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Sample records for acute neurological injury

  1. Treatment of Hyponatremia in Patients with Acute Neurological Injury.

    PubMed

    Human, Theresa; Cook, Aaron M; Anger, Brian; Bledsoe, Kathleen; Castle, Amber; Deen, David; Gibbs, Haley; Lesch, Christine; Liang, Norah; McAllen, Karen; Morrison, Christopher; Parker, Dennis; Rowe, A Shaun; Rhoney, Denise; Sangha, Kiranpal; Santayana, Elena; Taylor, Scott; Tesoro, Eljim; Brophy, Gretchen

    2017-01-04

    Little data exist regarding the practice of sodium management in acute neurologically injured patients. This study describes the practice variations, thresholds for treatment, and effectiveness of treatment in this population. This retrospective, multicenter, observational study identified 400 ICU patients, from 17 centers, admitted for ≥48 h with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), traumatic brain injury (TBI), intraparenchymal hemorrhage, or intracranial tumors between January 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012. Data collection included demographics, APACHE II, Glascow Coma Score (GCS), serum sodium (Na+), fluid rate and tonicity, use of sodium-altering therapies, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, and modified Rankin score upon discharge. Data were collected for the first 21 days of ICU admission or ICU discharge, whichever came first. Sodium trigger for treatment defined as the Na+ value prior to treatment with response defined as an increase of ≥4 mEq/L at 24 h. Sodium-altering therapy was initiated in 34 % (137/400) of patients with 23 % (32/137) having Na(+) >135 mEq/L at time of treatment initiation. The most common indications for treatment were declining serum Na(+) (68/116, 59 %) and cerebral edema with mental status changes (21/116, 18 %). Median Na(+) treatment trigger was 133 mEq/L (IQR 129-139) with no difference between diagnoses. Incidence and treatment of hyponatremia was more common in SAH and TBI [SAH (49/106, 46 %), TBI (39/97, 40 %), ICH (27/102, 26 %), tumor (22/95, 23 %); p = 0.001]. The most common initial treatment was hypertonic saline (85/137, 62 %), followed by oral sodium chloride tablets (42/137, 31 %) and fluid restriction (15/137, 11 %). Among treated patients, 60 % had a response at 24 h. Treated patients had lower admission GCS (12 vs. 14, p = 0.02) and higher APACHE II scores (12 vs. 10, p = 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome when comparing treated and untreated

  2. Can anatomic level of injury on MRI predict neurological level in acute cervical spinal cord injury?

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Parker, Laurence; Harrop, James S; Vaccaro, Alex R; Marino, Ralph J; Flanders, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    Determining neurological level of injury (NLI) is of paramount importance after spinal cord injury (SCI), although its accuracy depends upon the reliability of the neurologic examination. Here, we determine if anatomic location of cervical cord injury by MRI (MRI level of injury) can predict NLI in the acute traumatic setting. A retrospective review was undertaken of SCI patients with macroscopic evidence of cervical cord injury from non-penetrating trauma, all of whom had undergone cervical spine MRI and complete neurologic testing. The recorded MRI information included cord lesion type (intra-axial edema, hemorrhage) and MRI locations of upper and lower lesion boundary, as well as lesion epicenter. Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess the relationship between MRI levels of injury and NLI. All five MRI parameters, namely (1) upper and (2) lower boundaries of cord edema, (3) lesion epicenter, and (4) upper and (5) lower boundaries of cord hemorrhage demonstrated statistically significant, positive correlations with NLI. The MRI locations of upper and lower boundary of hemorrhage were found to have the strongest correlation with NLI (r = 0.72 and 0.61, respectively; p < 0.01). A weaker (low to moderate) correlation existed between lower boundary of cord edema and NLI (r = 0.30; p < 0.01). Upper boundary of cord hemorrhage on MRI demonstrated the best agreement with NLI (mean difference 0.03 ± 0.73; p < 0.01) by Bland-Altman analysis. MRI level of injury has the potential to serve as a surrogate for NLI in instances where the neurologic examination is either unavailable or unreliable.

  3. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces apoptosis and protects against neurological injury after acute hemorrhagic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Solá, Susana; Nan, Zhenhong; Castro, Rui E.; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Low, Walter C.; Steer, Clifford J.

    2003-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an endogenous bile acid, modulates cell death by interrupting classic pathways of apoptosis. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating acute neurological disorder, without effective treatment, in which a significant loss of neuronal cells is thought to occur by apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated whether TUDCA can reduce brain injury and improve neurological function after ICH in rats. Administration of TUDCA before or up to 6 h after stereotaxic collagenase injection into the striatum reduced lesion volumes at 2 days by as much as 50%. Apoptosis was ≈50% decreased in the area immediately surrounding the hematoma and was associated with a similar inhibition of caspase activity. These changes were also associated with improved neurobehavioral deficits as assessed by rotational asymmetry, limb placement, and stepping ability. Furthermore, TUDCA treatment modulated expression of certain Bcl-2 family members, as well as NF-κB activity. In addition to its protective action at the mitochondrial membrane, TUDCA also activated the Akt-1/protein kinase Bα survival pathway and induced Bad phosphorylation at Ser-136. In conclusion, reduction of brain injury underlies the wide-range neuroprotective effects of TUDCA after ICH. Thus, given its clinical safety, TUDCA may provide a potentially useful treatment in patients with hemorrhagic stroke and perhaps other acute brain injuries associated with cell death by apoptosis. PMID:12721362

  4. Post-Injury Administration of Tert-butylhydroquinone Attenuates Acute Neurological Injury After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Alleyne, Cargill H

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe form of stroke with substantial public health impact. Notably, there is no effective treatment for ICH. Given the role of transcription factor Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) in antioxidant signaling, herein, we tested the efficacy of tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), a selective inducer of Nrf2 in a preclinical model of ICH. Male CD1 mice were subjected to experimental intracerebral hemorrhage and administered intraperitoneally with TBHQ. The administration of TBHQ enhanced the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2 in the brain and reduced oxidative brain damage in comparison to vehicle-treated ICH. In addition, TBHQ treatment reduced microglial activation with concomitant reduction in the release of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1 β). Furthermore, TBHQ treatment attenuated neurodegeneration and improved neurological outcomes after ICH. Altogether, the data demonstrate the efficacy of post-injury administration of TBHQ in attenuating acute neurological injury after ICH.

  5. Meglumine cyclic adenylate improves neurological function following acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jingwu; Xie, Jingming; Lin, Daqiang; Lu, Ning; Guo, Limin; Li, Weiqiang; Pu, Bo; Yang, Yang; Yang, Zhenlong; Zhang, Ying; Song, Yueming

    2014-09-01

    Elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels facilitates recovery following spinal injury by suppressing secondary pathology and promoting axonal regeneration. However, this treatment strategy is limited by lack of effective and tolerable clinical agents. The present study examined the effects of meglumine cyclic adenylate (MCA) on neurological recovery, cAMP concentration, adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) activity and phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) activity during early stage acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. A total of 48 Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups A, B or C, each consisting of 16 animals. SCI was induced by Allen's method using a 7 g x 3 cm extradural weight‑drop impact on spinal cord segment T11. A total of 30 min following SCI, group A received a single 30 mg/kg‑bw i.p. dose of methylprednisolone, group B received 2 mg/kg‑bw i.p. MCA daily for seven days and group C were administered an equal volume of normal saline. Seven days following SCI, the spinal cord samples from eight rats per group were obtained to measure the cAMP concentration, and the activities of AC3 and PDE4D. The remaining eight rats per group were used for behavioral assessments using the inclined plane stability test and Gale scale for up to six weeks post‑SCI. The drug‑treated groups A and B had higher cAMP concentrations and AC3 activities but lower PDE4D activities at the lesion sites, as well as superior behavioral scores post‑SCI compared with the vehicle‑treated group C (P<0.05). Furthermore, cAMP was higher in group B than in group A (P<0.05). It was concluded that MCA may serve as an effective SCI treatment by activating AC3 and suppressing PDE4D.

  6. Neurological Effects of Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Ramona R.; Fertig, Stephanie J.; Desrocher, Rebecca E.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Pancrazio, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, thousands of soldiers and an even greater number of civilians have suffered traumatic injuries due to blast exposure, largely attributed to improvised explosive devices in terrorist and insurgent activities. The use of body armor is allowing soldiers to survive blasts that would otherwise be fatal due to systemic damage. Emerging evidence suggests that exposure to a blast can produce neurological consequences in the brain, but much remains unknown. To elucidate the current scientific basis for understanding blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), the NIH convened a workshop in April, 2008. A multidisciplinary group of neuroscientists, engineers, and clinicians were invited to share insights on bTBI, specifically pertaining to: physics of blast explosions, acute clinical observations and treatments, preclinical and computational models, and lessons from the international community on civilian exposures. This report provides an overview of the state of scientific knowledge of bTBI, drawing from the published literature, as well as presentations, discussions, and recommendations from the workshop. One of the major recommendations from the workshop was the need to characterize the effects of blast exposure on clinical neuropathology. Clearer understanding of the human neuropathology would enable validation of preclinical and computational models, which are attempting to simulate blast wave interactions with the central nervous system. Furthermore, the civilian experience with bTBI suggests that polytrauma models incorporating both brain and lung injuries may be more relevant to the study of civilian countermeasures than considering models with a neurological focus alone. PMID:20453776

  7. [Acute vertigo of neurological origin].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Højgaard, Joan L Sunnleyg; Kondziella, Daniel

    2013-11-04

    Acute vertigo of neurological origin may be caused by haemorrhages and tumours in the posterior fossa and, most frequently, by ischaemic infarction in the vertebrobasilar circulation. Urgent diagnosis is necessary to avoid further ischaemic episodes, herniation due to cerebellar oedema and/or fatal brainstem infarction. The history should focus on accompanying neurological symptoms. However, vertigo with cerebellar lesions may be monosymptomatic and then bedside evaluation of oculomotor function is the key to correct diagnosis. This paper discusses the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical evaluation of acute vertigo of neurological origin.

  8. Neurological outcome after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Biener, Ingeborg; Czaplik, Michael; Nolte, Kay; Dembinski, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2011-12-15

    We examined the influences of acute lung injury and hypoxia on neurological outcome. Functional performance was assessed using a neurocognitive test and a neurologic deficit score (NDS) five days before. On experimental day, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to hypoxia only (HO group, n=5) or to acute lung injury (ALI group, n=5). Hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, systemic cytokines and further physiologic variables were obtained at baseline, at the time of ALI, 2, 4 and 8h thereafter. Subsequently, injured lungs were recruited and animals weaned from the ventilator. Neurocognitive testing was re-examined for five days. Then, brains were harvested for neurohistopathology. After the experiment, neurocognitive performance was significantly worsened and the NDS increased in the ALI group. Histopathology revealed no significant differences. Oxygenation was comparable between groups although significantly higher inspiratory pressures occured after ALI. Cytokines showed a trend towards higher levels after ALI. Neurocognitive compromise after ALI seems due to a more pronounced inflammatory response and complex mechanical ventilation.

  9. The use of an electronic von Frey device for evaluation of sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and those with acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, S A; Hettlich, B F; Waln, A

    2013-08-01

    The utility and inter-session repeatability of sensory threshold measurements using an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer (VFA) were assessed in a group of six neurologically normal dogs. Sensory threshold values obtained in neurologically normal dogs were compared to those of dogs with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by intervertebral disc extrusion (n=6) and to a group of neurologically normal dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=6). Sensory threshold values in neurologically normal dogs were 155.8 ± 37.7 g and 154.7 ± 67.2 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively. The difference in mean sensory threshold values obtained for the group when two distinct testing sessions were compared was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Mean sensory threshold values for the group with SCI were significantly higher than those for neurologically normal dogs at 351.1 ± 116.5 g and 420.3 ± 157.7 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively (P=0.01). A comparison of sensory threshold values for the group with CCLR and neurologically normal dogs was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The modified dorsal technique for VFA described here represents a reliable method to assess sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and in those with SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  11. The neurology of acutely failing respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-04-01

    Forces involved in breathing-which effectively pull in air-are the diaphragmatic, intercostal, spine, and neck muscles. Equally important is the bulbar musculature maintaining the architecture of a patent airway conduit and abdominal wall and internal intercostal muscles providing cough. Acute injury along a neural trajectory from brainstem to muscle will impair the coordinated interaction between these muscle groups. Acutely failing respiratory mechanics can be caused by central and peripheral lesions. In central lesions, the key lesion is in the nucleus ambiguus innervating the dilator muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, but abnormal respiratory mechanics rarely coincide with abnormalities of the respiratory pattern generator. In peripheral lesions, diaphragmatic weakness is a main element, but in many neuromuscular disorders mechanical upper airway obstruction from oropharyngeal weakness contributes equally to an increased respiratory load. The neurology of breathing involves changes in respiratory drive, rhythm, mechanics, and dynamics. This review focuses on the fundamentals of abnormal respiratory mechanics in acute neurologic conditions, bedside judgment, interpretation of additional laboratory tests, and initial stabilization, with practical solutions provided. Many of these respiratory signs are relevant to neurologists, who in acute situations may see these patients first. Ann Neurol 2017;81:485-494. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  12. Neurologic injury because of trauma after type II odontoid nonunion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Dibra, Florian; Anderson, D Greg; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Harrop, James S; Albert, Todd J; Radcliff, Kristen E

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of Type II odontoid fractures remains controversial, whereas nonoperative treatment is well accepted for isolated Type III odontoid fractures. Little is known about long-term sequelae of nonoperative management or risk of recurrent injury after nonsurgical treatment. We hypothesize that a substantial proportion of odontoid fractures assumed to be acute are actually chronic injuries and have a high rate of late displacement resulting in neurologic injury. To identify patients presenting with previously unrecognized odontoid fracture nonunions and to document the incidence of new neurologic injury after secondary trauma in this population. Retrospective case series. One hundred thirty-three patients with Type II odontoid fractures presenting to a Level I trauma center. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, American Spinal Injury Association Motor Score (AMS), and neurologic examination. All patients presenting after traumatic injury to a Level I trauma center from May 2005 to May 2010 with a Type II odontoid fracture on CT scan were included. Patients aged less than 18 years and those with pathologic fractures were excluded. Fractures were classified as chronic or acute based on CT evidence of chronic injury/nonunion including fracture resorption, sclerosis, and cyst formation. Magnetic resonance imaging was then examined for evidence of fracture acuity (increased signal in C2 on T2 images). Patients without evidence of acute fracture on MRI were considered to have chronic injuries. Computed tomography and MRI scans were interpreted independently by two reviewers. Chart review was performed to document demographics, AMS, and new-onset neurologic deficit associated with secondary injury. One hundred thirty-three patients presented with Type II odontoid fractures and no known history of cervical fracture with an average age of 79 years. Based on CT criteria, 31/133 (23%) fractures were chronic injuries. Nine additional fractures

  13. Neurologic and musculoskeletal complications of burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffery C; Qu, Huaguang David

    2011-05-01

    As more people survive burn injuries, there is an increasing focus on managing the complications of burn injuries with the ultimate goal of improving survivors' quality of life. Musculoskeletal and neurologic sequelae are significant complications of burn injury. Electrical injury is a subcategory of burns with multiple musculoskeletal and neurologic complications. Knowledge of these complications helps clinicians provide optimal long-term care for burn survivors and enables survivors to attain maximal recovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  15. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  16. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Rachel; Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Lumba-Brown, Angela; Miller, Chad M

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support topic due to its frequency, the impact of early intervention on outcomes for patients with TBI, and the need for an organized approach to the care of such patients within the emergency setting. This protocol was designed to enumerate the practice steps that should be considered within the first critical hour of neurological injury.

  17. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  18. Immediate neurological recovery following perispinal etanercept years after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tobinick, Edward; Rodriguez-Romanacce, Helen; Levine, Arthur; Ignatowski, Tracey A; Spengler, Robert N

    2014-05-01

    Positron emission tomographic brain imaging and pathological examination have revealed that a chronic, intracerebral neuroinflammatory response lasting for years after a single brain injury may occur in humans. Evidence suggests the immune signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is centrally involved in this pathology through its modulation of microglial activation, role in synaptic dysfunction, and induction of depressive symptoms and neuropathic pain. Etanercept is a recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein and potent TNF inhibitor that has been found to reduce microglial activation and neuropathic pain in multiple experimental models. We report that a single dose of perispinal etanercept produced an immediate, profound, and sustained improvement in expressive aphasia, speech apraxia, and left hemiparesis in a patient with chronic, intractable, debilitating neurological dysfunction present for more than 3 years after acute brain injury. These results indicate that acute brain injury-induced pathologic levels of TNF may provide a therapeutic target that can be addressed years after injury. Perispinal administration of etanercept is capable of producing immediate relief from brain injury-mediated neurological dysfunction.

  19. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  20. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  1. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Hannah J; Battey, Thomas Wk; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce Cv; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Sheth, Kevin N; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-10-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema, and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (ΔNIHSS ≥ 4), early neurological recovery (ΔNIHSS ≤ -4) or early neurological stability (ΔNIHSS between -3 and 3). The association between these categories and volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hemorrhage, and 3-month modified Rankin Scale score were evaluated. Results Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were less likely to be independent (modified Rankin Scale = 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with early neurological recovery ( P < 0.001). Patients with early neurological deterioration or early neurological stability were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with early neurological recovery ( P = 0.03; P < 0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of parenchymal hemorrhage, and reperfusion ( P < 0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign and is associated with tissue injury, including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors.

  2. Improving hand hygiene after neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Duke, Lynsay; Gibbison, Lucy; McMahon, Victoria

    Caring for hands tightened by spasticity after stroke, brain injury or other neurological conditions can be challenging for care staff. Opening and cleaning the hand, managing pressure areas, cutting nails and reducing pain becomes more complex if muscles are tight and short. Hand hygiene is key for staff but literature on patients' hand and nail care is lacking, so specialist education and care planning may be needed to help staff ensure these activities are done well. This article outlines the importance of maintaining patients' hand hygiene, explores the barriers to providing effective care and discusses how they might be overcome.

  3. The neurologic manifestations of the acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Herkes, Geoffrey K

    2011-09-01

    The porphyrias are diseases characterised by accumulation of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors owing to enzymatic deficiencies of the haem synthetic pathway. In the acute hepatic porphyrias accumulation of porphyrin precursors, in particular delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), cause dysfunction of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. This leads to the characteristic clinical findings of abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. The exact pathogenic mechanism is not clear but evidence to date suggests both direct toxic effects of ALA and intracellular metabolic derangement contribute to the neurologic disorders. This review explores the mechanisms of neural dysfunction in the acute porphyrias and the resultant clinical features of an acute attack. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Acute Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke; Stahl, Rolf

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important part of renal diseases and a common clinical problem. AKI is an acute decline in renal function. Due to a lack of therapeutic options, prevention and optimal management of patients with AKI are the most important strategies. Although seldom the sole cause of patients' death, AKI is associated with a significant increase in mortality. Our objective is to draw the attention towards the prevention of AKI of non-renal causes.

  5. Acute injuries in orienteerers.

    PubMed

    Kujala, U M; Nylund, T; Taimela, S

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the type and severeity of acute injuries occurring in Finnish orienteerers in 1987 to 1991. The study is based on the orienteering license insurance records accounting for 2189 orienteering injuries during 69268 person-years of exposure in active orienteerers. Of these orienteerers, 73.0% were male; 73.5% (N = 1608) of all injuries occurred in males, so the injury rate was similar in males and females. The rate was highest in orienteerers 20 to 24 years of age and lowest in children. Injuries occurred most commonly during May to September (78.9% or all injuries), the months which include the orienteering competition season, and were more common during competitions (59.8%) than during training. A high number of the injuries occurred during weekends (58.9% of injuries) including 68.1% of all competition injuries and 44.9% of all training injuries. The lower limbs were involved in 1611 (73.6%) of cases, the ankle (28.7%) and the knee (23.2%) being the two most common injury locations. Sprains, strains and contusions were the most common injuries. Wounds were proportionally more common in males than in females while ankle sprains were more common in females. Fractures, seven open and 94 closed, accounted for 4.6% of injuries; they were most common in the hand/wrist/forearm (N = 44) and ankle (N = 16), and were more frequent during competition (62.3%) than during training. The most important areas for preventive measures seem to be the ankle and the knee.

  6. The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI): I. Construct validity.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; McCauley, Stephen R; Kelly, Tara M; Weyand, Annie M; Pedroza, Claudia; Levin, Harvey S; Clifton, Guy L; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Shah, Monika V; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure adapted from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and is intended to capture essential neurological deficits impacting individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) (see Wilde et al., 2010 ). In the present study we evaluate the measure's construct validity via comparison with a quantified neurological examination performed by a neurologist. Spearman rank-order correlation between the NOS-TBI and the neurological examination was rho = 0.76, p < 0.0001, suggesting a high degree of correspondence (construct validity) between these two measures of neurological function. Additionally, items from the NOS-TBI compared favorably to the neurological examination items, with correlations ranging from 0.60 to 0.99 (all p < 0.0001). On formal neurological examination, some degree of neurological impairment was observed in every participant in this cohort of individuals undergoing rehabilitation for TBI, and on the NOS-TBI neurological impairment was evident in all but one participant. This study documents the presence of measurable neurological sequelae in a sample of patients with TBI in a post-acute rehabilitation setting, underscoring the need for formal measurement of the frequency and severity of neurological deficits in this population. The results suggest that the NOS-TBI is a valid measure of neurological functioning in patients with TBI.

  7. Multivariate Analysis of MRI Biomarkers for Predicting Neurologic Impairment in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, J; Mabray, M C; Whetstone, W D; Dhall, S S; Pan, J Z; Upadhyayula, P; Manley, G T; Bresnahan, J C; Beattie, M S; Ferguson, A R; Talbott, J F

    2017-03-01

    Acute markers of spinal cord injury are essential for both diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between early MR imaging biomarkers after acute cervical spinal cord injury and to evaluate their predictive validity of neurologic impairment. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 95 patients with acute spinal cord injury and preoperative MR imaging within 24 hours of injury. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale was used as our primary outcome measure to define neurologic impairment. We assessed several MR imaging features of injury, including axial grade (Brain and Spinal Injury Center score), sagittal grade, length of injury, maximum canal compromise, and maximum spinal cord compression. Data-driven nonlinear principal component analysis was followed by correlation and optimal-scaled multiple variable regression to predict neurologic impairment. Nonlinear principal component analysis identified 2 clusters of MR imaging variables related to 1) measures of intrinsic cord signal abnormality and 2) measures of extrinsic cord compression. Neurologic impairment was best accounted for by MR imaging measures of intrinsic cord signal abnormality, with axial grade representing the most accurate predictor of short-term impairment, even when correcting for surgical decompression and degree of cord compression. This study demonstrates the utility of applying nonlinear principal component analysis for defining the relationship between MR imaging biomarkers in a complex clinical syndrome of cervical spinal cord injury. Of the assessed imaging biomarkers, the intrinsic measures of cord signal abnormality were most predictive of neurologic impairment in acute spinal cord injury, highlighting the value of axial T2 MR imaging. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. International Survey of Critically Ill Children With Acute Neurologic Insults: The Prevalence of Acute Critical Neurological Disease in Children: A Global Epidemiological Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Fink, Ericka L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Tasker, Robert C; Beca, John; Bell, Michael J; Clark, Robert S B; Hutchison, Jamie; Vavilala, Monica S; Fabio, Anthony; Angus, Derek C; Watson, R Scott

    2017-04-01

    The international scope of critical neurologic insults in children is unknown. Our objective was to assess the prevalence and outcomes of children admitted to PICUs with acute neurologic insults. Prospective study. Multicenter (n = 107 PICUs) and multinational (23 countries, 79% in North America and Europe). Children 7 days to 17 years old admitted to the ICU with new traumatic brain injury, stroke, cardiac arrest, CNS infection or inflammation, status epilepticus, spinal cord injury, hydrocephalus, or brain mass. None. We evaluated the prevalence and outcomes of children with predetermined acute neurologic insults. Child and center characteristics were recorded. Unfavorable outcome was defined as change in pre-post insult Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score greater than or equal to 2 or death at hospital discharge or 3 months, whichever came first. Screening data yielded overall prevalence of 16.2%. Of 924 children with acute neurologic insults, cardiac arrest (23%) and traumatic brain injury (19%) were the most common. All-cause mortality at hospital discharge was 12%. Cardiac arrest subjects had highest mortality (24%), and traumatic brain injury subjects had the most unfavorable outcomes (49%). The most common neurologic insult was infection/inflammation in South America, Asia, and the single African site but cardiac arrest in the remaining regions. Neurologic insults are a significant pediatric international health issue. They are frequent and contribute substantial morbidity and mortality. These data suggest a need for an increased focus on acute critical neurologic diseases in infants and children including additional research, enhanced availability of clinical resources, and the development of new therapies.

  9. Boxing injuries: neurologic, radiologic, and neuropsychologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ross, R J; Casson, I R; Siegel, O; Cole, M

    1987-01-01

    Boxing is an endeavor that may have to be re-evaluated in the coming years as to whether it should be designated as a sport. It is the only "sport" in which victory is determined by the amount of physical damage done to the opponent. We have presented the largest number of professional and amateur boxers (58) evaluated by various modern diagnostic modalities and have unequivocally demonstrated the deleterious effects of boxing upon the brain. There have been few, if any, meaningful actions taken by the promoters of boxing to correct the conditions under which boxers are subjected to physical abuse. Recommendations regarding the creation of a National Board of Boxing to supervise this "sport" have not been heeded. Suggested safeguards for the boxer, including mandatory medical and boxing history records (passports), use of headgear and approved safe boxing gloves, avoiding blows to the head, improved boxing ring floors, mandatory neurologic examinations, and more competent physicians at ringsides making medical decisions, have essentially not been implemented. The suggestions that mandatory computed tomograms at various stages in a boxer's career be used to determine possible changes of atrophy have not been followed, even when the CT scans have been made available at no cost to the boxers. The effective use of neuropsychologic evaluation, even when offered at no cost, has also been denied. The established medical injuries due to boxing and the lack of any sustained and significant efforts on the part of organized boxing create an atmosphere that is conducive to following the call for the consideration of a ban of boxing.

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Traumatic Spine Injury.

    PubMed

    Stein, Deborah M; Knight, William A

    2017-09-14

    Traumatic spine injuries (TSIs) carry significantly high risks of morbidity, mortality, and exorbitant health care costs from associated medical needs following injury. For these reasons, TSI was chosen as an ENLS protocol. This article offers a comprehensive review on the management of spinal column injuries using the best available evidence. Though the review focuses primarily on cervical spinal column injuries, thoracolumbar injuries are briefly discussed as well. The initial emergency department (ED) clinical evaluation of possible spinal fractures and cord injuries, along with the definitive early management of confirmed injuries, are also covered.

  11. Neurological injuries and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: the challenge of the new ECMO era.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Gennaro; Lo Re, Vincenzina; Arcadipane, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-saving mechanical respiratory and/or circulatory support for potentially reversible severe heart or respiratory injury untreatable with conventional therapies. Thanks to the technical and management improvements the use of ECMO has increased dramatically in the last few years. Data in the literature show a progressive increase in the overall outcome. Considering the improving survival rate of patients on ECMO, and the catastrophic effect of neurological injuries in such patients, the topic of neurological damage during the ICU stay in ECMO is gaining importance. We present a case series of six neurological injuries that occurred in 1 year during the ECMO run or after the ECMO weaning. In each case the neurological complication had a dramatic effect: ranging from brain death to prolonged ICU stay and long term disability. This case series has an informative impact for the multidisciplinary teams treating ECMO patients because of its heterogeneity in pathogenesis and clinical manifestation: cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke due to cerebral fat embolism, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to H1N1 Influenza. In our ECMO hub we started strict neurological monitoring involving intensivists, a neurologist and our radiology service, but neurological complications are still an insidious diagnosis and treatment. Considering several possible neurological injuries may help reduce delay in diagnosis and speed rehabilitation.

  12. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  13. Neurologic signs and symptoms frequently manifest in acute HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Joanna; Fletcher, James L K; Valcour, Victor; Kroon, Eugène; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Intasan, Jintana; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Narvid, Jared; Pothisri, Mantana; Allen, Isabel; Krebs, Shelly J; Slike, Bonnie; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Spudich, Serena

    2016-07-12

    To determine the incidence, timing, and severity of neurologic findings in acute HIV infection (pre-antibody seroconversion), as well as persistence with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Participants identified with acute HIV were enrolled, underwent structured neurologic evaluations, immediately initiated cART, and were followed with neurologic evaluations at 4 and 12 weeks. Concurrent brain MRIs and both viral and inflammatory markers in plasma and CSF were obtained. Median estimated HIV infection duration was 19 days (range 3-56) at study entry for the 139 participants evaluated. Seventy-three participants (53%) experienced one or more neurologic findings in the 12 weeks after diagnosis, with one developing a fulminant neurologic manifestation (Guillain-Barré syndrome). A total of 245 neurologic findings were noted, reflecting cognitive symptoms (33%), motor findings (34%), and neuropathy (11%). Nearly half of the neurologic findings (n = 121, 49%) occurred at diagnosis, prior to cART initiation, and most of these (n = 110, 90%) remitted concurrent with 1 month on treatment. Only 9% of neurologic findings (n = 22) persisted at 24 weeks on cART. Nearly all neurologic findings (n = 236, 96%) were categorized as mild in severity. No structural neuroimaging abnormalities were observed. Participants with neurologic findings had a higher mean plasma log10 HIV RNA at diagnosis compared to those without neurologic findings (5.9 vs 5.4; p = 0.006). Acute HIV infection is commonly associated with mild neurologic findings that largely remit while on treatment, and may be mediated by direct viral factors. Severe neurologic manifestations are infrequent in treated acute HIV. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  15. Neurologic signs and symptoms frequently manifest in acute HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, James L.K.; Valcour, Victor; Kroon, Eugène; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Intasan, Jintana; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Narvid, Jared; Pothisri, Mantana; Allen, Isabel; Krebs, Shelly J.; Slike, Bonnie; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Puttamaswin, Suwanna; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Spudich, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence, timing, and severity of neurologic findings in acute HIV infection (pre–antibody seroconversion), as well as persistence with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Methods: Participants identified with acute HIV were enrolled, underwent structured neurologic evaluations, immediately initiated cART, and were followed with neurologic evaluations at 4 and 12 weeks. Concurrent brain MRIs and both viral and inflammatory markers in plasma and CSF were obtained. Results: Median estimated HIV infection duration was 19 days (range 3–56) at study entry for the 139 participants evaluated. Seventy-three participants (53%) experienced one or more neurologic findings in the 12 weeks after diagnosis, with one developing a fulminant neurologic manifestation (Guillain-Barré syndrome). A total of 245 neurologic findings were noted, reflecting cognitive symptoms (33%), motor findings (34%), and neuropathy (11%). Nearly half of the neurologic findings (n = 121, 49%) occurred at diagnosis, prior to cART initiation, and most of these (n = 110, 90%) remitted concurrent with 1 month on treatment. Only 9% of neurologic findings (n = 22) persisted at 24 weeks on cART. Nearly all neurologic findings (n = 236, 96%) were categorized as mild in severity. No structural neuroimaging abnormalities were observed. Participants with neurologic findings had a higher mean plasma log10 HIV RNA at diagnosis compared to those without neurologic findings (5.9 vs 5.4; p = 0.006). Conclusions: Acute HIV infection is commonly associated with mild neurologic findings that largely remit while on treatment, and may be mediated by direct viral factors. Severe neurologic manifestations are infrequent in treated acute HIV. PMID:27287217

  16. Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Anna; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a global public health concern associated with high morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. Other than dialysis, no therapeutic interventions reliably improve survival, limit injury, or speed recovery. Despite recognized shortcomings of in vivo animal models, the underlying pathophysiology of AKI and its consequence, chronic kidney disease (CKD), is rich with biological targets. We review recent findings relating to the renal vasculature and cellular stress responses, primarily the intersection of the unfolded protein response, mitochondrial dysfunction, autophagy, and the innate immune response. Maladaptive repair mechanisms that persist following the acute phase promote inflammation and fibrosis in the chronic phase. Here macrophages, growth-arrested tubular epithelial cells, the endothelium, and surrounding pericytes are key players in the progression to chronic disease. Better understanding of these complex interacting pathophysiological mechanisms, their relative importance in humans, and the utility of biomarkers will lead to therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat AKI or impede progression to CKD or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PMID:26768243

  17. Acute hand injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Yoseph A; Awan, Hisham M

    2017-03-22

    Hand and wrist injuries in athletes are common, representing between 3 and 25% of all sports injuries. As many as a quarter of all sports injuries involve the hand or wrist. We review the recent literature regarding acute hand injuries in athletes based on the structures involved - bone, muscle/tendon, ligament, and neurovascular - including diagnosis and pathophysiology of these injuries, focusing on athlete-specific facets of treatment, and when available, opinions on return to play.

  18. Neurologic Injuries in the Athlete's Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Duralde, Xavier A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To review the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and prognosis of various nerve injuries about the shoulder in the athletic population. Included are injuries to the axillary, suprascapular, musculocutaneous, long thoracic, and spinal accessory nerves. Data Sources: This article represents a review of the literature regarding incidence, presentation, and results of treatment of these various nerve injuries. The clinically pertinent anatomy is also presented to better relate mechanism of injury to the occurrence of nerve injury. I searched MEDLINE from 1966 through 1999 and the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery from 1992 through 1999 for the key words “nerve” and “shoulder.” Data Synthesis: A historical review of treatment results is presented as well as a review of treatment options and the results of studies using modern techniques in the management of nerve injuries. Conclusions/Recommendations: Nerve injuries about the shoulder present as distinct clinical syndromes, although signs and symptoms can be subtle. The athletic trainer and team physician must be able to recognize the presentation of these injuries so that adequate evaluation and prompt treatment can be instituted to maximize the athlete's chance for early return to sport. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4. PMID:16558645

  19. Early neurological stability predicts adverse outcome after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Hannah J.; Battey, Thomas W.K.; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Kimberly, W. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Background Deterioration in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) in the early days after stroke is associated with progressive infarction, brain edema and/or hemorrhage, leading to worse outcome. Aims We sought to determine whether a stable NIHSS score represents an adverse or favorable course. Methods Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) from a research cohort of acute ischemic stroke patients were analyzed. Using NIHSS scores at baseline and follow-up (day 3-5), patients were categorized into early neurological deterioration (END, ΔNIHSS ≥4), early neurological recovery (ENR, ΔNIHSS, ≥−4) or early neurological stability (ENS, ΔNIHSS between −3 and 3). The association between these categories and the volume of infarct growth, volume of swelling, parenchymal hematoma (PH) and 3 month modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score were evaluated. Results Patients with END or ENS were less likely to be independent (mRS 0-2) at 3 months compared to those with ENR (P<0.001). Patients with END or ENS were observed to have significantly greater infarct growth and swelling volumes than those with ENR (P=0.03; P<0.001, respectively). Brain edema was more common than the other imaging markers investigated and was independently associated with a stable or worsening NIHSS score after adjustment for age, baseline stroke volume, infarct growth volume, presence of PH, and reperfusion (P<0.0001). Conclusions Stable NIHSS score in the subacute period after ischemic stroke may not be benign, and is associated with tissue injury including infarct growth and brain edema. Early improvement is considerably more likely to occur in the absence of these factors. PMID:27334760

  20. Value of MRI and DTI as Biomarkers for Classifying Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-29

    spine obtained 14 within twelve hours of the initial injury ; (3) injuries resulting from non-penetrating trauma; and (4) isolated cervical ...neurologic recovery in acute central cervical cord injury with only upper extremity impairment. Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2002 Aug 1;27(15):1652,8...resonance imaging of acute cervical spine trauma. correlation with severity of neurologic injury . Spine . 1989 Oct;14(10):1090- 5. 27. Schaefer DM

  1. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids.

  2. Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kallet, Richard H; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged breathing of very high FIO2 (FIO2 ≥ 0.9) uniformly causes severe hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) and, without a reduction of FIO2, is usually fatal. The severity of HALI is directly proportional to PO2 (particularly above 450 mm Hg, or an FIO2 of 0.6) and exposure duration. Hyperoxia produces extraordinary amounts of reactive O2 species that overwhelms natural antioxidant defenses and destroys cellular structures through several pathways. Genetic predisposition has been shown to play an important role in HALI among animals, and some genetics-based epidemiologic research suggests that this may be true for humans as well. Clinically, the risk of HALI likely occurs when FIO2exceeds 0.7, and may become problematic when FIO2 exceeds 0.8 for an extended period of time. Both high-stretch mechanical ventilation and hyperoxia potentiate lung injury and may promote pulmonary infection. During the 1960s, confusion regarding the incidence and relevance of HALI largely reflected such issues as the primitive control of FIO2, the absence of PEEP, and the fact that at the time both ALI and ventilator-induced lung injury were unknown. The advent of PEEP and precise control over FIO2, as well as lung-protective ventilation, and other adjunctive therapies for severe hypoxemia, has greatly reduced the risk of HALI for the vast majority of patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the 21st century. However, a subset of patients with very severe ARDS requiring hyperoxic therapy is at substantial risk for developing HALI, therefore justifying the use of such adjunctive therapies. PMID:23271823

  3. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, Vera; Hotaling, James M

    2016-02-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  4. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Trofimenko, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  5. Neurological and functional recovery after thoracic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brian A.; Leiby, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe neurological and functional outcomes after traumatic paraplegia. Design Retrospective analysis of longitudinal database. Setting Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems. Participants Six hundred sixty-one subjects enrolled in the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems database, injured between 2000 and 2011, with initial neurological level of injury from T2–12. Two hundred sixty-five subjects had second neurological exams and 400 subjects had Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores ≥6 months after injury. Outcome Measures American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade, sensory level (SL), lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), and FIM. Results At baseline, 73% of subjects were AIS A, and among them, 15.5% converted to motor incomplete. The mean SL increase for subjects with an AIS A grade was 0.33 ± 0.21; 86% remained within two levels of baseline. Subjects with low thoracic paraplegia (T10–12) demonstrated greater LEMS gain than high paraplegia (T2–9), and also had higher 1-year FIM scores, which had not been noted in earlier reports. Better FIM scores were also correlated with better AIS grades, younger age and increase in AIS grade. Ability to walk at 1 year was associated with low thoracic injury, higher initial LEMS, incomplete injury and increase in AIS grade. Conclusion Little neurological recovery is seen in persons with complete thoracic SCI, especially with levels above T10. Persons who are older at the time of injury have poorer functional recovery than younger persons. Conversion to a better AIS grade is associated with improvement in self-care and mobility at 1 year. PMID:25520184

  6. [Ascites and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Piano, Salvatore; Tonon, Marta; Angeli, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis. Ascites develops as a consequence of an abnormal splanchnic vasodilation with reduction of effecting circulating volume and activation of endogenous vasoconstrictors system causing salt and water retention. Patients with ascites have a high risk to develop further complications of cirrhosis such as hyponatremia, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and acute kidney injury resulting in a poor survival. In recent years, new studies helped a better understanding of the pathophysiology of ascites and acute kidney injury in cirrhosis. Furthermore, new diagnostic criteria have been proposed for acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome and a new algorithm for their management has been recommended with the aim of an early diagnosis and treatment. Herein we will review the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ascites and acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and we will identify the unmet needs that should be clarified in the next years.

  7. Biomarkers in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Kosutova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its milder form acute lung injury (ALI) may result from various diseases and situations including sepsis, pneumonia, trauma, acute pancreatitis, aspiration of gastric contents, near-drowning etc. ALI/ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar injury, lung edema formation, neutrophil-derived inflammation, and surfactant dysfunction. Clinically, ALI/ARDS is manifested by decreased lung compliance, severe hypoxemia, and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. Severity and further characteristics of ALI/ARDS may be detected by biomarkers in the plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (or tracheal aspirate) of patients. Changed concentrations of individual markers may suggest injury or activation of the specific types of lung cells-epithelial or endothelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, etc.), and thereby help in diagnostics and in evaluation of the patient's clinical status and the treatment efficacy. This chapter reviews various biomarkers of acute lung injury and evaluates their usefulness in diagnostics and prognostication of ALI/ARDS.

  8. Acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard Anton

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent and serious complication in hospitalized patients. Mortality rates have not substantially been decreased during the last 20 years. In most patients AKI results from transient renal hypoperfusion or ischemia. The consequences include tubular cell dysfunction/damage, inflammation of the organ, and post-ischemic microvasculopathy. The two latter events perpetuate kidney damage in AKI. Clinical manifestations result from diminished excretion of water, electrolytes, and endogenous / exogenous waste products. Patients are endangered by cardiovascular complications such as hypertension, heart failure, and arrhythmia. In addition, the whole organism may be affected by systemic toxification (uremia). The diagnostic approach in AKI involves several steps with renal biopsy inevitable in some patients. The current therapy focuses on preventing further kidney damage and on treatment of complications. Different pharmacological strategies have failed to significantly improve prognosis in AKI. If dialysis treatment becomes mandatory, intermittent and continuous renal replacement therapies are equally effective. Thus, new therapies are urgently needed in order to reduce short- and long-term outcome in AKI. In this respect, stem cell-based regimens may offer promising perspectives. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  9. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates <1500 g, infants who experience perinatal asphyxia, near term/ term infants with low Apgar scores, those treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and those requiring cardiac surgery. We provide recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of these patients, including medications and renal replacement therapies. We discuss the need for long-term follow-up of neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations.

  10. Decompressive Hemicraniectomy in Acute Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Crudele, Angela; Shah, Syed Omar; Bar, Barak

    2016-10-01

    Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to severe brain injury is common. Increased ICP is commonly encountered in malignant middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Multiple interventions-both medical and surgical-exist to manage increased ICP. Medical management is used as first-line therapy; however, it is not always effective and is associated with significant risks. Decompressive hemicraniectomy is a surgical option to reduce ICP, increase cerebral compliance, and increase cerebral blood perfusion when medical management becomes insufficient. The purpose of this review is to provide an up-to-date summary of the use of decompressive hemicraniectomy for the management of refractory elevated ICP in malignant middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Early Acute Kidney Injury in Military Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Early acute kidney injury in military casualties Kelly D. Heegard, MD, Ian J. Stewart, MD, Andrew P. Cap, MD, PhD, Jonathan A. Sosnov, MD, Hana K...Ikizler, MD, and Kevin K. Chung, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND: While acute kidney injury (AKI) has been well studied in a variety of patient settings...and epidemiologic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Acute kidney injury; trauma; war; lactate; Injury Severity Score. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly

  12. Acute injuries in Taekwondo.

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Brust, K; Leistenschneider, P; Dargel, J; Springorum, H P; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-08-01

    Although Taekwondo is becoming an increasingly popular sport, there is a lack of reliable epidemiologic data on Taekwondo injuries. To perform an epidemiologic study on the variety of types of injury in professional and amateur Taekwondo athletes and to find a relation between Taekwondo style, skill level, weight-class and warm-up routine and the occurrence of injuries, we analysed the injury data using a 7-page questionnaire from a total of 356 Taekwondo athletes who were randomly selected. Overall, we registered a total of 2,164 injuries in 356 athletes. Most traumas were contusions and sprains in the lower extremities. Professional Taekwondo athletes have an increased risk of injury in comparison to recreational athletes. Taekwondo style, weight class and tournament frequency have an influence on the athlete's injury profile. Warm-up routines were found to have a positive effect on injury rates. Overall, Taekwondo may be considered a rather benign activity, if injuries during Taekwondo tournaments can be avoided. If not, Taekwondo can result in serious musculoskeletal problems. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Neurological Manifestations of Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhotani, Ashjan; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an immune-mediated chorioretinal disease that causes acute visual symptoms with characteristic ophthalmoscopic findings. Neurological complications are rarely reported in the literature. Here we report two new cases of APMPPE that presented with neurological manifestations, one of which was associated with peripheral neuropathy, which has not been described before. Methods A retrospective database review of all patients with a diagnosis of APMPPE was performed. Clinical, ophthalmological, and neurological data were analyzed, and only cases of APMPPE with neurological complications were included. A literature review of several databases was also performed, and previous case reports were reviewed and analyzed in detail. Results In total, 56 cases of APMPPE-associated neurological complications were included in the analyses: 54 from the literature and 2 from our own practice. The most common complication was cerebral vasculitis, which affected 28 patients (50%), followed by headaches in 15 patients (26.8%). The other complications include sixth-cranial-nerve palsy, transient hearing loss, meningoencephalitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and viral meningitis. Conclusions This report adds to the literature of a novel association of APMPPE with peripheral neuropathy, and comprehensively reviews the neurological manifestations of this disease. A high level of suspicion should be applied when dealing with a case of APMPPE. We recommend applying detailed clinical neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging to APMPPE patients, and then early steroid treatment if the examination is positive or even suspicious. Early treatment with steroids and long-term treatment with immunosuppressive azathioprine with interval neurological evaluations will contribute positively to the outcomes and avoid fatal complications, namely strokes. PMID:27819416

  14. Acute Neurological Issues in Pregnancy and the Peripartum

    PubMed Central

    Hosley, Catherine M.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2011-01-01

    Acute neurological diseases requiring hospitalization are relatively rare in women of childbearing age. However, during pregnancy and the postpartum period, several diseases increase in prevalence. Some are unique to the pregnant/postpartum state including preeclampsia and delivery-associated neuropathies. Others, although indirectly related to pregnancy, such as cerebral venous thrombosis, ischemic stroke, and intracerebral hemorrhage, increase in frequency and carry considerable risk of morbidity and mortality. In addition, treatment options are often limited. This review discusses the diseases more commonly seen during pregnancy and the postpartum period, with a focus on emergent neurological diseases and their management. Interventional therapies will also be discussed. PMID:23983844

  15. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  16. Acute Neurological Involvement in Diarrhea-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Thérésa; Elmaleh, Monique; Charbit, Marina; Launay, Emma Allain; Harambat, Jérôme; Brun, Muriel; Ranchin, Bruno; Bandin, Flavio; Cloarec, Sylvie; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhene; Piètrement, Christine; Champion, Gérard; Ulinski, Tim; Deschênes, Georges

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Neurologic involvement is the most threatening complication of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS). Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report a retrospective multicenter series of 52 patients with severe initial neurologic involvement that occurred in the course of D+HUS. Results: Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection was documented in 24. All except two patients had acute renal failure that required peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or both techniques. A first group of eight patients remained with normal consciousness; five of them had protracted seizures. A second group of 23 patients had stuporous coma; five of these had protracted severe seizures, and 18 had a neurologic defect including pyramidal syndrome, hemiplegia or hemiparesia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. A third group of 21 patients had severe coma. Plasma exchanges were undertaken in 25 patients, 11 of whom were treated within 24 hours after the first neurologic sign; four died, two survived with severe sequelae, and five were alive without neurologic defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 29 patients showed that (1) every structure of the central nervous system was susceptible to involvement; (2) no correlation seemed to exist between special profile of localization on early MRI and the final prognosis; and (3) MRI did not exhibit any focal lesions in three patients. The overall prognosis of the series was marked by the death of nine patients and severe sequelae in 13. Conclusions: Neurologic involvement is associated with a severe renal disease but does not lead systematically to death or severe disability. PMID:20498239

  17. Acute neurological involvement in diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, Sylvie; Kwon, Thérésa; Elmaleh, Monique; Charbit, Marina; Launay, Emma Allain; Harambat, Jérôme; Brun, Muriel; Ranchin, Bruno; Bandin, Flavio; Cloarec, Sylvie; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhene; Piètrement, Christine; Champion, Gérard; Ulinski, Tim; Deschênes, Georges

    2010-07-01

    Neurologic involvement is the most threatening complication of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS). We report a retrospective multicenter series of 52 patients with severe initial neurologic involvement that occurred in the course of D+HUS. Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection was documented in 24. All except two patients had acute renal failure that required peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or both techniques. A first group of eight patients remained with normal consciousness; five of them had protracted seizures. A second group of 23 patients had stuporous coma; five of these had protracted severe seizures, and 18 had a neurologic defect including pyramidal syndrome, hemiplegia or hemiparesia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. A third group of 21 patients had severe coma. Plasma exchanges were undertaken in 25 patients, 11 of whom were treated within 24 hours after the first neurologic sign; four died, two survived with severe sequelae, and five were alive without neurologic defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 29 patients showed that (1) every structure of the central nervous system was susceptible to involvement; (2) no correlation seemed to exist between special profile of localization on early MRI and the final prognosis; and (3) MRI did not exhibit any focal lesions in three patients. The overall prognosis of the series was marked by the death of nine patients and severe sequelae in 13. Neurologic involvement is associated with a severe renal disease but does not lead systematically to death or severe disability.

  18. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Galeiras Vázquez, R; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Mourelo Fariña, M; Montoto Marqués, A; Salvador de la Barrera, S

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury requires a multidisciplinary approach both for specialized treatment of the acute phase and for dealing with the secondary complications. A suspicion or diagnosis of spinal cord injury is the first step for a correct management. A review is made of the prehospital management and characteristics of the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Respiratory monitoring for early selective intubation, proper identification and treatment of neurogenic shock are essential for the prevention of secondary spinal cord injury. The use of corticosteroids is currently not a standard practice in neuroprotective treatment, and hemodynamic monitoring and early surgical decompression constitute the cornerstones of adequate management. Traumatic spinal cord injury usually occurs as part of multiple trauma, and this can make diagnosis difficult. Neurological examination and correct selection of radiological exams prevent delayed diagnosis of spinal cord injuries, and help to establish the prognosis.

  19. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  20. Endovascular treatment for acute pulmonary embolism in neurological patient

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Gunchan; Paul, Birinder S; Gautam, Parshotam L; Mohan, Bishav; Sharma, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Among the spectrum of venous thrombo-embolic disease, acute pulmonary embolism accounts for the most life threatening manifestations with mortality exceeding 50%. It can affect many patient populations across various disciplines, hence immediate attention and aggressive treatment is crucial. With the advancement of technologies, various catheter-based devices are available to treat massive or submassive PE. In this paper we report two patients of acute pulmonary embolism with neurological issues where the life threatening emergency was successfully managed by utilizing endovascular directed thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. PMID:26609298

  1. Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults.

    PubMed

    Monica, James; Vredenburgh, Zachary; Korsh, Jeremy; Gatt, Charles

    2016-07-15

    Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and clavicle fractures mostly occur in young adults as the result of a sports injury or direct trauma. Most nondisplaced or minimally displaced injuries can be treated conservatively. Treatment includes pain management, short-term use of a sling for comfort, and physical therapy as needed. Glenohumeral dislocations can result from contact sports, falls, bicycle accidents, and similar high-impact trauma. Patients will usually hold the affected arm in their contralateral hand and have pain with motion and decreased motion at the shoulder. Physical findings may include a palpable humeral head in the axilla or a dimple inferior to the acromion laterally. Reduction maneuvers usually require intra-articular lidocaine or intravenous analgesia. Proximal humerus fractures often occur in older patients after a low-energy fall. Radiography of the shoulder should include a true anteroposterior view of the glenoid, scapular Y view, and axillary view. Most of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, using a sling, early range-of-motion exercises, and strength training. Rotator cuff tears can cause difficulty with overhead activities or pain that awakens the patient from sleep. On physical examination, patients may be unable to hold the affected arm in an elevated position. It is important to recognize the sometimes subtle signs and symptoms of acute shoulder injuries to ensure proper management and timely referral if necessary.

  2. Neurologic Injury With Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Klinzing, Stephanie; Wenger, Urs; Stretti, Federica; Steiger, Peter; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Schwarz, Urs; Maggiorini, Marco

    2017-08-31

    This retrospective single-center study investigated the incidence of neurologic injury as determined by autopsy or cerebral imaging in 74 patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Seventy-three percent of patients were treated with venovenous and 27% with venoarterial ECMO. ECMO-associated intracerebral hemorrhage was diagnosed in 10.8% of patients. There were no cases of ischemic stroke. Clinical characteristics did not differ between patients with and without neurologic injury. Six-month survival was 13% (Wilson confidence interval, 2%-47%) in patients with severe intracerebral hemorrhage compared to an overall survival rate of 57% (Wilson confidence interval, 45%-67%).

  3. Ritalin revisited: does it really help in neurological injury?

    PubMed

    Kajs-Wyllie, Marylyn

    2002-12-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is a commonly used central nervous stimulant. It has been used in various neurological conditions, including attention deficit disorder, depression, and narcolepsy. Methylphenidate has been advocated in patients with traumatic brain injury and stroke for a variety of cognitive, attention, and behavioral problems. It also has been shown to speed recovery from poststroke depression so that patients can participate more fully in rehabilitation programs. Research suggests that it also may have a role in augmenting activity of injured neuronal tissue in the comatose patient, thus facilitating a return to consciousness. The neuroscience nurse plays an important role in monitoring response to Ritalin, including identifying its side effects. A review of the limited studies on the use of Ritalin, its mechanisms of action, dosing, and weaning provide a current understanding of this adjunctive agent's role in treatment for the neurological population.

  4. Inaccurate early assessment of neurological severity in head injury.

    PubMed

    Stocchetti, Nino; Pagan, Francesca; Calappi, Emiliana; Canavesi, Katia; Beretta, Luigi; Citerio, Giuseppe; Cormio, Manuela; Colombo, Angelo

    2004-09-01

    Intubation, which requires sedation and myorelaxants, may lead to inaccurate neurological evaluation of severely head-injured patients. Aims of this study were to describe the early clinical evolution of traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU), to identify cases of over-estimated neurological severity, and to quantify the risk factors for this over-estimation. A total of 753 TBI patients consecutively admitted to ICU of three academic neurosurgical hospitals (NSH) were assessed. Cases whose severity was potentially over-estimated were identified by four criteria and indicated as "mistakenly severe" (MS): (1) no surgical intracranial masses; (2) could not follow commands at neurological assessment; (3) were dismissed from the ICU in < or =3 days to a regular ward; and (4) had regained the ability to obey commands. A total of 675 patients were intubated and/or sedated-paralyzed at the post-stabilization evaluation. In all, 304 patients had surgically treated intracranial masses. Among the 449 non-surgical cases, 58 patients fulfilling the criteria for MS were identified. The main features distinguishing MS from truly severe cases were younger age, higher Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at all time points, Marshall classification of Computerized Tomographic (CT) scan mostly Diffuse Injury I and II, fewer pupillary abnormalities, and a lower frequency of hypoxia, hypotension, and extra-cranial injuries. In a certain proportion of non-surgical TBI patients, mostly intubated and sedated, neurological examination is difficult and severity can be over-estimated. Risk factors for this inaccurate evaluation can be identified, and clinical decisions should be based on further examination.

  5. Acute traumatic cervical cord injury in patients with os odontoideum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Jian; Chu, Tongwei; Li, Changqing; Ren, Xianjun; Wang, Weidong

    2010-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 10 patients with os odontoideum. Their clinical history, neurological symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association impairment classification and motor score were reviewed. Before their traumatic injury, three patients were asymptomatic and seven reported myelopathic symptoms, including four patients with neck pain, two patients with unsteadiness and one patient with dizziness. Falls were the most common cause of injury (n=6), followed by minor motor vehicle accidents (n=3) and assault (n=1). MRI and dynamic cervical lateral radiographs showed that all patients had atlantoaxial instability and cord compression. Most patients had spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI. Spinal cord compression was posterior (n=5), or both anterior and posterior (n=5). All patients underwent posterior rigid screw fixation and fusion, including atlantoaxial fusion (n=8) and occipitocervical fusion (n=2). We conclude that patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury after minor traumatic injury. Fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of developing myelopathy and to avoid the neurological deterioration associated with acute traumatic cervical cord injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mourelo Fariña, M; Salvador de la Barrera, S; Montoto Marqués, A; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Galeiras Vázquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of treatment in acute traumatic spinal cord injury is to preserve residual neurologic function, avoid secondary injury, and restore spinal alignment and stability. In this second part of the review, we describe the management of spinal cord injury focusing on issues related to short-term respiratory management, where the preservation of diaphragmatic function is a priority, with prediction of the duration of mechanical ventilation and the need for tracheostomy. Surgical assessment of spinal injuries based on updated criteria is discussed, taking into account that although the type of intervention depends on the surgical team, nowadays treatment should afford early spinal decompression and stabilization. Within a comprehensive strategy in spinal cord injury, it is essential to identify and properly treat patient anxiety and pain associated to spinal cord injury, as well as to prevent and ensure the early diagnosis of complications secondary to spinal cord injury (thromboembolic disease, gastrointestinal and urinary disorders, pressure ulcers).

  7. Central Venous Line and Acute Neurological Deficit: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Seyed Hossein; Shirzad, Mahmood; Zeraatian, Sam; Salehiomran, Abbas; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Ghiasi, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion is a practical way to assess patients hemodynamic specially in cardiovascular surgery but this relatively simple junior level procedure is not risk free and its common reported complications include; pneumothorax, hydrothorax, hemothorax, local hematoma, cardiac tamponade, vascular injury, thrombosis, embolism, and catheter disruption. Here in this article we are going to present 6 patients with very unusual presentation of CVC complication which was neurological deficit presented by agitation, unconsciousness, disorientation to time and place and hemiparesis. All patients undergone neurologic consult and brain computed tomography. Final diagnosis was brain ischemic damage and finally we kept them on conservative management; fortunately we did not have any permanent damage. PMID:25870645

  8. Long-term neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Cernak, Ibolja; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda; Potolicchio, Samuel; Temkin, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    To determine the relations between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and several neurologic outcomes 6 months or more after TBI. Not applicable. Systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed literature. Not applicable. We identified 75 studies that examined the relations between TBI and neurologic outcomes. Unprovoked seizures are causally related to penetrating TBI as well as to moderate and severe TBI. There was only limited evidence of an association between seizures and mild TBI. Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT) was associated with moderate and severe TBI, but not with mild TBI unless there was loss of consciousness (LOC); the evidence for the latter was limited. Parkinsonism was associated with moderate and severe TBI, but there was only modest evidence of a link with mild TBI without LOC. Dementia pugilistica was associated with professional boxing. There was insufficient evidence to support an association between TBI and both multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. TBI appeared to produce a host of postconcussive symptoms (eg, memory problems, dizziness, and irritability). Moderate and severe TBI were associated with endocrine problems such as hypopituitarism and growth hormone deficiency and possibly with diabetes insipidus. There was only limited evidence of an association between mild TBI and the development of ocular/visual motor deterioration. TBI is strongly associated with several neurologic disorders 6 months or more after injury. Clinicians caring for TBI patients should monitor them closely for the development of these disorders. While some of these disorders can be treated after they arise (eg, seizures), a greater public health benefit would be achieved by preventing them before they develop. Research efforts to develop therapies aimed at secondary prevention are currently underway.

  9. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-12-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically "Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage" (RIFLE), "Acute Kidney Injury Netwok" (AKIN) and "The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also "cell cycle arrest" molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated.

  10. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically “Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage” (RIFLE), “Acute Kidney Injury Netwok” (AKIN) and “The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes” (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also “cell cycle arrest” molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated. PMID:27366441

  11. Pertussis immunisation and serious acute neurological illnesses in children.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D; Madge, N; Diamond, J; Wadsworth, J; Ross, E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine long term outcome in children who had a severe acute neurological illness in early childhood associated with pertussis immunisation. DESIGN--Follow up study of cases and matched controls. SETTING--Assessment of children at home and at school throughout Britain. SUBJECTS--Children recruited into the national childhood encephalopathy study in 1976-9 were followed up, with one of their two original matched controls, in 1986-9. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Performance in educational attainment tests; behaviour problems reported by teachers and parents; continuing convulsions; evidence of other neurological or physical dysfunction. RESULTS--Over 80% of cases and controls were traced. Case children were significantly more likely than controls to have died or to have some form of educational, behavioural, neurological, or physical dysfunction a decade after their illness. The prevalence of one or more of these adverse outcomes in case children who had been immunised with diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine within seven days before onset of their original illness was similar to that in case children who had not been immunised recently. The relative risk for recent diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis immunisation in children who had died or had any dysfunction in comparison with controls was 5.5 (95% confidence interval 1.6 to 23.7). However, the number of cases associated with vaccine (12) was extremely small and statistically vulnerable, and other possible agents or predisposing factors could not be excluded. CONCLUSIONS--Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine may on rare occasions be associated with the development of severe acute neurological illnesses that can have serious sequelae. Some cases may occur by chance or have other causes. The role of pertussis vaccine as a prime or concomitant factor in the aetiology of these illnesses cannot be determined in any individual case. The balance of possible risk against known benefits from pertussis

  12. Abdominal hollow viscus injuries are associated with spine and neurologic infections after penetrating spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Schwed, Alexander C; Plurad, David S; Bricker, Scott; Neville, Angela; Bongard, Fred; Putnam, Brant; Kim, Dennis Y

    2014-10-01

    Penetrating spinal cord injuries are rare but potentially devastating injuries that are associated with significant morbidity. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of abdominal hollow viscus injuries (HVIs) on neurologic and spinal infectious complications in patients sustaining penetrating spinal cord injuries. We performed a 13-year retrospective review of a Level I trauma center database. Variables analyzed included demographics, injury patterns and severity, spine operations, and outcomes. Spine and neurologic infections (SNIs) were defined as paraspinal or spinal abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with SNI. Of 137 patients, there were 126 males (92%) with a mean age of 27 ± 10 years. Eight patients (6%) underwent operative stabilization of their spine. Fifteen patients (11%) developed SNI. There was a higher incidence of SNI among patients with abdominal HVI compared with those without (eight [26%] vs six [6%], P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, after controlling for injury severity, solid abdominal injury and HVI, vascular injury, and spine operation, abdominal HVIs were independently associated with an increased risk for SNI (odds ratio, 6.88; 95% confidence interval, 2.14 to 22.09; P = 0.001). Further studies are required to determine the optimal management strategy to prevent and successfully treat these infections.

  13. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  14. The chronic and evolving neurological consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lindsay; Stewart, William; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Horton, Lindsay; Menon, David K; Polinder, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have lifelong and dynamic effects on health and wellbeing. Research on the long-term consequences emphasises that, for many patients, TBI should be conceptualised as a chronic health condition. Evidence suggests that functional outcomes after TBI can show improvement or deterioration up to two decades after injury, and rates of all-cause mortality remain elevated for many years. Furthermore, TBI represents a risk factor for a variety of neurological illnesses, including epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. With respect to neurodegeneration after TBI, post-mortem studies on the long-term neuropathology after injury have identified complex persisting and evolving abnormalities best described as polypathology, which includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Despite growing awareness of the lifelong consequences of TBI, substantial gaps in research exist. Improvements are therefore needed in understanding chronic pathologies and their implications for survivors of TBI, which could inform long-term health management in this sizeable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical practices, complications, and mortality in neurological patients with acute severe hypertension: the Studying the Treatment of Acute hyperTension registry.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Stephan A; Kurtz, Pedro; Wyman, Allison; Sung, Gene Y; Multz, Alan S; Varon, Joseph; Granger, Christopher B; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Lapointe, Marc; Peacock, W Frank; Katz, Jason N; Gore, Joel M; O'Neil, Brian; Anderson, Frederick A

    2011-10-01

    To determine the demographic and clinical features, hospital complications, and predictors of 90-day mortality in neurologic patients with acute severe hypertension. Studying the Treatment of Acute hyperTension (STAT) was a multicenter (n=25) observational registry of adult critical care patients with severe hypertension treated with intravenous therapy. Emergency department or intensive care unit. A qualifying blood pressure measurement>180 mm Hg systolic or >110 mm Hg diastolic (>140/90 mm Hg for subarachnoid hemorrhage) was required for inclusion in the STAT registry. Patients with a primary neurologic admission diagnosis were included in the present analysis. All patients were treated with at least one parenteral (bolus or continuous infusion) antihypertensive agent. Of 1,566 patients included in the STAT registry, 432 (28%) had a primary neurologic diagnosis. The most common diagnoses were subarachnoid hemorrhage (38%), intracerebral hemorrhage (31%), and acute ischemic stroke (18%). The most common initial drug was labetalol (48%), followed by nicardipine (15%), hydralazine (15%), and sodium nitroprusside (13%). Mortality at 90 days was substantially higher in neurologic than in non-neurologic patients (24% vs. 6%, p<.0001). Median initial blood pressure was 183/95 mm Hg and did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors. In a multivariable analysis, neurologic patients who died experienced lower minimal blood pressure values (median 103/45 vs. 118/55 mm Hg, p<.0001) and were less likely to experience recurrent hypertension requiring intravenous treatment (29% vs. 51%, p=.0001) than those who survived. Mortality was also associated with an increased frequency of neurologic deterioration (32% vs. 10%, p<.0001). Neurologic emergencies account for approximately 30% of hospitalized patients with severe acute hypertension, and the majority of those who die. Mortality in hypertensive neurologic patients is associated with lower minimum blood pressure values

  16. Acute kidney injury after burn.

    PubMed

    Clark, Audra; Neyra, Javier A; Madni, Tarik; Imran, Jonathan; Phelan, Herb; Arnoldo, Brett; Wolf, Steven E

    2017-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and morbid complication after severe burn, with an incidence and mortality as high as 30% and 80%, respectively. AKI is a broad clinical condition with many etiologies, which makes definition and diagnosis challenging. The most recent Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) consensus guidelines defined stage and severity of AKI based on changes of serum creatinine and urine output (UOP) across time. Burn-related kidney injury is typically classified as early (0-3days after injury) or late (4-14days after injury). Early burn AKI is typically due to hypovolemia, poor renal perfusion, direct cardiac suppression from TNF-alpha, and precipitation of denatured proteins, while late AKI is often due to sepsis, multi-organ failure, and nephrotoxic drugs. Diagnosis can be difficult as UOP and biochemical markers can be relatively normal even with significant renal injury. A sensitive and specific biomarker for the early diagnosis of AKI is sorely needed, and multiple potential biomarkers are being investigated. For treatment, the reversal of the underlying cause is the first intervention. The advent of renal replacement therapy has significantly improved the mortality of burn patients with AKI and should be initiated early if injury progresses despite initial maneuvers. Unfortunately, no beneficial pharmacologic agents have been identified, despite multiple investigations. Of burn patients who survive AKI, the vast majority do not receive long-term hemodialysis and they are generally thought to have a good renal prognosis although this view is shifting. Preliminary data in the burn population suggest that AKI may confer an increased risk of end-stage renal disease and long-term all-cause mortality, but further research is needed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Mitochondria in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ralto, Kenneth M.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) continues to be a significant contributor to morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure. In the United States alone, it is estimated that over $10 billion is spent on AKI every year1. Currently, there are no available therapies to treat established AKI. The mitochondrion is positioned to be a critical player in AKI with its dual role as the primary source of energy for each cell and as a key regulator of cell death. This review aims to cover the current state of research on the role of mitochondria in AKI while also proposing potential therapeutic targets and future therapies. PMID:27085731

  18. Neurological and vascular injury associated with supracondylar humerus fractures and ipsilateral forearm fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Muchow, Ryan D; Riccio, Anthony I; Garg, Sumeet; Ho, Christine A; Wimberly, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 5% of supracondylar humerus fractures in children are associated with an ipsilateral forearm fracture, often referred to as a floating elbow when both injuries are displaced. Historically, these patients have higher complication rates than patients with an isolated supracondylar humerus fracture. The purpose of this study was to review the acute neurologic and vascular injuries in patients with ipsilateral, operative supracondylar humerus and forearm fractures and compare the findings with a cohort of isolated, operative supracondylar humerus fractures. We performed an IRB-approved, retrospective review of all pediatric patients with ipsilateral, operative supracondylar humerus and forearm fractures from a single institution and compared our findings to a cohort of isolated, operative supracondylar humerus fractures. A total of 150 patients with operative supracondylar humerus and ipsilateral forearm fractures were compared with 1228 patients with isolated, operative supracondylar humerus fractures. Twenty-two of the 150 (14.7%) floating elbow patients had documented pretreatment nerve palsies compared with 96/1228 (7.8%) of isolated injury patients (P=0.006). Eighteen of 22 nerve palsies were in patients with forearm fractures that required reduction. The overall incidence of nerve palsy was 18.9% (18/95) when a forearm fracture required reduction compared with only 7.3% (4/55) in a forearm fracture that was not reduced (P=0.05). We did not find a significant difference in the rate of pulseless extremities when comparing the ipsilateral (6/150 4%) and isolated (50/1228 4.1%) injury patients. No compartment syndromes were identified in any patient with an ipsilateral injury. The rate of acute neurologic injury in ipsilateral supracondylar humerus and forearm fractures is almost twice than that found in patients with isolated supracondylar humerus fractures. This rate increases further when the forearm fracture requires a manipulative reduction. The

  19. Acute intermittent porphyria: studies of the severe homozygous dominant disease provides insights into the neurologic attacks in acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Solis, Constanza; Martinez-Bermejo, Antonio; Naidich, Thomas P; Kaufmann, Walter E; Astrin, Kenneth H; Bishop, David F; Desnick, Robert J

    2004-11-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), due to half-normal hydroxymethylbilane synthase activity,is characterized by acute life-threatening neurologic attacks whose etiology remains unclear. To date, only 3 patients confirmed to have homozygous dominant AIP (HD-AIP) have been described (hydroxymethylbilane synthase genotypes R167Q/R167Q and R167W/R173Q). To investigate the genetic, biochemical, clinical, and neuroradiologic features of a severely affected infant with HD-AIP. Clinical, imaging, and genotype/phenotype studies were performed. The proband, homoallelic for hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutation R167W, had approximately 1% of normal hydroxymethylbilane synthase activity, elevated porphyrins and porphyrin precursors, severe psychomotor delay, and central and peripheral neurologic manifestations. When expressed in vitro, the R167W mutant enzyme had less than 2% of normal activity but was markedly unstable, consistent with the proband's severe phenotype. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes were normal. Neuroradiologic studies revealed a unique pattern of deep cerebral white matter injury, with relative preservation of the corpus callosum, anterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral gray matter, and infratentorial structures. This severely affected patient with HD-AIP expanded the phenotypic spectrum of HD-AIP. His brain magnetic resonance imaging studies suggested selective cerebral oligodendrocyte postnatal involvement in HD-AIP, whereas most structures developed prenatally were intact. These findings indicate that the neurologic manifestations result from porphyrin precursor toxicity rather than heme deficiency and suggest that porphyrin precursor toxicity is primarily responsible for the acute neurologic attacks in heterozygous AIP and other porphyrias.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Acute and Chronic Thoracic Aortic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raupach, Jan Ferko, Alexander; Lojik, Miroslav; Krajina, Antonin; Harrer, Jan; Dominik, Jan

    2007-11-15

    Our aim is to present midterm results after endovascular repair of acute and chronic blunt aortic injury. Between December 1999 and December 2005, 13 patients were endovascularly treated for blunt aortic injury. Ten patients, 8 men and 2 women, mean age 38.7 years, were treated for acute traumatic injury in the isthmus region of thoracic aorta. Stent-graftings were performed between the fifth hour and the sixth day after injury. Three patients (all males; mean age, 66 years; range, 59-71 years) were treated due to the presence of symptoms of chronic posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm of the thoracic aorta (mean time after injury, 29.4 years, range, 28-32). Fifteen stent-grafts were implanted in 13 patients. In the group with acute aortic injury one patient died due to failure of endovascular technique. Lower leg paraparesis appeared in one patient; the other eight patients were regularly followed up (1-72 months; mean, 35.6 months), without complications. In the group with posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms all three patients are alive. One patient suffered postoperatively from upper arm claudication, which was treated by carotidosubclavian bypass. We conclude that the endoluminal technique can be used successfully in the acute repair of aortic trauma and its consequences. Midterm results are satisfactory, with a low incidence of neurologic complications.

  1. Acute Kidney Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tujjar, Omar; Belloni, Ilaria; Hougardy, Jean-Michel; Scolletta, Sabino; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Creteur, Jacques; Taccone, Fabio S

    2017-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients and may contribute to poor outcome. Few data are available on the incidence and impact of AKI in patients suffering from nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We reviewed all patients admitted to our Department of Intensive Care with SAH over a 3-year period. Exclusion criteria were time from SAH symptoms to intensive care unit (ICU) admission >96 hours and ICU stay <48 hours. AKI was defined as sustained oligoanuria (urine output <0.5 mL/kg/h for 24 h) or an increase in plasma creatinine (≥0.3 mg/dL or a 1.5-fold increase from baseline level within 48 h). Neurological status was assessed at day 28 using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) (from 1=death to 5=good recovery; favorable outcome=GOS 4 to 5). Of 243 patients admitted for SAH during the study period, 202 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria (median age 56 y, 78 male). Twenty-five patients (12%) developed AKI, a median of 8 (4 to 10) days after admission. Independent predictors of AKI were development of clinical vasospasm, and treatment with vancomycin. AKI was more frequent in ICU nonsurvivors than in survivors (11/50 vs. 14/152, P=0.03), and in patients with an unfavorable neurological outcome than in other patients (17/93 vs. 8/109, P=0.03). Nevertheless, in multivariable regression analysis, AKI was not an independent predictor of outcome. AKI occurred in >10% of patients after SAH. These patients had more severe neurological impairment and needed more aggressive ICU therapy; AKI did not significantly influence outcome.

  2. Admissions for isolated nonoperative mild head injuries: Sharing the burden among trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Mejaddam, Ali Y; Chang, Yuchiao; DeMoya, Marc A; King, David R; Yeh, Daniel D; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Alam, Hasan B; Velmahos, George C

    2016-10-01

    Isolated nonoperative mild head injuries (INOMHI) occur with increasing frequency in an aging population. These patients often have multiple social, discharge, and rehabilitation issues, which far exceed the acute component of their care. This study was aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with INOMHI admitted to three services: trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. Retrospective case series (January 1, 2009 to August 31, 2013) at an academic Level I trauma center. According to an institutional protocol, INOMHI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15 were admitted on a weekly rotational basis to trauma surgery, neurosurgery, and neurology. The three populations were compared, and the primary outcomes were survival rate to discharge, neurological status at hospital discharge as measured by the Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), and discharge disposition. Four hundred eighty-eight INOMHI patients were admitted (trauma surgery, 172; neurosurgery, 131; neurology, 185). The mean age of the study population was 65.3 years, and 58.8% of patients were male. Seventy-seven percent of patients has a GCS score of 15. Age, sex, mechanism of injury, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Injury Severity Score, Abbreviated Injury Scale in head and neck, and GCS were similar among the three groups. Patients who were admitted to trauma surgery, neurosurgery and neurology services had similar proportions of survivors (98.8% vs 95.7% vs 94.7%), and discharge disposition (home, 57.0% vs 61.6% vs 55.7%). The proportion of patients with GOS of 4 or 5 on discharge was slightly higher among patients admitted to trauma (97.7% vs 93.0% vs 92.4%). In a logistic regression model adjusting for Charlson Comorbidity Index CCI and Abbreviated Injury Scale head and neck scores, patients who were admitted to neurology or neurosurgery had significantly lower odds being discharged with GOS 4 or 5. While the trauma group had the lowest proportion of repeats of brain computed tomography (61

  3. Infrared pupillometry, the Neurological Pupil index and unilateral pupillary dilation after traumatic brain injury: implications for treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jefferson William; Vakil-Gilani, Kiana; Williamson, Kay Lyn; Cecil, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    Pupillary dysfunction, a concerning finding in the neurologic examination of the patient with an acute traumatic brain injury often dictates the subsequent treatment paradigm. Patients were monitored closely with an infrared pupillometer, with NPi technology, for acute changes in pupillary function. NPi technology applies a scalar value to pupillary function. A retrospective chart review was performed of traumatic brain injury patients with acute unilateral pupillary dilation, admitted to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center's NeuroTrauma Unit, Portland, OR, and followed as outpatients, between January 2012 and December 2013. Clinical exam findings of pupillary size, NPi scores, and brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography images were analyzed. Five traumatic brain injury patients were identified with unilateral pupillary dysfunction with long-term follow-up after the initial injury. Each patient was monitored closely in the trauma bay for neurological deterioration with a pupillometer and the clinical exam. Two patients underwent subsequent intracranial pressure monitoring based on a deteriorating clinical scenario, including consistent abnormal unilateral NPi scores. One patient with consistent abnormal NPi scores and an improved clinical exam did not undergo invasive interventions. Two patients showed early improvement in NPi scores correlating with the normalization of their pupillary reactivity. Anisocoria improved in all patients despite concurrent abnormal NPi scores. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography imaging studies, with a focus on the third nerve, revealed focal abnormalities consistent with the clinical findings. A unilateral blown pupil and abnormal NPi score in a traumatic brain injury patient are not necessarily indicative of intracranial pressure issues, and must be correlated with the entire clinical scenario, to determine the etiology of the third nerve injury and direct potential therapeutic interventions. Early NPi score

  4. Rehabilitation of acute hamstring strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Marc A; Johnston, Tyler S; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2015-04-01

    Acute hamstring injuries are responsible for significant time loss for athletes. As there are a multitude of injury mechanisms, thorough evaluation is imperative for determining the appropriate plan of care and adequate rehabilitation is required to reduce the risk of recurrent injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanical patterns of cervical injury influence postoperative neurological outcome: a verification of the allen system.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Machino, Masaaki; Kato, Fumihiko

    2011-03-15

    Retrospective clinical case study. To evaluate whether spinal column injury severity influences neurological outcome after cervical spine injury patterns of Allen's classification. Allen's classification is commonly used in cervical fracture/dislocation. Cervical spine injuries are classified into 6 common patterns by their mechanism. Each pattern is divided into stages according to spinal column damage severity, and these stages have been closely correlated with the neurological damage at injury. However, the validity of the relationship has not been adequately discussed. Moreover, only a few reports have assessed whether the injury pattern influences the neurological outcome. We selected 155 patients with unstable subaxial cervical spine injuries. Only 146 patients having more than 12-month postoperative follow-up were included. All were treated with posterior spinal arthrodesis. Supplemental anterior surgery was added in four patients. The injury patterns were graded using Allen's classification. The neurological status at injury and final follow-up was evaluated using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Patients were categorized by using Allen's classification as follows: distractive flexion, 82; compressive flexion, 29; compressive extension, 21; vertical compression, 8; and distractive extension, 6. In distractive flexion cases, the ratios of ASIA A cases at final follow-up increased with advancing stage (27%, 18%, 63%, and 100% in stages 1-4; P < 0.001). Furthermore, in similar cases with neurological deficit, the ratio of postoperative improvement on the ASIA impairment scale (>1 level) decreased with advancing stage (62%, 67%, 27%, and 0% in stages 1-4; P < 0.01). With other patterns, neurological outcome was likely to be influenced by spinal column injury severity. Injury patterns based on Allen's classification well-correlated with the neurological outcome and recovery rate. This was especially evident distractive flexion

  6. Rock Climbing Injuries: Acute and Chronic Repetitive Trauma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Connie Y; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J

    2016-01-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity as a sport, and specific injuries related to its practice are becoming more common. Chronic repetitive injuries are more common than acute injuries, although acute injuries tend to be more severe. We review both acute and chronic upper and lower extremity injuries. Understanding the injury pattern in rock climbers is important for accurate diagnosis.

  7. Diuretics in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2011-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI is increasing and despite clinical advances there has been little change in the outcomes associated with AKI. A variety of interventions, including loop diuretics, have been tested for the prevention and treatment of AKI; however, none to date have shown convincing benefits in clinical studies, and the management of AKI remains largely supportive. In this article, we review the pharmacology and experimental and clinical evidence for loop diuretics in the management of AKI. In addition, we also review evidence for other agents with diuretic and/or natriuretic properties such as thiazide diuretics, mannitol, fenoldopam, and natriuretic peptides in both the prevention and treatment of AKI. Implications for current clinical practice are outlined to guide clinical decisions in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Secondary neurological deterioration in traumatic spinal injury: data from medicolegal cases.

    PubMed

    Todd, N V; Skinner, D; Wilson-MacDonald, J

    2015-04-01

    We assessed the frequency and causes of neurological deterioration in 59 patients with spinal cord injury on whom reports were prepared for clinical negligence litigation. In those who deteriorated neurologically we assessed the causes of the change in neurology and whether that neurological deterioration was potentially preventable. In all 27 patients (46%) changed neurologically, 20 patients (74% of those who deteriorated) had no primary neurological deficit. Of those who deteriorated, 13 (48%) became Frankel A. Neurological deterioration occurred in 23 of 38 patients (61%) with unstable fractures and/or dislocations; all 23 patients probably deteriorated either because of failures to immobilise the spine or because of inappropriate removal of spinal immobilisation. Of the 27 patients who altered neurologically, neurological deterioration was, probably, avoidable in 25 (excess movement in 23 patients with unstable injuries, failure to evacuate an epidural haematoma in one patient and over-distraction following manipulation of the cervical spine in one patient). If existing guidelines and standards for the management of actual or potential spinal cord injury had been followed, neurological deterioration would have been prevented in 25 of the 27 patients (93%) who experienced a deterioration in their neurological status.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jim, Belinda; Garovic, Vesna D

    2017-07-01

    Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (AKI) has declined in incidence in the last three decades, although it remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy-related causes of AKI such as preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver function tests, Low Platelets) syndrome, and the thrombotic microangiopathies (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome [HUS]) exhibit overlapping features and often present as diagnostic dilemmas. Differentiating among these conditions may be difficult or impossible based on clinical criteria only. In difficult and rare cases, a renal biopsy may need to be considered for the exact diagnosis and to facilitate appropriate treatment, but the risks and benefits need to be carefully weighed. The use of eculizumab for the treatment of atypical HUS has demonstrated efficacy in early case reports. Non-pregnancy related causes such as volume depletion and pyelonephritis require early and aggressive resuscitative as well as antibiotic measures respectively. We will discuss in this review the various etiologies of AKI in pregnancy, current diagnostic approaches, and the latest treatment strategies. Given the recent trends of increasing maternal age at the time of pregnancy, and the availability of modern reproductive methods increase the risks of AKI in pregnancy in the coming years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Barbiturates for acute neurological and neurosurgical emergencies--do they still have a role?

    PubMed

    Cordato, Dennis J; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Mather, Laurence E; Morgan, Michael K

    2003-05-01

    A number of clinical studies have reported poor clinical outcomes for patients treated with barbiturate therapy in acute neurological and neurosurgical emergencies. Barbiturate therapy, as currently practised with thiopentone and pentobarbitone at least, is also associated with a prolonged post-infusion period of clinical unresponsiveness. Hence, the popularity of barbiturate therapy for sedation of critically ill neurological and neurosurgical patients has declined over the past decade. A retrospective study of traumatic brain injury patients treated at the Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, with high-dose thiopentone therapy between 1987 and 1997 has found disappointing results with a 1-month mortality outcome of 50% (14 of 28 patients). Nevertheless, barbiturate therapy remains a consideration for patients with severe cranial trauma in whom preferred treatments have failed to control intracranial or cerebral perfusion pressures. More favourable results ( approximately 10% 1-month mortality rate) were encountered for patients with refractory vasospasm complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage or intracerebral haemorrhage complicating supratentorial arteriovenous malformation resection. A well designed, prospective and randomised controlled trial may be of value in further determining the role of barbiturate therapy in acute neurovascular emergencies refractory to standard therapy.

  11. Neurological outcome in a series of 58 patients operated for traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Dobran, Mauro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Di Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria; Di Rienzo, A.; Colasanti, Roberto; Nocchi, Niccolò; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Moriconi, Elisa; Nasi, Davide; Scerrati, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures represent approximately 65% of all traumatic spinal fractures and are frequently associated to permanent disability with significant social and economic impact. These injuries create severe physical limitations depending on neurological status, level of fracture, severity of injury, patient age and comorbidities. Predicting neurological improvement in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) is very difficult because it is related to different preoperative prognostic factors. We evaluated the neurological improvement related to the preoperative neurological conditions and the anatomic level of spinal cord injury. Methods: From January 2004 to June 2010, we operated 207 patients for unstable thoracolumbar spinal fractures. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 69 patients with traumatic SCIs operated on by a posterior fixation performed within 24 hours from the trauma. The preoperative neurological conditions (ASIA grade), the type of the fracture, the anatomic level of spinal cord injury and the postoperative neurological improvement were evaluated for each patient. Results: The ASIA grade at admission (P = 0,0005), the fracture type according to the AO spine classification (P = 0,0002), and the anatomic location of the injury (P = 0,0213) represented predictive factors of neurological improvement at univariate analysis. The preoperative neurological status (P = 0,0491) and the fracture type (P = 0,049) confirmed a positive predictive value also in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Our study confirms that the preoperative neurological status, the fracture type and the anatomic location of the fracture are predictive factors of the neurological outcome in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:25289154

  12. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Arash; Sperl, André; Heller, Raban; Kunzmann, Kevin; Graeser, Viola; Akbar, Michael; Gerner, Hans Jürgen; Biglari, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1). IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury.

  13. Barbiturates for acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Roberts, I

    2000-01-01

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important complication of severe brain injury, and is associated with a high mortality rate. Barbiturates are believed to reduce intracranial pressure by suppressing cerebral metabolism, thus reducing cerebral metabolic demands and cerebral blood volume. However, barbiturates also reduce blood pressure and therefore may adversely effect cerebral perfusion pressure. To assess the effects of barbiturates in reducing raised intracranial pressure, mortality and morbidity in people with acute traumatic brain injury. To quantify any side effects resulting from the use of barbiturates. The review draws largely on the search strategy developed for the Cochrane Injuries Group as a whole. However, in addition the Cochrane Library was searched in December 1996 using the text terms "barbiturate*," "pentobarb*," "phenobarb*," "head," and "brain." An updated search was done in April 1999. Randomised or quasi randomised trials of any one or more of the barbiturate class of drugs (amobarbital, barbital, hexobarbital, mephobarbital, methohexital, murexide, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, thiobarbiturate) where study participants had a clinically diagnosed acute traumatic brain injury of any severity. The reviewer extracted the data and assessed the quality of allocation concealment in the trials. The pooled relative risk for death (barbiturate vs no barbiturate) was 1.09 (95%CI 0.81 to 1.47). The pooled effect of barbiturates on adverse neurological outcome, measured using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (death, persistent vegetative state or severe disability) was 1.15 (95% 0.81 to 1.64). Two studies examined the effect of barbiturate therapy on intracranial pressure. In the study by Eisenberger et al, a smaller proportion of patients in the barbiturate group had uncontrolled ICP (68% vs 83%). The relative risk for uncontrolled ICP was 0.81 (95%CI 0.62 to 1.06). Similarly, in the study by Ward et al, mean ICP was lower in the

  14. Pathophysiology of ischaemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel Suren

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is common, dangerous and costly, affecting around one in five patients emergency admissions to hospital. Although survival decreases as disease worsens, it is now apparent that even modest degrees of dysfunction are not only associated with higher mortality but are an independent risk factor for death. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury secondary to ischaemia - its commonest aetiology. The haemodynamic disturbances, endothelial injury, epithelial cell injury and immunological mechanisms underpinning its initiation and extension will be discussed along with the considerable and complex interplay between these factors that lead to an intense, pro-inflammatory state. Mechanisms of tubular recovery will be discussed but also the pathophysiology of abnormal repair with its direct consequences for long-term renal function. Finally, the concept of 'organ cross-talk' will be introduced as a potential explanation for the higher mortality observed with acute kidney injury that might be deemed modest in conventional biochemical terms.

  15. Neurological Complication After Low-Voltage Electric Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Min; Ko, Yeong-A; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. However, delayed neurological complications caused by low-voltage electric shock are rarely reported. Here, a case of a man suffering from weakness and aphasia due to the delayed-onset of the peripheral nerve injury and ischemic stroke following an electrical shock is presented. Possible mechanisms underlying the neurological complications include thermal injury to perineural tissue, overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, vascular injury, and histological or electrophysiological changes. Moreover, vasospasms caused by low-voltage alternating current may predispose individuals to ischemic stroke. Therefore, clinicians should consider the possibility of neurological complications, even if the onset of the symptoms is delayed, and should perform diagnostic tests, such as electrophysiology or imaging, when patients present with weakness following an electric injury. PMID:24855625

  16. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Intraspinal penetrating stab injury to the middle thoracic spinal cord with no neurologic deficit.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Curry, Emily J; Blais, Micah; Ma, Richard; Sungarian, Arno S

    2012-05-01

    The annual incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury worldwide is estimated to be 35 patients per million. Nonmissile penetrating spinal injuries most commonly occur in the thoracic region, and the majority has neurologic deficits on admission. The management of patients who lack neurologic deficits is controversial due to the risk of neurologic status alteration intraoperatively. However, failure to intervene increases the risk of infection, delayed onset of neurologic deficits, and worsening functional outcome.A 17-year-old boy presented with an intradural T7-T8 knife penetration injury to the spinal cord with no neurologic deficit. Rapid surgical intervention was critical because the knife was lodged between the 2 hemispheres of the spinal cord. The patient was intubated in the lateral position, transferred to the prone position on a Jackson table, and underwent surgical decompression with laminectomy 1 level above and below the injury site, removal of the knife blade in the original path of trajectory, and repair of the dural tear with a collagen matrix. The patient sustained no neurologic sequelae from the penetrating knife injury. He was able to ambulate at discharge and had no complications. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a patient with intradural spinal cord penetration by a foreign object (knife blade) presenting with a normal neurologic preoperative examination that persisted throughout the course of postoperative care. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Gunshot injuries of the spine--a review of 49 cases managed at the Groote Schuur Acute Spinal Cord Injury Unit.

    PubMed

    le Roux, J C; Dunn, R N

    2005-11-01

    The Acute Spinal Injury Unit, relocated from Conradie Hospital to Groote Schuur Hospital in mid-2003, admitted 162 patients in the first year of its existence. A large number of these injuries were the result of interpersonal violence, particularly gunshot wounds. To review patients with gunshot injuries to the spine, with reference to neurological injury, associated injuries, need for surgery and complications. A comprehensive database is maintained to collect data on all spinal injury admissions. These data, as well as case notes and X-rays, were reviewed for all gunshot spine patients admitted to the Acute Spinal Injury Unit over a year. Forty-nine patients were identified. Thirty-eight were male and 11 female with an average age of 27.5 years (range 15-51 +/- 8.53). The average stay in the acute unit was 30 (4-109 +/- 28) days. The spinal injury was complete in 38 and incomplete in 8, with 3 having no neurological deficit. The level was cervical in 13, thoracic in 24 and lumbar in 12. Only 9 patients improved neurologically. The spine was considered stable in 43 cases. Stabilisation was performed in the 6 unstable cases. The bullets were removed in 11 cases as they were in the canal. There were 55 significant associated injuries, viz. 14 haemo-pneumothoraces, 16 abdominal visceral injuries, 3 vascular injuries, 4 injuries of the brachial plexus and 3 of the oesophagus, 2 tracheal injuries, 1 soft palate injury and 11 non-spinal fractures. Complications included 3 deaths and discitis in 3 cases, pneumonia in 6 and pressure sores in 6. Gunshot injuries of the spine are a prevalent and resource-intensive cause of paralysis. There is a high incidence of permanent severe neurological deficit, but usually the spine remains mechanically stable. Most of the management revolves around the associated injuries and consequences of the neurological deficit.

  19. Neurological Diseases, Disorders and Injuries in Canada: Highlights of a National Study.

    PubMed

    Bray, Garth M; Huggett, Deanna L

    2016-01-01

    The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions, a partnership between Neurological Health Charities Canada and the Government of Canada, was the largest study of neurological diseases, disorders, and injuries ever conducted in Canada. Undertaken between 2009 and 2013, the expansive program of research addressed the epidemiology, impacts, health services, and risk factors of 18 neurological conditions and estimated the health outcomes and costs of these conditions in Canada through 2031. This review summarizes highlights from the component projects of the study as presented in the synthesis report, Mapping Connections: An Understanding of Neurological Conditions in Canada. The key findings included new prevalence and incidence estimates, documentation of the diverse and often debilitating effects of neurological conditions, and identification of the utilization, economic costs, and current limitations of related health services. The study findings will support health charities, governments, and other stakeholders to reduce the impact of neurological conditions in Canada.

  20. Neurologic impairment following closed head injury predicts post-traumatic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Villasana, L.E.; Westbrook, G.L.; Schnell, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian hippocampus, neurogenesis persists into adulthood, and increased generation of newborn neurons could be of clinical benefit following concussive head injuries. Post-traumatic neurogenesis has been well documented using “open” traumatic brain injury (TBI) models in rodents; however, human TBI most commonly involves closed head injury. Here we used a closed head injury (CHI) model to examine post-traumatic hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. All mice were subjected to the same CHI protocol, and a gross-motor based injury severity score was used to characterize neurologic impairment one hour after the injury. When analyzed 2 weeks later, post-traumatic neurogenesis was significantly increased only in mice with a high degree of transient neurologic impairment immediately after injury. This increase was associated with an early increase in c-fos activity, and subsequent reactive astrocytosis and microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Our results demonstrate that the initial degree of neurologic impairment after closed head injury predicts the induction of secondary physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, and that animals with severe neurologic impairment early after injury manifest an increase in post-traumatic neurogenesis in the absence of gross anatomic pathology. PMID:24861442

  1. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Jawa, Randeep S; Anillo, Sergio; Kulaylat, Mahmoud N

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) refers to a clinical syndrome of acute lung injury that occurs in a temporal relationship with the transfusion of blood products. Because of the difficulty in making its diagnosis, TRALI is often underreported. Three not necessarily mutually exclusive hypotheses have been described to explain its etiogenesis: antibody mediated, non-antibody mediated, and two hit mechanisms. Treatment is primarily supportive and includes supplemental oxygen. Diuretics are generally not indicated, as hypovolemia should be avoided. Compared with many other forms of acute lung injury, including the acute respiratory distress syndrome, TRALI is generally transient, reverses spontaneously, and carries a better prognosis. A variety of prevention strategies have been proposed, ranging from restrictive transfusion strategies to using plasma derived only from males.

  2. The 'ouR-HOPE' approach for ethics and communication about neonatal neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Farlow, Barbara; Miller, Steven; Payot, Antoine; Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Shevell, Michael I; Thomson, Donna; Wintermark, Pia

    2017-02-01

    Predicting neurological outcomes of neonates with acute brain injury is an essential component of shared decision-making, in order to guide the development of treatment goals and appropriate care plans. It can aid parents in imagining the child's future, and guide timely and ongoing treatment decisions, including shifting treatment goals and focusing on comfort care. However, numerous challenges have been reported with respect to evidence-based practices for prognostication such as biases about prognosis among clinicians. Additionally, the evaluation or appreciation of living with disability can differ, including the well-known disability paradox where patients self-report a good quality of life in spite of severe disability. Herein, we put forward a set of five practice principles captured in the "ouR-HOPE" approach (Reflection, Humility, Open-mindedness, Partnership, and Engagement) and related questions to encourage clinicians to self-assess their practice and engage with others in responding to these challenges. We hope that this proposal paves the way to greater discussion and attention to ethical aspects of communicating prognosis in the context of neonatal brain injury.

  3. Acute epididymitis: a work-related injury?

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, E. K.; Anderson, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Occupational medicine physicians frequently are presented with requests by employers to determine the work-relatedness of medical illnesses or injuries. Occasionally, this involves a sudden onset of acute epididymitis in the male employee after strenuous activity in the workplace. Because the vast majority of acute epididymitis cases have an underlying sexually transmitted disease component, this poses a real dilemma for the consulting physician. This article discusses the etiology and pathogenesis of acute epididymitis along with its epidemiologic significance and reviews workers' compensation and its possible legal interpretation when acute epididymitis occurs at the worksite. PMID:8691501

  4. A Mechanistic End-to-End Concussion Model That Translates Head Kinematics to Neurologic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Laurel J.; Volman, Vladislav; Gibbons, Melissa M.; Phohomsiri, Pi; Cui, Jianxia; Swenson, Darrell J.; Stuhmiller, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Past concussion studies have focused on understanding the injury processes occurring on discrete length scales (e.g., tissue-level stresses and strains, cell-level stresses and strains, or injury-induced cellular pathology). A comprehensive approach that connects all length scales and relates measurable macroscopic parameters to neurological outcomes is the first step toward rationally unraveling the complexity of this multi-scale system, for better guidance of future research. This paper describes the development of the first quantitative end-to-end (E2E) multi-scale model that links gross head motion to neurological injury by integrating fundamental elements of tissue and cellular mechanical response with axonal dysfunction. The model quantifies axonal stretch (i.e., tension) injury in the corpus callosum, with axonal functionality parameterized in terms of axonal signaling. An internal injury correlate is obtained by calculating a neurological injury measure (the average reduction in the axonal signal amplitude) over the corpus callosum. By using a neurologically based quantity rather than externally measured head kinematics, the E2E model is able to unify concussion data across a range of exposure conditions and species with greater sensitivity and specificity than correlates based on external measures. In addition, this model quantitatively links injury of the corpus callosum to observed specific neurobehavioral outcomes that reflect clinical measures of mild traumatic brain injury. This comprehensive modeling framework provides a basis for the systematic improvement and expansion of this mechanistic-based understanding, including widening the range of neurological injury estimation, improving concussion risk correlates, guiding the design of protective equipment, and setting safety standards. PMID:28663736

  5. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Vyvyca J.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-01-01

    Summary Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron’s ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. PMID:27085736

  6. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Acute injuries from mountain biking.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T K; Bracker, M D; Patrick, K

    1993-01-01

    We questioned members of 2 southern California off-road bicycling organizations about injuries associated with the use of all-terrain bicycles. Cyclists were asked about riding and safety habits, the kind(s) of injury sustained with their most recent accident and whether they sought medical treatment, and the circumstances of the accident. Of 459 mailed surveys, 268 (58.4%) were returned. Respondents (82.8% of whom were male) ranged in age from 14 to 68 years. Of these, 225 (84%) had been injured while riding all-terrain bicycles, 51% in the past year. Although most injuries were characterized as minor, 26% required professional medical care, and 4.4% of those injured were admitted to hospital. Extremity injuries--abrasions, lacerations, contusions--occurred in 201 (90%) cyclists with 27 (12%) sustaining a fracture or dislocation. High levels of helmet use (88%) may explain the low occurrence of head and neck trauma (12%). Frequent riding and riding on paved terrain were associated with increased severity of injury, although most accidents--197 (87.6%)--occurred off paved roads. These results suggest that, compared with regular bicyclists, all-terrain cyclists have more, but not necessarily more severe, injuries. Clinicians and emergency medical personnel should be aware that the increasing popularity of off-road cycling may change the frequency and nature of bicycling injuries. PMID:8212679

  8. Acute Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, complications, and mortality rate associated with acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A total of 75 patients who were treated at Samsung Changwon Hospital between February 2005 and March 2016 were included in the study sample. The outcomes included in-hospital survival, renal recovery, metabolic and fluid control rates, and technical success rates. Refractory heart failure was the most frequent cause of acute PD (49.3%), followed by hepatic failure (20.0%), septic shock (14.7%), acute pancreatitis (9.3%), and unknown causes (6.7%). The hospital survival of patients in the acute PD was 48.0%. Etiologies of acute kidney injury (AKI) (refractory heart failure, acute pancreatitis compared with hepatic failure, septic shock or miscellaneous causes), use of inotropes, use of a ventilator, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II were associated with survival differences. Maintenance dialysis required after survival was high (80.1% [29/36]) due to AKI etiologies (heart or hepatic failures). Metabolic and fluid control rates were 77.3%. The technical success rate for acute PD was 93.3%. Acute PD remains a suitable treatment modality for patients with AKI in the era of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Nearly all patients who require dialysis can be dialyzed with acute PD without mechanical difficulties. This is particularly true in patients with refractory heart failure and acute pancreatitis who had a weak requirement for inotropes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  9. [The acute knee injury - practical considerations].

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy

    2014-04-09

    The acute knee injury represents one of the most common reasons to visit a general practitioner or an emergency department in a hospital. The initial assessment of an acute knee injury usually is affected by severe swelling, pain and a significant lack of motion. Conventional radiographs in three planes may provide additional information to limit the differential diagnosis. A clinical re-evaluation after five to ten days usually allows proper functional testing and therefore correct diagnosis in the majority of cases can be made. With suspicious clinical findings, MRI may be helpful to evaluate ligamentous, meniscal and cartilaginous structures. Femoro-tibial knee dislocation represents the most harmful acute knee injury and needs to be further evaluated and treated in an adequate medical institution in every suspicious case. Rapid vascular diagnostic with (CT)-angiography is crucial. Behind a multi-ligament injury of the knee a spontaneously reduced dislocation may hide and proper neuro-vascular exam therefore is mandatory in every patient. When fracture, blocking and major instability can be excluded at initial assessment, there is usually no need for any acute surgical intervention and initial conservative treatment may be conducted on an out-patient basis for most of the patients. Priority of surgical treatment depends on the injury pattern and delayed intervention with a pre-habilitative phase may be beneficial for certain pathologies.

  10. A Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Theodore, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dignity Health San Francisco, CA 94107-1773 REPORT DATE: October 2015...TASK NUMBER E-Mail: Nicholas.Theodore@bnaneuro.net 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Dignity Health AND ADDRESS...patients aims to reduce cell death and axonal damage leading to improved neurological function in patients. 2. KEYWORDS acute spinal cord injury

  11. [Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in obstetrics may be caused by the same disorders that are observed in the general population or may be specific for a pregnancy such as: preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome or acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The renal changes may be only temporary, and resolve within a few weeks postpartum, or may become irreversible leading to a progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the article the most important pregnancy related syndromes associated with AKI have been shortly reviewed.

  12. Role of Interleukin-10 in Acute Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Joshua M.; Stillings, Stephanie A.; Leclerc, Jenna L.; Phillips, Harrison; Edwards, Nancy J.; Robicsek, Steven A.; Hoh, Brian L.; Blackburn, Spiros; Doré, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an important anti-inflammatory cytokine expressed in response to brain injury, where it facilitates the resolution of inflammatory cascades, which if prolonged causes secondary brain damage. Here, we comprehensively review the current knowledge regarding the role of IL-10 in modulating outcomes following acute brain injury, including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the various stroke subtypes. The vascular endothelium is closely tied to the pathophysiology of these neurological disorders and research has demonstrated clear vascular endothelial protective properties for IL-10. In vitro and in vivo models of ischemic stroke have convincingly directly and indirectly shown IL-10-mediated neuroprotection; although clinically, the role of IL-10 in predicting risk and outcomes is less clear. Comparatively, conclusive studies investigating the contribution of IL-10 in subarachnoid hemorrhage are lacking. Weak indirect evidence supporting the protective role of IL-10 in preclinical models of intracerebral hemorrhage exists; however, in the limited number of clinical studies, higher IL-10 levels seen post-ictus have been associated with worse outcomes. Similarly, preclinical TBI models have suggested a neuroprotective role for IL-10; although, controversy exists among the several clinical studies. In summary, while IL-10 is consistently elevated following acute brain injury, the effect of IL-10 appears to be pathology dependent, and preclinical and clinical studies often paradoxically yield opposite results. The pronounced and potent effects of IL-10 in the resolution of inflammation and inconsistency in the literature regarding the contribution of IL-10 in the setting of acute brain injury warrant further rigorously controlled and targeted investigation. PMID:28659854

  13. Targeting L-Selectin to Improve Neurologic and Urologic Function After Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    diclofenac (DFA), an anti-inflammatory agent with L-Selectin sheddase activity, in a murine model of spinal cord injury. Scope: These studies have...Selectin, diclofenac , mouse, urologic function, neurologic function 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...proposal is investigating the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DFA), acting as an L- selectin sheddase, will improve neurologic

  14. Nail gun injuries to the head with minimal neurological consequences: a case series.

    PubMed

    Makoshi, Ziyad; AlKherayf, Fahad; Da Silva, Vasco; Lesiuk, Howard

    2016-03-16

    An estimated 3700 individuals are seen annually in US emergency departments for nail gun-related injuries. Approximately 45 cases have been reported in the literature concerning nail gun injuries penetrating the cranium. These cases pose a challenge for the neurosurgeon because of the uniqueness of each case, the dynamics of high pressure nail gun injuries, and the surgical planning to remove the foreign body without further vascular injury or uncontrolled intracranial hemorrhage. Here we present four cases of penetrating nail gun injuries with variable presentations. Case 1 is of a 33-year-old white man who sustained 10 nail gunshot injuries to his head. Case 2 is of a 51-year-old white man who sustained bi-temporal nail gun injuries to his head. Cases 3 and 4 are of two white men aged 22 years and 49 years with a single nail gun injury to the head. In the context of these individual cases and a review of similar cases in the literature we present surgical approaches and considerations in the management of nail gun injuries to the cranium. Case 1 presented with cranial nerve deficits, Case 2 required intubation for low Glasgow Coma Scale, while Cases 3 and 4 were neurologically intact on presentation. Three patients underwent angiography for assessment of vascular injury and all patients underwent surgical removal of foreign objects using a vice-grip. No neurological deficits were found in these patients on follow-up. Nail gun injuries can present with variable clinical status; mortality and morbidity is low for surgically managed isolated nail gun-related injuries to the head. The current case series describes the surgical use of a vice-grip for a good grip of the nail head and controlled extraction, and these patients appear to have a good postoperative prognosis with minimal neurological deficits postoperatively and on follow-up.

  15. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied. PMID:25029344

  16. Mechanical Factors and Bone Health: Effects of Weightlessness and Neurologic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shreyasee

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue with homeostasis governed by many factors. Among them, mechanical stimuli appear to be particularly critical for bone structure and strength. With removal of mechanical stimuli, a profound bone loss occurs, as best observed in the extreme examples following exposure to space flight or neurologic impairment. This review provides an overview of the changes in bone density and structure that occur during and after space flight as well as following neurologic injury from stroke and spinal cord injury. It also discusses the potential mechanisms through which mechanical stimuli are postulated to act on bone tissue. PMID:20425519

  17. Mechanical factors and bone health: effects of weightlessness and neurologic injury.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shreyasee

    2010-06-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue with homeostasis governed by many factors. Among them, mechanical stimuli appear to be particularly critical for bone structure and strength. With removal of mechanical stimuli, a profound bone loss occurs, as best observed in the extreme examples following exposure to space flight or neurologic impairment. This review provides an overview of the changes in bone density and structure that occur during and after space flight as well as following neurologic injury from stroke and spinal cord injury. It also discusses the potential mechanisms through which mechanical stimuli are postulated to act on bone tissue.

  18. DNA repair in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Pressly, Jeffrey D; Park, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common cause of acute kidney injury leading to an induction of oxidative stress, cellular dysfunction, and loss of renal function. DNA damage, including oxidative base modifications and physical DNA strand breaks, is a consequence of renal IRI. Like many other organs in the body, a redundant and highly conserved set of endogenous repair pathways have evolved to selectively recognize the various types of cellular DNA damage and combat its negative effects on cell viability. Severe damage to the DNA, however, can trigger cell death and elimination of the injured tubular epithelial cells. In this minireview, we summarize the state of the current field of DNA damage and repair in the kidney and provide some expected and, in some cases, unexpected effects of IRI on DNA damage and repair in the kidney. These findings may be applicable to other forms of acute kidney injury and could provide new opportunities for renal research.

  19. Predation as a cause of neurologic signs and acute mortality in a pheasant flock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M P; Anderson, C M; Johnson, B; Wakenell, P S

    2006-09-01

    A flock of approximately 15,000 ring-necked pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) was evaluated for a sudden increase in mortality and acute neurological signs after having been previously diagnosed 3 wk earlier with a chronic respiratory disease of undetermined etiology. Approximately 25 live birds were displaying neurological signs including circling, ataxia, and obtunded behavior and 50 birds were dead. Three birds with neurological signs were submitted for evaluation. Extensive subcutaneous hemorrhage over the head and penetrating puncture wounds through the skull and into the brain were found. Trauma from a wild predatory mammal, most likely the long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata) that had invaded the pheasant house and expressed surplus killing behavior was determined to be the cause of the acute neurological signs and mortality. The relationship of the chronic respiratory disease to the predation episode was not determined but it is possible that pheasants with severe respiratory disease may have had increased susceptibility to predation.

  20. Xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces secondary injury following trauma in an in vivo model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Luh, Clara; Gruss, Marco; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Hirnet, Tobias; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Franks, Nicholas P; Thal, Serge C; Dickinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon following traumatic brain injury, and to determine whether application of xenon has a clinically relevant therapeutic time window. Design Controlled animal study. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Male C57BL/6N mice (n=196) Interventions 75% xenon, 50% xenon or 30% xenon, with 25% oxygen (balance nitrogen) treatment following mechanical brain lesion by controlled cortical impact. Measurements & Main Results Outcome following trauma was measured using: 1) functional neurological outcome score, 2) histological measurement of contusion volume, 3) analysis of locomotor function and gait. Our study shows that xenon-treatment improves outcome following traumatic brain injury. Neurological outcome scores were significantly (p<0.05) better in xenon-treated groups in the early phase (24 hours) and up to 4 days after injury. Contusion volume was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in the xenon-treated groups. Xenon treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced contusion volume when xenon was given 15 minutes after injury or when treatment was delayed 1 hour or 3 hours after injury. Neurological outcome was significantly (p<0.05) improved when xenon treatment was given 15 minutes or 1 hour after injury. Improvements in locomotor function (p<0.05) were observed in the xenon-treated group, 1 month after trauma. Conclusions These results show for the first time that xenon improves neurological outcome and reduces contusion volume following traumatic brain injury in mice. In this model, xenon application has a therapeutic time window of up to at least 3 hours. These findings support the idea that xenon may be of benefit as a neuroprotective treatment in brain trauma patients. PMID:25188549

  1. Searching for a neurologic injury's Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition profile.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta A; Moura, Octávio; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre; Simões, Mário R

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of a Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) cognitive profile in a Portuguese neurologic injured sample. The Portuguese WAIS-III was administered to 81 mixed neurologic patients and 81 healthy matched controls selected from the Portuguese standardization sample. Although the mixed neurologic injury group performed significantly lower than the healthy controls for the majority of the WAIS-III scores (i.e., composite measures, discrepancies, and subtests), the mean scores were within the normal range and, therefore, at risk of being unobserved in a clinical evaluation. ROC curves analysis showed poor to acceptable diagnostic accuracy for the WAIS-III composite measures and subtests (Working Memory Index and Digit Span revealed the highest accuracy for discriminating between participants, respectively). Multiple regression analysis showed that both literacy and the presence of brain injury were significant predictors for all of the composite measures. In addition, multiple regression analysis also showed that literacy, age of injury onset, and years of survival predicted all seven composite measures for the mixed neurologic injured group. Despite the failure to find a WAIS-III cognitive profile for mixed neurologic patients, the results showed a significant influence of brain lesion and literacy in the performance of the WAIS-III.

  2. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  3. Acute lung injury after thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Kenneth D; Neustein, Steven M

    2010-08-01

    In this review, the authors discussed criteria for diagnosing ALI; incidence, etiology, preoperative risk factors, intraoperative management, risk-reduction strategies, treatment, and prognosis. The anesthesiologist needs to maintain an index of suspicion for ALI in the perioperative period of thoracic surgery, particularly after lung resection on the right side. Acute hypoxemia, imaging analysis for diffuse infiltrates, and detecting a noncardiogenic origin for pulmonary edema are important hallmarks of acute lung injury. Conservative intraoperative fluid administration of neutral to slightly negative fluid balance over the postoperative first week can reduce the number of ventilator days. Fluid management may be optimized with the assistance of new imaging techniques, and the anesthesiologist should monitor for transfusion-related lung injuries. Small tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg and low plateau pressures of < or =30 cmH2O may reduce organ and systemic failure. PEEP may improve oxygenation and increases organ failure-free days but has not shown a mortality benefit. The optimal mode of ventilation has not been shown in perioperative studies. Permissive hypercapnia may be needed in order to reduce lung injury from positive-pressure ventilation. NO is not recommended as a treatment. Strategies such as bronchodilation, smoking cessation, steroids, and recruitment maneuvers are unproven to benefit mortality although symptomatically they often have been shown to help ALI patients. Further studies to isolate biomarkers active in the acute setting of lung injury and pharmacologic agents to inhibit inflammatory intermediates may help improve management of this complex disease.

  4. Provision of 24 hour acute neurology care by neurologists: manpower requirements in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C; Zajicek, J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The ABN has published standards of care for patients with acute neurological disease. Derriford Hospital provides a 24 hour neurology intake service to a population of 500 000 with the equivalent of four consultants, three specialist registrars (SpRs), and four senior house officers (SHOs) with a 37 bed ward. The authors undertook a prospective study of all neurology admissions to enable calculation of manpower necessary to meet the ABN guidelines. Methods: All admissions to the neurology department were analysed prospectively for a three month period (March to May 2002). Results: There were 629 admissions (equating to 2500 per year); data were collected for 93%. 78% of admissions were emergency, 16% elective. The mean number of neurology inpatients at any time was 76, with three (4%) being elective. The main diagnostic categories were stroke (29%), headache syndrome (13%), and epilepsy or seizures (12%). With regard to emergency admissions, 94% were seen by a neurology SHO within 6 hours and 81% by an SpR or consultant within 24 hours. Twenty five percent of emergency admissions were not seen by a consultant. 55% of patients were cared for on non-neurological wards for their entire admission. Median length of stay for stroke patients was 9.5 days, compared with 4 days for other patients. 37% of patients received a neurology follow up appointment. Currently each SpR spends 18 hours per week involved in the care of acute neurology admissions. Conclusion: Meeting the ABN guidelines will require an increase in total neurology bed provision to at least 15 per 100 000 population, with the equivalent of 3 consultant sessions (11 hours/week). Meeting the European Working Time Directive will require a minimum of 8–10 SpRs working a full shift system, which will have a significant impact on training and other aspects of service delivery. PMID:14966156

  5. Visualizing the Propagation of Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Jiang, YunQing; Hamedani, Hooman; Profka, Harrilla; Kadlecek, Stephen; Clapp, Justin; Deshpande, Charuhas G.; Wu, Jue; Gee, James C.; Kavanagh, Brian P.; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical ventilation worsens acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but this secondary ‘ventilator-associated’ injury is variable and difficult to predict. We aimed to visualize the propagation of such ventilator-induced injury, in the presence (and absence) of a primary underlying lung injury, and to determine the predictors of propagation. Methods Anesthetized rats (n=20) received acid aspiration (HCl) followed by ventilation with moderate tidal volume (VT). In animals surviving ventilation for at least two hours, propagation of injury was quantified using serial computed tomography (CT). Baseline lung status was assessed by oxygenation, lung weight, and lung strain (VT/expiratory lung volume). Separate groups of rats without HCl aspiration were ventilated with large (n=10) or moderate (n=6) VT. Results In 15 rats surviving longer than two hours, CT opacities spread outwards from the initial site of injury. Propagation was associated with higher baseline strain (propagation vs. no propagation, mean ± SD: 1.52 ± 0.13 vs. 1.16 ± 0.20, p<0.01), but similar oxygenation and lung weight. Propagation did not occur where baseline strain <1.29. In healthy animals, large VT caused injury that was propagated inwards from the lung periphery; in the absence of preexisting injury, propagation did not occur where strain was <2.0. Conclusions Compared with healthy lungs, underlying injury causes propagation to occur at a lower strain threshold and, it originates at the site of injury; this suggests that tissue around the primary lesion is more sensitive. Understanding how injury is propagated may ultimately facilitate a more individualized monitoring or management. PMID:26536308

  6. Psychosocial outcomes among youth with spinal cord injury by neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Anne; Kelly, Erin H.; Klaas, Sara J.; Vogel, Lawrence C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine psychosocial outcomes of youth with spinal cord injury (SCI) as a function of neurological level (paraplegia/tetraplegia) and severity (American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS)). Design Survey research. Setting Three pediatric SCI specialty centers in the USA. Participants Youth with SCI ages 5–18 with neurological impairment classifications of: tetraplegia AIS ABC (tetraplegia ABC), paraplegia AIS ABC (paraplegia ABC), or AIS D. Outcome Measures Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale, and Children's Depression Inventory. Results Three hundred and forty youth participated; 57% were male; 60% were Caucasian, 21% Hispanic, 7% African-American, 2% Native American, and 3% reported “other”. Their mean age was 8.15 years (standard deviation (SD) = 5.84) at injury and 13.18 years (SD = 3.87) at interview. Ninety-six youth (28%) had tetraplegia ABC injuries, 191 (56%) paraplegia ABC injuries, and 53 (16%) AIS D injuries. Neurological impairment was significantly related to participation and quality of life (QOL). Specifically, youth with paraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries participated in more activities than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.002; P = 0.018, respectively) and youth with paraplegia ABC participated more often than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.006). Youth with paraplegia ABC reported higher social QOL than youth with tetraplegia ABC (P = 0.001) and AIS D injuries (P = 0.002). Groups did not differ regarding mental health. Conclusion Interventions should target youth with tetraplegia ABC, as they may need support in terms of participation, and both youth with tetraplegia ABC and AIS D injuries in terms of social integration. PMID:24621027

  7. Outcomes from a US military neurology and traumatic brain injury telemedicine program.

    PubMed

    Yurkiewicz, Ilana R; Lappan, Charles M; Neely, Edward T; Hesselbrock, Roger R; Girard, Philip D; Alphonso, Aimee L; Tsao, Jack W

    2012-09-18

    This study evaluated usage of the Army Knowledge Online (AKO) Telemedicine Consultation Program for neurology and traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases in remote overseas areas with limited access to subspecialists. We performed a descriptive analysis of quantity of consults, response times, sites where consults originated, military branches that benefitted, anatomic locations of problems, and diagnoses. This was a retrospective analysis that searched electronic databases for neurology consults from October 2006 to December 2010 and TBI consults from March 2008 to December 2010. A total of 508 consults were received for neurology, and 131 consults involved TBI. For the most part, quantity of consults increased over the years. Meanwhile, response times decreased, with a mean response time of 8 hours, 14 minutes for neurology consults and 2 hours, 44 minutes for TBI consults. Most neurology consults originated in Iraq (67.59%) followed by Afghanistan (16.84%), whereas TBI consults mainly originated from Afghanistan (40.87%) followed by Iraq (33.91%). The most common consultant diagnoses were headaches, including migraines (52.1%), for neurology cases and mild TBI/concussion (52.3%) for TBI cases. In the majority of cases, consultants recommended in-theater management. After receipt of consultant's recommendation, 84 known neurology evacuations were facilitated, and 3 known neurology evacuations were prevented. E-mail-based neurology and TBI subspecialty teleconsultation is a viable method for overseas providers in remote locations to receive expert recommendations for a range of neurologic conditions. These recommendations can facilitate medically necessary patient evacuations or prevent evacuations for which on-site care is preferable.

  8. Progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junpeng; Huang, Siqing; Qin, Shu; You, Chao; Zeng, Yunhui

    2016-12-22

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, and the identification of effective, inexpensive and widely practicable treatments for brain injury is of great public health importance worldwide. Progesterone is a naturally produced hormone that has well-defined pharmacokinetics, is widely available, inexpensive, and has steroidal, neuroactive and neurosteroidal actions in the central nervous system. It is, therefore, a potential candidate for treating TBI patients. However, uncertainty exists regarding the efficacy of this treatment. This is an update of our previous review of the same title, published in 2012. To assess the effects of progesterone on neurologic outcome, mortality and disability in patients with acute TBI. To assess the safety of progesterone in patients with acute TBI. We updated our searches of the following databases: the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register (30 September 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; Issue 9, 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid; 1950 to 30 September 2016), Embase (Ovid; 1980 to 30 September 2016), Web of Science Core Collection: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S; 1990 to 30 September 2016); and trials registries: Clinicaltrials.gov (30 September 2016) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (30 September 2016). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progesterone versus no progesterone (or placebo) for the treatment of people with acute TBI. Two review authors screened search results independently to identify potentially relevant studies for inclusion. Independently, two review authors selected trials that met the inclusion criteria from the results of the screened searches, with no disagreement. We included five RCTs in the review, with a total of 2392 participants. We assessed one trial to be at low risk of bias; two at unclear risk of bias (in one multicentred trial the possibility of

  9. Latent Growth Modeling of nursing care dependency of acute neurological inpatients.

    PubMed

    Piredda, M; Ghezzi, V; De Marinis, M G; Palese, A

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal three-time point study, addressing how neurological adult patient care dependency varies from the admission time to the 3rd day of acute hospitalization. Nursing care dependency was measured with the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) and a Latent Growth Modeling approach was used to analyse the CDS trend in 124 neurosurgical and stroke inpatients. Care dependence followed a decreasing linear trend. Results can help nurse-managers planning an appropriate amount of nursing care for acute neurological patients during their initial stage of hospitalization. Further studies are needed aimed at investigating the determinants of nursing care dependence during the entire in-hospital stay.

  10. Pertussis immunisation and serious acute neurological illness in children.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D L; Ross, E M; Alderslade, R; Bellman, M H; Rawson, N S

    1981-01-01

    The first 1000 cases notified to the National Childhood Encephalopathy Study were analysed. The diagnoses included encephalitis/encephalopathy, prolonged convulsions, infantile spasms, and Reye's syndrome. Eighty-eight of the children had had a recent infectious disease, including 19 with pertussis. Only 35 of the notified children (3.5%) had received pertussis antigen within seven days before becoming ill. Of 1955 control children matched for age, sex, and area of residence, 34 (1.7%) had been immunised with pertussis vaccine within the seven days before the date on which they became of the same age as the corresponding notified child. The relative risk of a notified child having had pertussis immunisation within that time interval was 2.4 (p less than 0.001). Of the 35 notified children, 32 had no previous neurological abnormality. A year later two had died, nine had developmental retardation, and 21 were normal. A significance association was shown between serious neurological illness and pertussis vaccine, though cases were few and most children recovered completely. PMID:6786580

  11. MRI in the acute phase of spinal cord traumatic lesions: Relationship between MRI findings and neurological outcome.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Chiara; Colaiacomo, Maria Chiara; Rojas Beccaglia, Mario; Di Biasi, Claudio; Casciani, Emanuele; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the role of emergency MRI in the diagnosis of acute spinal injuries, and to correlate the MRI pattern with the neurological outcome. Thirty-eight patients with MRI-proven spinal cord injury were classified according to the Frankel classification. MRI was always performed within 8 hours from trauma. Frankel classification divides spinal cord injuries into 5 classes of decreasing severity based on the presence of motor and/or sensory function loss. On the basis of the MRI findings the patients were classified in 3 groups: group 1 (intramedullary haematoma), group 2 (multi-metamer oedema), group 3 (single-metamer oedema). All patients underwent neurosurgery and were clinically evaluated until the stabilization of neurological recovery. Mean follow-up time was 12 months. The MR images were retrospectively evaluated and correlated to the neurological outcome. Twenty-eight patients showed complete motor loss (Frankel classes A and B); of these 28 patients 12 (42.8%) had MRI evidence of intramedullary haematoma, 12 (42.8%) had multi-metamer oedema and 4 (14.4%) had single-metamer oedema. Of the 10 patients with incomplete motor loss, none had MRI evidence of haemorrhage, 4 (40%) showed multi-metamer oedema and 6 (60%) showed single-metamer oedema. Follow-up clinical assessment revealed that 14/38 patients (36,8%) had clinical improvement and 2/38 cases (5%) had a complete motor recovery, as demonstrated by the move to a higher Frankel class. Our results, consistent with previous reports, confirm a strong correlation between the MRI appearance of traumatic spinal cord injuries in acute phase and long-term recovery of motor and sensory function: patients with initial haemorrhage had a poor prognosis, whereas those with spinal cord oedema had a good clinical outcome, as demonstrated by the passage to a higher Frankel class. MRI is particularly important in the initial evaluation of unconscious patients who cannot undergo a motor and sensory neurological

  12. Silica nanoparticles as vehicles for therapy delivery in neurological injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Desiree

    Acrolein, a very reactive aldehyde, is a culprit in the biochemical cascade after primary, mechanical spinal cord injury (SCI), which leads to the destruction of tissue initially unharmed, referred to as "secondary injury". Additionally, in models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and some clinical research, acrolein levels are significantly increased. This aldehyde overwhelms the natural anti-oxidant system, reacts freely with proteins, and releases during lipid peroxidation (LPO), effectively regenerating its self. Due to its ability to make more copies of itself in the presence of tissue via lipid peroxidation, researchers believe that acrolein plays a role in the increased destruction of the central nervous system in both SCI and MS. Hydralazine, an FDA-approved hypertension drug, has been shown to scavenge acrolein, but its side effects and short half life at the appropriate dose for acrolein scavenging must be improved for beneficial clinical translation. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Nanoparticles made from silica provide distinct advantages. They form porous networks that can carry therapeutic molecules throughout the body. Therefore, a nanomedical approach has been designed using silica nanoparticles as a porous delivery vehicle hydralazine. The silica nanoparticles are formed in a one-step method that incorporates poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG), a stealth molecule, directly onto the nanoparticles. As an additional avenue for study, a natural product in green tea, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), has been explored for its ability to react with acrolein, disabling its reactive capabilities. Upon demonstration of attenuating acrolein, EGCG's delivery may also be improved using the nanomedical approach. The

  13. Acute injuries of the distal radioulnar joint.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, S C; Hildreth, D H; Lichtman, D M

    2000-08-01

    Distal radioulnar joint injuries can occur in isolation or in association with distal radius fractures, Galeazzi fractures, Essex-Lopresti injuries, and both-bone forearm fractures. The authors have classified DRUJ/TFCC injuries into stable, partially unstable (subluxation), and unstable (dislocation) patterns based on the injured structures and clinical findings. Clinical findings and plain radiographs are usually sufficient to diagnose the lesion, but axial CT scans are pathognomonic. Diagnostic arthroscopy is the next test of choice to visualize stable and partially unstable lesions. Stable injuries of the DRUJ/TFCC unresponsive to conservative measures require arthroscopic debridement of the TFCC tear, along with ulnar shortening if there is ulnar-positive variance. Partially unstable injuries, on the other hand, are treated with direct arthroscopic or open repair of the TFCC tear, once again, along with ulnar shortening if ulnar-positive variance is present. Unstable injuries include simple and complex DRUJ dislocations. A simple DRUJ dislocation is easily reducible but may be stable or unstable. In complex dislocation, reduction is not possible because there is soft tissue interposition or a significant tear. After the associated injury is dealt with, treatment for complex injuries requires exploration of the DRUJ, extraction of the interposed tissue, repair of the soft tissues, and open reduction and internal fixation of the ulnar styloid fracture (if present and displaced). The early recognition and appropriate treatment of an acute DRUJ injury are critical to avoid progression to a chronic DRUJ disorder, the treatment of which is much more difficult and much less satisfying.

  14. Surfactant for Pediatric Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Willson, Douglas F.; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS, including the multifaceted pathology of inflammatory lung injury, the effectiveness of surfactant delivery in injured lungs, and composition-based activity differences among clinical exogenous surfactant preparations. PMID:18501754

  15. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  16. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Peck, Brandon W; Workeneh, Biruh; Kadikoy, Huseyin; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2014-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) is commonly used as an irrigant during dental procedures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI). In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  17. Dengue-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Fernando Picollo; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is presently the most relevant viral infection transmitted by a mosquito bite that represents a major threat to public health worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious and potentially lethal complication of this disease, and the actual incidence is unknown. In this review, we will assess the most relevant epidemiological and clinical data regarding dengue and the available evidence on the frequency, etiopathogenesis, outcomes and treatment of dengue-associated AKI. PMID:26613023

  18. Aspirin-Induced Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Satoskar, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin is thought to be a relatively safe drug in adults. The association of aspirin and Reye syndrome in children is well documented. We report a 41-year-old female with pericarditis who was treated with high-dose aspirin and developed subsequent acute liver injury. After discontinuation of aspirin, liver enzyme elevation and right upper quadrant pain both resolved. We conclude that high-dose aspirin should be considered as a potentially hepatotoxic agent. PMID:26157904

  19. Neurological outcome in surgically treated patients with incomplete closed traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Singhal, B; Mohammed, A; Samuel, J; Mues, J; Kluger, P

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective study based on a reference paper. Neurological outcome in patients who were managed surgically with closed traumatic cervical spine injury was evaluated using the ASIA motor scoring system and Frankel grading. To assess the accuracy of motor charting and Frankel grading as tools to evaluate neurological outcome in closed traumatic cervical spine injury, and also to evaluate how the surgically treated patients fared in their neurological recovery by measurement tools as in the reference paper. National Spinal Injuries Centre, Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Aylesbury, UK. Fifty-seven patients were admitted within 2 days of the injury with closed traumatic cervical spine injuries (1997-2004). Thirty-seven (65%) met the inclusion criteria as per the referenced paper, that is, were treated surgically, were Frankel grade B and above and had at least 12 months follow up. The remaining 20 patients were not included as they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The breakdown of the 20 patients is given in Table 1. The mean recovery percentage (MRP) and mean deficit percentage (MDP) were calculated as per the referenced paper. An evaluation of 37 patients surgically treated, who had follow up of at least 12 months, showed that preservation of pin prick below the level of lesion, and preservation of anal tone and perianal sensation were good prognostic indicators. There was no correlation between degree of encroachment of canal or the degree of kyphosis to MDP or MRP. The mean time from injury to mobilization was 7.6 days in 25 out of 37 patients. Twelve of the 37 patients had prolonged immobilization because of ITU stay or because they were initially treated conservatively. Three out of the 37 patients developed DVT/PE. Mean hospital stay was 6.4 months. The neurological outcome in surgically treated patients is comparable to the conservatively treated patients. The Frankel grading and ASIA motor charting combined is a powerful tool in assessing the neurological

  20. Very early administration of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wright, David W; Yeatts, Sharon D; Silbergleit, Robert; Palesch, Yuko Y; Hertzberg, Vicki S; Frankel, Michael; Goldstein, Felicia C; Caveney, Angela F; Howlett-Smith, Harriet; Bengelink, Erin M; Manley, Geoffrey T; Merck, Lisa H; Janis, L Scott; Barsan, William G

    2014-12-25

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Progesterone has been shown to improve neurologic outcome in multiple experimental models and two early-phase trials involving patients with TBI. We conducted a double-blind, multicenter clinical trial in which patients with severe, moderate-to-severe, or moderate acute TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 to 12, on a scale from 3 to 15, with lower scores indicating a lower level of consciousness) were randomly assigned to intravenous progesterone or placebo, with the study treatment initiated within 4 hours after injury and administered for a total of 96 hours. Efficacy was defined as an increase of 10 percentage points in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome, as determined with the use of the stratified dichotomy of the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score at 6 months after injury. Secondary outcomes included mortality and the Disability Rating Scale score. A total of 882 of the planned sample of 1140 patients underwent randomization before the trial was stopped for futility with respect to the primary outcome. The study groups were similar with regard to baseline characteristics; the median age of the patients was 35 years, 73.7% were men, 15.2% were black, and the mean Injury Severity Score was 24.4 (on a scale from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating greater severity). The most frequent mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle accident. There was no significant difference between the progesterone group and the placebo group in the proportion of patients with a favorable outcome (relative benefit of progesterone, 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85 to 1.06; P=0.35). Phlebitis or thrombophlebitis was more frequent in the progesterone group than in the placebo group (relative risk, 3.03; CI, 1.96 to 4.66). There were no significant differences in the other prespecified safety outcomes. This clinical trial did not show a benefit of progesterone over placebo in the

  1. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis due to multiple wasp stings

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Hemachandar

    2014-01-01

    In most patients, wasp stings cause local reactions and rarely anaphylaxis. Acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis are unusual complications of wasp stings. We report a case of acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis secondary to multiple wasp stings. A 55-year-old farmer developed multi organ dysfunction with acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis 3 days after he had sustained multiple wasp stings. The etiology of acute kidney injury is probably both rhabdomyolysis and acute tubular necrosis. He improved completely after hemodialysis and intensive care. PMID:25097363

  2. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katie N.; Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Allan, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection) have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review. PMID:25705177

  3. Combination of methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone promotes recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-gong; Lin, Xiang-jin; Du, Jun-hua; Xu, San-zhong; Lou, Xian-feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone exhibits anti-inflammatory antioxidant properties, and rosiglitazone acts as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in the spinal cord. Methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone have been clinically used during the early stages of secondary spinal cord injury. Because of the complexity and diversity of the inflammatory process after spinal cord injury, a single drug cannot completely inhibit inflammation. Therefore, we assumed that a combination of methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone might promote recovery of neurological function after secondary spinal cord injury. In this study, rats were intraperitoneally injected with methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg) and rosiglitazone (2 mg/kg) at 1 hour after injury, and methylprednisolone (15 mg/kg) at 24 and 48 hours after injury. Rosiglitazone was then administered once every 12 hours for 7 consecutive days. Our results demonstrated that a combined treatment with methylprednisolone and rosiglitazone had a more pronounced effect on attenuation of inflammation and cell apoptosis, as well as increased functional recovery, compared with either single treatment alone, indicating that a combination better promoted recovery of neurological function after injury. PMID:27904502

  4. Survival, neurological recovery and morbidity after spinal cord injuries following road accidents in Israel.

    PubMed

    Tchvaloon, E; Front, L; Gelernter, I; Ronen, J; Bluvshtein, V; Catz, A

    2008-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study. Assess outcomes in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) following road accidents, and factors that affect them. Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel. A total of 143 patients admitted for rehabilitation between 1962 and 2004. Survival rates were estimated using the product limit (Kaplan-Meyer) method and their association with risk factors was analyzed with the Cox model. Neurological recovery was determined by comparing the Frankel grade at admission to rehabilitation and at discharge. The relation between recovery and various factors was tested with logistic regression. The risk of SCI in road accidents is higher among car drivers and motorcycle or bicycle riders. Median survival was 43 years. Survival was negatively associated with age at injury (P<0.0002) and with diagnosis of pressure sores (P=0.0065). Recovery of at least one Frankel grade occurred in 29.1% of patients. Useful recovery (upgrade to Frankel grade D or E) occurred in 23.1% of all patients. Neurological recovery was negatively associated with the severity of neurological deficit (P<0.001) and with thoracic injuries (P=0.046). The most common complications were pressure sores and those of the urinary and respiratory systems. In SCI following road accidents, survival rates were higher and recovery rates lower than in mixed types of trauma. This may be related to better compensation followed by better nursing for road accident victims in Israel, which may prevent life-shortening complications, and to more severe injuries caused by road accidents.

  5. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination.

  6. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E.; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination. PMID:24688139

  7. Medical and Nonstroke Neurologic Causes of Acute, Continuous Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-08-01

    Most patients with the acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) have vestibular neuritis or stroke or, in the setting of trauma, a posttraumatic vestibular cause. Some medical and nonstroke causes of the AVS must also be considered. Multiple sclerosis is the most common diagnosis in this group. Other less common causes include cerebellar masses, inflammation and infection, mal de debarquement, various toxins, Wernicke disease, celiac-related dizziness, and bilateral vestibulopathy. Finally, there may be unmasking of prior posterior circulation events by various physiologic alterations such as alterations of temperature, blood pressure, electrolytes, or various medications, especially sedating agents.

  8. Canadian benchmarks for acute injury care.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lynne; Evans, David; Yanchar, Natalie L; Thakore, Jaimini; Stelfox, Henry Thomas; Hameed, Sayed Morad; Simons, Richard; Kortbeek, John; Clément, Julien; Lauzier, François; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2017-10-01

    Acute care injury outcomes vary substantially across Canadian provinces and trauma centres. Our aim was to develop Canadian benchmarks to monitor mortality and hospital length of stay (LOS) for injury admissions. Benchmarks were derived using data from the Canadian National Trauma Registry on patients with major trauma admitted to any level I or II trauma centre in Canada and from the following patient subgroups: isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI), isolated thoracoabdominal injury, multisystem blunt injury, age 65 years or older. We assessed predictive validity using measures of discrimination and calibration, and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of replacing analytically complex methods (multiple imputation, shrinkage estimates and flexible modelling) with simple models that can be implemented locally. The mortality risk adjustment model had excellent discrimination and calibration (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.886, Hosmer-Lemeshow 36). The LOS risk-adjustment model predicted 29% of the variation in LOS. Overall, observed:expected ratios of mortality and mean LOS generated by an analytically simple model correlated strongly with those generated by analytically complex models (r > 0.95, κ on outliers > 0.90). We propose Canadian benchmarks that can be used to monitor quality of care in Canadian trauma centres using Excel (see the appendices, available at canjsurg.ca). The program can be implemented using local trauma registries, providing that at least 100 patients are available for analysis.

  9. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  10. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury: Cases with classification challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kirshblum, S. C.; Biering-Sorensen, F.; Betz, R.; Burns, S.; Donovan, W.; Graves, D. E.; Johansen, M.; Jones, L.; Mulcahey, M. J.; Rodriguez, G. M.; Schmidt-Read, M.; Steeves, J. D.; Tansey, K.; Waring, W.

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine the levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association regarding the classification. The committee felt that disseminating some of the challenging questions posed, as well as the responses, would be of benefit for professionals utilizing the ISNCSCI. Case scenarios that were submitted to the committee are presented with the responses as well as the thought processes considered by the committee members. The importance of this documentation is to clarify some points as well as update the SCI community regarding possible revisions that will be needed in the future based upon some rules that require clarification. PMID:24559416

  11. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury: Cases With Classification Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Biering-Sørensen, F.; Betz, R.; Burns, S.; Donovan, W.; Graves, D.E.; Johansen, M.; Jones, L.; Mulcahey, M.J.; Rodriguez, G.M.; Schmidt-Read, M.; Steeves, J.D.; Tansey, K.; Waring, W.

    2014-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) regarding the classification. The committee felt that disseminating some of the challenging questions posed, as well as the responses, would be of benefit for professionals utilizing the ISNCSCI. Case scenarios that were submitted to the committee are presented with the responses as well as the thought processes considered by the committee members. The importance of this documentation is to clarify some points as well as update the SCI community regarding possible revisions that will be needed in the future based upon some rules that require clarification. PMID:25477729

  12. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury: cases with classification challenges.

    PubMed

    Kirshblum, S C; Biering-Sorensen, F; Betz, R; Burns, S; Donovan, W; Graves, D E; Johansen, M; Jones, L; Mulcahey, M J; Rodriguez, G M; Schmidt-Read, M; Steeves, J D; Tansey, K; Waring, W

    2014-03-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is routinely used to determine the levels of injury and to classify the severity of the injury. Questions are often posed to the International Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association regarding the classification. The committee felt that disseminating some of the challenging questions posed, as well as the responses, would be of benefit for professionals utilizing the ISNCSCI. Case scenarios that were submitted to the committee are presented with the responses as well as the thought processes considered by the committee members. The importance of this documentation is to clarify some points as well as update the SCI community regarding possible revisions that will be needed in the future based upon some rules that require clarification.

  13. Epidemiology of Overuse and Acute Injuries Among Competitive Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingzhen; Tibbetts, Abigail S.; Covassin, Tracey; Cheng, Gang; Nayar, Saloni; Heiden, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although overuse injuries are gaining attention, epidemiologic studies on overuse injuries in male and female collegiate athletes are lacking. (70.7%) acute injuries were reported. The overall injury rate was Objective: To report the epidemiology of overuse injuries sustained by collegiate athletes and to compare the rates of overuse and acute injuries. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1317 reported injuries sustained by 573 male and female athletes in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005–2008 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): The injury and athlete-exposure (AE) data were obtained from the Sports Injury Monitoring System. An injury was coded as either overuse or acute based on the nature of injury. Injury rate was calculated as the total number of overuse (or acute) injuries during the study period divided by the total number of AEs during the same period. Results: A total of 386 (29.3%) overuse injuries and 931 63.1 per 10000 AEs. The rate ratio (RR) of acute versus overuse injuries was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05, 2.67). Football had the highest RR (RR = 8.35, 95% CI = 5.38, 12.97), and women's rowing had the lowest (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.51, 1.10). Men had a higher acute injury rate than women (49.8 versus 38.6 per 10000 AEs). Female athletes had a higher rate of overuse injury than male athletes (24.6 versus 13.2 per 10000 AEs). More than half of the overuse injuries (50.8%) resulted in no time loss from sport. Conclusions: Additional studies are needed to examine why female athletes are at greater risk for overuse injuries and identify the best practices for prevention and rehabilitation of overuse injuries. PMID:22488286

  14. Transcranial Doppler to Predict Neurologic Outcome after Mild to Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Pierre; Almeras, Luc; Manhes, Pauline; Sanders, Laurence; Levrat, Albrice; David, Jean-Stephane; Cinotti, Raphael; Chabanne, Russel; Gloaguen, Aurélie; Bobbia, Xavier; Thoret, Sophie; Oujamaa, Lydia; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Payen, Jean-François; Asehnoune, Karim; Pes, Philippe; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Mirek, Sébastien; Albasini, François; Scrimgeour, Caron; Thouret, Jean-Marc; Chartier, Freddy; Ginet, Marc

    2016-08-01

    To assess the performance of transcranial Doppler (TCD) in predicting neurologic worsening after mild to moderate traumatic brain injury. The authors conducted a prospective observational study across 17 sites. TCD was performed upon admission in 356 patients (Glasgow Coma Score [GCS], 9 to 15) with mild lesions on cerebral computed tomography scan. Normal TCD was defined as a pulsatility index of less than 1.25 and diastolic blood flow velocity higher than 25 cm/s in the two middle cerebral arteries. The primary endpoint was secondary neurologic deterioration on day 7. Twenty patients (6%) developed secondary neurologic deterioration within the first posttraumatic week. TCD thresholds had 80% sensitivity (95% CI, 56 to 94%) and 79% specificity (95% CI, 74 to 83%) to predict neurologic worsening. The negative predictive values and positive predictive values of TCD were 98% (95% CI, 96 to 100%) and 18% (95% CI, 11to 28%), respectively. In patients with minor traumatic brain injury (GCS, 14 to 15), the sensitivity and specificity of TCD were 91% (95% CI, 59 to 100%) and 80% (95% CI, 75 to 85%), respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of a multivariate predictive model including age and GCS was significantly improved with the adjunction of TCD. Patients with abnormal TCD on admission (n = 86 patients) showed a more altered score for the disability rating scale on day 28 compared to those with normal TCD (n = 257 patients). TCD measurements upon admission may provide additional information about neurologic outcome after mild to moderate traumatic brain injury. This technique could be useful for in-hospital triage in this context. (Anesthesiology 2016; 125:346-54).

  15. Updates for the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kirshblum, Steven; Waring, William

    2014-08-01

    The International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) is the most widely used classification in the field of spinal cord injury medicine. Since its first publication in 1982, multiple revisions refining the recommended examination, scaling, and classification have taken place to improve communication, consistency, and clarity. This article describes a brief historical perspective on the development and changes over the years leading to the current ISNCSCI, detailing the most recent updates of 2011 and the worksheet 2013 as well as issues facing the ISNCSCI for the future.

  16. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  17. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  18. Management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2016-12-01

    Surgical management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries should be focused on realigning the torn ends of the ligaments to allow for healing potential. The most widely utilized treatment methods incorporate the use of metal hardware, which can alter the biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint. This leads to a second surgical procedure for hardware removal once the ligaments have healed. Patients with unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries managed with arthroscopy-assisted procedures have shown good and excellent clinical outcomes, without the need for a second operation. These procedures incorporate a coracoclavicular suspension device aimed to function as an internal brace, narrowing the coracoclavicular space thus allowing for healing of the torn coracoclavicular ligaments. The lesser morbidity of a minimally invasive approach and the possibility to diagnose and treat concomitant intraarticular injuries; no obligatory implant removal, and the possibility of having a straight visualization of the inferior aspect of the base of the coracoid (convenient when placing coracoclavicular fixation systems) are the main advantages of the arthroscopic approach over classic open procedures. This article consists on a narrative review of the literature in regard to the management of acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

  19. [Acute and chronic injuries after electrical accidents].

    PubMed

    Veiersted, Kaj Bo; Goffeng, Lars Ole; Moian, Rune; Remo, Eirik; Solli, Are; Erikssen, Jan

    2003-09-11

    Electrical accidents are potentially fatal incidents with effect on the cardiovascular, nerve and musculoskeletal systems and on the skin (burns). The electrical engineering industry points out that the follow-up of injured persons from site of accident to hospital is quite random. This paper gives a review of the current literature and proposes guidelines for the follow-up of victims of electrical accidents. A search of the literature was conducted on Medline, Embase, Biosis, Healthline, the Cochrane Library, the ISI citation databases, and on several other search engines. The revised guidelines were developed in consultation with 23 medical and industry institutions. Serious acute effects of electrical accidents include cardiac arrest, respiration failure, burns (also (internal burns) with necrosis of e.g. muscle tissue), injuries to the nerve system, and renal failure. Traumas caused by falls are also frequent. Possible chronic effects are mostly seen in the nerve system as encephalopathy and psychological sequelae or as spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. Most importantly, long latent periods are possible for some chronic nerve injuries. This paper suggest guidelines for acute (on the spot) action and criteria for referral to hospital, observation in hospital and further follow-up.

  20. Tree stand falls: A persistent cause of neurological injury in hunting

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Clifford A; Plog, Benjamin A; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L; Huang, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize and compare our current series of patients to prior reports in order to identify any changes in the incidence of neurological injury related to hunting accidents in Rochester, New York. METHODS: All tree stand-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center from September 2003 through November 2011 were reviewed. Information was obtained from the hospital’s trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries. RESULTS: Fifty-four patients were identified. Ninety-six percent of patients were male with a mean age of 47.9 years (range 15-69). The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.53 ± 1.17 (range 2-34). The average height of fall was 18.2 feet (range 4-40 feet). All patients fell to the ground with the exception of one who landed on rocks, and many hit the tree or branches on the way down. A reason for the fall was documented in only 13 patients, and included tree stand construction (3), loss of balance (3), falling asleep (3), structural failure (2), safety harness breakage (3) or light-headedness (1). The most common injuries were spinal fractures (54%), most commonly in the cervical spine (69%), followed by the thoracic (38%) and lumbar (21%) spine. Eight patients required operative repair. Head injuries occurred in 22%. Other systemic injuries include rib/clavicular fractures (47%), pelvic fractures (11%), solid organ injury (23%), and pneumothorax or hemothorax (19%). No patient deaths were reported. The average hospital length of stay was 6.56 ± 1.07 d. Most patients were discharged home without (72%) or with (11%) services and 17% required rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: Falls from hunting tree stands are still common, with a high rate of neurological injury. Compared to a decade ago we have made no progress in preventing these neurological injuries, despite an increase in safety advances. Neurosurgeons must continue to advocate for increased safety awareness and participate in

  1. The Impact of Acupuncture on Neurological Recovery in Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruijie; Liu, Xin; Clark, Justin; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2015-12-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has become a significant social and economic burden for patients and their families. The effect of acupuncture on neurological recovery in individuals with SCI remains inconclusive despite previous studies and meta-analyses. The aim of the current study was to perform a more rigorous systematic review and bias-adjusted meta-analysis of studies so that the overall impact of acupuncture on neurological recovery in SCI can be determined. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) only were included and were searched for in seven databases through to August 2014. Four key outcomes were assessed: neurological recovery, motor function, sensory function, and functional recovery. Several statistical approaches were compared, models were tested for robustness using sensitivity analysis, and results are presented as weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes and relative risk (RR) for binary outcomes. The included studies' susceptibility to bias was also assessed. A total of 12 studies were included after exclusions were applied. Heterogeneity was evident among the studies included. Pooled analyses showed that acupuncture may have a beneficial effect on neurological recovery (RRs: 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-1.50), motor function (WMD: 6.86, 95% CI: 0.41-13.31), and functional recovery (SMD: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.56-1.21) and all statistical approaches concurred. Sensitivity analyses suggested that the smaller studies (sample size <30), those with acute disease, and studies that used varying acupuncture sessions demonstrated a larger magnitude of effect. However, studies were generally of poor quality and publication bias favoring positive studies was evident. Therefore, the benefit of acupuncture we report is by no means definitive and well-designed future studies are recommended to confirm this.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

    PubMed

    Papasotiriou, Marios; Betsi, Grigoria; Tsironi, Maria; Assimakopoulos, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by muscle injury, drugs or alcohol and presents with muscle weakness and pain. It is characterized by rise in serum creatine kinase, aminotransferases and electrolytes as well as myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria may cause acute kidney injury by direct proximal tubule cytotoxicity, renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation and distal tubule obstruction. Muscle pain and weakness as well as vascular injury have been reported after acupuncture. We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

  3. Acute neurologic disease in Porcine rubulavirus experimentally infected piglets.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Jenifer; Gómez-Núñez, Luis; Lara-Romero, Rocío; Diosdado, Fernando; Martínez-Lara, Atalo; Jasso, Miguel; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical disease, humoral response and viral distribution of recent Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) isolates in experimentally infected pigs. Four, 6-piglet (5-days old) groups were employed (G1-84, G2-93, G3-147, and G4-T). Three viral strains were used for the experimental infection: the reference strain LPMV-1984 (Michoacán 1984) and two other strains isolated in 2013, one in Queretaro (Qro/93/2013) and the other in Michoacán (Mich/147/2013). Each strain was genetically characterized by amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding hemagglutinin-neuroamidase (HN). The inoculation was performed through the oronasal and ocular routes, at a dose of 1×10(6)TCID50/ml. Subsequently, the signs were evaluated daily and necropsies were performed on 3 different days post infection (dpi). We recorded all micro- and macroscopic lesions. Organs from the nervous, lymphatic, and respiratory system were analyzed by quantifying the viral RNA load and the presence of the infectious virus. The presence of the viral antigen in organs was evidenced through immunohistochemistry. Seroconversion was evaluated through the use of a hemagglutination inhibition test. In the characterization of gene HN, only three substitutions were identified in strain Mich/147/2013, two in strain LPMV/1984 (fourth passage) and one in strain Qro/93/2013, with respect to reference strain LPMV-84, these changes had not been identified as virulence factors in previously reported strains. Neurological alterations associated with the infection were found in all three experimental groups starting from 3dpi. Groups G1-84 and G3-147 presented the most exacerbated nervous signs. Group G2-93 only presented milder signs including slight motor incoordination, and an increased rectal temperature starting from day 5 post infection (PI). The main histopathological findings were the presence of a mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate (lymphocytic/monocytic) surrounding the

  4. Torsade de pointes indicates early neurologic damage in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Yen; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Lin, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Chung; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tsai, Tsung-Neng

    2013-12-01

    Torsade de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is related to QT prolongation. Although QT prolongation is commonly seen in acute stroke, TdP is rare. We report the case of a 78-year-old woman with ischemic stroke who presented with TdP as the initial manifestation of early neurologic deterioration. We hypothesized that an increase in intracranial pressure may result in neurohormonal activation, QT prolongation, and then myocardial damage, leading to TdP. We highlight that new onset of TdP in a patient with stroke may reflect neurologic deterioration, requiring further evaluation and specific intervention.

  5. Caffeine impairs short-term neurological outcome after concussive head injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Al Moutaery, Khalaf; Al Deeb, Saleh; Ahmad Khan, Haseeb; Tariq, Mohammad

    2003-09-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous neuroprotective agent that is released during ischemia, hypoxia, epilepsy, and ischemic brain injury. Caffeine is a receptor antagonist for adenosine that might interfere with the neuroprotective effect of adenosine in ischemic-hypoxic conditions. An investigation was undertaken to study the effect of caffeine on neurological function, edema formation, and blood-brain barrier permeability after experimental head injury in rats. Adult female Wistar rats classified into different groups received caffeine intraperitoneally at doses of 0, 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg body weight. Thirty minutes after the caffeine treatment, the animals were subjected to concussive head injury (CHI) administered by a controlled cortical impact device. Neurological severity score was recorded in each rat at 2 hours after CHI. Specific gravity, water content (as an indicator of edema), and blood-brain barrier impairment were analyzed in the cortical tissue surrounding the injury site. The levels of myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde in the cortical region were measured as indicators of neutrophil infiltration and lipid peroxidation, respectively. A significant increase in righting latency and neurological deficiency after CHI was observed in caffeine-treated rats as compared with untreated animals. Although no deaths occurred in the rats exposed to CHI after pretreatment with saline, pretreatment with caffeine caused significant mortality of animals after trauma in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine also exacerbated neutrophil infiltration, edema, and disruption of blood-brain barrier in the traumatic cortex. Light microscopy of brain revealed more severe hemorrhage and neuronal degeneration in the injured hemisphere of caffeine-treated rats as compared with rats in the injury-alone group. A significant increase in malondialdehyde in the brain of injured rats treated with caffeine before CHI clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress. Caffeine adversely affects

  6. Synthetic cannabinoids and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Faisal; Prabhakar, Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCB) are a family of chemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors and cause psychoactive effects. Over the past few years, they have been increasingly used for recreational purposes, especially by young adults, and have been reported to have many adverse effects. Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been recently reported; the pathophysiology of SCB-induced AKI is unknown. We report three cases of AKI in the setting of SCB use. The peak serum creatinine levels ranged from 3.0 to 5.7 mg/dL; one patient required hemodialysis. SCB can induce AKI. PMID:26424946

  7. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  8. Acute kidney injury in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H

    2013-08-01

    Most patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) are older than 65 years. Specific structural and functional changes that occur in the aging kidney predispose the elderly patient to AKI. This risk is further compounded by comorbid conditions, polypharmacy, and the need for invasive procedures. When AKI does occur, it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although morbidity and mortality increases with advancing age, many elderly patients can survive AKI and do well. Thus, decision making should be thoughtful and individualized, and not dependent on age. Whenever possible, preventive approaches should be pursued to lessen the burden of AKI.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury: Diagnostic Approaches and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a significant independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. In the last ten years a large number of publications have highlighted the limitations of traditional approaches and the inadequacies of conventional biomarkers to diagnose and monitor renal insufficiency in the acute setting. A great effort was directed not only to the discovery and validation of new biomarkers aimed to detect AKI more accurately but also to standardise the definition of AKI. Despite the advances in both areas, biomarkers have not yet entered into routine clinical practice and the definition of this syndrome has many areas of uncertainty. This review will discuss the controversies in diagnosis and the potential of novel biomarkers to improve the definition of the syndrome. PMID:28167845

  10. Historical perspective: neurological advances from studies of war injuries and illnesses.

    PubMed

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2009-10-01

    Early in the 20th century during the Russo-Japanese War and World War I (WWI), some of the most important, lasting contributions to clinical neurology were descriptive clinical studies, especially those concerning war-related peripheral nerve disorders (eg, Hoffmann-Tinel sign, Guillain-Barré-Strohl syndrome [GBS]) and occipital bullet wounds (eg, the retinal projection on the cortex by Inouye and later by Holmes and Lister, and the functional partitioning of visual processes in the occipital cortex by Riddoch), but there were also other important descriptive studies concerning war-related aphasia, cerebellar injuries, and spinal cord injuries (eg, cerebellar injuries by Holmes, and autonomic dysreflexia by Head and Riddoch). Later progress, during and shortly after World War II (WWII), included major progress in understanding the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injuries by Denny-Brown, Russell, and Holbourn, pioneering accident injury studies by Cairns and Holbourn, promulgation of helmets to prevent motorcycle injuries by Cairns, development of comprehensive multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation by Rusk, and development of spinal cord injury care by Munro, Guttman, and Bors. These studies and developments were possible only because of the large number of cases that allowed individual physicians the opportunity to collect, collate, and synthesize observations of numerous cases in a short span of time. Such studies also required dedicated, disciplined, and knowledgeable investigators who made the most out of their opportunities to systematically assess large numbers of seriously ill and injured soldiers under stressful and often overtly dangerous situations.

  11. Maternal Cigarette Smoke Exposure Worsens Neurological Outcomes in Adolescent Offspring with Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yik L; Saad, Sonia; Machaalani, Rita; Oliver, Brian G; Vissel, Bryce; Pollock, Carol; Jones, Nicole M; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy occurs in approximately 6 per 1000 term newborns leading to devastating neurological consequences, such as cerebral palsy and seizures. Maternal smoking is one of the prominent risk factors contributing to HI injury. Mitochondrial integrity plays a critical role in neural injury and repair during HI. We previously showed that maternal cigarette smoke exposure (SE) can reduce brain mitochondrial fission and autophagosome markers in male offspring. This was accompanied by increased brain cell apoptosis (active caspase-3) and DNA fragmentation (TUNEL staining). Here, we aimed to investigate whether maternal SE leads to more severe neurological damage after HI brain injury in male offspring. Female BALB/c mice (8 weeks) were exposed to cigarette smoke prior to mating, during gestation, and lactation. At postnatal day 10, half of the pups from each litter underwent left carotid artery occlusion, followed by exposure to 8% oxygen (92% nitrogen). At postnatal day 40-44, maternal SE reduced grip strength in grip traction and foot fault tests, which were also reduced by HI injury to similar levels regardless of the maternal group. Limb coordination was impaired by maternal SE which was not worsened by HI injury. Maternal SE increased anxiety level in the offspring, which was normalized by HI injury. Apoptosis markers were increased in different brain regions by maternal SE, with the cortex having further increased TUNEL by HI injury, along with increased markers of inflammation and mitophagy. We conclude that maternal SE can worsen HI-induced cellular damage in male offspring well into adolescence.

  12. "Symptomatic" infection-associated acute encephalopathy in children with underlying neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yoshimichi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Development of infection-associated acute encephalopathy (AE) is precipitated by several factors, including viral agents, age, and genetic polymorphisms. In addition, children with prior underlying neurological disorders can also present with AE. We reviewed 55 children with AE who were referred to hospitals participating in the Status Epilepticus Study Group from 1988 to 2013. AE was classified into eight subtypes: acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD); hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome (HH); acute necrotizing encephalopathy; hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES); clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion; acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures; Reye-like syndrome; and unclassified. Of the 55 AE cases, 14 (25.4%) had underlying neurological disorders, including perinatal insults (n=6) and genetic syndrome and/or brain malformations (n=8). These preceding morbidities were relatively common in AESD (6/18, 33.3%), HH (3/9, 33.3%), and HSES (3/6, 50.0%). History of epilepsy or febrile seizures were frequent in HH cases (4/9, 44.4%), whereas they were rare in other AE subtypes. Among the AE subgroups, HH, HSES, and AESD frequently emerged in preceding etiologies with augmented neuronal excitability. These subgroups may have distinct pathomechanism from the "cytokine storm" mediated AEs during childhood. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinases as a Therapeutic Target to Improve Neurologic Recovery After Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    patterns in a multicenter study of acute spinal cord injury . Spine 24S: S68–S86. 46. Zhang H, Chang M, Hansen CN, Basso DM, Noble-Haeusslein LJ (2011... Cervical Spinal Cord Injury : Opportunities to Enhance the Time to Definitive Treatment. J Neurotrauma 30: 487–491. MMP Inhibition in Spinal Cord Injured...are evaluating efficacy of GM6001, a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor in a murine model of spinal cord injury (UCSF) and in dogs (Texas A & M

  14. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Graf, Rudolf; Strong, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma. The consequences of these intrinsic mechanisms are intimately linked to the composition of the brain extracellular microenvironment and to the level of brain perfusion and in consequence brain energy supply. This paper summarizes the evidence provided by novel invasive techniques, which implicates CSD as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves.

  15. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Graf, Rudolf; Strong, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma. The consequences of these intrinsic mechanisms are intimately linked to the composition of the brain extracellular microenvironment and to the level of brain perfusion and in consequence brain energy supply. This paper summarizes the evidence provided by novel invasive techniques, which implicates CSD as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves. PMID:21045864

  16. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  17. Brain natriuretic peptide improves long-term functional recovery after acute CNS injury in mice.

    PubMed

    James, Michael L; Wang, Haichen; Venkatraman, Talaignair; Song, Pingping; Lascola, Christopher D; Laskowitz, Daniel T

    2010-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to suggest that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is elevated after acute brain injury, and that it may play an adaptive role in recovery through augmentation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Through a series of experiments, we tested the hypothesis that the administration of BNP after different acute mechanisms of central nervous system (CNS) injury could improve functional recovery by improving CBF. C57 wild-type mice were exposed to either pneumatic-induced closed traumatic brain injury (TBI) or collagenase-induced intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). After injury, either nesiritide (hBNP) (8 microg/kg) or normal saline were administered via tail vein injection at 30 min and 4 h. The mice then underwent functional neurological testing via rotorod latency over the following 5 days and neurocognitive testing via Morris water maze testing on days 24-28. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was assessed by laser Doppler from 25 to 90 min after injury. After ICH, mRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histochemical staining were performed during the acute injury phase (<24 h) to determine the effects on inflammation. Following TBI and ICH, administration of hBNP was associated with improved functional performance as assessed by rotorod and Morris water maze latencies (p < 0.01). CBF was increased (p < 0.05), and inflammatory markers (TNF-alpha and IL-6; p < 0.05), activated microglial (F4/80; p < 0.05), and neuronal degeneration (Fluoro-Jade B; p < 0.05) were reduced in mice receiving hBNP. hBNP improves neurological function in murine models of TBI and ICH, and was associated with enhanced CBF and downregulation of neuroinflammatory responses. hBNP may represent a novel therapeutic strategy after acute CNS injury.

  18. Acute mild traumatic brain injury is not associated with white matter change on diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Ilvesmäki, Tero; Luoto, Teemu M; Hakulinen, Ullamari; Brander, Antti; Ryymin, Pertti; Eskola, Hannu; Iverson, Grant L; Ohman, Juha

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to (i) evaluate the influence of age on diffusion tensor imaging measures of white matter assessed using tract-based spatial statistics; (ii) determine if mild traumatic brain injury is associated with microstructural changes in white matter, in the acute phase following injury, in a large homogenous sample that was carefully screened for pre-injury medical, psychiatric, or neurological problems; and (iii) examine if injury severity is related to white matter changes. Participants were 75 patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (age = 37.2 ± 12.0 years, 45 males and 30 females) and 40 controls (age = 40.6 ± 12.2 yrs, 20 males and 20 females). Age effects were analysed by comparing control subgroups aged 31-40, 41-50, and 51-60 years against a group of 18-30-year-old control subjects. Widespread statistically significant areas of abnormal diffusion tensor measures were observed in older groups. Patients and controls were compared using age and gender as covariates and in age- and gender-matched subgroups. Subgroups of patients with more severe injuries were compared to age-and gender-matched controls. No significant differences were detected in patient-control or severity analyses (all P-value > 0.01). In this large, carefully screened sample, acute mild traumatic brain injury was not associated with diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities detectable with tract-based spatial statistics.

  19. The neuropathological foundations for the restorative neurology of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kakulas, Byron A; Kaelan, Cahyono

    2015-02-01

    An appreciation of the neuropathology of human spinal cord injury (SCI) is a basic requirement for all concerned with the medical treatment of patients with SCI as well as for the many neuroscientists devoted to finding a "cure". An understanding of the neuropathology of SCI is a necessary guide to those concerned at all levels of treatment, whether they are doctors or other health professionals. The underlying changes in the spinal cord are especially relevant to the restorative neurology (RN) of SCI. The new discipline of RN seeks to enhance the function of residual spinal cord elements which have survived the injury and so improve the patient's rehabilitative status. This is in contrast to the conventional approach in rehabilitation which works around the clinical neurological deficiencies. Following the injury a series of changes take place in the spinal cord and surrounding tissues which continue to evolve throughout the life of the patient. In flexion and extension injuries resulting from motor vehicle trauma, diving and sporting accidents the spinal cord is compressed and disrupted but usually with some continuity remaining in the white matter columns. The brunt of the injury is usually centrally placed where there is bleeding into the disrupted grey matter involving one two segments, usually cervical. The loss of central grey matter is nowhere near as important as is the tearing apart of the white matter tracts in determining the patient's clinical state. The central grey matter supplies one two overlapping segmental myotomes and sensory fields. In contrast loss of continuity in the long white matter tracts is catastrophic because all functions below the level of injury are affected, autonomic or voluntary either by paralysis or anaesthesia, usually both. It is important to determine the exact nature of the injury in every patient as a preliminary to treatment by RN. This assessment is both clinical and neurophysiological with special attention given to any

  20. Adenosine and protection from acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Steven C.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a major clinical problem without effective therapy. Development of AKI among hospitalized patients drastically increases mortality, and morbidity. With increases in complex surgical procedures together with a growing elderly population, the incidence of AKI is rising. Renal adenosine receptor (AR) manipulation may have great therapeutic potential in mitigating AKI. In this review, we discuss renal AR biology and potential clinical therapies for AKI. Recent Findings The 4 AR subtypes (A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR) have diverse effects on the kidney. The pathophysiology of AKI may dictate the specific AR subtype activation needed to produce renal protection. The A1AR activation in renal tubules and endothelial cells produces beneficial effects against ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury by modulating metabolic demand, decreasing necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. The A2AAR protects against AKI by modulating leukocyte-mediated renal and systemic inflammation whereas the A2BAR activation protects by direct activation of renal parenchymal ARs. In contrast, the A1AR antagonism may play a protective role in nephrotoxic AKI and radiocontrast induced nephropathy by reversing vascular constriction and inducing naturesis and diuresis. Furthermore, as the A3AR-activation exacerbates apoptosis and tissue damage due to renal IR, selective A3AR antagonism may hold promise to attenuate renal IR injury. Finally, renal A1AR activation also protects against renal endothelial dysfunction caused by hepatic IR injury. Summary Despite the current lack of therapies for the treatment and prevention of AKI, recent research suggests that modulation of renal ARs holds promise in treating AKI and extrarenal injury. PMID:22080856

  1. Metabolic acidosis aggravates experimental acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Patrícia Andréa da Fonseca; de Brito, Teresinha Silva; Freire, Rosemayre Souza; da Silva, Moisés Tolentino Bento; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Vale, Mariana Lima; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Libório, Alexandre Braga

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and metabolic acidosis (MA) are two critical conditions that may simultaneously occur in clinical practice. The result of this combination can be harmful to the kidneys, but this issue has not been thoroughly investigated. The present study evaluated the influence of low systemic pH on various parameters of kidney function in rats that were subjected to an experimental model of renal I/R injury. Metabolic acidosis was induced in male Wistar rats by ingesting ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) in tap water, beginning 2 days before ischemic insult and maintained during the entire study. Ischemia/reperfusion was induced by clamping both renal arteries for 45 min, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Four groups were studied: control (subjected to sham surgery, n=8), I/R (n=8), metabolic acidosis (MA; 0.28 M NH4Cl solution and sham surgery, n=6), and MA+I/R (0.28 M NH4Cl solution plus I/R, n=9). Compared with I/R rats, MA+I/R rats exhibited higher mortality (50 vs. 11%, p=0.03), significant reductions of blood pH, plasma bicarbonate (pBic), and standard base excess (SBE), with a severe decline in the glomerular filtration rate and tubular function. Microscopic tubular injury signals were detected. Immunofluorescence revealed that the combination of MA and I/R markedly increased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), but it did not interfere with the decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression that was caused by I/R injury. Acute ischemic kidney injury is exacerbated by acidic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical prediction model for acute inpatient complications after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury: a subanalysis from the Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jefferson R; Arnold, Paul M; Singh, Anoushka; Kalsi-Ryan, Sukhvinder; Fehlings, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    While the majority of existing reports focus on complications sustained during the chronic stages after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the objective in the current study was to characterize and quantify acute inpatient complications. In addition, the authors sought to create a prediction model using clinical variables documented at hospital admission to predict acute complication development. Analyses were based on data from the Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS) data registry, which contains prospective information on adult patients with cervical SCIs who were enrolled at 6 North American centers over a 7-year period. All patients who underwent a standardized American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) neurological examination within 24 hours of injury and whose follow-up information was available at the acute hospital discharge were included in the study. For purposes of classification, complications were divided into 5 major categories: 1) cardiopulmonary, 2) surgical, 3) thrombotic, 4) infectious, and 5) decubitus ulcer development. Univariate statistical analyses were performed to determine the relationship between complication occurrence and individual demographic, injury, and treatment variables. Multivariate logistic regression was subsequently performed to create a complication prediction model. Model discrimination was judged according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Complete complication information was available for 411 patients at the acute care discharge. One hundred sixty patients (38.9%) experienced 240 complications. The mean age among those who experienced at least one complication was 45.9 years, as compared with 43.5 years among those who did not have a complication (p = 0.18). In the univariate analysis, patients with complications were less likely to receive steroids at admission (p = 0.01), had a greater severity of neurological injury as indicated by the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS

  3. The impacts of acute carbon monoxide poisoning on the brain: Longitudinal clinical and 99mTc ethyl cysteinate brain SPECT characterization of patients with persistent and delayed neurological sequelae.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Fen; Yip, Ping-Keung; Chen, Shao-Yuan; Lin, Jen-Cheng; Yeh, Zai-Ting; Kung, Lan-Yu; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Fan, Yu-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning poses a significant threat to the central nervous system. It can cause brain injury and diverse neurological deficits including persistent neurological sequelae (PNS) and delayed neurological sequelae (DNS). The study aimed to investigate the long-term impacts of acute CO poisoning on brain perfusion and neurological function, and to explore potential differences between PNS and DNS patients. We evaluated brain perfusion using (99m)Tc ethyl cysteinate (ECD) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and assessed clinical neurological symptoms and signs one month following acute poisoning. For DNS patients, ECD SPECT and clinical evaluation were performed when their delayed symptoms appeared. All patients had follow-up SPECT imaging, along with clinical assessments six months following poisoning. 12 PNS and 12 DNS patients were recruited between 2007 and 2010. Clinically, the main characteristic presentations were cognitive decline, emotional instability, and gait disturbance. SPECT imaging demonstrated consistent frontal hypoperfusion of varying severities in all patients, which decreased in severity at follow-up imaging. DNS patients usually had more severe symptoms and perfusion defects, along with worse clinical outcomes than the PNS group. These results suggest that acute CO poisoning might lead to long term brain injuries and neurological sequelae, particularly in DNS patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The pharmacology of neurotrophic treatment with Cerebrolysin: brain protection and repair to counteract pathologies of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Masliah, E; Díez-Tejedor, E

    2012-04-01

    Neurotrophic factors are considered as part of the therapeutic strategy for neurological disorders like dementia, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation which mimics the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors on brain protection and repair. In dementia models, Cerebrolysin decreases β-amyloid deposition and microtubule-associated protein tau phosphorylation by regulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity, increases synaptic density and restores neuronal cytoarchitecture. These effects protect integrity of the neuronal circuits and thus result in improved cognitive and behavioral performance. Furthermore, Cerebrolysin enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, the basis for neuronal replacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental studies in stroke animal models have shown that Cerebrolysin stabilizes the structural integrity of cells by inhibition of calpain and reduces the number of apoptotic cells after ischemic lesion. Cerebrolysin induces restorative processes, decreases infarct volume and edema formation and promotes functional recovery. Stroke-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone was also promoted by Cerebrolysin, thus supporting the brain's self-repair after stroke. Both, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury conditions stimulate the expression of natural neurotrophic factors to promote repair and regeneration processes -axonal regeneration, neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis- that is considered to be crucial for the future recovery. Neuroprotective effects of Cerebrolysin on experimentally induced traumatic spinal cord injury have shown that Cerebrolysin prevents apoptosis of lesioned motoneurons and promotes functional recovery. This section summarizes the most relevant data on the pharmacology of Cerebrolysin obtained from in vitro assays (biochemical and cell cultures) and in vivo animal models of acute and chronic neurological disorders.

  5. AOSpine thoracolumbar spine injury classification system: fracture description, neurological status, and key modifiers.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Alexander R; Oner, Cumhur; Kepler, Christopher K; Dvorak, Marcel; Schnake, Klaus; Bellabarba, Carlo; Reinhold, Max; Aarabi, Bizhan; Kandziora, Frank; Chapman, Jens; Shanmuganathan, Rajasekaran; Fehlings, Michael; Vialle, Luiz

    2013-11-01

    Reliability and agreement study, retrospective case series. To develop a widely accepted, comprehensive yet simple classification system with clinically acceptable intra- and interobserver reliability for use in both clinical practice and research. Although the Magerl classification and thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS) are both well-known schemes to describe thoracolumbar (TL) fractures, no TL injury classification system has achieved universal international adoption. This lack of consensus limits communication between clinicians and researchers complicating the study of these injuries and the development of treatment algorithms. A simple and reproducible classification system of TL injuries was developed using a structured international consensus process. This classification system consists of a morphologic classification of the fracture, a grading system for the neurological status, and description of relevant patient-specific modifiers. Forty cases with a broad range of injuries were classified independently twice by group members 1 month apart and analyzed for classification reliability using the Kappa coefficient (κ). The morphologic classification is based on 3 main injury patterns: type A (compression), type B (tension band disruption), and type C (displacement/translation) injuries. Reliability in the identification of a morphologic injury type was substantial (κ= 0.72). The AOSpine TL injury classification system is clinically relevant according to the consensus agreement of our international team of spine trauma experts. Final evaluation data showed reasonable reliability and accuracy, but further clinical validation of the proposed system requires prospective observational data collection documenting use of the classification system, therapeutic decision making, and clinical follow-up evaluation by a large number of surgeons from different countries.

  6. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Toso, Paulina A; González, Alvaro J; Pérez, María E; Kattan, Javier; Fabres, Jorge G; Tapia, José L; González, Hernán S

    2014-01-01

    to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR) were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. ten of the 21 monitored infants (48%) presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25%) encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%), all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43%) evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for acute knee injury in female youth football.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Martin; Waldén, Markus

    2016-03-01

    To prospectively evaluate risk factors for acute time-loss knee injury, in particular ACL injury, in female youth football players. Risk factors were studied in 4556 players aged 12-17 years from a randomised controlled trial during the 2009 season. Covariates were both intrinsic (body mass index, age, relative age effect, onset of menarche, previous acute knee injury or ACL injury, current knee complaints, and familial disposition of ACL injury) and extrinsic (no. of training sessions/week, no. of matches/week, match exposure ratio, match play with other teams, and artificial turf exposure). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from individual variable and multiple Cox regression analyses. Ninety-six acute knee injuries were recorded, 21 of them ACL injuries. Multiple Cox regression showed a fourfold higher ACL injury rate for players with familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 3.57; 95% CI 1.48-8.62). Significant predictor variables for acute knee injury were age >14 years (HR 1.97; 95% CI 1.30-2.97), knee complaints at the start of the season (HR 1.98; 95% CI 1.30-3.02), and familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 1.96; 95% CI 1.22-3.16). No differences in injury rates were seen when playing on artificial turf compared with natural grass. Female youth football players with a familial disposition of ACL injury had an increased risk of ACL injury and acute knee injury. Older players and those with knee complaints at pre-season were more at risk of acute knee injury. Although the predictive values were low, these factors could be used in athlete screening to target preventive interventions. II.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robert S.; Herron, Crystal R.; Groom, Robert C.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor short- and long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  9. Albumin treatment reduces neurological deficit and protects blood-brain barrier integrity after acute intracortical hematoma in the rat.

    PubMed

    Belayev, Ludmila; Saul, Isabel; Busto, Raul; Danielyan, Kristine; Vigdorchik, Alexey; Khoutorova, Larissa; Ginsberg, Myron D

    2005-02-01

    Acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common and severe form of stroke. To date, medical management of ICH has had scant impact on morbidity and mortality. Because albumin therapy is markedly neuroprotective in preclinical models of ischemic stroke, and because ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke share several common injury mechanisms, we hypothesized that albumin therapy might also benefit ICH. Acute intracortical hematoma was produced in anesthetized, normothermic rats by the single stereotaxic injection of 50 muL of autologous, nonheparinized whole blood over 5 minutes. Separate animal groups were treated either with 25% human albumin, 1.25 g/kg, or with intravenous saline vehicle at 60 minutes after ICH. Neurobehavior was quantified sequentially over the next 2 to 7 days. Damage to the blood-brain barrier was assessed at 2 days after ICH by fluorometric measurement of Evans blue extravasation in dissected brain regions. High-grade neurological deficits were present in all rats at 50 minutes after ICH (score 10.3+/-0.2, mean+/-SEM [maximal score 12]). Albumin-treated rats showed improved neuroscores relative to saline-treated animals beginning within hours of treatment and persisting throughout the 7-day survival period. At 3 and 7 days, mean total neuroscores of the albumin group were 38% to 43% lower than in saline-treated animals. Perihematomal Evans blue discoloration was readily evident in saline-treated ICH rats but was reduced by albumin treatment. Hemispheric Evans blue content ipsilateral to the hematoma was reduced by 49% by albumin treatment (albumin 93.9+/-13.3 versus saline 184.7+/-33.7 mg/g, P<0.05). Hematoma volume and brain swelling were not affected by albumin treatment. Prompt albumin therapy improves neurological function and blood-brain barrier integrity after acute intracortical hematoma. These observations have important potential clinical implications.

  10. Activation of P2X7 promotes cerebral edema and neurological injury after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kimbler, Donald E; Shields, Jessica; Yanasak, Nathan; Vender, John R; Dhandapani, Krishnan M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Cerebral edema, the abnormal accumulation of fluid within the brain parenchyma, contributes to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and is a common life-threatening neurological complication following TBI. Unfortunately, neurosurgical approaches to alleviate increased ICP remain controversial and medical therapies are lacking due in part to the absence of viable drug targets. In the present study, genetic inhibition (P2X7-/- mice) of the purinergic P2x7 receptor attenuated the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and reduced cerebral edema following controlled cortical impact, as compared to wild-type mice. Similarly, brilliant blue G (BBG), a clinically non-toxic P2X7 inhibitor, inhibited IL-1β expression, limited edemic development, and improved neurobehavioral outcomes after TBI. The beneficial effects of BBG followed either prophylactic administration via the drinking water for one week prior to injury or via an intravenous bolus administration up to four hours after TBI, suggesting a clinically-implementable therapeutic window. Notably, P2X7 localized within astrocytic end feet and administration of BBG decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a reactive astrocyte marker, and attenuated the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel that promotes cellular edema. Together, these data implicate P2X7 as a novel therapeutic target to prevent secondary neurological injury after TBI, a finding that warrants further investigation.

  11. Performance of Serum Creatinine and Kidney Injury Biomarkers for Diagnosing Histologic Acute Tubular Injury.

    PubMed

    Moledina, Dennis G; Hall, Isaac E; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Reese, Peter P; Weng, Francis L; Schröppel, Bernd; Doshi, Mona D; Wilson, F Perry; Coca, Steven G; Parikh, Chirag R

    2017-08-23

    The diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is currently defined as an increase in serum creatinine (Scr) concentration, provides little information on the condition's actual cause. To improve phenotyping of AKI, many urinary biomarkers of tubular injury are being investigated. Because AKI cases are not frequently biopsied, the diagnostic accuracy of concentrations of Scr and urinary biomarkers for histologic acute tubular injury is unknown. Cross-sectional analysis from multicenter prospective cohort. Hospitalized deceased kidney donors on whom kidney biopsies were performed at the time of organ procurement for histologic evaluation. (1) AKI diagnosed by change in Scr concentration during donor hospitalization and (2) concentrations of urinary biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP], interleukin 18 [IL-18], and kidney injury molecule 1 [KIM-1]) measured at organ procurement. Histologic acute tubular injury. Of 581 donors, 98 (17%) had mild acute tubular injury and 57 (10%) had severe acute tubular injury. Overall, Scr-based AKI had poor diagnostic performance for identifying histologic acute tubular injury and 49% of donors with severe acute tubular injury did not have AKI. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of change in Scr concentration for diagnosing severe acute tubular injury was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.49-0.67) and for any acute tubular injury was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.45-0.58). Compared with Scr concentration, NGAL concentration demonstrated higher AUROC for diagnosing both severe acute tubular injury (0.67; 95% CI, 0.60-0.74; P=0.03) and any acute tubular injury (0.60; 95% CI, 0.55-0.66; P=0.005). In donors who did not have Scr-based AKI, NGAL concentrations were higher with increasing severities of acute tubular injury (subclinical AKI). However, compared with Scr concentration, AUROCs for acute tubular injury diagnosis were not significantly higher for urinary L

  12. Brain Injuries and Neurological System Failure are the Most Common Proximate Cause of Death in Children Admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Au, Alicia K.; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Clark, Robert S. B.; Bell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mortality rates from critical illness in children have declined over the past several decades, now averaging between 2-5% in most Pediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs). While these rates, and mortality rates from specific disorders, are widely understood, the impact of acute neurological injuries in such children who die and the role of these injuries in the cause of death are not well understood. We hypothesized that neurological injuries are an important cause of death in children. Design Retrospective review. Setting PICU at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, an academic tertiary care center Patients Seventy-eight children who died within the PICU from April 2006-February 2008. Measurements and Main Results Data regarding admission diagnosis, presence of chronic illness, diagnosis of brain injury, and cause of death were collected. Mortality was attributed to brain injury in 65.4% (51/78) of deaths. Ninety-six (28/29) percent of previously healthy children died with brain injuries, compared to 46.9% (23/49) of chronically-ill children (p<0.05). The diagnosed brain injury was the proximate cause of death in 89.3% of previously healthy children and 91.3% with chronic illnesses. PICU and hospital length of stay was longer in those with chronic illnesses (38.8d±7.0 vs. 8.9d±3.7 and 49.2d±8.3 vs. 9.0d±3.8, p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) Conclusion Brain injury was exceedingly common in children who died in our PICU and was the proximate cause of death in a large majority of cases. Neuroprotective measures for a wide variety of admission diagnoses, and initiatives directed to prevention or treatment of brain injury are likely to attain further improvements in mortality in previously healthy children in the modern PICU. PMID:21037501

  13. Pre-Adult MRI of Brain Cancer and Neurological Injury: Multivariate Analyses.

    PubMed

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Brain cancer and neurological injuries, such as stroke, are life-threatening conditions for which further research is needed to overcome the many challenges associated with providing optimal patient care. Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of pattern recognition technique involving the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of neuroimaging challenges, including identifying variables associated with patient outcomes; understanding an injury's etiology, development, and progression; creating diagnostic tests; assisting in treatment monitoring; and more. Compared to adults, imaging of the developing brain has attracted less attention from MVA researchers, however, remarkable MVA growth has occurred in recent years. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA technologies applied to brain injury and cancer in neurological fetal, neonatal, and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With a wide variety of MRI modalities providing physiologically meaningful biomarkers and new biomarker measurements constantly under development, MVA techniques hold enormous potential toward combining available measurements toward improving basic research and the creation of technologies that contribute to improving patient care.

  14. Clinical Influence of Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis on Neurological Outcome after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Major Fracture or Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Seiji; Morishita, Yuichiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kubota, Kensuke; Ideta, Ryosuke; Mori, Eiji; Yugue, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Ueta, Takayoshi; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To clarify the influence of cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS) on neurological functional recovery after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) without major fracture or dislocation. Overview of Literature The biomechanical etiology of traumatic CSCI remains under discussion and its relationship with CSCS is one of the most controversial issues in the clinical management of traumatic CSCI. Methods To obtain a relatively uniform background, patients non-surgically treated for an acute C3–4 level CSCI without major fracture or dislocation were selected. We analyzed 58 subjects with traumatic CSCI using T2-weighted mid-sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. The sagittal diameter of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) column, degree of canal stenosis, and neurologic outcomes in motor function, including improvement rate, were assessed. Results There were no significant relationships between sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their American Spinal Injury Association motor scores at both admission and discharge. Moreover, no significant relationships were observed between the sagittal diameter of the CSF column at the C3–4 segment and their neurological recovery during the following period. Conclusions No relationships between pre-existing CSCS and neurological outcomes were evident after traumatic CSCI. These results suggest that decompression surgery might not be recommended for traumatic CSCI without major fracture or dislocation despite pre-existing CSCS. PMID:27340535

  15. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Nnadi, Mon; Bankole, O B

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives : The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients managed nonoperatively in our center. This was a prospective descriptive study carried out on traumatic spinal injury patients managed by neurosurgical unit in our center from August 2010 to July 2013. The unit started in July 2010 with virtually no available facilities for surgical care for these patients. All patients were managed nonoperatively. The unit recorded data of the patients in accident and emergency, intensive care unit, and wards using structured proforma. Data were analyzed using Epi Info 7 software. There were 76 patients studied of which 57 were males and 25 were females. Fifty three were caused by road traffic accident. Nineteen were complete injury. Patients with incomplete injuries did well at discharge. Completeness of injury significantly affected the outcome. The neurological recovery in incomplete spinal injuries in our study was good, but poor in complete injury. Conservative treatment should be adopted in developing countries in patients with poor resources and in centers where facilities are not available for adequate imaging and surgical care. Trauma system is imperative in our country.

  16. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ashok K; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  17. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  18. Traumatic brain injury is associated with subsequent neurologic and psychiatric disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, David C.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Peterson, Matthew J.; Pieper, Carl F.; Bullock, Thomas; Boeve, Bradley F.; Miller, Bruce L.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Kramer, Joel H.; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Object Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proposed as a risk factor for development of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, depression, and other illnesses. This study’s objective was to determine the association of prior mild TBI with subsequent diagnosis (i.e., at least one year post-injury) of neurologic or psychiatric disease. Methods All studies from 1995–2012 reporting TBI as a risk factor for diagnoses of interest were identified by searching PubMed, study references, and review articles. Reviewers abstracted the data and assessed study design and characteristics. Results 57 studies met inclusion criteria. A random effects meta-analysis revealed a significant association of prior TBI with subsequent neurologic and psychiatric diagnosis. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for TBI on development of any illness was 1.67 (95% CI 1.44–1.93, p<.001). Prior TBI was independently associated with both neurologic [OR 1.55 (95% CI 1.31–1.83, p<.001)] and psychiatric [OR 2.00 (95% CI 1.50–2.66, p<.001)] outcomes. Analyses of individual diagnoses found higher odds of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, depression, mixed affective disorders, and bipolar disorder in individuals with previous TBI compared to those without TBI. This association was present when examining only studies of mild TBI and when considering the influence of study design and characteristics. Analysis of a subset of studies found no evidence that multiple TBIs were associated with higher odds of disease than a single TBI. Conclusions History of TBI, including mild TBI, is associated with the development of neurologic and psychiatric illness. This indicates that either TBI is a risk factor for heterogeneous pathologic processes or that TBI may contribute to a common pathologic mechanism. PMID:26315003

  19. Parallel Metabolomic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum for Identifying Biomarkers of Injury Severity after Acute Human Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiman; Streijger, Femke; Wang, Yining; Lin, Guohui; Christie, Sean; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Parent, Stefan; Bailey, Christopher S.; Paquette, Scott; Boyd, Michael C.; Ailon, Tamir; Street, John; Fisher, Charles G.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Kwon, Brian K.; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Suffering an acute spinal cord injury (SCI) can result in catastrophic physical and emotional loss. Efforts to translate novel therapies in acute clinical trials are impeded by the SCI community’s singular dependence upon functional outcome measures. Therefore, a compelling rationale exists to establish neurochemical biomarkers for the objective classification of injury severity. In this study, CSF and serum samples were obtained at 3 time points (~24, 48, and 72 hours post-injury) from 30 acute SCI patients (10 AIS A, 12 AIS B, and 8 AIS C). A differential chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CIL LC-MS) with a universal metabolome standard (UMS) was applied to the metabolomic profiling of these samples. This method provided enhanced detection of the amine- and phenol-containing submetabolome. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed dysregulations in arginine-proline metabolism following SCI. Six CSF metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers of baseline injury severity, and good classification performance (AUC > 0.869) was achieved by using combinations of these metabolites in pair-wise comparisons of AIS A, B and C patients. Using the UMS strategy, the current data set can be expanded to a larger cohort for biomarker validation, as well as discovering biomarkers for predicting neurologic outcome. PMID:27966539

  20. Acute Neuronal Injury and Blood Genomic Profiles in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Mercado, Rafael; Ford, Gregory D; Xu, Zhenfeng; Kraiselburd, Edmundo N; Martinez, Melween I; Eterović, Vesna A; Colon, Edgar; Rodriguez, Idia V; Portilla, Peter; Ferchmin, Pedro A; Gierbolini, Lynette; Rodriguez-Carrasquillo, Maria; Powell, Michael D; Pulliam, John VK; McCraw, Casey O; Gates, Alicia; Ford, Byron D

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize acute neuronal injury in a novel nonhuman primate (NHP) ischemic stroke model by using multiple outcome measures. Silk sutures were inserted into the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery of rhesus macaques to achieve permanent occlusion of the vessel. The sutures were introduced via the femoral artery by using endovascular microcatheterization techniques. Within hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), infarction was detectable by using diffusion-weighted MRI imaging. The infarcts expanded by 24 h after MCAO and then were detectable on T2-weighted images. The infarcts seen by MRI were consistent with neuronal injury demonstrated histologically. Neurobehavioral function after MCAO was determined by using 2 neurologic testing scales. Neurologic assessments indicated that impairment after ischemia was limited to motor function in the contralateral arm; other neurologic and behavioral parameters were largely unaffected. We also used microarrays to examine gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after MCAO-induced ischemia. Several genes were altered in a time-dependent manner after MCAO, suggesting that this ischemia model may be suitable for identifying blood biomarkers associated with the presence and severity of ischemia. This NHP stroke model likely will facilitate the elucidation of mechanisms associated with acute neuronal injury after ischemia. In addition, the ability to identify candidate blood biomarkers in NHP after ischemia may prompt the development of new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic stroke in humans. PMID:23114047

  1. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  2. Demographic, clinical, and radiologic predictors of neurologic deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Ueno, Yuji; Kawamura, Miyako; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2013-04-01

    One-third of patients with acute ischemic stroke develop early neurologic worsening, which is associated with increased mortality and long-term functional disability. We investigated the predictive factors for neurologic deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke within 1 week of onset. We retrospectively investigated 643 patients who were admitted within 2 days of acute ischemic stroke between April 2007 and March 2010. Neurologic deterioration was defined as an increase of 4 points or more in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score within 1 week of admission. We retrieved data on demographic and clinical characteristics, medications, and stroke subtypes. Out of 537 patients, deterioration was noted in 64 patients (11.9%; deterioration group). Multivariate analysis identified history of myocardial infarction (P < .001), NIHSS score ≥8 at onset (P < .001), high leukocyte count (P = .035), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥140 mg/dL (P = .002), and hemoglobin A1c ≥7% (P = .006) as significant factors associated with deterioration. Branch atheromatous disease was more frequent in the deterioration group, and >90% of patients with deterioration either were discharged to nursing home care or died. Multivariate analysis of magnetic resonance imaging findings identified internal carotid/middle cerebral artery occlusion (each P < .001), striate capsular infarction (P = .030), pontine infarction (P = .047), and lesion size of 15-30 mm (P = .011) as independent factors associated with deterioration. Stroke patients with a high low-density lipoprotein level, high hemoglobin A1c level on admission, a history of myocardial infarction, and high NIHSS score are at high risk for neurologic deterioration. Patients with multiple risk factors for deterioration can benefit most from intensive monitoring. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid as a Predictor of Neurological Deterioration in Acute Minor Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingyang; Han, Zhao; Zhou, Qiang; Lin, Jing; Liu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between high plasma 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels and neurological deterioration (ND) has not been investigated in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke. We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke. Plasma levels of 20-HETE were measured at admission in all patients. The primary end point of the study was ND within 10 days after admission. The degree of disability was assessed using modified Rankin scale at 3 months after admission. A total of 322 patients were enrolled, of which 85 patients (26.4%) developed ND. Mean 20-HETE level was 1687±158 pmol/L. On multivariate analyses, high level (>1675 pmol/L) of 20-HETE was an independent predictor of ND (third and fourth quartiles). Neurological deterioration was associated with a higher risk of poor outcome (modified Rankin scale scores 3-6) at 3 months. ND is fairly common in acute minor ischemic stroke and is associated with poor prognosis. Elevated plasma level of 20-HETE may be a predictor for ND in acute minor ischemic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Rehabilitative potential of Ayurveda for neurological deficits caused by traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with worst outcomes and requires a prolonged rehabilitation. Ayurvedic indigenous methods of rehabilitation are often utilized to treat such conditions. A case of SCI was followed up for 3 months upon an Ayurvedic composite intervention and subsequently reported. The composite treatment plan involved Ayurvedic oral medications as well as a few selected external and internal pancha karma procedures. A substantial clinical and patient centered outcome improvement in existing neurological deficits and quality of life was observed after 3 months of the Ayurvedic treatment given to this case. PMID:24812477

  5. Getting soldiers with brain injury back to work: the defence medical rehabilitation centre neurological vocational pathway.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Elizabeth; Duncan-Anderson, J; Mitchell, J; Etherington, J; McGilloway, E

    2016-04-01

    The Neuro-Rehabilitation Group at the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre (DMRC) has developed an integrated vocational pathway to transition service personnel back into employment. This article describes how vocational rehabilitation at DMRC fits with the wider UK military, in comparison with civilian rehabilitation. It also describes the ongoing development of the vocational pathway, which contributes to improved outcomes from neurological disorders, including traumatic brain injury. We present two cases to highlight how the programme integrates with and influences patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Federico, Anne

    2009-02-01

    Approximately one person in 5,000 will experience an episode of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in conjunction with the transfusion of whole blood or blood components. Its hallmarks include hypoxemia, dyspnea, fever, hypotension, and bilateral pulmonary edema (noncardiogenic). The mortality for reported cases is 16.3%. The incidence and mortality may be even higher than estimated because of under-recognition and under-reporting. Although TRALI was identified as a clinical entity in the 1980s, a lack of consensus regarding a definition was present until 2004. An exact cause has yet to be identified; however, there are two theories regarding the etiology: the "antibody" and the "two-hit" theories. These theories involve both donor and recipient factors. Further education and research are needed to assist in the development of strategies for the prevention and treatment of TRALI.

  8. Fluid management in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2014-01-01

    Fluid management in critical illness has undergone extensive reevaluation in the past decade. Since a significant percentage of critically ill patients develop acute kidney injury (AKI), optimal fluid management is even more paramount to prevent the ill effects of either underhydration or overhydration. The concepts of early goal-directed fluid therapy (EGDT) and conservative late fluid management permeate current clinical research, and the independent association between fluid accumulation and mortality has been repeatedly demonstrated. A number of prospective randomized trials are planned to provide an adequately powered assessment of the effect of EGDT or earlier renal replacement therapy initiation in patients with, or at risk for AKI. The aim of this analytical review is to use existing clinical and physiological studies to support a 3-phase model of fluid management in the critically ill patient with AKI. © The Author(s) 2012.

  9. Medication-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Stuart L

    2016-12-01

    The present article will review the current state of our understanding of nephrotoxic medication-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) and provide strategies to reduce its impact. Nephrotoxic medications contribute to a substantial proportion of AKI in hospitalized patients. The previous perspective of nephrotoxic medication-associated AKI as a nonmodifiable necessary evil of providing appropriate therapy to ill patients had led to an incomplete understanding of its epidemiology and provided little impetus to reduce its occurrence. Recent work on understanding specific combinations, thresholds for nephrotoxic burden and systematic kidney function assessment had mitigated, and even in some cases reduced, nephrotoxic AKI rates and severity. Current initiatives are underway to further refine specific nephrotoxic medication AKI risk via novel urinary biomarkers and genetic susceptibility.

  10. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  11. Erythropoietin (EPO) in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, Elizabeth; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-03-21

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein produced by the kidney, and is mostly well-known for its physiological function in regulating red blood cell production in the bone marrow. Accumulating evidence, however, suggests that EPO has additional organ protective effects, which may be useful in the prevention or treatment of acute kidney injury. These protective mechanisms are multifactorial in nature and include inhibition of apoptotic cell death, stimulation of cellular regeneration, inhibition of deleterious pathways, and promotion of recovery.In this article, we review the physiology of EPO, assess previous work that supports the role of EPO as a general tissue protective agent, and explain the mechanisms by which it may achieve this tissue protective effect. We then focus on experimental and clinical data that suggest that EPO has a kidney protective effect.

  12. Acute liver injury secondary to sertraline.

    PubMed

    Suen, Christopher F D Li Wai; Boyapati, Ray; Simpson, Ian; Dev, Anouk

    2013-09-26

    Sertraline is widely prescribed to treat depression and anxiety disorders. However, hepatitis secondary to its use is a rare entity. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman in her 20th week of pregnancy presented with nausea, vomiting, malaise and dark urine. This occurred 6 months after sertraline 50 mg daily was started for the treatment of depression. Three weeks prior to her presentation, the dose of sertraline was increased to 100 mg daily. The patient's liver biochemical profile demonstrated increased transaminases. The biopsy of the liver showed lobular hepatitis, with a mild prominence of eosinophils, suggestive of a drug-induced or toxin-induced aetiology. Extensive biochemical work-up failed to show any other pathology to account for her hepatitis. Liver function tests normalised after cessation of sertraline, indicating a probable association between sertraline use and acute hepatocellular injury in our patient.

  13. Acute kidney injury in elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Coca, Steven G

    2010-07-01

    The incidence rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) is highest in elderly patients, who make up an ever-growing segment of the population at large. AKI in these patients is associated with an increased risk of short- and long-term death and chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal disease. Whether AKI in older individuals carries a larger relative risk for these outcomes compared with younger individuals is unclear at this time. Other domains, such as health-related quality of life, may be mildly impacted on after an episode of AKI. No effective therapies for AKI currently are available for widespread use. However, because the incidence of AKI is highest in the elderly and the phenotype is not discernibly different from AKI in all populations, future randomized controlled trials of interventions for AKI should be performed in the elderly population.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Persons

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence rate of acute kidney injury (AKI) is highest in elderly patients, who comprise an ever-growing segment of the population at large. AKI in these patients is associated with an increased risk of short-term and long-term death and chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal disease. Whether AKI in older individuals carries a larger relative risk for these outcomes compared to younger individuals in unclear at this time. Other domains such as health-related quality of life may be mildly impacted after an episode of AKI. No effective therapies for AKI are currently available for wide-spread use. However, since the incidence of AKI is highest in the elderly and the phenotype is not discernibly different from AKI in all populations, future randomized controlled trials of interventions for AKI should be performed in the elderly population. PMID:20346560

  15. Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  16. Autophagy in acute kidney injury and repair.

    PubMed

    He, Liyu; Livingston, Man J; Dong, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major kidney disease associated with a poor clinical outcome both in the short and long term. Autophagy is a cellular stress response that plays important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Autophagy is induced in proximal tubules during AKI. A renoprotective role of autophagy in AKI has been demonstrated by pharmacological and genetic inhibition studies. The role of autophagy in kidney recovery and repair from AKI, however, remains largely unknown. A dynamic change in autophagy during the recovery phase of AKI seems to be important for tubular proliferation and repair. In renal fibrosis, autophagy may either promote this via the induction of tubular atrophy and decomposition, or prevent it via effects on the intracellular degradation of excessive collagen. Further research is expected to improve the understanding of the regulation of autophagy in kidney injury and repair, elucidate the pathological roles of autophagy in renal fibrosis, and discover therapeutic targets for treating AKI and preventing its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  17. Prehospital plasma resuscitation associated with improved neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P

    2017-09-01

    Trauma-related hypotension and coagulopathy worsen secondary brain injury in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Early damage control resuscitation with blood products may mitigate hypotension and coagulopathy. Preliminary data suggest resuscitation with plasma in large animals improves neurologic function after TBI; however, data in humans are lacking. We retrospectively identified all patients with multiple injuries age >15 years with head injuries undergoing prehospital resuscitation with blood products at a single Level I trauma center from January 2002 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were prehospital resuscitation with either packed red blood cells (pRBCs) or thawed plasma as sole colloid resuscitation. Patients who died in hospital and those using anticoagulants were excluded. Primary outcomes were Glasgow Outcomes Score Extended (GOSE) and Disability Rating Score (DRS) at dismissal and during follow-up. Of 76 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 53% (n = 40) received prehospital pRBCs and 47% (n = 36) received thawed plasma. Age, gender, injury severity or TBI severity, arrival laboratory values, and number of prehospital units were similar (all p > 0.05). Patients who received thawed plasma had an improved neurologic outcome compared to those receiving pRBCs (median GOSE 7 [7-8] vs. 5.5 [3-7], p < 0.001). Additionally, patients who received thawed plasma had improved functionality compared to pRBCs (median DRS 2 [1-3.5] vs. 9 [3-13], p < 0.001). Calculated GOSE and DRS scores during follow-up, median 6 [5-7] months, demonstrated increased function in those resuscitated with thawed plasma compared to pRBCs by both median GOSE (8 [7-8] vs. 6 [6-7], p < 0.001) and DRS (0 [0-1] vs. 4 [2-8], p < 0.001). In critically injured trauma patients with TBI, early resuscitation with thawed plasma is associated with improved neurologic and functional outcomes at discharge and during follow-up compared to pRBCs alone. These preliminary data support the

  18. Acute Acquired Comitant Esotropia in Adults: Is It Neurologic or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Kansu, Tulay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Acute acquired comitant esotropia (AACE) can be a diagnostic challenge for ophthalmologists and neurologists because of its association with neurological pathologies. Our study describes a series of adult patients with AACE of undetermined etiology. Methods. Data on the clinical findings of patients presented with AACE of undetermined etiology with a minimum follow-up of 1 year were retrieved from the medical records and the results analyzed. Results. A series of 9 esotropia cases (age range: 20–43 years) was reviewed. All patients had full duction and versions, without an A-pattern or V-pattern. All patients had esotropia for distance and near. Neurological evaluation in all cases was normal. Among patients, 3 were treated with prisms, 4 were treated with strabismus surgery, and 1 was treated with botulinum toxin injections; 1 patient declined treatment. In treated patients posttreatment sensory testing indicated restoration of binocularity that remained stable throughout follow-up of 1–9 years. The patient that declined treatment had binocular function with base-out prisms. Conclusion. Acute onset esotropia may be seen without a neurological pathology in adults. Good motor and sensory outcomes can be achieved in these patients with AACE of undetermined etiology via surgical and nonsurgical methods. PMID:28018672

  19. Worse Neurological State During Acute Ischemic Stroke is Associated with a Decrease in Serum Albumin Levels.

    PubMed

    Bielewicz, Joanna; Kurzepa, Jacek; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Kamieniak, Piotr; Daniluk, Beata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Rejdak, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    High serum albumin levels during ischemic stroke (IS) decrease the risk of a poor outcome. This study aimed to determine whether serum albumin levels within the first days after IS correlate with radiological and biochemical markers of brain tissue damage. Fifty-six IS patients were enrolled into the study. Neurological examinations were based on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Serum albumin levels and S100BB were evaluated using commercially available ELISA kits. The albumin decrease index (ADI) was calculated as the difference between serum albumin levels measured on days 1 and 10 of IS. All parameters were estimated on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 10th days of IS, and the volume of ischemic focus was measured on the 10th day. Mean serum albumin levels were decreased during acute IS. There were correlations between the ADI and mean S100BB serum levels (r = 0.36, p < 0.05), the volume of ischemic focus (r = 0.39, p < 0.05), and the patients' neurological state when measured on day 10 of IS (r = 0.59, p < 0.001). A decrease in serum albumin levels during the acute phase of IS corresponds to a worse neurological state as a result of a large ischemic focus with intense catabolic processes.

  20. Nutritional aspects in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Berbel, Marina Nogueira; Pinto, Milene Peron Rodrigues; Ponce, Daniela; Balbi, André Luís

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional assessment is an indispensable tool for the evaluation and clinical monitoring of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Acute loss of renal function interferes with the metabolism of all macronutrients, responsible for proinflammatory, pro-oxidative and hypercatabolic situations. The major nutritional disorders in AKI patients are hypercatabolism, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Those added to the contributions of the underlying disease, complications, and the need for renal replacement therapy can interfere in the nutritional depletion of those patients. Malnutrition in AKI patients is associated with increased incidence of complications, longer hospitalization, and higher hospital mortality. However, there are few studies evaluating the nutritional status of AKI patients. Anthropometric parameters, such as body mass index, arm circumference, and thickness of skin folds, are difficult to interpret due to changes in hydration status in those patients. Biochemical parameters commonly used in clinical practice are also influenced by non-nutritional factors like loss of liver function and inflammatory status. Although there are no prospective data about the behavior of nutritional markers, some authors demonstrated associations of some parameters with clinical outcomes. The use of markers like albumin, cholesterol, prealbumin, IGF-1, subjective global assessment, and calculation of the nitrogen balance seem to be useful as screening parameters for worse prognosis and higher mortality in AKI patients. In patients with AKI on renal replacement therapy, a caloric intake of 25 to 30 kcal/kg and a minimum amount of 1.5 g/kg/day of protein is recommended to minimize protein catabolism and prevent metabolic complications.

  1. Acute lung injury, overhydration or both?

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, A B Johan; Polderman, Kees H

    2005-04-01

    Acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in the course of sepsis is thought to result from increased pulmonary capillary permeability and resultant edema. However, when the edema is assessed at the bedside by measuring the extravascular thermal volume by transpulmonary dilution, some ALI/ARDS patients with sepsis may have normal extravascular lung water (EVLW). Conversely, a raised EVLW may be present even when criteria for ALI/ARDS are not met, according to GS Martin and colleagues in this issue of Critical Care. This commentary puts the findings into a broader perspective and focuses on the difficulty, at the bedside, in recognizing and separating various types of pulmonary edema. Some of these forms of edema, classically differentiated on the basis of increased permeability and cardiogenic/hydrostatic factors, may overlap, whereas the criteria for ALI/ARDS may be loose, poorly reproducible, relatively insensitive and nonspecific, and highly therapy-dependent. Overhydration is particularly difficult to recognize. Additional diagnostics may be required to improve the delineation of pulmonary edema so as to redirect or redefine treatment and improve patient morbidity and, perhaps, mortality. Monitoring EVLW by single transpulmonary thermal dilution, for instance, might have a future role in this process.

  2. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Schweisfurth, H; Sopivnik, I; Moog, R

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is primarily caused by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma or platelet concentrates and occurs by definition within 6 hours after transfusion with acute shortness of breath, hypoxemia and radiographically detectable bilateral infiltrates of the lung. Mostly leucocyte antibodies in the plasma of the blood donor (immunogenic TRALI) are responsible. Apart from antibodies, other substances such as biologically active lipids, mainly arising from the storage of platelet and red blood cell concentrates, can activate neutrophilic granulocytes and trigger a non-immunogenic TRALI. Pathophysiologically, granulocytes in the capillaries of the lung vessels release oxygen radicals and enzymes which damage the endothelial cells and cause pulmonary edema. Therapeutically, nasal oxygen administration may be sufficient. In severe cases, mechanical ventilation, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and fluid intake are required. Diuretics should be avoided. The administration of glucocorticoids is controversial. Antibody-related TRALI reactions occurred mainly after transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, which had been obtained from womenimmunized during pregnancy against leukocyte antigens. Therefore, in Germany, since 2009 only plasma from female donors without a history of prior or current pregnancy or negative testing for antibodies against HLA I, II or HNA has been used with the result that since then no TRALI-related death has been registered.

  3. Do statins prevent acute kidney injury?

    PubMed

    Philips, Barbara; MacPhee, Iain

    2015-10-01

    Statins were introduced as lipid-lowering agents with a specific action to decrease plasma cholesterol concentrations and they have led to significant reductions in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Since their introduction, they have been found to have highly pleiotropic effects and potential use in many medical conditions well beyond cardiovascular disease alone. With their widespread and increasing use, adverse effects have also become apparent and it is suggested from the interrogation of observational data from large datasets that an early complication of statin use may be acute kidney injury (AKI). This review explores the evidence relating to statins and the risks of AKI. The pathophysiology of AKI is considered and the statins are compared and contrasted. Statins have also been attributed with reno-protective effects and the literature relating to these circumstances are reviewed. The question of whether statins cause AKI remains unresolved. Evidence suggests that statins may both protect or harm kidneys acutely and that risk varies with the condition and the dose and type of statin used. However, any current adverse data should not deter prescription of statins in patients where there is clear evidence for either primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events.

  4. Acute kidney injury: global health alert.

    PubMed

    Li, Philip Kam Tao; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2013-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high-risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, and increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other healthcare professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  5. Acute kidney injury in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus–related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation. PMID:21911980

  6. Acute kidney injury in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; George, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most challenging problems faced by clinicians in the tropics owing to its fast-changing burden. AKI in the tropics is strikingly different from that in the developed world in terms of etiology and presentation. In addition, there is a stark contrast between well-developed and poor areas in the tropics. The true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropics is not well understood due to the late presentation of patients to tertiary centers. Infections remain the major culprit in most cases of AKI, with high mortality rates in the tropics. Human immunodeficiency virus-related AKI, related to nephrotoxicity due to antiretroviral therapy, is on the rise. Acute tubular necrosis and thrombotic microangiopathy are the most common mechanisms of AKI. A notable problem in the tropics is the scarcity of resources in health centers to support patients who require critical care due to AKI. This article reviews the unique and contrasting nature of AKI in the tropics and describes its management in each situation.

  7. Acute renal injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Bredt, Luis Cesar; Cipriani, Raphael Flavio Fachini

    2016-01-01

    Currently, partial hepatectomy is the treatment of choice for a wide variety of liver and biliary conditions. Among the possible complications of partial hepatectomy, acute kidney injury (AKI) should be considered as an important cause of increased morbidity and postoperative mortality. Difficulties in the data analysis related to postoperative AKI after liver resections are mainly due to the multiplicity of factors to be considered in the surgical patients, moreover, there is no consensus of the exact definition of AKI after liver resection in the literature, which hampers comparison and analysis of the scarce data published on the subject. Despite this multiplicity of risk factors for postoperative AKI after partial hepatectomy, there are main factors that clearly contribute to its occurrence. First factor relates to large blood losses with renal hypoperfusion during the operation, second factor relates to the occurrence of post-hepatectomy liver failure with consequent distributive circulatory changes and hepatorenal syndrome. Eventually, patients can have more than one factor contributing to post-operative AKI, and frequently these combinations of acute insults can be aggravated by sepsis or exposure to nephrotoxic drugs. PMID:27478539

  8. Acute neurologic illness of unknown etiology in children - Colorado, August-September 2014.

    PubMed

    Pastula, Daniel M; Aliabadi, Negar; Haynes, Amber K; Messacar, Kevin; Schreiner, Teri; Maloney, John; Dominguez, Samuel R; Davizon, Emily Spence; Leshem, Eyal; Fischer, Marc; Nix, W Allan; Oberste, M Steven; Seward, Jane; Feikin, Daniel; Miller, Lisa

    2014-10-10

    On September 12, 2014, CDC was notified by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment of a cluster of nine children evaluated at Children's Hospital Colorado with acute neurologic illness characterized by extremity weakness, cranial nerve dysfunction (e.g., diplopia, facial droop, dysphagia, or dysarthria), or both. Neurologic illness onsets occurred during August 8-September 15, 2014. The median age of the children was 8 years (range = 1-18 years). Other than neck, back, or extremity pain in some patients, all had normal sensation. All had a preceding febrile illness, most with upper respiratory symptoms, occurring 3-16 days (median = 7 days) before onset of neurologic illness. Seven of eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord had nonenhancing lesions of the gray matter of the spinal cord spanning multiple levels, and seven of nine with magnetic resonance imaging of the brain had nonenhancing brainstem lesions (most commonly the dorsal pons). Two of five with magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral region had gadolinium enhancement of the ventral nerve roots of the cauda equina. Eight children were up to date on polio vaccination. Eight have not yet fully recovered neurologically.

  9. Wasp sting-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan; Shankar, Palaniselvam; Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Balasubramaniyan, Thoppalan

    2016-01-01

    Background Wasp stings are a common form of envenomation in tropical countries, especially in farmers. The aim of this study was to document the clinical presentation, treatment and outcomes of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) due to multiple wasp stings in a tertiary care hospital. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational study of patients with multiple wasp stings and AKI at the Department of Nephrology between July 2011 and August 2015. The clinical features, laboratory data, treatment details and outcomes were noted. Results A total of 11 patients were included. All were from rural areas. All of them were males with age ranging from 21 to 70 years, mean age 45 ± 23 years. Six had oliguria and two had hypotension. All 11 patients had evidence of rhabdomyolysis and three also had hemolysis. Ten patients required hemodialysis with a mean number of hemodialysis sessions of 8.7 ± 2.8. Renal biopsy carried out on four patients, showed acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) in one patient, acute tubular necrosis (ATN) in two patients, and one patient had both AIN and ATN. The two patients with AIN were given steroids, while all other patients were managed with supportive measures. One patient died within 48 h of presentation due to shock. At a mean follow-up of 24 months, one had progressed to chronic kidney disease and the remaining nine had normal renal function. Conclusions Wasp sting is an occupational hazard. AKI was most commonly due to rhabdomyolysis. Early renal biopsy is indicated in those patients who do not respond to supportive measures. Timely dialysis and steroid in the case of AIN improves renal survival. PMID:26985369

  10. Serum uric acid and acute kidney injury: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Kai; Kanbay, Mehmet; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J; Ejaz, A Ahsan

    2017-09-01

    Acute kidney injury causes great morbidity and mortality in both the community and hospital settings. Understanding the etiological factors and the pathophysiological principles resulting in acute kidney injury is essential in prompting appropriate therapies. Recently hyperuricemia has been recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for acute kidney injury, including that associated with cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration, rhabdomyolysis, and associated with heat stress. This review discussed the evidence that repeated episodes of acute kidney injury from heat stress and dehydration may also underlie the pathogenesis of the chronic kidney disease epidemic that is occurring in Central America (Mesoamerican nephropathy). Potential mechanisms for how uric acid might contribute to acute kidney injury are also discussed, including systemic effects on renal microvasculature and hemodynamics, and local crystalline and noncrystalline effects on the renal tubules. Pilot clinical trials also show potential benefits of lowering uric acid on acute kidney injury associated with a variety of insults. In summary, there is mounting evidence that hyperuricemia may have a significant role in the development of acute kidney injury. Prospective, placebo controlled, randomized trials are needed to determine the potential benefit of uric acid lowering therapy on kidney and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  11. Alveolar edema fluid clearance and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Berthiaume, Yves; Matthay, Michael A

    2007-12-15

    Although lung-protective ventilation strategies have substantially reduced mortality of acute lung injury patients there is still a need for new therapies that can further decrease mortality in patients with acute lung injury. Studies of epithelial ion and fluid transport across the distal pulmonary epithelia have provided important new concepts regarding potential new therapies for acute lung injury. Overall, there is convincing evidence that the alveolar epithelium is not only a tight epithelial barrier that resists the movement of edema fluid into the alveoli, but it is also actively involved in the transport of ions and solutes, a process that is essential for edema fluid clearance and the resolution of acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to consider some areas of recent progress in the field of alveolar fluid transport under normal and pathologic conditions. Vectorial ion transport across the alveolar and distal airway epithelia is the primary determinant of alveolar fluid clearance. The general paradigm is that active Na(+) and Cl(-) transport drives net alveolar fluid clearance, as demonstrated in several different species, including the human lung. Although these transport processes can be impaired in severe lung injury, multiple experimental studies suggest that upregulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) transport might be an effective therapy in acute lung injury. We will review mechanisms involved in pharmacological modulation of ion transport in lung injury with a special focus on the use of beta-adrenergic agonists which has generated considerable interest and is a promising therapy for clinical acute lung injury.

  12. Nontraumatic spinal cord injury at the neurological intensive care unit: spectrum, causes of admission and predictors of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Grassner, Lukas; Marschallinger, Julia; Dünser, Martin W.; Novak, Helmut F.; Zerbs, Alexander; Aigner, Ludwig; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Nontraumatic spinal cord injuries (NTSCIs) form a heterogeneous group of diseases, which may evolve into a life-threatening condition. We sought to characterize spectrum, causes of admission and predictors of death in patients with NTSCI treated at the neurological intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: We performed a retrospective observational analysis of NTSCI cases treated at a tertiary care center between 2001 and 2013. Among the 3937 NICU admissions were 93 patients with NTSCI (2.4%). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we examined predictors of mortality including demographics, etiology, reasons for admission and GCS/SAPS (Glasgow Coma Scale/Simplified Acute Physiology Score) scores. Results: Infectious and inflammatory/autoimmune causes made up 50% of the NTSCI cases. The most common reasons for NICU admission were rapidly progressing paresis (49.5%) and abundance of respiratory insufficiency (26.9%). The mortality rate was 22.6% and 2.5-fold higher than in the cohort of all other patients treated at the NICU. Respiratory insufficiency as the reason for NICU admission [odds ratio (OR) 4.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38–17.9; p < 0.01], high initial SAPS scores (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.003–1.08; p = 0.04), and the development of acute kidney injury throughout the stay (OR 7.25, 1.9–27.5; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for NICU death. Conclusions: Patients with NTSCI account for a subset of patients admitted to the NICU and are at risk for adverse outcome. A better understanding of predisposing conditions and further knowledge of management of critically ill patients with NTSCI is mandatory. PMID:27006696

  13. Barbiturates for acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ian; Sydenham, Emma

    2012-12-12

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important complication of severe brain injury, and is associated with high mortality. Barbiturates are believed to reduce ICP by suppressing cerebral metabolism, thus reducing cerebral metabolic demands and cerebral blood volume. However, barbiturates also reduce blood pressure and may, therefore, adversely effect cerebral perfusion pressure. To assess the effects of barbiturates in reducing mortality, disability and raised ICP in people with acute traumatic brain injury. To quantify any side effects resulting from the use of barbiturates. The following electronic databases were searched on 26 September 2012: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid SP), PubMed, EMBASE (Ovid SP), PsycINFO (Ovid SP), PsycEXTRA (Ovid SP), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science. Searching was not restricted by date, language or publication status. We also searched the reference lists of the included trials and review articles. We contacted researchers for information on ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials of one or more of the barbiturate class of drugs, where study participants had clinically diagnosed acute traumatic brain injury of any severity. Two review authors screened the search results, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the trials. Data from seven trials involving 341 people are included in this review.For barbiturates versus no barbiturate, the pooled risk ratio (RR) of death from three trials was 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81 to 1.47). Death or disability, measured using the Glasgow Outcome Scale was assessed in two trials, the RR with barbiturates was 1.15 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.64). Two trials examined the effect of barbiturate therapy on ICP. In one, a smaller proportion of patients in the barbiturate group had uncontrolled ICP (68% versus 83%); the RR for uncontrolled ICP was 0.81 (95% CI 0.62 to 1.06). In the other, mean ICP was also lower in

  14. Acupuncture Improved Neurological Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury by Activating BDNF/TrkB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Chen, Chong; Yang, Xiping; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Ming-liang; Sun, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    How to promote neural repair following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been an intractable problem. Although acupuncture has been demonstrated to facilitate the neurological recovery, the underlying mechanism is elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts substantial protective effects for neurological disorders. In this study, we found that the level of BDNF and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) was elevated spontaneously after TBI and reached up to the peak at 12 h. Nevertheless, this enhancement is quickly declined to the normal at 48 h. After combined stimulation at the acupoints of Baihui, Renzhong, Hegu, and Zusanli, we found that BDNF and TrkB were still significantly elevated at 168 h. We also observed that the downstream molecular p-Akt and p-Erk1/2 were significantly increased, suggesting that acupuncture could persistently activate the BDNF/TrkB pathway. To further verify that acupuncture improved recovery through activating BDNF/TrkB pathway, K252a (specific inhibitor of TrkB) was treated by injection stereotaxically into lateral ventricle. We observed that K252a could significantly prevent the acupuncture-induced amelioration of motor, sensation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. These data indicated that acupuncture promoted the recovery of neurological impairment after TBI by activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, providing new molecular mechanism for understanding traditional therapy of acupuncture. PMID:28243312

  15. Acupuncture Improved Neurological Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury by Activating BDNF/TrkB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Chen, Chong; Yang, Xiping; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Ming-Liang; Sun, Hongtao; Zhang, Sai; Tu, Yue

    2017-01-01

    How to promote neural repair following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long been an intractable problem. Although acupuncture has been demonstrated to facilitate the neurological recovery, the underlying mechanism is elusive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts substantial protective effects for neurological disorders. In this study, we found that the level of BDNF and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) was elevated spontaneously after TBI and reached up to the peak at 12 h. Nevertheless, this enhancement is quickly declined to the normal at 48 h. After combined stimulation at the acupoints of Baihui, Renzhong, Hegu, and Zusanli, we found that BDNF and TrkB were still significantly elevated at 168 h. We also observed that the downstream molecular p-Akt and p-Erk1/2 were significantly increased, suggesting that acupuncture could persistently activate the BDNF/TrkB pathway. To further verify that acupuncture improved recovery through activating BDNF/TrkB pathway, K252a (specific inhibitor of TrkB) was treated by injection stereotaxically into lateral ventricle. We observed that K252a could significantly prevent the acupuncture-induced amelioration of motor, sensation, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. These data indicated that acupuncture promoted the recovery of neurological impairment after TBI by activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, providing new molecular mechanism for understanding traditional therapy of acupuncture.

  16. Acute Kidney Injury Predicts Mortality after Charcoal Burning Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Yi-Chia; Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Yang, Huang-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Chen, Hui-Ling; Fu, Jen-Fen; Lin, Wey-Ran; Wang, I-Kuan; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2016-01-01

    A paucity of literature exists on risk factors for mortality in charcoal burning suicide. In this observational study, we analyzed the data of 126 patients with charcoal burning suicide that seen between 2002 and 2013. Patients were grouped according to status of renal damage as acute kidney injury (N = 49) or non-acute kidney injury (N = 77). It was found that patients with acute kidney injury suffered severer complications such as respiratory failure (P = 0.002), myocardial injury (P = 0.049), hepatic injury (P < 0.001), rhabdomyolysis (P = 0.045) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (P = 0.028) than patients without acute kidney injury. Moreover, patients with acute kidney injury suffered longer hospitalization duration (16.9 ± 18.3 versus 10.7 ± 10.9, P = 0.002) and had higher mortality rate (8.2% versus 0%, P = 0.011) than patients without injury. In a multivariate Cox regression model, it was demonstrated that serum creatinine level (P = 0.019) and heart rate (P = 0.022) were significant risk factors for mortality. Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with acute kidney injury suffered lower cumulative survival than without injury (P = 0.016). In summary, the overall mortality rate of charcoal burning suicide population was 3.2%, and acute kidney injury was a powerful predictor of mortality. Further studies are warranted. PMID:27430168

  17. Functional Outcomes in Individuals Undergoing Very Early (< 5 h) and Early (5-24 h) Surgical Decompression in Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Analysis of Neurological Improvement from the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study.

    PubMed

    Mattiassich, Georg; Gollwitzer, Maria; Gaderer, Franz; Blocher, Martina; Osti, Michael; Lill, Markkus; Ortmaier, Reinhold; Haider, Thomas; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Resch, Herbert; Aschauer-Wallner, Stephanie

    2017-08-10

    Our study aim was to assess the neurological outcomes of surgical decompression and stabilization within 5 and 24 h after injury. We performed a multi-center, retrospective cohort study in adolescents and adults 15-85 years of age presenting cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) at one of 6 Austrian trauma centers participating in the Austrian Spinal Cord Injury Study (ASCIS). Neurological outcomes were measured using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade according to the International Standards For Neurological Classification Of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) form after at least 6 months of follow-up (FU). Of the 49 enrolled patients with acute CSCI, 33 underwent surgical decompression within 5 h (mean 3.2 h ± 1.1 h; very early group) after injury, and 16 underwent surgical decompression between 5 and 24 h (mean 8.6 h ± 5.5 h; early group). Significant neurological improvement was observed among the entire study population between the preoperative assessment and the FU. We identified a significant difference in the AIS grade at the last FU between the groups the using Jonckheere-Terpstra test for doubly ordered crosstabs (p = 0.011) and significantly different AIS improvement rates in the early group (Poisson model, p = 0.018). Improvement by one AIS grade was observed in 31% and 42% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.54). Improvement by two AIS grades was observed in 31% and 6% of the patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 0.03; relative risk [RR], 5.2; 95% CI, 1.1-35). Improvement by three AIS grades was observed in 6% and 3% of patients in the early and very early groups, respectively (p = 1.0). Decompression of the spinal cord within 24 h after SCI was associated with an improved neurological outcome. No additional neurological benefit was observed in patients who underwent decompression within 5 h of injury.

  18. Pre-Adult MRI of Brain Cancer and Neurological Injury: Multivariate Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Brain cancer and neurological injuries, such as stroke, are life-threatening conditions for which further research is needed to overcome the many challenges associated with providing optimal patient care. Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of pattern recognition technique involving the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of neuroimaging challenges, including identifying variables associated with patient outcomes; understanding an injury’s etiology, development, and progression; creating diagnostic tests; assisting in treatment monitoring; and more. Compared to adults, imaging of the developing brain has attracted less attention from MVA researchers, however, remarkable MVA growth has occurred in recent years. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA technologies applied to brain injury and cancer in neurological fetal, neonatal, and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With a wide variety of MRI modalities providing physiologically meaningful biomarkers and new biomarker measurements constantly under development, MVA techniques hold enormous potential toward combining available measurements toward improving basic research and the creation of technologies that contribute to improving patient care. PMID:27446888

  19. Shoulder dystocia related fetal neurological injuries: the predisposing roles of forceps and ventouse extractions.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, Michael; Iffy, Leslie; Apuzzio, Joseph J; Varadi, Valeria; Nagy, Balint; Raju, Vijaya; Portuondo, Nuris

    2008-05-01

    On the basis of 333 documented cases of permanent perinatal neurological damage, associated with arrest of the shoulders at birth, the authors conducted a retrospective study in order to evaluate the predisposing role, if any, of the utilization of extraction instruments. The investigation revealed that 35% of all injuries occurred in neonates delivered by forceps, ventouse or sequential ventouse-forceps procedures. This frequency was several-fold higher than the prevailing instrument use in the practices of American obstetricians during the same years. A high rate of forceps and ventouse extractions was demonstrable in all birth weight categories. Average weight and moderately large for gestational age fetuses underwent instrumental extractions more often than grossly macrosomic ones. This circumstance indicates that forceps and ventouse are independent risk factors, unrelated to fetal size. Their use entailed central nervous system injuries significantly more often than did spontaneous deliveries. The findings suggest that extraction procedures may be as important as macrosomia among the factors that lead to neurological damage in the child in connection with shoulder dystocia. Because they augment the intrinsic dangers of excessive fetal size exponentially, the authors consider their use in case of > or =4,000 g estimated fetal weight inadvisable. Sequential forceps-ventouse utilization further doubles the risks and is, therefore, to be avoided in all circumstances.

  20. Multiple hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) expands the therapeutic window in acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Mehta, M P; Eichhorn, J H; Nanda, A; Zhang, J H

    2003-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy has been reported to improve neurological recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI). In the present study, we examined whether multiple HBO expands the therapeutic window for acute SCI. Single HBO (2.8 ATA, 1 hour) treatment was used at 30 minutes, 3 hours, and 6 hours following SCI, and serial HBO treatment (once daily for 1 week) at 6 hours and 24 hours post-injury. Mild SCI was induced by adjusting the height for a weight drop insult (10 g) to 6.25 mm above the exposed spinal cord. The group of animals receiving a single HBO intervention beginning at 30 minutes and 3 hours, or serial HBO treatment starting at 6 hours following the injury had a significantly better neurological recovery than animals with SCI only. The results of this study demonstrate that multiple HBO expands the therapeutic window for acute SCI to 6 hours after injury, further that serial HBO administration is superior to single HBO therapy.

  1. Alcohol Exposure after Mild Focal Traumatic Brain Injury Impairs Neurological Recovery and Exacerbates Localized Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Sophie X; Katz, Paige S; Maxi, John K; Mayeux, Jacques P; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Molina, Patricia E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. Alcohol abuse is a risk factor associated with increased TBI incidence. In addition, up to 26% of TBI patients engage in alcohol consumption after TBI. Limited preclinical studies have examined the impact of post-injury alcohol exposure on TBI recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the isolated and combined effects of TBI and alcohol on cognitive, behavioral, and physical recovery, as well as on associated neuroinflammatory changes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (~300 g) were subjected to a mild focal TBI by lateral fluid percussion (~30 PSI, ~25 ms) under isoflurane anesthesia. On day 4 after TBI, animals were exposed to either sub-chronic intermittent alcohol vapor (95% ethanol 14h on /10h off; BAL~200 mg/dL) or room air for 10 days. TBI induced neurological dysfunction reflected by an increased neurological severity score (NSS) showed progressive improvement in injured animals exposed to room air (TBI/air). In contrast, TBI animals exposed to alcohol vapor (TBI/alcohol) showed impaired NSS recovery throughout the 10-day period of alcohol exposure. Open-field exploration test revealed an increased anxiety-like behavior in TBI/alcohol group compared to TBI/air group. Additionally, alcohol-exposed animals showed decreased locomotion and impaired novel object recognition. Immunofluorescence showed enhanced reactive astrocytes, microglial activation, and HMGB1 expression localized to the injured cortex of TBI/alcohol as compared to TBI/air animals. The expression of neuroinflammatory markers showed significant positive correlation with NSS. These findings indicated a close relationship between accentuated neuroinflammation and impaired neurological recovery from post-TBI alcohol exposure. The clinical implications of long-term consequences in TBI patients exposed to alcohol during recovery warrant further investigation. PMID:25489880

  2. Alcohol exposure after mild focal traumatic brain injury impairs neurological recovery and exacerbates localized neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Teng, Sophie X; Katz, Paige S; Maxi, John K; Mayeux, Jacques P; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Molina, Patricia E

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. Alcohol abuse is a risk factor associated with increased TBI incidence. In addition, up to 26% of TBI patients engage in alcohol consumption after TBI. Limited preclinical studies have examined the impact of post-injury alcohol exposure on TBI recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the isolated and combined effects of TBI and alcohol on cognitive, behavioral, and physical recovery, as well as on associated neuroinflammatory changes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼300g) were subjected to a mild focal TBI by lateral fluid percussion (∼30PSI, ∼25ms) under isoflurane anesthesia. On day 4 after TBI, animals were exposed to either sub-chronic intermittent alcohol vapor (95% ethanol 14h on/10h off; BAL∼200mg/dL) or room air for 10days. TBI induced neurological dysfunction reflected by an increased neurological severity score (NSS) showed progressive improvement in injured animals exposed to room air (TBI/air). In contrast, TBI animals exposed to alcohol vapor (TBI/alcohol) showed impaired NSS recovery throughout the 10-day period of alcohol exposure. Open-field exploration test revealed an increased anxiety-like behavior in TBI/alcohol group compared to TBI/air group. Additionally, alcohol-exposed animals showed decreased locomotion and impaired novel object recognition. Immunofluorescence showed enhanced reactive astrocytes, microglial activation, and HMGB1 expression localized to the injured cortex of TBI/alcohol as compared to TBI/air animals. The expression of neuroinflammatory markers showed significant positive correlation with NSS. These findings indicated a close relationship between accentuated neuroinflammation and impaired neurological recovery from post-TBI alcohol exposure. The clinical implications of long-term consequences in TBI patients exposed to alcohol during recovery warrant further investigation.

  3. Outcome measures: evolution in clinical trials of neurological/functional recovery in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ditunno, J F

    2010-09-01

    The need to determine the beneficial effect of the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI) requires clearly defined standardized measures of the severity of injury and how well the function is restored. Improved neurological recovery should be linked to increased capacity to perform tasks such as walking, reaching and grasping, which results in meaningful gains in mobility and self-care. Measurements of recovery, capacity, mobility and self-care are the outcomes used to determine the benefits from the treatment and have evolved over the last century with contributions by the mentors and protégés of Sir Ludwig Guttmann, whom we honor today. Randomized clinical trials in the past 20 years have taught us many lessons as to which outcome measures have the greatest validity and reliability. The International Standards for Neurological Classification of SCI have become the clinical gold standard for measurement of severity, but would benefit from pathophysiological surrogates to better understand the mechanisms of recovery. Measurements of walking capacity have emerged as valid/reliable/responsive and upper extremity measures are in development, which help distinguish neurological improvement from rehabilitation adaptation. Performance of self-care and mobility has been linked to capacity and severity outcomes. In addition, new partnerships between clinical trial entities, professional societies, industry and federal agencies should facilitate identification of priorities and uniformity of measurement standards. Our ultimate goal is to improve the quality of life of those individuals with SCI whom we serve, but we must focus our investigative efforts carefully, systematically and rigorously as clinical scientists.

  4. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss. PMID:21173910

  5. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.

  6. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p < 0.0001). Death alone and major adverse kidney events after discharge were most common in the pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both

  7. A review and update on the guidelines for the acute management of cervical spinal cord injury - Part II.

    PubMed

    Yue, John K; Chan, Andrew K; Winkler, Ethan A; Upadhyayula, Pavan S; Readdy, William J; Dhall, Sanjay S

    2016-09-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating worldwide disease with an estimated annual incidence of 10 to 83 affected individuals per million inhabitants. These injuries typically impact younger individuals and reduce quality-adjusted life years with estimated lifetime costs exceeding $4 million per person. Hence it is critical to establish and refine clear practice guidelines for acute management of SCI. In 2013 the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) released a revision of the 2002 guidelines for Cervical SCI. In the present report we explore seven subsections for management of specific cervical injury types, review key supporting literature, and provide an update on recent studies since the publication of the 2013 guidelines. Our review finds a paucity of Level I and Level II treatment recommendations for cervical spine injuries, with the exception of subaxial cervical spine injury classification and surgical management for Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly. We recommend the systematic implementation of large randomized controlled studies across diverse demographics and ethnicities, injury mechanisms and morphologies to address pressing limitations in the current literature. The cohesive effort to adopt the 2013 AANS/CNS Guidelines and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Common Data Elements for SCI as part of a multicenter international approach will enable reproducible data collection and robust analyses toward achieving this goal.

  8. Urodynamic profile in acute transverse myelitis patients: Its correlation with neurological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anupam; Kumar, Sushruth Nagesh; Taly, Arun B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to observe urodynamic profile of acute transverse myelitis (ATM) patients and its correlation with neurological outcome. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was conducted in the neurorehabilitation unit of a tertiary university research hospital from July 2012 to June 2014. Forty-three patients (19 men) with ATM with bladder dysfunction, admitted in the rehabilitation unit, were included in this study. Urodynamic study (UDS) was performed in all the patients. Their neurological status was assessed using ASIA impairment scale and functional status was assessed using spinal cord independence measure. Bladder management was based on UDS findings. Results: In total, 17 patients had tetraplegia and 26 had paraplegia. Thirty-six patients (83.7%) had complaints of increased frequency and urgency of urine with 26 patients reported at least one episode of urge incontinence. Seven patients reported obstructive urinary complaints in the form of straining to void with 13 patients reported both urgency and straining to void and 3 also had stress incontinence. Thirty-seven (86.1%) patients had neurogenic overactive detrusor with or without sphincter dyssynergia and five patients had acontractile detrusor on UDS. No definitive pattern was observed between neurological status and bladder characteristics. All patients showed significant neurological and functional recovery with inpatient rehabilitation (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: The problem of neurogenic bladder dysfunction is integral to ATM. Bladder management in these patients should be based on UDS findings. Bladder characteristics have no definitive pattern consistent with the neurological status. PMID:28149080

  9. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis.

  10. Transverse Myelitis in Acute Hepatitis A Infection: The Rare Co-Occurrence of Hepatology and Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Chonmaitree, Piyanant; Methawasin, Kulthida

    2016-01-01

    Transverse myelitis refers to the inflammatory process involving the spinal cord. Clinical features can be either acute or subacute onset that results in neurological deficits such as weakness and/or numbness of extremities as well as autonomic dysfunctions. While there are some etiologies related, a viral infection is common. However, the hepatitis A virus rarely causes myelitis. This report provides details of a hepatitis A infectious patient who developed myelitis as comorbidity. Although, the disability was initially severe, the patient successfully recovered with corticosteroid treatment. PMID:27403101

  11. Subspace based adaptive denoising of surface EMG from neurological injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zev Rymer, William; Zhou, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Objective: After neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury, voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals recorded from affected muscles are often corrupted by interferences, such as spurious involuntary spikes and background noises produced by physiological and extrinsic/accidental origins, imposing difficulties for signal processing. Conventional methods did not well address the problem caused by interferences. It is difficult to mitigate such interferences using conventional methods. The aim of this study was to develop a subspace-based denoising method to suppress involuntary background spikes contaminating voluntary surface EMG recordings. Approach: The Karhunen-Loeve transform was utilized to decompose a noisy signal into a signal subspace and a noise subspace. An optimal estimate of EMG signal is derived from the signal subspace and the noise power. Specifically, this estimator is capable of making a tradeoff between interference reduction and signal distortion. Since the estimator partially relies on the estimate of noise power, an adaptive method was presented to sequentially track the variation of interference power. The proposed method was evaluated using both semi-synthetic and real surface EMG signals. Main results: The experiments confirmed that the proposed method can effectively suppress interferences while keep the distortion of voluntary EMG signal in a low level. The proposed method can greatly facilitate further signal processing, such as onset detection of voluntary muscle activity. Significance: The proposed method can provide a powerful tool for suppressing background spikes and noise contaminating voluntary surface EMG signals of paretic muscles after neurological injuries, which is of great importance for their multi-purpose applications.

  12. Neurological heterotopic ossification following spinal cord injury is triggered by macrophage-mediated inflammation in muscle.

    PubMed

    Genêt, François; Kulina, Irina; Vaquette, Cedryck; Torossian, Frédéric; Millard, Susan; Pettit, Allison R; Sims, Natalie A; Anginot, Adrienne; Guerton, Bernadette; Winkler, Ingrid G; Barbier, Valérie; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Neurological heterotopic ossification (NHO) is the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissues as a consequence of spinal cord or traumatic brain injury. NHO causes pain, ankyloses, vascular and nerve compression and delays rehabilitation in this high-morbidity patient group. The pathological mechanisms leading to NHO remain unknown and consequently there are no therapeutic options to prevent or reduce NHO. Genetically modified mouse models of rare genetic forms of heterotopic ossification (HO) exist, but their relevance to NHO is questionable. Consequently, we developed the first model of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced NHO in genetically unmodified mice. Formation of NHO, measured by micro-computed tomography, required the combination of both SCI and localized muscular inflammation. Our NHO model faithfully reproduced many clinical features of NHO in SCI patients and both human and mouse NHO tissues contained macrophages. Muscle-derived mesenchymal progenitors underwent osteoblast differentiation in vitro in response to serum from NHO mice without additional exogenous osteogenic stimuli. Substance P was identified as a candidate NHO systemic neuropeptide, as it was significantly elevated in the serum of NHO patients. However, antagonism of substance P receptor in our NHO model only modestly reduced the volume of NHO. In contrast, ablation of phagocytic macrophages with clodronate-loaded liposomes reduced the size of NHO by 90%, supporting the conclusion that NHO is highly dependent on inflammation and phagocytic macrophages in soft tissues. Overall, we have developed the first clinically relevant model of NHO and demonstrated that a combined insult of neurological injury and soft tissue inflammation drives NHO pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Vijaykumar, DK; Paul, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury. PMID:18957111

  14. Tracking Spinal Cord Injury: Differences in Cytokine Expression of IGF-1, TGF- B1, and sCD95l Can Be Measured in Blood Samples and Correspond to Neurological Remission in a 12-Week Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Ferbert, Thomas; Child, Christopher; Graeser, Viola; Swing, Tyler; Akbar, Michael; Heller, Raban; Biglari, Bahram; Moghaddam, Arash

    2017-02-01

    Neuroinflammation presumably has an important impact on the secondary phase of spinal cord injury and is regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. We analyzed serum levels of three different cytokines (insulin-like-growth-factor [IGF]-1, tumor growth factor [TGF]-β1, and soluble CD 95 ligand [sCD95L]), in blood samples of 23 patients admitted with acute traumatic spinal cord injury between November 2010 and July 2013 with a follow-up period of 12 weeks. Quantification was performed using Human Quantikine Immunoassays, classification of neurological impairment was performed using the American Spinal Cord Injury Impairment Scale at time of admission and after 12 weeks. After an initial drop of all three cytokine serum levels, IGF-1, TGF-β1, and sCD95L showed significantly increased serum levels during the acute and sub-acute phases. For IGF-1 and sCD95L, we could also observe significantly higher serum levels in patients without neurological improvement compared with patients who had improvement after 12 weeks. In this study, we were able to show differences in cytokine serum levels in patients with different neurological outcome. Measuring the serum level patterns of IGF-1, TGF-β1, and sCD95L might be a useful tool for prognosis in patients with neurological improvement and tracking the pathophysiology in further studies. Further, our observations might link promising therapeutic efforts in numerous animal studies and future studies in human patients.

  15. Functional MRI for Assessment of the Default Mode Network in Acute Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kondziella, Daniel; Fisher, Patrick M; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée; Hauerberg, John; Fabricius, Martin; Møller, Kirsten; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2017-05-08

    Assessment of the default mode network (DMN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may improve assessment of the level of consciousness in chronic brain injury, and therefore, fMRI may also have prognostic value in acute brain injury. However, fMRI is much more challenging in critically ill patients because of cardiovascular vulnerability, intravenous sedation, and artificial ventilation. Using resting-state fMRI, we investigated the DMN in a convenience sample of patients with acute brain injury admitted to the intensive care unit. The DMN was classified dichotomously into "normal" and "grossly abnormal." Clinical outcome was assessed at 3 months. Seven patients with acute brain injury (4 females; median age 37 years [range 14-71 years]; 1 traumatic brain injury [TBI]; 6 non-TBI) were investigated by fMRI a median of 15 days after injury (range 5-25 days). Neurological presentation included 2 coma, 1 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS), 3 minimal conscious state (MCS) minus, and 1 MCS plus. Clinical outcomes at 3 months included 1 death, 1 VS/UWS, 1 MCS plus, and 4 conscious states (CS; 1 modified Rankin Scale 0; 2 mRS 4; 1 mRS 5). Normal DMNs were seen in 4 out of 7 patients (1 MCS plus, 3 CS at follow-up). It is feasible to assess the DMN by resting-state fMRI in patients with acute brain injury already in the very early period of intensive care unit admission. Although preliminary data, all patients with a preserved DMN regained consciousness levels at follow-up compatible with MCS+ or better.

  16. The throw: biomechanics and acute injury.

    PubMed

    Gainor, B J; Piotrowski, G; Puhl, J; Allen, W C; Hagen, R

    1980-01-01

    The throw and its modifications are integral components of many sports. This study correlates case histories of acute injuries in throwing with a biomechanical analysis of the throwing mechanism. Comparisons are made with a similar analysis of the kick analyzed by the same film technique and computer program. Just prior to ball release, the pitching arm extends through an arc of about 73 degress in 40 msec, beginning with the elbow flexed at 80 degrees. This produces an axial load on the humerus and coincides with a pulse of external torque at the shoulder. This acts as stress protection to the humerus which is developing an internal torque of 14,000 inch-lb prior to ball release. The change in angular velocity, or the angular acceleration, during the throw is acquired in a much shorter time than in the kick. Torque is directly proportional to angular acceleration. This necessitates the development of substantially higher torques in the humerus during the throw than about the knee during a kick. The kinetic energy in the arm is 27,000 inch-lb during the throw. This is much higher than the kinetic energy in the kicking leg because the kinetic energy varies proportionally with the square of the angular velocity of the extremity. The angular velocity of the arm is about twice that of the leg. Thus, the pitching arm contains about four times as much kinetic energy as the kicking leg. These severe overloading conditions predispose the upper extremity to injury in the throwing mechanism.

  17. Acute spinal injury after centrifuge training in asymptomatic fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung-Wook; Shin, Young Ho; Kang, Seungcheol

    2015-04-01

    Many countries have hypergravity training centers using centrifuges for pilots to cope with a high gravity (G) environment. The high G training carries potential risk for the development of spinal injury. However, no studies evaluated the influence of centrifuge training on the spines of asymptomatic fighter pilots on a large scale. Study subjects were 991 male fighter pilots with high G training at one institution. Subject variables included information about physical characteristics, flight hours of pilots prior to the training, and G force exposure related factors during training. The two dependent variables were whether the pilots developed acute spinal injury after training and the severity of the injury (major/minor). The incidence of acute spinal injury after high G training was 2.3% (23 of 991 subjects). There were 19 subjects who developed minor injury and 4 subjects who developed a herniated intervertebral disc, which is considered a major injury. In multivariate analysis, only the magnitude of G force during training was significantly related to the development of acute spinal injury. However, there was no significant factor related to the severity of the injury. These results suggest that high G training could cause negative effects on fighter pilots' spines. The magnitude of G force during training seemed to be the most significant factor affecting the occurrence of acute spinal injury.

  18. EFFECT OF ERYTHROPOIETIN ADMINISTRATION AND TRANSFUSION THRESHOLD ON NEUROLOGICAL RECOVERY AFTER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claudia S.; Hannay, H. Julia; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Gopinath, Shankar; Goodman, J. Clay; Tilley, Barbara C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance There is limited information about the effect of erythropoietin or a high transfusion threshold in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To compare the effects of erythropoietin and two transfusion thresholds (7 and 10 g/dl) on neurological recovery after TBI. Design Randomized trial using a factorial design to test: i.) whether erythropoietin would fail to improve favorable outcomes by 20%, and ii.) whether a transfusion threshold of >10 g/dl would increase favorable outcomes without increasing complications. Setting Neurosurgical intensive care units of two Houston level 1 trauma centers Participants Between May 2006 and August 2012, 200 patients with closed head injury who were unable to follow commands were enrolled within 6 hours of injury; 102 patients received erythropoetin and 98 received placebo. Erythropoetin or placebo was initially dosed daily for 3 days and then weekly for 2 more weeks (n=74) and then the 24h and 48h doses were dropped for the remainder (n=126). Ninety-nine and 101 patients were assigned to the 7g/dl and 10g/dl transfusion thresholds. Intervention Intravenous erythropoietin 500 IU/kg or saline per dose. Transfusion threshold maintained with packed red blood cell transfusion. Main Outcome Glasgow Outcome Scale dichotomized as favorable (good recovery and moderate disability) and unfavorable (severe disability, vegetative, or dead) at 6 months post-injury. Results There was no erythropoeitin-transfusion threshold interaction. Compared to placebo (favorable outcome rate: 34/89 [38.2%]; 95%CI=28.2-49.1%), both erythropoetin groups were futile (first dosing regimen: 17/35 [48.6%]; 95%CI=31.4-66.0%, p=0.13, and second dosing regimen: 17/57 [29.8%]; 95%CI=18.4-43.4%, p<0.001). Favorable outcome rates were 37/87 (42.5%) and 31/94 (33.0%) in the 7 and 10 g/dl threshold groups (95%CI for the difference = − 0.05 to 0.25, p=0.28). There was a higher incidence of thromboembolic events in the 10 g/dl threshold group (22/101 [21.8%] vs

  19. [Positive end-expiratory pressure : adjustment in acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Bruells, C S; Dembinski, R

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from acute lung injury is a challenge for the treating physician. In recent years ventilation of patients with acute hypoxic lung injury has changed fundamentally. Besides the use of low tidal volumes, the most beneficial setting of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) has been in the focus of researchers. The findings allow adaption of treatment to milder forms of acute lung injury and severe forms. Additionally computed tomography techniques to assess the pulmonary situation and recruitment potential as well as bed-side techniques to adjust PEEP on the ward have been modified and improved. This review gives an outline of recent developments in PEEP adjustment for patients suffering from acute hypoxic and hypercapnic lung injury and explains the fundamental pathophysiology necessary as a basis for correct treatment.

  20. Challenges of targeting vascular stability in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P

    2008-08-01

    Acute kidney injury following folate administration is characterized by a vascular remodeling that is initially proliferative but subsequently results in vascular endothelial loss. Interventions directed toward promoting endothelial growth may preserve vascular structure and therefore renal function. However, angiopoietin-1 therapy in the setting of folate-induced acute kidney injury resulted in an expanded fibrotic response despite apparent preservation of the vasculature, indicating that renal repair responses are complex and vascular-directed therapies should be approached with caution.

  1. Acute kidney injury and dialysis in children: illustrative cases.

    PubMed

    Symons, Jordan M; Picca, Stefano

    2008-09-01

    Pediatric nephrologists and critical care physicians are faced with a heterogeneous patient population with varied epidemiology caring for children with acute kidney injury or other diseases that may require renal replacement therapy provision. We have composed 4 detailed case scenarios to highlight the challenges and interdisciplinary approach required for optimal care provision to children, and that serve to direct the different articles contained in this special issue of Seminars of Nephrology devoted to acute kidney injury in children.

  2. Contrast induced acute kidney injury in acute coronary syndrome patients: A single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Serdar; Vogel, Birgit; Tentzeris, Ioannis; Jarai, Rudolf; Freynhofer, Matthias Karl; Smetana, Peter; Egger, Florian; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Huber, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate predictors of contrast induced acute kidney injury, in-hospital and long-term mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome treated by percutaneous coronary intervention. We investigated 536 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Contrast induced acute kidney injury was classified according to risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function and end-stage kidney disease/acute kidney injury network (RIFLE/AKIN) criteria into those with normal kidney function, risk, RIFLE stage I and those with stage ⩾ II. We investigated in-hospital, all-cause mortality during index hospitalization and long-term all-cause mortality during the follow-up period of 94 months (interquartile 81.6-108.9 months) in adjustment with parameters of the Global Risk of Acute Coronary Events score. Patients with contrast induced acute kidney injury had worse baseline clinical characteristics and displayed more co-morbidities than patients with normal kidney function. In multivariate logistic regression analysis intra-aortic balloon pump use, congestive heart failure, age >75 years and admission serum creatinine >1.5mg/dl were independent predictors of contrast induced acute kidney injury development. contrast induced acute kidney injury RIFLE stage ⩾ II was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 33.16, confidence interval 1.426-770.79, p=0.029) and long-term mortality (hazard ratio 4.713, confidence interval 1.53-14.51, p=0.007) even after adjustment for confounders (variables of Global Risk of Acute Coronary Events score). Contrast induced acute kidney injury is a common complication of acute coronary syndrome patients treated by percutaneous coronary intervention. Advanced deterioration in renal function after percutaneous coronary intervention is an independent predictor for in-hospital and long-term mortality. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  3. Post-partum acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Naresh; Bharani, Rajesh; Kumar, Ravindra

    2014-11-01

    To determine the risk factors, course of hospital stay and mortality rate among women with post-partum acute kidney injury (AKI), we studied (of 752 patients with AKI admitted to a tertiary care center during the study period between November 2009 and August 2012) 27 (3.59%) women with post-partum AKI. The data regarding age, parity, cause of renal failure, course of hospital stay and requirement of dialysis were recorded. Sepsis was the major cause (70.3%) of post-partum AKI. Other causes included disseminated intravascular coagulation (55.5%), pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (40.7%), ante- and post-partum hemorrhage (40.7% and 22.2%) and hemolytic anemia and elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome (29.6%); most patients had more than one cause of AKI. We found a very high prevalence (18.5%) of cortical necrosis in our study patients. A significant correlation was also found between the creatinine level on admission and the period of onset of disease after delivery. In conclusion, several factors are involved in causing post-partum AKI in our population, and sepsis was the most common of them.

  4. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Loubon, Christian; Fernández-Molina, Manuel; Carrascal-Hinojal, Yolanda; Fulquet-Carreras, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a well-recognized complication resulting with the higher morbid-mortality after cardiac surgery. In its most severe form, it increases the odds ratio of operative mortality 3–8-fold, length of stay in the Intensive Care Unit and hospital, and costs of care. Early diagnosis is critical for an optimal treatment of this complication. Just as the identification and correction of preoperative risk factors, the use of prophylactic measures during and after surgery to optimize renal function is essential to improve postoperative morbidity and mortality of these patients. Cardiopulmonary bypass produces an increased in tubular damage markers. Their measurement may be the most sensitive means of early detection of AKI because serum creatinine changes occur 48 h to 7 days after the original insult. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 are most promising as an early diagnostic tool. However, the ideal noninvasive, specific, sensitive, reproducible biomarker for the detection of AKI within 24 h is still not found. This article provides a review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI, including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment. We searched the electronic databases, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE using search terms relevant including pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, biomarkers, classification, postoperative management, and treatment, in order to provide an exhaustive review of the different perspectives of the CSA-AKI. PMID:27716701

  5. Prostatic surgery associated acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Costalonga, Elerson Carlos; Costa e Silva, Verônica Torres; Caires, Renato; Hung, James; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with extended hospital stays, high risks of in-hospital and long-term mortality, and increased risk of incident and progressive chronic kidney disease. Patients with urological diseases are a high-risk group for AKI owing to the coexistence of obstructive uropathy, older age, and preexistent chronic kidney disease. Nonetheless, precise data on the incidence and outcomes of postoperative AKI in urological procedures are lacking. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer are common diagnoses in older men and are frequently treated with surgical procedures. Whereas severe AKI after prostate surgery in general appears to be unusual, AKI associated with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) syndrome and with rhabdomyolysis (RM) after radical prostatectomy have been frequently described. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, risk factors, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of AKI associated with prostatic surgery. The mechanisms of TURP syndrome and RM following prostatic surgeries will be emphasized. PMID:25374813

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Müller, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) significantly increases the overall morbidity and mortality, particularly by elevating the cardiovascular risk. The kidneys are severely affected as well, partly as a result of intrarenal athero- and arteriosclerosis but also due to noninflammatory glomerular damage (diabetic nephropathy). DM is the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease in our society. Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a clinical and prognostic problem of fundamental importance since incidences have been increased in recent years while mortality has not substantially been improved. As a matter of fact, not many studies particularly addressed the topic “AKI in diabetes mellitus.” Aim of this article is to summarize AKI epidemiology and outcomes in DM and current recommendations on blood glucose control in the intensive care unit with regard to the risk for acquiring AKI, and finally several aspects related to postischemic microvasculopathy in AKI of diabetic patients shall be discussed. We intend to deal with this relevant topic, last but not least with regard to increasing incidences and prevalences of both disorders, AKI and DM. PMID:27974972

  7. Mechanisms of triple whammy acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Prieto-García, Laura; Pericacho, Miguel; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M; Sánchez, Ángel; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; López-Novoa, José Miguel; López-Hernández, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    Pre-renal acute kidney injury (AKI) results from glomerular haemodynamic alterations leading to reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with no parenchymal compromise. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and diuretics, are highly prescribed drugs that are frequently administered together. Double and triple associations have been correlated with increased pre-renal AKI incidence, termed "double whammy" and "triple whammy", respectively. This article presents an integrative analysis of the complex interplay among the effects of NSAIDs, ACEIs/ARAs and diuretics, acting alone and together in double and triple therapies. In addition, we explore how these drug combinations alter the equilibrium of regulatory mechanisms controlling blood pressure (renal perfusion pressure) and GFR to increase the odds of inducing AKI through the concomitant reduction of blood pressure and distortion of renal autoregulation. Using this knowledge, we propose a more general model of pre-renal AKI based on a multi whammy model, whereby several factors are necessary to effectively reduce net filtration. The triple whammy was the only model associated with pre-renal AKI accompanied by a course of other risk factors, among numerous potential combinations of clinical circumstances causing hypoperfusion in which renal autoregulation is not operative or is deregulated. These factors would uncouple the normal BP-GFR relationship, where lower GFR values are obtained at every BP value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute injury of anterior cruciate ligament during karate training.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Wang, Ting-Chung

    2007-06-01

    A 38-year-old black-belt karate practitioner presented with acute disabling injury of his knee after swift-withdrawal of a reverse-roundhouse-kick. Examination confirmed the diagnosis of grade III ACL tear. Although there are reports documenting injury rate in modern karate, no previous cases of karate-related ACL injuries have been reported. The trauma mechanism is different than ACL injuries during other non-contact and contact sports. The current case report indicates that ACL injury can occur without any contact of the lower limb as a result of dynamic muscular forces during karate training.

  9. Acute hydrogen sulfide-induced neuropathology and neurological sequelae: challenges for translational neuroprotective research.

    PubMed

    Rumbeiha, Wilson; Whitley, Elizabeth; Anantharam, Poojya; Kim, Dong-Suk; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), the gas with the odor of rotten eggs, was formally discovered in 1777, over 239 years ago. For many years, it was considered an environmental pollutant and a health concern only in occupational settings. Recently, however, it was discovered that H2 S is produced endogenously and plays critical physiological roles as a gasotransmitter. Although at low physiological concentrations it is physiologically beneficial, exposure to high concentrations of H2 S is known to cause brain damage, leading to neurodegeneration and long-term neurological sequelae or death. Neurological sequelae include motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits, which are incapacitating. Currently, there are concerns about accidental or malicious acute mass civilian exposure to H2 S. There is a major unmet need for an ideal neuroprotective treatment, for use in the field, in the event of mass civilian exposure to high H2 S concentrations. This review focuses on the neuropathology of high acute H2 S exposure, knowledge gaps, and the challenges associated with development of effective neuroprotective therapy to counteract H2 S-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Acute hydrogen sulfide–induced neuropathology and neurological sequelae: challenges for translational neuroprotective research

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Elizabeth; Anantharam, Poojya; Kim, Dong‐Suk; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the gas with the odor of rotten eggs, was formally discovered in 1777, over 239 years ago. For many years, it was considered an environmental pollutant and a health concern only in occupational settings. Recently, however, it was discovered that H2S is produced endogenously and plays critical physiological roles as a gasotransmitter. Although at low physiological concentrations it is physiologically beneficial, exposure to high concentrations of H2S is known to cause brain damage, leading to neurodegeneration and long‐term neurological sequelae or death. Neurological sequelae include motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits, which are incapacitating. Currently, there are concerns about accidental or malicious acute mass civilian exposure to H2S. There is a major unmet need for an ideal neuroprotective treatment, for use in the field, in the event of mass civilian exposure to high H2S concentrations. This review focuses on the neuropathology of high acute H2S exposure, knowledge gaps, and the challenges associated with development of effective neuroprotective therapy to counteract H2S‐induced neurodegeneration. PMID:27442775

  11. Epidemiology of acute spinal cord injuries in the Groote Schuur Hospital Acute Spinal Cord Injury (GSH ASCI) Unit, Cape Town, South Africa, over the past 11 years.

    PubMed

    Sothmann, Johan; Stander, Juliette; Kruger, Nicolas; Dunn, Robert

    2015-09-19

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating to both patient and society, with acute management and ongoing care being extremely expensive. Few epidemiological data are available on SCIs in South Africa (SA). To identify the epidemiological profile of SCI patients at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), Cape Town, SA, and identify seasonal trends and peak periods. As the majority of the injuries are preventable, these data are important to develop prevention strategies. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted on all patients admitted to the Acute Spinal Cord Injury (ASCI) Unit at GSH from 1 April 2003 to 31 March 2014. All cases registered on a prospectively maintained database were included in the study. The total number of patients admitted to the ASCI Unit was 2,042, with an average of 185 admissions per year. The male/female ratio was 5.25:1. The 21-30-year-old age category was the largest, comprising 33.5% of the patients. The most prevalent cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (44.6%), followed by violence-related injuries (27.2%). Thirty-two point two per cent of patients needed ventilatory support, and 91.5% of mechanically ventilated patients were successfully weaned. December was the busiest month in the unit. In patients in whom neurological deficit was incomplete, the average motor function improvement was 16.0%. Data capturing and analysis of SCIs should be encouraged in SA to guide management and prevention strategies, and to optimise outcomes. This study establishes the ASCI Unit at GSH to be one of the key role players in acute SCI management in SA.

  12. Cerebrolysin effects on neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Nikpour, Mohammad Reza; Nazarbaghi, Surena; Ahmadi-Salmasi, Babak; Mokari, Tayebeh; Tahamtan, Urya; Rezaei, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebrolysin, a brain-derived neuropeptide, has been shown to improve the neurological outcomes of stroke, but no study has demonstrated its effect on cerebral blood flow. This study aimed to determine the cerebrolysin impact on the neurological outcomes and cerebral blood flow. Methods In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, 46 patients who had acute focal ischemic stroke were randomly assigned into two groups to receive intravenously either 30 mL of cerebrolysin diluted in normal saline daily for 10 days (n=23) or normal saline alone (n=23) adjunct to 100 mg of aspirin daily. All patients were examined using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and transcranial Doppler to measure the mean flow velocity and pulsatility index (PI) of their cerebral arteries at baseline as well as on days 30, 60, and 90. Results The patients’ mean age was 60±9.7 years, and 51.2% of patients were male. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on day 60 (median 10, interquartile range 9–11, P=0.008) and day 90 (median 11, interquartile range 10–13.5, P=0.001). The median of PI in the right middle cerebral artery was significantly lower in the cerebrolysin group compared with the placebo group on days 30, 60, and 90 (P<0.05). One patient in the cerebrolysin group and two patients in the placebo group died before day 30 (4.3% versus 8.7%). Conclusion Cerebrolysin can be useful to improve the neurological outcomes and the PI of middle cerebral artery in patients with acute focal ischemic stroke. PMID:25516711

  13. Correlation between serum neuron specific enolase and functional neurological outcome in patients of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Sana; Beg, Mujahid; Rizvi, Imran; Islam, Najmul; Ullah, Ekram; Akhtar, Nishat

    2013-10-01

    The use of biomarkers to predict stroke prognosis is gaining particular attention nowadays. Neuron specific enolase (NSE), which is a dimeric isoenzyme of the glycolytic enzyme enolase and is found mainly in the neurons is one such biomarker. This study was carried out on patients of acute ischemic stroke with the aims to determine the correlation between NSE levels on the day of admission with infarct volume, stroke severity, and functional neurological outcome on day 30. Seventy five patients of acute ischemic stroke admitted in the Department of Medicine were included in the study. Levels of NSE were determined on day 1 using the human NSE ELISA kit (Alpha Diagnostic International Texas 78244, USA). Volume of infarct was measured by computed tomography (CT) scan using the preinstalled software Syngo (version A40A) of Siemen's medical solutions (Forchheim, Germany). Stroke severity at admission was assessed using Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and functional neurological outcome was assessed using modified Rankin scale (mRS) on day 30. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software for windows version 15.0 (SPSS). A positive correlation was found between concentration of NSE on day 1 and infarct volume determined by CT scan (r = 0.955, P < 0.001). A strong negative correlation was found between GCS at presentation and concentration of NSE on day 1 (r = -0.806, P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between NSE levels at day 1 and functional neurological outcome assessed by mRS at day 30 (r = 0.744, P < 0.001). Serum levels of NSE in first few days of ischemic stroke can serve as a useful marker to predict stroke severity and early functional outcome. However, larger studies with serial estimation of NSE are needed to establish these observations more firmly.

  14. Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Acute Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    DeGracia, Donald J.; Tri Anggraini, Fika; Taha, Doaa Taha Metwally; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Many clinically relevant forms of acute injury, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and myocardial infarction, have resisted treatments to prevent cell death following injury. The clinical failures can be linked to the currently used inductive models based on biological specifics of the injury system. Here we contrast the application of inductive and deductive models of acute cell injury. Using brain ischemia as a case study, we discuss limitations in inductive inferences, including the inability to unambiguously assign cell death causality and the lack of a systematic quantitative framework. These limitations follow from an overemphasis on qualitative molecular pathways specific to the injured system. Our recently developed nonlinear dynamical theory of cell injury provides a generic, systematic approach to cell injury in which attractor states and system parameters are used to quantitatively characterize acute injury systems. The theoretical, empirical, and therapeutic implications of shifting to a deductive framework are discussed. We illustrate how a deductive mathematical framework offers tangible advantages over qualitative inductive models for the development of therapeutics of acutely injured biological systems. PMID:27437490

  15. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; McCollum, Graham A; Calder, James D F; van Dijk, C Niek

    2013-06-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was performed using Pubmed/Medline, Ovid and Embase using key words: ankle ligaments, injury, lateral ligament, ankle sprain and athlete. Articles related to the topic were included and reviewed. It is estimated that one inversion injury of the ankle occurs for every 10,000 people each day. Ankle sprains constitute 7-10 % of all admissions to hospital emergency departments. Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. The lateral ankle ligament complex consists of three ligaments: the anterior talofibular ligament, the calcaneofibular ligament and the posterior talofibular ligament. The most common trauma mechanism is supination and adduction (inversion) of the plantar-flexed foot. Delayed physical examination provides a more accurate diagnosis. Ultrasound and MRI can be useful in diagnosing associated injury and are routine investigations in professional athletes. Successful treatment of grade II and III acute lateral ankle ligament injuries can be achieved with individualized aggressive, non-operative measures. RICE therapy is the treatment of choice for the first 4-5 days to reduce pain and swelling. Initially, 10-14 days of immobilization in a below the knee cast/brace is beneficial followed by a period in a lace-up brace or functional taping reduces the risk of recurrent injury. Acute repair of the lateral ankle ligaments in grade III injuries in professional athletes may give better results.

  16. A new perspective in the understanding of hand dysfunction following neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Sangole, Archana P; Levin, Mindy F

    2007-01-01

    The human hand is inherently complex and versatile. Its use in everyday activities requires its careful positioning relative to the arm and fine adjustments of the fingers to secure the object in the hand to perform a desired task. Understanding the mechanics of prehension requires an appreciation of the anatomy, biomechanics, kinematics, and control of the hand. This article summarizes these complex mechanisms as well as the central nervous system control of hand movement. We propose a measure to characterize the biomechanics of palmar arch modulation during grasping. We also highlight questions to be investigated in future studies to stimulate further understanding of the motor control of hand function and of the recovery of hand functioning after neurological injury.

  17. 2009 Review and Revisions of the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Waring, William P; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Burns, Stephen; Donovan, William; Graves, Daniel; Jha, Amitabh; Jones, Linda; Kirshblum, Steven; Marino, Ralph; Mulcahey, M.J; Reeves, Ronald; Scelza, William M; Schmidt-Read, Mary; Stein, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) were recently reviewed by the ASIA's Education and Standards Committees, in collaboration with the International Spinal Cord Society's Education Committee. Available educational materials for the ISNCSCI were also reviewed. The last citable reference for the ISNCSCI's methodology is the ISNCSCI Reference Manual, published in 2003 by ASIA. The Standards Committee recommended that the numerous items that were revised should be published and a precedent established for a routine published review of the ISNCSCI. The Standards Committee also noted that, although the 2008 reprint pocket booklet is current, the reference manual should be revised after proposals to modify/revise the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS as modified from Frankel) are considered. In addition, the Standards Committee adopted a process for thorough and transparent review of requests to revise the ISNCSCI. PMID:21061894

  18. _ 2009 review and revisions of the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Waring, William P; Biering-Sorensen, Fin; Burns, Stephen; Donovan, William; Graves, Daniel; Jha, Amitabh; Jones, Linda; Kirshblum, Steven; Marino, Ralph; Mulcahey, M J; Reeves, Ronald; Scelza, William M; Schmidt-Read, Mary; Stein, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) were recently reviewed by the ASIA's Education and Standards Committees, in collaboration with the International Spinal Cord Society's Education Committee. Available educational materials for the ISNCSCI were also reviewed. The last citable reference for the ISNCSCI's methodology is the ISNCSCI Reference Manual, published in 2003 by ASIA. The Standards Committee recommended that the numerous items that were revised should be published and a precedent established for a routine published review of the ISNCSCI. The Standards Committee also noted that, although the 2008 reprint pocket booklet is current, the reference manual should be revised after proposals to modify/revise the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS as modified from Frankel) are considered. In addition, the Standards Committee adopted a process for thorough and transparent review of requests to revise the ISNCSCI.

  19. Neurology and neuropathology of Soman-induced brain injury: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Petras, J M

    1994-01-01

    Battlefield use of nerve agents poses serious medical threats to combat troops and to civilians in the immediate or adjacent environment. The experiments reported herein were carried out in the 1980s to help to define both the neurological and neuropathological consequences of exposure to the organophosphate nerve agent Soman. These data contributed to the scientific foundation for a program of drug development to find agents that would prevent or reduce the risk of injury to the central nervous system and specifically pointed to the importance of including an anticonvulsant in the treatment of agent exposure. Since these experiments were conducted, research efforts have continued to improve pretreatment and treatment, such as the inclusion of the anticonvulsant diazepam in the medical treatment of exposed personnel. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:8169578

  20. Incidence and aetiology of acute injuries during competitive road cycling.

    PubMed

    Decock, Mathieu; De Wilde, Lieven; Vanden Bossche, Luc; Steyaert, Adelheid; Van Tongel, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Despite the ever-increasing popularity of bicycle racing, the high perceived risk of acute injuries and the recent media attention, studies of acute injuries in road cyclists are rather scarce. The goal of this study is to evaluate the incidence, aetiology and patterns of acute injuries in non-professional competitive road cyclists during cycling races in Flanders. All acute injuries that occurred during competition in Flanders in 2002 and 2012, collected in the injury registry, were analysed. The incidence, injury rate, diagnosis, circumstances and level of performance were evaluated. A total of 777 documented reports of accidents (1230 injuries) were retrieved for the years 2002 and 2012. There was no significant difference between incidence and injury rate between 2002 and 2012. There was a strong significant difference in the incidence between the different levels of performance in both seasons. Severe injuries were seen in 29.5% in 2002 and in 30.1% in 2012. The most common location of a severe injury was the hand. Collision with another rider was the most common cause of injury. Almost 1 out of 6 non-professional competitive road cyclists had an accident during cycling races in 2002 and 2012 in Flanders and collision with other riders was the most important cause of a crash. The most common lesion was abrasion, but almost one out of three riders had a severe injury. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Responsiveness to therapy for increased intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury is associated with neurological outcome.

    PubMed

    Colton, K; Yang, S; Hu, P F; Chen, H H; Stansbury, L G; Scalea, T M; Stein, D M

    2014-12-01

    In patients with severe traumatic brain injury, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is associated with poor functional outcome or death. Hypertonic saline (HTS) is a hyperosmolar therapy commonly used to treat increased ICP; this study aimed to measure initial patient response to HTS and look for association with patient outcome. Patients >17 years old, admitted and requiring ICP monitoring between 2008 and 2010 at a large urban tertiary care facility were retrospectively enrolled. The first dose of hypertonic saline administered after admission for ICP >19mmHg was recorded and correlated with vital signs recorded at the bedside. The absolute and relative change in ICP at 1 and 2h after HTS administration was calculated. Patients were stratified by mortality and long-term (≥6 months) functional neurological outcome. We identified 46 patients who received at least 1 dose of HTS for ICP>19, of whom 80% were male, mean age 34.4, with a median post-resuscitation GCS score of 6. All patients showed a significant decrease in ICP 1h after HTS administration. Two hours post-administration, survivors showed a further decrease in ICP (43% reduction from baseline), while ICP began to rebound in non-survivors (17% reduction from baseline). When patients were stratified for long-term neurological outcome, results were similar, with a significant difference in groups by 2h after HTS administration. In patients treated with HTS for intracranial hypertension, those who survived or had good neurological outcome, when compared to those who died or had poor outcomes, showed a significantly larger sustained decrease in ICP 2h after administration. This suggests that even early in a patient's treatment, treatment responsiveness is associated with mortality or poor functional outcome. While this work is preliminary, it suggests that early failure to obtain a sustainable response to hyperosmolar therapy may warrant greater treatment intensity or therapy escalation.

  2. Effect of interferon-β on neuroinflammation, brain injury and neurological outcome after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tiebosch, Ivo A C W; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Cobelens, Pieter M; Bouts, Mark J R J; Zwartbol, René; van der Meide, Peter H; van den Bergh, Walter M

    2013-02-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has a poor outcome, particularly attributed to progressive injury after the initial incident. Several studies suggest a critical role for inflammation in lesion progression after SAH. Our goal was to test whether treatment with anti-inflammatory interferon-β, which has shown promise as a therapeutic agent in experimental ischaemic stroke, can protect the brain after SAH. SAH was induced in adult male Wistar rats by puncturing the intracranial bifurcation of the right internal carotid artery. Treatment effects of daily interferon-β (n = 16) or vehicle (n = 14) injections were serially evaluated with multiparametric MRI and behavioral tests from day 0 to 7, in compliance with recent recommendations for pre-clinical drug testing. Outcome measures included neurological status, brain lesion volume, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage, and levels of inflammatory markers. In animals that survived up to 7 days post-SAH, we found no significant differences between vehicle- and interferon-β-treated animals with respect to final neurological score (14.3 ± 1.0 vs. 13.0 ± 2.2), brain lesion size on T(2)-weighted MR images (59 ± 83 vs. 124 ± 99 mm(3)), BBB leakage (0.26 ± 0.05 vs. 0.22 ± 0.08 contrast-induced relative MR signal change), upregulation of brain RNA for cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules, and increased neutrophil activation. In contrast to previously published findings in experimental ischemic stroke models, interferon-β has no clear efficacy to protect the brain after SAH. In line with recent highlighting of the significance of negative findings, our data currently do not recommend clinical testing of interferon-β to prevent neurological damage in SAH patients.

  3. Ethyl pyruvate protects against blood-brain barrier damage and improves long-term neurological outcomes in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hong; Wang, Hai-Lian; Pu, Hong-Jian; Shi, Ye-Jie; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Wen-Ting; Wang, Guo-Hua; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Leak, Rehana K; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yan-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Many traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors sustain neurological disability and cognitive impairments due to the lack of defined therapies to reduce TBI-induced long-term brain damage. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown neuroprotection in several models of acute brain injury. The present study therefore investigated the potential beneficial effect of EP on long-term outcomes after TBI and the underlying mechanisms. Male adult rats were subjected to unilateral controlled cortical impact injury. EP was injected intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI and again at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h after TBI. Neurological deficits, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, and neuroinflammation were assessed. Ethyl pyruvate improved sensorimotor and cognitive functions and ameliorated brain tissue damage up to 28 day post-TBI. BBB breach and brain edema were attenuated by EP at 48 h after TBI. EP suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production from peripheral neutrophils and reduced the number of MMP-9-overproducing neutrophils in the spleen, and therefore mitigated MMP-9-mediated BBB breakdown. Moreover, EP exerted potent antiinflammatory effects in cultured microglia and inhibited the elevation of inflammatory mediators in the brain after TBI. Ethyl pyruvate confers long-term neuroprotection against TBI, possibly through breaking the vicious cycle among MMP-9-mediated BBB disruption, neuroinflammation, and long-lasting brain damage. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Ethyl Pyruvate Protects against Blood-Brain Barrier Damage and Improves Long-Term Neurological Outcomes in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Wang, Hailian; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Guohua; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Aims Many traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors sustain neurological disability and cognitive impairments due to the lack of defined therapies to reduce TBI-induced long-term brain damage. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown neuroprotection in several models of acute brain injury. The present study therefore investigated the potential beneficial effect of EP on long-term outcomes after TBI and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to unilateral controlled cortical impact injury. EP was injected intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI and again at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h after TBI. Neurological deficits, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and neuroinflammation were assessed. Results EP improved sensorimotor and cognitive functions and ameliorated brain tissue damage up to 28 d post-TBI. BBB breach and brain edema were attenuated by EP at 48 h after TBI. EP suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production from peripheral neutrophils and reduced the number of MMP-9-overproducing neutrophils in the spleen, and therefore mitigated MMP-9-mediated BBB breakdown. Moreover, EP exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects in cultured microglia and inhibited the elevation of inflammatory mediators in the brain after TBI. Conclusion EP confers long-term neuroprotection against TBI, possibly through breaking the vicious cycle among MMP-9-mediated BBB disruption, neuroinflammation and long-lasting brain damage. PMID:25533312

  5. Acute traumatic injuries in automotive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Warner, M; Baker, S P; Li, G; Smith, G S

    1998-10-01

    Motor vehicle manufacturing, with its varied tasks, challenging work environment, and diverse worker populations, presents many hazards to employees. This study examined routinely collected surveillance data from a major motor vehicle manufacturer to identify injury types, high-risk workers, causes of injury, and factors associated with work loss. Injury and personnel data were used to calculate injury rates. Injury data were from the routinely collected medical and safety surveillance system on occupational injuries. The number of persons working in the plants was estimated using year-end personnel reports. Key word searches supplementing the analyses provided insight into the specific circumstances of injury. The most common injuries were sprains/strains (39% of the total), lacerations (22%), and contusions (15%). Forty-nine percent of the injuries resulted in one or more lost or restricted workdays; 25% resulted in 7 or more lost or restricted workdays. The injuries most likely to result in work loss were amputations, hernias and fractures. Sprains/strains accounted for 65% of all lost workdays. Injury rates ranged from 13.8 per 100 person-years at stamping plants to 28.7 at parts depots. Even within similar types of plants, injury rates varied widely, with a twofold difference among the individual assembly plants in overall injury rates. Injury surveillance systems with descriptive data on injury events shed light on the circumstances under which certain types of injuries occur and can provide the basis for preventive interventions. Sources of variation and potential biases are discussed, providing guidance for those interested in designing and using surveillance systems for occupational injuries.

  6. Postoperative acute kidney injury in living donor liver transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Atalan, Hakan K; Gucyetmez, Bulent; Aslan, Serdar; Yazar, Serafettin; Polat, Kamil Y

    2017-09-05

    There are many risk factors for postoperative acute kidney injury in liver transplantation. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors for postoperative acute kidney injury in living donor liver transplantation recipients. 220 living donor liver transplantation recipients were retrospectively evaluated in the study. According to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Guidelines, acute kidney injury in postoperative day 7 was investigated for all patients. The patient's demographic data, preoperative and intraoperative parameters, and outcomes were recorded. Acute kidney injury was found in 27 (12.3%) recipients. In recipients with acute kidney injury, female population, model for end-stage liver disease score, norepinephrine requirement, duration of mean arterial pressure less than 60 mmHg, the usage of gelatin and erythrocyte suspension and blood loss were significantly higher than recipients with nonacute kidney injury (for all p<0.05). In multivariate analyses, the likelihood of acute kidney injury on postoperative day 7 were increased 2.8-fold (1.1-7.0), 2.7-fold (1.02-7.3), 3.4-fold (1.2-9.9) and 5.1-fold (1.7-15.0) by postoperative day 7, serum tacrolimus level ≥10.2 ng dL-1, intraoperative blood loss ≥14.5 mL kg-1, the usage of gelatin >5 mL kg-1 and duration of MAP less than 60 mmHg ≥5.5 minutes respectively (for all p<0.05). In living donor liver transplantation recipients, serum tacrolimus levels, intraoperative blood loss, hypotension period and the usage of gelatin may be risk factors for acute kidney injury in the early postoperative period.

  7. Dialysis Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Acute Cerebrovascular Accident Hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint A; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Kamat, Sunil; Annapureddy, Narender; Benjo, Alexandre; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admissions is poorly understood with previous studies being from a single center or year. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends of AKI-D in hospitalizations with AIS and ICH from 2002 to 2011. We also evaluated the trend of impact of AKI-D on in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) after adjusting for demographics and comorbidity indices. We extracted a total of 3,937,928 and 696,754 hospitalizations with AIS and ICH, respectively. AKI-D occurred in 1.5 and 3.5 per 1000 in AIS and ICH admissions, respectively. Incidence of admissions complicated by AKI-D doubled from 0.9/1000 to 1.7/1000 in AIS and from 2.1/1000 to 4.3/1000 in ICH admissions. In AIS admissions, AKI-D was associated with 30% higher odds of mortality (aOR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.48; P<0.001) and 18% higher odds of adverse discharge (aOR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.37; P<0.001). Similarly, in ICH admissions, AKI-D was associated with twice the odds of mortality (aOR, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.61-2.36; P<0.01) and 74% higher odds of adverse discharge (aOR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.24; P<0.01). Attributable risk percent of mortality was high with AKI-D (98%-99%) and did not change significantly over the study period. Incidence of AKI-D complicating hospitalizations with cerebrovascular accident continues to grow and is associated with increased mortality and adverse discharge. This highlights the need for early diagnosis, better risk stratification, and preparedness for need for complex long-term care in this vulnerable population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Giant multinucleated macrophages occur in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leskovar, A; Turek, J; Borgens, R B

    2001-05-01

    Using a cell-isolation and -culture procedure specific for macrophages, we report the existence of giant (more than 50 microm diameter), multinucleated macrophages within an acute, 5-day-old adult rat spinal cord injury. The size and multinuclearity of these isolated giant cells was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Giant macrophages are markers for long-term infection, disease, and chronic injury in other soft tissues and are unexpected in the acute inflammatory stage of central nervous system injury. To our knowledge, this descriptive report is the first confirming the existence of giant macrophages in any injured nervous tissue, with additional data suggesting some of these cells to be multinucleated.

  9. Consequences of knuckle cracking: a report of two acute injuries.

    PubMed

    Chan, P S; Steinberg, D R; Bozentka, D J

    1999-02-01

    A question commonly asked of physicians focuses on the possible deleterious effects of knuckle cracking. Patients are usually concerned that the risk of arthritis is increased by the habit; however, reports addressing the potential long-term consequence are controversial. We present two cases in which acute injuries were suffered while the patients were attempting to crack their knuckles. Both injuries responded well to conservative treatment. Our investigation shows that acute injuries can result from the forceful manipulation needed to achieve the audible pop of cracking knuckles and that patients should be counseled accordingly.

  10. Glomerular haematuria, renal interstitial haemorrhage and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Martín Cleary, Catalina; Moreno, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Beatriz; Ortiz, Alberto; Parra, Emilio G; Gracia, Carolina; Blanco-Colio, Luis M; Barat, Antonio; Egido, Jesús

    2010-12-01

    Macroscopic haematuria of glomerular origin has been associated with acute kidney injury. We report a patient with IgA nephropathy, macroscopic haematuria and acute kidney injury. Systemic anticoagulation may have aggravated haematuria. There was extensive interstitial and intratubular red blood cell extravasation, and interstitial haemosiderin deposits. The abundant presence of macrophages expressing the haemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 and of cells stained for oxidative stress markers (NADPH-p22 phox and heme-oxigenase-1) in areas of interstitial haemorrhage and red blood cell cast-containing tubules provided evidence for a role for free haemoglobin in tubulointerstitial renal injury in human glomerular disease.

  11. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  12. Bath Salts: A Newly Recognized Cause of Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity. PMID:24555135

  13. Bath salts: a newly recognized cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Jonathan; Parikh, Samir; Valentine, Christopher; Haddad, Nabil; Shidham, Ganesh; Rovin, Brad; Hebert, Lee; Agarwal, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Bath salts are substance of abuse that are becoming more common and are difficult to recognize due to negative toxicology screening. Acute kidney injury due to bath salt use has not previously been described. We present the case of a previously healthy male who developed acute kidney injury and dialysis dependence after bath salt ingestion and insufflation. This was self-reported with negative toxicology screening. Clinical course was marked by severe hyperthermia, hyperkalemia, rhabdomyolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, oliguria, and sepsis. We discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnoses, potential mechanisms of injury, management, and review of the literature related to bath salt toxicity.

  14. Urine specific gravity as a predictor of early neurological deterioration in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lin, L C; Fann, W C; Chou, M H; Chen, H W; Su, Y C; Chen, J C

    2011-07-01

    We previously found that a blood urea nitrogen/creatinine (BUN/Cr) ratio>15 is an independent predictor of early neurological deterioration after acute ischemic stroke, which suggests that dehydration may be a cause of early deterioration. The aim of this study was to determine whether urine specific gravity, which is another indicator of hydration status and one that is more easily obtained, is also an independent predictor of early deterioration or stroke-in-evolution (SIE). Demographic and clinical data were recorded at admission from patients with acute ischemic stroke who were prospectively enrolled from October 2007 to June 2010. We compared patients with and without stroke-in-evolution (based on an increase of 3 points or more points on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale within 3 days). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were carried out. A total of 317 patients (43 SIE and 274 non-SIE) were enrolled; the first 196 patients comprised the cohort of our previous study. The only two independent predictors of early deterioration or SIE were BUN/Cr>15 and urine specific gravity>1.010. After adjusting for age and gender, patients with a urine specific gravity>1.010 were 2.78 times more likely to develop SIE (95% CI=1.11-6.96; P=0.030). Urine specific gravity may be useful as an early predictor of early deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Patients with urine specific gravity ≤ 1.010 therefore may have a reduced likelihood of early neurological deterioration.

  15. Acute diabetes insipidus in severe head injury: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Hadjizacharia, Pantelis; Beale, Elizabeth O; Inaba, Kenji; Chan, Linda S; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2008-10-01

    The incidence and risk factors for acute diabetes insipidus after severe head injury and the effect of this complication on outcomes have not been evaluated in any large prospective studies. We conducted a prospective study of all patients admitted to the surgical ICU of a Level I trauma center with severe head injury (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] >or= 3). The following potential risk factors with p < 0.2 on bivariate analysis were included in a stepwise logistic regression to identify independent risk factors for diabetes insipidus and its association with mortality: age, mechanism of injury (blunt or penetrating), blood pressure, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, head and other body area AIS, skull fracture, cerebral edema and shift, intracranial hemorrhage, and pneumocephaly. There were 436 patients (blunt injuries, 392; penetrating injuries, 44); 387 patients had isolated head injury. Diabetes insipidus occurred in 15.4% of all patients (blunt, 12.5%; penetrating, 40.9%; p < 0.0001) and in 14.7% of patients with isolated head injury (blunt, 11.8%; penetrating, 39.5%; p < 0.0001). The presence of major extracranial injuries did not influence the incidence of diabetes insipidus. Independent risk factors for diabetes insipidus in isolated head injury were Glasgow Coma Scale3. Diabetes insipidus was an independent risk factor for death (adjusted odds ratio, 3.96; 95% CI [1.65, 9.72]; adjusted p value = 0.002). The incidence of acute diabetes insipidus in severe head injury is high, especially in penetrating injuries. Independent risk factors for diabetes insipidus include a Glasgow Coma Scale3. Acute diabetes insipidus was associated with significantly increased mortality.

  16. The influence of time from injury to surgery on motor recovery and length of hospital stay in acute traumatic spinal cord injury: an observational Canadian cohort study.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Marcel F; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Fisher, Charles G; Finkelstein, Joel; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Paquet, Jérôme; Tsai, Eve C; Townson, Andrea; Attabib, Najmedden; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Drew, Brian; Fourney, Daryl R; Fox, Richard; Hurlbert, R John; Johnson, Michael G; Linassi, A G; Parent, Stefan; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    To determine the influence of time from injury to surgery on neurological recovery and length of stay (LOS) in an observational cohort of individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI), we analyzed the baseline and follow-up motor scores of participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry to specifically assess the effect of an early (less than 24 h from injury) surgical procedure on motor recovery and on LOS. One thousand four hundred and ten patients who sustained acute tSCIs with baseline American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grades A, B, C, or D and were treated surgically were analyzed to determine the effect of the timing of surgery (24, 48, or 72 h from injury) on motor recovery and LOS. Depending on the distribution of data, we used different types of generalized linear models, including multiple linear regression, gamma regression, and negative binomial regression. Persons with incomplete AIS B, C, and D injuries from C2 to L2 demonstrated motor recovery improvement of an additional 6.3 motor points (SE=2.8 p<0.03) when they underwent surgical treatment within 24 h from the time of injury, compared with those who had surgery later than 24 h post-injury. This beneficial effect of early surgery on motor recovery was not seen in the patients with AIS A complete SCI. AIS A and B patients who received early surgery experienced shorter hospital LOS. While the issues of when to perform surgery and what specific operation to perform remain controversial, this work provides evidence that for an incomplete acute tSCI in the cervical, thoracic, or thoracolumbar spine, surgery performed within 24 h from injury improves motor neurological recovery. Early surgery also reduces LOS.

  17. Motor levels in high cervical spinal cord injuries: Implications for the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Franz, Steffen; Kirshblum, Steven C; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Schuld, Christian

    2016-09-01

    To verify the hypothesis that motor levels (ML) inferred from sensory levels in the upper cervical segments C2-C4 according to the current version of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) are counterintuitive in cases where the most rostral myotomes C5 and C6 are graded as intact. Prospective cohort study of ISNCSCI instructional course participants completing a post-test after the workshop to determine the MLs in two variants of a complete, high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) case scenario. Both variants were based on the same ISNCSCI sensory and MLs of C2. In the first variant myotomes C5 and C6 were bilaterally graded as intact, while in variant 2 only active movements against gravity were possible (grade 3). Eight ISNCSCI instructional courses conducted during the study period from November 2012 until March 2015 in the framework of the European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI- http//emsci.org ). Ninety-two clinicians from twenty-two SCI centers. Most of the attendees were physicians (58.7%) or physical therapists (33.7%) and had less than one year (44.6%) experience in SCI medicine. Not applicable. The classification performance described as percentage of correctly determined MLs by the clinicians. Variant 2 (89.13%) was significantly (P < 0.0001) better classified than variant 1 (65.76%). In variant 1 with intact myotomes at C5 and C6, C6 was incorrectly classified as the ML by the clinicians in 33.15% of all cases, whereas in variant 2 with non-intact C5 / C6 myotomes, C6 was rarely chosen (2.17%). Sensory level deferred MLs in the high cervical region of C2-C4 are counterintuitive whenever the most rostral cervical myotomes are intact. An adjustment of the ML definition in ISNCSCI may be needed.

  18. Correlation of brain levels of progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone with neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury in female mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Giatti, Silvia; Caruso, Donatella; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Melcangi, Roberto C; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of disability in humans. Neuroactive steroids, such as progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), are neuroprotective in TBI models. However in order to design potential neuroprotective strategies based on neuroactive steroids it is important to determine whether its brain levels are altered by TBI. In this study we have used a weight-drop model of TBI in young adult female mice to determine the levels of neuroactive steroids in the brain and plasma at 24h, 72 h and 2 weeks after injury. We have also analyzed whether the levels of neuroactive steroids after TBI correlated with the neurological score of the animals. TBI caused neurological deficit detectable at 24 and 72 h, which recovered by 2 weeks after injury. Brain levels of progesterone, tetrahydroprogesterone (THP), isopregnanolone and 17β-estradiol were decreased 24h, 72 h and 2 weeks after TBI. DHEA and brain testosterone levels presented a transient decrease at 24h after lesion. Brain levels of progesterone and DHEA showed a positive correlation with neurological recovery. Plasma analyses showed that progesterone was decreased 72 h after lesion but, in contrast with brain progesterone, its levels did not correlate with neurological deficit. These findings indicate that TBI alters the levels of neuroactive steroids in the brain with independence of its plasma levels and suggest that the pharmacological increase in the brain of the levels of progesterone and DHEA may result in the improvement of neurological recovery after TBI.

  19. Lack of mitochondrial ferritin aggravates neurological deficits via enhancing oxidative stress in a traumatic brain injury murine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligang; Wang, Libo; Dai, Zhibo; Wu, Pei; Shi, Huaizhang; Zhao, Shiguang

    2017-09-29

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mitochondrial ferritin (Ftmt) is reported to be closely related to oxidative stress. However, whether Ftmt is involved in TBI-induced oxidative stress and neurological deficits remains unknown. In this study, the controlled cortical impact model was established in wild-type and Ftmt knockout mice as a TBI model. The Ftmt expression, oxidative stress, neurological deficits and brain injury were measured. We found that Ftmt expression was gradually decreased from 3 days to 14 days post TBI, while oxidative stress was gradually increased, as evidenced by reduced GSH and SOD levels and elevated MDA and NO levels. Interestingly, the extent of reduced Ftmt expression in the brain was linearly correlated with oxidative stress. Knockout of Ftmt significantly exacerbated TBI-induced oxidative stress, intracerebral hemorrhage, brain infarction, edema, neurological severity score, memory impairment and neurological deficits. However, all these effects in Ftmt knockout mice were markedly mitigated by pharmacological inhibition of oxidative stress using an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results reveal an important correlation between Ftmt and oxidative stress after TBI. Ftmt deficiency aggravates TBI-induced brain injuries and neurological deficits, which at least partially through increasing oxidative stress levels. Our data suggest that Ftmt may be a promising molecular target for the treatment of TBI. ©2017 The Author(s).

  20. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Michael E; Peterson, Josh F; Eden, Svetlana K; Hung, Adriana M; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2). Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  1. Laboratory Test Surveillance following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Parr, Sharidan K.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Siew, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort. Methods We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 L/min/1.73 m2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Results A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients. Conclusions Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease. PMID:25117447

  2. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  3. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy: a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Machado, Susana; Figueiredo, Nuno; Borges, Andreia; São José Pais, Maria; Freitas, Luís; Moura, Paulo; Campos, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy declined significantly over the second half of the 20th century; however, it is still associated with major maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. A set of systemic and renal physiological adaptive mechanisms occur during a normal gestation that will constrain several changes in laboratory parameters of renal function, electrolytes, fluid and acid-base balances. The diagnosis of acute kidney injury in pregnancy is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate are not validated in this population. During the first trimester of gestation, acute kidney injury develops most often due to hyperemesis gravidarum or septic abortion. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis is more challenging for the obstetrician and the nephrologist and comprises some pathologies that are reviewed in this article: preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies.

  4. Review of control strategies for robotic movement training after neurologic injury

    PubMed Central

    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using robotic devices to assist in movement training following neurologic injuries such as stroke and spinal cord injury. This paper reviews control strategies for robotic therapy devices. Several categories of strategies have been proposed, including, assistive, challenge-based, haptic simulation, and coaching. The greatest amount of work has been done on developing assistive strategies, and thus the majority of this review summarizes techniques for implementing assistive strategies, including impedance-, counterbalance-, and EMG- based controllers, as well as adaptive controllers that modify control parameters based on ongoing participant performance. Clinical evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of different types of robotic therapy controllers is limited, but there is initial evidence that some control strategies are more effective than others. It is also now apparent there may be mechanisms by which some robotic control approaches might actually decrease the recovery possible with comparable, non-robotic forms of training. In future research, there is a need for head-to-head comparison of control algorithms in randomized, controlled clinical trials, and for improved models of human motor recovery to provide a more rational framework for designing robotic therapy control strategies. PMID:19531254

  5. Acute Pancreatitis and Rhabdomyolysis with Acute Kidney Injury following Multiple Wasp Stings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo Hee; Song, Yeon Han; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Su Bin; Han, Sang Youb; Kim, Han-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Multiple wasp stings can induce multiple organ dysfunction by toxic reactions. However, acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation in wasp sting injury. A 74-year-old woman visited the emergency department by anaphylactic shock because of multiple wasp stings. Acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, and coagulopathy were developed next day. Serum amylase and lipase were elevated and an abdominal computed tomography revealed an acute pancreatitis. Urine output was recovered after 16 days of oliguria (below 500 ml/day). Her kidney, liver, and pancreas injury gradually improved after sessions of renal replacement therapy. PMID:28706746

  6. Long-Term Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury: Current Status of Potential Mechanisms of Injury and Neurological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant clinical problem with few therapeutic interventions successfully translated to the clinic. Increased importance on the progressive, long-term consequences of TBI have been emphasized, both in the experimental and clinical literature. Thus, there is a need for a better understanding of the chronic consequences of TBI, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutic interventions to treat the devastating consequences of brain injury. In models of mild, moderate, and severe TBI, histopathological and behavioral studies have emphasized the progressive nature of the initial traumatic insult and the involvement of multiple pathophysiological mechanisms, including sustained injury cascades leading to prolonged motor and cognitive deficits. Recently, the increased incidence in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases in this patient population has also been emphasized. Pathomechanisms felt to be active in the acute and long-term consequences of TBI include excitotoxicity, apoptosis, inflammatory events, seizures, demyelination, white matter pathology, as well as decreased neurogenesis. The current article will review many of these pathophysiological mechanisms that may be important targets for limiting the chronic consequences of TBI. PMID:25158206

  7. The anatomy and biomechanics of acute and chronic whiplash injury.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Winkelstein, Beth A; Ivancic, Paul C; Svensson, Mats Y; Vasavada, Anita

    2009-04-01

    Whiplash injury is the most common motor vehicle injury, yet it is also one of the most poorly understood. Here we examine the evidence supporting an organic basis for acute and chronic whiplash injuries and review the anatomical sites within the neck that are potentially injured during these collisions. For each proposed anatomical site--facet joints, spinal ligaments, intervertebral discs, vertebral arteries, dorsal root ganglia, and neck muscles--we present the clinical evidence supporting that injury site, its relevant anatomy, the mechanism of and tolerance to injury, and the future research needed to determine whether that site is responsible for some whiplash injuries. This article serves as a snapshot of the current state of whiplash biomechanics research and provides a roadmap for future research to better understand and ultimately prevent whiplash injuries.

  8. Bile Acid Signaling Is Involved in the Neurological Decline in a Murine Model of Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Ashfaq, Samir; de los Santos, Mario; Grant, Stephanie; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neurological complication of liver failure. Serum bile acids are elevated after liver damage and may disrupt the blood-brain barrier and enter the brain. Our aim was to assess the role of serum bile acids in the neurological complications after acute liver failure. C57Bl/6 or cytochrome p450 7A1 knockout (Cyp7A1−/−) mice were fed a control, cholestyramine-containing, or bile acid–containing diet before azoxymethane (AOM)-induced acute liver failure. In parallel, mice were given an intracerebroventricular infusion of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) Vivo-morpholino before AOM injection. Liver damage, neurological decline, and molecular analyses of bile acid signaling were performed. Total bile acid levels were increased in the cortex of AOM-treated mice. Reducing serum bile acids via cholestyramine feeding or using Cyp7A1−/− mice reduced bile acid levels and delayed AOM-induced neurological decline, whereas cholic acid or deoxycholic acid feeding worsened AOM-induced neurological decline. The expression of bile acid signaling machinery apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, FXR, and small heterodimer partner increased in the frontal cortex, and blocking FXR signaling delayed AOM-induced neurological decline. In conclusion, circulating bile acids may play a pathological role during hepatic encephalopathy, although precisely how they dysregulate normal brain function is unknown. Strategies to minimize serum bile acid concentrations may reduce the severity of neurological complications associated with liver failure. PMID:26683664

  9. Increased Blood Pressure Variability Is Associated with Worse Neurologic Outcome in Acute Anterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alicia; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Smith, Gordon; Wang, Haimei; Wold, Jana; Chung, Lee; Tirschwell, David L.; Majersik, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although research suggests that blood pressure variability (BPV) is detrimental in the weeks to months after acute ischemic stroke, it has not been adequately studied in the acute setting. Methods. We reviewed acute ischemic stroke patients from 2007 to 2014 with anterior circulation stroke. Mean blood pressure and three BPV indices (standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and successive variation) for the intervals 0–24, 0–72, and 0–120 hours after admission were correlated with follow-up modified Rankin Scale (mRS) in ordinal logistic regression models. The correlation between BPV and mRS was further analyzed by terciles of clinically informative stratifications. Results. Two hundred and fifteen patients met inclusion criteria. At all time intervals, increased systolic BPV was associated with higher mRS, but the relationship was not significant for diastolic BPV or mean blood pressure. This association was strongest in patients with proximal stroke parent artery vessel occlusion and lower mean blood pressure. Conclusion. Increased early systolic BPV is associated with worse neurologic outcome after ischemic stroke. This association is strongest in patients with lower mean blood pressure and proximal vessel occlusion, often despite endovascular or thrombolytic therapy. This hypothesis-generating dataset suggests potential benefit for interventions aimed at reducing BPV in this patient population. PMID:27974991

  10. Systemic hypothermia in acute cervical spinal cord injury: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dididze, M; Green, B A; Dietrich, W Dalton; Vanni, S; Wang, M Y; Levi, A D

    2013-05-01

    Systemic hypothermia remains a promising neuroprotective strategy. There has been recent interest in its use in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). In this article, we describe our extended single center experience using intravascular hypothermia for the treatment of cervical SCI. Thirty-five acute cervical SCI patients received modest (33 °C) intravascular hypothermia for 48 h. Neurological outcome was assessed by the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury scale (ISNCSCI) developed by the American Spinal Injury Association. Local and systemic complications were recorded. All patients were complete ISNCSCI A on admission, but four converted to ISNCSCI B in <24 h post injury. Hypothermia was delivered in 5.76 (±0.45) hours from injury if we exclude four cases with delayed admission (>18 h). Fifteen of total 35 patients (43%) improved at least one ISNCSCI grade at latest follow up 10.07 (±1.03) months. Even excluding those patients who converted from ISNCSCI A within 24 h, 35.5% (11 out of 31) improved at least one ISNCSCI grade. Both retrospective (n=14) and prospective (n=21) groups revealed similar number of respiratory complications. The overall risk of any thromboembolic complication was 14.2%. The results are promising in terms of safety and improvement in neurological outcome. To date, the study represents the largest study cohort of cervical SCI patients treated by modest hypothermia. A multi-center, randomized study is needed to determine if systemic hypothermia should be a part of SCI patients' treatment for whom few options exist.

  11. Borax partially prevents neurologic disability and oxidative stress in experimental spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Koc, Emine Rabia; Gökce, Emre Cemal; Sönmez, Mehmet Akif; Namuslu, Mehmet; Gökce, Aysun; Bodur, A Said

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential effects of borax on ischemia/reperfusion injury of the rat spinal cord. Twenty-one Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups: sham (no ischemia/reperfusion), ischemia/reperfusion, and borax (ischemia/reperfusion + borax); each group was consist of 7 animals. Infrarenal aortic cross clamp was applied for 30 minutes to generate spinal cord ischemia. Animals were evaluated functionally with the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scoring system and inclined-plane test. The spinal cord tissue samples were harvested to analyze tissue concentrations of nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase activity, xanthine oxidase activity, total antioxidant capacity, and total oxidant status and to perform histopathological examination. At the 72nd hour after ischemia, the borax group had significantly higher Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan and inclined-plane scores than those of ischemia/reperfusion group. Histopathological examination of spinal cord tissues in borax group showed that treatment with borax significantly reduced the degree of spinal cord edema, inflammation, and tissue injury disclosed by light microscopy. Xanthine oxidase activity and total oxidant status levels of the ischemia/reperfusion group were significantly higher than those of the sham and borax groups (P < .05), and total antioxidant capacity levels of borax group were significantly higher than those of the ischemia/reperfusion group (P < .05). There was not a significantly difference between the sham and borax groups in terms of total antioxidant capacity levels (P > .05). The nitric oxide levels and nitric oxide synthase activity of all groups were similar (P > .05). Borax treatment seems to protect the spinal cord against injury in a rat ischemia/reperfusion model and improve neurological outcome. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. International standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury: classification skills of clinicians versus computational algorithms.

    PubMed

    Schuld, C; Franz, S; van Hedel, H J A; Moosburger, J; Maier, D; Abel, R; van de Meent, H; Curt, A; Weidner, N; Rupp, R

    2015-04-01

    This is a retrospective analysis. The objective of this study was to describe and quantify the discrepancy in the classification of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) by clinicians versus a validated computational algorithm. European Multicenter Study on Human Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI). Fully documented ISNCSCI data sets from EMSCI's first years (2003-2005) classified by clinicians (mostly spinal cord medicine residents, who received in-house ISNCSCI training by senior SCI physicians) were computationally reclassified. Any differences in the scoring of sensory and motor levels, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) or the zone of partial preservation (ZPP) were quantified. Four hundred and twenty ISNCSCI data sets were evaluated. The lowest agreement was found in motor levels (right: 62.1%, P=0.002; left: 61.8%, P=0.003), followed by motor ZPP (right: 81.6%, P=0.74; left 80.0%, P=0.27) and then AIS (83.4%, P=0.001). Sensory levels and sensory ZPP showed the best concordance (right sensory level: 90.8%, P=0.66; left sensory level: 90.0%, P=0.30; right sensory ZPP: 91.0%, P=0.18; left sensory ZPP: 92.2%, P=0.03). AIS B was most often misinterpreted as AIS C and vice versa (AIS B as C: 29.4% and AIS C as B: 38.6%). Most difficult classification tasks were the correct determination of motor levels and the differentiation between AIS B and AIS C/D. These issues should be addressed in upcoming ISNCSCI revisions. Training is strongly recommended to improve classification skills for clinical practice, as well as for clinical investigators conducting spinal cord studies. This study is partially funded by the International Foundation for Research in Paraplegia, Zurich, Switzerland.

  13. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  14. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a

  15. [Neurologic complications induced by the treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody OKT3].

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Romero, F; Bravo, M; Burgos, D; Cabello, M; González-Molina, M

    1993-10-01

    The treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody orthoclone OKT3 produces both systemic and neurologic alterations. In a series of 21 patients with an acute renal allograft rejection treated with this monoclonal antibody, 20 with a renal allograft transplantation and one with a renal and pancreatic allograft transplantation, 29% referred headache associated with fever and vomiting, and 14.2% presented severe neurological alterations induced by the treatment. We stress the need to know these secondary effects to differentiate them from other central nervous system disorders, particularly those of infectious origin.

  16. Acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure following paracetamol poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, S. V.; Howdle, P.; O'Grady, J. G.; Webster, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--There is little information on the incidence of acute lung injury or changes in the pulmonary circulation in acute liver failure. The aim of this study was to record the incidence of acute lung injury in fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, to document the associated pulmonary circulatory changes, and to assess the impact of lung injury on patient outcome. METHODS--The degree of lung injury was retrospectively assessed by a standard scoring system (modified from Murray) in all patients with fulminant hepatic failure caused by paracetamol poisoning, admitted to the intensive care unit over a one year period. The severity of liver failure and illness, other organ system failure, and patient outcome were also analysed. RESULTS--Twenty four patients with paracetamol-induced liver failure were admitted and nine developed lung injury of whom eight (33%) had severe injury (Murray score > 2.5). In two patients hypoxaemia contributed to death. Patients with lung injury had higher median encephalopathy grades (4 v 2 in the non-injured group) and APACHE II scores (29 v 16). Circulatory failure, requiring vasoconstrictor support, occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 40% of those without. Cerebral oedema, as detected by abnormal rises in intracranial pressure, also occurred in all patients with lung injury but in only 27% of the non-injured patients. The incidence of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy was similar in both groups (67% and 47%). Pulmonary artery occlusion pressures were normal in the lung injury group. Cardiac output was high (median 11.2 1/min), systemic vascular resistance low (median 503 dynes/s/cm-5), and pulmonary vascular resistance low (median 70 dynes/s/cm-5), but not significantly different from the group without lung injury. Mortality was much higher in the lung injury group than in the non-injured group (89% v 13%). CONCLUSIONS--Acute lung injury was common in patients with paracetamol

  17. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, p<0.05), while DFA decreased during P3 (DFA=1.10±0.10) with respect to P1 (DFA=1.26±0.14, p<0.05). A significant SDRR increase (p<0.05) was observed during the recovery period P4 (SDRR=50±30ms) with respect to the HT session period P3 (SDRR=30±10ms). Our results suggest that HT might benefit children with disabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Extubation Failure and Functional Outcomes in Patients with Acute Neurologic Illness.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Muhammad Adeel; Kashyap, Rahul; Wilson, Gregory; Schenck, Louis; Hocker, Sara

    2016-04-01

    An association between extubation failure and neurologic and functional outcomes in patients with primary neurologic illness has not been investigated rigorously. We plan to conduct a retrospective chart review to study this association. A total of 949 unique patients intubated and ventilated for at least 48 h in Neuro ICU (NICU) were obtained. Extubation failure was defined as need for reintubation within 48 h of initial extubation. Independent and dependent association between extubation failure and clinical parameters was assessed. The patients had a median age [interquartile range (IQR)] of 58.5 (23.0) years. 60.5% were male and 81.9% were Caucasian. Extubation failure occurred in 108 (12.8%) patients. There was no difference in age, APACHE 3 score, FOUR score, or GCS score of patients at ICU admission between those who experienced extubation failure and those who did not. Extubation failure was associated with longer NICU and hospital LOS [median (IQR); 13.7 (11.3) vs. 9.1(8.2) days, P < 0.01 and 24.5 (20.0) vs. 16.8 (16.7) days, P < 0.01]. Patients with extubation failure had worse functional outcomes at 6 months as measured by the modified Rankin score [MRS; median (IQR), 5.0 (2.0) vs. 4.0 (3.0), P < 0.01]. After adjusting for confounders, extubation failure was associated with longer hospital and ICU LOS and worse functional outcomes. In patients with acute neurological illness, extubation failure is associated with longer ICU and hospital stays but does not impact hospital mortality. Patients with extubation failure may experience a worsening of their functional status over time.

  19. Safety of Carotid Revascularization during the Acute Period of Neurological Symptom Onset in Women.

    PubMed

    De Rango, Paola; Simonte, Gioele; Howard, Virginia J; Farchioni, Luca; Cieri, Enrico; Caso, Valeria; Pelliccia, Selena; Lenti, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Benefit from carotid revascularization is supposed to be lower in women due to increased periprocedural risks. The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of stroke/death after carotid intervention in women treated within 15 days from last neurological event. Data from 282 consecutive patients treated during 2009-2015 by carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting within 15 days from neurological symptoms were analyzed by sex and stratified according to treatment delay toward symptoms onset. Eighty women (28.4%) underwent carotid stenosis correction: in 37 treatment was performed within 7 days from symptoms (in 12 within 48 hr); the remaining underwent carotid disease correction between day 8 and day 15 after the index event. Baseline comorbidity profile, presenting symptoms (stroke, transient ischemic attack, and recurrent symptoms) and treatment delay were comparable between sexes. The 30-day stroke/death rate was 2.5% in women (2/80) and 3.5% (7/202) in men (P = 1.00). There was no 30-day death or cerebral hemorrhage in women and in patients treated within the first 48 hours. In adjusted analyses, female sex was not associated with increased stroke/death risk. At 4 years, for women and men survival was 93.9% vs. 79.2% (P = 0.047) and freedom from stroke 92.6% vs. 92.2% (P = 0.76). Women with symptomatic carotid stenosis may benefit as men from intervention when performed within the acute (15 days) or hyperacute (48 hr) period after neurological event. Thirty-day stroke/death rate in this experience is lower or comparable to men's and treatment appears to be effective in preventing new strokes at midterm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroactive Steroids in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Association with Cognitive, Functional, and Neurological Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Casas, Sebastian; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gargiulo-Monachelli, Gisella M; Perez, Andres Felipe; Tourreilles, Martin; Mattiazzi, Marcelo; Ojeda, Cristian; Lotero Polesel, Daniel; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2017-01-01

    Despite several scientific and technological advances, there is no single neuroprotective treatment that can reverse the brain damage after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Neuroactive steroids are cholesterol-derived hormones that have the ability to modulate the normal and pathologic nervous system employing genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. In this work, we first investigated if AIS affects the plasma concentration of 5 neuroactive steroids (cortisol, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and 3α-androstenediol glucuronide). Second, we studied if levels of circulating steroids associate with neurological, cognitive, and functional outcome in a cohort of 60- to 90 year-old male and female patients with AIS. For this purpose, we recruited patients who were hospitalized at the Emergency Room of the Central Military Hospital within the first 24 h after stroke onset. We designed 2 experimental groups, each one composed of 30 control subjects and 30 AIS patients, both males and females. The assessment of neurological deficit was performed with the NIHSS and the tests used for the functional and cognitive status were: (1) modified Rankin Scale; (2) Photo test, and (3) abbreviated Pfeiffer's mental status questionnaire. We observed a significant difference in plasma concentration of cortisol and estradiol between both experimental groups. In the AIS group, higher levels of these neuroactive steroids were associated with more pronounced neurological, cognitive and functional deficits in women compared to men. We propose that in elderly patients, high levels of circulating neuroactive steroids like cortisol and estradiol could potentiate AIS-mediated neuropathology in the ischemic and penumbra areas. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables.

  2. Hepatic encephalopathy with reversible focal neurologic signs resembling acute stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Yamazaki, Mineo; Katayama, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    A 64-year-old female with a history of primary biliary cirrhosis and esophageal varices starting at age 39 was brought to our Stroke Care Unit by ambulance with right-side weakness and speech difficulty. Physical examination revealed right hemiparesis (including the face), sensory disturbances, pathological reflexes, and slightly decreased consciousness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale rating of E3V4M6. Flapping tremors and speech disturbance, as well as anarithmia, construction apraxia, and ideomotor apraxia, were noted, and her National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 13. Initially, the patient was diagnosed with acute stroke and treated accordingly; however, subsequent findings from clinical images and electroencephalography led to a diagnosis of focal neurologic signs due to hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The patient had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow in the left side of the brain, probably due to microsurgical repair of an aneurysm done 2 years earlier. HE with exaggerated chronic liver damage might have made the previously silent ischemia clinically apparent. This interpretation is supported by the fact that the patient's neurologic deficits resolved once HE was adequately controlled. This case illustrates the need for careful assessment of background pathophysiology when diagnosing patients with stroke-like symptoms.

  3. Urgent carotid endarterectomy in patients with acute neurological ischemic events within six hours after symptoms onset.

    PubMed

    Gajin, P; Radak, Dj; Tanaskovic, S; Babic, S; Nenezic, D

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the outcome of urgent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed within less than six hours in patients with crescendo transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke in progression. From January 1998 to December 2008, 58 urgent CEAs were done for acute neurological ischemic events--46 patients with crescendo TIA and 12 patients with stroke in progression. Brain computed tomography (CT) was done prior and after the surgery. Disability level was assessed prior to and after urgent CEA using modified Rankin scale. Median follow-up was 42.1 ± 16.6 months. In the early postoperative period stroke rate was 0% for the patients in crescendo TIA group while in patients with stroke in progression group 3 patients (25%) had positive postoperative brain CT, yet neurological status significantly improved. Mid-term stroke rate was 2.2% in crescendo TIA group and 8.3% in stroke in progression group. In the early postoperative period there were no lethal outcomes, mid-term mortality was 8.3% in stroke in progression while in crescendo TIA group lethal outcomes were not observed. In conclusion, based on our results urgent CEA is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with crescendo TIA and stroke in progression with acceptable rate of postoperative complications.

  4. Promoting neurological recovery in the post-acute stroke phase: benefits and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Dirk M; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Profound cellular and biochemical remodeling processes occur in the brain following an ischemic stroke, raising the possibility that we may be able to promote neurological recovery by harnessing the brain's endogenous recovery processes with pharmacological or cell-based therapies. There is a compelling body of evidence that cerebral plasticity and neurological recovery can be stimulated in the post-acute ischemic brain in this manner. This overview of neurorestorative therapies highlights the main challenges in their development, and summarizes the implications of these findings to stroke patients. Key Message: Neurorestorative therapies are a highly promising avenue of treatment for the restitution of neuronal networks damaged by stroke. The key supporting data have so far been obtained using in vivo models in animals, underscoring the need to validate these findings in humans. For human studies, several potentially confounding variables should be kept in mind, including age, and the presence of risk factors and comorbidities (such as hyperlipidemia and diabetes). Stroke patients vary considerably in age and genetic background, as well as in the etiology, localization and size of brain infarcts. The choice of patient population is a critical factor in the success of clinical trials, as patient heterogeneity could mask any potential therapeutic benefits. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury: Evidence or paradigm?

    PubMed

    Lombi, Fernando; Muryan, Alexis; Canzonieri, Romina; Trimarchi, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury in the critically ill represents an independent risk factor of morbidity and mortality in the short and long terms, with significant economic impacts in terms of public health costs. Currently its diagnosis is still based on the presence of oliguria and/or a gradual increase in serum creatinine, which make the diagnosis a delayed event and to detriment of the so-called 'therapeutic window'. The appearance of new biomarkers of acute kidney injury could potentially improve this situation, contributing to the detection of 'subclinical acute kidney injury', which could allow the precocious employment of multiple treatment strategies in order to preserve kidney function. However these new biomarkers display sensitive features that may threaten their full capacity of action, which focus specifically on their additional contribution in the early approach of the situation, given the lack of specific validated treatments for acute kidney injury. This review aims to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these new tools in the early management of acute kidney injury.

  6. Diffuse Brain Injury Induces Acute Post-Traumatic Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Striz, Martin; Bachstetter, Adam D.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Donohue, Kevin D.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical observations report excessive sleepiness immediately following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of experimental evidence to support or refute the benefit of sleep following a brain injury. The aim of this study is to investigate acute post-traumatic sleep. Methods Sham, mild or moderate diffuse TBI was induced by midline fluid percussion injury (mFPI) in male C57BL/6J mice at 9:00 or 21:00 to evaluate injury-induced sleep behavior at sleep and wake onset, respectively. Sleep profiles were measured post-injury using a non-invasive, piezoelectric cage system. In separate cohorts of mice, inflammatory cytokines in the neocortex were quantified by immunoassay, and microglial activation was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Results Immediately after diffuse TBI, quantitative measures of sleep were characterized by a significant increase in sleep (>50%) for the first 6 hours post-injury, resulting from increases in sleep bout length, compared to sham. Acute post-traumatic sleep increased significantly independent of injury severity and time of injury (9:00 vs 21:00). The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β increased in brain-injured mice compared to sham over the first 9 hours post-injury. Iba-1 positive microglia were evident in brain-injured cortex at 6 hours post-injury. Conclusion Post-traumatic sleep occurs for up to 6 hours after diffuse brain injury in the mouse regardless of injury severity or time of day. The temporal profile of secondary injury cascades may be driving the significant increase in post-traumatic sleep and contribute to the natural course of recovery through cellular repair. PMID:24416145

  7. Acute stroke care in a neurologically underserved state: lessons learned from the Iowa Stroke Survey.

    PubMed

    Albright, Karen C; Schott, Todd C; Boland, Debbie F; George, Leslie; Boland, Kevin P; Wohlford-Wessels, Mary Pat; Finnerty, Edward P; Jacoby, Michael R K

    2009-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that stroke care is more fragmented in rural or neurologically underserved areas. The purpose of this study was to determine the availability of diagnostic and treatment services for acute stroke care in Iowa and to identify factors influencing care. Each of the 118 facilities in Iowa with emergency departments was surveyed by telephone. This survey consisted of 10 questions, focusing on the existence of pre-hospital and emergency room acute stroke protocols and the availability of essential personnel and diagnostic and treatment modalities essential for acute stroke care. Of the 118 hospitals with emergency departments, 109 (92.4%) had CT available. Within the subset having CT capabilities, 89.9% (98/109) had intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV t-PA) available. Of those facilities with both CT and IV t-PA, 46% (45/98) had around-the-clock in-house physician coverage. Further, 31% (14/45) of sites with CT, t-PA, and an in-house physician had a radiology technician on site. Only 12% (14/118) of centers could offer all essential components. Despite 88% of Iowa hospitals not providing all of these components, only 31% of these hospitals reported protocols for stabilization and immediate transfer of acute stroke patients. These findings indicate that the development of a stroke system is still in its infancy in Iowa. Collaborative efforts are needed to address barriers in rural Iowa and to assist facilities in providing the best possible care. Creativity will be paramount in establishing a functional statewide system to ensure optimum care for all Iowans.

  8. Nursing Activities Score and Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Filipe Utuari de Andrade; Watanabe, Mirian; Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti da; Padilha, Katia Grillo; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the nursing workload in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A quantitative study, conducted in an intensive care unit, from April to August of 2015. The Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) were used to measure nursing workload and to classify the stage of AKI, respectively. A total of 190 patients were included. Patients who developed AKI (44.2%) had higher NAS when compared to those without AKI (43.7% vs 40.7%), p <0.001. Patients with stage 1, 2 and 3 AKI showed higher NAS than those without AKI. A relationship was identified between stage 2 and 3 with those without AKI (p = 0.002 and p <0.001). The NAS was associated with the presence of AKI, the score increased with the progression of the stages, and it was associated with AKI, stage 2 and 3. avaliar a carga de trabalho de enfermagem em pacientes de terapia intensiva com lesão renal aguda (LRA). estudo quantitativo, em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, no período de abril a agosto de 2015. O Nursing Activities Score (NAS) e o Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) foram utilizados para medir a carga de trabalho de enfermagem e classificar o estágio da LRA, respectivamente. foram incluídos 190 pacientes. Os pacientes que desenvolveram LRA (44,2%) possuíam NAS superiores quando comparados aos sem LRA (43,7% vs 40,7%), p<0,001. Os pacientes com LRA nos estágios 1, 2 e 3 de LRA demonstraram NAS superiores aos sem LRA, houve relação entre os estágios 2 e 3 com os sem LRA, p=0,002 e p<0,001. o NAS apresentou associação com a existência de LRA, visto que seu valor aumenta com a progressão dos estágios, tendo associação com os estágios 2 e 3 de LRA.

  9. Identifying Homogeneous Subgroups in Neurological Disorders: Unbiased Recursive Partitioning in Cervical Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Tanadini, Lorenzo G; Steeves, John D; Hothorn, Torsten; Abel, Rainer; Maier, Doris; Schubert, Martin; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Curt, Armin

    2014-07-01

    Background The reliable stratification of homogeneous subgroups and the prediction of future clinical outcomes within heterogeneous neurological disorders is a particularly challenging task. Nonetheless, it is essential for the implementation of targeted care and effective therapeutic interventions. Objective This study was designed to assess the value of a recently developed regression tool from the family of unbiased recursive partitioning methods in comparison to established statistical approaches (eg, linear and logistic regression) for predicting clinical endpoints and for prospective patients' stratification for clinical trials. Methods A retrospective, longitudinal analysis of prospectively collected neurological data from the European Multicenter study about Spinal Cord Injury (EMSCI) network was undertaken on C4-C6 cervical sensorimotor complete subjects. Predictors were based on a broad set of early (<2 weeks) clinical assessments. Endpoints were based on later clinical examinations of upper extremity motor scores and recovery of motor levels, at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Prediction accuracy for each statistical analysis was quantified by resampling techniques. Results For all settings, overlapping confidence intervals indicated similar prediction accuracy of unbiased recursive partitioning to established statistical approaches. In addition, unbiased recursive partitioning provided a direct way of identification of more homogeneous subgroups. The partitioning is carried out in a data-driven manner, independently from a priori decisions or predefined thresholds. Conclusion Unbiased recursive partitioning techniques may improve prediction of future clinical endpoints and the planning of future SCI clinical trials by providing easily implementable, data-driven rationales for early patient stratification based on simple decision rules and clinical read-outs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Neurologic Injury Associated with Rewarming from Hypothermia: Is Mild Hypothermia on Bypass Better than Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Bhalala, Utpal S.; Appachi, Elumalai; Mumtaz, Muhammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many known risk factors for adverse cardiovascular and neurological outcomes in children with congenital heart defects (CHD) are not modifiable; however, the temperature and blood flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), are two risk factors, which may be altered in an attempt to improve long-term neurological outcomes. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, traditionally used for aortic arch repair, has been associated with short-term and long-term neurologic sequelae. Therefore, there is a rising interest in using moderate hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral blood flow on CPB during aortic arch repair. Rewarming from moderate-to-deep hypothermia has been shown to be associated with neuronal injury, neuroinflammation, and loss of cerebrovascular autoregulation. A significantly lesser degree of rewarming is required following mild (33–35°C) hypothermia as compared with moderate (28–32°C), deep (21–27°C), and profound (less than 20°C) hypothermia. Therefore, we believe that mild hypothermia is associated with a lower risk of rewarming-induced neurologic injury. We hypothesize that mild hypothermia with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion during CPB for neonatal aortic arch repair would be associated with improved neurologic outcome. PMID:27734011

  11. Resveratrol Pretreatment Decreases Ischemic Injury and Improves Neurological Function Via Sonic Hedgehog Signaling After Stroke in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pingping; Wang, Li; Tang, Fanren; Zeng, Li; Zhou, Luling; Song, Xiaosong; Jia, Wei; Chen, Jixiang; Yang, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol has neuroprotective effects for ischemic cerebral stroke. However, its neuroprotective mechanism for stroke is less well understood. Beneficial actions of the activated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway in stroke, such as improving neurological function, promoting neurogenesis, anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic, and pro-angiogenic effects, have been noted, but relatively little is known about the role of Shh signaling in resveratrol-reduced cerebral ischemic injury after stroke. The present study tests whether the Shh pathway mediates resveratrol to decrease cerebral ischemic injury and improve neurological function after stroke. We observed that resveratrol pretreatment significantly improved neurological function, decreased infarct volume, enhanced vitality, and reduced apoptosis of neurons in vivo and vitro after stroke. Meanwhile, expression levels of Shh, Ptc-1, Smo, and Gli-1 mRNAs were significantly upregulated and Gli-1 was relocated to the nucleus. Intriguingly, in vivo and in vitro inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway with cyclopamine, a Smo inhibitor, completely reversed the above effects of resveratrol. These results suggest that decreased cerebral ischemic injury and improved neurological function by resveratrol may be mediated by the Shh signaling pathway.

  12. Anesthetic management of acute cervical spinal cord injury in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baranović, Senka; Maldini, Branka; Cengić, Tomislav; Kolundzić, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury is 11,000 per year, with 55% of the injuries occurring between the age of 16 and 33, 18% of these in women of reproductive age. Diagnostic and early spinal decompression along with maintaining the mean arterial pressure to improve spinal cord perfusion and a high progesterone level in pregnancy for its neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effect have the leading role in neurological recovery and clinical outcome. We present a case of a patient in the 17th week of pregnancy who sustained luxation fracture of the C5 and C6 vertebrae and tetraplegia as passenger in a road accident. The early operative treatment and appropriate anesthetic procedure resulted in good clinical outcome with complete neurological recovery.

  13. Coagulation, fibrinolysis, and fibrin deposition in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Idell, Steven

    2003-04-01

    To review: a) the role of extravascular fibrin deposition in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury; b) the abnormalities in the coagulation and fibrinolysis pathways that promote fibrin deposition in the acutely injured lung; and c) the pathways that contribute to the regulation of the fibrinolytic system via the lung epithelium, including newly recognized posttranscriptional and urokinase-dependent pathways. Another objective was to determine how novel anticoagulant or fibrinolytic strategies may be used to protect against acute inflammation or accelerated fibrosis in acute lung injury. Published medical literature. Alveolar fibrin deposition is characteristic of diverse forms of acute lung injury. Intravascular thrombosis or disseminated intravascular coagulation can also occur in the acutely injured lung. Extravascular fibrin deposition promotes lung dysfunction and the acute inflammatory response. In addition, transitional fibrin in the alveolar compartment undergoes remodeling leading to accelerated pulmonary fibrosis similar to the events associated with wound healing, or desmoplasia associated with solid neoplasms. In acute lung injury, alveolar fibrin deposition is potentiated by consistent changes in endogenous coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. Procoagulant activity is increased in conjunction with depression of fibrinolytic activity in the alveolar compartment. Initiation of the procoagulant response occurs as a result of local overexpression of tissue factor associated with factor VII. Depression of fibrinolytic activity occurs as a result of inhibition of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) by plasminogen activators, or series inhibition of plasmin by antiplasmins. Locally increased amplification of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is largely responsible for this fibrinolytic defect. Newly described pathways by which lung epithelial cells regulate expression of uPA, its receptor uPAR, and PAI-1 at the posttranscriptional level have been

  14. Acute gastroduodenal injury after ingestion of diluted herbicide pendimethalin.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, K; Azuhata, H; Katoh, H; Kuwano, H

    2009-03-01

    The herbicide, pendimethalin, is used worldwide, but its acute toxicity is not yet widely known. There have been some reported acute pendimethalin poisoning cases in humans and most of them intentionally ingested the concentrated formulation. We describe a 73-year-old man who developed corrosive gastroduodenal injury after accidental ingestion of the diluted (300 times with water) pendimethalin formulation. He had a history of reflux oesophagitis and had been taking omeprazol (10 mg/day) for a year. He consumed alcohol two hours after the accidental ingestion and then had nausea and epigastric pain. Endoscopy performed three days post-exposure revealed gastroduodenal injury. As he had consumed alcohol every day for years and had no history of gastroduodenal ulcer, the accidental ingestion may be associated with this injury. He was successfully treated by increasing his dosage of omeprazol (20 mg/day) for two weeks. This case indicates that ingestion of a small quantity of pendimethalin can provoke gastroduodenal injury.

  15. [Acute and overuse injuries in elite paracycling - an epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Kromer, P; Röcker, K; Sommer, A; Baur, H; Konstantinidis, L; Gollhofer, A; Südkamp, N P; Hirschmüller, A

    2011-09-01

    Although paracycling is a growing discipline in high level competitive sports as well as in posttraumatic rehabilitation, epidemiological data of resulting injuries is still missing. Therefore, 19 athletes of the German national paracycling team were asked about their injuries during the 2008 season using a standardized questionnaire. Overall, 18 (94.7 %) of 19 athletes reported overuse injuries; most commonly localized at the back (83.3 %), neck/shoulder (77.8 %), knee (50 %), groin/buttock (50 %) and hands/wrists (38.9 %). Altogether, 18 accidents were registered, corresponding to an injury rate of 0,95 acute injuries per athlete per year (0,07 / 1000 km). The most common acute injuries were abrasions (69.2 %) and contusions (61.5 %), whereas fractures were stated only twice (11.8 %). The anatomical distribution of overuse injuries in disabled cyclists confirms the results of studies in able-bodied cycling, although the incidences in low-back pain and neck/shoulder pain is clearly higher in disabled cycling, as well as the rate of traumatic injuries.

  16. Intrathecal injection of bone marrow stromal cells attenuates neurologic injury after spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Enyi; Kazui, Teruhisa; Jiang, Xiaojing; Washiyama, Naoki; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi; Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad

    2006-06-01

    It has been shown that transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the ischemic brain improves functional outcome. We sought to investigate whether intrathecal injection of MSCs can attenuate neurologic injury of spinal cord ischemia. Rabbit MSCs were expanded in vitro and were pre-labeled with bromodeoxyuridine. Spinal cord ischemia was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion. Group A and control A were subjected to a 20-minute ischemia and the ischemic duration was extended to 30 minutes in group B and control B. Two days before spinal cord ischemia, 1 x 10(8) MSCs were intrathecally injected into groups A and B, whereas vehicle alone was injected into the control groups. Hind-limb motor function was assessed during a 14-day recovery period with Tarlov criteria, and then histologic examination was performed. Marrow stromal cells survived and engrafted into the spinal cord 2 days after transplantation, and more MSCs were found in the lumbar spinal cord (ischemic segment) than in the thoracic spinal cord (nonischemic segment) at 14 days. Compared with their respective control groups, Tarlov scores were significantly higher in both groups A and B (p < 0.05, group A vs control A, at 2, 7, and 14 days; p < 0.05, group B vs control B, at 1, 2, 7, and 14 days, respectively). The number of intact motor neurons was much higher in the two experimental groups (p < 0.01 vs the corresponding control groups, respectively). Intrathecal injection of MSCs attenuates ischemic injury of spinal cord.

  17. Socially constructed ‘value’ and vocational experiences following neurological injury

    PubMed Central

    Fadyl, Joanna K.; Payne, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Paid work is seen as a key outcome in rehabilitation. However, research demonstrates that because of normative expectations in the job market and workplace, experiences of disability can be intensified in a work context. We sought to explore this issue in more depth by analysing the effects of societal constructions of worker ‘value’ within individual case studies of people with acquired neurological injury. Method: Instrumental case study of four heterogeneous participants, employing a discourse analysis approach. Results: Participants described a perpetuation of discourses in which a disabled body or mind itself is seen to qualify, disqualify or limit a person’s value in employment. Nevertheless, interviews also highlighted discourses that constructed other worker identities: based on pre-injury identities, life experiences and other aspects of self. The contrasts between individuals illustrated how worker identities, when situated within broader societal discourses of worker ‘value’, can either constrain or expand the vocational opportunities available to individuals who experience disability. However, current and historical interactions about worker ‘value’ shaped the identities genuinely available to each individual. Conclusion: Understanding how societal discourses enable and constrain worker identities may be vital to (a) facilitating valid opportunities and (b) navigating situations that could unintentionally hinder vocational possibilities. Implications for RehabilitationThis study shows how worker identities, situated within societal discourses of worker ‘value’, can constrain or broaden vocational opportunities available to individuals who experience disability.Barriers to gaining, maintaining and developing in employment could be re-envisaged in terms of what is limiting a person’s ability to embody an enabling identity.A knowledge of both societal discourses and individuals’ interactions with them may be vital to

  18. Adrenomedullin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takefumi; Obata, Hiroaki; Murakami, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kaoru; Kangawa, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2007-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), an endogenous peptide, has been shown to have a variety of protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of AM on acute lung injury remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated whether AM infusion ameliorates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were randomized to receive continuous intravenous infusion of AM (0.1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or vehicle through a microosmotic pump. The animals were intratracheally injected with either LPS (1 mg/kg) or saline. At 6 and 18 h after intratracheal instillation, we performed histological examination and bronchoalveolar lavage and assessed the lung wet/dry weight ratio as an index of acute lung injury. Then we measured the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In addition, we evaluated BALF total protein and albumin levels as indexes of lung permeability. LPS instillation caused severe acute lung injury, as indicated by the histological findings and the lung wet/dry weight ratio. However, AM infusion attenuated these LPS-induced abnormalities. AM decreased the numbers of total cells and neutrophils and the levels of TNF-alpha and CINC in BALF. AM also reduced BALF total protein and albumin levels. In addition, AM significantly suppressed apoptosis of alveolar wall cells as indicated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. In conclusion, continuous infusion of AM ameliorated LPS-induced acute lung injury in rats. This beneficial effect of AM on acute lung injury may be mediated by inhibition of inflammation, hyperpermeability, and alveolar wall cell apoptosis.

  19. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, H; Gopi, M; Arumugam, A

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  20. Spreading depolarization monitoring in neurocritical care of acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hartings, Jed A

    2017-04-01

    Spreading depolarizations are unique in being discrete pathologic entities that are well characterized experimentally and also occur commonly in patients with substantial acute brain injury. Here, we review essential concepts in depolarization monitoring, highlighting its clinical significance, interpretation, and future potential. Cortical lesion development in diverse animal models is mediated by tissue waves of mass spreading depolarization that cause the toxic loss of ion homeostasis and limit energy substrate supply through associated vasoconstriction. The signatures of such deterioration are observed in electrocorticographic recordings from perilesional cortex of patients with acute stroke or brain trauma. Experimental work suggests that depolarizations are triggered by energy supply-demand mismatch in focal hotspots of the injury penumbra, and depolarizations are usually observed clinically when other monitoring variables are within recommended ranges. These results suggest that depolarizations are a sensitive measure of relative ischemia and ongoing secondary injury, and may serve as a clinical guide for personalized, mechanistically targeted therapy. Both existing and future candidate therapies offer hope to limit depolarization recurrence. Electrocorticographic monitoring of spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury provides a sensitive measure of relative energy shortage in focal, vulnerable brains regions and indicates ongoing secondary damage. Depolarization monitoring holds potential for targeted clinical trial design and implementation of precision medicine approaches to acute brain injury therapy.

  1. Intrathecal Transplantation of Autologous Adherent Bone Marrow Cells Induces Functional Neurological Recovery in a Canine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Hala; El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Farghali, Haithem A M A; Ismail, Zeinab M K; Zickri, Maha B; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Kishk, Nirmeen A; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in demyelination of surviving axons, loss of oligodendrocytes, and impairment of motor and sensory functions. We have developed a clinical strategy of cell therapy for SCI through the use of autologous bone marrow cells for transplantation to augment remyelination and enhance neurological repair. In a preclinical large mammalian model of SCI, experimental dogs were subjected to a clipping contusion of the spinal cord. Two weeks after the injury, GFP-labeled autologous minimally manipulated adherent bone marrow cells (ABMCs) were transplanted intrathecally to investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous ABMC therapy. The effects of ABMC transplantation in dogs with SCI were determined using functional neurological scoring, and the integration of ABMCs into the injured cords was determined using histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations and electron microscopic analyses of sections from control and transplanted spinal cords. Our data demonstrate the presence of GFP-labeled cells in the injured spinal cord for up to 16 weeks after transplantation in the subacute SCI stage. GFP-labeled cells homed to the site of injury and were detected around white matter tracts and surviving axons. ABMC therapy in the canine SCI model enhanced remyelination and augmented neural regeneration, resulting in improved neurological functions. Therefore, autologous ABMC therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for spinal cord injuries.

  2. Acute kidney injury caused by zonisamide-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiro; Hasegawa, Midori; Nabeshima, Kuihiro; Tomita, Makoto; Murakami, Kazutaka; Nakai, Shigeru; Yamakita, Takashi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2010-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a severe adverse drug reaction affecting multiple organs caused by drug treatment. The current report describes a man who was prescribed zonisamide for epilepsy and subsequently developed widespread skin rash, acute kidney injury, high-grade fever, eosinophilia, liver dysfunction, lymphadenopathy and an increase in antihuman herpesvirus-6 immunoglobulin G titer. Hypersensitivity to zonisamide was confirmed by the skin patch test. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with DRESS/DIHS caused by zonisamide. This is the first report of acute kidney injury due to zonisamide-induced DRESS/DIHS.

  3. Acute Management of Nutritional Demands after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven; Singer, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding nutritional management in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Specific metabolic challenges are present following spinal cord injury. The acute stage is characterized by a reduction in metabolic activity, as well as a negative nitrogen balance that cannot be corrected, even with aggressive nutritional support. Metabolic demands need to be accurately monitored to avoid overfeeding. Enteral feeding is the optimal route following SCI. When oral feeding is not possible, nasogastric, followed by nasojejunal, then by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, if necessary, is suggested. PMID:20373845

  4. Determinants of the impact of blood pressure variability on neurological outcome after acute ischaemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alicia; Stoddard, Gregory J; Smith, Gordon; Chung, Lee; O'Donnell, Steve; McNally, J Scott; Tirschwell, David; Majersik, Jennifer J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Increased blood pressure variability (BPV) is detrimental after acute ischaemic stroke, but the interaction between BPV and neuroimaging factors that directly influence stroke outcome has not been explored. Methods We retrospectively reviewed inpatients from 2007 to 2014 with acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke, CT perfusion and angiography at hospital admission, and a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) 30–365 days after stroke onset. BPV indices included SD, coefficient of variation and successive variation of the systolic blood pressure between 0 and 120 hours after admission. Ordinal logistic regression models were fitted to mRS with predictor variables of BPV indices. Models were further stratified by CT perfusion volumetric measurements, proximal vessel occlusion and collateral score. Results 110 patients met the inclusion criteria. The likelihood of a 1-point rise in the mRS increased with every 10 mm Hg increase in BPV (OR for the 3 BPV indices ranged from 2.27 to 5.54), which was more pronounced in patients with larger ischaemic core volumes (OR 8.37 to 18.0) and larger hypoperfused volumes (OR 6.02 to 15.4). This association also held true for patients with larger mismatch volume, proximal vessel occlusion and good collateral vessels. Conclusions These results indicate that increased BPV is associated with worse neurological outcome after stroke, particularly in patients with a large lesion core volume, concurrent viable ischaemic penumbra, proximal vessel occlusion and good collaterals. This subset of patients, who are often not candidates for or fail acute stroke therapies such as intravenous tissue plasminogen activator or endovascular thrombectomy, may benefit from interventions aimed at reducing BPV. PMID:28959484

  5. CD47 deficiency improves neurological outcomes of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Song; Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Yu; Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yinghua; van Leyen, Klaus; Yang, Yong-Guang; Lok, Josephine M; Whalen, Michael J; Lo, Eng H; Wang, Xiaoying

    2017-03-16

    CD47 is a receptor for signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα) in self-recognition by the innate immune system, and a receptor of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) contributing to vascular impairment in response to stress. However, the roles of CD47 in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been investigated. In this study we aimed to test our hypothesis that CD47 mediates early neutrophil brain infiltration and late brain vascular remodeling after TBI. Mice were subjected to TBI using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device. We examined early phase neutrophil infiltration, and late phase brain vessel density, pro-angiogenic markers VEGF and Ang-1 protein expression, neurological function deficits and lesion volumes for up to three weeks after TBI. Our results show that mice deficient in CD47 (CD47 Knockout) had significantly less brain neutrophil infiltration at 24h, upregulated VEGF expression in peri-lesion cortex at 7 and 14days, and increased blood vessel density at 21days after TBI, compared to wild type (WT) mice. CD47 knockout also significantly decreased sensorimotor function deficits and reduced brain lesion volume at 21days after TBI. We conclude that CD47 may play pathological roles in brain neutrophil infiltration, progression of brain tissue damage, impairment of cerebrovascular remodeling and functional recovery after TBI.

  6. Characterization of neurologic injury using novel morphological analysis of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials.

    PubMed

    Madhok, Jai; Iyer, Shrivats; Thakor, Nitish V; Maybhate, Anil

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative, easy-to-interpret, clinically translatable tool for analysis of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEPs). Unlike traditional analysis, which involves peak-to-peak amplitude and latency calculation, this method, phase space analysis, analyzes the overall morphology of the SSEP, and includes greater information. The SSEP is plotted in phase space (x-dot vs. x), which leads to an approximately spiral curve. The area swept out by this curve is termed the Phase Space Area (PSA). As PSA calculation involves numerical differentiation, we present a comparison of two different approaches to combat noise amplification: finite-window smoothing, and total variation regularization (TVR) of the numerical derivative. These methods are applied to simulated SSEPs. The efficacy of these methods in performing noise-reduction is assessed and compared with ensemble averaging. While TVR gives a reasonably robust approximation of the derivative, Gaussian smoothing of the derivative offers the best trade-off between the number of signal sweeps required to be averaged, close approximation of the SSEP derivative, and optimal estimation of the PSA. We validate this method by analyzing non-characteristic SSEPs that have indistinguishable peaks as is frequently seen in cases of underlying neurologic injury such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  7. Induced hypernatraemia is protective in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Shailesh; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Lawrence, Mark D; Bersten, Andrew D

    2016-06-15

    Sucrose induced hyperosmolarity is lung protective but the safety of administering hyperosmolar sucrose in patients is unknown. Hypertonic saline is commonly used to produce hyperosmolarity aimed at reducing intra cranial pressure in patients with intracranial pathology. Therefore we studied the protective effects of 20% saline in a lipopolysaccharide lung injury rat model. 20% saline was also compared with other commonly used fluids. Following lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury, male Sprague Dawley rats received either 20% hypertonic saline, 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, 20% albumin, 5% glucose or 20% albumin with 5% glucose, i.v. During 2h of non-injurious mechanical ventilation parameters of acute lung injury were assessed. Hypertonic saline resulted in hypernatraemia (160 (1) mmol/l, mean (SD)) maintained through 2h of ventilation, and in amelioration of lung oedema, myeloperoxidase, bronchoalveolar cell infiltrate, total soluble protein and inflammatory cytokines, and lung histological injury score, compared with positive control and all other fluids (p ≤ 0.001). Lung physiology was maintained (conserved PaO2, elastance), associated with preservation of alveolar surfactant (p ≤ 0.0001). Independent of fluid or sodium load, induced hypernatraemia is lung protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and validation of a computerized algorithm for International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI).

    PubMed

    Walden, K; Bélanger, L M; Biering-Sørensen, F; Burns, S P; Echeverria, E; Kirshblum, S; Marino, R J; Noonan, V K; Park, S E; Reeves, R K; Waring, W; Dvorak, M F

    2016-03-01

    Validation study. To describe the development and validation of a computerized application of the international standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury (ISNCSCI). Data from acute and rehabilitation care. The Rick Hansen Institute-ISNCSCI Algorithm (RHI-ISNCSCI Algorithm) was developed based on the 2011 version of the ISNCSCI and the 2013 version of the worksheet. International experts developed the design and logic with a focus on usability and features to standardize the correct classification of challenging cases. A five-phased process was used to develop and validate the algorithm. Discrepancies between the clinician-derived and algorithm-calculated results were reconciled. Phase one of the validation used 48 cases to develop the logic. Phase three used these and 15 additional cases for further logic development to classify cases with 'Not testable' values. For logic testing in phases two and four, 351 and 1998 cases from the Rick Hansen SCI Registry (RHSCIR), respectively, were used. Of 23 and 286 discrepant cases identified in phases two and four, 2 and 6 cases resulted in changes to the algorithm. Cross-validation of the algorithm in phase five using 108 new RHSCIR cases did not identify the need for any further changes, as all discrepancies were due to clinician errors. The web-based application and the algorithm code are freely available at www.isncscialgorithm.com. The RHI-ISNCSCI Algorithm provides a standardized method to accurately derive the level and severity of SCI from the raw data of the ISNCSCI examination. The web interface assists in maximizing usability while minimizing the impact of human error in classifying SCI. This study is sponsored by the Rick Hansen Institute and supported by funding from Health Canada and Western Economic Diversification Canada.

  9. Low Tidal Volume Ventilation in Patients Without Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Ye; Zhu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life threatening respiratory condition characterized by breakdown of the alveolar-capillary barrier, leading to flooding of the alveolar space producing the classical chest radiograph of bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. In this study, we employed lung protective ventilation strategies in patients without acute lung injury (ALI) to determine whether mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volume would provide more clinical benefits to patients without ALI.

  10. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Comparison of Preventative Therapies.

    PubMed

    Honicker, Theresa; Holt, Karyn

    2016-01-01

    Contrast medium is used daily for diagnostic and interventional procdures as a means to visualize blood vessels. The administration of contrast dye, however, can lead to an acute reduction in kidney function. This complication can impact length of hospital stay, risk of dialysis, and increased hospital mortality. Common preventative measures include N-acetylcysteine and intravenous hydration. The evidence reviewed revealed hydration to be the more effective treatment to reduce the risk of acute kidney injury.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of bloodletting at Jing points combined with mild induced hypothermia in acute severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yue; Miao, Xiao-mei; Yi, Tai-long; Chen, Xu-yi; Sun, Hong-tao; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Zhang, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Bloodletting at Jing points has been used to treat coma in traditional Chinese medicine. Mild induced hypothermia has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects. However, the therapeutic effects of bloodletting at Jing points and mild induced hypothermia alone are limited. Therefore, we investigated whether combined treatment might have clinical effectiveness for the treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. Using a rat model of traumatic brain injury, combined treatment substantially alleviated cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, neurological function was ameliorated, and cellular necrosis and the inflammatory response were lessened. These findings suggest that the combined effects of bloodletting at Jing points (20 μL, twice a day, for 2 days) and mild induced hypothermia (6 hours) are better than their individual effects alone. Their combined application may have marked neuroprotective effects in the clinical treatment of acute severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:27482221

  12. Oral penicillin-associated acute kidney injury in an infant with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Zieg, Jakub; Hacek, Jaromir

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactam-associated acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a rare condition in childhood. We report the case of an infant with penicillin-associated ATIN and concomitant acute pyelonephritis resulting in the development of severe acute kidney injury (AKI). The treatment consisted of penicillin suspension and appropriate AKI management, which required a short period of dialysis. Finally, full recovery and normalization of laboratory parameters occurred. We present here the first case of oral penicillin-associated ATIN in childhood.

  13. Chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates acute renal ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Grifoni, Samira; Clark, Jeb S.; Csongradi, Eva; Maric, Christine; Juncos, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent epidemiological reports showed that smoking has a negative impact on renal function and elevates the renal risk not only in the renal patient but perhaps also in the healthy population. Studies suggested that nicotine, a major tobacco alkaloid, links smoking to renal dysfunction. While several studies showed that smoking/chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates the progression of chronic renal diseases, its impact on acute kidney injury is virtually unknown. Here, we studied the effects of chronic nicotine exposure on acute renal ischemic injury. We found that chronic nicotine exposure increased the extent of renal injury induced by warm ischemia-reperfusion as evidenced by morphological changes, increase in plasma creatinine level, and kidney injury molecule-1 expression. We also found that chronic nicotine exposure elevated markers of oxidative stress such as nitrotyrosine as well as malondialdehyde. Interestingly, chronic nicotine exposure alone increased oxidative stress and injury in the kidney without morphological alterations. Chronic nicotine treatment not only increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and injury but also exacerbated oxidative stress-induced ROS generation through NADPH oxidase and mitochondria in cultured renal proximal tubule cells. The resultant oxidative stress provoked injury through JNK-mediated activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 transcription factor in vitro. This mechanism might exist in vivo as phosphorylation of JNK and its downstream target c-jun, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, is elevated in the ischemic kidneys exposed to chronic nicotine. Our results imply that smoking may sensitize the kidney to ischemic insults and perhaps facilitates progression of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney injury. PMID:21511693

  14. Chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates acute renal ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Grifoni, Samira; Clark, Jeb S; Csongradi, Eva; Maric, Christine; Juncos, Luis A

    2011-07-01

    Recent epidemiological reports showed that smoking has a negative impact on renal function and elevates the renal risk not only in the renal patient but perhaps also in the healthy population. Studies suggested that nicotine, a major tobacco alkaloid, links smoking to renal dysfunction. While several studies showed that smoking/chronic nicotine exposure exacerbates the progression of chronic renal diseases, its impact on acute kidney injury is virtually unknown. Here, we studied the effects of chronic nicotine exposure on acute renal ischemic injury. We found that chronic nicotine exposure increased the extent of renal injury induced by warm ischemia-reperfusion as evidenced by morphological changes, increase in plasma creatinine level, and kidney injury molecule-1 expression. We also found that chronic nicotine exposure elevated markers of oxidative stress such as nitrotyrosine as well as malondialdehyde. Interestingly, chronic nicotine exposure alone increased oxidative stress and injury in the kidney without morphological alterations. Chronic nicotine treatment not only increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and injury but also exacerbated oxidative stress-induced ROS generation through NADPH oxidase and mitochondria in cultured renal proximal tubule cells. The resultant oxidative stress provoked injury through JNK-mediated activation of the activator protein (AP)-1 transcription factor in vitro. This mechanism might exist in vivo as phosphorylation of JNK and its downstream target c-jun, a component of the AP-1 transcription factor, is elevated in the ischemic kidneys exposed to chronic nicotine. Our results imply that smoking may sensitize the kidney to ischemic insults and perhaps facilitates progression of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney injury.

  15. Neonatal acute kidney injury - Severity and recovery prediction and the role of serum and urinary biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2017-02-01

    Neonatal acute kidney injury is common, in part due to incomplete renal maturation and also due to frequent exposure to risk factors for acute kidney injury such as perinatal asphyxia, extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation, cardiac surgery, sepsis, prematurity and nephrotoxicity. However the current method by which acute kidney injury is diagnosed is sub-optimal and not universally accepted which impairs the accurate estimation of the true incidence of neonatal acute kidney injury. Serum Cystatin-C, urinary NGAL, KIM-1 and IL-18 are promising neonatal acute kidney injury biomarkers however the diagnosis of acute kidney injury remains serum creatinine/urine output-based in many studies. Emerging biomarkers which require further study in the neonatal population include netrin-1 and EGF. Increased awareness amongst clinicians of nephrotoxic medications being a modifiable risk factor for the development of neonatal acute kidney injury is imperative. The burden of chronic kidney failure following neonatal acute kidney injury is unclear and requires further study.

  16. Targeting apoptosis in acute tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alberto; Justo, Pilar; Sanz, Ana; Lorz, Corina; Egido, Jesús

    2003-10-15

    Recent research has shown that apoptosis and its regulatory mechanisms contribute to cell number regulation in acute renal failure. Acute tubular necrosis is the most frequent form of parenchymal acute renal failure. The main causes are ischemia-reperfusion, sepsis and nephrotoxic drugs. Exogenous factors such as nephrotoxic drugs and bacterial products, and endogenous factors such as lethal cytokines promote tubular cell apoptosis. Such diverse stimuli engage intracellular death pathways that in some cases are stimulus-specific. We now review the role of apoptosis in acute renal failure, the potential molecular targets of therapeutic intervention, the therapeutic weapons to modulate the activity of these targets and the few examples of therapeutic intervention on apoptosis.

  17. Calcium channel blockers for acute traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Langham, J; Goldfrad, C; Teasdale, G; Shaw, D; Rowan, K

    2003-01-01

    Acute traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. Calcium channel blockers (calcium antagonists) have been used in an attempt to prevent cerebral vasospasm after injury, maintain blood flow to the brain, and so prevent further damage. To estimate the effects of calcium channel blockers in patients with acute traumatic brain injury, and in a subgroup of brain injury patients with traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage. Handsearching and electronic searching for randomised controlled trials. Randomised controlled trials in patients with all levels of severity of clinically diagnosed acute traumatic brain injury. Two reviewers independently assessed the identified studies for eligibility and extracted data from each study. Summary odds ratios were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel method. Six RCTs were identified as eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. The effect of calcium channel blockers on the risk of death was reported in five of the RCTs. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the five studies was 0.91 (95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.70-1.17). For the four RCTs that reported death and severe disability (unfavourable outcome), the pooled odds ratio was 0.85 (95%CI 0.68-1.07). In the two RCTs which reported the risk of death in a subgroup of traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage patients, the pooled odds ratio was 0.59 (95%CI 0.37-0.94). Three RCTs reported death and severe disability as an outcome in this subgroup, and the pooled odds ratio was 0.67 (95%CI 0.46-0.98). This systematic review of randomised controlled trials of calcium channel blockers in acute traumatic head injury patients shows that considerable uncertainty remains over their effects. The effect of nimodipine in a subgroup of brain injury patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage shows a beneficial effect, though the increase in adverse reactions suffered by the intervention group may mean that the drug is harmful for some patients.

  18. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-12-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury.

  19. Severe but reversible acute kidney injury resulting from Amanita punctata poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunjung; Cheong, Ka-Young; Lee, Min-Jeong; Kim, Seirhan; Shin, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Heungsoo; Park, In-Whee

    2015-01-01

    Mushroom-related poisoning can cause acute kidney injury. Here we report a case of acute kidney injury after ingestion of Amanita punctata, which is considered an edible mushroom. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred within 24 hours from the mushroom intake and were followed by an asymptomatic period, acute kidney injury, and elevation of liver and pancreatic enzymes. Kidney function recovered with supportive care. Nephrotoxic mushroom poisoning should be considered as a cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26779427

  20. Acute respiratory infections in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Stephen P

    2007-05-01

    Respiratory disorders are the leading cause of death for persons with both acute and chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), and much of the morbidity and mortality associated with respiratory disorders is related to acute respiratory infections. Pneumonia is the best recognized respiratory infection associated with mortality in this population. Recent evidence supports some management strategies that differ from those recommended for the general population. Upper respiratory tract infections and acute bronchitis may be precipitating factors in the development of pneumonia or ventilatory failure in patients with chronic SCI. This review emphasizes management principles for treatment and prevention of respiratory infections in persons with SCI.

  1. Musculoskeletal and neurological injuries associated with work organization among immigrant Latino women manual workers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Cartwright, Michael S; Chen, Haiying; Rosenbaum, Daryl A; Walker, Francis O; Mora, Dana C; Quandt, Sara A

    2014-04-01

    This analysis examines the associations of work organization attributes among Latino women in manual occupations with musculoskeletal and neurological injuries. Participants included 234 women in western North Carolina. Outcome measures included epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, back pain, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Independent measures included indicators of job demand, job control, and job support, as well as personal characteristics. Latina workers commonly experienced epicondylitis, rotator cuff syndrome, back pain, and CTS. Awkward posture and decision latitude were associated with epicondylitis. Rotator cuff syndrome was associated with awkward posture and psychological demand. Awkward posture and psychological demand, and decreased skill variety and job control were related to CTS. Work organization factors are potentially important for musculoskeletal and neurological injury among vulnerable workers. Research is required to understand the associations of work and health outcomes of these women. Policy initiatives need to consider how work organization affects health. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. RIFLE and Acute Kidney Injury Network classifications predict mortality in leptospirosis-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Silva Júnior, Geraldo B; Abreu, Krasnalhia Lívia S; Mota, Rosa M S; Barreto, Adler G C; Araújo, Sônia M H A; Rocha, Hermano A L; Libório, Alexandre B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2011-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in leptospirosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between RIFLE and AKIN classifications with mortality in leptospirosis-associated AKI. A retrospective study was conducted in patients with leptospirosis admitted to tertiary hospitals in Brazil. The association between RIFLE and AKIN classifications with mortality was investigated. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to investigate risk factors for death. A total of 287 patients were included, with an average age of 37 ± 16 years, and 80.8% were male. Overall mortality was 13%. There was a significant association between these classifications and death. Among non-survivors, 86% were in the class 'failure' and AKIN 3. Increased mortality was observed according to the worse classifications: 'risk' (R; 2%), 'injury' (I; 8%) and 'failure' (F; 23%), as well as in AKIN 1 (2%), AKIN 2 (8%) and AKIN 3 (23%) (P < 0.0001). The worst classifications were significantly associated with death: RIFLE F (odds ratio = 11.6, P = 0.018) and AKIN 3 (odds ratio = 12.8, P = 0.013). Receiver-operator curve for patients with AKI showed high areas under the curve (0.71, 95% confidence interval = 0.67-0.74) for both RIFLE and AKIN classifications in determining the sensitivity for mortality. There is a significant association between RIFLE and AKIN classifications with mortality in patients with leptospirosis. Initiation of dialysis in patients with RIFLE F and AKIN 3 should always be considered. © 2011 The Authors. Nephrology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Metabolic assessment and enteral tube feeding usage in children with acute neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Leite, H P; Fantozzi, G

    1998-01-01

    To report on acquired experience of metabolic support for children with acute neurological diseases, emphasizing enteral tube feeding usage and metabolic assessment, and also to recommend policies aimed towards improving its implementation. Retrospective analysis. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo. 44 patients consecutively admitted to the Pediatric ICU over a period of 3 years who were given nutrition and metabolic support for at least 72 hours. Head trauma, CNS infections and craniotomy post-operative period following tumor exeresis were the main diagnoses. Records of protein-energy intake, nutrient supply route, nitrogen balance and length of therapy. From a total of 527 days of therapy, single parenteral nutrition was utilized for 34.3% and single enteral tube feeding for 79.1% of that period. 61.4% of the children were fed exclusively via enteral tube feeding, 9.1% via parenteral and 39.5% by both routes. The enteral tube feeding was introduced upon admission and transpyloric placement was successful in 90% of the cases. Feeding was started 48 hours after ICU admission. The caloric goal was achieved on the 7th day after admission, and thereafter parenteral nutrition was interrupted. The maximum energy supply was 104.2 +/- 23.15 kcal/kg. The median length of therapy was 11 days (range 4-38). None of the patients on tube feeding developed GI tract bleeding, pneumonia or bronchoaspiration episodes and, of the 4 patients who were given exclusive TPN, 2 developed peptic ulcer. The initial urinary urea nitrogen was 7.11 g/m2 and at discharge 6.44 g/m2. The protein supply increased from 1.49 g/kg to 3.65 g/kg (p < 0.01). The nitrogen balance increased from--7.05 to 2.2 g (p < 0.01). Children with acute neurological diseases are hypercatabolic and have high urinary nitrogen losses. The initial negative nitrogen balance can be increased by more aggressive feeding regimes than the usual ones. Early tube feeding was

  4. Clinical relevance of midline fluid percussion brain injury: acute deficits, chronic morbidities, and the utility of biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Lifshitz, Jonathan; Rowe, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Daniel R.; Evilsizor, Megan N.; Thomas, Theresa C.; Adelson, P. David; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2016-01-01

    After 30 years of characterisation and implementation, fluid percussion injury (FPI) is firmly recognised as one of the best-characterised, reproducible and clinically relevant models of TBI, encompassing concussion through diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Depending on the specific injury parameters (e.g. injury site, mechanical force), FPI can model diffuse TBI with or without a focal component, and may be designated as mild to severe according to the chosen mechanical forces and resulting acute neurological responses. Among FPI models, midline FPI may best represent clinical diffuse TBI, because of the acute behavioural deficits, the transition to late-onset behavioural morbidities, and the absence of gross histopathology. The goal here was to review acute and chronic physiological and behavioural deficits and morbidities associated with diffuse TBI induced by midline FPI. In the absence of neurodegenerative sequelae associated with focal injury, there is a need for biomarkers in the diagnostic, prognostic, predictive and therapeutic approaches to evaluate outcomes from TBI. The current literature suggests that midline FPI offers a clinically-relevant, validated model of diffuse TBI to investigators wishing to evaluate novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of TBI and the utility of biomarkers in the delivery of healthcare to patients with brain injury. PMID:27712117

  5. Development of predisposition, injury, response, organ failure model for predicting acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure.

    PubMed

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Suman; Jain, Priyanka; Kumar, Guresh; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Moreau, Richard; Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Abbas, Zaigham; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bihari, Chhagan; Butt, Amna Subhan; Chan, Albert; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar; Chowdhury, Ashok; Dhiman, RadhaKrishan; Dokmeci, Abdul Kadir; Ghazinyan, Hasmik; Hamid, Saeed Sadiq; Kim, Dong Joon; Komolmit, Piyawat; Lau, George K; Lee, Guan Huei; Lesmana, Laurentius A; Jamwal, Kapil; Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Mathur, Rajendra Prasad; Nayak, Suman Lata; Ning, Qin; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Alcantara-Payawal, Diana; Rastogi, Archana; Rahman, Salimur; Rela, Mohamed; Saraswat, Vivek A; Shah, Samir; Shiha, Gamal; Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Kapil; Tan, Soek Siam; Chandel, Shivendra Singh; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Wani, Zeeshan A; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yokosuka, Osamu; Duseja, Ajay; Jafri, Wasim; Devarbhavi, Harshad; Eapen, C E; Goel, Ashish; Sood, Ajit; Ji, Jia; Duan, Z; Chen, Y

    2017-10-01

    There is limited data on predictors of acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure. We developed a PIRO model (Predisposition, Injury, Response, Organ failure) for predicting acute kidney injury in a multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients. Data of 2360 patients from APASL-ACLF Research Consortium (AARC) was analysed. Multivariate logistic regression model (PIRO score) was developed from a derivation cohort (n=1363) which was validated in another prospective multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients (n=997). Factors significant for P component were serum creatinine[(≥2 mg/dL)OR 4.52, 95% CI (3.67-5.30)], bilirubin [(<12 mg/dL,OR 1) vs (12-30 mg/dL,OR 1.45, 95% 1.1-2.63) vs (≥30 mg/dL,OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2)], serum potassium [(<3 mmol/LOR-1) vs (3-4.9 mmol/L,OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.05-1.97) vs (≥5 mmol/L,OR 4.34, 95% CI 1.67-11.3)] and blood urea (OR 3.73, 95% CI 2.5-5.5); for I component nephrotoxic medications (OR-9.86, 95% CI 3.2-30.8); for R component,Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome,(OR-2.14, 95% CI 1.4-3.3); for O component, Circulatory failure (OR-3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5). The PIRO score predicted acute kidney injury with C-index of 0.95 and 0.96 in the derivation and validation cohort. The increasing PIRO score was also associated with mortality (P<.001) in both the derivation and validation cohorts. The PIRO model identifies and stratifies acute on chronic liver failure patients at risk of developing acute kidney injury. It reliably predicts mortality in these patients, underscoring the prognostic significance of acute kidney injury in patients with acute on chronic liver failure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Accelerated recovery from acute brain injuries: clinical efficacy of neurotrophic treatment in stroke and traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, N; Poon, W S

    2012-04-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating vascular diseases in the world as it is responsible for almost five million deaths per year. Almost 90% of all strokes are ischemic and mainly due to atherosclerosis, cardiac embolism and small-vessel disease. Intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage can lead to hemorrhagic stroke, which usually has the poorest prognosis. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation which mimics the action of a neurotrophic factor, protecting stroke-injured neurons and promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis. Cerebrolysin has been widely studied as a therapeutic tool for both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, as well as traumatic brain injury. In ischemic stroke, Cerebrolysin given as an adjuvant therapy to antiplatelet and rheologically active medication resulted in accelerated improvement in global, neurological and motor functions, cognitive performance and activities of daily living. Cerebrolysin was also safe and well tolerated when administered in patients suffering from hemorrhagic stroke. Traumatic brain injury leads to transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral functions. This is associated with deficits in the recognition of basic emotions, the capacity to interpret the mental states of others, and executive functioning. Pilot clinical studies with adjuvant Cerebrolysin in the acute and postacute phases of the injury have shown faster recovery, which translates into an earlier onset of rehabilitation and shortened hospitalization time.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Acute Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Vivien; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Magnus, Tim; Gelderblom, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic and traumatic injury of the central nervous system (CNS) is known to induce a cascade of inflammatory events that lead to secondary tissue damage. In particular, the sterile inflammatory response in stroke has been intensively investigated in the last decade, and numerous experimental studies demonstrated the neuroprotective potential of a targeted modulation of the immune system. Among the investigated immunomodulatory agents, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) stand out due to their beneficial therapeutic potential in experimental stroke as well as several other experimental models of acute brain injuries, which are characterized by a rapidly evolving sterile inflammatory response, e.g., trauma, subarachnoid hemorrhage. IVIg are therapeutic preparations of polyclonal immunoglobulin G, extracted from the plasma of thousands of donors. In clinical practice, IVIg are the treatment of choice for diverse autoimmune diseases and various mechanisms of action have been proposed. Only recently, several experimental studies implicated a therapeutic potential of IVIg even in models of acute CNS injury, and suggested that the immune system as well as neuronal cells can directly be targeted by IVIg. This review gives further insight into the role of secondary inflammation in acute brain injury with an emphasis on stroke and investigates the therapeutic potential of IVIg. PMID:28824617

  8. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Nag, A.; Datta, J.; Das, A.; Agarwal, A. K.; Sinha, D.; Mondal, S.; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a “gravitational” pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  9. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    PubMed

    Nag, A; Datta, J; Das, A; Agarwal, A K; Sinha, D; Mondal, S; Ete, T; Chakraborty, A; Ghosh, S

    2014-07-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp).

  10. Dyselectrolytemia in acute kidney injury causing tetany and quadriparesis

    PubMed Central

    Palkar, Atul Vijay; Mewada, Mayur; Thakur, Sonal; Shrivastava, Makardhwaj Sarvadaman

    2011-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, presented with prerenal acute kidney injury secondary to diarrhoea. With appropriate hydration, she went into diuretic phase and subsequently developed hypokalemic quadriparesis with hypocalcaemic tetany due to hypomagnesemia and subclinical vitamin D deficiency. The patient improved with oral potassium, magnesium, calcium and vitamin D supplementation. PMID:22674589

  11. Dyselectrolytemia in acute kidney injury causing tetany and quadriparesis.

    PubMed

    Palkar, Atul Vijay; Mewada, Mayur; Thakur, Sonal; Shrivastava, Makardhwaj Sarvadaman

    2011-11-15

    A 40-year-old female, presented with prerenal acute kidney injury secondary to diarrhoea. With appropriate hydration, she went into diuretic phase and subsequently developed hypokalemic quadriparesis with hypocalcaemic tetany due to hypomagnesemia and subclinical vitamin D deficiency. The patient improved with oral potassium, magnesium, calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

  12. [The catalase inhibitor aminotriazole alleviates acute alcoholic liver injury].

    PubMed

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Liang, Tian-Cai; Yang, Qing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-25

    In this study, the effects of catalase (CAT) inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) on alcohol-induced acute liver injury were investigated to explore the potential roles of CAT in alcoholic liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alcohol in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and various doses of ATZ (100-400 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered intraperitoneally at 30 min before alcohol exposure. After 24 h of alcohol exposure, the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in plasma were determined. The degree of hepatic histopathological abnormality was observed by HE staining. The activity of hepatic CAT, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver tissue were measured by corresponding kits. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that treatment with ATZ dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of ALT, AST and LDH levels induced by alcohol exposure, and that ATZ alleviated alcohol-induced histopathological alterations. Furthermore, ATZ inhibited the activity of CAT, reduced hepatic levels of H₂O₂and MDA in alcohol exposed rats. ATZ also decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α and IL-6 in rats with alcohol exposure. These results indicated that ATZ attenuated alcohol-induced acute liver injury in rats, suggesting that CAT might play important pathological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury.

  13. Maternal organ donation and acute injuries in surviving children.

    PubMed

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Woodfine, Jason D; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Scales, Damon C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to test whether maternal deceased organ donation is associated with rates of subsequent acute injuries among surviving children after their mother's death. This is a longitudinal cohort analysis of children linked to mothers who died of a catastrophic brain event in Ontario, Canada, between April 1988 and March 2012. Surviving children were distinguished by whether their mother was an organ donor after death. The primary outcome was an acute injury event in surviving children during the year after their mother's death. Surviving children (n=454) had a total of 293 injury events during the year after their mother's death, equivalent to an average of 65 events per 100 children per year and a significant difference comparing children of mothers who were organ donors to children of mothers who were not organ donors (21 vs 82, P<.001). This difference in subsequent injury rates between groups was equal to a 76% relative reduction in risk (95% confidence interval, 62%-85%). Deceased organ donation was associated with a reduction in excess acute injuries among surviving children after their mother's death. An awareness of this positive association provides some reassurance about deceased organ donation programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute work injuries among electric utility meter readers.

    PubMed

    Sahl, J D; Kelsh, M A; Haines, K D; Sands, F K; Kraus, J

    1997-05-01

    This report provides estimates of incidence rates for acute work injuries for a well defined cohort of electric utility meter readers. Specifically, person-time rates by sex, age, and job experience are evaluated by part of body injured and type of injury. Meter readers experienced 731 acute lost time [11.1 per 100 person-work years; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.3-11.9] and 4,401 acute non-lost time (66.5 per 100 person-work years; 95% CI = 64.6-68.5) work injuries over the study period, 1980-1992. Women had nearly twice the lost time injury rate as men (17.5 vs 9.6 per 100 person-work years). There is an inverse relation between job experience and both lost time and non-lost time injuries. Although these data are limited to the electric utility industry, they may be relevant to occupations with similar tasks and environments, including residential gas and water supply industry meter readers and postal carriers.

  15. Interleukin-1 as a pharmacological target in acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Brough, David; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review discusses the latest findings on the contribution of inflammation to brain injury, how inflammation is a therapeutic target, and details of recent and forthcoming clinical studies. What advances does it highlight? Here we highlight recent advances on the role and regulation of inflammasomes, and the latest clinical progress in targeting inflammation. Acute brain injury is one of the leading causes of mortality and disability worldwide. Despite this, treatments for acute brain injuries are limited, and there remains a massive unmet clinical need. Inflammation has emerged as a major contributor to non-communicable diseases, and there is now substantial and growing evidence that inflammation, driven by the cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1), worsens acute brain injury. Interleukin-1 is regulated by large, multimolecular complexes called inflammasomes. Here, we discuss the latest research on the regulation of inflammasomes and IL-1 in the brain, preclinical efforts to establish the IL-1 system as a therapeutic target, and the promise of recent and future clinical studies on blocking the action of IL-1 for the treatment of brain injury. © 2015 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  16. Acute stress promotes post-injury brain regeneration in fish.

    PubMed

    Sinyakov, Michael S; Haimovich, Amihai; Avtalion, Ramy R

    2017-09-12

    The central nervous system and the immune system, the two major players in homeostasis, operate in the ongoing bidirectional interaction. Stress is the third player that exerts strong effect on these two 'supersystems'; yet, its impact is studied much less. In this work employing carp model, we studied the influence of preliminary stress on neural and immune networks involved in post-injury brain regeneration. The relevant in-vivo models of air-exposure stress and precisely directed cerebellum injury have been developed. Neuronal regeneration was evaluated by using specific tracers of cell proliferation and differentiation. Involvement of immune networks was accessed by monitoring the expression of selected T cells markers. Contrast difference between acute and chronic stress manifested in the fact that chronically stressed fish did not survive the brain injury. Neuronal regeneration appeared as a biphasic process whereas involvement of immune system proceeded as a monophasic route. In stressed fish, immune response was fast and accompanied or even preceded neuronal regeneration. In unstressed subjects, immune response took place on the second phase of neuronal regeneration. These findings imply an intrinsic regulatory impact of acute stress on neuronal and immune factors involved in post-injury brain regeneration. Stress activates both neuronal and immune defense mechanisms and thus contributes to faster regeneration. In this context, paradoxically, acute preliminary stress might be considered a distinct asset in speeding up the following post-injury brain regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk of Acute Kidney Injury After Intravenous Contrast Media Administration.

    PubMed

    Hinson, Jeremiah S; Ehmann, Michael R; Fine, Derek M; Fishman, Elliot K; Toerper, Matthew F; Rothman, Richard E; Klein, Eili Y

    2017-05-01

    The study objective was to determine whether intravenous contrast administration for computed tomography (CT) is independently associated with increased risk for acute kidney injury and adverse clinical outcomes. This single-center retrospective cohort analysis was performed in a large, urban, academic emergency department with an average census of 62,179 visits per year; 17,934 ED visits for patients who underwent contrast-enhanced, unenhanced, or no CT during a 5-year period (2009 to 2014) were included. The intervention was CT scan with or without intravenous contrast administration. The primary outcome was incidence of acute kidney injury. Secondary outcomes included new chronic kidney disease, dialysis, and renal transplantation at 6 months. Logistic regression modeling and between-groups odds ratios with and without propensity-score matching were used to test for an independent association between contrast administration and primary and secondary outcomes. Treatment decisions, including administration of contrast and intravenous fluids, were examined. Rates of acute kidney injury were similar among all groups. Contrast administration was not associated with increased incidence of acute kidney injury (contrast-induced nephropathy criteria odds ratio=0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.08; and Acute Kidney Injury Network/Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria odds ratio=1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.87 to 1.16). This was true in all subgroup analyses regardless of baseline renal function and whether comparisons were made directly or after propensity matching. Contrast administration was not associated with increased incidence of chronic kidney disease, dialysis, or renal transplant at 6 months. Clinicians were less likely to prescribe contrast to patients with decreased renal function and more likely to prescribe intravenous fluids if contrast was administered. In the largest well-controlled study of acute kidney injury following contrast

  18. Extensive neurological recovery from a complete spinal cord injury: a case report and hypothesis on the role of cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Ann S.; Belegu, Visar; Yoshida, Shoko; Joel, Suresh; Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Smith, Seth A.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Pekar, James J.; McDonald, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Neurological recovery in patients with severe spinal cord injury (SCI) is extremely rare. We have identified a patient with chronic cervical traumatic SCI, who suffered a complete loss of motor and sensory function below the injury for 6 weeks after the injury, but experienced a progressive neurological recovery that continued for 17 years. The extent of the patient's recovery from the severe trauma-induced paralysis is rare and remarkable. A detailed study of this patient using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), and resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) revealed structural and functional changes in the central nervous system that may be associated with the neurological recovery. Sixty-two percent cervical cord white matter atrophy was observed. DTI-derived quantities, more sensitive to axons, demonstrated focal changes, while MTI-derived quantity, more sensitive to myelin, showed a diffuse change. No significant cortical structural changes were observed, while rs-fMRI revealed increased brain functional connectivity between sensorimotor and visual networks. The study provides comprehensive description of the structural and functional changes in the patient using advanced MR imaging technique. This multimodal MR imaging study also shows the potential of rs-fMRI to measure the extent of cortical plasticity. PMID:23805087

  19. Severe neurologic manifestations in acute intermittent porphyria developed after spine surgery under general anesthesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Young; Kim, Yi Seul; Lim, Kyung-Jee; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Soo Kyung; Choi, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific enzyme defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias are induced by various precipitants. Clinical features include abdominal pain, neurologic manifestations, autonomic neuropathy, and mental disturbance. Diagnosis may be delayed because of variable symptoms that mimic other diseases and because of the rarity of of porphyrias. Although most patients with known porphyria can complete anesthesia and surgery safely, undiagnosed porphyric patients are in danger of porphyric crisis due to inadvertent exposure to precipitating drugs and environment. We report a case of a patient who experienced delayed emergence with neurological disturbance after general anesthesia, ultimately diagnosed as acute intermittent porphyria. PMID:25302100

  20. Neurologic Evaluation of Acute Lacrimomimetic Effect of Cyclosporine in an Experimental Rabbit Dry Eye Model

    PubMed Central

    Toshida, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Doan H.; Beuerman, Roger W.; Murakami, Akira

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate neurologically acute lacrimation caused by cyclosporine (CsA) eyedrops in rabbit. METHODS Normal adult male New Zealand White rabbits and those that underwent parasympathectomy each received a single instillation of 0.1% CsA or vehicle eyedrops. Schirmer tear test (STT) results, flow rate of lacrimal gland (LG) fluid from the excretory lacrimal duct of the main LG, and blink rate (over a 3-minute period) were measured before and after instillation of CsA or vehicle. Light microscopy was performed to examine the main LG in vitro. Protein release from LG fragments was assessed after incubation with CsA for 30 minutes. RESULTS In normal rabbits, the STT value and the flow rate of LG fluid were significantly increased after treatment with CsA compared with vehicle (P < 0.05). In contrast, no changes were found in denervated eyes. The blink rate of CsA-treated eyes was significantly higher than that of vehicle- treated eyes in normal rabbits (P < 0.005), whereas that of denervated eyes decreased significantly after CsA instillation compared with before administration (P < 0.005). Light microscopy showed that the cytoplasm of acinar cells was packed with secretory granules in denervated LG tissue 7 days after parasympathectomy. The same finding was observed 3 hours after CsA instillation. CsA had no stimulatory effect on protein release by acinar cells in LG fragments at all concentrations tested. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that CsA has no direct effect on tear fluid secretion from the LG in an acute model. Instead, CsA increases reflex tear flow. PMID:19218606

  1. L-arginine attenuates acute lung injury after smoke inhalation and burn injury in sheep.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Yu, Yong-Ming; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David; Traber, Daniel L

    2007-10-01

    Thermal injury results in reduced plasma levels of arginine (Arg). With reduced Arg availability, NOS produces superoxide instead of NO. We hypothesized that Arg supplementation after burn and smoke inhalation (B + S) injury would attenuate the acute insult to the lungs and, thus, protect pulmonary function. Seventeen Suffolk ewes (n = 17) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham injury group (n = 6), (2) B + S injury plus saline treatment (n = 6), and (3) B + S injury plus L-ARG infusion at 57 mg.kg(-1).h(-1) (n = 5). Burn and smoke inhalation injury was induced by standardized procedures, including a 40% area full thickness flame burn combined with 48 breaths of smoke from burning cottons. All animals were immediately resuscitated by Ringer solution and supported by mechanical ventilation for 48 h, during which various variables of pulmonary function were monitored. The results demonstrated that Arg treatment attenuated the decline of plasma Arg concentration after B + S injury. A higher plasma Arg concentration was associated with a less decline in Pao2/Fio2 ratio and a reduced extent of airway obstruction after B + S injury. Histopathological examinations also indicated a remarkably reduced histopathological scores associated with B + S injury. Nitrotyrosine stain in lung tissue was positive after B + S injury, but was significantly reduced in the group with Arg. Therefore, L-Arg supplementation improved gas exchange and pulmonary function in ovine after B + S injury via its, at least in part, effect on reduction of oxidative stress through the peroxynitrite pathway.

  2. Molluscan Memory of Injury: Evolutionary Insights into Chronic Pain and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Edgar T.; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Molluscan preparations have yielded seminal discoveries in neuroscience, but the experimental advantages of this group have not, until now, been complemented by adequate molecular or genomic information for comparisons to genetically defined model organisms in other phyla. The recent sequencing of the transcriptome and genome of Aplysia californica, however, will enable extensive comparative studies at the molecular level. Among other benefits, this will bring the power of individually identifiable and manipulable neurons to bear upon questions of cellular function for evolutionarily conserved genes associated with clinically important neural dysfunction. Because of the slower rate of gene evolution in this molluscan lineage, more homologs of genes associated with human disease are present in Aplysia than in leading model organisms from Arthropoda (Drosophila) or Nematoda (Caenorhabditis elegans). Research has hardly begun in molluscs on the cellular functions of gene products that in humans are associated with neurological diseases. On the other hand, much is known about molecular and cellular mechanisms of long-term neuronal plasticity. Persistent nociceptive sensitization of nociceptors in Aplysia displays many functional similarities to alterations in mammalian nociceptors associated with the clinical problem of chronic pain. Moreover, in Aplysia and mammals the same cell signaling pathways trigger persistent enhancement of excitability and synaptic transmission following noxious stimulation, and these highly conserved pathways are also used to induce memory traces in neural circuits of diverse species. This functional and molecular overlap in distantly related lineages and neuronal types supports the proposal that fundamental plasticity mechanisms important for memory, chronic pain, and other lasting alterations evolved from adaptive responses to peripheral injury in the earliest neurons. Molluscan preparations should become increasingly useful for comparative

  3. Nonviral gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury after spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shi, Enyi; Jiang, Xiaojing; Kazui, Teruhisa; Washiyama, Naoki; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi; Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad

    2006-10-01

    Paraplegia caused by spinal cord ischemia remains a serious complication after surgical repair of thoracoabdminal aortic aneurysms. Hepatocyte growth factor is a potent angiogenic and neurotrophic factor. We sought to investigate the neuroprotective effect of gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor on spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. Human hepatocyte growth factor expression plasmid was combined with hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector containing the hepatocyte growth factor gene was injected intrathecally into the experimental rabbits, whereas control vector or saline was given to the control animals. Five days later, spinal cord ischemia was induced by means of infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Hind-limb motor function was assessed during a 14-day recovery period with Tarlov criteria. Human hepatocyte growth factor was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid 3 days after gene transfer, and the level peaked on day 5. Compared with the control animals, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer significantly increased the capillary density in the gray matter and decreased the spinal cord edema. All rabbits pretreated with saline or control vector had hind-limb paraplegia (Tarlov score = 0) 14 days after spinal cord ischemia. However, previous transfection of the hepatocyte growth factor gene remarkably enhanced the Tarlov scores, and 8 of the 9 rabbits showed normal motor function (Tarlov score = 5) after a 14-day recovery period. Histologic examination showed that the intact motor neurons were preserved to a much greater extent in the rabbits transfected with the hepatocyte growth factor gene. Gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury after spinal cord ischemia.

  4. Neurorestorative targets of dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in neurological injury

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-O3PUFAs) exhibit therapeutic potential for the treatment and prevention of the neurological deficits associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the mechanisms implicated in these protective responses remain unclear. The objective of the present functional metabolomics study was to identify and define the dominant metabolic pathways targeted by dietary LC-O3PUFAs. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed rodent purified chows containing menhaden fish oil-derived LC-O3PUFAs for 8 weeks before being subjected to sham or spinal cord contusion surgeries. We show, through untargeted metabolomics, that dietary LC-O3PUFAs regulate important biochemical signatures associated with amino acid metabolism and free radical scavenging in both the injured and sham-operated spinal cord. Of particular significance, the spinal cord metabolome of animals fed with LC-O3PUFAs exhibited reduced glucose levels (−48%) and polar uncharged/hydrophobic amino acids (<−20%) while showing significant increases in the levels of antioxidant/anti-inflammatory amino acids and peptides metabolites, including β-alanine (+24%), carnosine (+33%), homocarnosine (+27%), kynurenine (+88%), when compared to animals receiving control diets (p < 0.05). Further, we found that dietary LC-O3PUFAs impacted the levels of neurotransmitters and the mitochondrial metabolism, as evidenced by significant increases in the levels of N-acetylglutamate (+43%) and acetyl-CoA levels (+27%), respectively. Interestingly, this dietary intervention resulted in a global correction of the pro-oxidant metabolic profile that characterized the SCI-mediated sensorimotor dysfunction. In summary, the significant benefits of metabolic homeostasis and increased antioxidant defenses unlock important neurorestorative pathways of dietary LC-O3PUFAs against SCI. PMID:24740740

  5. Acute kidney injury secondary to exposure to insecticides used for bedbug (Cimex lectularis) control.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Babar; Sharma, Shree G; Stein, Harold D; Sirota, Robert A; D'Agati, Vivette D

    2013-11-01

    Bedbug (Cimex lectularis) infestation is becoming a worldwide epidemic due to the emergence of insecticide-resistant strains. Pyrethroids are approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency for use against bedbugs and are considered minimally toxic to humans, with known respiratory, neurologic, and gastrointestinal effects. We present the first reported case of pyrethroid-induced toxic acute tubular necrosis (ATN). A 66-year-old healthy woman receiving no prior nephrotoxic medications presented with extreme weakness, decreased urine output, and acute kidney injury. She had administered multiple applications of a bedbug spray (permethrin) and a fogger (pyrethrin), exceeding the manufacturer's recommended amounts. She was found to have severe nonoliguric acute kidney injury associated with profound hypokalemia. Kidney biopsy revealed toxic ATN with extensive tubular degenerative changes and cytoplasmic vacuolization. With conservative management, serum creatinine level decreased from 13.0 mg/dL (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 3 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) to 1.67 mg/dL (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 37 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) within 6 weeks. Literature review uncovered no prior report of pyrethroid insecticide-induced ATN in humans, although there are reports of ATN with similar tubular vacuolization in rats exposed to this agent. Bedbug insecticides containing pyrethroids should be used with caution due to the potential development of toxic ATN after prolonged exposure.

  6. A simple rat model of mild traumatic brain injury: a device to reproduce anatomical and neurological changes of mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury typically involves temporary impairment of neurological function. Previous studies used water pressure or rotational injury for designing the device to make a rat a mild traumatic brain injury model. The objective of this study was to make a simple model of causing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. The device consisted of a free-fall impactor that was targeted onto the rat skull. The weight (175 g) was freely dropped 30 cm to rat’s skull bregma. We installed a safety device made of acrylic panel. To confirm a mild traumatic brain injury in 36 Sprague-Dawley rats, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain within 24 h after injury. We evaluated behavior and chemical changes in rats before and after mild traumatic brain injury. The brain MRI did not show high or low signal intensity in 34 rats. The mobility on grid floor was decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. The absolute number of foot-fault and foot-fault ratio were decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. However, the difference of the ratio was a less than absolute number of foot-fault. These results show that the device is capable of reproducing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. Our device can reduce the potential to cause brain hemorrhage and reflect the mechanism of real mild traumatic brain injury compared with existing methods and behaviors. This model can be useful in exploring physiology and management of mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:28070456

  7. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with severe neurological outcomes following virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Alicino, Cristiano; Infante, Maria Teresa; Gandoglia, Ilaria; Miolo, Nadia; Mancardi, Gian Luigi; Zappettini, Simona; Capello, Elisabetta; Orsi, Andrea; Tamburini, Tiziano; Grandis, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory, usually monophasic, immune mediate, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which involves the white matter. ADEM is more frequent in children and usually occurs after viral infections, but may follow vaccinations, bacterial infections, or may occur without previous events. Only 5% of cases of ADEM are preceded by vaccination within one month prior to symptoms onset. The diagnosis of ADEM requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy and specific demyelinating lesions of white matter. Overall prognosis of ADEM patients is often favorable, with full recovery reported in 23% to 100% of patients from pediatric cohorts, and more severe outcome in adult patients. We describe the first case of ADEM occurred few days after administration of virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine. The patient, a 59-year-old caucasic man with unremarkable past medical history presented at admission decreased alertness, 10 days after flu vaccination. During the 2 days following hospitalization, his clinical conditions deteriorated with drowsiness and fever until coma. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed multiple and symmetrical white matter lesions in both cerebellar and cerebral hemispheres, suggesting demyelinating disease with inflammatory activity, compatible with ADEM. The patient was treated with high dose of steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin with relevant sequelae and severe neurological outcomes.

  8. Growth and development alter susceptibility to acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Naito, Masayo; Lund, Steve R; Kim, Nayeon; Bomsztyk, Karol

    2008-09-01

    Many of the studies of acute renal injury have been conducted in young mice usually during their rapid growth phase; yet, the impact of age or growth stage on the degree of injury is unknown. To address this issue, we studied three forms of injury (endotoxemic-, glycerol-, and maleate-induced) in mice ranging in age from adolescence (3 weeks) to maturity (16 weeks). The severity of injury within each model significantly correlated with weight and age. We also noticed a progressive age-dependent reduction in renal cholesterol content, a potential injury modifier. As the animals grew and aged they also exhibited stepwise decrements in the mRNAs of HMG CoA reductase and the low density lipoprotein receptor, two key cholesterol homeostatic genes. This was paralleled by decreased amounts of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factor SREBP1/2 at the reductase and lipoprotein receptor gene loci as measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our study shows that the early phase of mouse growth can profoundly alter renal susceptibility to diverse forms of experimental acute renal injury.

  9. [Concepts boosting the clinical impact in early neurological rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Gilart de Keranflec'h, Charlotte; Décaillet, François

    2016-10-01

    Vaudois university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland, has an acute neurological rehabilitation unit. An interdisciplinary team cares for patients with brain injuries after their transfer from intensive care. In this context, nurses base their practice on different concepts and techniques for introducing early neurological rehabilitation into each care procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Does MRI of the Thoracolumbar Spine Change Management in Blunt Trauma Patients with Stable Thoracolumbar Spinal Injuries Without Neurologic Deficits?

    PubMed

    Deramo, Paul; Agrawal, Vaidehi; Amos, Joseph; Patel, Nimesh; Jefferson, Henry

    2017-04-01

    In blunt trauma patients with computed tomography (CT) findings of stable thoracolumbar (TL) spinal injury without neurologic deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are commonly obtained, though the impact on overall management remains unclear. The indication for MRI in patients with TL injury without neurologic deficits continues to remain unclear. Here, we evaluate the role of MRI on clinical management of patients presenting with this diagnosis. After IRB approval, all registry patients from December 2005 to December 2015 with all blunt TL injuries without defects were extracted. General demographics, injury parameters, hospital and ICU length of stay (ILOS/HLOS), CT/MRI findings, and intervention were collected. Impact of variant ISS in the four groups was corrected by dividing HLOS and ILOS by ISS. The Student's t test was conducted for statistical analysis. Of 613 patients, 236 met the inclusion criteria with average age of 52 ± 23 y, ISS (7 ± 4), HLOS (5 ± 3 days), and ILOS (1 ± 2 days). One hundred and thirty-three patients underwent MRI, and 103 patients underwent CT only. Patients who underwent MRI were no more likely to attain intervention (p < 0.06) but had longer length of stay relative to ISS (p < 0.006). MRI did not affect rate of intervention though increased HLOS accounting for ISS. CT findings of stability were concordant with MRI findings. Our results suggest that MRI may not affect intervention decisions in blunt trauma patients with CT findings of stable thoracolumbar spinal injury without neurological deficits.

  11. Body temperature control in sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Giueng-Chueng; Chi, Wei-Ming; Perng, Wan-Cherng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2003-12-31

    Body temperature is precisely regulated to maintain homeostasis in homeothermic animals. Although it remains unproved whether change of body temperature constitutes a beneficial or a detrimental component of the septic response, temperature control should be an important entity in septic experiments. We investigated the effect of body temperature control on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Acute lung injury in rats was induced by intratracheal spray of LPS and body temperature was either clamped at 37 degrees C for 5 hours or not controlled. The severity of lung injury was evaluated at the end of the experiment. Intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS caused a persistent decline in body temperature and a significant lung injury as indicated by an elevation of protein-concentration and LDH activity in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio of lungs. Administration of LPS also caused neutrophil sequestration and lipid peroxidation in the lung tissue as indicated by increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, respectively. Control of body temperature at 37 degrees C after LPS (LPS/BT37, n = 11) significantly reduced acute lung injury as evidenced by decreases in BAL fluid protein concentration (983 +/- 189 vs. 1403 +/- 155 mg/L) and LDH activity (56 +/- 10 vs. 123 +/- 17 deltamAbs/min) compared with the LPS group (n = 11). Although the W/D ratio of lung and MDA level were lower in the rats received temperature control compared with those received LPS only, the differences were not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that intratracheal administration of aerosolized LPS induced a hypothermic response and acute lung injury in rats and controlling body temperature at a normal range may alleviate the LPS-induced lung injury.

  12. Urologic dysfunction and neurologic outcome in coma survivors after severe traumatic brain injury in the postacute and chronic phase.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Antonella; Silvestro, Daniela; Siracusano, Salvatore; Azicnuda, Eva; D'Ippolito, Mariagrazia; Rigon, Jessica; Sabatini, Umberto; Bini, Vittorio; Formisano, Rita

    2011-07-01

    To investigate voiding dysfunction and upper urinary tract status in survivors of coma resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare clinical and urodynamic results with neurologic and psychological features as well as functional outcomes. Observational study focused on urologic dysfunction and neurologic outcome in coma survivors after traumatic brain injury in the postacute and chronic phase. A postcoma unit in a rehabilitation hospital. Consecutive patients (N=57) who recovered from coma of traumatic etiology and who were admitted during a 1-year period to a postcoma unit of a rehabilitation hospital. Patients underwent clinical urologic assessment, urodynamics with the assessment of the Schafer nomogram and the projected isovolumetric detrusor pressure to evaluate detrusor contractility, ultrasound assessment of the lower and upper urinary tract and voiding cystourethrography, routinely performed, according to the International Continence Society Standards. Neurologic variables assessed were brain injury and disability severity, and neuropsychological status. Neuroimaging identified the site of cerebral lesions. Urinary symptoms, disability by means of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), and neuropsychological status by means of the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NBRS), and the relationships among them. Of the 57 patients studied, 30 had overactive bladder (urge incontinence) symptoms, 28 had detrusor overactivity, and 18 had detrusor underactivity with associated pseudodyssynergia in 15 of these patients. Eleven patients had hypertrophic bladder; 3, bilateral pyelectasia; and 2, vesicoureteral reflux. Disability measured by GOS was severe in 8 patients and moderate in 27, while recovery was good in 22 patients. The mean NBRS total score indicated a mild cognitive impairment. Neuroimaging showed diffuse brain injury in all patients. Statistically significant relationships were found between urge incontinence, detrusor overactivity, and poor neurologic

  13. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports.

    PubMed

    Fong, Daniel Tp; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick Sh; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-07-30

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing - a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60-90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41-45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not be

  14. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms). Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms). The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative. Immobilization should not

  15. Progesterone alleviates acute brain injury via reducing apoptosis and oxidative stress in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Cao, Shenglong; Chen, Jingyin; Yan, Feng; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2015-07-23

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of progesterone on acute brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=72) by endovascular perforation. Progesterone (8 mg/kg or 16 mg/kg) was administered to rats at 1, 6, and 12h after SAH. Mortality, neurologic deficits, cell apoptosis, expression of apoptotic markers, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were assayed at 24h after experimental SAH. Mortality, cell apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3 were decreased, and improved neurological function was observed in the progesterone-treated SAH rats. Further, exploration demonstrated that progesterone significantly reduced the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and attenuated the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Progesterone also induced anti-oxidative effects by elevating the activity of SOD and decreasing MDA content after SAH. Furthermore, dose-response relationships for progesterone treatment were observed, and high doses of progesterone enhanced the neuroprotective effects. Progesterone treatment could alleviate acute brain injury after SAH by inhibiting cell apoptosis and decreasing damage due to oxidative stress. The mechanism involved in the anti-apoptotic effect was related to the mitochondrial pathway. These results indicate that progesterone possesses the potential to be a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of acute brain injury after SAH.

  16. [Evidence for treatment of acute syndesmosis injuries in sports].

    PubMed

    Best, R; Mauch, F; Bauer, G

    2013-06-01

    Injuries of the distal syndesmosis often accompany acute ankle sprains especially in professional team sports. While small partial syndesmosis lesions can often be missed as a consequence of impressive symptoms due to ventrolateral capsuloligamentous injuries, higher grade injuries of the syndesmosis can mostly be diagnosed without any problem. Furthermore, there is a consensus concerning the necessity of operative treatment in significantly unstable situations as well concerning conservative treatment of incomplete partial lesions. Consequently, the greatest challenge regarding diagnostic tools, quantification and optimal therapy arises in the most common form of sport-associated, complete or partial lesions of the distal syndesmosis. This review article summarizes sports-associated injuries of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis considering the current literature and placing the emphasis on the anatomy, pathobiomechanics, diagnostics and therapy of syndesmosis lesions from an evidence-based viewpoint.

  17. Role of thoracoscopy in acute management of chest injury.

    PubMed

    Casós, Steven R; Richardson, J David

    2006-12-01

    To review the literature on the use of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the diagnosis and treatment of intrathoracic injuries. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is a relatively recent innovation. It was originally promoted for the treatment of retained hemothorax and the diagnosis of diaphragm injury. It is highly effective for the management of those problems. Recent studies have focused on video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for treatment of chest wall bleeding, diagnosis of transmediastinal injuries, pericardial window and persistent pneumothorax. In properly selected patients, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is extremely efficacious in managing these problems. The role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in the management of acute chest injury is expanding. It is an invaluable tool for the trauma surgeon.

  18. The role of pharmacotherapy in modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    do Vale Ramos, Renato Carlos; Alegrete, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to conduct a review of the literature on pharmacological therapies for modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with the terms "spinal cord injury AND methylprednisolone/GM1/apoptosis inhibitor/calpain inhibitor/naloxone/tempol/tirilazad", in Portuguese or in English, published over the last five years. Older studies were included because of their historical importance. The pharmacological groups were divided according to their capacity to interfere with the physiopathological mechanisms of secondary injuries. Use of methylprednisolone needs to be carefully weighed up: other anti-inflammatory agents have shown benefits in humans or in animals. GM1 does not seem to have greater efficacy than methylprednisolone, but longer-term studies are needed. Many inhibitors of apoptosis have shown benefits in in vitro studies or in animals. Naloxone has not shown benefits. Tempol inhibits the main consequences of oxidation at the level of the spinal cord and other antioxidant drugs seem to have an effect superior to that of methylprednisolone. There is an urgent need to find new treatments that improve the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The benefits from treatment with methylprednisolone have been questioned, with concerns regarding its safety. Other drugs have been studied, and some of these may provide promising alternatives. Additional studies are needed in order to reach conclusions regarding the benefits of these agents in clinical practice.

  19. Anti-oxidative aspect of inhaled anesthetic gases against acute brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain injury is a critical and emergent condition in clinical settings, which needs to be addressed urgently. Commonly acute brain injuries include traumatic brain injury, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Oxidative stress is a key contributor to the subsequent injuries and impedes the reparative process after acute brain injury; therefore, facilitating an anti-oxidative approach is important in the care of those diseases. Readiness to deliver and permeability to blood brain barrier are essential for the use of this purpose. Inhaled anesthetic gases are a group of such agents. In this article, we discuss the anti-oxidative roles of anesthetic gases against acute brain injury. PMID:28217295

  20. Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Can Predict Neurologic Prognosis in Patients with Isolated Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Hung; Su, Yu-Feng; Chan, Hon-Man; Huang, Shiuh-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie; Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) has been proved to be a simple and effective tool for recognizing osteoporosis risk. Our previous study has demonstrated that the preoperative OSTA index was a good prognostic predictor for stage II and III colon cancer patients after surgery. We aim to evaluate the value of OSTA index in prognostication of isolated traumatic brain injury with moderate severity (GCS 9-13). We retrospectively reviewed all patients visiting Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital emergency department due to isolated moderate traumatic brain injury from Jan. 2010 to Dec. 2012. Background data (including the OSTA index), clinical presentations, management and outcomes (ICU admission days, total admission days, complications, Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at discharge, mortality) of the patients were recorded for further analysis. Our major outcome was good neurologic recovery defined as GOS of 5. Pearson chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare demographic features. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors. 107 isolated moderate TBI patients were studied. 40 patients (37.4%) showed good recovery and 10 (9.3%) died at discharge. The univariate analysis revealed that younger age, higher OSTA index, lower ISS, lower AIS-H, and avoidance to neurosurgery were associated with better neurologic outcome for all moderate TBI patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that lower ISS, higher OSTA, and the avoidance of neurosurgery were independent risk factors predicting good neurologic recovery. Higher ISS, lower OSTA index and exposure to neurosurgery were the independent risk factors for poorer recovery from isolated moderate TBI. In addition to labeling the cohort harboring osteoporotic risk, OSTA index could predict neurologic prognosis in patients with isolated moderate traumatic brain injury.

  1. Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Can Predict Neurologic Prognosis in Patients with Isolated Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hon-Man; Huang, Shiuh-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie; Lou, Yun-Ting; Chen, Chao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) has been proved to be a simple and effective tool for recognizing osteoporosis risk. Our previous study has demonstrated that the preoperative OSTA index was a good prognostic predictor for stage II and III colon cancer patients after surgery. We aim to evaluate the value of OSTA index in prognostication of isolated traumatic brain injury with moderate severity (GCS 9-13). Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients visiting Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital emergency department due to isolated moderate traumatic brain injury from Jan. 2010 to Dec. 2012. Background data (including the OSTA index), clinical presentations, management and outcomes (ICU admission days, total admission days, complications, Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at discharge, mortality) of the patients were recorded for further analysis. Our major outcome was good neurologic recovery defined as GOS of 5. Pearson chi-square test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare demographic features. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors. Results 107 isolated moderate TBI patients were studied. 40 patients (37.4%) showed good recovery and 10 (9.3%) died at discharge. The univariate analysis revealed that younger age, higher OSTA index, lower ISS, lower AIS-H, and avoidance to neurosurgery were associated with better neurologic outcome for all moderate TBI patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that lower ISS, higher OSTA, and the avoidance of neurosurgery were independent risk factors predicting good neurologic recovery. Conclusion Higher ISS, lower OSTA index and exposure to neurosurgery were the independent risk factors for poorer recovery from isolated moderate TBI. In addition to labeling the cohort harboring osteoporotic risk, OSTA index could predict neurologic prognosis in patients with isolated moderate traumatic brain injury. PMID:26186582

  2. Acute ethanol intake attenuates inflammatory cytokines after brain injury in rats: a possible role for corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Zehava; Moore, Anthony N; Dash, Pramod K

    2002-03-01

    It has been reported that acute ethanol intoxication exerts dose-dependent effects, both beneficial and detrimental, on the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI), although the mechanism(s) has not been determined. Given that pro-inflammatory cytokines are either neuroprotective or neurotoxic, depending on their tissue levels, ethanol-induced alterations in brain cytokine production may be involved in determining the recovery after TBI. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of acute ethanol pretreatments (producing blood alcohol concentrations of 100+/-16 mg/dL, and 220+/-10 mg/dL, considered low and intoxicating doses, respectively) on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in discrete brain regions. In addition, serum corticosterone levels were also examined because the hormone is a modulator of cytokine production, its secretion is stimulated by ethanol, and it has been associated with the severity of post-injury neurologic dysfunction. The data presented in this report demonstrate that moderate cortical impact brain injury elicits a marked increase in IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in the injured cortex as well as in the hippocampus ipsilateral to the injury. Ethanol pretreatment lowered cytokine levels in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus in a dose-dependent manner after TBI compared to the untreated injured rats. Serum corticosterone levels were markedly increased in the injured rats, and were further augmented in the ethanol-pretreated injured animals in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ethanol-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be linked to increased circulating corticosterone, both of which may contribute to the outcome of brain injury.

  3. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications. PMID:21303532

  4. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Gamakaranage, Champika Sssk; Epa, Dhanesha S; Gnanathasan, Ariaranee; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2011-02-08

    We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit.Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far.It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  5. The effect of increased T2 signal intensity in the spinal cord on the injury severity and early neurological recovery in patients with central cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hjelm, Nik; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Weinstein, Michael S; Kepler, Christopher K

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this paper was to compare the severity of the initial neurological injury as well as the early changes in the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) motor score (AMS) between central cord syndrome (CCS) patients with and without an increased T2 signal intensity in their spinal cord. METHODS Patients with CCS were identified and stratified based on the presence of increased T2 signal intensity in their spinal cord. The severity of the initial neurological injury and the progression of the neurological injury over the 1st week were measured according to the patient's AMS. The effect of age, sex, congenital stenosis, surgery within 24 hours, and surgery in the initial hospitalization on the change in AMS was determined using an analysis of variance. RESULTS Patients with increased signal intensity had a more severe initial neurological injury (AMS 57.6 vs 75.3, respectively, p = 0.01). However, the change in AMS over the 1st week was less severe in patients with an increase in T2 signal intensity (-0.85 vs -4.3, p = 0.07). Analysis of variance did not find that age, sex, Injury Severity Score, congenital stenosis, surgery within 24 hours, or surgery during the initial hospitalization affected the change in AMS. CONCLUSIONS The neurological injury is different between patients with and without an increased T2 signal intensity. Patients with an increased T2 signal intensity are likely to have a more severe initial neurological deficit but will have relatively minimal early neurological deterioration. Comparatively, patients without an increase in the T2 signal intensity will likely have a less severe initial injury but can expect to have a slight decline in neurological function in the 1st week.

  6. Diabetes, insulin, and development of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Honiden, Shyoko; Gong, Michelle N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Recently, many studies have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of insulin and glucose control in critical illness. This review examines evidence regarding the relationship between diabetes and the development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), reviews studies of lung injury related to glycemic and nonglycemic metabolic features of diabetes, and examines the effect of diabetic therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection A MEDLINE/PubMed search from inception to August 1, 2008, was conducted using the search terms acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, hyperglycemia, diabetes mellitus, insulin, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, including combinations of these terms. Bibliographies of retrieved articles were manually reviewed. Data Extraction and Synthesis Available studies were critically reviewed, and data were extracted with special attention to the human and animal studies that explored a) diabetes and ALI; b) hyperglycemia and ALI; c) metabolic nonhyperglycemic features of diabetes and ALI; and d) diabetic therapies and ALI. Conclusions Clinical and experimental data indicate that diabetes is protective against the development of ALI/ARDS. The pathways involved are complex and likely include effects of hyperglycemia on the inflammatory response, metabolic abnormalities in diabetes, and the interactions of therapeutic agents given to diabetic patients. Multidisciplinary, multifaceted studies, involving both animal models and clinical and molecular epidemiology techniques, are essential. PMID:19531947

  7. Acute Kidney Injury After Computed Tomography: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Ryan D; Westafer, Lauren M; Boxen, Jennifer L; Majlesi, Nima; Schoenfeld, Elizabeth M; Bannuru, Raveendhara R

    2017-08-12

    Computed tomography (CT) is an important imaging modality used in the diagnosis of a variety of disorders. Imaging quality may be improved if intravenous contrast is added, but there is a concern for potential renal injury. Our goal is to perform a meta-analysis to compare the risk of acute kidney injury, need for renal replacement, and total mortality after contrast-enhanced CT versus noncontrast CT. We searched MEDLINE (PubMed), the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ProQuest, and Academic Search Premier for relevant articles. Included articles specifically compared rates of renal insufficiency, need for renal replacement therapy, or mortality in patients who received intravenous contrast versus those who received no contrast. The database search returned 14,691 articles, inclusive of duplicates. Twenty-six unique articles met our inclusion criteria, with an additional 2 articles found through hand searching. In total, 28 studies involving 107,335 participants were included in the final analysis, all of which were observational. Meta-analysis demonstrated that, compared with noncontrast CT, contrast-enhanced CT was not significantly associated with either acute kidney injury (odds ratio [OR] 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83 to 1.07), need for renal replacement therapy (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.59 to 1.16), or all-cause mortality (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.73 to 1.36). We found no significant differences in our principal study outcomes between patients receiving contrast-enhanced CT versus those receiving noncontrast CT. Given similar frequencies of acute kidney injury in patients receiving noncontrast CT, other patient- and illness-level factors, rather than the use of contrast material, likely contribute to the development of acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Open Tracheostomy Gastric Acid Aspiration Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury Results in Maximal Acute Nonlethal Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Alluri, Ravi; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Mullan, Barbara A; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R

    2017-02-26

    Acid pneumonitis is a major cause of sterile acute lung injury (ALI) in humans. Acid pneumonitis spans the clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by neutrophilic alveolitis, and injury to both alveolar epithelium and vascular endothelium. Clinically, ARDS is defined by acute onset of hypoxemia, bilateral patchy pulmonary infiltrates and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Human studies have provided us with valuable information about the physiological and inflammatory changes in the lung caused by ARDS, which has led to various hypotheses about the underling mechanisms. Unfortunately, difficulties determining the etiology of ARDS, as well as a wide range of pathophysiology have resulted in a lack of critical information that could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies. Translational animal models are valuable when their pathogenesis and pathophysiology accurately reproduce a concept proven in both in vitro and clinical settings. Although large animal models (e.g., sheep) share characteristics of the anatomy of human trachea-bronchial tree, murine models provide a host of other advantages including: low cost; short reproductive cycle lending itself to greater data acquisition; a well understood immunologic system; and a well characterized genome leading to the availability of a variety of gene deletion and transgenic strains. A robust model of low pH induced ARDS requires a murine ALI that targets mainly the alveolar epithelium, secondarily the vascular endothelium, as well as the small airways leading to the alveoli. Furthermore, a reproducible injury with wide differences between different injurious and non-injurious insults is important. The murine gastric acid aspiration model presented here using hydrochloric acid employs an open tracheostomy and recreates a pathogenic scenario that reproduces the low pH pneumonitis injury in humans. Additionally, this model can be used to examine interaction of a

  9. Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are clinical entities of multi-factorial origin frequently seen in traumatically injured patients requiring intensive care. We performed an unsystematic search using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to January 2012. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence for the pathophysiology and the management of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in the critically injured patient. Lung protective ventilation remains the most beneficial therapy. Future trials should compare intervention groups to controls receiving lung protective ventilation, and focus on relevant outcome measures such as duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality. PMID:22883052

  10. Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient.

    PubMed

    Bakowitz, Magdalena; Bruns, Brandon; McCunn, Maureen

    2012-08-10

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are clinical entities of multi-factorial origin frequently seen in traumatically injured patients requiring intensive care. We performed an unsystematic search using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to January 2012. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence for the pathophysiology and the management of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in the critically injured patient. Lung protective ventilation remains the most beneficial therapy. Future trials should compare intervention groups to controls receiving lung protective ventilation, and focus on relevant outcome measures such as duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality.

  11. Microbleeds may expand acutely after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Toth, Arnold; Kovacs, Noemi; Tamas, Viktoria; Kornyei, Balint; Nagy, Mate; Horvath, Andrea; Rostas, Tamas; Bogner, Peter; Janszky, Jozsef; Doczi, Tamas; Buki, Andras; Schwarcz, Attila

    2016-03-23

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a very sensitive tool for the detection of microbleeds in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The number and extent of such traumatic microbleeds (TMBs) have been shown to correlate with the severity of the injury and the clinical outcome. However, the acute dynamics of TMBs have not been revealed so far. Since TBI is known to constitute dynamic pathological processes, we hypothesized that TMBs are not constant in their appearance, but may progress acutely after injury. We present here five closed moderate/severe (Glasgow coma scale≤13) TBI patients who underwent SWI very early (average=23.4 h), and once again a week (average=185.8 h) after the injury. The TMBs were mapped at both time points by a conventional radiological approach and their numbers and volumes were measured with manual tracing tools by two observers. TMB counts and extents were compared between time points. TMBs were detected in four patients, three of them displaying an apparent TMB change. In these patients, TMB confluence and apparent growth were detected in the corpus callosum, coronal radiation or subcortical white matter, while unchanged TMBs were also present. These changes caused a decrease in the TMB count associated with an increase in the overall TMB volume over time. We have found a compelling evidence that diffuse axonal injury-related microbleed development is not limited strictly to the moment of injury: the TMBs might expand in the acute phase of TBI. The timing of SWI acquisition may be relevant for optimizing the prognostic utility of this imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Liu, Yong; Peng, XiangPing; Liu, Wei; Zhao, FeiYan; Feng, DanDan; Han, JianZhong; Huang, YanHong; Luo, SiWei; Li, Lian; Yue, Shao Jie; Cheng, QingMei; Huang, XiaoTing; Luo, ZiQiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Large amount of glutamate can overstimulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), causing neuronal injury and death. Recently, NMDAR has been reported to be found in the lungs. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of memantine, a NMDAR channel blocker, on bleomycin-induced lung injury mice. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intratracheally injected with bleomycin (BLM) to induce lung injury. Mice were randomized to receive saline, memantine (Me), BLM, BLM plus Me. Lungs and BALF were harvested on day 3 or 7 for further evaluation. Results BLM caused leukocyte infiltration, pulmonary edema and increase in cytokines, and imposed significant oxidative stress (MDA as a marker) in lungs. Memantine significantly mitigated the oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury caused by BLM. Moreover, activation of NMDAR enhances CD11b expression on neutrophils. Conclusions Memantine mitigates oxidative stress, lung inflammatory response and acute lung injury in BLM challenged mice. PMID:25942563

  13. Paeoniflorin ameliorates acute necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatitis‑induced acute renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Weixing; Shi, Qiao; Zhao, Liang; Mei, Fangchao; Li, Chen; Zuo, Teng; He, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    Acute renal injury caused by acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) is a common complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. Paeoniflorin is the active ingredient of paeonia radix and exhibits a number of pharmacological effects, such as anti‑inflammatory, anticancer, analgesic and immunomodulatory effects. The present study detected the potential treatment effects of paeoniflorin on acute renal injury induced by ANP in a rat model. The optimal dose of paeoniflorin for preventing acute renal injury induced by ANP was determined. Then, the possible protective mechanism of paeoniflorin was investigated. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑1β and IL‑6 were measured with enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kits. Renal inflammation and apoptosis were measured by immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The expression of nitric oxide in kidney tissues was also evaluated. The p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were measured by western blotting. The results shown that paeoniflorin may ameliorate acute renal injury following ANP in rats by inhibiting inflammatory responses and renal cell apoptosis. These effects may be associated with the p38MAPK and nuclear factor‑κB signal pathway.

  14. Plasma metabolomics profiles in rats with acute traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fei; Xia, Zi-An; Zeng, Yi-Fu; Luo, Jie-Kun; Sun, Peng; Cui, Han-Jin; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Yan-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. We validated the utility of plasma metabolomics analysis in the clinical diagnosis of acute TBI in a rat model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups of 15 rats each: the CCI group and sham group. Blood samples were obtained from the rats within the first 24 h after TBI injury. GC/MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of acute TBI-induced metabolic changes, resulting in the identification of 45 metabolites in plasma. Principal component analysis, partial least squares-discriminant analysis, orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis using hierarchical clustering and univariate/multivariate analyses revealed clear differences in the plasma metabolome between the acute CCI group and the sham group. CCI induced distinctive changes in metabolites including linoleic acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, galactose metabolism, and arachidonic acid metabolism. Specifically, the acute CCI group exhibited significant alterations in proline, phosphoric acid, β-hydroxybutyric acid, galactose, creatinine, L-valine, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the above 8 metabolites in plasma could be used as the potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute TBI. Furthermore, this study is the first time to identify the galactose as a biomarker candidate for acute TBI. This comprehensive metabolic analysis complements target screening for potential diagnostic biomarkers of acute TBI and enhances predictive value for the therapeutic intervention of acute TBI. PMID:28771528

  15. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (p<0.2) between these two groups were included in the univariate analysis. Following univariate analysis, those significantly different variables (p<0.05) were subjected to multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors of unsuccessful weaning. Compared to successful weaning patients, unsuccessful weaning patients were older; more often had high level of cervical spinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (p<0.001). The presence of acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors

  16. Acute Pharmacological DVT Prophylaxis after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Deep vein thromboses are a common occurrence following SCI. Administration of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) within 72 h of injury is recommended to minimize the occurrence of DVT. Furthermore, when surgical intervention is required, LMWH should be held the morning of surgery, and resumed within 24 h post-operatively. PMID:20795870

  17. Acute kidney injury due to intravenous bleach injection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ashish; Vanguri, Vijay K; Golla, Venkata; Rhyee, Sean; Trainor, Matthew; Abramov, Konstantin

    2013-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite is the active ingredient in bleach, a ubiquitous household disinfectant, and has known toxicities depending on route of exposure and amount. Acute kidney injury due to sodium hypochlorite exposure has never been reported. Patients that did develop nephrotoxicity following bleach exposure did so due to development of other risk factors for kidney injury such as volume depletion or sepsis. We report a patient who presented with black urine after parenteral self-administration of a large quantity of bleach. We review the clinical presentation, laboratory and biopsy findings, and outcome as well as discuss possible mechanisms of sodium hypochlorite toxicity and management strategies.

  18. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the adductor muscles: A detailed MRI study in athletes.

    PubMed

    Serner, A; Weir, A; Tol, J L; Thorborg, K; Roemer, F; Guermazi, A; Yamashiro, E; Hölmich, P

    2017-06-26

    Acute adductor injuries account for the majority of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics, which could be important for the understanding of etiology and management of these injuries. The study aim was to describe acute adductor injuries in athletes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Male athletes with acute groin pain and an MRI confirmed acute adductor muscle injury were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 7 days of injury using a standardized protocol and a reliable assessment approach. 156 athletes presented with acute groin pain of which 71 athletes were included, median age 27 years (range 18-37). There were 46 isolated muscle injuries and 25 athletes with multiple adductor injuries. In total, 111 acute adductor muscle injuries were recorded; 62 adductor longus, 18 adductor brevis, 17 pectineus, 9 obturator externus, 4 gracilis, and 1 adductor magnus injury. Adductor longus injuries occurred at three main injury locations; proximal insertion (26%), intramuscular musculo-tendinous junction (MTJ) of the proximal tendon (26%) and the MTJ of the distal tendon (37%). Intramuscular tendon injury was seen in one case. At the proximal insertion, 12 of 16 injuries were complete avulsions. This study shows that acute adductor injuries generally occur in isolation from other muscle groups. Adductor longus is the most frequently injured muscle in isolation and in combination with other adductor muscle injuries. Three characteristic adductor longus injury locations were observed on MRI, with avulsion injuries accounting for three-quarters of injuries at the proximal insertion, and intramuscular tendon injury was uncommon. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Safety of open suprapectoral and subpectoral biceps tenodesis: an anatomic assessment of risk for neurologic injury.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Paul M; Vadasdi, Katherine; Greene, R Timothy; Vitale, Mark A; Duong, Michelle; Miller, Seth R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical techniques for proximal biceps tenodesis that include penetration of the posterior humeral cortex for fixation may pose risk to the surrounding neurovascular structures. The risk of neurologic injury with techniques that involve penetration of the posterior humeral cortex for fixation in proximal biceps tenodesis will increase as the tenodesis site moves proximally from the subpectoral to the suprapectoral location. Proximal biceps tenodesis was performed on 10 cadaveric upper extremities with 3 separate techniques. The proximity of the hardware to the relevant neurovascular structures was measured. The distances between the tenodesis site and the relevant neurovascular structures were measured. The guide pin was in direct contact with the axillary nerve in 20% of the suprapectoral tenodeses. The distance between the axillary nerve and the tenodesis site was 10.5 ± 5.5 mm for the suprapectoral location, 36.7 ± 11.2 mm in the subpectoral scenario, and 24.1 ± 11.2 mm in the 30° cephalad scenario (P = .003). The distance between the radial nerve and the anterior tenodesis site was 41.3 ± 9.3 mm for the suprapectoral location and 48.0 ± 10.7 mm for the subpectoral location. The distance of the musculocutaneous nerve from the tenodesis site was 28.4 ± 9.2 mm for the suprapectoral location and 37.4 ± 11.2 mm for the subpectoral location. In a cadaveric model of open biceps tenodesis, penetration of the posterior humeral cortex at the suprapectoral location results in proximity to the axillary nerve and should be avoided. Subpectoral bicortical button fixation drilled perpendicular to the axis of the humerus was a uniformly safe location with respect to the axillary nerve. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Neurological Deterioration in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Minor Stroke.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dezhi; Sun, Wen; Scalzo, Fabien; Xiong, Yunyun; Zhang, Xiaohao; Qiu, Zhongming; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Xu, Gelin; Lu, Guangming; Liebeskind, David S; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    Early neurological deterioration (END) is an important factor associated with worse clinical outcome in minor strokes. Early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can provide better sensitivity to delineate stroke pathophysiology and have diagnostic value associated with causative mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between early MRI finding and the presence of END in minor stroke patients with lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Consecutive MCA minor stroke patients who were admitted to our center within 24 hours of symptom onset were included in this study. All patients underwent MRI within 24 hours of admission. We analyzed baseline characteristics, infarction patterns, and treatment algorithms. The correlation between early MRI findings and END, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score increasing more than 2 points during 72 hours after admission, was also determined. Across 211 patients meeting entry criteria between January 2010 and December 2013, internal border-zone (IBZ) infarcts on early MRI scan were observed in 23 of 65 patients with END (35.4%) and in 18 of 146 patients without END (12.3%, P < .001). Patients with IBZ infarcts were found to have more hyperlipidemia, less perforating artery infarcts, more pial artery infarcts, more cortical border-zone infarcts and more ipsilateral large arterial stenosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that IBZ infarct was independently associated with END after adjustment for other factors (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.74; P = .031). Early MRI patterns of IBZ infarction are associated with END in minor stroke patients with acute infarcts of the MCA territory. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early care of acute hyperglycemia benefits the outcome of traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xin; Liu, Yuepeng; Yuan, Tao; Jiang, Na-Na; Dong, Yan-Bin; Wang, Jian-Wei; Fu, Guang-Hui; Liu, Yu-Liang; Wang, Wen-Xue

    2016-11-01

    Previous animal studies showed contradictory clinical observations on whether acute hyperglycemia contributes to poor outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we tried to clarify this issue. Striking with depths of 3.0-4.25mm at right occipitoparietal brain region and with depth of 3.75mm at right/left occipitoparietal or right/left frontoparietal brain region were performed, respectively. Blood glucose and insulin levels were traced every four hours from 1 to 72h after striking. HOMA2-%S and HOMA2-%β were calculated. Modified neurological severity scores (mNSS) were used to evaluate neurological deficit within 72h. Striking with depths of 3.5-4.25mm induced increase in blood glucose lasting up to 24h after striking. The levels of blood glucose after striking with depths of 3.75-4.25mm were significantly different from that of striking with the depth of 3.0mm. Striking with depth of 3.75mm at right/left occipitoparietal region induced higher blood glucose in 24h than that at right/left frontoparietal region. Insulin concentration increased slowly during 72h after striking. Striking also induced decrease in insulin sensitivity and secretion lasting 72h. Evaluation of mNSS revealed that severe striking (beyond 3.75mm) worsened nerve function than slight striking (<3.0mm). Intervention of acute hyperglycemia could decrease the mNSS from 2 to 7 days after TBI. Our results suggested that only severe TBI could induce acute hyperglycemia by itself, and early care of acute hyperglycemia could benefit the outcome of TBI patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute Lung Injury after Phosgene Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Yang, Ju-Yeoul; Jang, An-Soo; Park, Yong-Uk; Kim, Young-Chul; Choi, In-Seon; Park, Kyung-Ok

    1996-01-01

    Phosgene (COCl2) is a colorless oxidant gas which is heavier than air and the lethal exposure dose (LC50) in humans is 500 ppm/min. This gas was originally manufactured as an agent for chemical warfare during World War I and there had been a great deal of studies on phosgene poisoning during the early years of industrial use. It is still widely used in the synthesis of chemicals and plastics. In the modern era, however, phosgene poisoning is relatively uncommon except in accidental exposures. In Korea, there has been no report about lung injury from phosgene inhalation. We present a clinical experience with six patients accidentally exposed to phosgene. PMID:8882481

  3. Transcranial Low-Level Laser Therapy Improves Neurological Performance in Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice: Effect of Treatment Repetition Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liyi; Wu, Qiuhe; Xuan, Yi; Dai, Tianhong; Ando, Takahiro; Xu, Tao; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied around the world for a spectrum of disorders requiring healing, regeneration and prevention of tissue death. One area that is attracting growing interest in this scope is the use of transcranial LLLT to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). We developed a mouse model of severe TBI induced by controlled cortical impact and explored the effect of different treatment schedules. Adult male BALB/c mice were divided into 3 broad groups (a) sham-TBI sham-treatment, (b) real-TBI sham-treatment, and (c) real-TBI active-treatment. Mice received active-treatment (transcranial LLLT by continuous wave 810 nm laser, 25 mW/cm2, 18 J/cm2, spot diameter 1 cm) while sham-treatment was immobilization only, delivered either as a single treatment at 4 hours post TBI, as 3 daily treatments commencing at 4 hours post TBI or as 14 daily treatments. Mice were sacrificed at 0, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days post-TBI for histology or histomorphometry, and injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) at days 21–27 to allow identification of proliferating cells. Mice with severe TBI treated with 1-laser Tx (and to a greater extent 3-laser Tx) had significant improvements in neurological severity score (NSS), and wire-grip and motion test (WGMT). However 14-laser Tx provided no benefit over TBI-sham control. Mice receiving 1- and 3-laser Tx had smaller lesion size at 28-days (although the size increased over 4 weeks in all TBI-groups) and less Fluoro-Jade staining for degenerating neurons (at 14 days) than in TBI control and 14-laser Tx groups. There were more BrdU-positive cells in the lesion in 1- and 3-laser groups suggesting LLLT may increase neurogenesis. Transcranial NIR laser may provide benefit in cases of acute TBI provided the optimum treatment regimen is employed. PMID:23308226

  4. [Current concept of TRALI (transfusion-related acute lung injury)].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko; Okazai, Hitoshi

    2007-11-01

    It is only 20 years since TRALI was clinically recognized. As it is gradually recognized among Japanese medical community, the number of cases reported is increasing gradually. In the past nine years (1997-2005), Japanese Red Cross confirmed 118 TRALI cases and 38 possible TRALI cases in Japan. Twelve TRALI cases among them occurred during or after anesthesia on the day of operation. Since acute lung injury is caused by multiple pathological factors, it is difficult to identify its main cause as transfusion. Therefore, TRALI has been underdiagnosed and underreported. Several mechanisms have been proposed. Although anti-HLA antibody, anti-HNA antibody, or other immunoreactive substances appear to be involved in developing TRALI, underlying conditions like systemic inflammation may be required for igniting TRALI Although TRALI developed in the operating theater seems to be a small fraction of whole TRALI cases, anesthesiologists should be aware of TRALI, and remember it as one of the causes of acute lung injury.

  5. Acute kidney injury and ESRD management in austere environments.

    PubMed

    Raman, Gaurav; Perkins, Robert M; Jaar, Bernard G

    2012-05-01

    Current knowledge about managing acute kidney injury in disaster situations stems mostly from lessons learned while taking care of crush syndrome patients during major earthquakes. More recently, there has been a greater focus on emergency preparedness for ESRD management. Natural or man-made disasters create an "austere environment," wherein resources to administer standard of care are limited. Advance planning and timely coordinated intervention during disasters are paramount to administer effective therapies and save lives. This article reviews the presentation and management of disaster victims with acute kidney injury and those requiring renal replacement therapies. Major contributions of some key national and international organizations in the field of disaster nephrology are highlighted. The article intends to increase awareness about nephrology care of disaster victims, among nephrology and non-nephrology providers alike.

  6. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  7. Do Biliary Salts Have Role on Acute Kidney Injury Development?

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Vieira Junior, Jose Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in patients with acute liver failure and chronic liver disease. Hemodynamic changes appear to be the principal alterations in these conditions, therefore there should be no known structural abnormalities responsible for AKI. On the other hand, several authors have published data on structural changes known as bile cast nephropathy or cholemic nephrosis, which basically consist of the presence of bile casts in tubular lumen analogous to those observed in myeloma. Although these findings are well documented, there is a lack of reproducibility by other authors. This paper aims to discuss, through evidence-based medical literature, the role of biliary salts on kidney injury development. PMID:26251679

  8. Diagnostic Criteria for Acute Kidney Injury: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Acute kidney injury in a clinical diagnosis guided by standard criteria based on changes in serum creatinine, urine output or both. Severity of acute kidney injury is determined by the magnitude of increase in serum creatinine or decrease in urine output. Patients manifesting both oliguria and azotemia and those in which these impairments are persistent are more likely to have worse disease and worse outcomes. Both short- and long-term outcomes are worse when patients have some stage of AKI by both criteria. Duration of AKI was also a significant predictor of long-term outcomes irrespective of severity. New biomarkers for AKI may substantially aid in the risk assessment and evaluation of patients at risk for AKI. PMID:26410133

  9. Acute aseptic meningitis and diffuse myelitis as the presenting features of neurological Behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Mullins, G M; Elamin, M; Saidha, S; Ali, E; Jennings, L; Counihan, T J; Hennessy, M

    2009-12-01

    We report an explosive presentation of neurological Behcet disease, in an Irish male patient. We present the clinical and radiological findings in our patient and discuss a novel and effective therapeutic approach. We review other treatment modalities of patients with neurological involvement.

  10. Gunshot injury to the face with a missile lodged in the upper cervical spine without neurological deficit.

    PubMed

    Bumbasirević, M; Lesić, A; Bumbasirević, V; Rakocević, Z; Djurić, M

    2006-01-01

    An unusual case of facial gunshot injury with the missile lodged in the cervical spinal canal, but without any neurological impairment is reported. The extent of tissue damage and missile track termination in a male patient who sustained gunshot trauma to the face was assessed by plain radiography and by CT scans. The patient was treated conservatively and observed for clinical manifestations of neurological deficit for 3 weeks. CT of the head and neck performed 13 years after injury with the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of skeletal elements revealed healed fractures of the right nasal bone, the labyrinth of the right ethmoid bone, and position of the missile on the medial aspect of the right lateral mass of the atlas. There was no migration of the missile during this period. This case report of gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the cervical spine indicated possibility of survival and atypical absence of clinical manifestation that may occur even when a bullet remains in the spinal canal.

  11. Wiener filtering of surface EMG with a priori SNR estimation toward myoelectric control for neurological injury patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zhou, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals from neurological injury patients are often corrupted by involuntary background interference or spikes, imposing difficulties for myoelectric control. We present a novel framework to suppress involuntary background spikes during voluntary surface EMG recordings. The framework applies a Wiener filter to restore voluntary surface EMG signals based on tracking a priori signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the decision-directed method. Semi-synthetic surface EMG signals contaminated by different levels of involuntary background spikes were constructed from a database of surface EMG recordings in a group of spinal cord injury subjects. After the processing, the onset detection of voluntary muscle activity was significantly improved against involuntary background spikes. The magnitude of voluntary surface EMG signals can also be reliably estimated for myoelectric control purpose. Compared with the previous sample entropy analysis for suppressing involuntary background spikes, the proposed framework is characterized by quick and simple implementation, making it more suitable for application in a myoelectric control system toward neurological injury rehabilitation.

  12. Silent cerebral infarcts: a review on a prevalent and progressive cause of neurologic injury in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    DeBaun, Michael R; Armstrong, F Daniel; McKinstry, Robert C; Ware, Russell E; Vichinsky, Elliot; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2012-05-17

    Silent cerebral infarct (SCI) is the most common form of neurologic disease in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). SCI is defined as abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in the setting of a normal neurologic examination without a history or physical findings associated with an overt stroke. SCI occurs in 27% of this population before their sixth, and 37% by their 14th birthdays. In adults with SCA, the clinical history of SCI is poorly defined, although recent evidence suggests that they too may have ongoing risk of progressive injury. Risk factors for SCI include male sex, lower baseline hemoglobin concentration, higher baseline systolic blood pressure, and previous seizures. Specific morbidity associated with SCI includes a decrement in general intellectual abilities, poor academic achievement, progression to overt stroke, and progressive SCI. In addition, children with previous stroke continue to have both overt strokes and new SCI despite receiving regular blood transfusion therapy for secondary stroke prevention. Studies that only include overt stroke as a measure of CNS injury significantly underestimate the total cerebral injury burden in this population. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, natural history, morbidity, medical management, and potential therapeutic options for SCI in SCA.

  13. Silent cerebral infarcts: a review on a prevalent and progressive cause of neurologic injury in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, F. Daniel; McKinstry, Robert C.; Ware, Russell E.; Vichinsky, Elliot; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2012-01-01

    Silent cerebral infarct (SCI) is the most common form of neurologic disease in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). SCI is defined as abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in the setting of a normal neurologic examination without a history or physical findings associated with an overt stroke. SCI occurs in 27% of this population before their sixth, and 37% by their 14th birthdays. In adults with SCA, the clinical history of SCI is poorly defined, although recent evidence suggests that they too may have ongoing risk of progressive injury. Risk factors for SCI include male sex, lower baseline hemoglobin concentration, higher baseline systolic blood pressure, and previous seizures. Specific morbidity associated with SCI includes a decrement in general intellectual abilities, poor academic achievement, progression to overt stroke, and progressive SCI. In addition, children with previous stroke continue to have both overt strokes and new SCI despite receiving regular blood transfusion therapy for secondary stroke prevention. Studies that only include overt stroke as a measure of CNS injury significantly underestimate the total cerebral injury burden in this population. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, natural history, morbidity, medical management, and potential therapeutic options for SCI in SCA. PMID:22354000

  14. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  15. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review.

    PubMed

    Menitove, Jay E

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury, or TRALI, denotes the most frequently reported fatal complication of blood transfusion. TRALI accounted for 34% of transfusion associated mortalities reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2005. TRALI caused more deaths than those attributed to hemolytic reactions following incorrect blood administration or sepsis resulting from bacterial contamination of platelet and red cell components. (Holness, Leslie. Food and Drug Administration. Personal Communication, 2006) This paper reviews TRALI for the clinical physician.

  16. Deaths, injuries, and evacuations from acute hazardous materials releases.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, S

    1989-01-01

    We examined reports from three surveillance systems of 587 acute releases of hazardous materials in 1986. These releases resulted in at least 115 deaths, 2,254 injuries, and 111 evacuations. Only eight (1 percent) of the 587 events were common to all three systems. Estimates of the public health consequences of hazardous materials releases could be improved by enforcing existing laws, modifying report forms, and validating collected information. PMID:2751024

  17. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities.

  18. Acute kidney injury requiring haemodialysis following ingestion of mephedrone

    PubMed Central

    Rhidian, Rhys; Babu, Adarsh

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old man was found to have acute kidney injury (AKI) following ingestion of mephedrone. He presented to this local emergency department with worsening bilateral loin pain. He became oligoanuric, serum creatine peaked at 1214 µmol/l and he required several sessions of haemodialysis before kidney function began to improve. The mechanism of AKI and legal aspects of the use of mephedrone are discussed. PMID:23456157

  19. Presumptive acute lung injury following multiple surgeries in a cat.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Rieko; Sasaki, Jun; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Uzuka, Yuji; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nezu, Yoshinori

    2013-04-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.5-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat had a tracheal mass identified as malignant B-cell lymphoma. The cat had tracheal resection and subsequently developed laryngeal paralysis. Due to multiple episodes of respiratory distress the cat subsequently had tracheal surgeries. Finally, the cat had a sudden onset of severe respiratory distress and collapsed. Computed tomography imaging and arterial blood gas analysis supported a diagnosis of acute lung injury.

  20. Effects of estrogen on functional and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury: An experimental study with rats

    PubMed Central

    Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Marcon, Raphael Martus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of estrogen as a neuroprotective agent after a standard experimentally induced spinal cord lesion. METHODS: In this experimental study, 20 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one group with rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI) at T10 and receiving estrogen therapy with 17-beta estradiol (4mg/kg) immediately following the injury and after the placement of skin sutures and a control group with rats only subjected to SCI. A moderate standard experimentally induced SCI was produced using a computerized device that dropped a weight on the rat's spine from a height of 12.5 mm. Functional recovery was verified with the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scale on the 2nd, 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, 35th and 42nd days after injury and by quantifying the motor-evoked potential on the 42nd day after injury. Histopathological evaluation of the SCI area was performed after euthanasia on the 42nd day. RESULTS: The experimental group showed a significantly greater functional improvement from the 28th to the 42nd day of observation compared to the control group. The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in the motor-evoked potential compared with the control group. The results of pathological histomorphometry evaluations showed a better neurological recovery in the experimental group, with respect to the proportion and diameter of the quantified nerve fibers. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen administration provided benefits in neurological and functional motor recovery in rats with SCI beginning at the 28th day after injury. PMID:26598084

  1. Neurologic Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Lauren M; Grimmnitz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections. This article reviews the subtle presentations, difficult workups, and complicated treatment decisions as they pertain to our older patients."

  2. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  3. Acute lung injury after inhalation of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih Ling; Yap, Eng Soo; Khoo, See Meng; Lim, Tow Keang; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Teo, Sylvia Tzu Li

    2008-12-01

    We report two cases of acute lung injury after the inhalation of nitric acid fumes in an industrial accident. The first patient, who was not using a respirator and standing in close proximity to the site of spillage of concentrated nitric acid, presented within 12 h with worsening dyspnea and required noninvasive ventilation for type 1 respiratory failure. The second case presented 1 day later with similar symptoms, but only required supportive treatment with high-flow oxygen. Both patients' chest radiographs showed widespread bilateral airspace shadows consistent with acute lung injury. Both received treatment with systemic steroids. They were discharged from hospital 5 days postexposure. Initial lung function test showed a restrictive pattern that normalized by 3 weeks postexposure. This case series describes the natural history after acute inhalation of nitric acid fumes, and demonstrates that the severity of lung injury is directly dependent on the exposure level. It also highlights the use of noninvasive ventilatory support in the management of such patients.

  4. Macrophage Stimulating Protein May Promote Tubular Regeneration after Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Biancone, Luigi; Romanazzi, Giuseppe Mauriello; Figliolini, Federico; Beltramo, Silvia; Galimi, Francesco; Camboni, Maria Gavina; Deriu, Elisa; Conaldi, Piergiulio; Bottelli, Antonella; Orlandi, Viviana; Herrera, Maria Beatriz; Pacitti, Alfonso; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo; Camussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic effects, suggesting that it may play a role in tubular regeneration after acute kidney injury. In this study, elevated plasma levels of MSP were found both in critically ill patients with acute renal failure and in recipients of renal allografts during the first week after transplantation. In addition, MSP and its receptor, RON, were markedly upregulated in the regenerative phase after glycerol-induced tubular injury in mice. In vitro, MSP stimulated tubular epithelial cell proliferation and conferred resistance to cisplatin-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase activation and modulating Fas, mitochondrial proteins, Akt, and extracellular signal–regulated kinase. MSP also enhanced migration, scattering, branching morphogenesis, tubulogenesis, and mesenchymal de-differentiation of surviving tubular cells. In addition, MSP induced an embryonic phenotype characterized by Pax-2 expression. In conclusion, MSP is upregulated during the regeneration of injured tubular cells, and it exerts multiple biologic effects that may aid recovery from acute kidney injury. PMID:18614774

  5. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the hip flexor muscles - a detailed MRI study in athletes.

    PubMed

    Serner, A; Weir, A; Tol, J L; Thorborg, K; Roemer, F; Guermazi, A; Yamashiro, E; Hölmich, P

    2017-06-26

    Hip flexor injuries account for one-third of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics. The aims of this study were to describe acute hip flexor injuries using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in athletes with acute groin pain and to compare specific muscle injuries with reported injury situations. Male athletes with acute groin pain were prospectively and consecutively included during three sports seasons. MRI was performed within 7 days of injury using a standardized protocol and a reliable assessment approach. All athletes with an MRI confirmed acute hip flexor muscle injury were included. A total of 156 athletes presented with acute groin pain of which 33 athletes were included, median age 26 years (range 18-35). There were 16 rectus femoris, 12 iliacus, 7 psoas major, 4 sartorius, and 1 tensor fascia latae injury. Rectus femoris injuries primarily occurred during kicking (10) and sprinting (4), whereas iliacus injuries most frequently occurred during change of direction (5). In 10 (63%) rectus femoris injuries, tendinous injury was observed. The iliacus and psoas major injuries were mainly observed at the musculotendinous junction (MTJ), and two included tendinous injury. We have illustrated specific injury locations within these muscles, which may be relevant for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of these injuries. Most proximal rectus femoris injuries included tendinous injury. In contrast, distinct acute iliacus and psoas injuries predominantly occurred at the MTJ. Only the iliacus or psoas major were injured during change of direction, whereas rectus femoris injuries occurred primarily during kicking and sprinting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Autophagy in Acute Brain Injury: Feast, Famine, or Folly?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Craig M.; Chen, Yaming; Sullivan, Mara L.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, increased autophagy has now been reported after traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and seizures. This increase in autophagy could be physiologic, converting damaged or dysfunctional proteins, lipids and/or organelles to their amino acid and fatty acid components for recycling. On the other hand, this increase in autophagy could be supraphysiologic, perhaps consuming and eliminating functional proteins, lipids and/or organelles as well. Whether an increase in autophagy is beneficial (feast) or detrimental (famine) in brain likely depends on both the burden of intracellular substrate targeted for autophagy and the capacity of the cell’s autophagic machinery. Of course, increased autophagy observed after brain injury could also simply be an epiphenomenon (folly). These divergent possibilities have clear ramifications for designing therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy after acute brain injury, and are the subject of this review. PMID:20883784

  7. Limiting the use of routine radiography for acute ankle injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cockshott, W. P.; Jenkin, J. K.; Pui, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the diagnosis of ankle injuries routine radiography is often productive. An international survey of the average number of radiographs made of injured ankles suggested that two projections are adequate to detect fractures. This was confirmed in a prospective study of 242 patients coming to a hospital emergency department with recent ankle injuries. All the fractures could be identified on an anteroposterior or a lateral projection, although some were more obvious on an oblique view. As well, all the fractures were associated with malleolar soft-tissue swelling. Thus, radiography for acute ankle injuries could safely be restricted to patients with soft-tissue swelling, and fractures could be diagnosed using only two routine projections, though for management purposes additional projections might be needed. With a policy of limiting the use of radiography substantial cost reductions are possible. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6407744

  8. Hyperhomocysteinemia Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yanjun; Zhen, Xin; Zhu, Fengxin; Hu, Zheng; Lei, Wenjing; Li, Shuang; Zha, Yan; Nie, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) has been linked to several clinical manifestations including chronic kidney disease. However, it is not known whether HHcy has a role in the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). In the present study, we reported that HHcy mice developed more severe renal injury after cisplatin injection and ischemia-reperfusion injury shown as more severe renal tubular damage and higher serum creatinine. In response to cisplatin, HHcy mice showed more prevalent tubular cell apoptosis and decreased tubular cell proliferation. Mechanistically, a heightened ER stress and a reduced Akt activity were observed in kidney tissues of HHcy mice after cisplatin injection. Stimulating cultured NRK-52E cells with Hcy significantly increased the fraction of cells in G2/M phase and cell apoptosis together with decreased Akt kinase activity. Akt agonist IGF-1 rescued HHcy-induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that HHcy increases the sensitivity and severity of AKI. PMID:28255274

  9. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  10. Biomarkers of increased diffusion anisotropy in semi-acute mild traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal perspective.

    PubMed

    Ling, Josef M; Peña, Amanda; Yeo, Ronald A; Merideth, Flannery L; Klimaj, Stefan; Gasparovic, Charles; Mayer, Andrew R

    2012-04-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is the most prevalent neurological insult and frequently results in neurobehavioural sequelae. However, little is known about the pathophysiology underlying the injury and how these injuries change as a function of time. Although diffusion tensor imaging holds promise for in vivo characterization of white matter pathology, both the direction and magnitude of anisotropic water diffusion abnormalities in axonal tracts are actively debated. The current study therefore represents both an independent replication effort (n = 28) of our previous findings (n = 22) of increased fractional anisotropy during semi-acute injury, as well as a prospective study (n = 26) on the putative recovery of diffusion abnormalities. Moreover, new analytical strategies were applied to capture spatially heterogeneous white matter injuries, which minimize implicit assumptions of uniform injury across diverse clinical presentations. Results indicate that whereas a general pattern of high anisotropic diffusion/low radial diffusivity was present in various white matter tracts in both the replication and original cohorts, this pattern was only consistently observed in the genu of the corpus callosum across both samples. Evidence for a greater number of localized clusters with increased anisotropic diffusion was identified across both cohorts at trend levels, confirming heterogeneity in white matter injury. Pooled analyses (50 patients; 50 controls) suggested that measures of diffusion within the genu were predictive of patient