1 chemokine. CXCR4 is crucial in the trafficking of hematopoietic stem cells from/to the bone marrow, which involves also uPAR. Both uPAR and CXCR4 are expressed in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), with a lower expression in undifferentiated and myeloid subsets, and higher expression in myelomonocytic and promyelocytic subsets. We hypothesized a microRNA (miR)-mediated co-regulation of uPAR and CXCR4 expression, which could allow their cross-talk at the cell surface. We identified three miRs, miR-146a, miR-335 and miR-622, regulating the expression of both uPAR and CXCR4 in AML cell lines. Indeed, these miRs directly target the 3′untranslated region of both uPAR- and CXCR4-mRNAs; accordingly, uPAR/CXCR4 expression is reduced by their overexpression in AML cells and increased by their specific inhibitors. Overexpression of all three miRs impairs migration, invasion and proliferation of myelomonocytic cells. Interestingly, we observed an inverse relationship between uPAR/CXCR4 expression and miR-146a and miR-335 levels in AML blasts, suggesting their possible role in the regulation of uPAR/CXCR4 expression also in vivo. PMID:26082201

  4. Deletion mapping indicates that MTS1 is the target of frequent deletions at chromosome 9p21 in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Guidal-Giroux, C; Gérard, B; Cavé, H; Duval, M; Rohrlich, P; Elion, J; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1996-02-01

    Recent reports have indicated a high frequency of deletions of MTS1 (CDKN2, p16ink4, CDKI4) in acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (ALLs). This gene is located at chromosome 9p21 and encodes an inhibitor of cyclin D-dependent kinases. In contrast with the observations in some other malignancies, no inactivation of MTS1 by intragenic mutation was demonstrated in leukaemias. A contribution of MTS1 alterations to leukaemogenesis therefore remains questionable. In order to test for the implication of MTS1 as a tumour suppressor gene in paediatric ALLs we have explored the 9p21 chromosomal region of 46 children with this disease. The copy number of the MTS1 gene in blasts from the patients was determined using a quantitative PCR assay enabling us to precisely detect mono- and bi-allelic deletions. Rearrangements of the gene were sought by Southern blot analysis. The extent of the deletions was studied using microsatellite markers spanning the 9p21 chromosomal region. Point mutations were sought in exon 1 and exon 2 of the MTS1 gene in patients with a mono-allelic deletion in addition, exon 2 of MTS1, which contains two-thirds of the coding region, was sequenced in all patients who had no deletion of the gene. Altogether, our data are consistent with the view that MTS1 is the target of 9p21 deletions. Either one or two alleles of the gene were deleted in 36% of non-selected children with B-lineage ALL and both alleles were deleted in all seven patients we studied with T-lineage ALL. The absence of any point mutation implies that the major mechanism of inactivation of MTS1 in ALLs is deletional.

  5. miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Miao, Mei-hua; Ji, Xue-qiang; Xue, Jun; Shao, Xue-jun

    2015-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in leukaemia, particularly T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), has remained elusive. Here, we identified miR-664 and its predicted target gene PLP2 were differentially expressed in T-ALL using bioinformatics methods. In T-ALL cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-664, while miR-664 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation. Moreover, migration and invasion assay showed that overexpression of miR-664 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, whereas miR-664 inhibitor could reduce cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-664 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of PLP2, and western blotting showed that miR-664 suppressed the expression of PLP2 at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-664 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. - Highlights: • miR-664 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 targets 3′ UTR of PLP2 in T-ALL cells. • miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 in T-ALL cells.

  6. Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-29

    Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-1; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  7. Gene therapy for paediatric leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R F; Bollard, C M; Heslop, H E

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for paediatric leukaemia. However, there are still important problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid the concerns regarding the toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene therapy and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biological issues in the therapy of leukaemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukaemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumour function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal haematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of paediatric leukaemia in the future. PMID:11727502

  8. Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Is Having Clonal Cytogenetic Abnormalities the Same as Having Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Farina, Mirko; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Daniella; Marchina, Eleonora; Gale, Robert Peter

    2016-01-01

    A finding of cytogenetic abnormalities, even when these are clonal and even when the abnormalities are typically associated with leukaemia, is not the same as a person having leukaemia. We describe a person who had acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and achieved a complete haematological remission and who then had persistent and transient clonal cytogenetic abnormalities for 22 years but no recurrence of leukaemia. These data suggest that clones of myeloid cells with mutations and capable of expanding to levels detectable by routine cytogenetic analyses do not all eventuate in leukaemia, even after a prolonged observation interval. The possibility of incorrectly diagnosing a person as having leukaemia becomes even greater when employing more sensitive techniques to detect mutations such as by polymerase chain reaction and whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing. Caution is needed when interpreting clonal abnormalities in AML patients with normal blood and bone marrow parameters.

  10. A systematic evaluation of the safety and toxicity of fingolimod for its potential use in the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    D’Crus, Angel; Melville, Kathleen; Verrills, Nicole M.; Rowlings, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is challenging and emerging treatment options include protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activators. Fingolimod is a known PP2A activator that inhibits multiple signalling pathways and has been used extensively in patients with multiple sclerosis and other indications. The initial positive results of PP2A activators in vitro and mouse models of AML are promising; however, its safety for use in AML has not been assessed. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A literature review was carried out to assess safety before the commencement of Phase I trials of the PP2A activator Fingolimod in AML. From human studies of fingolimod in other indications, it is possible to evaluate whether the safety and toxicity profile of the PP2A activators will allow their use in treating AML. A systematic review of published literature in Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library of critical reviews was carried out. International standards for the design and reporting of search strategies were followed. Search terms and medical subject headings used in trials involving PP2A activators as well as a specific search were performed for ‘adverse events’, ‘serious adverse events’, ‘delays in treatment’, ‘ side effects’ and ‘toxicity’ for primary objectives. Database searches were limited to papers published in the last 12 years and available in English. The search yielded 677 articles. A total of 69 journal articles were identified as relevant and included 30 clinical trials, 24 review articles and 15 case reports. The most frequently reported adverse events were nausea, diarrhoea, fatigue, back pain, influenza viral infections, nasopharyngitis and bronchitis. Specific safety concerns include monitoring of the heart rate and conduction at commencement of treatment as cardiotoxicity has been

  11. Childhood leukaemia in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Herity, B; Daly, L; Breatnach, F; Buttimer, J; Egan, E; Fennelly, J; McCann, S; Walsh, J H

    1992-06-01

    In response to professional and public concern about health consequences, in particular cancer risk, from previous and current levels of ionising radiation in the Irish Sea, a study of incidence and mortality from acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) and other lymphoid malignancies in children was undertaken. Overall rates were similar to those found in other western populations and distribution of high rates was quite random over the country as a whole. There was a small but significant excess in incidence of ALL for the years 1974-76 in a narrow three mile wide strip along the east coast. It is not possible in the context of this study to postulate aetiological factors which might explain this finding. PMID:1628939

  12. Stem cell origins of leukaemia and curability.

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, M. F.

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemias and some other paediatric cancers are chemo-curable because they arise in stem cell populations that are functionally transient, chemosensitive and programmed for apoptosis. Most adult acute leukaemias are chemo-incurable at least in part because they originate in relatively drug resistant stem cells with extensive self-renewal capacity. The latter property in turn increases the probability of clones evolving with multi-drug resistance. Particular mutations may superimpose additional adverse features on leukaemic cells. PMID:8439493

  13. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  14. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Estimation of dynamic treatment strategies for maintenance therapy of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an application of history-adjusted marginal structural models.

    PubMed

    Rosthøj, S; Keiding, N; Schmiegelow, K

    2012-02-28

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is treated with long-term intensive chemotherapy. During the latter part of the treatment, the maintenance therapy, the patients receive oral doses of two cytostatics. The doses are tailored to blood counts measured on a weekly basis, and the treatment is therefore highly dynamic. In 1992-1996, the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) conducted a randomised study (NOPHO-ALL-92) to investigate the effect of a new and more sophisticated dynamic treatment strategy. Unexpectedly, the new strategy worsened the outcome for the girls, whereas there were no treatment differences for the boys. There are as yet no general guidelines for optimising the treatment. On basis of the data from this study, our goal is to formulate an alternative dosing strategy. We use recently developed methods proposed by van der Laan et al. to obtain statistical models that may be used in the guidance of how the physicians should assign the doses to the patients to obtain the target of the treatment. We present a possible strategy and discuss the reliability of this strategy. The implementation is complicated, and we touch upon the limitations of the methods in relation to the formulation of alternative dosing strategies for the maintenance therapy.

  16. L-Asparaginase as potent anti-leukemic agent and its significance of having reduced glutaminase side activity for better treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L N; Doble, Mukesh; Rekha, V P B; Pulicherla, K K

    2012-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is one of the leading types of malignant disorder seen in children. Viral infections, genetic factors and exposure to chemical carcinogens are some of the factors responsible for causing ALL. Treatment strategies followed for curing ALL include chemotherapy or radiation therapy, wherein, chemotherapy involves the use of the enzymatic drug L-Asparaginase. The enzyme can be produced from various plants, animals, bacterial and fungal sources but, among them, bacterial sources are widely used for production of this enzyme. The enzyme is non-human in origin having certain bottle necks with L-Asparaginase therapy in the form of side effects such as pancreatitis, thrombosis which are mainly due to glutaminase side activity. Hence, present-day research is mainly focussed on minimizing or completely eliminating the glutaminase activity of the enzyme L-Asparaginase. This review is focussed on the complications associated with glutaminase side activity and use of glutaminase free enzymatic drug L-Asparaginase in treating ALL and the other developments related to the modification of the drug for quality treatment. PMID:22684410

  17. Implications of delayed bone marrow aspirations at the end of treatment induction for risk stratification and outcome in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Zuna, Jan; Moericke, Anja; Arens, Mari; Koehler, Rolf; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Bartram, Claus R; Fischer, Susanna; Fronkova, Eva; Zaliova, Marketa; Schrauder, André; Stanulla, Martin; Zimmermann, Martin; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Mann, Georg; Schrappe, Martin; Cario, Gunnar

    2016-06-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) at the end of induction therapy is important for risk stratification of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), but bone marrow (BM) aspiration is often postponed or must be repeated to fulfil qualitative and quantitative criteria for morphological assessment of haematological remission and/or MRD analysis. The impact of BM aspiration delay on measured MRD levels and resulting risk stratification is currently unknown. We analysed paired MRD data of 289 paediatric ALL patients requiring a repeat BM aspiration. MRD levels differed in 108 patients (37%) with a decrease in the majority (85/108). This would have resulted in different risk group allocation in 64 of 289 patients (23%) when applying the ALL-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster 2000 criteria. MRD change was associated with the duration of delay; 40% of patients with delay ≥7 days had a shift to lower MRD levels compared to only 18% after a shorter delay. Patients MRD-positive at the original but MRD-negative at the repeat BM aspiration (n = 50) had a worse 5-year event-free survival than those already negative at first aspiration (n = 115) (86 ± 5% vs. 94 ± 2%; P = 0·024). We conclude that BM aspirations should be pursued as scheduled in the protocol because delayed MRD sampling at end of induction may result in false-low MRD load and distort MRD-based risk assessment.

  18. Safety and clinical activity of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) with or without Hyper-CVAD in relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher B; Thomas, Deborah A; Yang, Hui; Ravandi, Farhad; Rytting, Michael; O'Brien, Susan; Franklin, Anna R; Borthakur, Gautam; Dara, Samuel; Kwari, Monica; Pierce, Sherry R; Jabbour, Elias; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    To test the safety and activity of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), we conducted a phase 1 study with two parts: administering decitabine alone or in combination with Hyper-CVAD (fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine). Patients participated in either part of the study or in both parts sequentially. In the initial part, decitabine was administered intravenously at doses of 10-120 mg/m(2) per d for 5 d every other week in cycles of 28 d. In the combination part, patients were treated on the first 5 d of Hyper-CVAD with intravenous decitabine at 5-60 mg/m(2) per d. A total of 39 patients received treatment in the study: 14 in the first part only, 16 sequentially in both parts and 9 in the second part only. Decitabine was tolerated at all doses administered, and grade 3 or 4 toxic effects included non-life-threatening hepatotoxicity and hyperglycaemia. Induction of DNA hypomethylation was observed at doses of decitabine up to 80 mg/m(2) . Some patients who had previously progressed on Hyper-CVAD alone achieved a complete response when decitabine was added. Decitabine alone or given with Hyper-CVAD is safe and has clinical activity in patients with advanced ALL.

  19. Outpatient bendamustine and idarubicin for upfront therapy of elderly acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome: a phase I/II study using an innovative statistical design.

    PubMed

    Lionberger, Jack M; Pagel, John M; Sandhu, Vicky K; Xie, Hu; Shadman, Mazyar; Mawad, Raya; Boehm, Alexandra; Dean, Carol; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Scott, Bart L; Deeg, Hans Joachim; Becker, Pamela S; Hendrie, Paul C; Walter, Roland B; Ostronoff, Fabiana; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Estey, Elihu H

    2014-08-01

    Combinations of agents may improve outcomes among elderly acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. We performed an adaptive phase I/II trial for newly-diagnosed AML or high-risk MDS patients aged ≥50 years using a Bayesian approach to determine whether 1 of 3 doses of bendamustine (45, 60, 75 mg/m(2) days 1-3), together with idarubicin (12 mg/m(2) days 1-2), might provide a complete response (CR) rate ≥40% with <30% grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity. We treated 39 patients (34 AML; five MDS with >10% marrow blasts; median age 73 years). None of the three bendamustine doses in combination with idarubicin met the required CR and toxicity rates; the 75 mg/m(2) dose because of excess toxicity (two of three patients) and the 60 mg/m(2) dose because of low efficacy (CR rate 10/33), although no grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was seen at this dose. Median survival was 7·2 months. All patients began treatment as outpatients but hospitalization was required in 90% (35/39). Although we did not find a dose of bendamustine combined with idarubicin that would provide a CR rate of >40% with acceptable toxicity, bendamustine may have activity in AML/MDS patients, suggesting its addition to other regimens may be warranted.

  20. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates anticancer property of 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 by promoting mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Jianye; Wang, Min; Chen, Qidan; Song, Jia; Yu, Ziqi; Huang, Wei; Fang, Jianpei

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most prevalent childhood malignancy. Although most children with ALL are cured, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails owing to severe toxicities and drug resistance. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2), a major bioactive component isolated from Panax ginseng, has been shown to have a therapeutic effect on some tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell death induced by 20(S)-GRh2 in ALL cells remains unclear. In this study, we showed that 20(S)-GRh2 inhibited the cell growth and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. But it has no cytotoxic effect on human normal blood cells. Furthermore, autophagy plays a protective role in 20(S)-GRh2-induced apoptosis in ALL cell lines and human primary ALL cells. We demonstrated that either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy could be more effective in reducing viability and enhancing 20(S)-GRh2-induced toxicity than 20(S)-GRh2 treatment alone. In addition, inhibition of autophagy could aggravate mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial damage, and then accelerate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of autophagy can sensitize ALL cells towards 20(S)-GRh2. The appropriate inhibition of autophagy could provide a powerful strategy to increase the potency of 20(S)-GRh2 as a novel anticancer agent for ALL therapy. PMID:27027340

  1. 9-O-acetylated sialic acids differentiating normal haematopoietic precursors from leukemic stem cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Suchandra; Chandra, Sarmila; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-10-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) originates from mutations in haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). For high-risk patients, treated with intensified post-remission chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is considered. Autologous HSC transplantation needs improvisation till date. Previous studies established enhanced disease-associated expression of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins (Neu5,9Ac2-GPs) on lymphoblasts of these patients at diagnosis, followed by its decrease with clinical remission and reappearance with relapse. Based on this differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs, identification of a normal HPC population was targeted from patients at diagnosis. This study identifies two distinct haematopoietic progenitor populations from bone marrow of diagnostic ALL patients, exploring the differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs with stem cell (CD34, CD90, CD117, CD133), haematopoietic (CD45), lineage-commitment (CD38) antigens and cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Normal haematopoietic progenitor cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(hi)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(lo)CD34(+)CD38(-)CD90(+)CD117(+)CD133(+)) differentiated into morphologically different, lineage-specific colonies, being crucial for autologous HSC transplantation while leukemic stem cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(lo)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(hi)CD34(+)CD38(+)CD90(-)CD117(-)CD133(-)) lacking this ability can be potential targets for minimal residual disease detection and drug-targeted immunotherapy.

  2. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia under Treatment with the Protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 00-01

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Jaimes-Reyes, Ethel Zulie; Arellano-Galindo, José; García-Jiménez, Xochiketzalli; Tiznado-García, Héctor Manuel; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Ortíz-Torres, María Guadalupe; Ortíz-Fernández, Antonio; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to describe the results of treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Mexican children treated from 2006 to 2010 under the protocol from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) 00-01. The children were younger than 16 years of age and had a diagnosis of ALL de novo. The patients were classified as standard risk if they were 1–9.9 years old and had a leucocyte count <50 × 109/L, precursor B cell immunophenotype, no mediastinal mass, CSF free of blasts, and a good response to prednisone. The rest of the patients were defined as high risk. Of a total of 302 children, 51.7% were at high risk. The global survival rate was 63.9%, and the event-free survival rate was 52.3% after an average follow-up of 3.9 years. The percentages of patients who died were 7% on induction and 14.2% in complete remission; death was associated mainly with infection (21.5%). The relapse rate was 26.2%. The main factor associated with the occurrence of an event was a leucocyte count >100 × 109/L. The poor outcomes were associated with toxic death during induction, complete remission, and relapse. These factors remain the main obstacles to the success of this treatment in our population. PMID:25922837

  3. A randomised comparison of the novel nucleoside analogue sapacitabine with low-dose cytarabine in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, A K; Russell, N; Hills, R K; Panoskaltsis, N; Khwaja, A; Hemmaway, C; Cahalin, P; Clark, R E; Milligan, D

    2015-06-01

    The development of new treatments for older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an active area, but has met with limited success. Sapacitabine is a novel orally administered nucleoside analogue that has shown encouraging activity in unrandomised early-stage trials. We randomised 143 untreated patients with AML or with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (>10% marrow blasts) between sapacitibine and low-dose ara-C (LDAC) in our 'Pick a Winner' trial design. At the planned interim analysis there was no difference between LDAC and sapacitibine in terms of remission rate (CR/CRi, 27% vs 16% hazard ratio (HR) 1.98(0.90-4.39) P=0.09), relapse-free survival (10% vs 14% at 2 years, HR 0.73(0.33-1.61) P=0.4) or overall survival (OS; 12% vs 11% at 2 years, HR 1.24(0.86-1.78) P=0.2). Sapacitibine was well tolerated, apart from more grade 3/4 diarrhoea. On the basis of these findings sapacitibine did not show sufficient evidence of benefit over LDAC for the trial to be continued.

  4. MiR-424 and miR-155 deregulated expression in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia: correlation with NPM1 and FLT3 mutation status

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA have a central role in normal haematopoiesis and are deregulated in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The purpose of the study was to investigate by qRT-PCR the expression of miRNAs involved in myeloid differentiation (miR-424, miR-155, miR-223, miR-17-5p) in 48 patients with cytogenetically normal AML well characterized for NPM1 and/or FLT3 mutations. Three types of normalization were used for the data validation. Findings We found that miR-424 was down-modulated in AMLs with NPM1mutA regardless of FLT3 status. On the contrary, miR-155 showed up-regulation in patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITD) with or without NPM1 mutations. No significant associations were found by analyzing miR-223 and miR-17-5p in relation to FLT3 and NPM1 status. Conclusions This study supports the view that major genetic subsets of CN-AML are associated with distinct miRNA signatures and suggests that miR-424 and miR-155 deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of CN-AML with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations, respectively. PMID:22681934

  5. Various distinctive cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia aged 60 years and older express adverse prognostic value: results from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    van der Holt, Bronno; Breems, Dimitri A; Berna Beverloo, H; van den Berg, Eva; Burnett, Alan K; Sonneveld, Pieter; Löwenberg, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities are considered important prognostic factors in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However, the prognostic assessments have mainly been derived from patients with AML aged <60 years. Two recent studies of AML patients of 60 years and older proposed prognostic classifications with distinct discrepancies. To further study the prognostic value of cytogenetic abnormalities in this patient population, we have evaluated cytogenetic abnormalities in a series of 293 untreated patients with AML aged 60 years and older, included in a randomised phase 3 trial, also in relation to patient characteristics and clinical outcome. The most frequently observed cytogenetic abnormality was trisomy 8 (+8), in 31 (11%) patients. Abnormalities, such as -5, 5q-, abn(17p) and abn(17q), were almost exclusively present in complex karyotypes. A relatively favourable outcome was only observed in five patients with core-binding factor abnormalities t(8;21) and inv(16)/del(16)/t(16;16). However, most of the other evaluated cytogenetic abnormalities, such as 5q-, -7, +8, abn(17p), abn(17q), and complex aberrations expressed a more adverse prognosis when compared with patients with AML aged 60 years and older with a normal karyotype. Large studies to confirm the prognosis of individual cytogenetic aberrations are warranted.

  6. Expression of microRNA-181 determines response to treatment with azacitidine and predicts survival in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Butrym, Aleksandra; Rybka, Justyna; Baczyńska, Dagmara; Poręba, Rafał; Mazur, Grzegorz; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in cell differentiation and survival. Abnormal expression of miRs has been demonstrated in numerous types of cancer, including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The aim of the present study was to evaluate miR-181 expression at diagnosis and following the completion of chemotherapy in AML patients, with regard to clinical response and outcome, particularly in patients treated with azacitidine. miR-181 expression was analysed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 95 bone marrow specimens from newly diagnosed AML patients and in 20 healthy subjects for comparison. The results revealed upregulated miR-181 expression in the total cohort of AML patients, which was correlated with longer survival. However, in a subset of older AML patients treated with azacitidine, low miR-181 expression at diagnosis was a predictor for complete remission and prolonged survival. The findings indicated that miR-181 has an important role in AML and determines response to azacitidine treatment in older AML patients.

  7. Incidence and risk factors for Central Nervous System thrombosis in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia during intensive asparaginase treatment: a single-centre cohort study.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ximo; Esteves, Susana; Neto, Ana M; Pereira, Filomena

    2016-07-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) thrombosis is a complication of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) treatment that is potentially associated with significant morbidity and neurological sequelae. Its presumably multifactorial aetiology is poorly characterized. We conducted a single-centre, retrospective cohort study on 346 ALL paediatric patients (1-16 years old) treated with asparaginase intensive Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) protocols from 1998 to 2011. The incidence, risk factors and outcome of CNS thrombosis were evaluated. CNS thrombosis occurred in 3·8% (13/346) of the patients (95% confidence interval 2·0-6·3%). Twelve events were diagnosed during intensification, all of which resolved within 2 weeks without neurological sequelae or significant impact in survival. Obesity (body mass index above 95th percentile) and asparaginase formulation were the only factors associated with CNS thrombosis, with an increase in the odds of event in obese patients [odds ratio (OR) = 3·37; P = 0·064] and a reduction in patients receiving Erwinia asparaginase (OR = 0·12; P = 0·018). No association could be demonstrated for age, gender, DFCI risk-group, ALL phenotype, steroid or doxorubicin use, central venous line use or CNS radiotherapy. CNS thrombosis is a rare but manageable adverse event without significant sequelae or detrimental effects in survival. Increased awareness is recommended in obese patients particularly during intensive asparaginase use. PMID:27018199

  8. Impact of mTOR expression on clinical outcome in paediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Mycko, Katarzyna; Sałacińska-Łoś, Elżbieta; Pastorczak, Agata; Siwicka, Alicja; Młynarski, Wojciech; Matysiak, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To characterise expression of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) in childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), and to evaluate a possible link between mTOR and clinical characteristics. Material and methods The examined group consisted of 21 consecutive patients, aged 1–18 years, diagnosed with B-cell ALL in 2010, and 10 relapsed B-cell ALL patients diagnosed for the first time between 2009 and 2011, who developed relapse before 2014. All subjects were treated in the Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology of the Medical University of Warsaw according to the ALL-IC BFM 2002 Protocol. We evaluated mTOR and phospho-mTOR expression by immunohistochemistry using rabbit monoclonal antibodies. Results mTOR expression was found to be significantly associated with the risk of relapse and was more frequent in ALL recurrence. No significant relationship was detected between mTOR expression and other features of high-risk disease in paediatric ALL. Conclusions mTOR activity could be considered a high-risk feature in paediatric B-cell ALL. Expression of mTOR kinase is observed remarkably more frequently in disease recurrence than at first diagnosis, indicating higher proliferative and survival potential of leukaemic cells in relapse. Routine analysis of mTOR activity could be performed to select patients that may potentially benefit from mTOR inhibitors (MTI) treatment. PMID:27688725

  9. Persistence of DNMT3A R882 mutations during remission does not adversely affect outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Bhavana; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Nicolet, Deedra; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Blachly, James S.; Orwick, Shelley; Lucas, David M.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Blum, William; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Stone, Richard M.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Byrd, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Somatic mutation of the DNMT3A gene at the arginine R882 site is common in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The prognostic significance of DNMT3A R882 mutation clearance, using traditional diagnostic next generation sequencing (NGS) methods, during complete remission (CR) in AML patients is controversial. We examined the impact of clearing DNMT3A R882 mutations at diagnosis to the detectable threshold of <3% during CR on outcome in 56 adult AML patients. Mutational remission, defined as clearance of pre-treatment DNMT3A R882 and all other AML-associated mutations to a variant allele frequency <3%, occurred in 14 patients whereas persistent DNMT3A R882 mutations were observed in 42 patients. There were no significant differences in disease-free or overall survival between patients with and without DNMT3A R882 mutation clearance. Patients with persistent DNMT3A R882 who cleared all other AML mutations and did not acquire new mutations (n = 30), trended towards longer disease-free survival (1·6 vs. 0·6 years, P = 0·06) than patients with persistence of DNMT3A R882, in addition to other mutations or acquisition of new AML-associated mutations, such as those in TET2, JAK2, ASXL1 and TP53 (n = 12). These data demonstrate that DNMT3A R882 mutations, as assessed by traditional NGS methods, persist in the majority of AML patients in CR. PMID:27476855

  10. The 9p21.3 risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is explained by a rare high-impact variant in CDKN2A

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Henrion, Marc; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fiege, Bettina; Kumar, Rajiv; Inacio da Silva Filho, Miguel; Holroyd, Amy; Koehler, Rolf; Thomsen, Hauke; Irving, Julie A.; Allan, James M.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Kinsey, Sally E.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Thompson, Pamela D.; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Eisele, Lewin; Bartram, Claus R.; Schrappe, Martin; Greaves, Mel; Hemminki, Kari; Harrison, Christine J.; Stanulla, Martin; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided strong evidence for inherited predisposition to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) identifying a number of risk loci. We have previously shown common SNPs at 9p21.3 influence ALL risk. These SNP associations are generally not themselves candidates for causality, but simply act as markers for functional variants. By means of imputation of GWAS data and subsequent validation SNP genotyping totalling 2,177 ALL cases and 8,240 controls, we have shown that the 9p21.3 association can be ascribed to the rare high-impact CDKN2A p.Ala148Thr variant (rs3731249; Odds ratio = 2.42, P = 3.45 × 10−19). The association between rs3731249 genotype and risk was not specific to particular subtype of B-cell ALL. The rs3731249 variant is associated with predominant nuclear localisation of the CDKN2A transcript suggesting the functional effect of p.Ala148Thr on ALL risk may be through compromised ability to inhibit cyclin D within the cytoplasm. PMID:26463672

  11. Impact of mTOR expression on clinical outcome in paediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia – preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Mycko, Katarzyna; Sałacińska-Łoś, Elżbieta; Pastorczak, Agata; Siwicka, Alicja; Młynarski, Wojciech; Matysiak, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To characterise expression of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) in childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), and to evaluate a possible link between mTOR and clinical characteristics. Material and methods The examined group consisted of 21 consecutive patients, aged 1–18 years, diagnosed with B-cell ALL in 2010, and 10 relapsed B-cell ALL patients diagnosed for the first time between 2009 and 2011, who developed relapse before 2014. All subjects were treated in the Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology of the Medical University of Warsaw according to the ALL-IC BFM 2002 Protocol. We evaluated mTOR and phospho-mTOR expression by immunohistochemistry using rabbit monoclonal antibodies. Results mTOR expression was found to be significantly associated with the risk of relapse and was more frequent in ALL recurrence. No significant relationship was detected between mTOR expression and other features of high-risk disease in paediatric ALL. Conclusions mTOR activity could be considered a high-risk feature in paediatric B-cell ALL. Expression of mTOR kinase is observed remarkably more frequently in disease recurrence than at first diagnosis, indicating higher proliferative and survival potential of leukaemic cells in relapse. Routine analysis of mTOR activity could be performed to select patients that may potentially benefit from mTOR inhibitors (MTI) treatment.

  12. Expression of microRNA-181 determines response to treatment with azacitidine and predicts survival in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Butrym, Aleksandra; Rybka, Justyna; Baczyńska, Dagmara; Poręba, Rafał; Mazur, Grzegorz; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in cell differentiation and survival. Abnormal expression of miRs has been demonstrated in numerous types of cancer, including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The aim of the present study was to evaluate miR-181 expression at diagnosis and following the completion of chemotherapy in AML patients, with regard to clinical response and outcome, particularly in patients treated with azacitidine. miR-181 expression was analysed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 95 bone marrow specimens from newly diagnosed AML patients and in 20 healthy subjects for comparison. The results revealed upregulated miR-181 expression in the total cohort of AML patients, which was correlated with longer survival. However, in a subset of older AML patients treated with azacitidine, low miR-181 expression at diagnosis was a predictor for complete remission and prolonged survival. The findings indicated that miR-181 has an important role in AML and determines response to azacitidine treatment in older AML patients. PMID:27698792

  13. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  14. Phase II study of tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine in newly diagnosed older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk MDS.

    PubMed

    Mawad, Raya; Becker, Pamela S; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart; Wood, Brent L; Dean, Carol; Sandhu, Vicky; Deeg, Hans Joachim; Walter, Roland; Wang, Lixia; Myint, Han; Singer, Jack W; Estey, Elihu; Pagel, John M

    2016-01-01

    Tosedostat, an oral aminopeptidase inhibitor, has synergy with cytarabine and hypomethylating agents. We performed a Phase II trial to determine rates of complete remission (CR) and survival using tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine in older patients with untreated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Thirty-four patients ≥60 years old (median age 70 years; range, 60-83) were randomized to receive tosedostat (120 mg on days 1-21 or 180 mg continuously) with 5 d of either cytarabine (1 g/m2 /d) or decitabine (20 mg/m2 /d) every 35 d. Twenty-nine patients (85%) had AML, including 15 (44%) with secondary AML/MDS, and 5 (15%) had MDS-refractory anaemia with excess blasts type 2. The CR/CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) rate was 53% [9 in each arm; 14 CR (41%) and 4 CRi (12%)], attained in 6 of 14 patients with adverse cytogenetics and 4 of 7 with FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations. Median follow-up was 11.2 months (range, 0.5-22.3), and median survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.2-16.7). Twenty-three patients (67.6%) were treated as outpatients and 10 of these patients required hospitalization for febrile neutropenia. No Grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities required withdrawal from study. Tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine is tolerated in older patients with untreated AML/MDS, results in a CR/CRi rate of >50%, and warrants further study in larger trials.

  15. Efficacy and toxicity of a paediatric protocol in teenagers and young adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results from UKALL 2003.

    PubMed

    Hough, Rachael; Rowntree, Clare; Goulden, Nick; Mitchell, Chris; Moorman, Anthony; Wade, Rachel; Vora, Ajay

    2016-02-01

    Despite the substantial outcome improvements achieved in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), survival in teenage and young adult (TYA) patients has remained inferior. We report the treatment outcomes and toxicity profiles observed in TYA patients treated on the UK paediatric ALL trial, UKALL2003. UKALL2003 was a multi-centre, prospective, randomized phase III trial, investigating treatment intensification or de-escalation according to minimal residual disease (MRD) kinetics at the end of induction. Of 3126 patients recruited to UKALL2003, 229 (7·3%) were aged 16-24 years. These patients were significantly more likely to have high risk MRD compared to 10-15 year olds (47·9% vs. 36·6%, P = 0·004). Nonetheless, 5-year event-free survival for the TYA cohort (aged 16-24 years) was 72·3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 66·2-78·4] overall and 92·6% (95% CI: 85·5-99·7) for MRD low risk patients. The risk of serious adverse events was higher in patients aged ≥10 years compared to those aged 9 or younger (P < 0·0001) and novel age-specific patterns of treatment-related toxicity were observed. TYA patients obtain excellent outcomes with a risk- and response-adapted paediatric chemotherapy protocol. Whilst those aged 10 years and older have excess toxicity compared with younger patients, the age association is specific to individual toxicities.

  16. A prognostic model for survival after salvage treatment with FLAG-Ida +/- gemtuzumab-ozogamicine in adult patients with refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bergua, Juan M; Montesinos, Pau; Martinez-Cuadrón, David; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Serrano, Josefina; Sayas, María J; Prieto-Fernandez, Julio; García, Raimundo; García-Huerta, Ana J; Barrios, Manuel; Benavente, Celina; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Simiele, Adriana; Rodríguez-Macias, Gabriela; Herrera-Puente, Pilar; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Martínez-Sánchez, María P; Amador-Barciela, María L; Riaza-Grau, Rosalía; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    The combination of fludarabine, cytarabine, idarubicin, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG-Ida) is widely used in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We retrospectively analysed the results of 259 adult AML patients treated as first salvage with FLAG-Ida or FLAG-Ida plus Gentuzumab-Ozogamicin (FLAGO-Ida) of the Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología (PETHEMA) database, developing a prognostic score system of survival in this setting (SALFLAGE score). Overall, 221 patients received FLAG-Ida and 38 FLAGO-Ida; 92 were older than 60 years. The complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) rate was 51%, with 9% of induction deaths. Three covariates were associated with lower CR/CRi: high-risk cytogenetics and t(8;21) at diagnosis, no previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) and relapse-free interval <1 year. Allo-SCT was performed in second CR in 60 patients (23%). The median overall survival (OS) of the entire cohort was 0·7 years, with 22% OS at 5-years. Four independent variables were used to construct the score: cytogenetics, FLT3-internal tandem duplication, length of relapse-free interval and previous allo-SCT. Using this stratification system, three groups were defined: favourable (26% of patients), intermediate (29%) and poor-risk (45%), with an expected 5-year OS of 52%, 26% and 7%, respectively. The SALFLAGE score discriminated a subset of patients with an acceptable long-term outcome using FLAG-Ida/FLAGO-Ida regimen. The results of this retrospective analysis should be validated in independent external cohorts.

  17. Body composition and bone health in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood and adolescence: the protocol for a cross-sectional cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Ronald; Nayiager, Trishana; Gordon, Christopher; Marriott, Christopher; Athale, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Success in the treatment of young people with cancer, as measured conventionally by survival rates, is mitigated by late effects of therapy that impose a burden of morbidity and limit life expectancy. Among these adverse sequelae are altered body composition, especially obesity, and compromised bone health in the form of osteoporosis and increased fragility. These outcomes are potentially reversible and even preventable. This study will examine measures of body composition and bone health in long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in childhood and adolescence. These measures will be complemented by measures of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Methods and analysis Survivors of ALL who are at least 10 years from diagnosis, following treatment on uniform protocols, will undergo measurements of body mass index; triceps skin fold thickness and mid-upper arm circumference; fat mass, lean body mass, skeletal muscle mass and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; trabecular and cortical bone indices and muscle density by peripheral quantitative CT; physical activity by the Habitual Activity Estimation Scale; and HRQL by Health Utilities Index instruments. Descriptive measures will be used for continuous variables and number (percent) for categorical variables. Associations between variables will be assessed using Fisher's exact t test and the χ2 test; correlations will be tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the institutional research ethics board and is supported by a competitive funding award. Dissemination of the results will occur by presentations to scientific meetings and publications in peer-reviewed journals, and by posting summaries of the results on websites accessed by adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer. PMID:25603918

  18. A prognostic model for survival after salvage treatment with FLAG-Ida +/- gemtuzumab-ozogamicine in adult patients with refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bergua, Juan M; Montesinos, Pau; Martinez-Cuadrón, David; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Serrano, Josefina; Sayas, María J; Prieto-Fernandez, Julio; García, Raimundo; García-Huerta, Ana J; Barrios, Manuel; Benavente, Celina; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Simiele, Adriana; Rodríguez-Macias, Gabriela; Herrera-Puente, Pilar; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Martínez-Sánchez, María P; Amador-Barciela, María L; Riaza-Grau, Rosalía; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    The combination of fludarabine, cytarabine, idarubicin, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG-Ida) is widely used in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We retrospectively analysed the results of 259 adult AML patients treated as first salvage with FLAG-Ida or FLAG-Ida plus Gentuzumab-Ozogamicin (FLAGO-Ida) of the Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología (PETHEMA) database, developing a prognostic score system of survival in this setting (SALFLAGE score). Overall, 221 patients received FLAG-Ida and 38 FLAGO-Ida; 92 were older than 60 years. The complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) rate was 51%, with 9% of induction deaths. Three covariates were associated with lower CR/CRi: high-risk cytogenetics and t(8;21) at diagnosis, no previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) and relapse-free interval <1 year. Allo-SCT was performed in second CR in 60 patients (23%). The median overall survival (OS) of the entire cohort was 0·7 years, with 22% OS at 5-years. Four independent variables were used to construct the score: cytogenetics, FLT3-internal tandem duplication, length of relapse-free interval and previous allo-SCT. Using this stratification system, three groups were defined: favourable (26% of patients), intermediate (29%) and poor-risk (45%), with an expected 5-year OS of 52%, 26% and 7%, respectively. The SALFLAGE score discriminated a subset of patients with an acceptable long-term outcome using FLAG-Ida/FLAGO-Ida regimen. The results of this retrospective analysis should be validated in independent external cohorts. PMID:27118319

  19. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Tholouli, Eleni; MacDermott, Sarah; Hoyland, Judith; Yin, John Liu; Byers, Richard

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  20. Kinetics of versican-expressing macrophages in bone marrow after cord blood stem cell transplantation for treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Senda, Miho; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine versican-producing cells in normocellular bone marrow and to evaluate chronological alteration in the number of versican-producing macrophages in bone marrow of patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) after cord blood stem cell transplantation (CBSCT) to gain insight in the significance of versican in recovery of haematopoiesis. Methods We enrolled seven age-matched unrelated patients with normocellular bone marrow for determining versican-producing cells in bone marrow, CBSCT-treated patients with AML, 18 with fine and other four with poor engraftment, for determining chronological alteration of versican-expressing and CD68-expressing cells in transplanted bone marrow in reference to the total cells. Clot samples of patients with AML were collected from the +16 to +55 day after transplantation and separated into four groups. We included an AML case whose specimen was obtained on the +9 day. Cells positive in immunohistochemistry using antibodies to versican and CD68 were counted to obtain the mean±SD in a unit area of the bone marrow, plotted chronologically and compared with the numbers from the age-matched normocellular group. Results We determined by a double immunohistochemistry that the versican-expressing cells in bone marrow are macrophages. The time-course curve demonstrated an inverse relationship between the versican-positive macrophages and the total cells in the transplanted bone marrow for over 55 days. In bone marrow of poor engraftment cases, versican-positive macrophages appeared to be decreased in comparison with age-matched and sampling day-matched patients. Conclusions These results suggest that versican and/or versican-expressing macrophages positively contribute to bone marrow regeneration of patients with AML after CBSCT. PMID:26951084

  1. Fucoidan inhibits proliferation of the SKM-1 acute myeloid leukaemia cell line via the activation of apoptotic pathways and production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chunmei; Xiao, Qing; Kuang, Xingyi; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zesong; Wang, Li

    2015-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias and a high risk of progression to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Fucoidan, a complex sulphated polysaccharide isolated from the cell wall of brown seaweeds, has recently attracted attention for its multiple biological activities and its potential as a novel candidate for cancer therapy. In the present study, the anti‑cancer activity of fucoidan was investigated in the MDS/AML cell line SKM‑1. Fucoidan inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis and caused G1-phase arrest of the cell cycle in SKM‑1 cells as determined by a cell counting kit 8 assay and flow cytometry. Furthermore, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses indicated that treatment with fucoidan (100 µg/ml for 48 h) activated Fas and caspase‑8 in SKM‑1 cells, which are critical for the extrinsic apoptotic pathway; furthermore, caspase‑9 was activated via decreases in phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt signaling as indicated by reduced levels of phosphorylated Akt, suggesting the involvement of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In addition, fucoidan treatment of SKM‑1 cells resulted in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as determined by staining with dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate. These results suggested that the mechanisms of the anti‑cancer effects of fucoidan in SKM‑1 are closely associated with cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death, which partly attributed to the activation of apoptotic pathways and accumulation of intracellular ROS. Our results demonstrated that Fucoidan inhibits proliferation and induces the apoptosis of SKM‑1 cells, which provides substantial therapeutic potential for MDS treatment.

  2. Application of flow cytometry to molecular medicine: detection of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors in acute myeloid leukaemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, Alessandra; Mantovani, Irina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Grafone, Tiziana; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cocco, Lucio; Martelli, Alberto M

    2005-12-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), a cytokine belonging to the TNF (tumor necrosis factor) family, is currently regarded as a potential anti-cancer agent. Nevertheless, several types of cancer cells display a low sensitivity to TRAIL or are completely resistant to this pro-apoptotic cytokine. TRAIL signalling is dependent on four receptors. Two of them, death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5), induce apoptosis, whereas decoy receptors 1 and 2 (DcR1 and DcR2) are unable to evoke cell death upon TRAIL binding. TRAIL resistance may be related to the expression of TRAIL decoy receptors. TRAIL has been proposed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of haematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Surprisingly, however, very limited information is available concerning the expression of TRAIL receptors in AML blasts. Here, we have evaluated, using flow cytometry, TRAIL receptor surface expression and sensitivity to TRAIL-dependent apoptosis of AML blasts from 30 patients. We observed frequent expression of TRAIL DcR1 and DcR2, while expression of DR4 and DR5 was less frequent. Nevertheless, the expression of DR4 or DR5 in leukaemic cells was always matched by a similar expression of one of the decoy receptors. Leukaemic blasts were invariably resistant, even to a high concentration (1000 ng/ml) of TRAIL. We suggest that AML blasts are resistant to TRAIL apoptosis in vitro. Therefore, it is unlikely that TRAIL alone might be used in the future as an innovative pharmacological agent for the treatment of AML.

  3. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia in patients originating in Latin America is associated with an increased frequency of the bcr1 subtype of the PML/RARalpha fusion gene.

    PubMed

    Douer, Dan; Santillana, Sergio; Ramezani, Laleh; Samanez, Cesar; Slovak, Marilyn L; Lee, Ming S; Watkins, Kristy; Williams, Tony; Vallejos, Carlos

    2003-08-01

    The PML/RARalpha fusion gene in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has three subtypes based on the breakpoint site of the PML gene: long (bcr1), short (bcr3) and variable (bcr2) subtypes. The PML/RARalpha fusion protein is involved in the pathogenesis of APL and the breakpoint site of the PML gene might be associated with aetiological factor(s). Because APL is over-represented in patients that originate in Latin America (Latinos), we evaluated whether the distribution of the PML/RARalpha fusion mRNA in this population is different to that reported in non-Latinos. Among 52 APL patients (28 from Mexico and Central America diagnosed in Los Angeles and 24 from Peru, South America), bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 expression was 75%, 10% and 15% respectively. However, bcr1 breakpoints were significantly higher compared with non-Latino patients (340/654, 52%) reported in four studies. Often bcr1 and bcr2 are reported together; 862 (60%) of 1429 non-Latino APL patients reported in nine studies were either bcr1 or bcr2, compared with 44 (85%) in our 52 Latino patients. This difference was also statistically significant when our patients were compared to each of the individual studies from USA and Europe, but not for a small series from China and Japan. These results suggest that the overrepresentation of APL among Latin American patients can be accounted for by an increase of a single subtype--bcr1, and the breakage sites in the PML gene may not be random but possibly influenced by genetic and/or environmental factor(s).

  4. Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) as a New Non-Invasive Tool to Detect Oxidative Skeletal Muscle Impairment in Children Survived to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranconi, Francesca; Pollastri, Luca; Ferri, Alessandra; Fraschini, Donatella; Masera, Giuseppe; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Separating out the effects of cancer and treatment between central and peripheral components of the O2 delivery chain should be of interest to clinicians for longitudinal evaluation of potential functional impairment in order to set appropriate individually tailored training/rehabilitation programmes. We propose a non-invasive method (NIRS, near infrared spectroscopy) to be used in routine clinical practice to evaluate a potential impairment of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity during exercise in children previously diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of skeletal muscle to extract O2 in 10 children diagnosed with ALL, 1 year after the end of malignancy treatment, compared to a control group matched for gender and age (mean±SD = 7.8±1.5 and 7.3±1.4 years, respectively). Methods and Findings Participants underwent an incremental exercise test on a treadmill until exhaustion. Oxygen uptake (), heart rate (HR), and tissue oxygenation status (Δ[HHb]) of the vastus lateralis muscle evaluated by NIRS, were measured. The results showed that, in children with ALL, a significant linear regression was found by plotting vs Δ[HHb] both measured at peak of exercise. In children with ALL, the slope of the HR vs linear response (during sub-maximal and peak work rates) was negatively correlated with the peak value of Δ[HHb]. Conclusions The present study proves that the NIRS technique allows us to identify large inter-individual differences in levels of impairment in muscle O2 extraction in children with ALL. The outcome of these findings is variable and may reflect either muscle atrophy due to lack of use or, in the most severe cases, an undiagnosed myopathy. PMID:24956391

  5. Outcome of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) experiencing primary induction failure in the AIEOP AML 2002/01 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Quarello, Paola; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe; Putti, Maria C; Berger, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Menna, Giuseppe; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who fail induction due to primary resistance to chemotherapy account for a significant proportion of cases and have a particularly dismal prognosis. We report the clinical and biological data, and final outcome of 48 paediatric patients with primary-resistant AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 clinical trial. These patients had a significantly higher white blood cell count at diagnosis compared to other AML patients. Cytogenetic and molecular features did not differ between patients with primary induction failure and patients allocated to the high-risk group. For the whole patient population, the probability of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 21·8% ± 6·2, 20·4% ± 5·9, and 49·5% ± 11·3, respectively. Twenty-eight (58%) patients received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); 3 were autologous and 25 were allogeneic. Patients who underwent HSCT had improved EFS (31·2% vs. 5%, P < 0·0001). Only one of the 20 patients who did not receive HSCT is alive and disease free. The 19 patients in complete remission at time of HSCT showed significantly better DFS than the 9 with active disease (46% vs. 0%, P = 0·02). This study represents one of the largest series with long-term follow up of paediatric AML patients with primary refractory disease. Children who underwent transplantation had an encouraging long-term outcome. Disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure; a better understanding of the disease biology is desirable to develop more effective treatment strategies.

  6. Factors affecting long-term outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukaemia: a retrospective study of 172 adult patients reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Greinix, Hildegard T; Nachbaur, David; Krieger, Otto; Eibl, Margit; Knöbl, Paul; Kalhs, Peter; Lutz, Dieter; Linkesch, Werner; Niederwieser, Dietger; Hinterberger, Wolfgang; Lechner, Klaus; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Gritsch, Beate

    2002-06-01

    Between 1982 and 2000, 172 patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) received haematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCT) from related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 40) donors at four Austrian transplant centres and their results were reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry. Conditioning for SCT consisted of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation in 156 (91%) patients. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was with standard cyclosporine and methotrexate in 95 (55%) patients. Median post-transplant follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 0.2--16.7). Multivariate analysis of transplant-related mortality (TRM) identified four variables associated with a lower risk: disease status of first complete remission (CR) at SCT, patient age of 45 years and younger, transplant performed during or after 1995, and lack of acute GVHD. Variables associated with significantly improved leukaemia-free survival were: bone marrow as the stem cell source, disease status of first CR at SCT, and occurrence of chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, transplantation performed during or after 1995, first CR at SCT, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD and lack of acute GVHD grades III to IV were associated with increased overall survival. Based on these analyses, options for the improvement of results obtained with allogeneic SCT in patients with AML could be defined. PMID:12060131

  7. Neonatal leukaemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Handler, M Z; Schwartz, R A

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal leukaemia cutis is a significant neoplasm that may represent a cutaneous manifestation of systemic leukaemia, usually of myeloblastic type. Rarely, it may be or appear to be limited to skin, in which case it is called neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis. By definition, it presents within the first 4 weeks of life and often has a 'blueberry muffin baby' appearance of magenta coloured nodules affecting almost any area of the skin, usually sparing mucous membranes, palms and soles. This clinical pattern is more commonly associated with neonatal infections such rubella and toxoplasmosis, and may be evident with other neonatal neoplasms such as neuroblastoma. Due to the morbidity associated with chemotherapy and reported cases of spontaneous remission without systemic progression in those with neonatal aleukaemic leukaemia cutis without 11q23 translocation, the authors not treating the child with chemotherapy, but to simply monitor for fading of the violaceous nodules, and watch for possible signs of systemic leukaemia.

  8. Biomimetic nanoparticles for siRNA delivery in the treatment of leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianfeng; Cahill, Mary R; McKenna, Sharon L; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2014-12-01

    Leukaemia is a bone marrow cancer occurring in acute and chronic subtypes. Acute leukaemia is a rapidly fatal cancer potentially causing death within a few weeks, if untreated. Leukaemia arises as a result of disruption to haematopoietic precursors, caused either by acquired gene fusions, gene mutations or inappropriate expression of the relevant oncogenes. Current treatment options have made significant progress, but the 5 year survival for acute leukaemia remains under 10% in elderly patients, and less than 50% for some types of acute leukaemia in younger adults. For chronic leukaemias longer survival is generally expected and for chronic myeloid leukaemia patients on tyrosine kinase inhibitors the median survival is not yet reached and is expected to exceed 10 years. Chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukaemia provide the mainstay of therapy for patients under 65 and both carry significant morbidity and mortality. Alternative and superior therapeutic strategies for acute leukaemias are urgently required. Recent molecular-based knowledge of recurring chromosome rearrangements, in particular translocations and inversions, has resulted in significant advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of leukaemia. Identification of a number of unique fusion genes has facilitated the development of highly specific small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Although delivery of siRNA using multifunctional nanoparticles has been investigated to treat solid cancers, the application of this approach to blood cancers is at an early stage. This review describes current treatments for leukaemia and highlights the potential of leukaemic fusion genes as therapeutic targets for RNA interference (RNAi). In addition, the design of biomimetic nanoparticles which are capable of responding to the physiological environment of leukaemia and their potential to advance RNAi therapeutics to the clinic will be critically evaluated.

  9. PACSIN2 polymorphism is associated with thiopurine-induced hematological toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia undergoing maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Alenka; Karas-Kuzelicki, Natasa; Jazbec, Janez; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Adequate maintenance therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), with 6-mercaptopurine as an essential component, is necessary for retaining durable remission. Interruptions or discontinuations of the therapy due to drug-related toxicities, which can be life threatening, may result in an increased risk of relapse. In this retrospective study including 305 paediatric ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy, we systematically investigated the individual and combined effects of genetic variants of folate pathway enzymes, as well as of polymorphisms in PACSIN2 and ITPA, on drug-induced toxicities by applying a multi-analytical approach including logistic regression (LR), classification and regression tree (CART) and generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR). In addition to the TPMT genotype, confirmed to be a major determinant of drug related toxicities, we identified the PACSIN2 rs2413739TT genotype as being a significant risk factor for 6-MP-induced toxicity in wild-type TPMT patients. A gene-gene interaction between MTRR (rs1801394) and MTHFR (rs1801133) was detected by GMDR and proved to have an independent effect on the risk of stomatitis, as shown by LR analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing PACSIN2 genotype association with hematological toxicity in ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. PMID:27452984

  10. Extended diagnostic criteria for plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Feuillard, Jean; Ferrand, Christophe; Biichle, Sabeha; Trimoreau, Franck; Seilles, Estelle; Salaun, Véronique; Garand, Richard; Lepelley, Pascale; Maynadié, Marc; Kuhlein, Emilienne; Deconinck, Eric; Daliphard, Sylvie; Chaperot, Laurence; Beseggio, Lucille; Foisseaud, Vincent; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Bene, Marie-Christine; Saas, Philippe; Jacob, Marie-Christine

    2009-06-01

    The diagnosis of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukaemia (pDCL) is based on the immunophenotypic profile: CD4(+) CD56(+) lineage(neg) CD45RA(+)/RO(neg) CD11c(neg) CD116(low) CD123(+) CD34(neg) CD36(+) HLA-DR(+). Several studies have reported pDCL cases that do not express this exact profile or expressing some lineage antigens that could thus be misdiagnosed. This study aimed to validate pDCL-specific markers for diagnosis by flow-cytometry or quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on bone marrow samples. Expression of markers previously found in normal pDC was analysed in 16 pDCL, four pDCL presenting an atypical phenotype (apDCL) and 113 non-pDC - lymphoid or myeloid - acute leukaemia. CD123 was expressed at significantly higher levels in pDCL and apDCL. BDCA-2 was expressed on 12/16 pDCL and on 2/4 apDCL, but was never detected in the 113 non-pDC acute leukaemia cases. BDCA-4 expression was found on 13/16 pDCL, but also in 12% of non-pDC acute leukaemia. High levels of LILRA4 and TCL1A transcripts distinguished pDCL and apDCL from all other acute leukaemia (except B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia for TCL1A). We thus propose a diagnosis strategy, scoring first the CD4(+) CD56(+/-) MPO(neg) cCD3(neg) cCD79a(neg) CD11c(neg) profile and then the CD123(high), BDCA-2 and BDCA-4 expression. Atypical pDCL can be also identified this way and non-pDC acute leukaemia excluded: this scoring strategy is useful for diagnosing pDCL and apDCL.

  11. Porcine myelomonocytic markers and cell populations.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra, A; Revilla, C; Alvarez, B; Pérez, C; Alonso, F; Domínguez, J

    2009-03-01

    This review focuses in what is currently known about swine myeloid markers, the expression and function of these receptors in the biology of porcine myelomonocytic cells, the regulation of their expression along the different developmental stages of these cells and their utility to investigate the heterogeneity of monocyte and macrophage populations. Although the number of monoclonal antibodies recognizing surface antigens expressed on either swine granulocytes or monocytes is low compared with those available for human or mouse, they have contributed significantly to study the members of myeloid lineages in this species, allowing to discriminate different maturation stages of these cells in bone marrow and to reveal the heterogeneity of blood monocytes and tissue macrophages. Porcine myeloid cells share many similarities with humans, highlighting the relevance of the pig as a biomedical model.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, M M; Tefferi, A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a clonal stem cell disorder associated with peripheral blood monocytosis and an inherent tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. CMML has overlapping features of myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. Clonal cytogenetic changes are seen in ~30%, whereas gene mutations are seen in >90% of patients. Common cytogenetic abnormalities include; trisomy 8, -Y, -7/del(7q), trisomy 21 and del(20q), with the Mayo–French risk stratification effectively risk stratifying patients based on cytogenetic abnormalities. Gene mutations frequently involve epigenetic regulators (TET2 ~60%), modulators of chromatin (ASXL1 ~40%), spliceosome components (SRSF2 ~50%), transcription factors (RUNX1 ~15%) and signal pathways (RAS ~30%, CBL ~15%). Of these, thus far, only nonsense and frameshift ASXL1 mutations have been shown to negatively impact overall survival. This has resulted in the development of contemporary, molecularly integrated (inclusive of ASXL1 mutations) CMML prognostic models, including Molecular Mayo Model and the Groupe Français des Myélodysplasies model. Better understanding of the prevalent genetic and epigenetic dysregulation has resulted in emerging targeted treatment options for some patients. The development of an integrated (cytogenetic and molecular) prognostic model along with CMML-specific response assessment criteria are much needed future goals. PMID:26849014

  13. Unplugging JAK/STAT in Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Solary, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The proliferative component of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, related to an increased sensitivity of myeloid progenitors to granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, suggests dedicated therapeutic approaches. In this issue, ruxolitinib, a JAK1 and -2 inhibitory drug, is shown to induce objective responses in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients. Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3707-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Padron et al., p. 3746. PMID:26979390

  14. Leukaemia in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors from 1945 through 1959.

    PubMed

    TOMONAGA, M

    1962-01-01

    This review of the Nagasaki leukaemia experience during a period of 14 years after the detonation of the atomic bomb, together with comparisons with data from Hiroshima and from other series of post-radiation leukaemia cases, again demonstrates beyond reasonable doubt the leukaemogenic effect on man of ionizing radiation. An increased risk of leukaemia following doses probably as low as 100 rads (air-entry dose) of whole-body radiation is demonstrated on the basis of the available estimates of atomic bomb radiation doses. At doses above this level the increase in leukaemia incidence may be linearly related to the radiation dose. The data are too limited to allow of an evaluation of the risk represented by doses at the lower levels of radiation; but it seems clear that, if a threshold dose for leukaemia induction exists, it is lower than the threshold dose for the clinical expression of acute radiation syndrome.The sex and age distribution of radiation-induced leukaemia and the types of leukaemia observed are also discussed.

  15. Stage-specific expression of intracisternal A-particle sequences in murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell lines and normal myelomonocytic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Y; O'Mara, M A; Spilsbury, K; Thwaite, R; Rowe, P B; Symonds, G

    1991-01-01

    The levels of intracisternal A-particle (IAP) mRNA were analyzed in a variety of myelomonocytic leukemia cell lines, peritoneally derived macrophages, and normal hemopoietic progenitors induced to differentiate. In both normal and leukemic cells, the highest level of IAP message was found in cells at an intermediate stage of myelomonocytic differentiation, namely, the promyelomonocyte. These results indicate that IAP sequence transcription is regulated differentially during myelomonocytic cell development and that in general, the expression pattern is preserved in leukemic cell lines in vitro. In addition, Northern (RNA) analysis detected only type I IAP transcripts as the major IAP message and the expressed IAP subtypes varied in certain cell lines. This is the first comprehensive study of IAP expression in the myelomonocytic lineage and provides a useful system to study the biology of IAPs. Images PMID:1848323

  16. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Time Trends and Geographical Distribution of Childhood Leukaemia in Basrah, Iraq, from 2004 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Alrudainy, Laith A; Hassan, Jenan G; Salih, Hussam M; Abbas, Mohammed K; Majeed, Athar AS

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the incidence and trend of childhood leukaemia in Basrah. Methods: This was a hospital-based cancer registry study carried out at the Pediatric Oncology Ward, Maternity & Children’s Hospital and other institutes in Basrah, Iraq. All children with leukaemia, aged 0 to 14 years diagnosed and registered in Basrah from January 2004 to December 2009 were included in the study. Their records were retrieved and studied. The pattern of childhood leukaemia by year of diagnosis, age at diagnosis, morphological subtypes, and geographical distribution was analysed. Rates of childhood leukaemia over time were calculated for six years using standard linear regression. Results: The total number of cases of childhood leukaemia was 181. The number of cases ranged from 21 in year 1, to 31 in the final year reaching a peak of 39 in 2006. Leukaemia rates did not change over the study period (test for trend was not significant, P = 0.81). The trend line shows a shift towards younger children (less than 5 years). The commonest types of leukaemia were acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), then acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and finally chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Conclusion: Annual rates of childhood leukaemia in Basrah were similar to those in other countries with a trend towards younger children. This raises the question about the effect of environmental catastrophes in the alteration of some specific rates of childhood leukaemia, rather than the overall incidence rate. There is a need for further epidemiological studies to understand the aetiology of childhood leukaemia in Basrah. PMID:21969893

  18. Establishment of a retinoic acid-resistant human acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) model in human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) transgenic severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Y.; Kizaki, M.; Kinjo, K.; Awaya, N.; Muto, A.; Ito, M.; Kawai, Y.; Umezawa, A.; Hata, J.; Ueyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.

    1998-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms and identify novel approaches to overcoming retinoic acid (RA) resistance in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), we established the first human RA-resistant APL model in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. UF-1 cells, an RA-resistant APL cell line established in our laboratory, were transplanted into human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-producing SCID (hGMTg SCID) mice and inoculated cells formed subcutaneous tumours in all hGMTg SCID mice, but not in the non-transgenic control SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions (UF-1/GMTg SCID cells) were similar in morphological, immunological, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features to parental UF-1 cells. All-trans RA did not change the morphological features of cells or their expression of CD11b. RA did not alter the growth curve of cells as determined by MTT assay, suggesting that UF-1/GMTg SCID cells are resistant to RA. These results demonstrate that this is the first RA-resistant APL animal model that may be useful for investigating the biology of this myeloid leukaemia in vivo, as well as for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches including patients with RA-resistant APL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764578

  19. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Gene profiling of the erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias induced by the Graffi murine retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias are associated with very poor prognoses and the mechanism of blastic transformation is insufficiently elucidated. The murine Graffi leukaemia retrovirus induces erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias when inoculated into NFS mice and represents a good model to study these leukaemias. Methods To expand our understanding of genes specific to these leukaemias, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and RT-PCR, of all leukaemia types induced by this virus. Results The transcriptome level changes, present between the different leukaemias, led to the identification of specific cancerous signatures. We reported numerous genes that may be potential oncogenes, may have a function related to erythropoiesis or megakaryopoiesis or have a poorly elucidated physiological role. The expression pattern of these genes has been further tested by RT-PCR in different samples, in a Friend erythroleukaemic model and in human leukaemic cell lines. We also screened the megakaryoblastic leukaemias for viral integrations and identified genes targeted by these integrations and potentially implicated in the onset of the disease. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the data obtained from this global gene profiling experiment have provided a detailed characterization of Graffi virus induced erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias with many genes reported specific to the transcriptome of these leukaemias for the first time. PMID:20102610

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  2. Clonal architecture of chronic myelomonocytic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Itzykson, Raphaël; Kosmider, Olivier; Renneville, Aline; Morabito, Margot; Preudhomme, Claude; Berthon, Céline; Adès, Lionel; Fenaux, Pierre; Platzbecker, Uwe; Gagey, Olivier; Rameau, Philippe; Meurice, Guillaume; Oréar, Cédric; Delhommeau, François; Bernard, Olivier A; Fontenay, Michaela; Vainchenker, William; Droin, Nathalie; Solary, Eric

    2013-03-21

    Genomic studies in chronic myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and MPN/MDS, have identified common mutations in genes encoding signaling, epigenetic, transcription, and splicing factors. In the present study, we interrogated the clonal architecture by mutation-specific discrimination analysis of single-cell-derived colonies in 28 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemias (CMML), the most frequent MPN/MDS. This analysis reveals a linear acquisition of the studied mutations with limited branching through loss of heterozygosity. Serial analysis of untreated and treated samples demonstrates a dynamic architecture on which most current therapeutic approaches have limited effects. The main disease characteristics are early clonal dominance, arising at the CD34(+)/CD38(-) stage of hematopoiesis, and granulomonocytic differentiation skewing of multipotent and common myeloid progenitors. Comparison of clonal expansions of TET2 mutations in MDS, MPN, and CMML, together with functional invalidation of TET2 in sorted progenitors, suggests a causative link between early clonal dominance and skewed granulomonocytic differentiation. Altogether, early clonal dominance may distinguish CMML from other chronic myeloid neoplasms with similar gene mutations.

  3. In vivo infusion of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies prevents graft failure after HLA partially incompatible bone marrow transplantation in children with high risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Jabado, N; Bordigoni, P; Michel, G; Haddad, E; Mechinaud, F; Landman-Parker, J; Leblanc, T; Plouvier, E; Baruchel, A; Stephan, J L; Souillet, G; Vilmer, E; Wijdenes, J; Le Deist, F; Fischer, A

    1997-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from matched sibling donors is the therapy of choice for children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children. It is however not available to more than two-thirds of patients who lack a matched donor. Here, we review the outcome of 28 patients with high-risk ALL who were transplanted in France with alternative marrow sources such as HLA-phenoidentical unrelated volunteers and HLA-partially incompatible relatives. For these patients, we tested the possibility to prevent T-depleted marrow graft rejection by infusing in vivo two monoclonal antibodies directed against adhesion receptors i.e., LFA-1 and CD2. Two previous multicenter trials in children transplanted with partially incompatible bone marrow for inborn errors of metabolism showed their efficacy in this setting. Twenty eight patients were enrolled in this study and followed for a median of 4.4 years. Bone marrow engraftment occurred in 81% of the evaluable patients. Post-transplantation leukaemic relapse was the most frequent cause of death in this group of patients, and occurred in 39% of patients. The second most frequent complication was infectious disease, while an EBV-induced B-lymphocyte proliferative disorder occurred in four patients. In conclusion, T-cell-depletion combined with infusion of anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies is efficient in preventing graft failure and GVHD in this group of children with high-risk leukaemia undergoing partially incompatible BMT. The overall DFS is not improved in contrast to what has been previously observed in patients with immunodeficiencies transplanted with a similar rejection prophylaxis. Other approaches are therefore needed aiming either at preserving donor T-cell mediated immunity or accelerating immune reconstitution.

  4. Concepts of remission, curability and lineage involvement in relationship to the problems of minimal residual leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, C; Charpentier, A; Marion, S; Proctor, S J

    1991-07-01

    Minimal residual leukaemia (MRL) is due to chemotherapeutic failure. Chemoincurability in chronic myeloid leukaemia and in myelodysplastic syndrome is the norm and is the result of tumour defect arising within the marrow stem cell compartment. We propose that this is indeed the state of affairs in the majority of adult acute leukaemias and such tumours derived from stem cells are chemoincurable. The proportion of acute leukaemias which belong to this category can only be cured by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation though conventional chemotherapy and autotransplant may result in prolonged periods of remission and a return to a preleukaemic state in some patients. A proportion of the acute leukaemias occurring predominantly in children are presently curable by chemotherapy. It is hypothesized that these chemocurable leukaemias derive from the compartment of haemopoietic progenitors already irreversibly committed to a single lineage. Some recent studies using markers of the leukaemic clone to determine the origin of in vitro myeloid colony forming cells support this concept. Intrinsic and/or acquired genetic chemoresistance represents a supplementary restriction to the chemocurability of acute leukaemias. New methods of detecting MRL are sensitive enough to detect up to one leukaemic cell in 10(6) bone marrow mononuclear cells. However, it is possible that even such sensitive techniques will not be sufficient to determine whether patients in complete remission continue to harbour leukaemic cells in the stem cell compartment when the marker of interest might not be expressed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Human herpes virus-6 seroprevalence and leukaemias: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, G; Mele, A; Ragona, G; Faggioni, A; Zompetta, C; Tosti, M E; Visani, G; Castelli, G; Pulsoni, A; Monarca, B; Martino, P; Mandelli, F

    1999-01-01

    The relationships between acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and refractory anaemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) and human herpes virus (HHV)-6 antibody level were investigated in a multicentre case-control study. An association between increased HHV-6 seropositivity and geometric mean titre ratio with AML was shown: P for trend = 0.022, adjusted odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.33 respectively. No association was found between HHV-6 and ALL, CML or RAEB. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362124

  6. Associations of novel genetic variations in the folate-related and ARID5B genes with the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose methotrexate in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Csordas, Katalin; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Semsei, Agnes F; Harnos, Andrea; Hegyi, Marta; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Eipel, Oliver T; Szalai, Csaba; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2014-08-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) plays an important role in the consolidation therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in many treatment regimens worldwide. However, there is a large interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of the drug. We investigated the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of the folate metabolic pathway, transporter molecules and transcription proteins on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of MTX and 7-hydroxy-methotrexate (7-OH-MTX). 63 SNPs of 14 genes were genotyped and a total of 463 HD-MTX courses (administered according to the ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocols) were analysed. Haematological, hepatic and renal toxicities, estimated by routine laboratory parameters were evaluated. Random forest and regression trees were used for variable selection and model building. Linear mixed models were established to prove the significance of the selected variables. SNPs (rs4948502, rs4948496, rs4948487) of the ARID5B gene were associated with the serum levels of MTX (P < 0·02), serum levels and area under the curve of 7-OH-MTX (P < 0·02) and with hypoproteinaemia (P = 0·004). SLCO1B1 rs4149056 also showed a significant association with serum MTX levels (P < 0·001). Our findings confirm the association of novel genetic variations in folate-related and ARID5B genes with the serum MTX levels and acute toxicity.

  7. Molecular genetics, natural history and the demise of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Greaves, M

    1999-12-01

    The patterns of genetic change, clonal evolution, natural history and latency are very different in the paediatric leukaemias compared with adult epithelial cancers but are similar to those in other childhood cancers of mesenchymal stem cell origin. This distinction has a biological logic in the context of the selective pressures for clonal emergence in different developmental and cellular contexts and has a major impact on curability. Most childhood leukaemias and some other mesenchymal stem cell tumours are of fetal origin and can metastasize without corruption of restraints on cell proliferation or bypassing apoptosis. In marked contrast to most invasive or metastatic epithelial carcinomas in adults, these former cancers then retain sensitivity to therapeutic apoptosis. Moreover, their abbreviated and less complex evolutionary status is associated with less genetic diversity and instability, minimising opportunity for clonal selection for resistance. A minority of leukaemias in children and a higher fraction in adults do, however, have genetic alterations that bypass cell cycle controls and apoptosis imposition. These are the 'bad news' genotypes. The cellular and molecular diversity of acute leukaemia impacts also on aetiology. Paediatric acute leukaemias can be initiated prenatally by illegitimate recombination and fusion gene formation in fetal haemopoiesis. For acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children, twin studies suggest that a secondary postnatal molecular event is also required. This may be promoted by an abnormal or delayed response to common infections. Even for a classic case of a cancer that is intrinsically curable by systematic chemotherapy i.e. childhood ALL, prevention may turn out to be the preferred option.

  8. Molecular genetics, natural history and the demise of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Greaves, M

    1999-02-01

    The patterns of genetic change, clonal evolution, natural history and latency are very different in the paediatric leukaemias compared with adult epithelial cancers but are similar to those in other childhood cancers of mesenchymal stem cell origin. This distinction has a biological logic in the context of the selective pressures for clonal emergence in different developmental and cellular contexts and has a major impact on curability. Most childhood leukaemias and some other mesenchymal stem cell tumours are of fetal origin and can metastasize without corruption of restraints on cell proliferation or bypassing apoptosis. In marked contrast to most invasive or metastatic epithelial carcinomas in adults, these former cancers then retain sensitivity to therapeutic apoptosis. Moreover, their abbreviated and less complex evolutionary status is associated with less genetic diversity and instability, minimising opportunity for clonal selection for resistance. A minority of leukaemias in children and a higher fraction in adults do, however, have genetic alterations that bypass cell cycle controls and apoptosis imposition. These are the 'bad news' genotypes. The cellular and molecular diversity of acute leukaemia impacts also on aetiology. Paediatric acute leukaemias can be initiated prenatally by illegitimate recombination and fusion gene formation in fetal haemopoiesis. For acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children, twin studies suggest that a secondary postnatal molecular event is also required. This may be promoted by an abnormal or delayed response to common infections. Even for a classic case of a cancer that is intrinsically curable by systematic chemotherapy i.e. childhood ALL, prevention may turn out to be the preferred option.

  9. t(1:14) and trisomy 4 in a patient with concomitant leukaemias.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Muhammad Nauman; Masood, Nehal; Shabbir-Moosajee, Munira

    2014-05-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities have long been recognized as the genetic basis of the occurrence of various malignancies. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities have shown to occur recurrently in particular subtypes of leukaemias and lymphomas. t(1;14) is an infrequently occurring recurrent chromosomal translocation that has been described in literature to be associated with haematological malignancies. Trisomy 4 is another rare genetic abnormality which has been reported in association with both acute myeloid and lymphoid leukaemias. The concomitant occurrence of a myeloid malignancy in association with a lymphoproliferative disorder is a distinctly unusual phenomenon. We report the case of a young patient with concomitant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia with a novel cytogenetic abnormality i.e. t(1;14) with trisomy 4. We believe this is the first reported case where a patient with two concomitant haematological malignancies, harboured this karyotype.

  10. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  11. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-06

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  12. High PRDM16 expression identifies a prognostic subgroup of pediatric acute myeloid leukaemia correlated to FLT3-ITD, KMT2A-PTD, and NUP98-NSD1: the results of the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-05 trial.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Norio; Ohki, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hara, Yusuke; Yamato, Genki; Tanoshima, Reo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Park, Myoung-Ja; Shimada, Akira; Sotomatsu, Manabu; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Horibe, Keizo; Adachi, Souichi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports described the NUP98-NSD1 fusion as an adverse prognostic marker for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and PRDM16 (also known as MEL1) as the representative overexpressed gene in patients harbouring NUP98-NSD1 fusion. PRDM16 gene expression levels were measured via real-time polymerase chain reaction in 369 paediatric patients with de novo AML, of whom 84 (23%) exhibited PRDM16 overexpression (PRDM16/ABL1 ratio ≥0·010). The frequencies of patients with high or low PRDM16 expression differed widely with respect to each genetic alteration, as follows: t(8;21), 4% vs. 96%, P < 0·001; inv(16), 0% vs. 100%, P < 0·001; KMT2A (also termed MLL)- partial tandem duplication, 100% vs. 0%, P < 0·001; NUP98-NSD1, 100% vs. 0%, P < 0·001. The overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) among PRDM16-overexpressing patients were significantly worse than in patients with low PRDM16 expression (3-year OS: 51% vs. 81%, P < 0·001, 3-year EFS: 32% vs. 64%, P < 0·001) irrespective of other cytogenetic alterations except for NPM1. PRDM16 gene expression was particularly useful for stratifying FLT3-internal tandem duplication-positive AML patients (3-year OS: high = 30% vs. low = 70%, P < 0·001). PRDM16 overexpression was highly recurrent in de novo paediatric AML patients with high/intermediate-risk cytogenetic profiles and was independently associated with an adverse outcome.

  13. Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult population.

    PubMed

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias; Harbo Poulsen, Aslak; Sørensen, Mette

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution causes lung cancer, but associations with other cancers have not been established. We investigated whether long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution is associated with the risk of the general population for leukaemia. We identified 1,967 people in whom leukaemia was diagnosed in 1992-2010 from a nation-wide cancer registry and selected 3,381 control people at random, matched on sex and year of birth, from the entire Danish population. Residential addresses since 1971 were traced in a population registry, and outdoor concentrations of NOx and NO2 , as indicators of traffic-related air pollution, were calculated at each address in a dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk for leukaemia after adjustment for income, educational level, cohabitation status and co-morbidity. In linear analyses, we found odds ratios for acute myeloid leukaemia of 1.20 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.38) per 20 µg/m(3) increase in NOx and 1.31 (1.02-1.68) per 10 µg/m(3) increase in NO2 , calculated as time-weighted average exposure at all addresses since 1971. We found no association with chronic myeloid or lymphocytic leukaemia. This study indicates an association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and acute myeloid leukaemia in the general population, but not for other subtypes of leukaemia.

  14. Maternal prenatal cigarette, alcohol and illicit drug use and risk of infant leukaemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Slater, Megan E; Linabery, Amy M; Blair, Cindy K; Spector, Logan G; Heerema, Nyla A; Robison, Leslie L; Ross, Julie A

    2011-11-01

    Several case-control studies have evaluated associations between maternal smoking, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use during pregnancy and risk of childhood leukaemia. Few studies have specifically focused on infants (<1 year) with leukaemia, a group that is biologically and clinically distinct from older children. We present data from a Children's Oncology Group case-control study of 443 infants diagnosed with acute leukaemia [including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] between 1996 and 2006 and 324 population controls. Mothers were queried about their cigarette, alcohol and illicit drug use 1 year before and throughout pregnancy. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals [CI] were calculated using adjusted unconditional logistic regression models. Maternal smoking (>1 cigarette/day) and illicit drug use (any amount) before and/or during pregnancy were not significantly associated with infant leukaemia. Alcohol use (>1 drink/week) during pregnancy was inversely associated with infant leukaemia overall [OR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.43, 0.94], AML [OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.28, 0.87], and leukaemia with mixed lineage leukaemia gene rearrangements ('MLL+') [OR = 0.59; 95% CI 0.36, 0.97]. While our results agree with the fairly consistent evidence that maternal cigarette smoking is not associated with childhood leukaemia, the data regarding alcohol and illicit drug use are not consistent with prior reports and are difficult to interpret. It is possible that unhealthy maternal behaviours during pregnancy, some of which carry potential legal consequences, may not be adequately measured using only self-report. Future case-control studies of childhood leukaemia that pursue these exposures may benefit from incorporation of validated instruments and/or biomarkers when feasible.

  15. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  16. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Treatment of primary refractory and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and adults: the GIMEMA/AIEOP experience. Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto. Associazione Italiana Ematologìa ed Ocologia Pediatrica.

    PubMed

    Giona, F; Testi, A M; Annino, L; Amadori, S; Arcese, W; Camera, A; Di Montezemolo, L C; Ladogana, S; Liso, V; Meloni, G

    1994-01-01

    One hundred and forty-seven patients aged < 55 years with advanced acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were enrolled in an Italian cooperative study (ALL R-87). This protocol consists of an induction phase with idarubicin (IDA) plus intermediate-dose cytarabine (IDARA-C), followed by a consolidation phase and bone marrow transplant (BMT). Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 97/147 patients (66%) with a CR rate of 77% in children versus 51% in adults (P < 0.01). 48 responders (50%) underwent BMT. Probability of event-free survival (EFS +/- SE) was 10.2 +/- 3.1% at 56 months. EFS was 14.3 +/- 4.51% at 56 months for children versus 3.8 +/- 3.41% at 37 months for adults (P < 0.0001). Among patients treated in first relapse, EFS was 14.2 +/-7.79% for patients with CR > 18 months verus 6.6 +/- 3.17% for those with CR < 18 months (P < 0.0001). Projected disease-free survival (DFS +/- SE) was 15.4 +/- 4.61% at 55 months for all responders and 43.3 +/- 14.34% at 52 months for allografted patients. Projected overall probability of survival +/- SE for all patients was 18.8 +/- 4.13% at 56 months. This study confirms the efficacy of IDA plus IDARA-C in poor-risk. ALL patients. A more intensive post-remission therapy or alternative approach must be designed to improve long-term results.

  19. The clinical impact of IKZF1 deletions in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is independent of minimal residual disease stratification in Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology treatment protocols used between 1992 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Linda; Ivanov Öfverholm, Ingegerd; Norén-Nyström, Ulrika; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Nordlund, Jessica; Sjögren, Helene; Golovleva, Irina; Nordgren, Ann; Paulsson, Kajsa; Heyman, Mats; Barbany, Gisela; Johansson, Bertil

    2015-09-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (BCP ALL) with IKZF1 deletions (∆IKZF1) are associated with a poor outcome. However, there are conflicting data as to whether ∆IKZF1 is an independent risk factor if minimal residual disease (MRD) and other copy number alterations also are taken into account. We investigated 334 paediatric BCP ALL, diagnosed 1992-2013 and treated according to Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL protocols, with known IKZF1 status based on either single nucleotide polymorphism array (N = 218) or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (N = 116) analyses. ∆IKZF1, found in 15%, was associated with inferior 10-year probabilities of event-free (60% vs. 83%; P < 0·001) and overall survival (pOS; 73% vs. 89%; P = 0·001). Adjusting for known risk factors, including white blood cell (WBC) count and MRD, ∆IKZF1 was the strongest independent factor for relapse and death. ∆IKZF1 was present in 27% of cases with non-informative cytogenetics ('BCP-other') and a poor 10-year pOS was particularly pronounced in this group (58% vs. 90%; P < 0·001). Importantly, neither MRD nor WBC count predicted events in the ∆IKZF1-positive cases. Co-occurrence of pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) deletions in Xp22.33/Yp11.32 (P2RY8-CRLF2) and ∆IKZF1 increased the risk of relapse (75% vs. 30% for cases with only ∆IKZF1; P = 0·045), indicating that BCP-other ALL with both P2RY8-CRLF2 and ∆IKZF1 constitutes a particularly high-risk group.

  20. The cost effectiveness of treating paediatric cancer in low-income and middle-income countries: a case-study approach using acute lymphocytic leukaemia in Brazil and Burkitt lymphoma in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Nickhill; Martiniuk, Alexandra L C; Gupta, Sumit; Howard, Scott C

    2013-02-01

    Approximately 90% of children with cancer reside in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC) where healthcare resources are scarce and allocation decisions difficult. The cost effectiveness of treating childhood cancers in these settings is unknown. The objective of the present work was to determine cost-effectiveness thresholds for common paediatric cancers using acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Brazil and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in Malawi as examples. Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) prevented by treatment were compared to the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of each country to define cost-effectiveness thresholds using WHO-CHOICE ('CHOosing Interventions that are Cost-Effective') guidelines. The case examples were selected due to the data available and because ALL and BL both have the potential to yield significant health gains at a low cost per patient treated. The key findings were as follows: the 3:1 cost/DALY prevented to GDP/capita ratio for ALL in Brazil was US $771,225; expenditures below this threshold were cost effective. Costs below US $257,075 (1:1 ratio) were considered very cost effective. Analogous thresholds for BL in Malawi were US $42,729 and US $14,243. Actual costs were far less. In Brazil, US $16,700 was spent to treat each patient while in Malawi total drug costs were less than US $50 per child. In summary, treatment of certain paediatric cancers in LMIC is very cost effective. Future research should evaluate actual treatment and infrastructure expenditures to help guide policymakers.

  1. All-trans retinoic acid with daunorubicin or idarubicin for risk-adapted treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia: a matched-pair analysis of the PETHEMA LPA-2005 and IC-APL studies.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Montesinos, Pau; Kim, Haesook T; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; Undurraga, María S; Uriarte, María R; Martínez, Lem; Jacomo, Rafael H; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Homero; Melo, Raul A M; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Fagundes, Evandro M; Vellenga, Edo; Holowiecka, Alexandra; González-Huerta, Ana J; Fernández, Pascual; De la Serna, Javier; Brunet, Salut; De Lisa, Elena; González-Campos, José; Ribera, José M; Krsnik, Isabel; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Rego, Eduardo M

    2015-08-01

    Front-line treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) consists of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. In this setting, a comparison of idarubicin and daunorubicin has never been carried out. Two similar clinical trials using ATRA and chemotherapy for newly diagnosed APL were compared using matched-pair analysis. One was conducted by the PETHEMA/HOVON group with idarubicin and the other by the International Consortium on APL (IC-APL) using daunorubicin. Three hundred and fifty patients from the PETHEMA/HOVON cohort were matched with 175 patients in the IC-APL cohort, adjusting for the significantly unbalanced presenting features of the two entire cohorts. Complete remission (CR) rate was significantly higher in the PETHEMA/HOVON (94 %) than in the IC-APL cohort (85 %) (P = 0.002). The distribution of causes of induction failure and the time to achieve CR were similar in both cohorts. Patients who achieved CR had comparable cumulative incidence of relapse and disease-free survival rates, but lower overall and event-free survivals were observed in the IC-APL cohort, which was mainly due to a higher death rate during induction therapy. A higher death rate during consolidation therapy was also observed in the IC-APL. These results show that daunorubicin and idarubicin have similar antileukaemic efficacy in terms of primary resistance, molecular persistence, as well as molecular and haematological relapse rates when combined with ATRA in treatment of APL. However, a higher toxic death rate during induction and consolidation therapy was observed in the IC-APL cohort. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00408278 [ClinicalTrials.gov]. PMID:25975975

  2. The pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepine, PBOX-15, enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulation of DR5 and downregulation of core cell survival proteins in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    NATHWANI, SEEMA-MARIA; GREENE, LISA M.; BUTINI, STEFANIA; CAMPIANI, GIUSEPPE; WILLIAMS, D. CLIVE; SAMALI, AFSHIN; SZEGEZDI, EVA; ZISTERER, DANIELA M.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic defects are frequently associated with poor outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) hence there is an ongoing demand for novel strategies that counteract apoptotic resistance. The death ligand TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and its selective tumour receptor system has attracted exceptional clinical interest. However, many malignancies including ALL are resistant to TRAIL monotherapy. Tumour resistance can be overcome by drug combination therapy. TRAIL and its agonist antibodies are currently undergoing phase II clinical trials with established chemotherapeutics. Herein, we present promising therapeutic benefits in combining TRAIL with the selective anti-leukaemic agents, the pyrrolo-1,5-benzoxazepines (PBOXs) for the treatment of ALL. PBOX-15 synergistically enhanced apoptosis induced by TRAIL and a DR5-selective TRAIL variant in ALL-derived cells. PBOX-15 enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by dual activation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. The specific caspase-8 inhibitor, Z-IETD-FMK, identified the extrinsic pathway as the principal mode of apoptosis. We demonstrate that PBOX-15 can enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulation of DR5, reduction of cellular mitochondrial potential, activation of the caspase cascade and downregulation of PI3K/Akt, c-FLIP, Mcl-1 and IAP survival pathways. Of note, the PI3K pathway inhibitor LY-294002 significantly enhanced the apoptotic potential of TRAIL and PBOX-15 validating the importance of Akt downregulation in the TRAIL/PBOX-15 synergistic combination. Considering the lack of cytotoxicity to normal cells and ability to downregulate several survival pathways, PBOX-15 may represent an effective agent for use in combination with TRAIL for the treatment of ALL. PMID:27176505

  3. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Dermatoglyphics in childhood leukaemia: a guide to prognosis and aetiology?

    PubMed

    Till, M; Larrauri, S; Smith, P G

    1978-06-01

    The results of analysis of the dermatoglyphics of 152 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (and the first-degree relatives of 54 of them) contrast with those of 31 children with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML) (and the first-degree relatives of 25 of them). In ALL our findings suggest that neither genetic susceptibility nor an environmental factor, effective during the early antenatal period, is of aetiological importance; but the response to treatment, assessed as length of first remission, was found to be related to the amount of fingertip pattern. This may have clinical application. In AML there is evidence of a genetically determined factor carrying a high risk of the development of the disease, in that a member of each of 5 different families of the 25 studied bore a rare hypothenar pattern, compared with none in 75 control families. No dermatoglyphic features were of prognostic significance in AML.

  5. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: Forefront of the field in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Christopher B; Nazha, Aziz; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) includes components of both myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasms and is associated with a characteristic peripheral monocytosis. CMML is caused by the proliferation of an abnormal hematopoietic stem cell clone and may be influenced by microenvironmental changes. The disease is rare and has undergone revisions in its classification. We review the recent classification strategies as well as diagnostic criteria, focusing on CMML’s genetic alterations and unique pathophysiology. We also discuss the latest molecular characterization of the disease, including how molecular factors affect current prognostic models. Finally, we focus on available treatment strategies, with a special emphasis on experimental and forthcoming therapies. PMID:25869097

  6. A case of chronic myeloid leukaemia presenting as megakaryocytic blast crisis (AML M7)

    PubMed Central

    Karkuzhali, Ponnuswamy; Shanthi, Velusamy; Usha, Thiruvengadam

    2013-01-01

    Acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (AMeL) is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia, which can be frequently misdiagnosed as acute myelofibrosis or myelosclerosis [1]. Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) presenting primarily as megakaryocytic blast crisis is very rare, with very few case reports published to date [2, 3]. This case report describes a 36-year-old woman who presented with anaemia and massive splenomegaly with peripheral blood and bone marrow showing features of AMeL. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and gel-electrophoretic study of peripheral blood leucocytes demonstrated breakpoint cluster region–Abelson oncogene translocation encoding for p210 fusion protein. Megakaryocytic blast crisis as the primary presentation of CML is very rare and requires clinical correlation and additional cytogenetic studies to determine the diagnosis. PMID:24282446

  7. Eosinophilic leukaemia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Hassan; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Esmaelli, Hossein; Khoshnegah, Javad

    2007-12-01

    A 14-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was presented to Tehran University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a persistent fever, anorexia, intermittent vomiting, weight loss and weakness. The main clinical signs were pale mucous membranes, dehydration and splenomegaly. The complete blood count and serum biochemistry tests revealed non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia and increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for feline leukaemia virus was negative. Blood film and bone marrow examination revealed a large number of immature eosinophils with variable sizes and numbers of faintly azurophilic granules. Cytochemical staining of blood film demonstrated 70% positive cells for ALP activity. Four percent CD34 positive cells were detected by flow cytometry. As eosinophilic leukaemia is difficult to identify by light microscopy, well-defined diagnostic criteria and the use of flow cytometry and cytochemical staining can improve the ability to correctly diagnose this type of leukaemia in cats. PMID:17669677

  8. [DEFINITION OF INTERRELATION BETWEEN AMINOACID COMPOSITION OF URINE AND BONE TISSUE DENSITY AT CHILDREN WITH ACUTE LEUKAEMIA FOR ONCOHEMATOLOGICAL PATHOLOGY RISK GROUP FORMATION].

    PubMed

    Bebeshko, V G; Bruslova, E M; Volodina, T T; Tsvietkova, N M; Lyashenko, L A; Pushkareva, T I; Voloshko, V I; Veselskaya, L P; Chernysh, T A; Trikhleb, I V

    2014-12-01

    Age and sexual indexies of densitometry at patients with acute leukemia (AL) and healthy children are presented. 31% of children with AL during the initial period of disease had manifestations of the osteopenic syndrome. At patients with AL more often than at healthy children anomalies of development of front part of skull are defined. The partial contribution of free and peptides-connencted oxyproline in urine at AL patients differs in comparison with control group that is caused by modification or deficiency of the corresponding enzymes. 30% of patients with AL had raised concentration of free oxyproline in urine, and lowered glycine concentration that testifies to the increased disintegration of collagen and deficiency of tile plastic material necessary for collagene-forming processes. The obtained data should be considered for forming of risk group on oncohematological pathology at children.

  9. The influence of joint application of arsenic trioxide and daunorubicin on primary acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells and apoptosis and blood coagulation of cell strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Qin, Na; Chen, Xinghua; Guo, Shuxia

    2015-05-01

    This test cultivated three groups of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and NB4 cells in liquid in vitro, processed them with arsenic trioxide (ATO), daunorubicin (DNR), ATO+DNR respectively, and then set up blank control group. Apoptosis of cells in each group was observed using flow cytometry, procoagulant activity of APL and NB4 cells in each group was detected with recalcification time, and expressions of tissue factor (TF), thrombomodulin and annexin II of NB4 cells in each group were measured using ELISA method. The results showed that the apoptosis rate increased 4-8 times compared with blank control group after processing APL and NB4 cells with ATO and DNR; procoagulant activity decreased obviously; and expression of TF and annexin II of NB4 cells reduced significantly (P<0.05). We concluded that combination of ATO and DNR could promote APL and NB4 cell apoptosis effectively without aggravating blood coagulation disorders, which might improve coagulation function of APL by inhibiting coagulation and hyperfibrinolysis through reducing expression of TF and annexin II. This drug combination may be a safe and effective method in the treatment of APL of primary high white blood cells type.

  10. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation versus chemotherapy in high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in first remission. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) and the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

    PubMed

    Uderzo, C; Valsecchi, M G; Balduzzi, A; Dini, G; Miniero, R; Locatelli, F; Rondelli, R; Pession, A; Arcese, W; Bacigalupo, A; Polchi, P; Andolina, M; Messina, C; Conter, V; Aricó, M; Galimberti, S; Masera, G

    1997-02-01

    We compared the outcome of children with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (HR-ALL) in first complete remission (first CR) treated with chemotherapy (CHEMO) or with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in a multicentre study. All children treated by the Italian Paediatric Haematology Oncology Association for HR-ALL in first CR between 1986 and 1994 were eligible for the study. 30 children were given BMT at a median of 4 months from first CR, with preparative regimens including total-body irradiation (n = 25/30). 130 matched controls for BMT patients were identified among 397 HR-ALL CHEMO patients. Matching on main prognostic factors and duration of first CR was adopted to control the selection and time-to-transplant biases. The comparative analysis was based on the results of a stratified Cox model. The estimated hazard ratios of BMT versus CHEMO at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after CR were 1.38 (CI 0.59-3.24), 0.69 (CI 0.27-1.77) and 0.35 (CI 0.06-1.91), with an overall non-significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.34). With a median follow-up of 4 years, the disease-free survival was 58.5% (SE 9.3) in the BMT group and 47.7% (SE 4.8) in the CHEMO group, at 4 years from CR. Non-leukaemic death occurred in 4% of CHEMO and 10% of BMT patients. In the BMT group the estimated cumulative incidence of relapse at 1.5 years from CR was 31.5% (SE 8.8) and did not change thereafter, whereas in the CHEMO group the corresponding figure was 29.2% (SE 4.1) and the incidence continued to increase thereafter (48.2% (SE 4.8) at 4 years from CR). The results of this study suggest that, with respect to the CHEMO group, the higher risk of early failure in the BMT group is outweighed by the lower risk of relapse after 1 year. Results prompt the need for a prospective study, in order to demonstrate the likely advantage of BMT in HR childhood ALL in first CR.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. SIRT2 activates G6PD to enhance NADPH production and promote leukaemia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuang-Nian; Wang, Tian-Shi; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Like most other types of cancer cells, leukaemia cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support rapid proliferation through enhancing biosynthetic processes. Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a pivotal role in meeting the anabolic demands for cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPP contributes to leukaemia remains elusive. Here, we report that leukaemia cell proliferation is dependent on the oxidative branch of PPP, in particular the first and rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Knockdown of G6PD reduces NADPH level in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines. Exogenous lipid supplements partially restore the proliferation of G6PD-depleted cells. Deacetylase SIRT2 promotes NADPH production through deacetylating G6PD at lysine 403 (K403). Activation of G6PD by SIRT2 supports the proliferation and clonogenic activity of leukaemia cells. Chemical inhibitors against SIRT2 suppress G6PD activity, leading to reduced cell proliferation of leukaemia cells, but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, SIRT2 is overexpressed in clinical AML samples, while K403 acetylation is downregulated and G6PD catalytic activity is increased comparing to that of normal control. Together, our study reveals that acetylation regulation of G6PD is involved in the metabolic reprogramming of AML, and SIRT2 serves as a promising target for further therapeutic investigations. PMID:27586085

  13. SIRT2 activates G6PD to enhance NADPH production and promote leukaemia cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuang-Nian; Wang, Tian-Shi; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Like most other types of cancer cells, leukaemia cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support rapid proliferation through enhancing biosynthetic processes. Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a pivotal role in meeting the anabolic demands for cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPP contributes to leukaemia remains elusive. Here, we report that leukaemia cell proliferation is dependent on the oxidative branch of PPP, in particular the first and rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Knockdown of G6PD reduces NADPH level in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines. Exogenous lipid supplements partially restore the proliferation of G6PD-depleted cells. Deacetylase SIRT2 promotes NADPH production through deacetylating G6PD at lysine 403 (K403). Activation of G6PD by SIRT2 supports the proliferation and clonogenic activity of leukaemia cells. Chemical inhibitors against SIRT2 suppress G6PD activity, leading to reduced cell proliferation of leukaemia cells, but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, SIRT2 is overexpressed in clinical AML samples, while K403 acetylation is downregulated and G6PD catalytic activity is increased comparing to that of normal control. Together, our study reveals that acetylation regulation of G6PD is involved in the metabolic reprogramming of AML, and SIRT2 serves as a promising target for further therapeutic investigations. PMID:27586085

  14. A case–control study of risk of leukaemia in relation to mobile phone use

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R; Laing, S; Swerdlow, A J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Mobile phone use is now ubiquitous, and scientific reviews have recommended research into its relation to leukaemia risk, but no large studies have been conducted. Methods: In a case–control study in South East England to investigate the relation of acute and non-lymphocytic leukaemia risk to mobile phone use, 806 cases with leukaemia incident 2003–2009 at ages 18–59 years (50% of those identified as eligible) and 585 non-blood relatives as controls (provided by 392 cases) were interviewed about mobile phone use and other potentially aetiological variables. Results: No association was found between regular mobile phone use and risk of leukaemia (odds ratio (OR)=1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.76, 1.46). Analyses of risk in relation to years since first use, lifetime years of use, cumulative number of calls and cumulative hours of use produced no significantly raised risks, and there was no evidence of any trends. A non-significantly raised risk was found in people who first used a phone 15 or more years ago (OR=1.87, 95% CI=0.96, 3.63). Separate analyses of analogue and digital phone use and leukaemia subtype produced similar results to those overall. Conclusion: This study suggests that use of mobile phones does not increase leukaemia risk, although the possibility of an effect after long-term use, while biologically unlikely, remains open. PMID:20940717

  15. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  16. BET inhibitor resistance emerges from leukaemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chun Yew; Gilan, Omer; Lam, Enid Y N; Rubin, Alan F; Ftouni, Sarah; Tyler, Dean; Stanley, Kym; Sinha, Devbarna; Yeh, Paul; Morison, Jessica; Giotopoulos, George; Lugo, Dave; Jeffrey, Philip; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Carpenter, Christopher; Gregory, Richard; Ramsay, Robert G; Lane, Steven W; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kouzarides, Tony; Johnstone, Ricky W; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Huntly, Brian J P; Prinjha, Rab K; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Dawson, Mark A

    2015-09-24

    Bromodomain and extra terminal protein (BET) inhibitors are first-in-class targeted therapies that deliver a new therapeutic opportunity by directly targeting bromodomain proteins that bind acetylated chromatin marks. Early clinical trials have shown promise, especially in acute myeloid leukaemia, and therefore the evaluation of resistance mechanisms is crucial to optimize the clinical efficacy of these drugs. Here we use primary mouse haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells immortalized with the fusion protein MLL-AF9 to generate several single-cell clones that demonstrate resistance, in vitro and in vivo, to the prototypical BET inhibitor, I-BET. Resistance to I-BET confers cross-resistance to chemically distinct BET inhibitors such as JQ1, as well as resistance to genetic knockdown of BET proteins. Resistance is not mediated through increased drug efflux or metabolism, but is shown to emerge from leukaemia stem cells both ex vivo and in vivo. Chromatin-bound BRD4 is globally reduced in resistant cells, whereas the expression of key target genes such as Myc remains unaltered, highlighting the existence of alternative mechanisms to regulate transcription. We demonstrate that resistance to BET inhibitors, in human and mouse leukaemia cells, is in part a consequence of increased Wnt/β-catenin signalling, and negative regulation of this pathway results in restoration of sensitivity to I-BET in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings provide new insights into the biology of acute myeloid leukaemia, highlight potential therapeutic limitations of BET inhibitors, and identify strategies that may enhance the clinical utility of these unique targeted therapies.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood-forming tissue ( bone marrow ). In normal bone marrow, hematopoietic ... 7186-203. Review. Citation on PubMed de Thé H, Chen Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into ...

  18. Molecular predictors of response to decitabine in advanced chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Itzykson, Raphael; Renneville, Aline; de Renzis, Benoit; Dreyfus, François; Laribi, Kamel; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Vey, Norbert; Toma, Andrea; Recher, Christian; Royer, Bruno; Joly, Bertrand; Vekhoff, Anne; Lafon, Ingrid; Sanhes, Laurence; Meurice, Guillaume; Oréar, Cédric; Preudhomme, Claude; Gardin, Claude; Ades, Lionel; Fontenay, Michaela; Fenaux, Pierre; Droin, Nathalie; Solary, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Hydroxyurea is the standard therapy of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) presenting with advanced myeloproliferative and/or myelodysplastic features. Response to hypomethylating agents has been reported in heterogeneous series of CMML. We conducted a phase 2 trial of decitabine (DAC) in 39 patients with advanced CMML defined according to a previous trial. Median number of DAC cycles was 10 (range, 1-24). Overall response rate was 38% with 4 complete responses (10%), 8 marrow responses (21%), and 3 stable diseases with hematologic improvement (8%). Eighteen patients (46%) demonstrated stable disease without hematologic improvement, and 6 (15%) progressed to acute leukemia. With a median follow-up of 23 months, overall survival was 48% at 2 years. Mutations in ASXL1, TET2, AML1, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, FLT3, and janus kinase 2 (JAK2) genes, and hypermethylation of the promoter of the tumor suppressor gene TIF1γ, did not predict response or survival on DAC therapy. Lower CJUN and CMYB gene expression levels independently predicted improved overall survival. This trial confirmed DAC efficacy in approximately 40% of CMML patients with advanced myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic features and suggested that CJUN and CMYB expression could be potential biomarkers in this setting. This trial is registered at EudraCT (eudract.ema.europa.eu) as #2008-000470-21 and www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01098084.

  19. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia displays mutations in components of the RAS pathway and the PRC2 network.

    PubMed

    Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Guidez, Fabien; Cassinat, Bruno; Gazal, Steven; Fenneteau, Odile; Lainey, Elodie; Nouri, Kazem; Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Dvorsky, Radovan; Lachenaud, Julie; Pereira, Sabrina; Vivent, Jocelyne; Verger, Emmanuelle; Vidaud, Dominique; Galambrun, Claire; Picard, Capucine; Petit, Arnaud; Contet, Audrey; Poirée, Marilyne; Sirvent, Nicolas; Méchinaud, Françoise; Adjaoud, Dalila; Paillard, Catherine; Nelken, Brigitte; Reguerre, Yves; Bertrand, Yves; Häussinger, Dieter; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza; Baruchel, André; Chomienne, Christine; Cavé, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare and severe myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasm of early childhood initiated by germline or somatic RAS-activating mutations. Genetic profiling and whole-exome sequencing of a large JMML cohort (118 and 30 cases, respectively) uncovered additional genetic abnormalities in 56 cases (47%). Somatic events were rare (0.38 events/Mb/case) and restricted to sporadic (49/78; 63%) or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)-associated (8/8; 100%) JMML cases. Multiple concomitant genetic hits targeting the RAS pathway were identified in 13 of 78 cases (17%), disproving the concept of mutually exclusive RAS pathway mutations and defining new pathways activated in JMML involving phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the mTORC2 complex through RAC2 mutation. Furthermore, this study highlights PRC2 loss (26/78; 33% of sporadic JMML cases) that switches the methylation/acetylation status of lysine 27 of histone H3 in JMML cases with altered RAS and PRC2 pathways. Finally, the association between JMML outcome and mutational profile suggests a dose-dependent effect for RAS pathway activation, distinguishing very aggressive JMML rapidly progressing to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26457648

  20. Investigation of human parvovirus B19 occurrence and genetic variability in different leukaemia entities.

    PubMed

    da Costa, A C; Bendit, I; de Oliveira, A C S; Kallas, E G; Sabino, E C; Sanabani, S S

    2013-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19V (B19V) has been associated with various haematological disorders, but data on its prevalence in leukaemia are scarce. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated patients in Sao Paulo, Brazil with leukaemia to determine the molecular frequency of B19 variants and characterize the viral genetic variability by partial and complete sequencing of the coding of non-structural protein 1 (NS1)/viral capsid proteins 1 and 2 (VP1/VP2). The presence of B19V infections was investigated by PCR amplification of the viral NS1 gene fragment and confirmed by sequencing analysis. The NS1/VP1/VP2 and partially larger gene fragments of the NS1-positive samples were determined by overlapping nested PCR and direct sequencing results. The B19V NS1 was detected in 40 (16%) of 249 bone marrow samples including 12/78 (15.4%) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, 25/155 (16.1%) acute myeloid leukaemia and 3/16 (18.7%) chronic myeloid leukaemia samples. Of the 40 participants, 25 (62.5%) were infected with genotype 1a and 15 (37.5%) with genotype 3b. The phylogenetic analysis of other regions revealed that 12/40 (30%) of the patients with leukaemia were co-infected with genotypes 1a and 3b. In addition, a new B19V intergenotypic recombinant (1a/3b) and an NS1 non-recombinant genotype 1a were detected in one patient. Our findings demonstrated a relatively high prevalence of B19V monoinfections and dual infections and provide, for the first time, evidence of inter-genotypic recombination in adults with leukaemia that may contribute to the genetic diversity of B19V and may also be a source of new emerging viral strains with future implications for diagnosis, therapy and efficient vaccine development.

  1. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts

  2. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Fennessy, Carl; Warrander, Fiona; Hoyle, Sarah; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone) or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE), and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1). Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:19508709

  3. Alternative models for early onset of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wheldon, T. E.; Mairs, R. J.; Barrett, A.; Wheldon, E. G.; Gibson, B. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers theoretical models for early-onset childhood leukaemia. The major focus of attention is the two-hit mutational model. A simple mathematical representation is used to explore mechanisms which might lead to onset of leukaemia at an unusually early age. Two such mechanisms are considered. The first of these, a germinal or very early embryonic first mutation is shown to imply that multiple independent leukaemic clones are likely to arise sequentially in very young patients. Clonal multiplicity could underlie the poor prognosis which has been associated with early onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. It implies that curative therapy might require intensive treatment followed by bone marrow rescue to ensure eradication of all single-hit predisposed target cells. The prediction of multiple leukaemic clones might be tested in female patients by means of X-linked restriction fragment length polymorphisms and in patients with B-lineage neoplasms by determination of immunoglobin gene rearrangements. A second mechanism for early onset leukaemogenesis is the occurrence of a high cellular mutation rate in some patients. This is shown to result in leukaemia at significantly earlier age if the mutation rate is sufficiently high to influence target cell loss rate. This mechanism would enable more rapid clonal evolution of leukaemic cells and the early emergence of drug resistant variants. The prediction might be tested experimentally by sequential observation of genetic markers (e.g. Karyotypes, DNA fingerprint patterns) and the rate of emergence of drug resistant phenotypes. Other models, considered more briefly, include one-hit mutational 'dominants' in the developing embryo and faster growth kinetics in neoplasms of younger patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1503920

  4. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Epigenetic dysregulation of leukaemic HOX code in MLL-rearranged leukaemia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray Kit; Kong, Cheuk Ting; So, Chi Chiu; Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Leung, Ka Chun; So, Kam Chung; Tsang, Ho Man; Chan, Li Chong; Sham, Mai Har

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are frequently dysregulated in human leukaemia with the gene rearrangement between mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) and partner genes. The resultant MLL fusion proteins are known to mediate leukaemia through disruption of the normal epigenetic regulation at the target gene loci. To elucidate the pathogenic role of MLL fusion proteins in HOX dysregulation in leukaemia, we generated a novel haematopoietic lineage-specific Mll-Een knock-in mouse model using a Cre-mediated inversion strategy. The Mll(Een) (/+) invertor mice developed acute myeloid leukaemia, with organomegaly of the spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes caused by infiltration of blast cells. Using Mll-Een-expressing leukaemic cell lines derived from bone marrow of Mll(Een) (/+) mutant mice, we showed that induction of Hox genes in leukaemic cells was associated with hypomethylated promoter regions and an aberrant active chromatin state at the Hox loci. Knock-down of Prmt1 was insufficient to reverse the active chromatin status and the hypomethylated Hox loci, suggesting that Prmt1-mediated histone arginine methylation was only partially involved in the maintenance of Hox expression in leukaemic cells. Furthermore, in vivo analysis of bone marrow cells of Mll(Een) (/+) mice revealed a Hox expression profile similar to that of wild-type haematopoietic stem cells. The leukaemic Hox profile was highly correlated with aberrant hypomethylation of Hox promoters in the mutant mice, which highlights the importance of DNA methylation in leukaemogenic mechanisms induced by MLL fusion proteins. Our results point to the involvement of dynamic epigenetic regulations in the maintenance of the stem cell-like HOX code that initiates leukaemic stem cells in MLL-rearranged leukaemia. This provides insights for the development of alternative strategies for leukaemia treatment.

  6. Selection for Evi1 activation in myelomonocytic leukemia induced by hyperactive signaling through wild-type NRas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Rudolph, C; Morgan, M; Büsche, G; Salguero, G; Stripecke, R; Schlegelberger, B; Baum, C; Modlich, U

    2013-06-20

    Activation of NRas signaling is frequently found in human myeloid leukemia and can be induced by activating mutations as well as by mutations in receptors or signaling molecules upstream of NRas. To study NRas-induced leukemogenesis, we retrovirally overexpressed wild-type NRas in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model in C57BL/6J mice. Overexpression of wild-type NRas caused myelomonocytic leukemias ∼3 months after BMT in the majority of mice. A subset of mice (30%) developed malignant histiocytosis similar to mice that received mutationally activated NRas(G12D)-expressing bone marrow. Aberrant Ras signaling was demonstrated in cells expressing mutationally active or wild-type NRas, as increased activation of Erk and Akt was observed in both models. However, more NRas(G12D) were found to be in the activated, GTP-bound state in comparison with wild-type NRas. Consistent with observations reported for primary human myelomonocytic leukemia cells, Stat5 activation was also detected in murine leukemic cells. Furthermore, clonal evolution was detected in NRas wild-type-induced leukemias, including expansion of clones containing activating vector insertions in known oncogenes, such as Evi1 and Prdm16. In vitro cooperation of NRas and Evi1 improved long-term expansion of primary murine bone marrow cells. Evi1-positive cells upregulated Bcl-2 and may, therefore, provide anti-apoptotic signals that collaborate with the NRas-induced proliferative effects. As activation of Evi1 has been shown to coincide with NRAS mutations in human acute myeloid leukemia, our murine model recapitulates crucial events in human leukemogenesis. PMID:22847614

  7. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in cancer therapy: lessons from leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ceccacci, Elena; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-03-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a key component of the epigenetic machinery regulating gene expression, and behave as oncogenes in several cancer types, spurring the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) as anticancer drugs. This review discusses new results regarding the role of HDACs in cancer and the effect of HDACi on tumour cells, focusing on haematological malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukaemia. Histone deacetylases may have opposite roles at different stages of tumour progression and in different tumour cell sub-populations (cancer stem cells), highlighting the importance of investigating these aspects for further improving the clinical use of HDACi in treating cancer.

  8. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jie; Zuo, Zhuang; Fu, Bin; Oki, Yasuhiro; Tang, Guilin; Goswami, Maitrayee; Priyanka, Priyanka; Muzzafar, Tariq; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Wang, Sa A

    2016-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) are extremely uncommon, and the clinicopathologic features of these neoplasms are poorly characterized. Over a 10-yr interval, NPM1 mutation analysis was performed in 152 CMML at our institution. NPM1 mutations were identified in 8 (5.3%) patients, five men and three women, with a median age of 72 yr (range, 27-87). In all patients, the bone marrow was hypercellular with multilineage dysplasia, monocytosis, and retained maturation supporting a diagnosis of CMML. NPM1 mutation allele burden was <5% in two patients and >10% in six patients. Four (50%) patients, all with >10% NPM1, progressed AML with a median interval of 11 months (range, 1-21). Compared with 144 CMML without NPM1 mutations, CMML patients with NPM1 mutation presented with more severe anemia (P = 0.053), higher BM monocyte percentage (P = 0.033), and an increased tendency for AML progression (P = 0.088) and an inferior overall survival (P = 0.076). Mutations involving NRAS/KRAS (2/7), TET2(2/5), ASXL1(1/5,) and FLT3(0/8) were not significantly different between these two groups. In summary, CMML with NPM1 mutation shows histopathological features of CMML, but patients appear to have a high probability for AML progression and may require aggressive clinical intervention, especially in patients with a high mutation burden.

  9. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. BRAF Kinase Domain Mutations are Common in RASwt Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Singh, Rajesh R.; Patel, Keyur P.; Stingo, Francesco; Routbort, Mark; You, M. James; Miranda, Roberto N.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Luthra, Raja; Khoury, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of RAS mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) suggests that activation of the MAPK pathway is important in CMML pathogenesis. Accordingly, we hypothesized that mutations in other members of the MAPK pathway might be overrepresented in RASwt CMML. Methods We performed next generation sequencing analysis on 70 CMML patients with known RAS mutation status using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel kit (Illumina, San Diego, CA). Results The study group included 37 men and 33 women with a median age of 67.8 years (range, 28–86 years). Forty patients were RASwt and 30 were RASmut; the latter included KRAS=17; NRAS=12; KRAS+NRAS=1. Next-generation sequencing showed 5 patients (7.1% of total group; 12.5% of RASwt group) with RASwt who had BRAF mutations. All BRAFmut patients had CMML-1; 2 (40%) with MPN-CMML and 3 with MDS-CMML. The BRAF mutations were of missense type and involved exon 11 in 1 patient and exon 15 in 4 patients. All BRAFmut patients had CMML-1 with low-risk cytogenetic findings, and none of the BRAFmut CMML cases were therapy-related. Two (40%) of the 5 patients with BRAFmut patients transformed to acute myeloid leukemia during follow up. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression modeling suggests that BRAFmut status is associated with overall survival (p=0.04). Additionally, the RASmut group tended to have worse OS compared to the RASwt group. Conclusion In summary, we demonstrate that a subset of patients with RASwt CMML harbors BRAF kinase domain mutations that are potentially capable of activating the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:24446311

  11. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. A phase II trial of partially incompatible bone marrow transplantation for high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children: prevention of graft rejection with anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 antibodies. Société Française de Greffe de Moelle Osseuse.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana-Calvo, M; Bordigoni, P; Michel, G; Esperou, H; Souillet, G; Leblanc, T; Stephan, J L; Vannier, J P; Mechinaud, F; Reiffers, J; Vilmer, E; Landman-Parker, J; Benkerrou, M; Baruchel, A; Pico, J; Bernaudin, F; Bergeron, C; Plouvier, E; Thomas, C; Wijdenes, J; Lacour, B; Blanche, S; Fischer, A

    1996-04-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from matched sibling donors has been useful for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children with a poor prognosis but is not available to more than two-thirds of patients who do not have a matched allogeneic donor. This study was undertaken to assess one strategy of marrow graft rejection prevention when alternative marrow sources such as HLA-phenoidentical unrelated volunteers and HLA-partially incompatible relatives were used. Results have been compared with two matched groups of children with the same risks factors and disease status who underwent HLA-genoidentical or autologous BMT. The conditioning regimen was the same for the three groups of patients; in the study group anti-LFA-1 and anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies combined with T-cell depletion of the marrow was added to prevent graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease. Nineteen patients were included and followed for a median of 25 months (14 months to 3 years). Bone marrow engraftment occurred in 83% of the evaluable patients. Post-transplantation infectious diseases were the most frequent causes of death in the study group, occurring in 31% of patients. No fatal infections occurred in the two control groups. Post-transplantation relapse of leukaemia occurred in 26% of study group's patients, in 58% of autologous BMT control group's patients and 5% of HLA-genoidentical allogeneic group's patients. The event-free survival was 83% in the HLA-genoidentical control group, and 30% and 24% in the study group and in the autologous control group, respectively. In conclusion, a high rate of engraftment was achieved by the use of anti-LFA-1 and anti CD2 antibodies. Occurrence of a long-lasting immunodeficiency, however, led to a high incidence of lethal infections and relapses. Combined approaches are therefore to be investigated accelerating immune reconstitution after transplantations of T-depleted HLA partially incompatible marrow.

  13. Neutrophil elastase and proteinase 3 trafficking routes in myelomonocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaellquist, Linda; Rosen, Hanna; Nordenfelt, Pontus; Calafat, Jero; Janssen, Hans; Persson, Ann-Maj; Hansson, Markus; Olsson, Inge

    2010-11-15

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (PR3) differ in intracellular localization, which may reflect different trafficking mechanisms of the precursor forms when synthesized at immature stages of neutrophils. To shed further light on these mechanisms, we compared the trafficking of precursor NE (proNE) and precursor PR3 (proPR3). Like proNE [1], proPR3 interacted with CD63 upon heterologous co-expression in COS cells but endogenous interaction was not detected although cell surface proNE/proPR3/CD63 were co-endocytosed in myelomonocytic cells. Cell surface proNE/proPR3 turned over more rapidly than cell surface CD63 consistent with processing/degradation of the pro-proteases but recycling of CD63. Colocalization of proNE/proPR3/CD63 with clathrin and Rab 7 suggested trafficking through coated vesicles and late endosomes. Partial caveolar trafficking of proNE/CD63 but not proPR3 was suggested by colocalization with caveolin-1. Blocking the C-terminus of proNE/proPR3 by creating a fusion with FK506 binding protein inhibited endosomal re-uptake of proNE but not proPR3 indicating 'pro{sub C}'-peptide-dependent structural/conformational requirements for proNE but not for proPR3 endocytosis. The NE aminoacid residue Y199 of a proposed NE sorting motif that interacts with AP-3 [2] was not required for proNE processing, sorting or endocytosis in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells expressing heterologous Y199-deleted proNE; this suggests operation of another AP-3-link for proNE targeting. Our results show intracellular multi-step trafficking to be different between proNE and proPR3 consistent with their differential subcellular NE/PR3 localization in neutrophils.

  14. Epigenetic silencing of AKAP12 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Lipka, Daniel B; Witte, Tania; Wierzbinska, Justyna A; Fluhr, Silvia; Helf, Monika; Mücke, Oliver; Claus, Rainer; Konermann, Carolin; Nöllke, Peter; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Flotho, Christian; Plass, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    A-kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12) is a regulator of protein kinase A and protein kinase C signaling, acting downstream of RAS. Epigenetic silencing of AKAP12 has been demonstrated in different cancer entities and this has been linked to the process of tumorigenesis. Here, we used quantitative high-resolution DNA methylation measurement by MassARRAY to investigate epigenetic regulation of all three AKAP12 promoters (i.e., α, β, and γ) within a large cohort of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) patient samples. The AKAP12α promoter shows DNA hypermethylation in JMML samples, which is associated with decreased AKAP12α expression. Promoter methylation of AKAP12α correlates with older age at diagnosis, elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin and poor prognosis. In silico screening for transcription factor binding motifs around the sites of most pronounced methylation changes in the AKAP12α promoter revealed highly significant scores for GATA-2/-1 sequence motifs. Both transcription factors are known to be involved in the haematopoietic differentiation process. Methylation of a reporter construct containing this region resulted in strong suppression of AKAP12 promoter activity, suggesting that DNA methylation might be involved in the aberrant silencing of the AKAP12 promoter in JMML. Exposure to DNMT- and HDAC-inhibitors reactivates AKAP12α expression in vitro, which could potentially be a mechanism underlying clinical treatment responses upon demethylating therapy. Together, these data provide evidence for epigenetic silencing of AKAP12α in JMML and further emphasize the importance of dysregulated RAS signaling in JMML pathogenesis.

  15. Expression and functional role of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor in normal and acute leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Castoldi, G L; Castagnari, B; Todd, R F; Moretti, S; Spisani, S; Latorraca, A; Focarile, E; Roberti, M G; Traniello, S

    1998-10-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (UPA-R-CD87) is a GPI-anchored membrane protein which promotes the generation of plasmin on the surface of many cell types, probably facilitating cellular extravasation and tissue invasion. A flow cytometric quantitative analysis of expression levels for UPA-R was performed on fresh blast cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 74), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, n = 24), and biphenotypic leukaemia (BAL, n = 3) using two CD87 monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) (3B10 and VIM5). Peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) cells from 15 healthy adults served as controls. Using 3B10 McAb, UPA-R was expressed (>99%) by blood monocytes, neutrophils, and BM myelomonocytic precursors in controls, whereas resting T and B lymphocytes, and CD34+ cells were UPA-R negative. We also attempted to clarify whether UPA-R has a role in mediating neutrophil functions. Oriented locomotion induced by different chemotaxins and lysozyme release by granules stimulated with fMLP or PMA were significantly decreased when UPA-R was neutralized by CD87 McAb. In contrast, the anti-UPA-R McAb had no effect on superoxide anion generation of normal neutrophils. Blasts from AML showed a heterogenous pattern of expression for the UPA-R McAbs, with reactivity strictly dependent on FAB subtype. The highest UPA-R expression was seen in the M5 group: all patients tested (n = 20) showed strong positivity for the UPA-R McAb whereas only 12% (3/24) of ALL patients were CD87 positive, and 2/3 of BAL patients showed a dim expression for CD87. The number of receptors expressed by blast cells in 6/74 (8.1%) AML patients was higher than those of normal samples: in addition, since co-expression of UPA-R and CD34 was not found in normal haemopoietic cells, it may be postulated that CD87 can be used alone (when overexpressed) or in combination with CD34 for the detection of minimal residual disease. Results also indicated that patients with UPA

  16. Childhood leukaemia in North West England 1954-1977: epidemiology, incidence and survival.

    PubMed

    Birch, J M; Swindell, R; Marsden, H B; Morris Jones, P H

    1981-03-01

    The annual incidence of leukaemia among children aged up to 14 years as estimated by the Manchester Children's Tumour Registry has been analysed for the 24 years 1954-1977. A significant increase in acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) was found, while the incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remained constant. Other types of leukaemia were too rare to be analysed separately. The increase in ALL was concentrated among boys in the 1--5-year age group. Analysis with respect to initial white-cell count showed the increase to be more pronounced in children with initial white cell counts of 1-5 x 10(4)/microliters. The proportion of cases presenting in Lancashire compared with Greater Manchester did not change during the study period. The distribution of cases with respect to social class and socio-economic group of the parents also remained constant. Due to advances in the treatment of childhood ALL survival improved considerably during the study period and no increase in mortality was seen.

  17. Advances in understanding the leukaemia microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Konopleva, Marina

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic interactions between leukaemic cells and cells of the bone marrow are a feature of haematological malignancies. Two distinct microenvironmental niches in the bone marrow, the 'osteoblastic (endosteal)' and 'vascular' niches, provide a sanctuary for subpopulations of leukaemic cells to evade chemotherapy-induced death and allow acquisition of drug resistance. Key components of the bone marrow microenvironment as a home for normal haematopoietic stem cells and the leukaemia stem cell niches, and the molecular pathways critical for microenvironment/leukaemia interactions via cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules as well as hypoxic conditions, are described in this review. Finally, the genetic abnormalities of leukaemia-associated stroma are discussed. Further understanding of the contribution of the bone marrow niche to the process of leukaemogenesis may provide new targets that allow destruction of leukaemia stem cells without adversely affecting normal stem cell self-renewal.

  18. Long-term serial xenotransplantation of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia recapitulates human disease in Rag2-/-γc-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Krombholz, Christopher Felix; Aumann, Konrad; Kollek, Matthias; Bertele, Daniela; Fluhr, Silvia; Kunze, Mirjam; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Flotho, Christian; Erlacher, Miriam

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a clonal malignant disease affecting young children. Current cure rates, even with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are no better than 50%-60%. Pre-clinical research on juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is urgently needed for the identification of novel therapies but is hampered by the unavailability of culture systems. Here we report a xenotransplantation model that allows long-term in vivo propagation of primary juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia cells. Persistent engraftment of leukemic cells was achieved by intrahepatic injection of 1×10(6) cells into newborn Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice or intravenous injection of 5×10(6) cells into 5-week old mice. Key characteristics of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were reproduced, including cachexia and clonal expansion of myelomonocytic progenitor cells that infiltrated bone marrow, spleen, liver and, notably, lung. Xenografted leukemia cells led to reduced survival of recipient mice. The stem cell character of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia was confirmed by successful serial transplantation that resulted in leukemia cell propagation for more than one year. Independence of exogenous cytokines, low donor cell number and slowly progressing leukemia are advantages of the model, which will serve as an important tool to research the pathophysiology of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and test novel pharmaceutical strategies such as DNA methyltransferase inhibition. PMID:26888021

  19. Long-term serial xenotransplantation of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia recapitulates human disease in Rag2-/-γc-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Krombholz, Christopher Felix; Aumann, Konrad; Kollek, Matthias; Bertele, Daniela; Fluhr, Silvia; Kunze, Mirjam; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Flotho, Christian; Erlacher, Miriam

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a clonal malignant disease affecting young children. Current cure rates, even with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are no better than 50%-60%. Pre-clinical research on juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is urgently needed for the identification of novel therapies but is hampered by the unavailability of culture systems. Here we report a xenotransplantation model that allows long-term in vivo propagation of primary juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia cells. Persistent engraftment of leukemic cells was achieved by intrahepatic injection of 1×10(6) cells into newborn Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice or intravenous injection of 5×10(6) cells into 5-week old mice. Key characteristics of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were reproduced, including cachexia and clonal expansion of myelomonocytic progenitor cells that infiltrated bone marrow, spleen, liver and, notably, lung. Xenografted leukemia cells led to reduced survival of recipient mice. The stem cell character of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia was confirmed by successful serial transplantation that resulted in leukemia cell propagation for more than one year. Independence of exogenous cytokines, low donor cell number and slowly progressing leukemia are advantages of the model, which will serve as an important tool to research the pathophysiology of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and test novel pharmaceutical strategies such as DNA methyltransferase inhibition.

  20. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  2. Ajoene (natural garlic compound): a new anti-leukaemia agent for AML therapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, H T

    2004-07-01

    The reputation of garlic (Allium sativum) as an effective remedy for tumours extends back to the Egyptian Codex Ebers of 1550 b.c. Several garlic compounds including allicin and its corresponding sulfide inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of several human non-leukaemia malignant cells including breast, bladder, colorectal, hepatic, prostate cancer, lymphoma and skin tumour cell lines. Ajoene (4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene-9-oxide) is a garlic-derived compound produced most efficiently from pure allicin and has the advantage of a greater chemical stability than allicin. Several clinical trials and in vitro studies of ajoene have demonstrated its best-known anti-thrombosis, anti-microbial and cholesterol lowering activities. Recently, topic application of ajoene has produced significant clinical response in patients with skin basal cell carcinoma. Ajoene was shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of several human leukaemia CD34-negative cells including HL-60, U937, HEL and OCIM-1. Also, ajoene induces 30% apoptosis in myeloblasts from chronic myeloid leukaemia patient in blast crisis. More significantly, ajoene profoundly enhanced the apoptotic effect of the two chemotherapeutic drugs: cytarabine and fludarabine in human CD34-positive resistant myeloid leukaemia cells through enhancing their bcl-2 inhibitory and caspase-3 activation activities. The two key anti-leukaemia biological actions of ajoene were the inhibition of proliferation and the induction of apoptosis. Studies have shown the anti-proliferation activity of ajoene to be associated with a block in the G2/M phase of cell cycle in human myeloid leukaemia cells. The apoptosis inducing activity of ajoene is via the mitochondria-dependent caspase cascade through a significant reduction of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 that results in release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. Since acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous malignant disease in which disease

  3. Increased post-induction intensification improves outcome in children and adolescents with a markedly elevated white blood cell count (≥200 × 10(9) /l) with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia but not B cell disease: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Caroline; Gaynon, Paul S; Nachman, James B; Sather, Harland N; Lu, Xiaomin; Devidas, Meenakshi; Seibel, Nita L

    2015-02-01

    Children and adolescents presenting with a markedly elevated white blood cell (ME WBC) count (WBC ≥200 × 10(9) /l) comprise a unique subset of high-risk patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We evaluated the outcomes of the 251 patients (12% of the study population) with ME WBC treated on the Children's Cancer Group-1961 protocol. Patients were evaluated for early response to treatment by bone marrow morphology; those with a rapid early response were randomized to treatment regimens testing longer and stronger post-induction therapy. We found that ME WBC patients have a poorer outcome compared to those patients presenting with a WBC <200 × 10(9) /l (5-year event-free survival 62% vs. 73%, P = 0·0005). Longer duration of therapy worsened outcome for T cell ME WBC with a trend to poorer outcome in B-ALL ME WBC patients. Augmented therapy benefits T cell ME WBC patients, similar to the entire study cohort, however, there appeared to be no impact on survival for B-ALL ME WBC patients. ME WBC was not a prognostic factor for T cell patients. In patients with high risk features, B lineage disease in association with ME WBC has a negative impact on survival.

  4. Risk of leukaemia mortality from exposure to ionising radiation in US nuclear workers: a pooled case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Robert D; Bertke, Stephen; Waters, Kathleen M; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To follow-up on earlier studies of the leukaemogenicity of occupational ionising radiation exposure. Methods We conducted a nested case-control analysis of leukaemia mortality in a pooled cohort of US nuclear workers followed through 2005. Each case was matched to four controls on attained age. Exposures were estimated from available records. General relative risk models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) of leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic (CLL), acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia and CLL while controlling for potential confounders. Preferred exposure lags and time-windows of risks were calculated using joint maximum likelihood. Dose-response was also examined using linear, linear-quadratic, categorical and restricted cubic spline models. Results There were 369 leukaemia deaths in 105 245 US nuclear workers. The adjusted ERR for non-CLL leukaemia was 0.09 (95% CI −0.17 to 0.65) per 100 mGy. Elevated non-CLL risks were observed from exposures occurring 6–14 years prior to attained age of cases (ERR per 100 mGy=1.9; 95% CI <0 to 8.0). Lagged models indicated non-linearity of risk at very low (<10 mGy) and high (>100 mGy) doses, which contributed to the imprecision of results in linear models. Similar risk attenuation was not evident in time-windows-based models. Conclusions Risk estimates were in reasonable agreement with previous estimates, with the temporality of non-CLL leukaemia risk as a dominant factor in dose-response analyses. Future research should focus on methods that improve evaluations of the dose-response, particularly in the low-dose range. PMID:23000827

  5. [Simultaneous occurrence of hemophilia A and acute lymphatic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Schmid, L; Schafroth, U; Osterwalder, B; Senn, H J

    1987-11-14

    In this paper the case of a man with haemophilia A is presented. At the age of 18 years an acute lymphatic leukaemia was observed. The case report demonstrates that even in the presence of a severe plasmatic coagulopathy an acute lymphatic leukaemia can be successfully treated with intensive chemotherapy, if the monitoring of the coagulation values and the substitution of antihaemophilic globulin and thrombocytes are guaranteed. Only 4 cases of haemophilia and acute leukaemia in the same patient are described in the literature. So we believe that the association of these two rare disorders is merely accidental.

  6. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  7. Antisera against leukaemia-associated antigens on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C C; Marti, G E; Mittal, K K

    1977-01-01

    Antisera were raised in rabbits against leukaemic lymphosarcoma (LSL) cells which carried surface markers of both thymus-derived T lymphocytes (T cells) and bone marrow-derived B lymphocytes (B cells). After absorption with leucocytes, erythrocytes and serum proteins from normal individuals, the antisera demonstrated significant complement-dependent cytotoxicity against leukaemic cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (9/11), LSL (7/9) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) (9/12), with an antibody titre of 1:64 or greater. The antisera did not react with: (a) blood lymphocytes from clinically healthy individuals (0/23), patients with ono-lymphoproliferative disorders (0/8) and normal umbilical cords (0/3), (b) normal lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen (0/7), allogeneic lymphocytes (0/3), fetuin (0/1), purified protein derivative (PPD) (0/2), and candida antigen (0/1); (C) normal marrow cells (0/3), (D) normal thymocytes (0/2) and (E) leukaemic cells from patients with acute myeloblastic (AML) (0/10) and chronic granulocytic leukaemia (CGL) (0/3). However, the antisera did react with lymphoblastoid cells from continuous B-cell lines derived from an AML patient and from a non-leukaemic individual and, to a lesser extent, with lymphocytes from patients with infectious mononucleosis. The antisera also reacted with lymphocytes from chronically infected tonsils. Cytotoxicity of the antisera against lymphoblastoid and tonsillar cells was inhibited by ALL and CLL cell-lysates; and, conversely, cytotoxicity against ALL cells was inhibited by the lymphoblastoid cell extract. In contrast, a cell lysate or extract from normal inhibited by the lymphoblastoid cell extract. In contrast, a cell lysate or extract from normal lymphocytes did not inhibit cytotoxicity toward lymphoblastoid, tonsillar or ALL cells. Cytotoxicity of the antisera was neutralized by a goat anti-rabbit IgG (GAR IgG). These results suggest that the antisera contained

  8. Iowa radon leukaemia study: a hierarchical population risk model for spatially correlated exposure measured with error.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Zhang, Lixun; Field, R William

    2007-11-10

    This paper presents a Bayesian model that allows for the joint prediction of county-average radon levels and estimation of the associated leukaemia risk. The methods are motivated by radon data from an epidemiologic study of residential radon in Iowa that include 2726 outdoor and indoor measurements. Prediction of county-average radon is based on a geostatistical model for the radon data which assumes an underlying continuous spatial process. In the radon model, we account for uncertainties due to incomplete spatial coverage, spatial variability, characteristic differences between homes, and detector measurement error. The predicted radon averages are, in turn, included as a covariate in Poisson models for incident cases of acute lymphocytic (ALL), acute myelogenous (AML), chronic lymphocytic (CLL), and chronic myelogenous (CML) leukaemias reported to the Iowa cancer registry from 1973 to 2002. Since radon and leukaemia risk are modelled simultaneously in our approach, the resulting risk estimates accurately reflect uncertainties in the predicted radon exposure covariate. Posterior mean (95 per cent Bayesian credible interval) estimates of the relative risk associated with a 1 pCi/L increase in radon for ALL, AML, CLL, and CML are 0.91 (0.78-1.03), 1.01 (0.92-1.12), 1.06 (0.96-1.16), and 1.12 (0.98-1.27), respectively. PMID:17373673

  9. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Anti-leukaemic effects induced by APR-246 are dependent on induction of oxidative stress and the NFE2L2/HMOX1 axis that can be targeted by PI3K and mTOR inhibitors in acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Dina; Mohammad, Dara K; Mujahed, Huthayfa; Jonson-Videsäter, Kerstin; Nore, Beston; Paul, Christer; Lehmann, Sören

    2016-07-01

    The small molecule APR-246 (PRIMA-1(MET) ) is a novel drug that restores the activity of mutated and unfolded TP53 protein. However, the mechanisms of action and potential off-target effects are not fully understood. Gene expression profiling in TP53 mutant KMB3 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells showed that genes which protected cells from oxidative stress to be the most up-regulated. APR-246 exposure also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione in AML cells. The genes most up-regulated by APR-246, confirmed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, were heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, also termed HO-1), SLC7A11 and RIT1. Up-regulation of HMOX1, a key regulator of cellular response to ROS, was independent of TP53 mutational status. NFE2L2 (also termed Nrf2), a master regulator of HMOX1 expression, showed transcriptional up-regulation and nuclear translocation by APR-246. Down-regulation of NFE2L2 by siRNA in AML cells significantly increased the antitumoural effects of APR-246. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibited APR-246-induced nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 and counteracted the protective cellular responses to APR-246, resulting in synergistic cell killing together with APR-246. In conclusion, ROS induction is important for antileukaemic activities of APR-246 and inhibiting the protective response of the Nrf-2/HMOX1 axis using PI3K inhibitors, enhances the antileukaemic effects.

  14. Intermediate dose of imatinib in combination with chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation improves early outcome in paediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): results of the Spanish Cooperative Group SHOP studies ALL-94, ALL-99 and ALL-2005.

    PubMed

    Rives, Susana; Estella, Jesús; Gómez, Pedro; López-Duarte, Mónica; de Miguel, Purificación García; Verdeguer, Amparo; Moreno, Maria José; Vivanco, José Luis; Couselo, José Miguel; Fernández-Delgado, Rafael; Maldonado, Marisol; Tasso, María; López-Ibor, Blanca; Lendínez, Francisco; López-Almaraz, Ricardo; Uriz, Javier; Melo, Montserrat; Fernández-Teijeiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Isidoro; Badell, Isabel

    2011-09-01

    Philadelphia-chromosome acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ ALL) is a subgroup of ALL with very high risk of treatment failure. We report here the results of the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Oncología Pediátricas (SEHOP/SHOP) in paediatric Ph+ ALL treated with intermediate-dose imatinib concurrent with intensive chemotherapy. The toxicities and outcome of these patients were compared with historical controls not receiving imatinib. Patients with Ph+ ALL aged 1-18years were enrolled in three consecutive ALL/SHOP trials (SHOP-94/SHOP-99/SHOP-2005). In the SHOP-2005 trial, imatinib (260mg/m(2) per day) was given on day-15 of induction. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from a matched related or unrelated donor was scheduled in first complete remission (CR1). Forty-three patients were evaluable (22 boys, median age 6·8years, range, 1·2-15). Sixteen received imatinib whereas 27 received similar chemotherapy without imatinib. Seventeen of 27 and 15 of 16 patients in the non-imatinib and imatinib cohort, respectively, underwent HSCT in CR1. With a median follow-up of 109 and 39months for the non-imatinib and imatinib cohorts, the 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 29·6% and 78·7%, respectively (P=0·01). These results show that, compared to historical controls, intermediate dose of imatinib given concomitantly with chemotherapy and followed by allogeneic HSCT markedly improved early EFS in paediatric Ph+ ALL.

  15. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  18. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Long- and short-term intravital imaging reveals differential spatiotemporal recruitment and function of myelomonocytic cells after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Fenrich, Keith K; Weber, Pascal; Rougon, Geneviève; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-01-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), resident and peripheral myelomonocytic cells are recruited to the injury site and play a role in injury progression. These cells are important for clearing cellular debris, and can modulate the retraction and growth of axons in vitro. However, their precise spatiotemporal recruitment dynamics is unknown, and their respective roles after SCI remain heavily debated. Using chronic, quantitative intravital two-photon microscopy of adult mice with SCI, here we show that infiltrating lysozyme M (LysM(+)) and resident CD11c(+) myelomonocytic cells have distinct spatiotemporal recruitment profiles, and exhibit changes in morphology, motility, phagocytic activity and axon interaction patterns over time. This study provides the first in vivo description of the influx of inflammatory and resident myelomonocytic cells into the injured spinal cord and their interactions with cut axons, and underscores the importance of precise timing and targeting of specific cell populations in developing therapies for SCI. PMID:23918770

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme overexpression in myelomonocytes prevents Alzheimer’s-like cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Koronyo, Yosef; Salumbides, Brenda C.; Sheyn, Julia; Pelissier, Lindsey; Lopes, Dahabada H.J.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Fuchs, Dieu-Trang; Yu, Jeff J.-Y.; Pham, Michael; Black, Keith L.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with elevated brain levels of amyloid β protein (Aβ), particularly neurotoxic Aβ1–42. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) can degrade Aβ1–42, and ACE overexpression in myelomonocytic cells enhances their immune function. To examine the effect of targeted ACE overexpression on AD, we crossed ACE10/10 mice, which overexpress ACE in myelomonocytes using the c-fms promoter, with the transgenic APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD (AD+). Evaluation of brain tissue from these AD+ACE10/10 mice at 7 and 13 months revealed that levels of both soluble and insoluble brain Aβ1–42 were reduced compared with those in AD+ mice. Furthermore, both plaque burden and astrogliosis were drastically reduced. Administration of the ACE inhibitor ramipril increased Aβ levels in AD+ACE10/10 mice compared with the levels induced by the ACE-independent vasodilator hydralazine. Overall, AD+ACE10/10 mice had less brain-infiltrating cells, consistent with reduced AD-associated pathology, though ACE-overexpressing macrophages were abundant around and engulfing Aβ plaques. At 11 and 12 months of age, the AD+ACE10/WT and AD+ACE10/10 mice were virtually equivalent to non-AD mice in cognitive ability, as assessed by maze-based behavioral tests. Our data demonstrate that an enhanced immune response, coupled with increased myelomonocytic expression of catalytically active ACE, prevents cognitive decline in a murine model of AD. PMID:24487585

  2. Leukaemia 'firsts' in cancer research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Mel

    2016-03-01

    Our understanding of cancer biology has been radically transformed over recent years with a more realistic grasp of its multilayered cellular and genetic complexity. These advances are being translated into more selective and effective treatment of cancers and, although there are still considerable challenges, particularly with drug resistance and metastatic disease, many patients with otherwise lethal malignancies now enjoy protracted remissions or cure. One largely unheralded theme of this story is the extent to which new biological insights and novel clinical applications have their origins with leukaemia and related blood cell cancers, including lymphoma. In this Timeline article, I review the remarkable and ground-breaking role that studies in leukaemia have had at the forefront of this progress.

  3. Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme in myelomonocytic cells enhances the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Khan, Zakir; Giani, Jorge F.; Zhao, Tuantuan; Eriguchi, Masahiro; Bernstein, Ellen A.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and thereby plays an important role in blood pressure control. However, ACE is relatively non-specific in its substrate specificity and cleaves many other peptides. Recent analysis of mice overexpressing ACE in monocytes, macrophages, and other myelomonocytic cells shows that these animals have a marked increase in resistance to experimental melanoma and to infection by Listeria monocytogenes or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several other measures of immune responsiveness, including antibody production, are enhanced in these animals. These studies complement a variety of studies indicating an important role of ACE in the immune response. PMID:27018193

  4. The immune receptor Tim-3 mediates activation of PI3 kinase/mTOR and HIF-1 pathways in human myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, Alexandr; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Rüegg, Laura; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-02-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated protein that is highly expressed in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells. As an acute myeloid leukaemia antigen, it could therefore be considered as a potential target for immune therapy and highly-specific drug delivery. However, a conceptual understanding of its biological role is required before consideration of this protein for therapeutic settings. Here, we reveal the detailed mechanism of action underlying the biological responses mediated by the Tim-3 receptor in myeloid cells. Our studies demonstrate that Tim-3 triggers growth factor type responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cells by activating a phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. In addition, the receptor activates hypoxic signalling pathways upregulating glycolysis and pro-angiogenic responses. These findings suggest that Tim-3 could be used as a potential therapeutic target for immune therapy and drug delivery in human acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

  5. A mathematical model of subpopulation kinetics for the deconvolution of leukaemia heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Garí, María; Misener, Ruth; García-Munzer, David; Velliou, Eirini; Georgiadis, Michael C; Kostoglou, Margaritis; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2015-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia is characterized by marked inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity, the identification of which is critical for the design of personalized treatments. Heterogeneity of leukaemic cells is determined by mutations which ultimately affect the cell cycle. We have developed and validated a biologically relevant, mathematical model of the cell cycle based on unique cell-cycle signatures, defined by duration of cell-cycle phases and cyclin profiles as determined by flow cytometry, for three leukaemia cell lines. The model was discretized for the different phases in their respective progress variables (cyclins and DNA), resulting in a set of time-dependent ordinary differential equations. Cell-cycle phase distribution and cyclin concentration profiles were validated against population chase experiments. Heterogeneity was simulated in culture by combining the three cell lines in a blinded experimental set-up. Based on individual kinetics, the model was capable of identifying and quantifying cellular heterogeneity. When supplying the initial conditions only, the model predicted future cell population dynamics and estimated the previous heterogeneous composition of cells. Identification of heterogeneous leukaemia clones at diagnosis and post-treatment using such a mathematical platform has the potential to predict multiple future outcomes in response to induction and consolidation chemotherapy as well as relapse kinetics.

  6. The CD68 protein as a potential target for leukaemia-reactive CTL.

    PubMed

    Sadovnikova, E; Parovichnikova, E N; Savchenko, V G; Zabotina, T; Stauss, H J

    2002-10-01

    CD68, a haematopoietic differentiation marker of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is expressed in various human malignancies including chronic and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). While the majority of normal CD34(+) cells are negative for CD68 expression, CD34(+) cells from AML patients produce elevated amounts of this protein. The purpose of this study was to identify CTL epitopes in the human CD68 protein. Mouse CD68 was also analysed to search for epitopes that could be used in murine tumor model. Peptides binding to murine H2(b) class I molecules were identified and used to stimulate CTL responses from allogeneic donor mice to avoid immunological tolerance. High avidity CTL clones specific for three different peptide epitopes did not kill CD68-expressing murine target cells, indicating that endogenous antigen processing failed to produce sufficient amounts of these peptides. In contrast, allo-restricted human CTL specific for an HLA-A2-binding peptide of CD68 recognised not only picomolar concentrations of peptide, but also displayed low levels of killing against HLA-A2-positive K562 and THP-1 leukemia cell lines and blast cells from AML patients. These data suggest that human leukaemia cells express limited amounts of CD68-derived peptides, and that high avidity CTL capable of recognising sub-picomolar concentrations of peptides are required for efficient killing of leukaemia cells.

  7. Residential exposures to pesticides and childhood leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Like many chemicals, carcinogenicity of pesticides is poorly characterised in humans, especially in children, so that the present knowledge about childhood leukaemia risk derives primarily from epidemiological studies. Overall, case–control studies published in the last decade have reported positive associations with home use of insecticides, mostly before the child's birth, while findings for herbicides are mixed. Previous studies relied solely on self-reports, therefore lacking information on active ingredients and effects of potential recall bias. Few series to date have examined the influence of children's genetic susceptibility related to transport and metabolism of pesticides. To overcome these limitations, investigators of the Northern California Childhood Leukaemia Study (NCCLS) have undertaken, in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team, a comprehensive assessment of residential pesticide exposure, including: (1) quality control of self-reports; (2) home pesticide inventory and linkage to the Environmental Protection Agency to obtain data on active ingredients; (3) collection and laboratory analyses of ∼600 home dust samples for over 60 pesticides and (4) geographic information studies using California environmental databases to assess exposure to agricultural pesticides. The NCCLS is also conducting large-scale genotyping to evaluate the role of genes in xenobiotic pathways relevant to the transport and metabolism of pesticides. A better quantification of children's exposures to pesticides at home is critical to the evaluation of childhood leukaemia risk, especially for future gene–environment interaction studies. PMID:18940823

  8. Emerging technologies in paediatric leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetic changes, in particular chromosomal aberrations, are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL) and accurate detection of them is important in ensuring assignment to the appropriate drug protocol. Our ability to detect these genetic changes has been somewhat limited in the past due to the necessity to analyse mitotically active cells by conventional G-banded metaphase analysis and by mutational analysis of individual genes. Advances in technology include high resolution, microarray-based techniques that permit examination of the whole genome. Here we will review the current available methodology and discuss how the technology is being integrated into the diagnostic setting. PMID:26835367

  9. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... and given back to the patient through an infusion . These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ... them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies are given by infusion. They may be used alone or to carry ...

  12. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Long-term serial xenotransplantation of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia recapitulates human disease in Rag2−/−γc−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Krombholz, Christopher Felix; Aumann, Konrad; Kollek, Matthias; Bertele, Daniela; Fluhr, Silvia; Kunze, Mirjam; Niemeyer, Charlotte M.; Flotho, Christian; Erlacher, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a clonal malignant disease affecting young children. Current cure rates, even with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are no better than 50%–60%. Pre-clinical research on juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is urgently needed for the identification of novel therapies but is hampered by the unavailability of culture systems. Here we report a xenotransplantation model that allows long-term in vivo propagation of primary juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia cells. Persistent engraftment of leukemic cells was achieved by intrahepatic injection of 1×106 cells into newborn Rag2−/−γc−/− mice or intravenous injection of 5×106 cells into 5-week old mice. Key characteristics of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were reproduced, including cachexia and clonal expansion of myelomonocytic progenitor cells that infiltrated bone marrow, spleen, liver and, notably, lung. Xenografted leukemia cells led to reduced survival of recipient mice. The stem cell character of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia was confirmed by successful serial transplantation that resulted in leukemia cell propagation for more than one year. Independence of exogenous cytokines, low donor cell number and slowly progressing leukemia are advantages of the model, which will serve as an important tool to research the pathophysiology of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and test novel pharmaceutical strategies such as DNA methyltransferase inhibition. PMID:26888021

  15. IL-6 Signaling in Myelomonocytic Cells Is Not Crucial for the Development of IMQ-Induced Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Klebow, Sabrina; Hahn, Matthias; Nikoalev, Alexei; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Hövelmeyer, Nadine; Karbach, Susanne H; Waisman, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease that is associated with aberrant activity of immune cells and keratinocytes. In mice, topical application of TLR7/8 agonist IMQ leads to a skin disorder resembling human psoriasis. Recently, it was shown that the IL-23/ IL-17 axis plays a deciding role in the pathogenesis of human psoriasis, as well as in the mouse model of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like skin disease. A consequence of IL-17A production in the skin includes increased expression and production of IL-6, resulting in the recruitment of neutrophils and other myelomonocytic cells to the site of inflammation. To further investigate and characterize the exact role of IL-6 signaling in myelomonocytic cells during experimental psoriasis, we generated mice lacking the IL-6 receptor alpha specifically in myelomonocytic cells (IL-6RαΔmyel). Surprisingly, disease susceptibility of these mice was not affected in this model. Our study shows that classical IL-6 signaling in myelomonocytic cells does not play an essential role for disease development of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like skin disease.

  16. IL-6 Signaling in Myelomonocytic Cells Is Not Crucial for the Development of IMQ-Induced Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Klebow, Sabrina; Hahn, Matthias; Nikoalev, Alexei; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Hövelmeyer, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease that is associated with aberrant activity of immune cells and keratinocytes. In mice, topical application of TLR7/8 agonist IMQ leads to a skin disorder resembling human psoriasis. Recently, it was shown that the IL-23/ IL-17 axis plays a deciding role in the pathogenesis of human psoriasis, as well as in the mouse model of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like skin disease. A consequence of IL-17A production in the skin includes increased expression and production of IL-6, resulting in the recruitment of neutrophils and other myelomonocytic cells to the site of inflammation. To further investigate and characterize the exact role of IL-6 signaling in myelomonocytic cells during experimental psoriasis, we generated mice lacking the IL-6 receptor alpha specifically in myelomonocytic cells (IL-6RαΔmyel). Surprisingly, disease susceptibility of these mice was not affected in this model. Our study shows that classical IL-6 signaling in myelomonocytic cells does not play an essential role for disease development of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like skin disease. PMID:26999594

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Management of Two Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia Patients According to Clinical and Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Ören, Hale; Demir Yenigürbüz, Fatma; Gözmen, Salih; Karapınar, Tuba Hilkay; İrken, Gülersu

    2015-06-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder of childhood. Major progress has been achieved in diagnosis and the understanding of the pathogenesis of JMML by identifying the genetic pathologies that occur in patients. Mutations of RAS, NF1, PTPN11, and CBL are found in approximately 80% of JMML patients. Distinct clinical features have been reported to be associated with specific gene mutations. The advent of genomic studies and recent identification of novel genetic mutations in JMML are important not only in diagnosis but also in the management and prognosis of the disease. Herein, we present 2 patients with JMML harboring different mutations, NRAS and c-CBL, respectively, with distinct clinical features and different therapeutic approaches.

  6. Subclonal mutations in SETBP1 confer a poor prognosis in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Troup, Camille B.; Gelston, Laura C.; Haliburton, John; Chow, Eric D.; Yu, Kristie B.; Akutagawa, Jon; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N.; Liu, Y. Lucy; Wang, Yong-Dong; Beckman, Kyle; Emanuel, Peter D.; Braun, Benjamin S.; Abate, Adam; Gerbing, Robert B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Loh, Mignon L.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloproliferative neoplasm of childhood associated with a poor prognosis. Recently, massively parallel sequencing has identified recurrent mutations in the SKI domain of SETBP1 in a variety of myeloid disorders. These lesions were detected in nearly 10% of patients with JMML and have been characterized as secondary events. We hypothesized that rare subclones with SETBP1 mutations are present at diagnosis in a large portion of patients who relapse, but are below the limits of detection for conventional deep sequencing platforms. Using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction, we identified SETBP1 mutations in 17/56 (30%) of patients who were treated in the Children’s Oncology Group sponsored clinical trial, AAML0122. Five-year event-free survival in patients with SETBP1 mutations was 18% ± 9% compared with 51% ± 8% for those without mutations (P = .006). PMID:25395418

  7. Genetic analysis of TP53 in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shoji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Taira, Chiaki; Sano, Kenji; Tanaka-Yanagisawa, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Koike, Kenichi

    2011-12-01

    Among 9 children with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 18 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, one MDS patient with der(5;17)(p10;q10) exhibited deletion of the TP53 gene in one allele and mutation (410 T>A) in the other allele in myeloid and erythroid cells. Since the mutation was not detected in peripheral blood leukocytes 9 months before the diagnosis, biallelic somatic inactivation of the TP53 gene might play an important role in the occurrence of MDS. His poor outcome might be associated with resistance to chemotherapy/radiation of a minor clone with both TP53 gene alteration and MLL duplication that already existed at onset. PMID:21784522

  8. Fusion of platelet-derived growth receptor {beta} to a novel ets-like gene, tel, in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with t(5;12) chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Golub, T.; Barker, G.; Gilliland, D.G.

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized by abnormal clonal myeloid proliferation, and by progression to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). A recently recognized subgroup of CMML has a t(5;12) (q33;p13) balanced translocation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) localized the translocation breakpoint near the CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) locus on chromosome 5q. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis confirmed rearrangements near CSF1R, but involvement of CSF1R itself was excluded. Southern blotting showed a rearrangement within the closely linked PDGF receptor {beta} (PDGFR{beta}) gene. Ribonuclease protection assays localized the translocation breakpoint to nucleotide 1766 in PDGFR{beta} RNA. Anchored PCR was used to identify the chromosome 12 fusion partner, a novel ets-like protein, tel. Tel contains a highly conserved carboxy terminal ets-like DNA-binding domain, and an amino terminal domain with a predicted helix-loop-helix (HLH) secondary structure. The consequence of the t(5;12) translocation is fusion of the tel HLH domain to the PDGFR{beta} transmembrane and tyrosine kinase domains. The tel HLH domain may contribute a dimerization motif which serves to constitutively activate PDGFR{beta} tyrosine kinase activity. The tel-PDGFR{beta} fusion demonstrates the oncogenic potential of PDGFR{beta}, and may provide a paradigm for early events in the pathogenesis of AML.

  9. Treatment with Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Improves Progression-Free Survival for Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kongtim, Piyanuch; Popat, Uday; Jimenez, Antonio; Gaballa, Sameh; El Fakih, Riad; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Borthakur, Gautam; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Alousi, Amin; Hosing, Chitra; Anderlini, Paolo; Khouri, Issa F; Kebriaei, Partow; Andersson, Borje S; Oran, Betul; Rezvani, Katayoun; Marin, David; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) with transplant has not been optimized. We retrospectively reviewed the data for 83 consecutive patients with CMML (47 with CMML-1/2 and 36 with CMML progressed to acute myeloid leukemia) who received an allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) at our institution between April 1991 and December 2013 to identify factors associated with improved survival and determine whether treatment with hypomethylating agents before transplant improves progression-free survival (PFS). The median age of the cohort was 57 years. Seventy-eight patients received induction treatment before transplant, with 37 receiving hypomethylating agents and 41 receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. Patients treated with a hypomethylating agent had a significantly lower cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years post-transplant (22%) than those treated with other agents (35%; P = .03), whereas treatment-related mortality at 1 year post-transplant did not significantly differ between the groups (27% and 30%, respectively; P = .84). The lower relapse rate resulted in a significantly higher 3-year PFS rate in patients treated with a hypomethylating agent (43%) than in those treated with other agents (27%; P = .04). Our data support the use of hypomethylating agents before allo-SCT for patients with CMML to achieve morphologic remission and improve PFS of these patients. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  10. Impacts of graft-versus-host disease on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A nationwide retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Itonaga, Hidehiro; Iwanaga, Masako; Aoki, Kazunari; Aoki, Jun; Ishiyama, Ken; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Sakura, Toru; Fukuda, Takahiro; Najima, Yuho; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Mori, Takehiko; Kurokawa, Mineo; Nawa, Yuichiro; Uchida, Naoyuki; Morishita, Yoshihisa; Hashimoto, Hisako; Eto, Tetsuya; Hirokawa, Makoto; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a therapeutic option that may lead to improved outcomes in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). However, few studies have examined the impact of the grade of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on post-transplant outcomes for CMML. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 141 patients with CMML who underwent allo-HSCT between 1987 and 2010, and achieved neutrophil engraftment. The effects of acute GVHD (aGVHD) or chronic GVHD (cGVHD) on overall survival (OS), leukemia-associated mortality (LAM), and transplant-related mortality were evaluated by hazards regression models, in which the onset date of aGVHD or cGVHD was treated as a time-dependent covariate. Grade I aGVHD was associated with better OS and lower LAM (P=0.042, P=0.033, respectively) than no GVHD in univariate analyses, but not in the multivariate analyses. The multivariate analyses demonstrated that extensive cGVHD significantly associated with better OS (Hazard Ratio [HR] 0.35 [95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.16-0.74]; P=0.007) and lower LAM (HR 0.36 [95% CI, 0.14-0.92]; P=0.033) in patients who were not in complete remission at transplantation. In conclusion, the occurrence of cGVHD may be an important factor affecting the outcomes of CMML patients who received transplantation. PMID:26754557

  11. Breastfeeding and early infection in the aetiology of childhood leukaemia in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Lujano, J; Perez-Saldivar, M L; Fuentes-Pananá, E M; Gorodezky, C; Bernaldez-Rios, R; Del Campo-Martinez, M A; Martinez-Avalos, A; Medina-Sanson, A; Paredes-Aguilera, R; De Diego-Flores Chapa, J; Bolea-Murga, V; Rodriguez-Zepeda, M C; Rivera-Luna, R; Palomo-Colli, M A; Romero-Guzman, L; Perez-Vera, P; Alvarado-Ibarra, M; Salamanca-Gómez, F; Fajardo-Gutierrez, A; Mejía-Aranguré, J M

    2009-01-01

    Background: For a child to develop acute leukaemia (AL), environmental exposure may not be sufficient: interaction with a susceptibility factor to the disease, such as Down syndrome (DS), may also be necessary. We assessed whether breastfeeding and early infection were associated with the risk of developing AL in children with DS. Methods: Children with DS in Mexico City, and either with or without AL, were the cases (N=57) and controls (N=218), respectively. Population was divided in children with AL and with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and also in children ⩽6 and >6 years old. Results: Breastfeeding and early infections showed moderate (but not significant) association for AL, whereas hospitalisation by infection during the first year of life increased the risk: odds ratios (confidence interval 95%) were 0.84 (0.43–1.61), 1.70 (0.82–3.52); and 3.57 (1.59–8.05), respectively. A similar result was obtained when only ALL was analysed. Conclusion: We found that breastfeeding was a protective factor for developing AL and ALL, and during the first year of life, infections requiring hospitalisation were related to a risk for developing the disease in those children with DS >6 years of age. These data do not support the Greaves's hypothesis of early infection being protective for developing ALL. PMID:19707206

  12. The incidence of childhood leukaemia around the La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant (France): a survey for the years 1978-1998

    PubMed Central

    Guizard, A; Boutou, O; Pottier, D; Troussard, X; Pheby, D; Launoy, G; Slama, R; Spira, A; ARKM

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A previous study has suggested an increased incidence rate of leukaemia from 1978 to 1992 in people aged 0 to 24 years and living in the vicinity of the La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant without considering age and cytological type.
SETTING—The Nord Cotentin region (France) and the island of Alderney (United Kingdom).
STUDY OBJECTIVE—To describe the occurrence of leukaemia for each age group and cytological type from 1978 to 1998 in the same area, using accurate reference incidence rates and adequate estimation of the at risk population.
DESIGN—A geographical study of incidence using three zones defined according to their distance from the site (0 to 10 km: Beaumont-Hague electoral ward, 10 to 20 km and 20 to 35 km) has been conducted. The risk of leukaemia was estimated from the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of the number of cases observed to the number expected. Exact 95% confidence intervals (CI) have been computed.
PARTICIPANTS—All people under the age of 25 years living in the study region between 1978 and 1998.
MAIN RESULTS—The observed number of cases of leukaemia in the study region as a whole was consistent with the expected value (SIR=1.03; 95%CI: 0.73, 1.41). No cases were observed on Alderney. The SIR in the Beaumont-Hague electoral ward was 2.17 (95%CI: 0.71, 5.07). The highest SIR was observed in the 5 to 9 years age group (SIR=6.38; 95%CI: 1.32, 18.65). This consists in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cases.
CONCLUSION—This study indicates an increased incidence of leukaemia in the area situated at less than 10 km from the plant. Monitoring and further investigations should be targeted at acute lymphoblastic leukaemia occurring during the childhood incidence peak (before 10 years) in children living near the La Hague site and may be other nuclear reprocessing plants.


Keywords: leukaemia; childhood; nuclear plant PMID:11413175

  13. Nested case-control study of leukaemia, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer in a cohort of petroleum workers exposed to gasoline

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O.; Trent, L.; Harris, F.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This nested case-control study was based on data in a cohort study of more than 18,000 petroleum distribution workers exposed to gasoline, which contains about 2%-3% benzene. Risks of leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia, multiple myeloma, and kidney cancer were examined relative to exposure to gasoline. METHODS: For each case, up to five individually matched controls were selected. Analyses based on the Mantel-Haenszel procedure as well as univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression were performed for each disease category. Jobs with similar exposures were grouped into homogeneous categories for analysis. Several quantitative indices of exposure to gasoline were used in the analyses: duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, frequency of peak exposure, and time of first exposure. RESULTS: No increased risks for the four cancers were found for any job category. Analyses with logistic regression models based on duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, and frequency of peak exposure did not show any increased risk or exposure-effect relation. Time of first exposure to gasoline was also found to be unrelated to the four diseases under investigation. CONCLUSION: Exposure to gasoline or benzene at the concentrations experienced by this cohort of distribution workers is not a risk factor for leukaemia (all cell types), acute myeloid leukaemia, multiple myeloma, or kidney cancer.   PMID:10450237

  14. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Autoimmune antibodies in chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D

    1978-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukaemia a factor in patients' serum enhances the in vitro viability of the abnormal cells and this has been identified as an antibody. The activity of this factor can be removed by interaction with anti-immunoglobulin and by ammonium sulphate precipitation with a degree of saturation in excess of 46%. Cohn fractionation and chromatography with A-50 Sephadex show that the factor is not a complex but an immunoglobulin. No activity is removed after reaction of sera with 2-mercapto-ethanol and di-thiothreitol. The evidence therefore suggests that a gamma-G immunoglobulin is involved. Concentrated washings from the leukaemic cells behave in exactly the same way as patients' sera and activity is retained in the same fraction during precipitation and purification procedure. The extensive cross-reactivity of the sera suggests a common chronic lymphatic leukaemic antibody and it is considered that an active autoimmune response may be an integral part of the disease.

  16. Proangiogenic factor PlGF programs CD11b(+) myelomonocytes in breast cancer during differentiation of their hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Hull, Eveline Faes-van't; Touvrey, Cedric; Kuonen, François; Lan, Qiang; Lorusso, Girieca; Doucey, Marie-Agnès; Ciarloni, Laura; Imaizumi, Natsuko; Alghisi, Gian Carlo; Fagiani, Ernesta; Zaman, Khalil; Stupp, Roger; Shibuya, Masabumi; Delaloye, Jean-François; Christofori, Gerhard; Ruegg, Curzio

    2011-06-01

    Tumor-mobilized bone marrow-derived CD11b(+) myeloid cells promote tumor angiogenesis, but how and when these cells acquire proangiogenic properties is not fully elucidated. Here, we show that CD11b(+) myelomonocytic cells develop proangiogenic properties during their differentiation from CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and that placenta growth factor (PlGF) is critical in promoting this education. Cultures of human CD34(+) progenitors supplemented with conditioned medium from breast cancer cell lines or PlGF, but not from nontumorigenic breast epithelial lines, generate CD11b(+) cells capable of inducing endothelial cell sprouting in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. An anti-Flt-1 mAb or soluble Flt-1 abolished the generation of proangiogenic activity during differentiation from progenitor cells. Moreover, inhibition of metalloproteinase activity, but not VEGF, during the endothelial sprouting assay blocked sprouting induced by these proangiogenic CD11b(+) myelomonocytes. In a mouse model of breast cancer, circulating CD11b(+) cells were proangiogenic in the sprouting assays. Silencing of PlGF in tumor cells prevented the generation of proangiogenic activity in circulating CD11b(+) cells, inhibited tumor blood flow, and slowed tumor growth. Peripheral blood of breast cancer patients at diagnosis, but not of healthy individuals, contained elevated levels of PlGF and circulating proangiogenic CD11b(+) myelomonocytes. Taken together, our results show that cancer cells can program proangiogenic activity in CD11b(+) myelomonocytes during differentiation of their progenitor cells in a PlGF-dependent manner. These findings impact breast cancer biology, detection, and treatment.

  17. Mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylases 1 collaborate with ERα to regulate HOXA10 expression in AML

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Fang, Li-Chao; Yang, Zai-Lin; Huang, Hui; Li, Yan; Deng, Jun; Zheng, Junsong

    2014-01-01

    HOXA10, a homeobox-containing gene involved in definitive haematopoiesis, which implicated in the pathogenesis of AML (acute myeloid leukaemia), has been studied extensively. But the regulatory mechanism that drives HOXA10 expression is still unclear. In the present paper, HOXA10 regulated by MLL1 (mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylase 1) with an epigenetic way has been demonstrated. The HOXA10 promoter contains several EREs (oestrogen response elements), including ERE1 and ERE2, which are close to the transcription start site, and are associated with E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. It has been shown that knockdown of the ERα (oestrogen receptor α) suppresses E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. Similarly, knockdown of MLL1 suppresses activation of HOXA10 and is bound to the ERE of HOXA10 promoter in an E2-dependent manner by forming complex with ERα. Knockdown of ERα affects the E2-dependent binding of MLL1 into HOXA10 EREs, suggesting critical roles of ERα in recruiting MLL on the HOXA10 promoter. More interestingly, the methylation status of histone protein H3K4 (H3 at lysine 4) with E2 is much higher than without E2 treatment in leukaemia cell. On the contrary, the methylation status of HOXA10 promoter with E2 treatment is much lower, which elevate the HOXA10 expression. Moreover, with ERα knockdown, the H3K4 methylation level is also decrease in myeloid cell. Overall, it has been clearly demonstrated that HOXA10 is transcriptionally regulated by MLL1, which, in coordination with ERα, plays a critical role in this process with epigenetic way and suggests a potential anti-E2 treatment of AML. PMID:25307539

  18. Population mixing and leukaemia in young people around the La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant

    PubMed Central

    Boutou, O; Guizard, A-V; Slama, R; Pottier, D; Spira, A

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate for an association between population mixing and the occurrence of leukaemia in young people (less than 25 years), a geographical study was conducted, for the years 1979 to 1998, in Nord Cotentin (France). This area experienced between the years 1978 and 1992 a major influx of workers for the construction of a nuclear power station and a new nuclear waste reprocessing unit. A population mixing index was defined on the basis of the number of workers born outside the French department of ‘La Manche’ and living in each ‘commune’, the basic geographical unit under study. The analyses were done with indirect standardisation and Poisson regression model allowing or not for extra-Poisson variation. Urban ‘communes’ were considered as the reference population. The Incidence Rate Ratio was 2.7 in rural ‘communes’ belonging to the highest tertile of population mixing (95% Bayesian credible interval, 95%BCI=1.2–5.9). A positive trend was observed among rural strata with increasing population mixing index (IRR for trend=1.4, 95%BCI=1.1–1.8). The risk became stronger for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in children 1–6 years old in the highest tertile of population mixing (IRR=5.5, 95%BCI=1.4–23.3). These findings provide further support for a possible infective basis of childhood leukaemia. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 740–745. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600529 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12232757

  19. Human trophoblast cells induced MDSCs from peripheral blood CD14+ myelomonocytic cells via elevated levels of CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Qu, Daiwei; Sun, Jintang; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Qingjie; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Zhang, Yun; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Successful human pregnancy requires the maternal immune system to recognize and tolerate the semi-allogeneic fetus. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which are capable of inhibiting T-cell responses, are highly increased in the early stages of pregnancy. Although recent reports indicate a role for MDSCs in fetal–maternal tolerance, little is known about the expansion of MDSCs during pregnancy. In the present study, we demonstrated that the trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo could instruct peripheral CD14+ myelomonocytic cells toward a novel subpopulation of MDSCs, denoted as CD14+HLA-DR−/low cells, with suppressive activity and increased expression of IDO1, ARG-1, and COX2. After interaction with HTR8/SVneo cells, CD14+ myelomonocytic cells secrete high levels of CCL2, promoting the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. We utilized a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to reveal the prominent role of CCL2 in the induction of CD14+HLA-DR−/low MDSCs. In combination, the results of the present study support a novel role for the cross-talk between the trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo and maternal CD14+ myelomonocytic cells in initiating MDSCs induction, prompting a tolerogenic immune response to ensure a successful pregnancy. PMID:26027727

  20. Ixazomib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Bortezomib, Daunorubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Application of the pMHC Array to Characterise Tumour Antigen Specific T Cell Populations in Leukaemia Patients at Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Suzanne E; Bonney, Stephanie A; Lee, Cindy; Publicover, Amy; Khan, Ghazala; Smits, Evelien L; Sigurdardottir, Dagmar; Arno, Matthew; Li, Demin; Mills, Ken I; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H; van Tendeloo, Viggo; Mufti, Ghulam J; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Elliott, Tim J; Orchard, Kim H; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy treatments for cancer are becoming increasingly successful, however to further improve our understanding of the T-cell recognition involved in effective responses and to encourage moves towards the development of personalised treatments for leukaemia immunotherapy, precise antigenic targets in individual patients have been identified. Cellular arrays using peptide-MHC (pMHC) tetramers allow the simultaneous detection of different antigen specific T-cell populations naturally circulating in patients and normal donors. We have developed the pMHC array to detect CD8+ T-cell populations in leukaemia patients that recognise epitopes within viral antigens (cytomegalovirus (CMV) and influenza (Flu)) and leukaemia antigens (including Per Arnt Sim domain 1 (PASD1), MelanA, Wilms' Tumour (WT1) and tyrosinase). We show that the pMHC array is at least as sensitive as flow cytometry and has the potential to rapidly identify more than 40 specific T-cell populations in a small sample of T-cells (0.8-1.4 x 10(6)). Fourteen of the twenty-six acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients analysed had T cells that recognised tumour antigen epitopes, and eight of these recognised PASD1 epitopes. Other tumour epitopes recognised were MelanA (n = 3), tyrosinase (n = 3) and WT1(126-134) (n = 1). One of the seven acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) patients analysed had T cells that recognised the MUC1(950-958) epitope. In the future the pMHC array may be used provide point of care T-cell analyses, predict patient response to conventional therapy and direct personalised immunotherapy for patients.

  9. High cost factors for leukaemia and lymphoma patients: a new analysis of costs within these diagnosis related groups

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, C.; Entezam, F.; Brunet-Lecomte, P.; Lepage, E.; Guy, H.; Dusserre, L.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine high cost factors to help managers and clinicians to analyse the reasons of adverse costs and provide indications for financial negotiation. DESIGN: To locate high cost or long stay patients, the analysis was designed on the basis of a mixture of Weibull distributions. In this new model, the proportion of high cost patients was expressed according to the multinomial logistic regression, permitting the determination of high cost factors. SETTING: The 1993 French reference database, constituted in the framework of the national study of DRG costs, conducted by the French Ministry of Health. The database of discharge abstracts recorded in 1993 in the Dijon public teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: The analyses were based on 1352 abstracts from the French reference database and 368 from the Dijon database concerning patients, aged 18 and over, suffering from leukaemia and lymphoma. MAIN RESULTS: High cost and long stay factors were the same: number of stays, death, transfer, acute leukaemia, neutropenia, septicaemia, high dose aplastic chemotherapy, central venous catheterisation, parenteral nutrition, protected or laminar airflow room, blood transfusion, and intravenous antibiotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Taking into account high cost predictive factors, as shown in the case of leukaemia and lymphoma patients, would help to reduce the adverse effects of a prospective payment system.   PMID:10326049

  10. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations. PMID:27698462

  11. Tracer‐Based Metabolic NMR‐Based Flux Analysis in a Leukaemia Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Carrigan, John B.; Reed, Michelle A. C.; Ludwig, Christian; Khanim, Farhat L.; Bunce, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a profound impact on acute myeloid leukaemia cells and can be used to specifically target these cells with novel therapies. We have previously shown how the combination of two redeployed drugs, the contraceptive steroid medroxyprogesterone and the lipid‐regulating drug bezafibrate exert anti‐leukaemic effects by producing ROS. Here we report a 13C‐tracer‐based NMR metabolic study to understand how these drugs work in K562 leukaemia cells. Our study shows that [1,2‐13C]glucose is incorporated into ribose sugars, indicating activity in oxidative and non‐oxidative pentose phosphate pathways alongside lactate production. There is little label incorporation into the tricarboxylic acid cycle from glucose, but much greater incorporation arises from the use of [3‐13C]glutamine. The combined medroxyprogesterone and bezafibrate treatment decreases label incorporation from both glucose and glutamine into α‐ketoglutarate and increased that for succinate, which is consistent with ROS‐mediated conversion of α‐ketoglutarate to succinate. Most interestingly, this combined treatment drastically reduced the production of several pyrimidine synthesis intermediates. PMID:27347458

  12. French American British (FAB) morphological classification of childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia and its clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Lilleyman, J S; Hann, I M; Stevens, R F; Eden, O B; Richards, S M

    1986-09-01

    As part of the Medical Research Council Leukaemia Trial UKALL VIII, 738 unselected children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had the morphology of their marrow blast cells reviewed by a panel of three haematologists. Ninety four (13%) showed appearances classifiable as type L2 by the French American and British (FAB) cooperative group's criteria, five (0.7%) were typed L3, and the remaining 639 (86%) as L1. Disregarding the patients classified as L3, those with the L2 variant showed an inferior disease free survival to that of the remainder (p less than 0.01), and more of them failed to remit after receiving "standard" remission induction treatment (p less than 0.01). They included an excess of older children (p less than 0.01) with less profound marrow failure at diagnosis, and fewer of them expressed the common ALL antigen (p = 0.05). There was no association between L2 morphology and the diagnostic white cell count, sex, or the presence of a mediastinal mass. These findings confirm earlier reports that FAB L2 ALL is associated with a poor prognosis and that it occurs more commonly in older children. The high remission failure rate is a recent observation and indicates that alternative early treatment may be appropriate for such patients.

  13. A multicentre trial of live attenuated varicella vaccine in children with leukaemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Gershon, A A; Steinberg, S; Gelb, L; Galasso, G; Borkowsky, W; LaRussa, P; Ferrara, A

    1985-01-01

    Two hundred forty children with acute leukaemia in remission for at least 1 year were immunized with live attenuated varicella vaccine. All were susceptible to varicella before immunization. There was a seroconversion to varicella-zoster virus in approximately 85% after 1 dose, and in 97% after 2 doses. The major side effect was mild to moderate rash, seen mainly in children with maintenance chemotherapy suspended for 1 week before and 1 week after vaccination. Vaccinees with rash were at some risk (10%) to transmit vaccine virus to varicella susceptibles with whom they had close contact. Twenty-nine vaccinees were subsequently exposed to varicella in their households. The attack rate of clinical varicella in these vaccinees was 21%, which is significantly lower than the 80%-90% attack rate occurring in varicella susceptibles after household exposure. All these breakthrough cases of varicella were mild, even in leukaemics receiving chemotherapy. Varicella vaccine was approximately 80% effective in preventing clinical varicella in children with leukaemia and completely effective in preventing severe varicella in this high-risk group.

  14. Erythrophagocytosis by acute lymphoblastic leukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Foadi, M D; Slater, A M; Pegrum, G D

    1978-01-01

    Phagocytosis of erthyrocytes and platelets by bone marrow blast cells has been noted in 4 patients in the late relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The underlying mechanism is unclear but prolonged course of the disease seems to be a major factor in the emergence of cells with phagocytic properties.

  15. Inhibition of proliferation by agricultural plant extracts in seven human adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL)-related cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of agricultural plants on the proliferation of seven ATL-related human leukaemia cells, using three ATL cell lines (ED, Su9T01 and S1T), two human T-cell lines transformed by HTLV-I infection (HUT-102 and MT-2) and two HTLV-I-negative human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines (Jurkat and MOLT-4). A total of 52 samples of 80% ethanol extracts obtained from 30 types of agricultural plants were examined. On the basis of IC(50) values, we selected samples with greater activity than genistein, which was used as a positive control. The highest inhibitory effect was observed with extracts from leaves of Vaccinium virgatum Aiton (blueberry) on four cell lines (ED, Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat); seeds of Momordica charantia L. (bitter gourd) exhibited the second highest activity. The bitter gourd seeds suppressed the proliferation of three cell lines (Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat). The extracts from edible parts of Ipomea batatas LAM. (sweet potato), edible parts of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (taro), skin of taro and seeds of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. (mume) showed markedly greater inhibitory effects on Su9T01 than genistein. These findings suggest that ATL-preventative bioactive compounds may exist in these agricultural plants, which are considered to be functional foods. PMID:21293936

  16. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride or Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Three additional malignancies occurring within one year in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Boots, M A; Pegrum, G D

    1978-09-01

    A patient with crhonic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL) is presented who was first seen with a basal cell carcinoma and subsequently developed two further malignant conditions within a year, without receiving any treatment for his leukaemia. It is suggested that this leukaemia was a predisposing factor in the development of his carcinomas.

  4. Inflammasome-Mediated Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes-Stimulated Immunity Is Independent of Myelomonocytic Function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cassandra R.; Dustin, Michael L.; Sauer, John-Demian

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the Nlrc4 inflammasome results in the secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 through caspase-1 and induction of pyroptosis. L. monocytogenes engineered to activate Nlrc4 by expression of Legionella pneumophilia flagellin (L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA) are less immunogenic for CD8+ T cell responses than wt L. monocytogenes. It is also known that IL-1β orchestrates recruitment of myelomonocytic cells (MMC), which have been shown to interfere with T cell-dendritic cells (DC) interactions in splenic white pulp (WP), limiting T cell priming and protective immunity. We have further analyzed the role of MMCs in the immunogenicity of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA. We confirmed that MMCs infiltrate the WP between 24–48 hours in response to wt L. monocytogenes infection and that depletion of MMCs enhances CD8+ T cell priming and protective memory. L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA elicited accelerated recruitment of MMCs into the WP. While MMCs contribute to control of L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA, MMC depletion did not increase immunogenicity of L.p.FlaA expressing strains. There was a significant decrease in L. monocytogenes L.p.FlaA in CD8α+ DCs independent of MMCs. These findings suggest that limiting inflammasome activation is important for bacterial accumulation in CD8α+ DCs, which are known to be critical for T cell response to L. monocytogenes. PMID:24349458

  5. SRSF2 mutations in 275 cases with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)

    PubMed Central

    Meggendorfer, Manja; Roller, Andreas; Haferlach, Torsten; Eder, Christiane; Dicker, Frank; Grossmann, Vera; Kohlmann, Alexander; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the mutational hotspot region of SRSF2 (Pro95) in 275 cases with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). In addition, ASXL1, CBL, EZH2, JAK2V617F, KRAS, NRAS, RUNX1, and TET2 mutations were investigated in subcohorts. Mutations in SRSF2 (SRSF2mut) were detected in 47% (129 of 275) of all cases. In detail, 120 cases had a missense mutation at Pro95, leading to a change to Pro95His, Pro95Leu, Pro95Arg, Pro95Ala, or Pro95Thr. In 9 cases, 3 new in/del mutations were observed: 7 cases with a 24-bp deletion, 1 case with a 3-bp duplication, and 1 case with a 24-bp duplication. In silico analyses predicted a damaging character for the protein structure of SRSF2 for all mutations. SRSF2mut was correlated with higher age, less pronounced anemia, and normal karyotype. SRSF2mut and EZH2mut were mutually exclusive, but SRSF2mut was associated with TET2mut. In the total cohort, no effect of SRSF2mut on survival was observed. However, in the RUNX1mut subcohort, SRSF2 Pro95His had a favorable effect on overall survival. This comprehensive mutation analysis found that 93% of all patients with CMML carried at least 1 somatic mutation in 9 recurrently mutated genes. In conclusion, these data show the importance of SRSF2mut as new diagnostic marker in CMML. PMID:22919025

  6. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  7. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Structural studies on leukaemia inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, R.S.; Maurer, T.; Smith, D.K.; Nicola, N.A.

    1994-12-01

    Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on a wide range of target cells, including mega-karyocytes, osteoblasts, hepatocytes, adipocytes, neurons, embryonic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. Many of its activities are shared with other cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, oncostatin-M, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Although secreted in vivo as a glycoprotein, nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in E. coli is fully active and has been used in our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the three-dimensional structure and structure-function relationships of LIF. With 180 amino acids and a molecular mass of about 20 kDa, OF is too large for direct structure determination by two-dimensional and three-dimensional {sup 1}HNMR. It is necessary to label the protein with the stable isotopes {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C and employ heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR in order to resolve and interpret the spectral information required for three-dimensional structure determination. This work has been undertaken with both human LIF and a mouse-human chimaera that binds to the human LIF receptor with the same affinity as the human protein and yet expresses in E. coli at much higher levels. Sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure elements for these proteins will be presented and progress towards determination of their three-dimensional structures described.

  10. Leukaemia and Sellafield: is there a heritable link?

    PubMed Central

    Tawn, E J

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of a statistical association between paternal preconceptional irradiation and childhood leukaemia appeared to provide a satisfactory explanation for the excess of cases in the village of Seascale, close to the Sellafield nuclear installation, and became the basis of two legal claims for compensation. In the ensuing scientific debate the biological plausibility of a causal interpretation of this association focused on the heritability of leukaemia and a comparison of the genetic risks implied by this finding with current information on the induction of genetic damage by irradiation. After a wide ranging review of the mechanistic issues it is concluded that there is no genetic basis for a causal relationship and this, together with recent appraisals of epidemiological studies, suggests that the association between childhood leukaemia and paternal preconceptional irradiation exposure is most likely to be a chance finding. PMID:7643351

  11. Somatostatin receptors on human lymphocytes and leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hiruma, K; Koike, T; Nakamura, H; Sumida, T; Maeda, T; Tomioka, H; Yoshida, S; Fujita, T

    1990-01-01

    Receptors for somatostatin were identified on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and human leukaemic cells in 87.5% of lymphoblastic leukaemia and in 12.5% of non-lymphocytic leukaemia, using a somatostatin radiobinding assay. The specific binding of 125I-somatostatin of these cells increased linearly with the cell numbers and was suppressed by non-iodinated somatostatin. We investigated the distribution of fluorescent somatostatin to mitogen-activated PBL by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Over 95% of the cell populations bound fluorescent somatostatin and no distinct predilection was found among certain lymphocyte subpopulations and somatostatin receptor-positive cells. Scatchard analysis showed a single class (low affinity) of binding site on mitogen-activated PBL and two classes (high and low affinity) of specific binding sites on lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. PMID:2177723

  12. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  16. Leucapheresis for management of retinopathy in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Muhajir; Oakley, Carmen; McEwen, Fiona; Connelley, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterised by granulocytic hyperplasia in the bone marrow and the presence of a specific cytogenetic abnormality known as Philadelphia chromosome with fusion of breakpoint cluster region (BCR) and ableson (ABL) genes. Retinopathy is a rare sight-threatening complication of chronic myeloid leukaemia, which occurs due to leucostasis in retinal blood vessels. We report a case of a patient who presented with visual impairment due to leucostasis, who was successfully managed by leucapheresis along with BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:26628310

  17. Impairment and Differential Expression of PR3 and MPO on Peripheral Myelomonocytic Cells with Endothelial Properties in Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Patschan, Susann; Patschan, Daniel; Henze, Elvira; Blaschke, Sabine; Wessels, Johannes T.; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2012-01-01

    Background. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are autoimmune-mediated diseases characterized by vasculitic inflammation of respiratory tract and kidneys. Clinical observations indicated a strong association between disease activity and serum levels of certain types of autoantibodies (antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies with cytoplasmic [cANCA in GPA] or perinuclear [pAN CA in MPA] immunofluorescence). Pathologically, both diseases are characterized by severe microvascular endothelial cell damage. Early endothelial outgrowth cells (eEOCs) have been shown to be critically involved in neovascularization under both physiological and pathological condition. Objectives. The principal aims of our study were (i) to analyze the regenerative activity of the eEOC system and (ii) to determine mPR3 and MPO expression in myelo monocytic cells with endothelial characteristics in GPA and MPA patients. Methods. In 27 GPA and 10 MPA patients, regenerative activity blood-derived eEOCs were analyzed using a culture-forming assay. Flk-1+, CD133+/Flk-1+, mPR3+, and Flk-1+/mPR3+ myelomonocytic cells were quantified by FACS analysis. Serum levels of Angiopoietin-1 and TNF-α were measured by ELISA. Results. We found reduced eEOC regeneration, accompanied by lower serum levels of Angiopoietin-1 in GPA patients as compared to healthy controls. In addition, the total numbers of Flk-1+ myelomonocytic cells in the peripheral circulation were decreased. Membrane PR3 expression was significantly higher in total as well as in Flk-1+ myelomonocytic cells. Expression of MPO was not different between the groups. Conclusions. These data suggest impairment of the eEOC system and a possible role for PR3 in this process in patients suffering from GPA. PMID:22792461

  18. tom-1, a novel v-Myb target gene expressed in AMV- and E26-transformed myelomonocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Burk, O; Worpenberg, S; Haenig, B; Klempnauer, K H

    1997-01-01

    The retroviral oncogene v-myb is a mutated and truncated version of the c-myb proto-oncogene and encodes a transcription factor (v-Myb) that specifically transforms myelomonocytic cells. Two different variants of v-myb, transduced independently by the oncogenic chicken retroviruses AMV and E26, have been characterized. It is believed that both variants of v-Myb transform myelomonocytic cells by affecting the expression of specific genes; however, no target genes common to both oncogenic viruses have been identified. Here, we describe the identification of a novel v-Myb target gene, designated as tom-1 (target of myb 1). The tom-1 gene has two promoters, one of which is Myb-inducible. tom-1 is expressed at elevated levels in AMV-transformed as well as in E26-transformed myeloid cells. We show that tom-1 activation by v-Myb does not require de novo protein synthesis and that the Myb-inducible tom-1 promoter contains a functional Myb binding site. Thus, tom-1 is the first example of a direct target gene for both oncogenic forms of the v-myb gene. Further analysis of the Myb-inducible tom-1 promoter shows that a C/EBP binding site is juxtaposed to the Myb binding site and that C/EBP is required for the Myb-dependent activation of the promoter. Together with previous work our results suggest that C/EBP may be a general cooperation partner for v-Myb in myelomonocytic cells. PMID:9135152

  19. Prognostic interaction between ASXL1 and TET2 mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, M M; Lasho, T L; Vijayvargiya, P; Finke, C M; Hanson, C A; Ketterling, R P; Gangat, N; Tefferi, A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations involving epigenetic regulators (TET2~60% and ASXL1~40%) and splicing components (SRSF2~50%) are frequent in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). On a 27-gene targeted capture panel performed on 175 CMML patients (66% males, median age 70 years), common mutations included: TET2 46%, ASXL1 47%, SRSF2 45% and SETBP1 19%. A total of 172 (98%) patients had at least one mutation, 21 (12%) had 2, 24 (14%) had 3 and 30 (17%) had >3 mutations. In a univariate analysis, the presence of ASXL1 mutations (P=0.02) and the absence of TET2 mutations (P=0.03), adversely impacted survival; while the number of concurrent mutations had no impact (P=0.3). In a multivariable analysis that included hemoglobin, platelet count, absolute monocyte count and circulating immature myeloid cells (Mayo model), the presence of ASXL1 mutations (P=0.01) and absence of TET2 mutations (P=0.003) retained prognostic significance. Patients were stratified into four categories: ASXL1wt/TET2wt (n=56), ASXL1mut/TET2wt (n=31), ASXL1mut/TET2mut (n=50) and ASXL1wt/TET2mut (n=38). Survival data demonstrated a significant difference in favor of ASXL1wt/TET2mut (38 months; P=0.016), compared with those with ASXL1wt/TET2wt (19 months), ASXL1mut/TET2wt (21 months) and ASXL1mut/TET2mut (16 months) (P=0.3). We confirm the negative prognostic impact imparted by ASXL1 mutations and suggest a favorable impact from TET2 mutations in the absence of ASXL1 mutations. PMID:26771811

  20. Integrating clinical features and genetic lesions in the risk assessment of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Such, Esperanza; Meggendorfer, Manja; Germing, Ulrich; Rizzo, Ettore; Cervera, Jose; Molteni, Elisabetta; Fasan, Annette; Schuler, Esther; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Lopez-Pavia, Maria; Zibellini, Silvia; Kuendgen, Andrea; Travaglino, Erica; Sancho-Tello, Reyes; Catricalà, Silvia; Vicente, Ana I.; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Cazzola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm with variable clinical course. To predict the clinical outcome, we previously developed a CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS) based on clinical parameters and cytogenetics. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that accounting for gene mutations would further improve risk stratification of CMML patients. We therefore sequenced 38 genes to explore the role of somatic mutations in disease phenotype and clinical outcome. Overall, 199 of 214 (93%) CMML patients carried at least 1 somatic mutation. Stepwise linear regression models showed that these mutations accounted for 15% to 24% of variability of clinical phenotype. Based on multivariable Cox regression analyses, cytogenetic abnormalities and mutations in RUNX1, NRAS, SETBP1, and ASXL1 were independently associated with overall survival (OS). Using these parameters, we defined a genetic score that identified 4 categories with significantly different OS and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution. In multivariable analyses, genetic score, red blood cell transfusion dependency, white blood cell count, and marrow blasts retained independent prognostic value. These parameters were included into a clinical/molecular CPSS (CPSS-Mol) model that identified 4 risk groups with markedly different median OS (from >144 to 18 months, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.69) and cumulative incidence of leukemic evolution (from 0% to 48% at 4 years, HR = 3.84) (P < .001). The CPSS-Mol fully retained its ability to risk stratify in an independent validation cohort of 260 CMML patients. In conclusion, integrating conventional parameters and gene mutations significantly improves risk stratification of CMML patients, providing a robust basis for clinical decision-making and a reliable tool for clinical trials. PMID:27385790

  1. LIN28B overexpression defines a novel fetal-like subgroup of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Helsmoortel, Hetty H; Bresolin, Silvia; Lammens, Tim; Cavé, Hélène; Noellke, Peter; Caye, Aurélie; Ghazavi, Farzaneh; de Vries, Andrica; Hasle, Henrik; Labarque, Veerle; Masetti, Riccardo; Stary, Jan; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Philippé, Jan; Van Roy, Nadine; Benoit, Yves; Speleman, Frank; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Flotho, Christian; Basso, Giuseppe; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; De Moerloose, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare and aggressive stem cell disease of early childhood. RAS activation constitutes the core component of oncogenic signaling. In addition, leukemic blasts in one-fourth of JMML patients present with monosomy 7, and more than half of patients show elevated age-adjusted fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the current standard of care and results in an event-free survival rate of 50% to 60%, indicating that novel molecular-driven therapeutic options are urgently needed. Using gene expression profiling in a series of 82 patient samples, we aimed at understanding the molecular biology behind JMML and identified a previously unrecognized molecular subgroup characterized by high LIN28B expression. LIN28B overexpression was significantly correlated with higher HbF levels, whereas patients with monosomy 7 seldom showed enhanced LIN28B expression. This finding gives a biological explanation of why patients with monosomy 7 are rarely diagnosed with high age-adjusted HbF levels. In addition, this new fetal-like JMML subgroup presented with reduced levels of most members of the let-7 microRNA family and showed characteristic overexpression of genes involved in fetal hematopoiesis and stem cell self-renewal. Lastly, high LIN28B expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in our JMML patient series but was not independent from other prognostic factors such as age and age-adjusted HbF levels. In conclusion, we identified elevated LIN28B expression as a hallmark of a novel fetal-like subgroup in JMML. PMID:26712910

  2. Relationship between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation, CMV-driven immunity, overall immune recovery and graft-versus-leukaemia effect in children.

    PubMed

    Jeljeli, Mohamed; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Porcher, Raphael; Fahd, Mony; Leveillé, Sandrine; Yakouben, Karima; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; LeGoff, Jerome; Cordeiro, Debora Jorge; Pédron, Beatrice; Baruchel, Andre; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Sterkers, Ghislaine

    2014-07-01

    The interplay between immune recovery, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactivation, CMV-driven immunity and graft-versus-leukaemia effect (GVL) was analysed in 108 children (median age: 8 years) who underwent haematopoietic-stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukaemia. Follow-up was 2 years unless death or relapse occurred. CMV-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was programmed weekly until month +3 post-HSCT. Immunomonitoring consisted of sequential lymphocyte subset enumerations and analyses of T-cell proliferative and γ-interferon responses to CMV and to adenovirus. In the 108 recipients, the 2-year relapse rate (RR) was 25% (median time to onset 4·5 months; range: 24 d-17 months). CMV reactivation occurrence was 31% (median time to onset 26 d). Donor/recipient CMV serostatus did not influence RR. Among the 89 recipients disease-free after day +120, i) early CMV-reactivation before day +30 was more frequent (P = 0·01) in the relapse recipient group opposed to the non-relapse group. ii) CD8(+) /CD28(-) and CD4(+) CD45RA(-) T-cell expansions induced by CMV did not influence RR, iii) Recovery of anti-CMV and also anti-adenovirus immunity and of naïve CD4(+) T-cells was faster in the non-relapse group (P = 0·008; 0·009 and 0·002 respectively). In contrast to adult acute myeloid leukaemia, CMV reactivation was associated with increased RR in this paediatric series. Accelerated overall immune recovery rather than CMV-driven immunity had a favourable impact on RR.

  3. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  4. Oxidative stress responses and NRF2 in human leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Amina; MacEwan, David J; Bowles, Kristian M; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress as a result of elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been observed in almost all cancers, including leukaemia, where they contribute to disease development and progression. However, cancer cells also express increased levels of antioxidant proteins which detoxify ROS. This includes glutathione, the major antioxidant in human cells, which has recently been identified to have dysregulated metabolism in human leukaemia. This suggests that critical balance of intracellular ROS levels is required for cancer cell function, growth, and survival. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) transcription factor plays a dual role in cancer. Primarily, NRF2 is a transcription factor functioning to protect nonmalignant cells from malignant transformation and oxidative stress through transcriptional activation of detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. However, once malignant transformation has occurred within a cell, NRF2 functions to protect the tumour from oxidative stress and chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, inhibition of the NRF2 oxidative stress pathway in leukaemia cells renders them more sensitive to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Our improved understanding of NRF2 biology in human leukaemia may permit mechanisms by which we could potentially improve future cancer therapies. This review highlights the mechanisms by which leukaemic cells exploit the NRF2/ROS response to promote their growth and survival.

  5. [The care pathway of a child with leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Lebot, Anne-Claire; Pastorelli, Céline; Tessier, Emmanuelle; Edelga, Laëtitia; Rialland, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Each year in France, 500 children and their family are faced with a diagnosis of leukaemia. Their lives then become centred on this disease. From diagnosis to cure, and over the following years, a special relationship is established between the child, their family and the staff of the paediatric haemato-oncology department.

  6. Oxidative Stress Responses and NRF2 in Human Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Aziz, Amina; MacEwan, David J.; Bowles, Kristian M.; Rushworth, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress as a result of elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been observed in almost all cancers, including leukaemia, where they contribute to disease development and progression. However, cancer cells also express increased levels of antioxidant proteins which detoxify ROS. This includes glutathione, the major antioxidant in human cells, which has recently been identified to have dysregulated metabolism in human leukaemia. This suggests that critical balance of intracellular ROS levels is required for cancer cell function, growth, and survival. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) transcription factor plays a dual role in cancer. Primarily, NRF2 is a transcription factor functioning to protect nonmalignant cells from malignant transformation and oxidative stress through transcriptional activation of detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. However, once malignant transformation has occurred within a cell, NRF2 functions to protect the tumour from oxidative stress and chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, inhibition of the NRF2 oxidative stress pathway in leukaemia cells renders them more sensitive to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Our improved understanding of NRF2 biology in human leukaemia may permit mechanisms by which we could potentially improve future cancer therapies. This review highlights the mechanisms by which leukaemic cells exploit the NRF2/ROS response to promote their growth and survival. PMID:25918581

  7. Expression of low molecular weight proteins in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, N; Abid, R; Qureshi, A W; Basheer, T

    2012-06-01

    The current study is conducted to observe the differences in the level of low molecular weight proteins in the sera of patients with leukaemia in comparison to healthy subjects (control group). The sera of patients with leukaemia showed 15 peaks in the densitometric curve in comparison to the seven peaks of the controls. The peaks in the experimental samples that coincide with those in the control were of 134.14, 113.15, 76.06, 63.25, 48.07, 22.85 and 16.47 kDa molecular weights, respectively. Most of the new peaks appeared between the proteins of molecular weight 36-29 kDa in the experimental groups. Mean density of the 134.14 kDa protein band showed an increase in the protein in experimental groups I and II only whereas 113.15 and 22.85 kDa protein were increased in all experimental groups of patients with leukaemia. The expression of 76.06 and 63.25 kDa protein fraction was downregulated in the patients with leukaemia. A decline in the level of the protein of 48.07 kDa was observed in patients with leukaemia except in group I. Unlike the other protein fractions, the level of the protein of 16.47 kDa was significantly (p < 0.05) increased with a maximum density in group II. Intergroup experimental) comparison revealed an increasing pattern of 95.44 and 89.21 kDa with maximum level in group III sera. However the protein fractions of 38.07 and 34.94 kDa varied in the serum with maximum density in Group IV Protein fractions of 32.92 and 31.24 kDa were expressed in all age groups of patients with leukaemia with a maximum density in group III whereas the percentage densities of 14.42 and 13.56 kDa protein were quite different. This preliminary study will provide a basis to study the role of different proteins in patients with leukaemia.

  8. Managing pregnancy in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Palani, Renuka; Milojkovic, Dragana; Apperley, Jane F

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, we have witnessed significant advances in knowledge of the biology and treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The development of molecular-targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has fundamentally changed the outcome of this disease. Treatment with TKIs is now the standard of care in patients with CML and has dramatically improved long-term survival in the majority of patients. Patients who achieve major molecular response (MMR) after 2 years of treatment with imatinib have survival rates comparable to those of the general population. The success of TKIs has led to durable molecular response and possibility of normal life expectancies, such that it is now timely to address quality of life aspects such as fertility, pregnancy and family planning. Pregnancy in CML presents specific management and therapeutic challenges for the patient and the physician. Despite the recent treatment advances, we still have limited data on the safety of TKIs in pregnancy and its effect on fertility. However, there is a cause for concern and heightened awareness following the occurrence of a constellation of rare congenital malformations and spontaneous abortions in association with imatinib therapy. When a patient becomes pregnant whilst receiving TKI therapy, the difficulty lies in balancing the risk to the foetus of continuing therapy versus the risk to the patient of treatment interruption and potentially losing optimal disease response. All couples should be counselled on the risks associated with pregnancy whilst receiving TKI therapy. This is an essential aspect in patient care and frequently not emphasized enough by physicians. At the time of diagnosis, fertility preservation should be discussed with both male and female patients of childbearing potential. They should be made aware of fertility options which are available such as semen cryopreservation, ovarian or oocyte retrieval and storage and embryo cryopreservation in view of the

  9. RAS mutations in early age leukaemia modulated by NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T) are associated with second-hand smoking exposures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deregulation of the MAPK genes signalling caused by somatic mutations have been implied in leukaemia pathogenesis, including RAS mutation (RASmut) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), which has been associated with intra-uterine chemical exposures. A case-case study was conducted in order to explore maternal and child exposures to tobacco smoking associations with early age leukaemia (EAL). Methods Covariables of reference were MLL rearrangements (MLL-r), RASmut and NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T). Samples from 150 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 85 AML were included. Maternal exposures were assessed using a structured questionnaire with demographic, personal habits and residence history information. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography were used to screen FLT3, KRAS, and NRAS mutations; direct sequencing was performed to validate the results. NQO1 polymorphism was detected by real-time allelic discrimination technique. Results Overall, RASmut were detected in 28.7% of EAL cases; BRAFmut was found only in one AML patient. Higher rate of KRASmut was found in ALL (30.3%) compared to AML (20.8%) with MLL-r; RASmut showed an association with second-hand tobacco smoking exposures (OR, 3.06, 95% CI, 1.03-9.07). A considerable increased risk for EAL with the combination of RASmut and NQO1 609CT (OR, 4.24, 95% CI, 1.24-14.50) was observed. Conclusions Our data demonstrated the increased risk association between maternal smoking and EAL with MLL-r. Additionally, suggests that children second-hand tobacco exposures are associated with increased risk of EAL with RASmut modulated by NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T). PMID:24571676

  10. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Detection of the chromosome 16 CBF beta-MYH11 fusion transcript in myelomonocytic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Poirel, H; Radford-Weiss, I; Rack, K; Troussard, X; Veil, A; Valensi, F; Picard, F; Guesnu, M; Leboeuf, D; Melle, J

    1995-03-01

    Karyotypic detection of chromosomal 16 abnormalities classically associated with AML M4Eo can be difficult. Characterization of the two genes involved in the inv(16)(p13q22), CBF beta and MYH11, has allowed the detection of fusion transcripts by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We have analyzed CBF beta-MYH11 fusion transcripts by RT-PCR in myelomonocytic leukemias, with or without eosinophilia, to determine whether their presence correlates with morphology. Fifty-three cases (11 AML M4Eo; 1 AML M4 with atypical abnormal eosinophils (AML M4 "Eo"); 29 AML M4; 8 AML M5; 3 CMML; and 1 AML M2 with eosinophilia) were analyzed. All 11 typical AML M4Eo were CBF beta-MYH11 positive. The single case of AML M4 with distinctive eosinophil abnormalities was negative by karyotype, RT-PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Three of 29 (10%) AML M4 without abnormal eosinophils were CBF beta-MYH11 positive, 1 of which did not show any apparent chromosome 16 abnormalities by classical metaphase analysis (2 not tested). Both cases tested also showed MYH11 genomic rearrangement. None of the other leukemias were RT-PCR positive. Follow-up of three patient showed residual positivity in apparent complete remission. These data show that CBF beta-MYH11 fusion transcripts occur not only in the vast majority of typical AML M4Eo, but also in approximately 10% of AML M4 without eosinophilic abnormalities, a much higher incidence than the sporadic reports of chromosome 16 abnormalities in AML M4 would suggest. Taken together with the detection of CBF beta-MYH11 transcripts in the absence of apparent chromosome 16 abnormalities by classical banding techniques, these data show that additional screening by either RT-PCR or FISH should be performed in all AML M4, regardless of morphologic features, to allow accurate evaluation of the prognostic importance of this fusion transcript.

  12. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Population mixing and the risk of childhood leukaemia in Switzerland: a census-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lupatsch, Judith E; Kuehni, Claudia E; Niggli, Felix; Ammann, Roland A; Egger, Matthias; Spycher, Ben D

    2015-12-01

    Childhood leukaemia (CL) may have an infectious cause and population mixing may therefore increase the risk of CL. We aimed to determine whether CL was associated with population mixing in Switzerland. We followed children aged <16 years in the Swiss National Cohort 1990-2008 and linked CL cases from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry to the cohort. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for all CL, CL at age <5 years and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) for three measures of population mixing (population growth, in-migration and diversity of origin), stratified by degree of urbanisation. Measures of population mixing were calculated for all municipalities for the 5-year period preceding the 1990 and 2000 censuses. Analyses were based on 2,128,012 children of whom 536 developed CL. HRs comparing highest with lowest quintile of population growth were 1.11 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.65-1.89] in rural and 0.59 (95 % CI 0.43-0.81) in urban municipalities (interaction: p = 0.271). Results were similar for ALL and for CL at age <5 years. For level of in-migration there was evidence of a negative association with ALL. HRs comparing highest with lowest quintile were 0.60 (95 % CI 0.41-0.87) in urban and 0.61 (95 % CI 0.30-1.21) in rural settings. There was little evidence of an association with diversity of origin. This nationwide cohort study of the association between CL and population growth, in-migration and diversity of origin provides little support for the population mixing hypothesis.

  14. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. How animal models of leukaemias have already benefited patients.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Nasr, Rihab; Zhu, Jun; Bazarbachi, Ali; Lallemand-Breittenbach, Valérie; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The relative genetic simplicity of leukaemias, the development of which likely relies on a limited number of initiating events has made them ideal for disease modelling, particularly in the mouse. Animal models provide incomparable insights into the mechanisms of leukaemia development and allow exploration of the molecular pillars of disease maintenance, an aspect often biased in cell lines or ex vivo systems. Several of these models, which faithfully recapitulate the characteristics of the human disease, have been used for pre-clinical purposes and have been instrumental in predicting therapy response in patients. We plea for a wider use of genetically defined animal models in the design of clinical trials, with a particular focus on reassessment of existing cancer or non-cancer drugs, alone or in combination.

  16. First-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of imatinib just over a decade ago, there has been a dramatic change in the treatment and prognosis of early chronic phase chronic myeloid Leukaemia (CML). This review article focuses on recent advances, culminating in the approval of nilotinib by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase. PMID:23556068

  17. Mutations of SETBP1 and JAK3 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: a report from the Italian AIEOP study group

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; De Filippi, Paola; Vendemini, Francesca; D'Alia, Mirko; Zecca, Marco; Meyer, Lueder H.; Danesino, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Basso, Giuseppe; te Kronnie, Geertruy

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare aggressive disease of early childhood. Driver mutations in the Ras signaling pathways are a key feature of JMML patients. Mutations in SETBP1 and JAK3 were recently identified in a subset of JMML patients characterized by poor prognosis and progression of disease. In this study, we report the results of a screening for mutations in SETBP1 and JAK3 of a cohort of seventy Italian patients with JMML, identifying 11.4% of them harboring secondary mutations in these two genes and discovering two new mutations in the SKI domain of SETBP1. JMML xenotransplantation and colony assay provide an initial understanding of the secondary nature of these events occurring in early precursor cells and suggest a different propagating capacity of clones harboring particular mutations. PMID:26980750

  18. Feline leukaemia virus and its clinical effects in cats.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L

    1975-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection is common among cats where contact is high. The virus can be transmitted readily between cats. It causes a variety of haemopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms; the most common types are alimentary, multicentric and thymic lymphosarcoma and lymphatic leukaemia. The virus is involved in the aetiology of certain other diseases including anaemia, glomerulonephritis and an immunosuppressive syndrome which predisposes cats to intercurrent infections. Many infected cats mount an immune response and do not suffer from any of these. The immune status is shown by serum antibody levels to feline leukaemia virus associated cell membrane antigens. Cats with a titre of 32 or more are most unlikely to suffer any ill effects and may eliminate the virus infection. The outcome of infection in an individual cat depends on the immunological competence of the cat, the dose of virus received and its ability to induce immunosuppression. FeLV infection can be detected by examination of tissues by electron microscopy, and by culture of virus from plasma and other tissues. In the United States, a method is now in use for the detection of leukaemia virus antigen in peripheral blood leukocytes; this is carried out on ordinary blood films. Successful prototype vaccines have been developed against FeLV. This paper describes the natural history of the virus, the diseases in which it is implicated and discusses recently developed diagnostic methods. PMID:163515

  19. Apoptosis induced by paclitaxel via Bcl-2, Bax and caspases 3 and 9 activation in NB4 human leukaemia cells is not modulated by ERK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cano, Daniel; Calviño, Eva; Rubio, Virginia; Herráez, Angel; Sancho, Pilar; Tejedor, M Cristina; Diez, José C

    2013-11-01

    We have studied the role of pivotal bio-molecules involved in signalling of cytotoxic effects induced by paclitaxel (Ptx) on acute promyelocytic human leukaemia NB4 cells. A time-dependent increase in cell death and DNA cleavage was observed after 30μM Ptx treatment. Cell death induction by Ptx proceeds mainly as programmed cell death as shown by annexin V-FITC, reaching up to 30% of apoptotic cells after 24h. Significant reductions of p53, changes in Bax and Bcl-2 and activation of caspases 3 and 9 were observed as the treatment was applied for long times. Ptx treatments produced NFkB depletion with expression levels abolished at 19h what could be involved in reduction of survival signals. Phosphorylation of intracellular kinases showed that pERK1/2 decreased significantly at 19h of Ptx treatment. When these cells were preincubated for 90min with 20μM PD98059, 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation, a slight reduction of cell viability was observed in comparison to that produced by Ptx alone. Pretreatment with PD98059 neither activated caspases nor significantly increased the apoptotic effect of Ptx. Taken together, our data reveal that the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation does not seem to be an essential pathway for bursting an increased induction of apoptosis by Ptx. Decrease of p53 and Bcl-2, fragmentation of DNA, increase of Bax and, finally, activation of caspases 3 and 9 in NB4 leukaemia cells make the apoptotic process induced by Ptx irreversible. Application of Ptx in leukaemia cells shows therefore a promising potential with particular effects on different leukaemia cell types.

  20. Illegitimate RAG-mediated recombination events are involved in IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion in BCR-ABL1 lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Liu, F; Wu, C; Li, S; Zhao, X; Zhang, P; Jiao, J; Yu, X; Ji, Y; Zhang, M

    2016-09-01

    Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukaemia viral oncogene homologue 1 (BCR-ABL1), encoded by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is the characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We demonstrated that expression of the Ik6 transcript, which lacked exons 3-6, was observed exclusively in BCR-ABL1(+) B ALL and lymphoid blast crisis CML (BC-CML) patients harbouring the IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion. To confirm the hypothesis that illegitimate recombination activating gene protein (RAG)-mediated recombination events are involved in IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion in BCR-ABL1 lymphoblastic leukaemia, we first demonstrated that the expression rates of RAG1 and RAG2, collectively called RAG, were higher in ALL and BC-CML (lymphoid). Notably, analysis of relationships among RAG, BCR-ABL1 and Ikaros 6 (Ik6) showed that Ik6 can be generated only if RAG and BCR-ABL1 are co-existing. The sequencing data showed that the deleted segments of introns 2 and 6 contained cryptic recombination signal sequences (cRSSs) and frequently had non-template nucleotides inserted between breakpoints. Furthermore, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology and demonstrated that the sequences directly flanking IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion breakpoints have significantly higher levels of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) modifications. Overall, RAG expression, good-quality cRSS and a specific chromatin modification, H3K4me3, satisfy the conditions of RAG's off-target effects on IKZF1. Our work provides evidence for RAG-mediated IKZF1 Δ3-6 deletion. Our results raise the prospect that RAG is a valuable biomarker in disease surveillance. Dissecting the contribution of RAG should not only provide valuable mechanistic insights, but will also lead to a new therapeutic direction. PMID:27198500

  1. Bone marrow necrosis at transformation of chronic granulocytic leukaemia treated with interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Kendra, J R; Pickens, S; Singh, A K; Singh, K

    1992-01-01

    A patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia was treated with interferon without using conventional cytotoxic agents. Bone marrow necrosis developed at the onset of blast transformation. It is suggested that cytotoxic drugs should be given before treatment with interferon for chronic myeloid leukaemia. Cytotoxic drugs may also be needed to prevent rapid bone marrow growth once interferon has been withdrawn. PMID:1401221

  2. Adenovirus detection in Guthrie cards from paediatric leukaemia cases and controls

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, G M; Kang, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Schiffman, J D; Lorey, F; Buffler, P; Wiemels, J L

    2008-01-01

    Archived neonatal blood cards (Guthrie cards) from children who later contracted leukaemia and matched normal controls were assayed for adenovirus (AdV) C DNA content using two highly sensitive methods. In contrast to a previous report, AdV DNA was not detected at a higher frequency among neonates who later developed leukaemia, when compared with controls. PMID:19002185

  3. [Acute kidney failure as the clinical presenting form of renal Burkitt's lymphoma in an HIV-positive patient].

    PubMed

    Saurina, A; Ramírez de Arellano, M; Chiné, M; Fulquet, M; Lladó, I; de las Cuevas, X

    2001-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a tumour often associated with low immunity as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (l3) or infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The incidence of renal affection is variable (34-62%) and there are different aetiologies. We present a case of acute renal failure in a patient with a Burkitt's lymphoma and renal infiltration, and infected by the human immunodeficiency virus.

  4. Epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, and radiation and risk of secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M. M.; Wilson, L. M.; Stovall, M. A.; Marsden, H. B.; Potok, M. H.; Kingston, J. E.; Chessells, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the incidence and aetiology of secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer in Britain. DESIGN--Cohort study and a case-control study. SETTING--Britain and population based National Register of Childhood Tumours. SUBJECTS--Cohort of 16,422 one year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed in Britain between 1962 and 1983, among whom 22 secondary leukaemias were observed. A case-control study of 26 secondary leukaemias observed among survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed in Britain between 1940 and 1983; 96 controls were selected matched for sex, type of first cancer, age at first cancer, and interval to diagnosis of secondary leukaemia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Dose of radiation averaged over patients' active bone marrow and total accumulated dose of epipodophyllotoxins, alkylating agents, vinca alkaloids, antimetabolites, and antibiotics (mg/m2) given for the original cancer. RESULTS--Cumulative risk of secondary leukaemia within the cohort did not exceed 0.5% over the initial five years beyond one year survival, except that after non-Hodgkin's lymphomas 1.4% of patients developed secondary leukaemia. Corresponding figure for patients treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in the early 1980s was 4%. The relative risk of secondary leukaemia increased significantly with exposure to epipodophyllotoxins and dose of radiation averaged over patients' active bone marrow. Ten patients developed leukaemia after having an epipodophyllotoxin-teniposide in nine cases, etoposide in one. Chromosomal translocations involving 11q23 were observed relating to two secondary leukaemias from a total of six for which there were successful cytogenetic studies after administration of an epipodophyllotoxin. CONCLUSIONS--Epipodophyllotoxins acting alone or together with alkylating agents or radiation seem to be involved in secondary leukaemia after childhood cancer. PMID:1581717

  5. Mutations of an E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl but not TET2 mutations are pathogenic in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Makishima, Hideki; Jankowska, Anna M.; Cazzolli, Heather; O'Keefe, Christine; Yoshida, Nao; Xu, Yinyan; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Hama, Asahito; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Manabe, Atsushi; Kojima, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare pediatric myeloid neoplasm characterized by excessive proliferation of myelomonocytic cells. When we investigated the presence of recurrent molecular lesions in a cohort of 49 children with JMML, neurofibromatosis phenotype (and thereby NF1 mutation) was present in 2 patients (4%), whereas previously described PTPN11, NRAS, and KRAS mutations were found in 53%, 4%, and 2% of cases, respectively. Consequently, a significant proportion of JMML patients without identifiable pathogenesis prompted our search for other molecular defects. When we applied single nucleotide polymorphism arrays to JMML patients, somatic uniparental disomy 11q was detected in 4 of 49 patients; all of these cases harbored RING finger domain c-Cbl mutations. In total, c-Cbl mutations were detected in 5 (10%) of 49 patients. No mutations were identified in Cbl-b and TET2. c-Cbl and RAS pathway mutations were mutually exclusive. Comparison of clinical phenotypes showed earlier presentation and lower hemoglobin F levels in patients with c-Cbl mutations. Our results indicate that mutations in c-Cbl may represent key molecular lesions in JMML patients without RAS/PTPN11 lesions, suggesting analogous pathogenesis to those observed in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patients. PMID:20008299

  6. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Uranium-235 and childhood leukaemia around Greenham Common airfield.

    PubMed

    Bithell, J F; Draper, G J

    1999-09-01

    There has been considerable publicity recently concerning the possible release of enriched uranium from the Greenham Common USAF base near Newbury in Berkshire. Evidence for the release relies on an internal report of the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston, the authors of which postulated that it resulted from a fire in 1958 involving a B47 bomber standing on the runway. Their report contained a much publicised contour map of excess 235U levels estimated from the ratio of 235U to 238U in 26 evergreen leaf samples examined. The current concern of the inhabitants of Newbury centres mostly on the incidence of leukaemia, which was known beforehand to be slightly elevated in parts of West Berkshire, at least for young children. A number of cases have received considerable press publicity, with suggestions that their homes are located close to the base or the flight-path. The reports are, however, anecdotal and are not based on a complete register of cases. We have examined the evidence for this putative association by re-analysing the uranium data and determining the spatial relationship to the base of cases of childhood leukaemia diagnosed in the years 1966-87. We conclude that, although the excess uranium found has a non-random distribution, it does not support the pattern depicted by the contours and bears no relation to the incidence of childhood leukaemia for the period we examined. In any case, the increase in level of environmental radiation as a result of the putative release must be very small and is at variance with the reporting in some of the national press.

  8. Time-to-diagnosis and symptoms of myeloma, lymphomas and leukaemias: a report from the Haematological Malignancy Research Network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior to diagnosis, patients with haematological cancers often have multiple primary care consultations, resulting in diagnostic delay. They are less likely to be referred urgently to hospital and often present as emergencies. We examined patient perspectives of time to help-seeking and diagnosis, as well as associated symptoms and experiences. Methods The UK’s Haematological Malignancy Research Network (http://www.hmrn.org) routinely collects data on all patients newly diagnosed with myeloma, lymphoma and leukaemia (>2000 annually; population 3.6 million). With clinical agreement, patients are also invited to participate in an on-going survey about the circumstances leading to their diagnosis (presence/absence of symptoms; type of symptom(s) and date(s) of onset; date medical advice first sought (help-seeking); summary of important experiences in the time before diagnosis). From 2004–2011, 8858 patients were approached and 5038 agreed they could be contacted for research purposes; 3329 requested and returned a completed questionnaire. The duration of the total interval (symptom onset to diagnosis), patient interval (symptom onset to help-seeking) and diagnostic interval (help-seeking to diagnosis) was examined by patient characteristics and diagnosis. Type and frequency of symptoms were examined collectively, by diagnosis and compared to UK Referral Guidelines. Results Around one-third of patients were asymptomatic at diagnosis. In those with symptoms, the median patient interval tended to be shorter than the diagnostic interval across most diseases. Intervals varied markedly by diagnosis: acute myeloid leukaemia being 41 days (Interquartile range (IQR) 17–85), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma 98 days (IQR 53–192) and myeloma 163 days (IQR 84–306). Many symptoms corresponded to those cited in UK Referral Guidelines, but some were rarely reported (e.g. pain on drinking alcohol). By contrast others, absent from the guidance, were more frequent

  9. [Characteristic of the yeast isolated from patients with leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Fedorovskaia, E A; Rybal'skaia, A P; Skachkova, N K; Mel'nik, E A; Nemirovskaia, L N; Nagornaia, S S; Babich, T V; Polishchuk, L V

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that biotopes of upper respiratory system and intestine were contaminated with yeast in 44.6% of patients with leukaemia (of 112 examined ones). Their quantity exceeds the boundary value for practically healthy people and is > or = 10(2) KOE/ml in the nasal activity and fauces and < or = 10(4) KOE/g in the intestine. It was established that in patients with leucemia the mycotic complications are mainly caused by anamorphous yeast of ascomycetic affinity. Candida albicans, as well as C. glabrata, C. rugosa and Candida sp. play the leading role. The Candida genus species are mainly sensitive to amphotericine B, clotrisamol and nistatin.

  10. The Effects of Herbs and Fruits on Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Saedi, Tayebeh Azam; Md Noor, Sabariah; Ismail, Patimah; Othman, Fauziah

    2014-01-01

    In developing countries, herbal therapy is the first and basis form of treatment for most types of diseases. About 75–80% of the world's population prefers herbal therapy as a major treatment due to its better adequacy and satisfactoriness, which enhance human body's symmetry with minimal side effects. Fruits and plants have been presented from the past as promising tools in becoming a natural anticancer agents. Many of these plant extracts are currently used in cancer therapy and prevention. This review paper will particularly explore and emphasize on herbs and fruits used in the treatment of the leukaemia. PMID:25250054

  11. Anti-lymphocyte antibody levels in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D

    1979-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for measuring levels of lymphocyte autoantibody in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) has been developed. Antibody in the form of crude IgG was extracted from patients' sera and iodinated. The assay utilizes its cross-reactivity with other CLL cells. Levels were measured in 23 patients. The results show that an inverse relationship exists between the quantity of circulating CLL autoantibodies and the number of mouse red blood cell rosetting lymphocytes (M cells). The preliminary findings do not correlate with disease activity although it is our impression that patients who are maintaining higher levels of autoantibody and fewer M-rosetting cells have nonprogressive disease.

  12. Hypercalcaemia associated with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in a Giant Schnauzer.

    PubMed

    Kleiter, M; Hirt, R; Kirtz, G; Day, M J

    2001-05-01

    A 7-year-old male Giant Schnauzer was referred with a history of severe vomiting, lethargy, weight loss, polydipsia and polyuria. Detailed investigations revealed leucocytosis with a marked lymphocytosis, mild non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercalcaemia and azotaemia. Circulating lymphocytes were small and well-differentiated, and the same lymphoid population was present in bone marrow. Chronic lymphocyctic leukaemia with associated paraneoplastic hypercalcaemia was diagnosed. Immunohistochemical staining of a bone marrow biopsy revealed a neoplastic B-cell line expressing CD79. The dog responded to therapy with prednisolone and chlorambucil for a period of 8 months.

  13. Acquired factor XI inhibitor in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrick, M. J.; Prentice, A. G.; Copplestone, J. A.; Pamphilon, D. H.; Boon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    A 71 year old man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) experienced excessive bleeding following transurethral resection of the prostate. Investigations showed a prolonged kaolin cephalin clotting time (KCCT) with low concentrations of factor XI. The prolonged KCCT was largely corrected by mixing with normal plasma but this correction was lost on incubation, confirming the presence of an inhibitor. He was treated with pulsed methylprednisolone and chlorambucil which resulted in the resolution of the bleeding problem and the loss of detectable circulating inhibitor. PMID:1577975

  14. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Leukaemia Diagnosis using Microscopic Blood Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Neoh, Siew; Srisukkham, Worawut; Zhang, Li; Todryk, Stephen; Greystoke, Brigit; Peng Lim, Chee; Alamgir Hossain, Mohammed; Aslam, Nauman

    2015-10-01

    This research proposes an intelligent decision support system for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosis from microscopic blood images. A novel clustering algorithm with stimulating discriminant measures (SDM) of both within- and between-cluster scatter variances is proposed to produce robust segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of lymphocytes/lymphoblasts. Specifically, the proposed between-cluster evaluation is formulated based on the trade-off of several between-cluster measures of well-known feature extraction methods. The SDM measures are used in conjuction with Genetic Algorithm for clustering nucleus, cytoplasm, and background regions. Subsequently, a total of eighty features consisting of shape, texture, and colour information of the nucleus and cytoplasm sub-images are extracted. A number of classifiers (multi-layer perceptron, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer ensemble) are employed for lymphocyte/lymphoblast classification. Evaluated with the ALL-IDB2 database, the proposed SDM-based clustering overcomes the shortcomings of Fuzzy C-means which focuses purely on within-cluster scatter variance. It also outperforms Linear Discriminant Analysis and Fuzzy Compactness and Separation for nucleus-cytoplasm separation. The overall system achieves superior recognition rates of 96.72% and 96.67% accuracies using bootstrapping and 10-fold cross validation with Dempster-Shafer and SVM, respectively. The results also compare favourably with those reported in the literature, indicating the usefulness of the proposed SDM-based clustering method.

  15. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Leukaemia Diagnosis using Microscopic Blood Images

    PubMed Central

    Chin Neoh, Siew; Srisukkham, Worawut; Zhang, Li; Todryk, Stephen; Greystoke, Brigit; Peng Lim, Chee; Alamgir Hossain, Mohammed; Aslam, Nauman

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an intelligent decision support system for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosis from microscopic blood images. A novel clustering algorithm with stimulating discriminant measures (SDM) of both within- and between-cluster scatter variances is proposed to produce robust segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of lymphocytes/lymphoblasts. Specifically, the proposed between-cluster evaluation is formulated based on the trade-off of several between-cluster measures of well-known feature extraction methods. The SDM measures are used in conjuction with Genetic Algorithm for clustering nucleus, cytoplasm, and background regions. Subsequently, a total of eighty features consisting of shape, texture, and colour information of the nucleus and cytoplasm sub-images are extracted. A number of classifiers (multi-layer perceptron, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer ensemble) are employed for lymphocyte/lymphoblast classification. Evaluated with the ALL-IDB2 database, the proposed SDM-based clustering overcomes the shortcomings of Fuzzy C-means which focuses purely on within-cluster scatter variance. It also outperforms Linear Discriminant Analysis and Fuzzy Compactness and Separation for nucleus-cytoplasm separation. The overall system achieves superior recognition rates of 96.72% and 96.67% accuracies using bootstrapping and 10-fold cross validation with Dempster-Shafer and SVM, respectively. The results also compare favourably with those reported in the literature, indicating the usefulness of the proposed SDM-based clustering method. PMID:26450665

  16. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Leukaemia Diagnosis using Microscopic Blood Images.

    PubMed

    Chin Neoh, Siew; Srisukkham, Worawut; Zhang, Li; Todryk, Stephen; Greystoke, Brigit; Peng Lim, Chee; Alamgir Hossain, Mohammed; Aslam, Nauman

    2015-10-09

    This research proposes an intelligent decision support system for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosis from microscopic blood images. A novel clustering algorithm with stimulating discriminant measures (SDM) of both within- and between-cluster scatter variances is proposed to produce robust segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of lymphocytes/lymphoblasts. Specifically, the proposed between-cluster evaluation is formulated based on the trade-off of several between-cluster measures of well-known feature extraction methods. The SDM measures are used in conjuction with Genetic Algorithm for clustering nucleus, cytoplasm, and background regions. Subsequently, a total of eighty features consisting of shape, texture, and colour information of the nucleus and cytoplasm sub-images are extracted. A number of classifiers (multi-layer perceptron, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer ensemble) are employed for lymphocyte/lymphoblast classification. Evaluated with the ALL-IDB2 database, the proposed SDM-based clustering overcomes the shortcomings of Fuzzy C-means which focuses purely on within-cluster scatter variance. It also outperforms Linear Discriminant Analysis and Fuzzy Compactness and Separation for nucleus-cytoplasm separation. The overall system achieves superior recognition rates of 96.72% and 96.67% accuracies using bootstrapping and 10-fold cross validation with Dempster-Shafer and SVM, respectively. The results also compare favourably with those reported in the literature, indicating the usefulness of the proposed SDM-based clustering method.

  17. An Intelligent Decision Support System for Leukaemia Diagnosis using Microscopic Blood Images.

    PubMed

    Chin Neoh, Siew; Srisukkham, Worawut; Zhang, Li; Todryk, Stephen; Greystoke, Brigit; Peng Lim, Chee; Alamgir Hossain, Mohammed; Aslam, Nauman

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes an intelligent decision support system for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia diagnosis from microscopic blood images. A novel clustering algorithm with stimulating discriminant measures (SDM) of both within- and between-cluster scatter variances is proposed to produce robust segmentation of nucleus and cytoplasm of lymphocytes/lymphoblasts. Specifically, the proposed between-cluster evaluation is formulated based on the trade-off of several between-cluster measures of well-known feature extraction methods. The SDM measures are used in conjuction with Genetic Algorithm for clustering nucleus, cytoplasm, and background regions. Subsequently, a total of eighty features consisting of shape, texture, and colour information of the nucleus and cytoplasm sub-images are extracted. A number of classifiers (multi-layer perceptron, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer ensemble) are employed for lymphocyte/lymphoblast classification. Evaluated with the ALL-IDB2 database, the proposed SDM-based clustering overcomes the shortcomings of Fuzzy C-means which focuses purely on within-cluster scatter variance. It also outperforms Linear Discriminant Analysis and Fuzzy Compactness and Separation for nucleus-cytoplasm separation. The overall system achieves superior recognition rates of 96.72% and 96.67% accuracies using bootstrapping and 10-fold cross validation with Dempster-Shafer and SVM, respectively. The results also compare favourably with those reported in the literature, indicating the usefulness of the proposed SDM-based clustering method. PMID:26450665

  18. Bovine leukaemia: facts and hypotheses derived from the study of an infectious cancer.

    PubMed

    Burny, A; Cleuter, Y; Kettmann, R; Mammerickx, M; Marbaix, G; Portetelle, D; van den Broeke, A; Willems, L; Thomas, R

    1988-07-01

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) is the etiological agent of chronic lymphatic leukaemia/lymphoma in cows, sheep and goats. Infection without neoplastic transformation was also obtained in pigs, rhesus monkeys, chimpanzees, rabbits and observed in capybaras and water-buffaloes. Structurally and functionally, BLV is a relative of human T lymphotropic viruses 1 and 2 (HTLV-I and HTLV-II) In humans, HTLV-I induces a T-cell leukaemia and its type 2 counterpart has been found in dermatopathic lymphadenopathy, hairy T-cell leukaemia and prolymphocytic leukaemia cases. At variance with HTLV-I, BLV has not been associated with neurological diseases of the degenerative type. Bovine leukaemia virus, HTLV-I and HTLV-II show clearcut sequence homologies. The pathology of the BLV-induced disease, most notably the absence of chronic viraemia, a long latency period and lack of preferred proviral integration sites in tumours, is similar to that of adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma induced by HTLV-I. The most striking feature of these three naturally transmitted leukaemia viruses is the X region located between the env gene and the long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence. The X region contains several overlapping long open reading frames. One of them, designated XBL-I, encodes a trans-activator function capable of increasing the level of gene expression directed by BLV-LTR and most probably is involved in "genetic instability" of BLV-infected cells of the B cell lineage. The "genetic instability" renders the infected cell susceptible to move, along a number of stages, towards full malignancy. Little is known about these events and their causes; we present some theoretical possibilities. Bovine leukaemia virus infection has a worldwide distribution. In temperate climates, the virus spreads mostly via iatrogenic transfer of infected lymphocytes. In warm climates and in areas heavily populated by haematophagous insects, there are indications of insect-borne propagation of the virus.

  19. Autoimmune and inflammatory diseases associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A series of 26 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Grignano, Eric; Mekinian, Arsene; Braun, Thorsten; Liozon, Eric; Hamidou, Mohamed; Decaux, Olivier; Puéchal, Xavier; Kahn, Jean Emmanuel; Schoindre, Yoland; Rossignol, Julien; Lortholary, Olivier; Lioger, Bertrand; Hermine, Olivier; Park, Sophie; Ades, Lionel; Montestruc, François; Ricard, Laure; Gardin, Claude; Fenaux, Pierre; Fain, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    We wanted to describe the characteristics, treatment and outcome of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases (SAIDs) associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and conducted a French multicenter retrospective study and a literature review. We included 26 cases of CMML (median age 75 years, 54% female), 80% with CMML-1. CPSS score was low (0 or 1) in 75% of cases. SAIDS was systemic vasculitis in 54%. Diagnosis of the 2 diseases was concomitant in 31% cases, and CMML was diagnosed before SAIDs in 12 cases (46%). First line treatment for SAIDs consisted mostly of steroid, with 85% of response. Second-line treatment was needed in 40% cases. Six patients received hypomethylating agents, with 66% response on SAIDs. A literature review found 49 cases of CMML-associated SAIDs, in whom SAIDs was systemic vasculitis in 29% cases. Hence, vasculitis is the most frequent SAIDs associated with CMML. After initial response to steroids, recurrence and steroid-dependence were frequent. Hypomethylating agents may be interesting in this context. PMID:27337291

  20. TET2 Mutations Are Associated with Specific 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Profiles in Patients with Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cristina; Martínez-Calle, Nicolas; Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Segura, Victor; Delabesse, Eric; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Garate, Leire; Alvarez, Sara; Rifon, José; Varea, Sara; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Wainscoat, James S.; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Calasanz, María José; Cross, Nicholas C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) has recently been associated with a high incidence of diverse mutations in genes such as TET2 or EZH2 that are implicated in epigenetic mechanisms. We have performed genome-wide DNA methylation arrays and mutational analysis of TET2, IDH1, IDH2, EZH2 and JAK2 in a group of 24 patients with CMML. 249 genes were differentially methylated between CMML patients and controls. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we identified enrichment in a gene network centered around PLC, JNK and ERK suggesting that these pathways, whose deregulation has beenrecently described in CMML, are affected by epigenetic mechanisms. Mutations of TET2, JAK2 and EZH2 were found in 15 patients (65%), 4 patients (17%) and 1 patient (4%) respectively while no mutations in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes were identified. Interestingly, patients with wild type TET2 clustered separately from patients with TET2 mutations, showed a higher degree of hypermethylation and were associated with higher risk karyotypes. Our results demonstrate the presence of aberrant DNA methylation in CMML and identifies TET2 mutant CMML as a biologically distinct disease subtype with a different epigenetic profile. PMID:22328940

  1. Myeloid Dysregulation in a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of PTPN11-Associated Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Sevilla, Ana; Roman, Angel C; Lee, Dung-Fang; D'Souza, Sunita L; Pardo, Sherly; Riess, Ilan; Su, Jie; Cohen, Ninette; Schaniel, Christoph; Rodriguez, Nelson A; Baccarini, Alessia; Brown, Brian D; Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Yalcin, Safak; Park, Christopher Y; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Yongchao, Ge; Edelmann, Lisa; Bahieg, Sawsan; Raynal, Patrick; Flex, Elisabetta; Tartaglia, Marco; Moore, Kateri A; Lemischka, Ihor R; Gelb, Bruce D

    2015-10-20

    Somatic PTPN11 mutations cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Germline PTPN11 defects cause Noonan syndrome (NS), and specific inherited mutations cause NS/JMML. Here, we report that hematopoietic cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) harboring NS/JMML-causing PTPN11 mutations recapitulated JMML features. hiPSC-derived NS/JMML myeloid cells exhibited increased signaling through STAT5 and upregulation of miR-223 and miR-15a. Similarly, miR-223 and miR-15a were upregulated in 11/19 JMML bone marrow mononuclear cells harboring PTPN11 mutations, but not those without PTPN11 defects. Reducing miR-223's function in NS/JMML hiPSCs normalized myelogenesis. MicroRNA target gene expression levels were reduced in hiPSC-derived myeloid cells as well as in JMML cells with PTPN11 mutations. Thus, studying an inherited human cancer syndrome with hiPSCs illuminated early oncogenesis prior to the accumulation of secondary genomic alterations, enabling us to discover microRNA dysregulation, establishing a genotype-phenotype association for JMML and providing therapeutic targets. PMID:26456833

  2. Role of mesenchymal stem cells in leukaemia: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Cheong, Soon-Keng

    2014-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have captured the attention of researchers today due to their multipotent differentiation capacity. Also, they have been successfully applied clinically, in the treatment of various diseases of the heart and musculoskeletal systems, with encouraging results. Their supportive role in haematopoiesis and their anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties have enhanced their contribution towards the improvement of engraftment and the treatment of graft-versus-host disease in patients receiving haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, there is a growing body of research that supports the involvement of MSCs in leukaemogenesis with several genetic and functional abnormalities having been detected in the MSCs of leukaemia patients. MSCs also exert leukaemia-enhancing effects and induce chemotherapy resistance in leukaemia cells. This paper addresses the key issues in the therapeutic value as well as the harmful effects of the MSCs in leukaemia with a sharp focus on the recent updates in the published literature. PMID:23794030

  3. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  4. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic

  5. Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Mark A; Prinjha, Rab K; Dittmann, Antje; Giotopoulos, George; Bantscheff, Marcus; Chan, Wai-In; Robson, Samuel C; Chung, Chun-wa; Hopf, Carsten; Savitski, Mikhail M; Huthmacher, Carola; Gudgin, Emma; Lugo, Dave; Beinke, Soren; Chapman, Trevor D; Roberts, Emma J; Soden, Peter E; Auger, Kurt R; Mirguet, Olivier; Doehner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Burnett, Alan K; Jeffrey, Phillip; Drewes, Gerard; Lee, Kevin; Huntly, Brian J P; Kouzarides, Tony

    2011-10-02

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene initiate aggressive forms of leukaemia, which are often refractory to conventional therapies. Many MLL-fusion partners are members of the super elongation complex (SEC), a critical regulator of transcriptional elongation, suggesting that aberrant control of this process has an important role in leukaemia induction. Here we use a global proteomic strategy to demonstrate that MLL fusions, as part of SEC and the polymerase-associated factor complex (PAFc), are associated with the BET family of acetyl-lysine recognizing, chromatin 'adaptor' proteins. These data provided the basis for therapeutic intervention in MLL-fusion leukaemia, via the displacement of the BET family of proteins from chromatin. We show that a novel small molecule inhibitor of the BET family, GSK1210151A (I-BET151), has profound efficacy against human and murine MLL-fusion leukaemic cell lines, through the induction of early cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. I-BET151 treatment in two human leukaemia cell lines with different MLL fusions alters the expression of a common set of genes whose function may account for these phenotypic changes. The mode of action of I-BET151 is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of transcription at key genes (BCL2, C-MYC and CDK6) through the displacement of BRD3/4, PAFc and SEC components from chromatin. In vivo studies indicate that I-BET151 has significant therapeutic value, providing survival benefit in two distinct mouse models of murine MLL-AF9 and human MLL-AF4 leukaemia. Finally, the efficacy of I-BET151 against human leukaemia stem cells is demonstrated, providing further evidence of its potent therapeutic potential. These findings establish the displacement of BET proteins from chromatin as a promising epigenetic therapy for these aggressive leukaemias.

  6. Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Mark A.; Prinjha, Rab K.; Dittman, Antje; Giotopoulos, George; Bantscheff, Marcus; Chan, Wai-In; Robson, Samuel C; Chung, Chun-wa; Hopf, Carsten; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Huthmacher, Carola; Gudgin, Emma; Lugo, Dave; Beinke, Soren; Chapman, Trevor D.; Roberts, Emma J.; Soden, Peter E; Auger, Kurt R.; Mirguet, Olivier; Doehner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Burnett, Alan K.; Jeffrey, Phillip; Drewes, Gerard; Lee, Kevin; Huntly, Brian J.P; Kouzarides, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene initiate aggressive forms of leukaemia, which are often refractory to conventional therapies1. Many MLL-fusion partners are members of the super elongation complex (SEC), a critical regulator of transcriptional elongation, suggesting that aberrant control of this process plays an important role in leukaemia induction2,3. Here we use a global proteomic strategy to demonstrate that MLL-fusions, as part of SEC2,3 and the polymerase associated factor (PAFc) complex4,5 are associated with the BET family of acetyl-lysine recognising, chromatin “adaptor” proteins. These data provided the basis for therapeutic intervention in MLL-fusion leukaemia, via the displacement of the BET family of proteins from chromatin. We show that a novel small molecule inhibitor of the BET family GSK1210151A (I-BET151) has profound efficacy against human and murine MLL-fusion leukaemic cell lines, through the induction of early cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. I-BET151 treatment in two human leukaemia cell lines with different MLL-fusions alters the expression of a common set of genes whose function may account for these phenotypic changes. The mode of action of I-BET151 is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of transcription at key genes (BCL2, C-MYC and CDK6) through the displacement of BRD3/4, PAFc and SEC components from chromatin. In vivo studies indicate that I-BET151 has significant therapeutic value, providing survival benefit in two distinct mouse models of murine MLL-AF9 and human MLL-AF4 leukaemia. Finally, the efficacy of I-BET151 against human leukaemia stem cells (LSC) is demonstrated, providing further evidence of its potent therapeutic potential. These findings establish the displacement of BET proteins from chromatin as a promising epigenetic therapy for these aggressive leukaemias. PMID:21964340

  7. Nuclear power plants and childhood leukaemia: lessons from the past and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kuehni, C; Spycher, B D

    2014-01-01

    In the 1980s, leukaemia clusters were discovered around nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Sellafield and Dounreay in the United Kingdom. This raised public concern about the risk of childhood leukaemia near nuclear power plants (NPPs). Since then, the topic has been well-studied, but methodological limitations make results difficult to interpret. Our review aims to: (1.) summarise current evidence on the relationship between NPPs and risk of childhood leukaemia, with a focus on the Swiss CANUPIS (Childhood cancer and nuclear power plants in Switzerland) study; (2.) discuss the limitations of previous research; and (3.) suggest directions for future research. There are various reasons that previous studies produced inconclusive results. These include: inadequate study designs and limited statistical power due to the low prevalence of exposure (living near a NPP) and outcome (leukaemia); lack of accurate exposure estimates; limited knowledge of the aetiology of childhood leukaemia, particularly of vulnerable time windows and latent periods; use of residential location at time of diagnosis only and lack of data on address histories; and inability to adjust for potential confounders. We conclude that risk of childhood leukaemia around NPPs should continue to be monitored and that study designs should be improved and standardised. Data should be pooled internationally to increase the statistical power. More research needs to be done on other putative risk factors for childhood cancer such as low-dose ionizing radiation, exposure to certain chemicals and exposure to infections. Studies should be designed to allow examining multiple exposures.

  8. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction associated with feline leukaemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M G; Duska, G O; Stiff, M I; Lafrado, L J; Olsen, R G

    1986-10-01

    The chemiluminescent characteristics of enriched (greater than 95%) peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations (PMN) from normal and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats were investigated. FeLV-infected cats demonstrated a significantly lower (P less than 0.001) PMN chemiluminescent response when compared to the response of normal age-matched controls. Normal PMN treated with FeLV-infected cat serum exhibited a depressed response in comparison to control cells. A titration of serum from infected cats supplemented with normal serum revealed a titratable suppression of chemiluminescence with increasing concentration of serum from the infected cats. However, PMN from FeLV-infected cats treated with normal serum displayed a slight increase in chemiluminescence over the same cells in autologous serum. The addition of inactivated FeLV to normal PMN caused a titratable decrease in chemiluminescence.

  9. Organising pneumonia mimicking invasive fungal disease in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, Fabio; Potenza, Leonardo; Morselli, Monica; Maccaferri, Monica; Pedrazzi, Letizia; Barozzi, Patrizia; Vallerini, Daniela; Riva, Giovanni; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Rossi, Giulio; Rivasi, Francesco; Messino', Massimino; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Grottola, Antonella; Venturelli, Claudia; Pecorari, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Torelli, Giuseppe; Luppi, Mario

    2010-07-01

    Clinical charts from 63 consecutive highly immunocompromised haematologic patients presenting with pulmonary nodular lesions on CT scan, classified as either probable or possible invasive fungal disease (IFD) according to the revised EORTC/MSG classification, were retrospectively studied. Histopathological analysis of lung tissues, available for 23 patients, demonstrated proven IFD in 17 cases (14 invasive aspergillosis and 3 invasive zygomycosis), diffuse alveolar damage in one and organising pneumonia (OP) in five cases. In the OP cases, three of which have been defined as probable IFD according to EORTC/MSG classification, extensive immunohistochemical, molecular and immunological analyses for fungi were negative. Our case descriptions extend the notion that OP may be encountered as a distinct histopathological entity in pulmonary nodular lesions in patients with leukaemia with probable/possible IFD.

  10. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  11. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Masao; Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  12. 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemic cells unresponsive to colony stimulating factors and phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bettens, F.; Schlick, E.; Farrar, W.; Ruscetti, F.

    1986-12-01

    The murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell line WEHI-3B D/sup +/, which differentiates in response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), can also be induced to differentiate into monocyte-macrophages by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) treatment, whereas the WEHI-3B D/sup -/ subline, which is unresponsive to G-CSF and PMA, can be induced to differentiate to granulocytes as well as monocytes by 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3), the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D3. A newly developed variant of the WEHI-3B D/sup +/ line, named WEHI-3B D/sup +/G, which was responsive to G-CSF but not to PMA, was also differentiated to granulocytes by 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3. Although vitamin D3 has been reported to induce macrophage differentiation in responsive tumor cells, this is the first demonstration that 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 can induce granulocyte differentiation. In both differentiation pathways, cessation of cellular proliferation accompanies changes in morphologic and cytochemical properties of the cells. This suggests that leukemic cell lines unresponsive to differentiation agents acting at the cell surface retain their ability to differentiate in response to agents that do not act via the plasma membrane such as 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3, which has cytosolic/nuclear receptors. These results suggest that low doses of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/ D3 may be useful in combination with hemopoietic growth factors (CSFs) as therapeutic agent to induce leukemic cell differentiation in vivo.

  13. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Phenotypically Dormant and Immature Leukaemia Cells Display Increased Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pallis, Monica; Harvey, Tamsin; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity drives a number of key metabolic processes including growth and protein synthesis. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway promotes cellular dormancy. Since cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be phenotypically dormant (quiescent), we examined biomarkers of their mTOR pathway activity concurrently with Ki-67 and CD71 (indicators of cycling cells) by quantitative flow cytometry. Using antibodies to phosphorylated epitopes of mTOR (S2448) and its downstream targets ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6, S235/236) and 4E-BP1 (T36/45), we documented that these phosphorylations were negligible in lymphocytes, but evident in dormant as well as proliferating subsets of both mobilised normal stem cell harvest CD34+ cells and AML blasts. Although mTOR phosphorylation in AML blasts was lower than that of the normal CD34+ cells, p-4E-BP1 was 2.6-fold higher and p-rpS6 was 22-fold higher. Moreover, in contrast to 4E-BP1, rpS6 phosphorylation was higher in dormant than proliferating AML blasts, and was also higher in the immature CD34+CD38- blast subset. Data from the Cancer Genome Atlas show that rpS6 expression is associated with that of respiratory chain enzymes in AML. We conclude that phenotypic quiescence markers do not necessarily predict metabolic dormancy and that elevated rpS6 ser235/236 phosphorylation is characteristic of AML. PMID:26985829

  16. Establishment and characterization of an arsenic-sensitive monoblastic leukaemia cell line (SigM5).

    PubMed

    Walter, R; Schoedon, G; Bächli, E; Betts, D R; Hossle, J P; Calandra, T; Joller-Jemelka, H I; Fehr, J; Schaffner, A

    2000-05-01

    Few human monoblastic cell lines have been characterized to date. We have established the SigM5 cell line from a patient with acute monoblastic leukaemia (FAB M5a). Original leukaemic cells had a karyotype of 47,XY,+8, whereas the cell line showed a stemline clone of 81,XX,Y,Y,1,4,6,7,+8,+8,9,10,10,11,13,16,19[cp], with a minor sideline also present. Cytochemical staining was strongly positive with alpha-naphthylbutyrate acetate esterase, particulate positive with Sudan black and weakly positive for myeloperoxidase. Cells were positive for CD13, CD15, CD18, CD23, CD33, CD38, CD45, CD68 and myeloperoxidase. CD14 expression was 3-15%. SigM5 constitutively secreted interleukin (IL)-2, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, ferritin, lysozyme, N-elastase and neopterin upon stimulation with interferon (IFN)-gamma. Cells expressed the proinflammatory mediator macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). All NADPH oxidase subunits were constitutively present, but nitroblue tetrazolium reduction was only detectable upon activation with IFN-gamma. SigM5 monoblasts were sensitive to arsenic trioxide (As2O3) previously not described to induce apoptosis in monoblastic cells. Differing considerably in morphology, immunophenotype and sensitivity to arsenics from the widely used cell lines U937, HL-60 and THP-1, SigM5 is a new monoblastic cell line useful for studying leukaemogenesis, monocyte differentiation and tumour cell susceptibility to arsenic compounds.

  17. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Temporal trends in childhood leukaemia incidence following exposure to radioactive fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard; Darby, Sarah C; Murphy, Michael F G

    2010-05-01

    Notably raised rates of childhood leukaemia incidence have been found near some nuclear installations, in particular Sellafield and Dounreay in the United Kingdom, but risk assessments have concluded that the radiation doses estimated to have been received by children or in utero as a result of operations at these installations are much too small to account for the reported increases in incidence. This has led to speculation that the risk of childhood leukaemia arising from internal exposure to radiation following the intake of radioactive material released from nuclear facilities has been substantially underestimated. The radionuclides discharged from many nuclear installations are similar to those released into the global environment by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, which was at its height in the late-1950s and early-1960s. Measurements of anthropogenic radionuclides in members of the general public resident in the vicinity of Sellafield and Dounreay have found levels that do not differ greatly from those in persons living remote from nuclear installations that are due to ubiquitous exposure to the radioactive debris of nuclear weapons testing. Therefore, if the leukaemia risk to children resulting from deposition within the body of radioactive material discharged from nuclear facilities has been grossly underestimated, then a pronounced excess of childhood leukaemia would have been expected as a consequence of the short period of intense atmospheric weapons testing. We have examined childhood leukaemia incidence in 11 large-scale cancer registries in three continents for which data were available at least as early as 1962. We found no evidence of a wave of excess cases corresponding to the peak of radioactive fallout from atmospheric weapons testing. The absence of a discernible increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia following the period of maximum exposure to the radioactive debris of this testing weighs heavily against the suggestion that

  19. Temporal trends in childhood leukaemia incidence following exposure to radioactive fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Richard; Darby, Sarah C; Murphy, Michael F G

    2010-05-01

    Notably raised rates of childhood leukaemia incidence have been found near some nuclear installations, in particular Sellafield and Dounreay in the United Kingdom, but risk assessments have concluded that the radiation doses estimated to have been received by children or in utero as a result of operations at these installations are much too small to account for the reported increases in incidence. This has led to speculation that the risk of childhood leukaemia arising from internal exposure to radiation following the intake of radioactive material released from nuclear facilities has been substantially underestimated. The radionuclides discharged from many nuclear installations are similar to those released into the global environment by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing, which was at its height in the late-1950s and early-1960s. Measurements of anthropogenic radionuclides in members of the general public resident in the vicinity of Sellafield and Dounreay have found levels that do not differ greatly from those in persons living remote from nuclear installations that are due to ubiquitous exposure to the radioactive debris of nuclear weapons testing. Therefore, if the leukaemia risk to children resulting from deposition within the body of radioactive material discharged from nuclear facilities has been grossly underestimated, then a pronounced excess of childhood leukaemia would have been expected as a consequence of the short period of intense atmospheric weapons testing. We have examined childhood leukaemia incidence in 11 large-scale cancer registries in three continents for which data were available at least as early as 1962. We found no evidence of a wave of excess cases corresponding to the peak of radioactive fallout from atmospheric weapons testing. The absence of a discernible increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia following the period of maximum exposure to the radioactive debris of this testing weighs heavily against the suggestion that

  20. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    PubMed Central

    Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for additional occupational and environmental studies published between 2005 and 2009. Study selection We selected 23 studies that: (1) examined the association between protracted exposures to ionising radiation and leukaemia excluding chronic lymphocytic subtype; (2) were a cohort or nested case–control design without major bias; (3) reported quantitative estimates of exposure; and (4) conducted exposure–response analyses using relative or excess RR per unit exposure. Methods Studies were further screened to reduce information overlap. Random effects models were developed to summarise between-study variance and obtain an aggregate estimate of the excess RR at 100 mGy. Publication bias was assessed by trim and fill and Rosenthal's file drawer methods. Results We found an ERR at 100 mGy of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.32) by modelling results from 10 studies and adjusting for publication bias. Between-study variance was not evident (p=0.99). Conclusions Protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation is significantly associated with leukaemia. Our estimate agreed well with the leukaemia risk observed among exposed adults in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors, providing increased confidence in the current understanding of leukaemia risk from ionising radiation. However, unlike the estimates obtained from the LSS, our model provides a precise, quantitative summary of the direct estimates of excess risk from studies of

  1. OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative, mediates cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and Burkitt lymphoma through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Yuan; Ma, Yihui; Kulp, Samuel K.; Wang, Shu-Huei; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Frissora, Frank; Mani, Rajeswaran; Mo, Xiaokui; Jarjoura, David; Byrd, John C.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance and associated immune deregulation limit use of current therapies in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), thus warranting alternative therapy development. Herein we demonstrate that OSU-DY7, a novel D-tyrosinol derivative targeting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mediates cytotoxicity in lymphocytic cell lines representing CLL (MEC-1), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (697 cells), Burkitt lymphoma (Raji and Ramos) and primary B cells from CLL patients in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is dependent on caspase activation, as evidenced by induction of caspase-3 activation and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and rescue of cytotoxicity by Z-VAD-FMK. Interestingly, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is mediated through activation of p38 MAPK, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downstream target protein MAPKAPK2. Pretreatment of B-CLL cells with SB202190, a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, results in decreased MAPKAPK2 protein level with concomitant rescue of the cells from OSU-DY7-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, OSU-DY7-induced cytotoxicity is associated with down regulation of p38 MAPK target BIRC5, that is rescued at protein and mRNA levels by SB202190. This study provides evidence for a role of OSU-DY7 in p38 MAPK activation and BIRC5 down regulation associated with apoptosis in B lymphocytic cells, thus warranting development of this alternative therapy for lymphoid malignancies. PMID:21470196

  2. Living with cancer: a qualitative report of the experiences of leukaemia patients in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adejoh, Samuel Ojima; Temilola, Olusegun Moses; Olayiwola, Bolutife

    2013-12-01

    The study examined the qualitative, cognitive and psychosocial experiences of those living with leukaemia undergoing treatment at a teaching hospital. Twenty respondents who consented to participate were purposively selected from the cancer patients with leukaemia receiving treatment in the said teaching hospital. The in-depth interview method was used to collect data. The data was analysed using manual content analysis. Data showed that patients lack basic knowledge about leukaemia and had no beliefs regarding leukaemia. Some patients believed in God and a medical breakthrough for a cure, while for some, the hope of living was not certain. The ill-health condition had brought about financial predicament to both patients and family members and has limited their productivity in terms of income-generating activities. Good interpersonal relationships and support from their care providers aided their compliance to treatment regime and provided hope for living positively with their condition. The study concludes that there is a need to educate the patients on the causes of their condition. Financial supports should be rendered to those living with leukaemia, while health care providers should be encouraged to continue to maintain good interpersonal relationships with their patients.

  3. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and cladribine synergistically induce apoptosis in NK-LGL leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoshen; Hasanali, Zainul S; Chen, Allshine; Zhang, Dianzheng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hong-Gang; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Xu, Kailin

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia features a clonal proliferation of CD3(-) NK cells that can be classified into either aggressive or chronic categories. The NKL cell line, derived from an aggressive Asian NK cell leukaemia, and patient samples from chronic NK-LGL leukaemia were used in our study to probe for synergistic efficacy of the epigenetic drugs vorinostat (SAHA) and cladribine in this disease. We demonstrate that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are over-expressed in both aggressive and chronic NK leukaemia. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA reduces class I and II HDAC expression and enhances histone acetylation in leukaemic NK cells. In vitro combination treatment with SAHA and cladribine dose-dependently exerts synergistic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on leukaemic NK cells. Expression profiling of apoptotic regulatory genes suggests that both compounds led to caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. Collectively, these data show that combined epigenetic therapy, using HDAC and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, may be a promising therapeutic approach for NK-LGL leukaemia.

  4. Non-coding recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Beà, Silvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Villamor, Neus; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Martín-Subero, José I; Munar, Marta; Rubio-Pérez, Carlota; Jares, Pedro; Aymerich, Marta; Baumann, Tycho; Beekman, Renée; Belver, Laura; Carrio, Anna; Castellano, Giancarlo; Clot, Guillem; Colado, Enrique; Colomer, Dolors; Costa, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Enjuanes, Anna; Estivill, Xavier; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Gelpí, Josep L; González, Blanca; González, Santiago; González, Marcos; Gut, Marta; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; López-Guerra, Mónica; Martín-García, David; Navarro, Alba; Nicolás, Pilar; Orozco, Modesto; Payer, Ángel R; Pinyol, Magda; Pisano, David G; Puente, Diana A; Queirós, Ana C; Quesada, Víctor; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Royo, Cristina; Royo, Romina; Rozman, María; Russiñol, Nuria; Salaverría, Itziar; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Tamborero, David; Terol, María J; Valencia, Alfonso; López-Bigas, Nuria; Torrents, David; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2015-10-22

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a frequent disease in which the genetic alterations determining the clinicobiological behaviour are not fully understood. Here we describe a comprehensive evaluation of the genomic landscape of 452 CLL cases and 54 patients with monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, a precursor disorder. We extend the number of CLL driver alterations, including changes in ZNF292, ZMYM3, ARID1A and PTPN11. We also identify novel recurrent mutations in non-coding regions, including the 3' region of NOTCH1, which cause aberrant splicing events, increase NOTCH1 activity and result in a more aggressive disease. In addition, mutations in an enhancer located on chromosome 9p13 result in reduced expression of the B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX5. The accumulative number of driver alterations (0 to ≥4) discriminated between patients with differences in clinical behaviour. This study provides an integrated portrait of the CLL genomic landscape, identifies new recurrent driver mutations of the disease, and suggests clinical interventions that may improve the management of this neoplasia. PMID:26200345

  5. Evaluation of the natural perinatal transmission of bovine leukaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Hirohisa; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Kirino, Yumi; Honkawa, Kazuyuki; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Norimine, Junzo

    2015-03-01

    The perinatal transmission of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) plays a critical role in the spread and persistence of BLV infection in cattle herds. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of perinatal infections in an area in Japan and investigate some risk factors associated with infection. Altogether, 129 calves born to BLV-infected cows in a herd in Japan were tested for infection immediately after birth and again at one month of age using nested PCR. Twenty-four calves (18.6 per cent) were infected with BLV, of which 14 (10.8 per cent) and 10 (7.7 per cent) calves were infected via the transplacental and the birth canal routes, respectively. Maternal viral loads, breed, the presence or absence of assistance during parturition and the number of births per dam were evaluated to investigate risk factors associated with infection. Maternal viral load was significantly correlated with the frequency of perinatal infection, and more than 40 per cent of newborn calves born to dams with high viral loads were infected with BLV. The results of this study could contribute towards developing effective eradication programmes by providing necessary data for replacement of breeding cow in the field.

  6. Unusual intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin inclusions in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, P; Preud'Homme, J L; Gourdin, M F; Reyes, F; Daniel, M T

    1982-01-01

    Unusual intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin inclusions were found by immunofluorescence in three patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. The inclusions contained the same immunoglobulin chains as those detected on the plasma membrane, except for delta chains which were expressed on the cell surface and not in the cytoplasmic inclusions. The cytoplasmic staining persisted throughout culture for 8 or more days. An initial study of patients 1's cells showed that the inclusions contained only mu chains, and kappa chains gradually became apparent after in vitro culture. In a second study, the fresh lymphocytes contained both mu and and kappa chains. Initially, biosynthetic experiments showed production of mu chains which polymerized in the cytoplasm and were not secreted. Subsequently there was synthesis of heavy and light chains which assembled into monomeric subunits that were retained and secretion of free light chains. The apparent molecular weight of these immunoglobulin chains was larger than that of their secretory counterparts. Immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed cytoplasmic mu chains in strands of endoplasmic reticulum. In the two other patients, immunofluorescence displayed unusual staining patterns of bright networks in perinuclear areas. PMID:6275878

  7. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-04-12

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  8. Non-coding recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Beà, Silvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Villamor, Neus; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Martín-Subero, José I; Munar, Marta; Rubio-Pérez, Carlota; Jares, Pedro; Aymerich, Marta; Baumann, Tycho; Beekman, Renée; Belver, Laura; Carrio, Anna; Castellano, Giancarlo; Clot, Guillem; Colado, Enrique; Colomer, Dolors; Costa, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Enjuanes, Anna; Estivill, Xavier; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Gelpí, Josep L; González, Blanca; González, Santiago; González, Marcos; Gut, Marta; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; López-Guerra, Mónica; Martín-García, David; Navarro, Alba; Nicolás, Pilar; Orozco, Modesto; Payer, Ángel R; Pinyol, Magda; Pisano, David G; Puente, Diana A; Queirós, Ana C; Quesada, Víctor; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Royo, Cristina; Royo, Romina; Rozman, María; Russiñol, Nuria; Salaverría, Itziar; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Tamborero, David; Terol, María J; Valencia, Alfonso; López-Bigas, Nuria; Torrents, David; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2015-10-22

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a frequent disease in which the genetic alterations determining the clinicobiological behaviour are not fully understood. Here we describe a comprehensive evaluation of the genomic landscape of 452 CLL cases and 54 patients with monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, a precursor disorder. We extend the number of CLL driver alterations, including changes in ZNF292, ZMYM3, ARID1A and PTPN11. We also identify novel recurrent mutations in non-coding regions, including the 3' region of NOTCH1, which cause aberrant splicing events, increase NOTCH1 activity and result in a more aggressive disease. In addition, mutations in an enhancer located on chromosome 9p13 result in reduced expression of the B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX5. The accumulative number of driver alterations (0 to ≥4) discriminated between patients with differences in clinical behaviour. This study provides an integrated portrait of the CLL genomic landscape, identifies new recurrent driver mutations of the disease, and suggests clinical interventions that may improve the management of this neoplasia.

  9. Hairy cell leukaemia and occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J; Conso, F; Limasset, J C; Mandereau, L; Roche, P; Flandrin, G; Hémon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to benzene in HCL. METHODS: A population of 226 male cases of HCL and 425 matched controls were included in the study. Benzene exposure was evaluated by expert review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by case-control interviews. RESULTS: No association was found between HCL and employment in a job exposed to benzene (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6-1.3)). The sample included 125 subjects, 34 cases (15%), and 91 controls (21%) who had been exposed to benzene, as individually assessed by the experts, for at least one hour a month during one of their jobs. Benzene exposure was not associated with a risk of HCL (OR 0.8 (0.5-1.2)). No trend towards an increase in OR was detected for increasing exposures, the percentage of work time involving exposure to > 1 ppm, or the duration of exposure. No findings suggested a particular risk period, when the OR associated with the time since first or last exposure, or since the end of exposure, were examined. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, with the low exposures prevalent in the sample, the study did not show any association between benzene exposure and HCL. PMID:8983464

  10. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction.

  11. The role of viruses in the origin of leukaemia in animals and man

    PubMed Central

    Zilber, L. A.

    1962-01-01

    In the course of the last decade intensive research has been conducted in many laboratories on the role of viruses in the etiology of various forms of animal and human leukaemia. This research has led to the accumulation of substantial experimental material, several reviews of which have been published. This article discusses the more important data obtained from study of the etiology of leukaemia in animals and man and attempts to evaluate them and to outline the pathways of study of problems still unsolved. It also contains information on the induction of leukaemia and tumours by means of nucleic acids isolated from neoplastic tissues, and some general problems of the pathogenesis of cancer caused by viruses are discussed in this connexion. PMID:20604114

  12. Progressive trichodysplasia spinulosa in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in remission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce S-S; Frederiksen, Peter; Kossard, Steven

    2008-02-01

    A 70-year old Caucasian man with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developed trichodysplasia spinulosa 2 months after ceasing chemotherapy. Histological features characteristic to this condition include dilated and enlarged hair follicles, hyperplastic hair bulbs, hyperplasia of inner root sheath cells with numerous large, eosinophilic, trichohyaline granules, and hypercornification. Although he was in remission for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lesions were slowly progressive 15 months after cessation of chemotherapy. We also describe a painless pull-test where spicules can be easily plucked and assessed microscopically for inner root sheath keratinization, or observed with surface microscopy in a clinic setting.

  13. HCMOGT-1 is a novel fusion partner to PDGFRB in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia with t(5;17)(q33;p11.2).

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Acquila, Maura; Rosanda, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Dufour, Carlo; Locatelli, Franco; Maserati, Emanuela; Pasquali, Francesco; Panarello, Claudio

    2004-04-15

    PDGFRB, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor for platelet-derived growth factor, is constitutively activated by gene fusion with different partners in myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorders with peculiar clinical characteristics. Six alternative partner genes have been described thus far. In this study, we report the molecular cloning of a novel translocation t(5;17)(q33;p11.2) in a case of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The novel partner gene was identified as HCMOGT-1 using 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends; fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses confirmed that the translocation resulted in PDGFRB/HCMOGT-1 fusion. We show that the breakpoint of PDGFRB occurred at the same site of all previously reported PDGFRB translocations.

  14. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  15. Targeting survival pathways in chronic myeloid leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A; Latif, A L; Holyoake, T L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the presence of a fusion oncogene BCR-ABL, which encodes a protein with constitutive TK activity. The implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) marked a major advance in CML therapy; however, there are problems with current treatment. For example, relapse occurs when these drugs are discontinued in the majority of patients who have achieved a complete molecular response on TKI and these agents are less effective in patients with mutations in the BCR-ABL kinase domain. Importantly, TKI can effectively target proliferating mature cells, but do not eradicate quiescent leukaemic stem cells (LSCs), therefore allowing disease persistence despite treatment. It is essential that alternative strategies are used to target the LSC population. BCR-ABL activation is responsible for the modulation of different signalling pathways, which allows the LSC fraction to evade cell death. Several pathways have been shown to be modulated by BCR-ABL, including PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK-STAT and autophagy signalling pathways. Targeting components of these survival pathways, alone or in combination with TKI, therefore represents an attractive potential therapeutic approach for targeting the LSC. However, many pathways are also active in normal stem cells. Therefore, potential targets must be validated to effectively eradicate CML stem ce